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Sample records for postoperative wound complications

  1. [Significance and prevention of post-operative wound complications].

    PubMed

    Napp, M; Gümbel, D; Lange, J; Hinz, P; Daeschlein, G; Ekkernkamp, A

    2014-01-01

    Although surgical site infections (SSI) in dermatologic operative procedures are extremely rare, it is important to understand risks and etiological factors to initiate risk assessment and specific preventive measures. SSI commonly are associated with a complicated, long-term and expensive outcome. Typical wound pathogens of these infections include a variety of multiresistant organisms along with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, hemolytic streptococci and the gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Effective hygienic measures as part of an adequate quality management system should consider the critical points in the development of SSI, particularly in the setting of an outpatient dermatologic unit, such as preparation of the operative area, preoperative skin antisepsis, hand hygiene, safe and skilled technique by surgeons, and barrier nursing to prevent spread of pathogens. The baseline infection incidence in dermatologic surgery inherently is low; nevertheless significant improvements can be achieved by implementation of risk-adapted infection control measures. PMID:24445942

  2. Relations between Long-term Glycemic Control and Postoperative Wound and Infectious Complications after Total Knee Arthroplasty in Type 2 Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyuk-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background The authors examined whether poor preoperative glucose control, as indicated by the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of more than 8%, is associated with postoperative wound and infectious complications in diabetic patients that have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods One hundred and sixty-seven TKAs performed in 115 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, from January 2001 through March 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. Logistic regression was used to identify the variables that had a significant effect on the risk of wound complications or early deep infection. The variables considered were age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, operation time, antibiotic-impregnated cement use, amount of blood transfusion, close suction drain use, duration of diabetes, method of diabetes treatment, diabetes complications, and preoperative HbA1c level. Results The overall incidence of wound complications was 6.6% (n = 11) and there were seven cases (4.2%) of early postoperative deep infection. Logistic regression revealed that the independent risk factors of wound complications were preoperative HbA1C ≥ 8% (odds ratio [OR], 6.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 33.0) and operation time (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.03). No variable examined was found to be significantly associated with the risk of early postoperative deep infection. Conclusions Poorly controlled hyperglycemia before surgery may increase the incidence of wound complications among diabetic patients after TKA. PMID:23730475

  3. Postoperative wound dehiscence: Predictors and associations.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Fernandez, Stephen J; Evans, Karen Kim; McNish, Sean; Banerjee, Anirban N; Couch, Kara S; Mete, Mihriye; Shara, Nawar

    2015-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality patient safety indicators (PSI) were developed as a metric of hospital complication rates. PSI-14 measures postoperative wound dehiscence and specifically how often a surgical wound in the abdominal or pelvic area fails to heal after abdominopelvic surgery. Wound dehiscence is estimated to occur in 0.5-3.4% of abdominopelvic surgeries, and carries a mortality of up to 40%. Postoperative wound dehiscence has been adopted as a surrogate safety outcome measure as it impacts morbidity, length of stay, healthcare costs and readmission rates. Postoperative wound dehiscence cases from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample demonstrate 9.6% excess mortality, 9.4 days of excess hospitalization and $40,323 in excess hospital charges relative to matched controls. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the associations between PSI-14 and measurable medical and surgical comorbidities using the Explorys technology platform to query electronic health record data from a large hospital system serving a diverse patient population in the Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD metropolitan areas. The study population included 25,636 eligible patients who had undergone abdominopelvic surgery between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Of these cases, 786 (2.97%) had postoperative wound dehiscence. Patient-associated comorbidities were strongly associated with PSI-14, suggesting that this indicator may not solely be an indicator of hospital safety. There was a strong association between PSI-14 and opioid use after surgery and this finding merits further investigation. PMID:25683272

  4. Postoperative wound dehiscence: predictors and associations

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Fernandez, Stephen; Evans, Karen Kim; McNish, Sean; Banerjee, Anirban; Couch, Kara; Mete, Mihrie; Shara, Nawar

    2015-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (ARHQ) patient safety indicators (PSI) were developed as a metric of hospital complication rates. PSI-14 measures postoperative wound dehiscence and specifically how often a surgical wound in the abdominal or pelvic area fails to heal after abdominopelvic surgery. Wound dehiscence is estimated to occur in 0.5–3.4% of abdominopelvic surgeries, and carries a mortality of up to 40%. Postoperative wound dehiscence has been adopted as a surrogate safety outcome measure since it impacts morbidity, length of stay, healthcare costs and readmission rates. Postoperative wound dehiscence cases from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample demonstrate 9.6% excess mortality, 9.4 days of excess hospitalization and $40,323 in excess hospital charges relative to matched controls. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the associations between PSI-14 and measurable medical and surgical co-morbidities by using the Explorys technology platform to query electronic health record (EHR) data from a large hospital system serving a diverse patient population in the Washington DC and Baltimore, MD metropolitan areas. The study population included 25,636 eligible patients who had undergone abdominopelvic surgery between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Of these cases, 786 (2.97%) had post-operative wound dehiscence. Patient-associated co-morbidities were strongly associated with PSI-14, suggesting that this indicator may not solely be an indicator of hospital safety. There was a strong association between PSI-14 and opioid use after surgery and this finding merits further investigation. PMID:25683272

  5. Preventing postoperative burn wound aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Levenson, C; Wohlford, P; Djou, J; Evans, S; Zawacki, B

    1991-01-01

    Between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1988, 35 patients at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Burn Center had postoperative cultures from their burn wounds that grew Aspergillus species; clinical burn-wound aspergillosis occurred in 66% of these cases and death occurred in 53% of these cases. Beginning in November 1984, several modifications in the air-conditioning system and topical antimicrobial wound therapy were undertaken. Cleaning and 8Cu-quinolinolate treatment of air ducts every 2 months did not reliably clear Aspergillus species from the air in patient care areas. Several changes in topical therapeutic regimen failed to prevent both burn wound culture positivity and clinical aspergillosis. Finally, installation of high-efficiency particulate air filters, installation of new air ducts, and inception of wound irrigation with a solution of mafenide hydrochloride plus nystatin both during and after operation were associated with a reduction in wound culture positivity rate to one occurrence in 1988 (Poisson probability less than 0.01 versus the rate in 1984) and no occurrences during the 18 months after the false ceiling of the burn ward was sealed. PMID:2050719

  6. Laparoscopic surgery complications: Postoperative peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Drăghici, L; Drăghici, I; Ungureanu, A; Copăescu, C; Popescu, M; Dragomirescu, C

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Complications within laparoscopic surgery, similar to classic surgery are inevitable and require immediate actions both to diminish intraoperative risks and to choose the appropriate therapeutic attitude. Peritonitis and hemorrhagic incidents are both part of the complications aspect of laparoscopic surgery. Fortunately, the incidence is limited, thus excluding the rejection of celioscopic methods. Patient’s risks and benefits are to be analyzed carefully prior recommending laparoscopic surgery. Materials and methods: This study presents a statistical analysis of peritonitis consecutive to laparoscopic surgery, experience of „Sf. Ioan” Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, and Department of Surgery (2000-2010). Results:There were 180 (0,96%) complicated situations requiring reinterventions, from a total of 18676 laparoscopic procedures. 106 cases (0,56%) represented different grades of postoperative peritonitis. Most frequently, there were consecutive laparoscopic appendicectomia and colecistectomia. During the last decade, few severe cases of peritonitis followed laparoscopic bariatric surgical procedures. Conclusions: This study reflects the possibility of unfavorable evolution of postoperative peritonitis comparing with hemorrhagic incidents within laparoscopic surgery. PMID:23049630

  7. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer. Abbreviations: PRS- Piver Rutledge-Smith, II- class II, III- class III PMID:24653760

  8. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. [Prevention and treatment of postoperative complications of hepatic echinococcosis].

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, R M; Ochilov, U B; Mirkhodzhaev, I A; Komilov, T S; Makliev, B Iu

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the outcomes of surgical treatment in 117 patients with complicated liver echinococciasis in the past 9 years. Hepatic function and immunity, their pre- and postoperative changes in the combined use of essentiale and T-activin were studied. It has been found that the functional status of the liver, its detoxifying function in particular, largely impairs and immunosuppression develops in patients with complicated liver echinococciasis. The postoperative combined use of essentiale and T-activin led to the normalization of hepatic function and immunity. The combined treatment reduced the incidence of postoperative complications from 34.83 to 17.2%, such as acute hepatic failure, suppuration of a wound and a residual cavity, isolated abdominal abscesses, pleurisy, and pneumonia. PMID:12886586

  10. [Postoperative complications of heart and pericardial injuries].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, Iu A; Abakumov, M M; Vladimirova, E S; Danielian, Sh N; Nikitina, O V; Belozerov, G E

    2013-01-01

    The 31-year experience of 839 cases of heart and pericardial injuries was analyzed. The complicated course was registered in 36%. Such factors as patient's age, blood loss, severity of injury and patient's condition on admission, defined the possibility of complications. No less important were the characteristics of postoperative treatment and early diagnostics of the injury. The thorough analysis of reasons of the complications' development allowed to work out some prophylactic measures and to decrease the frequency of postoperative lethality from 13.8 to 6.8%, whereas the complications rate was decreased from 43.8 to 32.3%. PMID:23715389

  11. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  12. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy—Patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61–87 years, median age 71 years) were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: “Managing postoperative complications,” “Being independent,” “Feeling safe,” and “Accepting the situation.” A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients’ lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery. PMID:26900139

  13. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy--Patient experiences.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Karin; Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61-87 years, median age 71 years) were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: "Managing postoperative complications," "Being independent," "Feeling safe," and "Accepting the situation." A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients' lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery. PMID:26900139

  14. How to address wound healing complications.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2015-12-16

    The final article in this six-part series looks at wound complications. While most acute wounds will heal with the right treatment, some get stuck along the normal healing pathway and become chronic. The pathology of these wounds is complex, requiring nurses to determine and eliminate any underlying problems, such as poor circulation, while preventing colonisation to avoid infection. Through appropriate treatment and the correct dressing choice, nurses can help prevent a chronic wound from getting worse and put it back on the path to healing. Some wounds will never be able to heal; in such cases, nurses can help to relieve patient discomfort. PMID:26841484

  15. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  16. Acute cholecystitis as a postoperative complication.

    PubMed Central

    Ottinger, L W

    1976-01-01

    The clinical course and management of 40 patients who underwent operation for acute cholecystitis developing as a postoperative complication were reviewed. Of note was the mortality of 47%, the high incidence of gangrene, perforation, empyema, and cholangitis, and the atypical clinical presentation of acute cholecystitis under these conditions. Awareness of this possible complication, knowledge of its clinical features, and early surgical intervention are important facets of successful management. PMID:952563

  17. [Diagnosis and monitoring of postoperative pulmonary complications].

    PubMed

    Inthorn, D

    1990-01-01

    There is no distinct difference between regular postoperative pulmonary changes and postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC). Beside the "classic" PPC, atelectases and bronchopneumonia, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and barotraumas are becoming of increasing importance. A single examination allows the diagnosis of up to 60% of PPC. Only in 63% of cases of bronchopneumonia does the X-ray diagnosis agree with the necropsy results. The varieties of germs found in bronchial secretions and lung parenchyma, however, are not considerably different. CAT scan seems to be the best diagnostic imaging tool for the follow-up of ARDS and barotrauma. PMID:1983488

  18. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  19. Postoperative Speech Outcomes and Complications in Submucous Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Seo; Nam, Su Bong; Kang, Kyung Dong; Sung, Ji Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The postoperative speech outcomes of submucous cleft palate (SMCP) surgery are known to be poorer than those of other types of cleft palate. We attempted to objectively characterize the postoperative complications and speech outcomes of the surgical treatment of SMCP through a comparison with the outcomes of incomplete cleft palate (ICP). Methods This study included 53 SMCP patients and 285 ICP patients who underwent surgical repair from 1998 to 2015. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was 3.9±1.9 years for the SMCP patients and 1.3±0.9 years for the ICP patients. A retrospective analysis was performed of the complications, the frequency of subsequent surgical correction for velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), and speech outcomes. Results In both the SMCP and ICP patients, no cases of respiratory difficulty, bleeding, or wound disruption were noted. Delayed wound healing and fistula occurred in 18.9% and 5.7% of the SMCP patients and in 14% and 3.2% of the ICP patients, respectively. However, no statistically significant difference in either delayed wound healing or fistula occurrence was observed between the two groups. The rate of surgical correction for VPD in the SMCP group was higher than in the ICP group. In the subset of 26 SMCP patients and 62 ICP patients who underwent speech evaluation, the median speech score value was 58.8 in the SMCP group and 66 in the ICP group, which was a statistically significant difference. Conclusions SMCP and ICP were found to have similar complication rates, but SMCP had significantly worse speech outcomes. PMID:27218023

  20. Prospective Assessment of Postoperative Complications and Associated Costs Following Inguinal Lymph Node Dissection (ILND) in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sharon B.; Askew, Robert L.; Xing, Yan; Weaver, Storm; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Royal, Richard; Lucci, Anthony; Ross, Merrick I.; Cormier, Janice N.

    2010-01-01

    Background We prospectively assessed the incidence, risk factors, and costs associated with wound complications and lymphedema in melanoma patients undergoing inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND). Materials and Methods A total of 53 melanoma patients were accrued to 2 trials (June 2005 to July 2008) that included prospective evaluations of postoperative complications; 30-day wound complications included infection, seroma, and/or dehiscence. There were 20 patients who underwent limb volume measurement and completed a 19-item lymphedema symptom assessment questionnaire preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. A multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate potential risk factors for complications. A microcosting analysis was also performed to evaluate the direct costs associated with wound complications. Results The 30-day wound complications were noted in 77.4% of patients. A BMI ≥ 30 (n = 28) increased the risk for wound complications (odds ratio [OR] = 11.4, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.6–78.5, P = .01), while advanced nodal disease approached significance (OR = 9.0, 95%CI: 0.79–103.1, P = .08). Other risk factors, including diabetes, smoking, and the addition of a deep pelvic (iliac/obturator) dissection to ILND, were not significant. Of 20 patients, 9 (45%) developed limb volume change (LVC) ≥5% at 3 months, with associated mean symptom scores of 6.1 versus 4.6 for those without LVC. Costs for patients with wound complications were significantly higher than for those without wound complications. Conclusions Postoperative wound complications and early onset lymphedema occur frequently following ILND for melanoma. Obesity is an adverse risk factor for 30-day wound complications that can significantly increase postoperative costs, as is likely the case for advanced disease. Risk reduction practices and novel treatment approaches are needed to reduce postoperative morbidity. PMID:20336388

  1. Wound complications of adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ormsby, M.V.; Hilaris, B.S.; Nori, D.; Brennan, M.F.

    1989-07-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy by the brachytherapy technique has been suggested by us to diminish local recurrence following resection of extremity and superficial truncal soft-tissue sarcoma. However, loading of the catheters with radioactive sources on the first through the fifth postoperative days results in a 48% significant wound-complication rate. Our previous animal experiments would suggest that delay of application of radiation to one week after wounding is accompanied by significant improvement in wound-breaking strength, new H3 hydroxyproline accumulation, and improved force-tension curves. As part of our ongoing prospective randomized trial of the effects of brachytherapy on local control, one change was made: the catheters were loaded five or more days after operation. Wound complications were then reviewed in 50 patients following this single change in brachytherapy delivery. Of the 21 patients receiving brachytherapy, 14% had significant wound complications; 10% of the 29 patients who did not receive radiation had wound complications of similar severity. This decrease in wound complications represents a major improvement over our prior experience and suggests that the timing of radioactive source loading in the postoperative period is a major factor in radiation-induced wound-healing delay.

  2. [Pre-, peri- and postoperative prevention of wound infections].

    PubMed

    Gottrup, Finn; Jrgensen, Peter Holmberg; Bekhj, Laura

    2007-11-26

    Many factors related to the patient, surgical techniques and perioperative hygiene are decisive for the development of postoperative wound infections. The present paper describes some of the most important factors and tries on basis of the present literature to evaluate the evidence of these factors. PMID:18211780

  3. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

  4. Effect of postoperative use of nasal oxygen catheter supplementation in wound healing following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; Angelini, Fábio Janson; Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Healing is an event that is fundamental to the success of total knee arthroplasty. The aims of the present study were to compare the rates of complications related to wound healing between two groups of volunteers submitted to total knee arthroplasty and to evaluate the effects of postoperative oxygen supplementation by means of a nasal catheter. METHOD: A total of 109 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were randomized into two groups, namely, groups that did and did not receive postoperative oxygen supplementation via a nasal catheter. The surgical wound was monitored every day during the hospital stay and on the 7th, 14th, 21st, 30th and 42nd postoperative days. Characteristics related to healing were observed, including hyperemia, dehiscence, necrosis, phlyctenules and deep and superficial infection. RESULTS: There were no cases of deep infection. Hyperemia was statistically correlated with the total number of complications in the groups, with oxygen demonstrated to be a protective factor against hyperemia. Approximately 30% of the patients who exhibited hyperemia had other complications, independent of oxygen supplementation. CONCLUSION: Oxygen supplementation following total knee arthroplasty was shown to be effective in diminishing hyperemia around the operative wound. The development of hyperemia was a precursor to other complications, irrespective of whether oxygen supplementation was used. PMID:25518030

  5. Abductor digiti minimi muscle flap transfer to prevent wound healing complications after ORIF of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Liang; Huang, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Sheng; Zhu, Tao; Lin, Chu; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the transfer of abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle flaps as a method for preventing wound healing complications in cases of closed calcaneal fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Method: Design: Retrospective review. Patients: Twenty-six cases of acute closed calcaneal fracture in patients at risk for serious wound complications or with serious fractures. Intervention: During the ORIF surgery, an ADM muscle flap was removed and used to cover the plate, filling the gap between the plate and skin. Main Outcome Measures: Wound healing rates, postoperative complications, and time to heal. Results: All wounds healed uneventfully, except for one case of minor superficial epithelial necrosis during the early postoperative period, which was treated conservatively. All patients regained ambulatory status with regular foot apparel. At last follow-up, the patients presented no clinical, laboratory, or radiological signs of complications. Conclusions: This ADM muscle flap transfer technique appeared to successfully prevent wound healing complications among patients undergoing ORIF for closed calcaneal fractures. This method offers a promising treatment option for calcaneal fractures in patients at high risk for serious wound complications, and future studies with greater numbers of cases are needed to further investigate its clinical application. PMID:26550221

  6. Incidence of postoperative wound infections after open tendo Achilles repairs

    PubMed Central

    Marican, Mohd Mizan; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung; Rikhraj, Inderjeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Tendo Achilles (TA), which is the confluence of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, is one of the most commonly injured tendons. The surgical repair of TA ruptures is associated with a significant risk of infection. This study examined several factors (i.e. gender, age, body mass index, history of diabetes mellitus, steroid use, acute or chronic TA injuries, type of surgical incision and type of sutures used) that may be associated with postoperative wound infection after open TA repair. METHODS This was a retrospective study involving 60 patients who underwent open TA repair over an 18-month period. Patients who had prior TA surgery or open TA injuries, or who needed soft tissues flaps were excluded. RESULTS Among the patients, 7 (11.7%) developed superficial wound infections that were successfully treated with oral antibiotics, while 3 (5.0%) developed deep wound infections that required at least one debridement procedure. No significant association was found between the risk of postoperative wound infection and gender, age, the presence of diabetes mellitus, acute or chronic ruptures, site of surgical incision and type of deep or superficial sutures used. CONCLUSION While diabetes mellitus and age did not appear to be associated with postoperative wound infections after open TA repair, obese patients were found to be two times more likely to develop a wound infection than normal-weight patients. The incidence of superficial wound infections in this study was similar to previously published results (11.7% vs. 8.2%–14.6%), but the incidence of deep infections was higher (5% vs. 1%–2%). PMID:26512146

  7. Partial Closure of Skin Wounds after Kidney Transplantation Decreases the Incidence of Postoperative Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Eric; Huntoon, Kristin; Shah, Kavin; Villa, Manuel; Blood, A.J.; Lumerman, Leandro; Fishbane, Lara; Goncharuk, Edwin; Oropallo, Alisha; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sachdeva, Mala; Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Calderon, Kellie; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto P.

    2012-01-01

    Wound infections are a major cause of morbidity after kidney transplantation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate an improved technique of wound closure. Data corresponding to 104 consecutive live donor kidney recipients were prospectively collected and analyzed. Our routine standard technique involved closure of the abdominal wall muscle and fascia in one layer with interrupted nonabsorbable full thickness sutures. No drains were used. The skin was closed with interrupted 2–0 nylon sutures 4 to 5 cm apart, leaving the skin and subcutaneous tissue in between partially open. Patients were allowed to shower starting on the first postoperative day. Examination of the wounds was continued for at least 1 month postoperatively, and then routinely as needed. All patients were thoroughly informed preoperatively of our technique. There were no immediate postoperative wound infections. There were no instances of dehiscence, evisceration, or need for revision. All patients were able to continue with their routine daily activities. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in all cases. We did not experience any patient complaints with respect to our technique. Patient satisfaction scores conducted by Press Ganey and Associates ranked in the 99 percentile with respect to peers undergoing kidney transplantation. Three patients returned six months postoperatively with suture granulomas which were treated nonoperatively. Partial closure of the skin wound with no associated drains is an effective and cosmetically desirable way to decrease the incidence of postoperative infections in kidney transplantation. PMID:23730135

  8. [Colonization of post-operative wounds by endogenous gram-negative rods in patients after laryngectomy].

    PubMed

    Rózalska, M; Weber-Dabrowska, B; Józefowicz-Korczyńska, M

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial flora of the posterior laryngeal wall, larynx and surgical wounds of the patients treated surgically for carcinoma of the larynx was investigated. A similarity of some bacterial strains isolated from various habitats was demonstrated by comparing the biochemical characteristics, drug resistance patterns, and susceptibility to bacteriocins and bacteriophages. Bacteriophagotyping confirmed the similarity of rods belonging to the genera Enterobacter and Pseudomonas. Thus, colonization of surgical wounds by bacteria present in the pharynx and the larynx, but not inducing healing complications, has been confirmed. The detected strains demonstrated high susceptibility to antibiotics, including those administered within the framework of post-operative preventive treatment. PMID:11757429

  9. Do postoperative antibiotics prevent abscess formation in complicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Kimbrell, Ashlee R; Novosel, Timothy J; Collins, Jay N; Weireter, Leonard J; Terzian, Hillman W T; Adams, Ryan T; Beydoun, Hind A

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that postoperative antibiotics in nonperforated appendicitis do not reduce infectious complications; however, there is no consensus on patients with complicated appendicitis. The aim of this study is to determine whether postoperative antibiotic administration in complicated appendicitis prevents intra-abdominal abscess formation. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing appendectomy from 2007 to 2012 at our institution. Patients with complicated appendicitis (perforated, gangrenous, or periappendiceal abscess) were identified and data collected including details of postoperative antibiotic administration and rates of postoperative abscess development. Of 444 charts reviewed, 52 patients were included. Forty-four patients received greater than 24 hours and eight patients received 24 hours or less of postoperative antibiotics. In those receiving greater than 24 hours of antibiotics, nine of 44 (20.5%) developed a postoperative abscess, and in those receiving 24 hours or less of antibiotics, two of eight (25.0%) developed a postoperative abscess (P = 1.0000). There is no significant difference in postoperative abscess development among those with complicated appendicitis who received greater than 24 hours of postoperative antibiotics compared with those who did not. Postoperative antibiotics may not provide an appreciable clinical benefit for preventing intra-abdominal abscesses; however, larger sample sizes and prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25197874

  10. Porcine xenograft biosynthetic wound dressings for the management of postoperative Mohs wounds.

    PubMed

    Raimer, David W; Group, Ashley R; Petitt, Matthew S; Nosrati, Neda; Yamazaki, Mika L; Davis, Nathan A; Kelly, Brent C; Gibson, Bernard R; Montilla, Richard D; Wagner, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Cadaveric allografts and a large variety of other biologic dressings have been reported as being useful for the postoperative management of Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) wounds. Although the use of porcine xenografts for the immediate postoperative management of these wounds is known, their use has not been detailed in the dermatology literature. A case series of 15 consecutive Mohs micrographic surgery patients (mean age = 74.9 years, range = 49 to 89 years) with wounds initially managed with porcine xenografts is described. Porcine xenografts were useful in a variety of clinical settings following MMS. These included: (1) wound management when tumor margins were indeterminate pending additional dermatopathology studies and (2) wound management when there are issues such as through and through nasal defects involving the mucosa, large wound depth, exposed cartilage and or bone, or patient medical comorbidities that delay or prevent plans for immediate wound reconstruction. Future controlled studies of biologic dressings are needed to determine which options are best for micrographic surgery wounds. Comparisons should also include the traditional option of second intention healing without biologic dressings. PMID:21971266

  11. [Influence of laser -- infrared irradiation on local complications of early postoperative period in hernias of anterior abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Gasymov, E M

    2005-01-01

    Results of laser-infrared irradiation (LIRI) of postoperative wound after surgical treatment of recurrent hernias of anterior abdominal wall were analyzed. LIRI decreased number of local complications in early postoperative period in patients both with recurrent and primary hernias. The method was more effective for the treatment of local complication in patients with recurrent hernia that is confirmed by reduced of frequency of infiltrates, seromas and suppurations. PMID:16247383

  12. Predicting postoperative pulmonary complications in high-risk populations

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Bhargavi; Sprung, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Our objective is to describe prediction models for surgical patients who have suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) at risk for postoperative respiratory complications and for surgical patients at risk for postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent findings Because of the increased rate of severe perioperative respiratory complications in patients with OSA, the American Society of Anesthesiologists issued practice guidelines for perioperative management. When OSA is diagnosed preoperatively, the rate of postoperative pulmonary complications is low and not associated with OSA severity. However, OSA continues to be an important risk because a substantial proportion of patients in the contemporary surgical population have undiagnosed OSA. Strategies based on preoperative and immediate postoperative clinical signs and symptoms can help identify patients with a high likelihood of OSA, postoperative desaturations, and pulmonary complications. ARDS is another serious postoperative complication associated with high mortality rate and limited treatment options, and its prevention is critical. Practice changes have led to a dramatic reduction in ARDS incidence. A recently developed prediction model can help identify high-risk patients. Summary Evidence is emerging that early identification of modifiable risk factors and implementation of ‘protective’ management strategies may lead to reduction of severe postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:23407151

  13. [PRINCIPLES OF POSTOPERATIVE DRUG THERAPY OF COMPLICATED DUODENAL ULCERS].

    PubMed

    Denisova, E V; Nazarov, V E

    2015-01-01

    The article highlights the principles of individualized drug therapy of complicated duodenal ulcers in the postoperative period, based on the removal of the pathophysiological changes that occurred after different types of medical or surgical benefits. PMID:26415272

  14. Treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds using human fibroblast-derived dermis: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Russell M; Smith, Nicholas C; Dux, Katherine; Stuck, Rodney M

    2014-04-01

    Human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute is a well-studied treatment for diabetic foot ulcers; however, no case series currently exist for its use in healing postoperative wounds of the lower extremity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 32 lower extremity postoperative wounds treated weekly with human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute. Postoperative wounds were defined as a wound resulting from an open partial foot amputation, surgical wound dehiscence, or nonhealing surgical wound of the lower extremity. Wound surface area was calculated at 4 and 12 weeks or until wound closure if prior to 12 weeks. Postoperative wounds treated with weekly applications showed mean improvement in surface area reduction of 63.6% at 4 weeks and 96.1% at 12 weeks. More than 56% of all wounds healed prior to the 12-week endpoint. Additionally, only one adverse event was noted in this group. This retrospective review supports the use of human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute in the treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds. This advanced wound care therapy aids in decreased total healing time and increased rate of healing for not only diabetic foot wounds but also postoperative wounds of the lower extremity, as demonstrated by this retrospective review. PMID:24521756

  15. Complications of equine wound management and dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R Reid

    2008-12-01

    Complications of wounds and cosmetic surgery can be accurately managed with a combination of timely surgical and medical intervention to ensure the best possible outcome. The lack of soft tissue protection and a large quantity of susceptible synovial, tendon, ligament, and neurovascular structures make early and meticulous evaluation of limb wounds critical. Skin grafting is usually used following a period of open wound management and after healthy granulation tissue formation. Penetrating wounds of the abdomen or thorax have a guarded prognosis resulting from the ensuing potential for infection and pneumothorax. Gunshot wounds limited to the skeletal muscles have a good prognosis, whereas injuries that involve vital organs decreased survivability. PMID:19203707

  16. High Rates of Postoperative Wound Infection Following Elective Implant Removal

    PubMed Central

    Backes, M; Schep, N.W.L; Luitse, J.S.K; Goslings, J.C; Schepers, T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Metal implants placed during fracture surgery are often removed for various reasons (i.e. pain, prominent material, patients request). The removal of implants is considered a ‘clean’ procedure and as low risk surgery. The incidence of wound infections following implant removal has received little attention in the literature. The aim of the current study was to assess the incidence and risk factors of postoperative wound infections (POWIs) following implant removal. Material and Methods : All consecutive adult patients in a Level 1 and Level 2 Trauma Center who had their implants removed during a 6.5 years period were included. Exclusion criteria were removal of implants because of an ongoing infection or fistula and removal followed by placement of new implants. Primary outcome measure was a POWI as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patient characteristics and peri-operative characteristics were collected from the medical charts. Results : A total of 452 patients were included (512 procedures). The overall POWI rate was 11.6% (10% superficial, 1.6% deep). A total of 403 procedures (78.7%) comprised of implant removal below the knee joint with a 12.2% POWI rate. A POWI following initial fracture treatment was associated with a higher rate of POWI following implant removal (p=0.012). A POWI occurred more often in younger patients (median age 36 versus 43 years; p=0.004). Conclusion : The overall incidence of postoperative wound infection was 11.6% with 10% superficial and 1.6% of deep infections in patients with elective implant removal. A risk factor for POWI following implant removal was a previous wound infection. PMID:26401166

  17. Postoperative Complications in Craniomaxillofacial Reconstruction With Medpor.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Ferreira, Ana Carulina Rezende; Muoz, Xiomara Mnica Johanna Palacio; Okamoto, Roberta; Pellizer, Eduardo Piza; Garcia, Idelmo Rangel

    2016-03-01

    Bone reconstruction in craniofacial surgery is a challenge for surgeons, who most commonly adopt the autogenous bone grafting and alloplastic implants in such procedures. Among the alloplastic materials, the high-density porous polyethylene is highlighted-Medpor (Medpor, Porex Surgical Inc, Newman, GA), considered to be pure polyethylene, with only 1 manufacturing process and standard pore size. The purpose of the current study has been to present through a review of literature and the types of complications derived from the use of Medpor in craniomaxillofacial bone surgery. A specific and sensitive database was initially created via PubMed, focusing on studies published in English peer-reviewed journals between 2004 and 2014, including case reports, experimental studies in humans, and prospective and retrospective studies. Forty articles were found at PubMed database. After analyzing their abstracts, 19 were selected, totaling 1453 patients and 121 complications, being the most commonly reported diplopia with 56 patients and infection with 6 patients. Most of the complications reported in the articles used for the development of the current review are not directly related to the use of the Medpor implant. The only complications directly related to the use of this biomaterial were cases of infection. PMID:26963299

  18. [Postoperative thromboembolic complications and preventive measures].

    PubMed

    Vegar-Brozović, Vesna; Prajdić-Predrijevac, D

    2003-01-01

    Modern surgical procedures become very extensive and aggressive in every surgical branch. Due to expressive development of anesthesia techniques with large monitoring systems support is provided to patients for broad spectrum of disorders. Therefore, we need to protect patients from imminent complications, as development of deep venous thrombosis and embolic pulmonary incidents. The main target in prophylaxis is to divide patients by risk and the type of surgical procedures during the time of "bed recovery". Today, current farmacological treatment is prone to control and prevent such events and to decrease mortality. Patients are divided in three groups: low risk (small operations with early mobilization); medium risk (surgery with risk in patients history); high risk (severe patients and long surgery, prolonged recovery). The best solutions in current medicine is to prevent most of complications, by administration of low molecular heparin (LMWH). Advantages of that treatment are: no need of intensive monitoring, long-time treatment, safe usage in "day case surgery" Beside LMWH, we still use heparin, although we tend to trial newer treatments and supports for prevention of complications. For special groups of patients recent trials examine heparinoid like drug-hyrudin, provided by chemical engeneering. That drug is metabolised in liver. Current therapy and prevention of DVT and pulmonary embolia is LMWH. It entered in every alghorythm of surgical and anaesthetic procedures and become CONDITIO SINE QUA NON. PMID:15017863

  19. Is There Any Benefit of Drain Placement on Postoperative Complications in Patients Undergoing the Sistrunk Procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Talha Ahmed; Suhail, Anwar; Zaidi, Syed Sajjad Ali; Siddiq, Wasif

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Same-day, outpatient Sistrunk procedure is commonly performed to manage thyroglossal duct cyst anomalies and may lead to postoperative complications. Surgical drains are placed to prevent complications, but recent observations show no advantage and rather increased health care costs and patient discomfort. Objective The study evaluated if drain placement in the Sistrunk procedure offers any benefit on postoperative complications. Methods A retrospective analysis of patient records having undergone same-day, outpatient Sistrunk procedure from 2004 to 2014 was done. Of 58 (38 male and 20 female) patients included, 38 did not have drains placed and the remaining 20 had drains placed. Mean and median age of patients was 18.1 and 13.5 years, respectively. Postoperative complications of patients with drains versus those without drains were statistically analyzed. Results Overall, about 10% of patients had hematoma/seroma (H-S), with 6.9% of patients needing aspiration for H-S; 3.4% had wound infections; and 1.7% had pus formation. No statistically significant differences in Sistrunk-related complications between patient groups (with drain or without drain) were seen using Fisher exact (two-sided) test: H-S (p = 0.08); need for aspiration (p = 0.29); wound infection (p > 0.05); and pus formation (p = 0.35). Chi-square test also did not show any significant difference in the groups in terms of number of follow-ups. Conclusion Surgical placement of a drain in the Sistrunk procedure does not seem to offer any advantage in terms of reducing common postoperative complications. Same-day Sistrunk procedure without any drain placement may be a safer alternative without necessitating hospitalization. More studies with larger sample size are needed for further substantiation. PMID:26491480

  20. Imaging panorama in postoperative complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Pamecha, Viniyendra; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the second most-often transplanted solid organ after the kidney, so it is clear that liver disease is a common and serious problem around the globe. With the advancements in surgical, oncological and imaging techniques, orthotopic liver transplantation has become the first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. Ultrasound, and Doppler are the most economical and cost-effective imaging modalities for evaluating postoperative fluid collections and vascular complications. Computed tomography (CT) is used to confirm the findings of ultrasound and look for pulmonary complications. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for the diagnosis of biliary complications, bile leaks and neurological complications. This article illustrates the imaging options for diagnosing the various complications that can be encountered in the postoperative period after liver transplantation. PMID:26534929

  1. Wound-healing complications following biopsy of the irradiated breast.

    PubMed

    Pezner, R D; Lorant, J A; Terz, J; Ben-Ezra, J; Odom-Maryon, T; Luk, K H

    1992-03-01

    A retrospective review evaluated results of 38 posttreatment biopsies (with resulting benign pathologic findings) that were performed on 32 irradiated breasts or axillae in 31 of 232 patients who underwent conservation treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Postbiopsy wound-healing complications developed in eight (30%) of 27 patients who were undergoing open biopsies but in none of 11 who underwent only needle biopsies. Wound-healing complications occurred in two of five patients who underwent incisional skin biopsy, three of five who underwent mammographic needle-localized excisional biopsy, and three of 17 who underwent other types of open biopsies. Frequency of wound-healing complications following open biopsy was not related to patient age, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, or use of chemotherapy. Wound-healing complications were related to breast size, developing in four (67%) of six patients with large breasts (brassiere cup size D or DD) as compared with that in only four (19%) of 21 patients with smaller breasts. Significant worsening of cosmetic breast retraction was frequently associated with wound-healing complications, especially wounds that took more than 1 month to heal. PMID:1550480

  2. [The prevention of postoperative suppurative complications in stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Chakŭrov, S; Iosifova, L; Karanov, S; Tomov, I; Marinova, V

    1989-01-01

    Bacteriologic studies of gastric juice and purulent drainage fluids in the event of complications were carried out in 80 patients who had undergone gastric resections and had been on conventional parenteral antibiotic treatment (control group). Another (experimental) group of 37 patient, having undergone the same operations, received prophylaxis of the suppurative complications with 5-nitrox and Flagyl solutions through nasogastric probe once in 3 hours for 6 to 8 days. The suppurative complications in the experimental group were reduced from 47.5 to 8.1 per cent and of the postoperative lethality due to suppurative complications from 22.5 to 0 per cent. PMID:2796222

  3. Risk factors for postoperative complications following oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; OHTA, Kouji; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to clarify significant risk factors for postoperative complications in the oral cavity in patients who underwent oral surgery, excluding those with oral cancer. Material and Methods This study reviewed the records of 324 patients who underwent mildly to moderately invasive oral surgery (e.g., impacted tooth extraction, cyst excision, fixation of mandibular and maxillary fractures, osteotomy, resection of a benign tumor, sinus lifting, bone grafting, removal of a sialolith, among others) under general anesthesia or intravenous sedation from 2012 to 2014 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Hiroshima University Hospital. Results Univariate analysis showed a statistical relationship between postoperative complications (i.e., surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) and diabetes (p=0.033), preoperative serum albumin level (p=0.009), and operation duration (p=0.0093). Furthermore, preoperative serum albumin level (<4.0 g/dL) and operation time (≥120 minutes) were found to be independent factors affecting postoperative complications in multiple logistic regression analysis results (odds ratio 3.82, p=0.0074; odds ratio 2.83, p=0.0086, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicate that a low level of albumin in serum and prolonged operation duration are important risk factors for postoperative complications occurring in the oral cavity following oral surgery. PMID:26398515

  4. Effects of immediate postoperative enteral nutrition on body composition, muscle function, and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, D; Gillanders, L; Mahr, K; Hill, G L

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-two patients undergoing bowel resection were randomized to receive either immediate postoperative nasojejunal feeding with full strength Osmolite solution for 56 hours (n = 16) or routine postoperative hypocaloric fluids and gradual reintroduction of diet (n = 16). Body composition changes were measured at 14 days after operation with in vivo neutron activation analysis, the wound healing response by subcutaneous implantation of Gortex tubes, and muscle function by grip strength, maximum ventilatory volume, and stimulation of the ulnar nerve at the wrist. Postoperative fatigue up to 3 months after operation was assessed using a 10-point analogue. Successful immediate enteral nutrition was established in 12 of the 16 patients. Enterally fed patients had a mean daily caloric intake of 1179 +/- 388 kcal/d (mean +/- SD) over the first 4 postoperative days compared with 382 +/- 71 kcal/d for the controls (p less than 0.0001). The amount of hydroxyproline accumulating in the Gortex tubes was also significantly greater (2.5 +/- 1.1 nmol/g tube vs 1.5 +/- 0.8 nmol/g tube; p less than 0.02). However, the amount and composition of the weight lost was not significantly different. Muscle function was not preserved, and postoperative fatigue occurred to an equal extent in both groups. Complications were similar in both groups, except for a preponderance of bowel obstructions in the controls. The time to passage of first flatus and first bowel motion, although shorter in the fed group, did not reach significance (p = 0.07). We conclude that immediate enteral nutrition is feasible and results in an improved wound healing response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1910100

  5. [Application of Opsite at donor sites, burns and postoperative wounds (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cavlak, Y

    1980-12-01

    The article reports on the Opsite foil and its properties. This is a film consisting of polyurethane which is permeable to gas and water vapour. Prolonged skin contact does not produce an allergic reaction. The wound becomes rapidly covered with an epithelium. Opsite is an extremely successful dressing for covering donor areas and wounds from burns, as well as postoperative wounds. PMID:6116406

  6. Association between postoperative thromboembolism prophylaxis and complications following urological surgery

    PubMed Central

    CERRUTO, MARIA ANGELA; D'ELIA, CAROLINA; PICCOLI, MARCO; CACCIAMANI, GIOVANNI; DE MARCHI, DAVIDE; CORSI, PAOLO; DE MARCO, VINCENZO; CAVALLERI, STEFANO; ARTIBANI, WALTER

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolism represents the most significant complication and cause of non-surgical mortality in major urological surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the type of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis and the postoperative complication rate in a cohort of patients undergoing major urological surgery. All consecutive patients treated with major urological surgery between December 2011 and March 2013 were evaluated. For each patient, clinical and demographic data, as well as information on the post-surgical complications and the type of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis, were collected. In total, 453 patients (mean age, 63.3612.05 years) were recruited (43.5% for prostate surgery, 33.1% for renal surgery, 12.1% for bladder surgery and 11.3% for other surgery). Postoperative blood transfusions were required in 50 cases (11.0%). A total of 32 patients (7.1%) underwent re-intervention due to the occurrence of grade ?3 complications, with a readmission rate of 2.0%. According to the Clavien-Dindo Classification, the complications were grade 1 in 36.0% of the cases, grade 2 in 19.4%, grade 3 in 6.0%, grade 4 in 2.0% and grade 5 (mortality) in 0.7%. Only 1 case of deep venous thrombosis not associated with pulmonary thromboembolism was observed. Univariate analyses showed a significant negative association (higher risk of complications) between the use of >4,000 IU enoxaparin as the thromboembolism prophylaxis and postoperative blood transfusion rate (P=0.045), re-intervention rate (P=0.001) and the occurrence of grade ?3 complications (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between the use of >4,000 IU enoxaparin and both re-intervention rate (P=0.013) and occurrence of grade ?3 complications (P=0.002). High doses of enoxaparin (>4,000 IU) may lead to an increased risk of re-intervention and severe postoperative complications following major urological surgery. Randomised, controlled trials comparing the effect of different types of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis on postoperative complications following major urological surgery are required. PMID:26889233

  7. Thromboembolic prophylaxis as a risk factor for postoperative complications after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Friis, Esbern; Hørby, John; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Pilsgaard, Bo; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Johansen, Lars; Jørgensen, Torben

    2004-06-01

    Hematoma and bruising (sugillation) are frequent problems after operations for primary breast cancer. In the present study we evaluated the influence of various methods of perioperative thromboembolic prophylaxis on the postoperative incidence of hematoma and suggilation. From June 1994 through August 1996, a series of 425 patients consecutively operated on for primary breast cancer were included. Thromboembolic prophylaxis was low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in 310 patients and thigh-long graded compression (TED) stockings in 102 patients. Postoperative complications including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, wound hematoma, and sugillation were recorded, and 17 variables with a potential influence on complications were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Heparin prophylaxis compared to prophylaxis with TED stockings was significantly and independently associated with postoperative hematoma [odds ratio (OR) 3, 13; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-7.13] or sugillation (OR 3.34; 95% CI 1.93-5.78). No clinically overt thromboembolic complications were diagnosed. After operations for breast cancer we found that LMWH was significantly associated with postoperative hematoma and sugillation compared to TED stockings for perioperative thromboembolic prophylaxis. PMID:15366741

  8. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  9. Postoperative metabolic and nutritional complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Koch, Timothy R; Finelli, Frederick C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly important method for management of medically complicated obesity. In patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, up to 87% with type 2 diabetes mellitus develop improvement or resolution of their disease postoperatively. Bariatric surgery can reduce the number of absorbed calories through performance of either a restrictive or a malabsorptive procedure. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery require indefinite, regular follow-up care by physicians who need to follow laboratory parameters of macronutrient as well as micronutrient malnutrition. Physicians who care for patients after bariatric surgery need to be familiar with common postoperative syndromes that result from specific nutrient deficiencies. PMID:20202584

  10. Complications associated with bacitracin powder in surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Joshua M; Amankwah, Ernest K; Tetreault, Lisa L; Perlman, Sharon A; Tuite, Gerald F

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There has been renewed interest in the application of concentrated antibiotic powder to surgical wounds as a method to decrease infection rates. While there is substantial medical literature describing the effectiveness and complications associated with vancomycin and gentamycin powders, very little has been reported regarding the safety and effectiveness of bacitracin powder in surgical wounds. In this paper the authors report their detailed analysis of potential bacitracin powder-related complications in a population of pediatric patients who underwent shunt surgery. METHODS A detailed retrospective analysis was completed of all CSF shunt surgeries performed by the corresponding author at a large children's hospital between 2001 and 2013. This cohort consisted of many patients who were the subject of a previous report that showed the use of bacitracin powder in shunt wounds potentially decreased infection rates. Data were collected regarding the most common known complications of bacitracin, i.e., anaphylaxis, wound healing difficulties, and renal dysfunction. Data were stratified by typical demographic, medical, and surgical variables, including whether bacitracin powder was applied to wounds prior to closure. RESULTS A total of 597 patients were reviewed in the analysis: 389 underwent surgery without bacitracin powder and 208 had concentrated bacitracin powder applied to the wounds prior to closure. The application of bacitracin powder was not associated with anaphylaxis (n = 0 both groups) or with an increase in wound breakdown (n = 5 in the control group, n = 0 in the bacitracin powder group) or renal dysfunction (creatinine/estimated glomerular filtration rate) using both comparative and multivariate analyses between the 2 groups. The sample size evaluating renal function was significantly lower (range 6-320) than that of anaphylaxis and wound breakdown analysis because only clinical values acquired during the routine care of these patients were available for analysis. The only significant difference in demographics was the more frequent use of intrathecal vancomycin and gentamycin in patients who received bacitracin powder (n = 1 for controls, n = 21 for bacitracin powder). In the multivariate analysis, only 1 factor, surgery performed on a premature infant within the first 3 months of life, was independently associated with a change in creatinine at 3 months (creatinine decreased by 0.18) compared with the level before surgery (p < 0.0001). Bacitracin powder was not a significant factor. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to systematically analyze the potential complications of concentrated bacitracin powder applied to surgical wounds. The use of topical bacitracin powder in CSF shunt wounds was not associated with anaphylaxis, wound breakdown, or renal dysfunction. Further study using standardized protocols is necessary before widespread use can be recommended. PMID:26382180

  11. Postoperative wound dealing and superficial surgical site infection in open radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Fukashi; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamashita, Mauso; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soishi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-09-01

    The number of open radical prostatectomy (RP) surgeries has been decreasing owing to the spread of laparoscopic and robotic surgery, which has implications for postoperative wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate and document the current status of postoperative wound healing and superficial surgical site infection (SSI) in open RPs. One hundred and seventy-five antegrade RPs with the same or similar kinds of prophylactic antibiotic administration were divided into two groups: (i) 'no intervention' (wound covering group) and (ii) 'washing', using a washing solution from the second postoperative day to the day of skin staple removal (wound washing group). We compared these groups for the occurrence of superficial SSI. The wound covering group had three (303%) cases of superficial SSI, with one case caused by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). The wound washing group had nine (118%) cases of superficial SSI, with three cases caused by MSSA, two cases caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and one by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The wound covering group showed a significantly lower ratio of superficial SSI (P?=?00472). In conclusion, the postoperative wound status data in this study suggests that no wound intervention after RP resulted in a comparatively lower ratio of superficial SSI than in the wound washing group. PMID:25186077

  12. Evaluation of vacuum-assisted closure in patients with wound complications following tumour surgery.

    PubMed

    Mermerkaya, Ugur; Bekmez, Senol; Alkan, Erkan; Ayvaz, Mehmet; Tokgozoglu, Mazhar

    2016-06-01

    Covering the reconstructed area with a healthy soft-tissue envelope is a major challenge after limb-sparing surgery in patients with malignant bone and soft-tissue tumours. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) of open wounds hastens healing and minimises the requirement for complex reconstructive soft-tissue surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of NPWT in bone and soft-tissue malignant tumour patients with postoperative wound complications. Between January 2006 and November 2009, at a single institution, 13 patients with malignant bone and soft-tissue tumours who had undergone wide resection were retrospectively analysed. NPWT was performed in all patients to temporarily close the soft-tissue defects. After obtaining the culture negativity and normal infection markers, definitive soft-tissue reconstruction was performed to close the wound with primary suturisation in two patients, split thickness grafts in four patients, full thickness grafts in two patients, rotational flaps in three patients and free flaps in two patients. Mean duration of hospitalisation was 20 (range 8-48) days and mean follow-up period was 57·3 (range 50-74) months. There was no tumour recurrence or skip metastasis in the follow-up period. In addition, there was no periprosthetic infection or complication associated with NPWT. In conclusion, NPWT therapy seems to be a safe and effective option in the management of local wound problems and secondary surgical site infections after musculoskeletal tumour surgery. PMID:24976480

  13. Imaging of bariatric surgery: normal anatomy and postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Carucci, Laura R

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions in the United States and around the world. During the past 2 decades, bariatric surgery has become an increasingly popular form of treatment for morbid obesity. The most common bariatric procedures performed include laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal examinations and abdominal computed tomography (CT) are the major imaging tests used to evaluate patients after these various forms of bariatric surgery. The purpose of this article is to present the surgical anatomy and normal imaging findings and postoperative complications for these bariatric procedures at fluoroscopic examinations and CT. Complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass include anastomotic leaks and strictures, marginal ulcers, jejunal ischemia, small bowel obstruction, internal hernias, intussusception, and recurrent weight gain. Complications after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding include stomal stenosis, malpositioned bands, pouch dilation, band slippage, perforation, gastric volvulus, intraluminal band erosion, and port- and band-related problems. Finally, complications after sleeve gastrectomy include postoperative leaks and strictures, gastric dilation, and gastroesophageal reflux. The imaging features of these various complications of bariatric surgery are discussed and illustrated. PMID:24471382

  14. Preoperative insurance status influences postoperative complication rates for gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Martin, L F; Tan, T L; Holmes, P A; Becker, D A; Horn, J; Mann, L D; Bixler, E O

    1991-06-01

    One hundred morbidly obese patients who had gastric bypass surgery were studied to determine how various demographic and medical variables affected complication rates, weight loss, and reduction in comorbidities associated with obesity. During the follow-up period (range: 12 to 59 months), 42 patients developed at least 1 complication. Twenty-three patients developed postoperative medical complications, 9 developed psychiatric complications, and 24 developed complications related to food ingestion. No significant relationships were observed between outcome and age, sex, age of obesity onset, or associated medical disorders. Striking differences in outcome were noted, however, when patients were contrasted according to their preoperative insurance status. Patients dependent on medical assistance, social security disability, or workman's compensation (publicly funded group) (n = 40) developed significantly more medical and psychiatric complications than did those (n = 60) who had private medical insurance (p less than 0.02). Despite the higher complication rate, both groups had the same average weight loss (44.9 +/- 15.3 kg for the publicly funded group versus 43.1 +/- 12.9 kg for those with private insurance) and similar reductions in percent excess weight (66.0 +/- 18.4% versus 75.7 +/- 23.0%) during the first postoperative year. All patients also had similar reductions in medication requirements for hypertension, diabetes, and degenerative joint disease. Additionally, 45% of the publicly funded insurance group who either received public welfare (n = 26) or disability benefits (n = 14) preoperatively were able to attain either full-time or part-time employment postoperatively which allowed them to decrease their level of support (58% and 21%, respectively). Forty-six percent of women in the private insurance group who were not working outside the home also began part-time or full-time employment postoperatively. All patients who were working preoperatively continued to work. These data suggest that although the risks associated with gastric bypass surgery are greater in patients dependent on public funding, these patients benefit significantly from the surgery. PMID:1830719

  15. Postoperative complications and clinical outcomes among patients undergoing thoracic and gastrointestinal cancer surgery: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Benítez, Frank Daniel; Gutiérrez-Noyola, Anarelys; Echevarría-Víctores, Adisbel

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the influence of postoperative complications on the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent thoracic and gastrointestinal cancer surgery. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted regarding 179 consecutive patients who received thorax or digestive tract surgery due to cancer and were admitted to an oncological intensive care unit. The Postoperative Morbidity Survey was used to evaluate the incidence of postoperative complications. The influence of postoperative complications on both mortality and length of hospital stay were also assessed. Results Postoperative complications were found for 54 patients (30.2%); the most common complications were respiratory problems (14.5%), pain (12.9%), cardiovascular problems (11.7%), infectious disease (11.2%), and surgical wounds (10.1%). A multivariate logistic regression found that respiratory complications (OR = 18.68; 95%CI = 5.59 - 62.39; p < 0.0001), cardiovascular problems (OR = 5.06, 95%CI = 1.49 - 17.13; p = 0.009), gastrointestinal problems (OR = 26.09; 95%CI = 6.80 - 100.16; p < 0.0001), infectious diseases (OR = 20.55; 95%CI = 5.99 - 70.56; p < 0.0001) and renal complications (OR = 18.27; 95%CI = 3.88 - 83.35; p < 0.0001) were independently associated with hospital mortality. The occurrence of at least one complication increased the likelihood of remaining hospitalized (log-rank test, p = 0.002). Conclusions Postoperative complications are frequent disorders that are associated with poor clinical outcomes; thus, structural and procedural changes should be implemented to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality.

  16. Convergent validity of three methods for measuring postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley A; Escallier, Krisztina E; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Oberhaus, Jordan; Becker, Jennifer; Geczi, Kristin; McKinnon, Sherry; Helsten, Dan L; Sharma, Anshuman; Wildes, Troy S; Avidan, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background Anesthesiologists need tools to accurately track postoperative outcomes. The accuracy of patient report in identifying a wide variety of postoperative complications following diverse surgical procedures has not previously been investigated. Methods In this cohort study, 1578 adult surgical patients completed a survey at least 30 days after their procedure asking if they had experienced any of 18 complications while in the hospital after surgery. Patient responses were compared to the results of an automated electronic chart review and (for a random subset of 750 patients) to a manual chart review. Results from automated chart review were also compared to those from manual chart review. Forty-two randomly selected patients were contacted by telephone to explore reasons for discrepancies between patient report and manual chart review. Results Comparisons between patient report, automated chart review, and manual chart review demonstrated poor-to-moderate positive agreement (range 0% to 58%) and excellent negative agreement (range 82% to 100%). Discordance between patient report and manual chart review were was frequently explicable by patients reporting events that happened outside the time period of interest. Conclusions Patient report can provide information about subjective experiences or events that happen after hospital discharge, but often yields different results from chart review for specific in-hospital complications. Effective in-hospital communication with patients and thoughtful survey design may increase the quality of patient-reported complication data. This is a substudy of the SATISFY-SOS surgical outcomes registry (NCT02032030). PMID:17992699

  17. Pilonidal sinus surgery: could we predict postoperative complications?

    PubMed

    Milone, Marco; Di Minno, Matteo Nd; Bianco, Paolo; Coretti, Guido; Musella, Mario; Milone, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Pilonidal sinus surgery could, as of now, be considered a surgery tailored more to the surgeon than to the patient. In an attempt to give to surgeons an objective instrument of decision, we have evaluated which variables could be considered predictive of postoperative complications after pilonidal sinus surgery. A prospective electronic database of all patients treated for sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease was analysed. Sex, age, obesity, smoking, recurrent disease, the presence of multiple orifices and the distance between the most lateral orifice and midline were recorded and correlated with the occurrence of postoperative complications (infection and recurrence); 1006 patients were evaluated. Excision with primary mid-line closure was performed on all the patients. Mean follow-up was 7·3 ± 3·6 years. A total of 158 patients with postoperative complications (infection and/or recurrence) were recorded during this period. A multivariate analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical and demographic characteristics, only a recurrent disease [odds ratio (OR): 3·41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1·89-6·15, P < 0·001] and the distance of lateral orifice from midline (OR: 26·3, 95% CI: 12·2-56·7, P < 0·001) were independent predictors of overall postoperative complications. Focussing on the distance from midline, the receiver operative characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the distance of lateral orifice from midline predicted 79·2% of complications and the Youden's test identified the best cut-off as 2·0 cm for this variable. An evidence-based tool for deciding on the type of surgical intervention could be developed and validated by further ad hoc prospective studies evaluating our results in comparison to other different types of surgical techniques. Our results support the use of these variables as an effective way to tailor pilonidal sinus surgery to the patient, so as to obtain the best results in patient care. PMID:24894163

  18. Retropubic Versus Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeman; Kwon, Taekmin; Kyung, Yoon Soo; Hong, Sungwoo; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) with those of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) performed by a single surgeon for the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The postoperative complications of 341 patients who underwent RRP and 524 patients who underwent RALP for prostate cancer at the Asan Medical Center between July 2007 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and compared. Complications were classified according to the modified Clavien classification system. Results RALP was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay (mean, 7.9 days vs. 10.1 days, p<0.001) and duration of urethral catheterization (6.2 days vs. 7.5 days, p<0.001) than RRP. Major complications (Clavien grade III-IV) were less common in the RALP group than in the RRP group (3.4% vs. 7.6%, p=0.006). There were no significant differences in medical complications between procedures. Considering surgical complications, urinary retention (7.0% vs. 2.7%, p=0.002) and wound repair (4.1% vs. 0.2%, p<0.001) were more common after RRP than after RALP. Extravasation of contrast medium during cystography was more common in the RRP group than in the RALP group (10.0% vs. 2.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions RALP is associated with a lower complication rate than RRP. PMID:24255757

  19. Pyoderma Gangrenosum in Two Successive Pregnancies Complicating Caesarean Wound

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sapna Vinit; Bajapai, Neha; Pai, Ashwini; Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare ulcerative cutaneous disorder with tendency to recur in the injured area. Though most of the time is associated with chronic systemic conditions, it can occur in isolation and can be a diagnostic dilemma. The aetiology is poorly understood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and excluding other causes of skin ulcers, as it does not have characteristic histopathology or laboratory findings. Lesions can develop after surgery, after trauma or de novo. We are reporting a 32-year-old pregnant lady with two previous instances of pyoderma gangrenosum in the previous pregnancy, who in postoperative period following caesarean section developed the same condition for the third time. She responded well to local wound care, oral Prednisolone, and Dapsone and made a good recovery. Pregnancy being an immunologically altered status can play a role in development of pyoderma gangrenosum and one should always rule out its possibility when there is a delayed wound healing. PMID:24707419

  20. Pyoderma gangrenosum in two successive pregnancies complicating caesarean wound.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sapna Vinit; Bajapai, Neha; Pai, Ashwini; Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare ulcerative cutaneous disorder with tendency to recur in the injured area. Though most of the time is associated with chronic systemic conditions, it can occur in isolation and can be a diagnostic dilemma. The aetiology is poorly understood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and excluding other causes of skin ulcers, as it does not have characteristic histopathology or laboratory findings. Lesions can develop after surgery, after trauma or de novo. We are reporting a 32-year-old pregnant lady with two previous instances of pyoderma gangrenosum in the previous pregnancy, who in postoperative period following caesarean section developed the same condition for the third time. She responded well to local wound care, oral Prednisolone, and Dapsone and made a good recovery. Pregnancy being an immunologically altered status can play a role in development of pyoderma gangrenosum and one should always rule out its possibility when there is a delayed wound healing. PMID:24707419

  1. Prevention of sternal wound complications after sternotomy: results of a large prospective randomized multicentre trial†

    PubMed Central

    Gorlitzer, Michael; Wagner, Florian; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Folkmann, Sandra; Meinhart, Johann; Fischlein, Theodor; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Grabenwoeger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES A prospective randomized multicentre trial was performed to analyse the efficacy of a vest (Posthorax support vest®) to prevent sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery, and to identify risk factors. METHODS From September 2007 to March 2010, 2539 patients undergoing cardiac surgery via median sternotomy were prospectively randomized into those who received a Posthorax® vest and those who did not. Patients were instructed to wear the vest postoperatively for 24 h a day for at least 6 weeks; the duration of follow-up was 90 days. Patients who did not use the vest within a period of 72 h postoperatively were regarded as study dropouts. Statistical calculations were based on an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. Further evaluations comprised all subgroups of patients. RESULTS Complete data were available for 2539 patients (age 67 ± 11years, 45% female). Of these, 1351 were randomized to receive a vest, while 1188 received no vest. No significant differences were observed between groups regarding age, gender, diabetes, body mass index, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), renal failure, the logistic EuroSCORE and the indication for surgery. The frequency of deep wound complications (dWC: mediastinitis and sternal dehiscence) was significantly lower in vest (n = 14; 1.04%) vs non-vest (n = 27; 2.27%) patients (ITT, P < 0.01), but superficial complications did not differ between groups. Subanalysis of vest patients revealed that only 933 (Group A) wore the vest according to the protocol, while 202 (Group BR) refused to wear the vest (non-compliance) and 216 (Group BN) did not use the vest for other reasons. All dWC occurred in Groups BR (n = 7) and BN (n = 7), although these groups had the same preoperative risk profile as Group A. Postoperatively, Group BN had a prolonged intubation time, a longer stay in the intensive care unit, greater use of intra-aortic balloon pump, higher frequency of COPD and a larger percentage of patients who required prolonged surgery. CONCLUSIONS Consistent use of the Posthorax® vest prevented deep sternal wounds. The anticipated risk factors for wound complications did not prove to be relevant, whereas intra- and postoperative complications appear to be very significant. PMID:23760221

  2. An analysis of postoperative complications and efficacy of 3-D miniplates in fixation of mandibular fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gokkulakrishnan, Sadhasivam; Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Ashish; Shahi, Ashish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recently, various modifications in transorally placed miniplates for direct fixation of the mandibular fracture are gaining popularity. The modifications have various advantages like more rigidity, less foreign material, less time in application, etc. Among the various modifications of miniplates, three-dimensional (3-D) plating system is also gaining popularity. Thus, in the present study, we tried to evaluate the efficacy and postoperative complications of 3-D titanium miniplates in the treatment of mandibular fractures. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 40 patients with non-comminuted mandibular fractures. They were treated using a 2-mm 3-D titanium miniplate through intraoral approach. All patients were systematically monitored 6 months postoperatively. Outcome parameters like infection, hardware failure, wound dehiscence, sensory disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve, occlusion, and 3-D plate stability were recorded. The statistical tests used in study were mean, standard deviation, and Chi-square test. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant and values less than 0.001 were considered very highly significant. Results: Two patients had a postoperative infection with no consequences. All patients had normal sensory function 3 months after surgery. Plate fracture had not occurred in any patient. Occlusal was normal and wound dehiscence was not reported. 3-D plate was stable in all the patients. Conclusions: It was seen that 3-D titanium miniplates were effective in the treatment of mandibular fractures and overall complication rates were lesser. In symphysis and parasymphysis regions, 3-D plating system uses lesser foreign material than the conventional miniplates using Champy's principle. PMID:23162581

  3. Post-operative abdominal complications in Crohn’s disease in the biological era: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waterland, Peter; Athanasiou, Thanos; Patel, Heena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on post-operative complications after surgery for Crohn’s disease (CD) comparing biological with no therapy. METHODS: PubMed, Medline and Embase databases were searched to identify studies comparing post-operative outcomes in CD patients receiving biological therapy and those who did not. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for each outcome measure of interest. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies were included for meta-analysis, comprising a total of 5425 patients with CD 1024 (biological treatment, 4401 control group). After biological therapy there was an increased risk of total infectious complications (OR = 1.52; 95%CI: 1.14-2.03, 8 studies) and wound infection (OR = 1.73; 95%CI: 1.12-2.67; P = 0.01, 7 studies). There was no increased risk for other complications including anastomotic leak (OR = 1.19; 95%CI: 0.82-1.71; P = 0.26), abdominal sepsis (OR = 1.22; 95%CI: 0.87-1.72; P = 0.25) and re-operation (OR = 1.12; 95%CI: 0.81-1.54; P = 0.46) in patients receiving biological therapy. CONCLUSION: Pre-operative use of anti-TNF-α therapy may increase risk of post-operative infectious complications after surgery for CD and in particular wound related infections. PMID:27022455

  4. [Clinical and ultrasonic predictors of postoperative complications after carotid endarterectomy].

    PubMed

    Shmyrev, V I; Nosenko, E M; Romanova, M S; Nosenko, N S; Kalinin, A A; Evdokimov, A G; Sakharov, A B

    2015-01-01

    For the period from 2007 to 2012 carotid endarterectomy was performed in 150 patients with cerebrovascular insufficiency I-IV degrees and atherosclerotic lesion of carotid arteries. Dynamic observation was performed by using of duplex scanning of brachiocephalic arteries, transcranial duplex scanning, multislice CT with contrast study of extracranial and intracranial arteries. Different degrees of vascular wall thickening of operated internal carotid artery including neo- and myointimal hyperplasia, restenosis and other complications were observed in 19 (12.6%) patients after carotid endarterectomy on background of cerebrovascular insufficiency progressing. It was revealed that transient ischemic attack or stroke, acute heart failure in early postoperative period, arterial hypertension with crisis course predominantly, diabetes mellitus 2 type, obesity, male sex, elderly age and smoking were clinical markers for complications after carotid endarterectomy. Ultrasonic markers of complications after carotid endarterectomy included terms of development and degree of vascular wall thickening in case of neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis, hyperperfusion syndrome and stroke, significant changes of blood flow velocity and indexes of peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:26031815

  5. Risk factors for postoperative complication after spinal fusion and instrumentation in degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively few studies have focused on the major medical complications that are more common in older adults. Furthermore, these studies have generally not reported how accurately a risk factor, or combination of risk factors, can distinguish between those who will have a complication and those who will not. Methods A total of 236 consecutive patients who had undergone surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar scoliosis between June 2008 and June 2012 were included retrospectively in this study. The demographic distribution, medical history, and clinical data were collected to investigate the predictive factors of postoperative complications by logistic regression. Results Among 236 eligible patients, major medical complications occurred in 7.2% of cases and wound complications occurred in 1.7% of cases. Ninety-day mortality rate was 0.4%. Postoperative complications were strongly associated with history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (P = 0.031), dyspnea with minimal exertion (P = 0.041), being at least partially dependent (P = 0.041), smoking within the past year (P = 0.044), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of more than 2 (P = 0.000), diabetes treated with insulin (P = 0.003), and steroid use for chronic condition (P = 0.003). In logistic regressions, operation time (odds ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11–4.78), ASA class (class 3 or 4 vs. class 1 or 2: odds ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.22–3.45), insulin-dependent diabetes (odds ratio 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.18–2.43), and steroid use for chronic condition (odds ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.32) may be reasonable predictors for an individual's likelihood of surgical complications. Conclusions The occurrence of postoperative complications is most likely multifactorial and is related to operation time, ASA class, insulin-dependent diabetes and steroid use for chronic condition. PMID:24606963

  6. Post-operative pulmonary complications after non-cardiothoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) occur in 5–10% of patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery and in 22% of high risk patients. PPCs are broadly defined as conditions affecting the respiratory tract that can adversely influence clinical course of the patient after surgery. Prior risk stratification, risk reduction strategies, performing short duration and/or minimally invasive surgery and use of anaesthetic technique of combined regional with general anaesthesia can reduce the incidence of PPCs. Atelectasis is the main cause of PPCs. Atelectasis can be prevented or treated by adequate analgesia, incentive spirometry (IS), deep breathing exercises, continuous positive airway pressure, mobilisation of secretions and early ambulation. Pre-operative treatment of IS is more effective. The main reason for post-operative pneumonia is aspiration along the channels formed by longitudinal folds in the high volume, low pressure polyvinyl chloride cuffs of the endotracheal tubes. Use of tapered cuff, polyurethane cuffs and selective rather than the routine use of nasogastric tube can decrease chances of aspiration. Acute lung injury is the most serious PPC which may prove fatal. PMID:26556919

  7. Post-operative pulmonary complications after non-cardiothoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-09-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) occur in 5-10% of patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery and in 22% of high risk patients. PPCs are broadly defined as conditions affecting the respiratory tract that can adversely influence clinical course of the patient after surgery. Prior risk stratification, risk reduction strategies, performing short duration and/or minimally invasive surgery and use of anaesthetic technique of combined regional with general anaesthesia can reduce the incidence of PPCs. Atelectasis is the main cause of PPCs. Atelectasis can be prevented or treated by adequate analgesia, incentive spirometry (IS), deep breathing exercises, continuous positive airway pressure, mobilisation of secretions and early ambulation. Pre-operative treatment of IS is more effective. The main reason for post-operative pneumonia is aspiration along the channels formed by longitudinal folds in the high volume, low pressure polyvinyl chloride cuffs of the endotracheal tubes. Use of tapered cuff, polyurethane cuffs and selective rather than the routine use of nasogastric tube can decrease chances of aspiration. Acute lung injury is the most serious PPC which may prove fatal. PMID:26556919

  8. The Association Between Body Mass Index and the Prognosis and Postoperative Complications of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Xiaoxiang; Wei, Fang; Geng, Qian; Ruan, Jian; shen, Hongfen; Li, Aimin; Luo, Rongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported the association between excess body mass index (BMI) and increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether BMI is associated with the prognosis and postoperative complications of HCC is still not clear. We searched PubMed and Embase for relevant studies published until the date of August 30, 2014. Additional studies were manually identified by searching reference lists of retrieved articles. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and risk ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs for postoperative complications were calculated using random effects or fixed effects models according to heterogeneities between studies. A total of 14 studies were included in the present meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that excess BMI was not significantly associated with improved OS (HR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.74–1.19, P = 0.588) or DFS (HR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.79–1.10, P = 0.382). In addition, higher BMI was not associated with increased rate of a number of complications including ascites (RR = 1.25, 95% CI: 0.94–1.65, P = 0.119), bile leaks (RR = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.81–1.83, P = 0.345), and 30-day mortality (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.57–1.96, P = 0.871). However, HCC patients with higher BMI had increased incidence of wound infections (RR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.28–3.68, P = 0.004). BMI was not an independent prognostic factor for the evaluation of the prognosis in HCC patients, and it was not associated with postoperative complications except for wound infections that as significantly associated with higher BMI scores. PMID:26252292

  9. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  10. Development of a Prediction Rule for Estimating Postoperative Pulmonary Complications

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Jung Seop; Yoo, Hongseok; Song, Wonjun; Han, Sangbin; Lee, Kyung Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O. Jung; Woo, Sookyoung; Park, Hye Yun

    2014-01-01

    Patient- and procedure-related factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) have changed over the last decade. Therefore, we sought to identify independent risk factors of PPCs and to develop a clinically applicable scoring system. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 2,059 patients who received preoperative evaluations from respiratory physicians between June 2011 and October 2012. A new scoring system for estimating PPCs was developed using beta coefficients of the final multiple regression models. Of the 2,059 patients studied, 140 (6.8%) had PPCs. A multiple logistic regression model revealed seven independent risk factors (with scores in parentheses): age ≥70 years (2 points), current smoker (1 point), the presence of airflow limitation (1 point), American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥2 (1 point), serum albumin <4 g/dL (1 point), emergency surgery (2 points), and non-laparoscopic abdominal/cardiac/aortic aneurysm repair surgery (4 points). The area under the curve was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.75–0.83) with the newly developed model. The new risk stratification including laparoscopic surgery has a good discriminative ability for estimating PPCs in our study cohort. Further research is needed to validate this new prediction rule. PMID:25437175

  11. A comparison of the effect of phenoxymethylpenicillin and azidocillin on postoperative complications after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Bystedt, H; von Konow, L; Nord, C E

    1981-01-01

    Postoperative complications after surgical removal of mandibular third molars are still a clinical problem. Sixty patients undergoing operations for removal of an impacted third mandibular molar, were included in a double blind study. Phenoxymethylpenicillin 800 mg, azidocillin 750 mg, or placebo were given to the patients pre-operatively and then twice per day for the following seven days. The concentrations of phenoxymethylpenicillin and azidocillin in serum and alveolar serum were measured and the postoperative courses - pain, trismus, swelling and wound-healing - were recorded. The 40 patients in the antibiotic groups responded significantly better with respect to wound-healing than the 20 patients in the placebo group, and there were no differences between phenoxymethylpenicillin and azidocillin. Antibiotics significantly reduced pain on day 7 postoperatively. There were no differences between antibiotic groups and placebo with respect to trismus and swelling. When the dental alveolar serum concentrations of phenoxymethylpenicillin 3.0 microgram/ml and azidocillin 7.9 microgram/ml were related to their range of inhibitory concentrations for microorganisms isolated from orofacial infections, it was noticed that the two drugs achieved levels sufficient to inhibit most strains. The effect of phenoxymethylpenicillin and azidocillin on postoperative infections can be of value after traumatic oral surgery or after operations on patients especially susceptible to infections. PMID:6800046

  12. A retrospective review of leg wound complications after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    East, Susan A; Lorenz, Rebecca A; Armbrecht, Eric S

    2013-10-01

    Little research or attention has been paid to finding out whether wound closure with sutures or staples attains the best outcomes after saphenous vein harvest for coronary artery bypass grafting. We undertook a quality improvement project to compare the prevalence of leg wound complications (eg, infection, seroma, hematoma, dehiscence) between two types of skin closure (ie, staples, subcuticular sutures) after conventional open surgery with bridging between incisions and vein harvesting during coronary revascularization to determine the need for practice changes. We found no significant differences between patients with wound complications and those without. However, in this project, the risk for infections was greater for patients with diabetes whose wounds were closed by using subcuticular sutures. These findings have led to practice changes for reducing leg wound complications within our institution: clinicians now assess patients for increased risk of leg wound complications preoperatively and opt to close wounds with staples for patients who have diabetes. PMID:24075335

  13. Topical autologous serum promotes enucleation wound healing in retinoblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Madeline K; Yam, Jason C S; Yu, Christopher B O; Lau, Flora H S

    2015-08-01

    Two retinoblastoma patients underwent uneventful enucleations while undergoing perioperative chemotherapy. In both cases the postoperative course was complicated by poor conjunctival wound healing. Administration of topical autologous serum was associated with wound healing and conjunctivalization of these wounds. PMID:26210027

  14. Implementing evidence-based practice findings to decrease postoperative sternal wound infections following open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Haycock, Camille; Laser, Craig; Keuth, Jennifer; Montefour, Kerry; Wilson, Melissa; Austin, Kerry; Coulen, Charmaine; Boyle, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Sternal wound infections following open heart surgery are an infrequent occurrence but can have significant impact on patient morbidity, length of stay, and cost of care. The objective of this project initiative was to decrease the incidence of sternal wound infections by examining and changing current practice in the preoperative and postoperative management of patients undergoing open heart surgery. Following a literature review of interdisciplinary best practices, process teams were formed to evaluate our own patient cohort with documented infection. Five key areas were addressed: (1) preoperative skin preparation, (2) antibiotic prophylaxis, (3) blood glucose control, (4) wound care management, and (5) hand hygiene. A retrospective chart review of patients with documented sternal wound infections status post-mediastinal open heart surgery revealed that the average postoperative glucose was 201 mg/dL. An inquiry of practice variations determined the absence of a common provider and causative organism. A change model guided project initiatives and sustainability of new behaviors and practice. Each element of the project initiative had defined outcome measures. Staff nurses participated in peer education and outcome data collection. Following the implementation of evidence based practice changes, a linear decrease in sternal wound infections was documented. Nurses play a critical role in identifying, orchestrating, and evaluating change efforts in clinical practice. Outcomes are enhanced when nurses collaborate with all stakeholders in the practice improvement initiative. PMID:16141774

  15. Postoperative Morbidity by Procedure and Patient Factors Influencing Major Complications Within 30 Days Following Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Edward; Iannuzzi, James C.; Thorsness, Robert; Noyes, Katia; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little data are available to prioritize quality improvement initiatives in shoulder surgery. Purpose: To stratify the risk for 30-day postoperative morbidity in commonly performed surgical procedures about the shoulder completed in a hospital setting and to determine patient factors associated with major complications. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This retrospective study utilized the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from the years 2005 to 2010. Using Current Procedural Terminology codes, the database was queried for shoulder cases that were divided into 7 groups: arthroscopy without repair; arthroscopy with repair; arthroplasty; clavicle/acromioclavicular joint (AC) open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF)/repair; ORIF of proximal humeral fracture; open tendon release/repair; and open shoulder stabilization. The primary end point was any major complication, with secondary end points of incisional infection, return to the operating room, and venothromboembolism (VTE), all within 30 days of surgery. Results: Overall, 11,086 cases were analyzed. The overall major complication rate was 2.1% (n = 234). Factors associated with major complications on multivariate analysis included: procedure performed (P < .001), emergency case (P < .001), pulmonary comorbidity (P < .001), preoperative blood transfusion (P = .033), transfer from an outside institution (P = .03), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .006), wound class (P < .001), dependent functional status (P = .027), and age older than 60 years (P = .01). After risk adjustment, open shoulder stabilization was associated with the greatest risk of major complications relative to arthroscopy without repair (odds ratio [OR], 5.56; P = .001), followed by ORIF of proximal humerus fracture (OR, 4.90; P < .001) and arthroplasty (OR, 4.40; P < .001). These 3 groups generated over 60% of all major complications. Open shoulder stabilization had the highest odds of reoperation (OR, 8.34; P < .001), while ORIF of proximal humerus fracture had the highest risk for VTE (OR, 6.47; P = .001) compared with the reference group of arthroscopy without repair. Conclusion: Multivariable analysis of the NSQIP database suggests that open shoulder stabilization, ORIF for proximal humerus fractures, and shoulder arthroplasty are associated with the highest risk of major complications within 30 days after shoulder surgery in a hospital setting. Age, functional status, ASA score, pulmonary comorbidity, emergency case, preoperative blood transfusion, and transfer from an outside institution are patient variables that significantly influence complication risk. PMID:26535274

  16. Open-label clinical trial comparing the clinical and economic effectiveness of using a polyurethane film surgical dressing with gauze surgical dressings in the care of post-operative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Ana Abejón; Casanova, Pabló López; Soriano, José Verdú; Torra I Bou, Joan-Enric

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common postoperative complication and can cause avoidable morbidity and excessive costs for the health service. Novel dressings, designed specifically for postoperative wounds, can help to reduce the risk of SSI and other complications such as blistering. This study compared the use of a new polyurethane film surgical dressing (Opsite Post-Op Visible, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) with gauze and tape in the management of postoperative wounds. The results show that the polyurethane film dressing results in a significant reduction in SSI (1·4% versus 6·6%, P = 0·006) as well as a reduction in other postoperative wound complications (e.g. blistering and erythema). Economic analysis conducted alongside the study suggests that these improved outcomes can be achieved at a lower treatment cost than gauze and tape dressings. The modest incremental cost of the polyurethane film surgical dressing is easily offset by the reduction in the costs related to treating SSI and other wound complications associated with gauze and tape dressings. PMID:23742125

  17. Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Esther, Robert J.; Erfanian, Kamil; Green, Rebecca; Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell; Tepper, Joel E.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

  18. Postoperative Complications of Thyroid Cancer in a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sang; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Chung, Woong Youn; Park, Cheong Soo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the complications following surgical treatment of thyroid cancer and the association between the extent of surgery and complication rates. A total of 2,636 patients who underwent surgery due to thyroid cancer were retrospectively reviewed to identify surgical complications. Complication rates were assessed according to the extent of surgery, which was classified as follows; less-than-total thyroidectomy with central compartment node dissection (CCND) (Group I, n=636), total thyroidectomy with CCND (Group II, n=1,390), total thyroidectomy plus ipsilateral neck dissection (Group III, n=513), and total thyroidectomy plus bilateral neck dissection (Group IV, n=97). The most common surgical complication was symptomatic hypoparathyroidism, of which 28.4% of cases were transient and 0.3% permanent. The other surgical complications included vocal cord palsy (0.7% transient, and 0.2% permanent), hematoma (0.5%), seroma (4.7%), chyle fistula (1.8%), and Horner's syndrome (0.2%). The complication rates increased significantly with increasing the extent of surgery from Group I to Group IV. The more extensive surgery makes more complications, such as hypoparathyroidism, seroma, and others. PMID:20357995

  19. Correlation of fluid balance and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xuezhong; Wang, Haijun; Qu, Shining; Huang, Chulin; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Sun, Kelin

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between fluid balance and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer in a high volume cancer center. Methods Data of patients who admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) after esophagectomy at Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) between September 2008 and October 2010 were retrospectively collected and reviewed. Results There were 85 males and 15 females. Among them, 39 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications and hospital death was observed in 3 patients (3.0%). Univariable analysis showed that patients who developed postoperative pulmonary complications had more cumulative fluid balance in day 1 to 2 (2,669±1,315 vs. 3,815±1,353 mL, P<0.001; and 4,307±1,627 vs. 5,397±2,040 mL, P=0.014, respectively) compared with patients who did not have postoperative pulmonary complications. Multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that only more cumulative fluid balance in day 1 (P=0.008; OR =1.001; 95% CI, 1.000-1.002) was independent risk factor for postoperative pulmonary complications. Conclusions Positive fluid balance in postoperative day 1 is predictive of pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer. PMID:26716037

  20. Isolated sacral injuries: Postoperative length of stay, complications, and readmission

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Shi, Hanyuan; Thakore, Rachel V; Lee, Young M; Joyce, David; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate inpatient length of stay (LOS), complication rates, and readmission rates for sacral fracture patients based on operative approach. METHODS: All patients who presented to a large tertiary care center with isolated sacral fractures in an 11-year period were included in a retrospective chart review. Operative approach (open reduction internal fixation vs percutaneous) was noted, as well as age, gender, race, and American Society of Anesthesiologists’ score. Complications included infection, nonunion and malunion, deep venous thrombosis, and hardware problems; 90-d readmissions were broken down into infection, surgical revision of the sacral fracture, and medical complications. LOS was collected for the initial admission and readmission visits if applicable. Fisher’s exact and non-parametric t-tests (Mann-Whitney U tests) were employed to compare LOS, complications, and readmissions between open and percutaneous approaches. RESULTS: Ninety-four patients with isolated sacral fractures were identified: 31 (30.4%) who underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) vs 63 (67.0%) who underwent percutaneous fixation. There was a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach: 9.1 d for ORIF patients vs 6.1 d for percutaneous patients (P = 0.043), amounting to a difference in cost of $13590. Ten patients in the study developed complications, with no significant difference in complication rates or reasons for complications between the two groups (19.4% for ORIF patients vs 6.3% for percutaneous patients). Eight patients were readmitted, with no significant difference in readmission rates or reasons for readmission between the two groups (9.5% percutaneous vs 6.5% ORIF). CONCLUSION: There is a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach for sacral fracture patients. Given similar complications and readmission rates, we recommend a percutaneous approach. PMID:26396939

  1. Randomized Clinical Trial for Early Postoperative Complications of Ex-PRESS Implantation versus Trabeculectomy: Complications Postoperatively of Ex-PRESS versus Trabeculectomy Study (CPETS).

    PubMed

    Arimura, Shogo; Takihara, Yuji; Miyake, Seiji; Iwasaki, Kentaro; Gozawa, Makoto; Matsumura, Takehiro; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We compared early postoperative complications between trabeculectomy and Ex-PRESS implantation. Enrolled patients with 39 primary open-angle or 25 exfoliative glaucoma were randomly assigned to receive trabeculectomy (trabeculectomy group) or Ex-PRESS implantation (Ex-PRESS group). Primary outcomes were early postoperative complications, including postoperative anterior chamber inflammation, frequencies of hyphema, flat anterior chamber, choroidal detachment, hypotonic maculopathy, and the change of visual acuity. The postoperative flare values in trabeculectomy group were higher than those in the Ex-PRESS group (overall, P = 0.004; and 10 days, P = 0.02). Hyphema occurred significantly more frequently in the trabeculectomy group (P = 0.0025). There were no significant differences of the other primary outcomes between the two groups. Additionally, duration of anterior chamber opening was significantly shorter in the Ex-PRESS group (P = 0.0002) and the eyes that had iris contact with Ex-PRESS tube had significantly shallower anterior chambers than did the eyes without the iris contact (P = 0.013). The Ex-PRESS implantation prevented early postoperative inflammation and hyphema in the anterior chamber and shortened the duration of anterior chamber opening. Iris contact with the Ex-PRESS tube occurred more frequently in eyes with open-angle glaucoma and shallow anterior chambers. PMID:27184606

  2. Colorectal resection in deep pelvic endometriosis: Surgical technique and post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Marco; Vignali, Andrea; Milone, Francesco; Pignata, Giusto; Elmore, Ugo; Musella, Mario; De Placido, Giuseppe; Mollo, Antonio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Coretti, Guido; Bracale, Umberto; Rosati, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of different surgical techniques on post-operative complications after colorectal resection for endometriosis. METHODS: A multicenter case-controlled study using the prospectively collected data of 90 women (22 with and 68 without post-operative complications) who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for endometriosis was designed to evaluate any risk factors of post-operative complications. The prospectively collected data included: gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists risk class, endometriosis localization (from anal verge), operative time, conversion, intraoperative complications, and post-operative surgical complications such as anastomotic dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and bowel dysfunction. RESULTS: A similar number of complicated cases have been registered for the different surgical techniques evaluated (laparoscopy, single access, flexure mobilization, mesenteric artery ligation, and transvaginal specimen extraction). A multivariate regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical, demographic, and surgical characteristics, complicated cases were only associated with endometriosis localization from the anal verge (OR = 0.8, 95%CI: 0.74-0.98, P = 0.03). After analyzing the association of post-operative complications and each different surgical technique, we found that only bowel dysfunction after surgery was associated with mesenteric artery ligation (11 out of 44 dysfunctions in the mesenteric artery ligation group vs 2 out of 36 cases in the no mesenteric artery ligation group; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Although further randomized clinical trials are needed to give a definitive conclusion, laparoscopic colorectal resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis appears to be both feasible and safe. Surgical technique cannot be considered a risk factor of post-operative complications. PMID:26715819

  3. Effect of Pre-Designed Instructions for Mothers of Children with Hypospadias on Reducing Postoperative Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Sanaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital anomaly with a prevalence estimated to be as high as 1 in 125 live male births. Complications after surgical procedures are possible. The incidence of complications can be reduced by meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. So the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of…

  4. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  5. Neoadjuvant Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: Systematic Review of Postoperative Morbidity, Mortality, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Li, Jinluan; Lin, Chi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to assess whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) result in differential postoperative morbidity and mortality as compared with pancreatic tumor resection surgery alone. Using PRISMA guidelines and the PubMed search engine, we reviewed all prospective phase II trials of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and CRT for pancreatic cancer that examined postoperative morbidities and mortalities. A total of 30 articles were identified, collated, and analyzed. Risks of postoperative complications vary based on trial. With surgery alone, the most common postoperative complications included delayed gastric emptying (DGE) (17% to 24%), pancreatic fistula (10% to 20%), anastomotic leaks (0% to 15%), postoperative bleeding (2% to 13%), and infections/sepsis (17% to 20%). With surgery alone, the mortality was <5%. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy showed comparable fistula rates (3% to 4%), leaks (3% to 11%), infection (3% to 7%), with mortality 0% to 4% in all but 1 study. CRT for resectable/borderline resectable patients also showed comparable complication rates: DGE (6% to 15%), fistulas (2% to 3%), leaks (3% to 7%), bleeding/hemorrhage (2% to 13%), infections/sepsis (3% to 19%), with 9/13 studies showing a mortality of ≤4%. As compared with initially borderline/resectable tumors, CRT for initially unresectable tumors (despite less data) showed higher complication rates: DGE (13% to 33%), fistulas (3% to 25%), infections/sepsis (3% to 16%). However, the confounding factor of the potentially higher tumor burden as an associative agent remains. The only parameters slightly higher than historical surgery-only complication rates were leaks and bleeding/hemorrhage (13% to 20%). Mortality rates in these patients were consistently 0%, with 2 outliers. Hence, neoadjuvant chemotherapy/CRT is safe from a postoperative complication standpoint, without significant increases in complication rates compared with surgery alone. Resectable and borderline resectable patients have fewer complications as compared with unresectable patients, although data for the latter are lacking. PMID:26950464

  6. Tissue Responses to Postoperative Laser Therapy in Diabetic Rats Submitted to Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    de Loura Santana, Cristiano; de Fátima Teixeira Silva, Daniela; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; Souza, Amanda Pires; Gomes, Mariana Teixeira; de Azevedo Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi; Shibuya, Josiane Ferraretto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study about low-level laser therapy biomodulation on a full-thickness burn model we showed that single and fractionated dose regimens increased wound healing and leukocyte influx similarly when compared with untreated control. In order to verify if this finding would be similar in an impaired wound model, we investigated the effect of single and multiple irradiations on wound closure rate, type of inflammatory infiltrate, myofibroblasts, collagen deposition, and optical retardation of collagen in diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats in the same estrous cycle had diabetes induced with streptozotocin and an 8-mm excisional wound performed with a punch. The experimental groups were: control group – untreated ulcer; single-dose group – ulcer submitted to single dose of diode laser therapy (λ = 660 ± 2 nm; P = 30 mW; energy density: 4 J/cm2) and fractionated-dose group – ulcer submitted to 1 J/cm2 laser therapy on Days 1, 3, 8, and 10. The ulcers were photographed on the experimental days and after euthanasia tissue samples were routinely processed for histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Independently of the energy density, laser therapy accelerated wound closure by approximately 40% in the first three days in comparison to the control group. Laser therapy increased acute inflammatory infiltrate until Day 3. Both laser groups exhibited more myofibroblasts and better collagen organization than the control group. The findings demonstrate that low-level laser therapy in the immediate postoperative period can enhance the tissue repair process in a diabetes model. Similar effects were achieved with laser therapy applied a single time with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 and applied four times with an energy density of 1 J/cm2. The application of laser therapy in the inflammatory phase was the most important factor to the enhancement of the tissue repair process. PMID:25909480

  7. [Postoperative complications of Bartholin's duct abscess. About two cases].

    PubMed

    Chêne, G; Tardieu, A-S; Nohuz, E; Rabischong, B; Favard, A; Mage, G

    2006-01-01

    Bartholinitis is the most common infectious vulvar disease and develops in approximately 2% of all women. The choice concerning treatment may be uneasy between medical or surgical modalities, and we have to be cautious because of the risk of severe complications associated with the procedure. We report two cases: one case of sepsis and the other one of bacterial cellulitis after Bartholin's duct abscess marsupialization. In the light of epidemiological and bacteriological date referring to Bartholinitis, we recommend a safe and effective management (particularly the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics) that we will describe. PMID:16777462

  8. Perioperative strategies to reduce postoperative complications after radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J; Smaldone, Marc C

    2015-05-01

    Radical cystectomy with creation of urinary diversion is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Despite advances in perioperative care, radical cystectomy is associated with significant morbidity. Reduction in perioperative morbidity and mortality remains a primary focus of bladder cancer outcome improvement. A number of evidence-based approaches to perioperative care have been proposed to reduce the overall burden of complications associated with radical cystectomy. Herein, we highlight and review recent and evolving evidence-based strategies to minimize the morbidity associated with surgical management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:25773348

  9. [The ways of reduction of early postoperative complications and the recurrences in complex rectal fistulas].

    PubMed

    Amirov, T J; Rustam, A M; Gamzaev, S M

    2013-09-01

    The results of treatment of 84 patients, suffering complex rectal fistulas, with the magnet-laser therapy application in early postoperative period were analyzed. The reduction of the early postoperative complications rate--by 12.5%, of the patients stationary stay--by (3.9 +/- 0.4) days, of the rehabilitation period--in 1.5 times, of the labor capacity restoration--by (7.2 +/- 1.3) days there were noted. PMID:24501927

  10. Multiple complications and short length of stay are associated with postoperative readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Kohlnhofer, Brittney M.; Tevis, Sarah E.; Weber, Sharon M.; Kennedy, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to characterize patients readmitted following inpatient general surgery procedures. We hypothesized that a decreased length of stay would increase risk for readmission. METHODS We utilized our institutional National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database from 2006 to 2011. The main outcome of interest was 30-day readmission. Univariate and logistic regression analyses identified risk factors for readmission. RESULTS We identified 3,556 patients, with 322 (9%) readmitted within 30 days after discharge. Multivariable analysis demonstrated age, dyspnea, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class to be independent risk factors for readmission. In addition, patients who suffered multiple complications had a decreased risk for readmission as length of stay increased. Patients with <2 postoperative complications had an increased risk for readmission as length of stay increased. CONCLUSIONS Contributors to postoperative readmissions are multifactorial. Perioperative factors predict risk for readmission and may help determine a target length of stay. Prevention of postoperative complications may reduce readmission rates. PMID:24524860

  11. Impact of postoperative complications on clinical and economic consequences in pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jon, Bohumil; Čermáková, Eva; Šubrt, Zdeněk; Ferko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients who develop complications consume a disproportionately large share of available resources in surgery; therefore the attention of healthcare funders focuses on the economic impact of complications. The main objective of this work was to assess the clinical and economic impact of postoperative complications in pancreatic surgery, and furthermore to assess risk factors for increased costs. Methods In all, 161 consecutive patients underwent pancreatic resection. The costs of the treatment were determined and analyzed. Results The overall morbidity rate was 53.4%, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 3.7%. The median of costs for all patients without complication was 3,963 Euro, whereas the median of costs for patients with at least one complication was significantly increased at 10,670 Euro (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis American Society of Anesthesiologists ≥ 3 (P = 0.006), multivisceral resection (P < 0.001) and any complication (P < 0.001) were independently associated with increased costs. Conclusion Postoperative complications are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs. The treatment costs increase with the severity of the postoperative complications. Those factors that are known to increase the treatment costs in pancreatic resection should be considered when planning patients for surgery. PMID:26793689

  12. Role of wound instillation with bupivacaine through surgical drains for postoperative analgesia in modified radical mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jonnavithula, Nirmala; Khandelia, Harsh; Durga, Padmaja; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM) is the commonly used surgical procedure for operable breast cancer, which involves extensive tissue dissection. Therefore, wound instillation with local anaesthetic may provide better postoperative analgesia than infiltration along the line of incision. We hypothesised that instillation of bupivacaine through chest and axillary drains into the wound may provide postoperative analgesia. Methods: In this prospective randomised controlled study 60 patients aged 45–60 years were divided into three groups. All patients were administered general anaesthesia. At the end of the surgical procedure, axillary and chest wall drains were placed before closure. Group C was the control with no instillation; Group S received 40 ml normal saline, 20 ml through each drain; and Group B received 40 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and the drains were clamped for 10 min. After extubation, pain score for both static and dynamic pain was evaluated using visual analog scale and then 4th hourly till 24 h. Rescue analgesia was injection tramadol, if the pain score exceeds 4. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13. Results: There was a significant difference in the cumulative analgesic requirement and the number of analgesic demands between the groups (P: 0.000). The mean duration of analgesia in the bupivacaine group was 14.6 h, 10.3 in the saline group and 4.3 h in the control group. Conclusion: Wound instillation with local anaesthetics is a simple and effective means of providing good analgesia without any major side-effects. PMID:25684808

  13. [Laparoscopic gastric bypass: computed tomography appearance of common postoperative changes and complications].

    PubMed

    Caracela Zeballos, C R; Diéguez Tapias, S; Cereceda Pérez, C N; Pinto Varela, J M

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y bypass is being increasingly used for weight reduction in patients with morbid obesity. Unfortunately, some complications can occur after this procedure, the most frequent being intestinal obstruction (due to stenosis of the anastomosis at the distal end of the loop, internal hernias, bands, and adhesions), anastomotic leaks, and bleeding. This article provides basic knowledge about the surgical technique and its correlation with the common postoperative changes with the aim of facilitating the interpretation of CT findings and the identification of postoperative complications in these patients. PMID:24508056

  14. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Heon

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  15. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  16. Postoperative Respiratory Complications of Laryngeal Mask Airway and Tracheal Tube in Ear, Nose and Throat Operations

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Reza; Hassani, Valiollah; Movasaghi, Gholamreza; Alimian, Mahzad; Faiz, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Supraglottic devices could be used to reduce postoperative respiratory complications, but there are few studies focused on their use in more prolonged surgeries. Objectives: In this study, we compared postoperative respiratory complications in patients with prolonged ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeries, whose airways were controlled with tracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Materials and Methods: In a randomized control trial (RCT), 171 candidates of prolonged ENT surgeries were randomly assigned into two groups. In group one (n = 85) LMA and in group two (n = 86) endotracheal tube were used for airway control. The incidences of four postoperative respiratory complications including sore throat, hoarseness, cough and shortness of breath in immediate postoperative period were measured and compared among patients of each group. Results: Sore throat was recorded in 32.9% of patients with LMA and 44.2% of intubated patients, but it was not statistically significant (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.158). Hoarseness was recorded in 3.5% of patients with LMA and 24.4% of intubated patients (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.000). In 1.2% of patients with LMA cough was recorded; it was also seen in 7% of the intubated patients (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.005). Shortness of breath was mentioned by two intubated patients (2.3%) and in patient with LMA we did not record this complication. Conclusions: LMA in prolonged ENT surgeries was associated with reduced respiratory complications. PMID:26473104

  17. Anti-Angiogenic Drugs: Involvement in Cutaneous Side Effects and Wound-Healing Complication

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The uses of anti-angiogenic drugs have not only made an impact on the battle to eliminate cancer but are also responsible for a number of medical complications. The long-term use of these drugs has increased the spectrum and incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the overall impact that these drugs have on patient care. Recent Advances: This review highlights the role of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in angiogenesis and wound healing and looks at how angiogenic inhibitors promote wound-healing complications. Critical Issues: With an increased use of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of various cancers and ocular diseases, there is an increased need for clinicians to define the risks and to optimize the usage of these drugs to reduce the incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. In addition, awareness is needed when treating patients on anti-angiogenic drugs so as not to exacerbate potential wound-healing complications when performing surgical procedures. Future Directions: Clinicians and surgeons will need to develop management guidelines to optimize patient care to reduce the risk of morbidity. When performing a surgical procedure, the impact of adverse effects from the use of anti-angiogenic drugs should be considered to ensure the welfare of the patient. In addition, the development of more specific inhibitors is necessary to reduce target effects to reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. PMID:25302138

  18. Anti-Angiogenic Drugs: Involvement in Cutaneous Side Effects and Wound-Healing Complication.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Significance: The uses of anti-angiogenic drugs have not only made an impact on the battle to eliminate cancer but are also responsible for a number of medical complications. The long-term use of these drugs has increased the spectrum and incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the overall impact that these drugs have on patient care. Recent Advances: This review highlights the role of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in angiogenesis and wound healing and looks at how angiogenic inhibitors promote wound-healing complications. Critical Issues: With an increased use of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of various cancers and ocular diseases, there is an increased need for clinicians to define the risks and to optimize the usage of these drugs to reduce the incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. In addition, awareness is needed when treating patients on anti-angiogenic drugs so as not to exacerbate potential wound-healing complications when performing surgical procedures. Future Directions: Clinicians and surgeons will need to develop management guidelines to optimize patient care to reduce the risk of morbidity. When performing a surgical procedure, the impact of adverse effects from the use of anti-angiogenic drugs should be considered to ensure the welfare of the patient. In addition, the development of more specific inhibitors is necessary to reduce target effects to reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. PMID:25302138

  19. The Impact of Postoperative Complications on Survivals After Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Booka, Eisuke; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Nishi, Tomohiko; Matsuda, Satoru; Kaburagi, Takuji; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Omori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the impact of postoperative complications after esophagectomy on long-term outcome. The treatment of esophageal cancer has recently been improved; however, esophagectomy with thoracotomy and laparotomy carries considerable postoperative morbidity and mortality. The real impact of postoperative complications on overall survival is still under evaluation. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy with thoracotomy and laparotomy, with R0 or R1 resection between January 1997 and December 2012. Of 402 patients, we analyzed the following parameters 284 patients who could be followed up for over 5 years: stage of disease, neoadjuvant therapies, surgical approaches, surgical complications, postoperative medical complications, and overall and relapse-free survivals using medical records. Of the 284 patients, 64 (22.5%) had pneumonia, 55 (19.4%) had anastomotic leakage, and 45 (15.8%) had recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP). Pneumonia had a significant negative impact on overall survival (P = 0.035); however, anastomotic leakage and RLNP did not affect overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of pneumonia was predictive of poorer overall survival; the multivariate hazard ratio was 1.456 (95% confidence interval 1.020–2.079, P = 0.039). Pneumonia has a negative impact on overall survival after esophagectomy. Strategies to prevent pneumonia after esophagectomy should improve outcomes in this operation. PMID:26287423

  20. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  1. The dynamic of nasogastric decompression after esophagectomy and its predictive value of postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Guo, Jie; You, Bin; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the regularity and the influence factors of nasogastric decompression volume after esophagectomy, and explore whether the volume of nasogastric decompression can be employed as a predictor for postoperative complications of esophageal carcinoma. Methods Consecutive 247 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy were retrospectively evaluated. The volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression was recorded and the regularity based on it was described. The single and multiple factors regression analysis were used to find out relative factors of the nasogastric decompression volume among the patients without postoperative complication. Gender, age, height, weight, tobacco or alcohol exposure, location of the tumor, histological type, pathological staging, operation time, surgical procedures, anastomotic position and gastric conduit reconstruction were considered as the independent variable. Then, verify the former regression models using the data of patients with postoperative complications. Results In trend analysis, the curve estimation revealed a quadratic trend in the relationship between nasogastric decompression volume and postoperative days (R2 =0.890, P=0.004). The volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression was described by daily drainage (mL) =82.215 + 69.620 × days − 6.604 × days2. The results of multiple linear stepwise regression analysis showed that gastric conduit reconstruction (β=0.410, P=0.000), smoking (β=−0.231, P=0.000), age (β=−0.193, P=0.001) and histological type of the tumor (β=−0.169, P=0.006) were significantly related to the volume of nasogastric decompression. The average drainage in 5 days after surgery =262.287 + 132.873 × X1 − 72.160 × X2 − 27.904 × X3 − 36.368 × X4 (X1, gastric conduit reconstruction; X2, smoking; X3, histological type; X4, age). The nasogastric decompression of the patients with delayed gastric emptying, and lung infection statistically differ from their predictive values respectively according to the former equation (P<0.01), but the data of anastomotic leakage cases had no significance difference (P=0.344). Conclusions It is found that the volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression presents a quadratic trend based on the days after esophagectomy. Gastric conduit reconstruction, smoking history, age and histological type were independent factors affecting on the volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression. Also, the volume of nasogastric decompression has validity and application value for predicting postoperative complications. PMID:26941977

  2. Wound Bioburden and Infection-Related Complications in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Sue E.; Frantz, Rita A.

    2013-01-01

    The identification and diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) infections remains a complex problem. Because inflammatory responses to microbial invasion may be diminished in persons with diabetes, clinical signs of infection are often absent in persons with DFUs when infection is limited to localized tissue. In the absence of these clinical signs, microbial load is believed to be the best indicator of infection. Some researchers, however, believe microbial load to be insignificant and type of organism growing in the ulcer to be most important. Previous studies on the microbiology of DFUs have not provided enough evidence to determine the microbiological parameters of importance. Infection-related complications of DFUs include wound deterioration, osteomyelitis, and amputation. Risk factors for amputation include age, peripheral vascular disease, low transcutaneous oxygen, smoking, and poor glycemic control. These risk factors are best measured directly with physiological measures of arterial perfusion, glycemic control, sensory neuropathy, plantar pressures, and activity level and by controlling off-loading. DFU bioburden has not been examined as a risk factor for infection-related complications. To address the relationship between wound bioburden and the development of infection-related complications in DFUs, tightly controlled prospective studies based on clearly defined, valid measures of wound bioburden and wound outcomes are needed. This article reviews the literature and proposes a model of hypothesized relationships between wound bioburden—including microbial load, microbial diversity, and pathogenicity of organisms—and the development of infection-related complications. PMID:18647759

  3. [Audiological analysis and peri-and postoperative complications in bone-anchored hearing aid surgery].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masatoki; Kitamura, Ken

    2011-07-01

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) has advantages over conventional hearing aids in sound quality and speech reception in silence, but requires surgery and may have peri-and postoperative complications. We evaluated audiological findings and complications in 12 subjects (13 ears)-8 men and 4 women aged 20-71--undergoing BAHA surgery from September 2001 to October 2005. Surgery was for single-sided deafness in one subject. Mean warble tone thresholds with BAHA were 29.9dB and 65.2dB without. Functional gains ranged from 16 to 52dB (mean: 35.3dB). Dural exposure or venous hemorrhage was seen in 4 ears, and mastoid cells opened and a skin flap was damaged in 1 ear each. No severe complications occurred perioperatively. Skin reactions categorized into grade 1 or more were recognized in nearly 70% of ears during the first postoperative year but most were a grade 1 reaction and skin reactions decreased with time. Skin overgrowth occurred in 1 ear immediately after an abutment separated accidentally from the fixture. All complications were treated in outpatient clinics. No fixture extrusion occurred. The decision to proceed with BAHA surgery thus required fully informed consent based on knowledge of peri-and postoperative complications. PMID:21838056

  4. Wounds of the distal limb complicated by involvement of deep structures.

    PubMed

    Jann, Henry; Pasquini, Chris

    2005-04-01

    The authors describe the clinically relevant structures of the distal limb and the current diagnostic and treatment modalities. Specific problems include tendon laceration, septic tenosynovitis, and sep-tic arthritis of the distal joints. A detailed description of tendon repair, tendon sheath lavage, and postoperative convalescent methodology is provided. This article makes available to the reader information necessary to appropriately diagnose and treat wounds of the distal equine limb involving deep structures. Information on the overall prognosis is also provided. PMID:15691605

  5. Neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in a wound of the postoperative maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in a wound of the postoperative maxillary sinus that was difficult to distinguish from a postoperative maxillary cyst. The patient was a 65-year-old Japanese woman who complained of left exophthalmos with cheek swelling and eye movement disorders. In past history, she had, 40 years previously undergone operation on the bilateral maxillary sinus by Caldwell-Luc's method. In a preoperative computed tomography, a mass occupied the left maxillary sinus showing irregular densities with destruction of the posterior bone walls and invasion into the left orbital. Both TI and T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed low intensities and unevenness in the mass. We performed a biopsy of the maxillary tumor according to Caldwell-Luc's method. Histological examination diagnosed neuroendocrine carcinoma. Radiation therapy (total 66Gy) resulted in partial response for this tumor. However, sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma has been identified as highly aggressive, with a high probability of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24765415

  6. Postoperative complications following TECA-LBO in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Rebecca E; Elkins, A Derrell; Moore, George E; Lantz, Gary C

    2013-01-01

    The medical records for 133 total ear canal ablations combined with lateral bulla osteotomies (TECA-LBOs) performed on 82 dogs (121 ears) and 11 cats (12 ears) between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed to determine if the duration of preoperative clinical signs was associated with the incidence of postoperative facial nerve injury and Horner's syndrome. Other perioperative complications, such as a head tilt, nystagmus, incisional drainage, draining tracts, hearing loss, as well as bacterial culture results, were noted. Postoperative facial nerve paresis occurred in 36 of 133 ears (27.1%), and paralysis occurred in 29 of 133 ears (21.8%), with no significant difference between species. Thus, postoperative facial nerve deficits occurred in 48.9% of ears. The median duration of clinically evident temporary facial nerve deficits was 2 wk for dogs and 4 wk for cats. Dogs had a significantly longer duration of preoperative clinical signs and were less likely than cats to have a mass in the ear canal. Dogs were less likely to have residual (> 1 yr) postoperative facial nerve deficits. The incidence of postoperative Horner's syndrome was significantly higher in cats than dogs. The duration of preoperative clinical signs of ear disease was not associated with postoperative facial nerve deficits. PMID:23535749

  7. Pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. Part 2: management of early-presenting complications.

    PubMed

    Bryce, G; Bomfim, D I; Bassi, G S

    2014-08-01

    Despite morbidity factors that include pain and complications with healing, there is currently little available guidance regarding optimal pre-and post-operative protocols for dental implant placement. While the first paper of this two-part series discussed the management of post-operative pain, the second instalment reviews pre- and post-operative means of managing early complications associated with dental implant placement. PMID:25146803

  8. The temporary use of allograft for complicated wounds in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Moerman, E; Middelkoop, E; Mackie, D; Groenevelt, F

    2002-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on the use of glycerol-preserved allografts (GPA) in the preparation of complicated wounds for secondary wound closure. All files from the plastic surgery department in the period 1992-1998 were screened. Thirty-three patients within a total 85 GPA treatments were selected and screened for indication of use of GPA, frequency of GPA changes, duration of treatment and whether or not subsequent autografting was possible. GPA was used as a biological cover for the following indications: problematic wound healing, 13 cases; non-healing burns, 12 cases; carcinoma, 4 cases; unstable scar, 2 cases; shortage of skin, 2 cases. The average frequency of GPA application was 2.6 times, with a mean duration of 5 days per application. In 84 cases (32 patients) the wound was successfully covered with autograft. In conclusion, GPA was used with good results as a temporary cover for complicated wounds. We postulate that angiogenic effects of this biological dressing may have contributed to the improved healing conditions and successful secondary wound closure. PMID:12237058

  9. Five days of postoperative antimicrobial therapy decreases infectious complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients at risk for bile contamination

    PubMed Central

    Sourrouille, Isabelle; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Lacave, Guillaume; Bert, François; Dokmak, Safi; Belghiti, Jacques; Paugam-Burtz, Catherine; Sauvanet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    ObjectivesPancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is associated with high morbidity, in part as a result of infectious complications increased by preoperative bile contamination. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect on the incidence of infectious complications of short-term antimicrobial therapy (AMT) in high-risk patients. MethodsPatients with a high risk for positive intraoperative bile culture (i.e. those with ampulloma or pancreatic adenocarcinoma with preoperative endoscopic procedures) (high-risk group, n = 99) were compared with low-risk patients (i.e. those with pancreatic adenocarcinoma without preoperative endoscopic procedures) (low-risk group, n = 76). The high-risk group received a 5-day course of perioperative AMT secondarily adapted to the bile antibiogram. The low-risk group received only the usual antimicrobial prophylaxis. ResultsPositive bile cultures were significantly more frequent in high-risk patients (81% versus 12%; P < 0.001). The overall rate of infectious complications was lower in the high-risk group (29% versus 46%; P = 0.018). The statistically significant decrease in the rate of infectious complications reflected reduced rates of urinary tract infections, pulmonary infections and septicaemia. Rates of wound infection (3% versus 5%; P = 0.639) and intra-abdominal abscess (7% versus 7%; P = 0.886) were similar in the high- and low-risk groups, as was the need for curative AMT. ConclusionsThis exploratory study suggests that a postoperative short course of AMT in patients at high risk for biliary contamination reduces the overall rate of infectious complications after PD. The adaptation of perioperative antimicrobial policy to the patient's risk for bile contamination seems promising and should be further evaluated. PMID:23458261

  10. Transversus abdominis plane block versus local anaesthetic wound infiltration for postoperative analgesia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingduo; Li, Rui; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Yali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and local anaesthetic wound infiltration can provide effective pain relief at the wound site after surgery. However, the relative efficacy of two techniques for postoperative analgesia remains controversial. Methods: We searched PUBMED, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TAP block with wound infiltration for pain relief after surgery. The primary outcomes were pain scores at rest and on movement at 1, 8 and 24 hours postoperatively and cumulative morphine consumption over 24 hours. The secondary outcomes were time to first rescue analgesic, number of rescue analgesic use and opioids-related side-effects. Results: Nine RCTs with a total of 500 participants were included. TAP block was associated with significant lower rest and dynamic pain scores at 8 hour [MD = -1.08, 95% CI (-1.89-0.26), P = 0.009] and 24 hour [MD = -0.83, 95% CI (-1.60, -0.06), P = 0.03] postoperatively than wound infiltration, but no significant difference was found at 1 hour [MD = -0.94, 95% CI (-1.97, 0.09), P = 0.08] postoperatively. In adults, TAP block significantly reduced 24-hour overall morphine consumption by 3.85 mg [MD = -3.85, 95% CI (-7.47, -0.22), P = 0.04] compared with wound infiltration. Subgroup analysis showed that adults received TAP block appeared to have lower rest pain scores at 24 hour than children (P = 0.008). Conclusion: TAP block provides superior analgesia compared with wound infiltration in the setting of a multimodal analgesic regimen. Subgroup analysis indicated that adults may have benefits additional to the analgesic effect than children. PMID:26770326

  11. Invasive aspergillosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complication

    PubMed Central

    Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Silva-Júnior, Heraldo Maia; de Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Milan, Eveline Pípolo; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus is a ubiquitous fungus which can cause a variety of clinical syndromes. This fungus has emerged as agent of systemic infections and has therefore gained considerable public health importance. This paper describes two cases of invasive aspergillosis caused by A. fumigatus in immuno-suppressed patients and underscores the importance of early identification of Aspergillus infection associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complications. PMID:24031340

  12. [The endotoxine aggression in the pathogenesis of postoperative complications in children with Hirsprung disease].

    PubMed

    Poddubnyĭ, I V; Meshkov, M V; Maĭskiĭ, I A; Nakovkin, O N; Kravchuk, S V; Kozlov, M Iu; Iakovlev, M Iu

    2013-01-01

    Signs of disseminated intravascular clotting (DIC), which were considered the laboratory sign of the subcompensated endotoxine aggression, were detected in 20 children with the Hirsprung disease, aged 3 months - 11 years. Under the influence of the operation stress the subcompensated DIC transformed to the acute decompensated reaction, which led to early complications, such as anastomosistis with tendency to the insufficiency or stenosis, enterocolitis, etc. The study revealed not only the straight connection between the postoperative complications and endotoxine aggression, but the necessity of preoperative preparation, directed on the decrease of the intestinal endotoxin level and normalization of antiendotoxin immunity. PMID:24362294

  13. The Preoperative CT-Scan Can Help to Predict Postoperative Complications after Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Femke F.; de Graaff, Feike; Bouman, Donald E.; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Slump, Kees H.; Klaase, Joost M.

    2015-01-01

    After pancreatoduodenectomy, complication rates are up to 40%. To predict the risk of developing postoperative pancreatic fistula or severe complications, various factors were evaluated. 110 consecutive patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy at our institute between January 2012 and September 2014 with complete CT scan were retrospectively identified. Pre-, per-, and postoperative patients and pathological information were gathered. The CT-scans were analysed for the diameter of the pancreatic duct, attenuation of the pancreas, and the visceral fat area. All data was statistically analysed for predicting POPF and severe complications by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The POPF rate was 18%. The VFA measured at umbilicus (OR 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00–1.02; P = 0.011) was an independent predictor for POPF. The severe complications rate was 33%. Independent predictors were BMI (OR 1.24; 95% CI = 1.10–1.42; P = 0.001), ASA class III (OR 17.10; 95% CI = 1.60–182.88; P = 0.019), and mean HU (OR 0.98; 95% CI = 0.96–1.00; P = 0.024). In conclusion, VFA measured at the umbilicus seems to be the best predictor for POPF. BMI, ASA III, and the mean HU of the pancreatic body are independent predictors for severe complications following PD. PMID:26605340

  14. Development and characterization of cefazolin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles composite gelatin nanofiber mats for postoperative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Rath, Goutam; Hussain, Taqadus; Chauhan, Gaurav; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Systemic antibiotic therapy in post-operative wound care remain controversial leading to escalation in levels of multi-resistant bacteria with unwanted morbidity and mortality. Recently zinc (Zn) because of multiple biophysiological functions, gain considerable interest for wound care. Based on our current understanding, the present study was designed with an intent to produce improve therapeutic approaches for post-operative wound management using composite multi-functional antibiotic carrier. The study involved the fabrication, characterization and pre-clinical evaluation of cefazolin nanofiber mats loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) and comparing co-formulated mats with individual component, enable a side by side comparison of the benefits of our intervention. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug, ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) and drug-ZnONP mixture against Staphylococcus aureus was determined using micro dilution assay. The fabricated nanofibers were then evaluated for in-vitro antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of inhibition was predicted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further these nanofiber mats were evaluated in-vivo for wound healing efficacy in Wistar rats. Study revealed that the average diameter of the nanofibers is around 200-900 nm with high entrapment efficiency and display sustained drug release behavior. The combination of ZnO and cefazolin in 1:1 weight ratio showed higher anti-bacterial activity of 1.9 ± 0.2 μg/ml. Transmission electron microscopy of bacterial cells taken from the zone of inhibition revealed the phenomenon of cell lysis in tested combination related to cell wall disruption. Further composite medicated nanofiber mats showed an accelerated wound healing as compared to plain cefazolin and ZnONP loaded mats. Macroscopical and histological evaluations demonstrated that ZnONP hybrid cefazolin nanofiber showed enhanced cell adhesion, epithelial migration, leading to faster and more efficient collagen synthesis. Hence the fabricated composite nanofiber mats have the potential to be used as a postoperative antimicrobial wound dressings. PMID:26478308

  15. The Effect of Modified TURP (M-TURP) in Intra and Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Ketabchi, Ali Asghar; Ketabchi, Mahsa; Barkam, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is the most common surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Objectives The aim of the present study was to compare the conventional bipolar transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) with a modified transurethral resection of the prostate (M-TURP) in men with mild to moderate symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Patients and Methods To compare and evaluate the clinical outcomes of M-TURP, a new electrosurgical suggested method, with the standard treatment, transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), 200 patients with benign prostatic enlargement causing moderate to severe clinical lower urinary symptoms were selected and divided into two equal groups of A and B. Patients of group A underwent M-TURP (incomplete bladder neck resection), resecting only from 1 to 11 O'clock position and group B underwent conventional TURP. These patients were evaluated between Jun 2008 and April 2011, after excluding 24 patients, finally 176 men were studied, 98 in the conventional monopolar transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) group and 78 in the (M-TURP) group. Postoperative follow up to assess the results of the surgeries and the complication rates, began from the operation and continued with postoperative visits of the patient at 24 hour after the catheter remove, two weeks, three months and finally six months. Results The age range of both groups were the same (65-82 years old), preoperative IPSS score in study and control groups were 18 ± 3.3, 17 ± 4.6 (nonsignificant P value = ns) respectively. The size of prostate gland was 58 ± 3.5 g in study and 78 ± 1.2 g in control (ns) preoperatively. Intra and postoperative complications including hematuria (need for transfusion), urine retention (need for catheterization), fever after operation in study and control groups were 2.04%, 6.41%, 1.02% and 0.0%, 3.06%, 6.41% respectively. ISI score (stress incontinence score index) were 7 ± 2.5 and 19 ± 3.6 and UR (urge ratio) were %26 and %70 for study and control groups respectively; P < 0.05. IIEF (international index of erectile function) in study group was better than control (23 ± 3.2 vs. 11 ± 1.7), P < 0.05. Conclusions The results of this study showed that the support of anterior fibro muscular zone (anterior lobe) of prostate after TUR-P has a significant role in postoperative complications, especially in postoperative stress incontinence. So, we strongly recommend to preserve this segment of prostate for prevention of incontinence and other intra and postoperative complications. PMID:23841040

  16. Intra- and postoperative complications in 137 cases of giant thyroid gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    DU, WEI; LIU, SHAN-TING; LI, PENG; SUN, LI-YAN; ZHAO, MING; QI, JIN-XING; LUO, RUI-HUA; FENG, LU; DAI, LI-YUAN; CUI, MENG; SUN, CHANG-FU; LIU, FA-YU

    2012-01-01

    The intra- and postoperative complications resulting from surgery for giant thyroid gland tumors (diameter greater than 10 cm) present serious challenges to patient recovery. Although there are a number of methods, all have limitations. In this study, we present our experience with several complications of surgical treatment of giant thyroid gland tumors to increase the awareness and aid the prevention of these complications. A total of 137 consecutive patients who underwent surgical treatment in Henan Tumor Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Statistics pertaining to the patients’ clinical factors were gathered. We found that the most common surgical complications were recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury and symptomatic hypoparathyroidism. Other complications included incision site infections, bleeding, infection and chyle fistula, the incidence of which increased significantly with increasing extent of surgery from group I (near-total thyroidectomy) to group V (total thyroidectomy plus lateral neck dissection). Low complication rates may be achieved with more accurate knowledge of the surgical anatomy, skilled surgical treatment and experience. More extensive surgery results in a greater number of complications. PMID:23162632

  17. Impact of advancing age on post-operative complications of deep brain stimulation surgery for essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Verla, Terence; Marky, Andrew; Farber, Harrison; Petraglia, Frank W.; Gallis, John; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Parente, Beth; Hickey, Patrick; Turner, Dennis A.; Lad, Shivanand P.

    2015-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) was the original indication for deep brain stimulation (DBS), with USA Food and Drug Administration approval since 1997. Despite the efficacy of DBS, it is associated with surgical complications that cause sub-optimal clinical outcomes. Given that ET is a progressive disease with increase in symptom severity with increasing age, this study evaluated the impact of increasing age on short-term complications following DBS surgery for ET. Thomson-Reuters MarketScan database was utilized (New York, NY, USA). Patients selected were over age 18 and underwent DBS for ET between the years 2000 and 2009. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to calculate complication odds ratios (OR) for a 5 year increase in age, after controlling for other covariates. Six hundred sixty-one patients were included in the analysis. The mean (standard deviation) age was 61.9 (14.3) years, with 17% of individuals aged ≥75 years. Overall 56.9% of patients were male, and 44.6% had a Charlson Comorbidity Score of ≥1. Additionally, 7.1% of patients experienced at least one complication within 90 days, including wound infections (3.0%), pneumonia (2.4%), hemorrhage or hematoma (1.5%), or pulmonary embolism (0.6%). Increasing age was not significantly associated with the overall 90 day complication rates (OR 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77–1.02; p = 0.102). The risk of the two most common procedure-related complications, hemorrhage and infection, did not significantly increase with age (hemorrhage: OR 1.02; 95%CI 0.77–1.37; p = 0.873; and infection: OR 0.88; 95%CI 0.72–1.07; p = 0.203). Our findings suggest that age should not be a primary exclusion factor for determining candidacy for DBS and also suggest a possible expansion of the traditional therapeutic window since postoperative complications remained relatively stable. PMID:25669119

  18. Effectiveness and safety of continuous wound infiltration for postoperative pain management after open gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xing; Feng, Xu; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively evaluate the effectiveness and safety of continuous wound infiltration (CWI) for pain management after open gastrectomy. METHODS: Seventy-five adult patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System (ASA) grade 1-3 undergoing open gastrectomy were randomized to three groups. Group 1 patients received CWI with 0.3% ropivacaine (group CWI). Group 2 patients received 0.5 mg/mL morphine intravenously by a patient-controlled analgesia pump (PCIA) (group PCIA). Group 3 patients received epidural analgesia (EA) with 0.12% ropivacaine and 20 µg/mL morphine with an infusion at 6-8 mL/h for 48 h (group EA). A standard general anesthetic technique was used for all three groups. Rescue analgesia (2 mg bolus of morphine, intravenous) was given when the visual analogue scale (VAS) score was ≥ 4. The outcomes measured over 48 h after the operation were VAS scores both at rest and during mobilization, total morphine consumption, relative side effects, and basic vital signs. Further results including time to extubation, recovery of bowel function, surgical wound healing, mean length of hospitalization after surgery, and the patient’s satisfaction were also recorded. RESULTS: All three groups had similar VAS scores during the first 48 h after surgery. Group CWI and group EA, compared with group PCIA, had lower morphine consumption (P < 0.001), less postoperative nausea and vomiting (1.20 ± 0.41 vs 1.96 ± 0.67, 1.32 ± 0.56 vs 1.96 ± 0.67, respectively, P < 0.001), earlier extubation (16.56 ± 5.24 min vs 19.76 ± 5.75 min, P < 0.05, 15.48 ± 4.59 min vs 19.76 ± 5.75 min, P < 0.01), and earlier recovery of bowel function (2.96 ± 1.17 d vs 3.60 ± 1.04 d, 2.80 ± 1.38 d vs 3.60 ± 1.04 d, respectively, P < 0.05). The mean length of hospitalization after surgery was reduced in groups CWI (8.20 ± 2.58 d vs 10.08 ± 3.15 d, P < 0.05) and EA (7.96 ± 2.30 d vs 10.08 ± 3.15 d, P < 0.01) compared with group PCIA. All three groups had similar patient satisfaction and wound healing, but group PCIA was prone to higher sedation scores when compared with groups CWI and EA, especially during the first 12 h after surgery. Group EA had a lower mean arterial pressure within the first postoperative 12 h compared with the other two groups. CONCLUSION: CWI with ropivacaine yields a satisfactory analgesic effect within the first 48 h after open gastrectomy, with lower morphine consumption and accelerated recovery. PMID:26855550

  19. Ruptured aneurysm of the infrarenal abdominal aorta: impact of age and postoperative complications on mortality.

    PubMed

    Alric, Pierre; Ryckwaert, Frédérique; Picot, Marie-Christine; Branchereau, Pascal; Colson, Pascal; Mary, Henri; Marty-Ané, Charles

    2003-05-01

    Between 1985 and 2000, a total of 871 patients underwent surgical treatment for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), including 98 (11.2%) presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA). An optimized operative protocol was used to treat 77 RAAA starting in January 1989. The main features of the optimized protocol are routine use of intraoperative autotransfusion, revascularization by aortoaortic bypass, absence of systemic heparinization, and use of a collagen-impregnated prosthesis. Intraoperative mortality (IOM) was 3.8%. Postoperative mortality at 1 month (POM1) was 25.9% and postoperative mortality at 3 months (POM3) was 33.7%. Heart failure (p <0.001), hemodynamic shock (p <0.001), and hemorrhage (p = 0.04) were the only complications correlated with POM1. Pneumonia (p = 0.01) and sepsis (p = 0.01) were the only complications correlated with POM3. Isolated acute renal insufficiency was not a significant risk factor for postoperative mortality. Using a cutoff of 75 years, there was a significant age-related difference (p = 0.025) for POM1 but not for IOM and POM3. The findings of this study show that optimizing the operative protocol decreases mortality related to RAAA. The main predictor of POM1 was hemodynamic status while the main predictor of POM3 was infection. Isolated acute renal insufficiency was not a risk factor for mortality. Age should not be considered a contraindication for operative treatment. PMID:12704541

  20. Postoperative pulmonary complication after neurosurgery: A case of unilateral lung collapse.

    PubMed

    Misra, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary complications, especially postoperative pulmonary complications, are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in neurosurgical patients. Hypoxemia due to mucus plug causing lung collapse is a rare event. We report a case of a 40-year-old female with right cerebellopontine angle space occupying lesion, scheduled for elective craniotomy and tumor excision. The patient underwent surgery uneventfully and was shifted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) for monitoring. Eight hours after extubation, she developed hypoxemia due to mucus plug resulting in left lung collapse. She was intubated, and mucus plug was aspirated through sterile endobronchial tube suction which resulted in reexpansion of the collapsed lung. The patient was managed with postural drainage, chest physiotherapy, and antibiotics and extubated after 24 h. This type of pulmonary complication may have a catastrophic course, especially in neurosurgical patients, if not diagnosed and managed in time. PMID:26957715

  1. [Pneumothorax and cardiac arrest as complications of postoperative nasopharyngeal administration of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Schou, J; Heppeler, F

    1992-04-01

    An unusual but life-threatening complication to nasopharyngeal oxygen administration is described. Following an unsuccessful attempt to advance nasogastric tube during anesthesia for cholecystectomy, the same nostril was used for an oxygen catheter at the end of operation. Within a few minutes after the oxygen supply had been opened following extubation, the patient developed submucous pharyngeal and mediastinal emphysema with subsequent bilateral pneumothorax and cardiac arrest. The patient was reintubated, received close-chest cardiac compressions for a brief period, and the pneumothoraces were drained. She recovered completely within a few hours and was extubated uneventfully the following day. With the increasing--and justified--use of oxygen postoperatively in and during transport to the recovery room, this complication is likely to occur more often. In this case, the anesthetist's previous experience of this complication and consequent rapid therapeutic intervention was probably responsible for the favorable outcome. PMID:1590576

  2. Postoperative pulmonary complication after neurosurgery: A case of unilateral lung collapse

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary complications, especially postoperative pulmonary complications, are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in neurosurgical patients. Hypoxemia due to mucus plug causing lung collapse is a rare event. We report a case of a 40-year-old female with right cerebellopontine angle space occupying lesion, scheduled for elective craniotomy and tumor excision. The patient underwent surgery uneventfully and was shifted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) for monitoring. Eight hours after extubation, she developed hypoxemia due to mucus plug resulting in left lung collapse. She was intubated, and mucus plug was aspirated through sterile endobronchial tube suction which resulted in reexpansion of the collapsed lung. The patient was managed with postural drainage, chest physiotherapy, and antibiotics and extubated after 24 h. This type of pulmonary complication may have a catastrophic course, especially in neurosurgical patients, if not diagnosed and managed in time. PMID:26957715

  3. A phase II trial of a surgical protocol to decrease the incidence of wound complications in obese gynecologic oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    Novetsky, Akiva P.; Zighelboim, Israel; Guntupalli, Saketh R.; Ioffe, Yevgeniya J.M.; Kizer, Nora T.; Hagemann, Andrea R.; Powell, Matthew A.; Thaker, Premal H.; Mutch, David G.; Massad, L. Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obese women have a high incidence of wound separation after gynecologic surgery. We explored the effect of a prospective care pathway on the incidence of wound complications. Methods Women with a body mass index (BMI)≥30kg/m2 undergoing a gynecologic procedure by a gynecologic oncologist via a vertical abdominal incision were eligible. The surgical protocol required: skin and subcutaneous tissues to be incised using a scalpel or cutting electrocautery, fascial closure using #1 polydioxanone suture, placement of a 7mm Jackson-Pratt drain below Camper’s fascia, closure of Camper’s fascia with 3-0 plain catgut suture and skin closure with staples. Wound complication was defined as the presence of either a wound infection or any separation. Demographic and perioperative data were analyzed using contingency tables. Univariable and multivariable regression models were used to identify predictors of wound complications. Patients were compared using a multivariable model to a historical group of obese patients to assess the efficacy of the care pathway. Results 105 women were enrolled with a median BMI of 38.1. Overall, 39 (37%) had a wound complication. Women with a BMI of 30–39.9 kg/m2 had a significantly lower risk of wound complication as compared to those with a BMI >40 kg/m2 (23% vs 59%, p<0.001). After controlling for factors associated with wound complications the prospective care pathway was associated with a significantly decreased wound complication rate in women with BMI<40kg/m2 (OR 0.40, 95% C.I.: 0.18–0.89). Conclusion This surgical protocol lead to a decreased rate of wound complications among women with BMI 30–39.9 kg/m2. PMID:24952366

  4. Wound complications after modified radical mastectomy compared with tylectomy with axillary lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Vinton, A L; Traverso, L W; Jolly, P C

    1991-05-01

    Tylectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and radiotherapy (TAD) has become an accepted treatment for early breast cancer and has been shown to result in equal 5- and 8-year survival when compared with modified radical mastectomy (MRM). In order to determine the safety of TAD with respect to wound complications and to identify potential risk factors, we reviewed the charts of 560 patients undergoing MRM (n = 387) and TAD (n = 173) at Virginia Mason Medical Center from 1983 through 1989. The incidence of infection, seroma, hematoma, and epidermolysis were compared, and obesity, age 60 years or older, smoking, antibiotics, and wound drainage were examined as possible risk factors. There were more wound complications in the MRM group versus the TAD group (49% versus 35%; p less than 0.01), specifically more seromas (29% versus 18%; p less than 0.01) and epidermolysis (18% versus 0%). In the MRM group, age 60 years or older was associated with seroma (p less than 0.01) and smoking was associated with epidermolysis (p less than 0.01). In the TAD group, obesity was associated with infection. In both groups, volume of drainage from closed suction wound drains greater than 30 mL in the 24 hours prior to removal of the last drain was associated with seroma (p less than 0.05). PMID:2031542

  5. [Quality assurance in surgery--more than documentation of postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, R T

    1996-01-01

    This review discusses several aspects of surgical quality assurance: 1. The surgical audit to collect data and analyze postoperative complications. 2. Quality assurance by measurement of patients' postoperative long-term outcome. 3. The elaboration of therapeutical guidelines. 4. Measurement of costs and benefit of the surgical intervention including patients' postoperative quality of life. 5. Quality assurance of clinical trials and medical publications. It is demonstrated that the regular documentation of postoperative complications and an internal data analysis improve the results, dependent on the quality of the data which is best guaranteed by a neutral observer. The late results after operation are mainly influenced by the quality of the surgeon, as prove recurrence rates after hernia repair ranging between 0 and 10% using identical operation techniques, or locoregional recurrences of 30-60% after abdominal perineal resection of the rectum. The elaboration of therapeutical guidelines may be helpful for the evaluation of the benefit of the intervention and for the prevention of unnecessary operations as has been demonstrated for the treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenoses. Qualified clinical studies performed according to the GCP rules with biometrical planning, clear cut definition of the purpose of the study and listing of inclusion and exclusion criteria are the prerequisites of substantiated therapeutical guidelines. Under increasing economic pressure not only the benefit, but also the costs of treatment are of major importance, the evaluation of the cost effectiveness ratio by measuring the cost per quality adjusted year of life saved will become essential for future therapeutical recommendations. PMID:8867341

  6. Does the use of carbon dioxide field flooding during heart valve surgery prevent postoperative cerebrovascular complications?

    PubMed

    Giordano, Salvatore; Biancari, Fausto

    2009-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is any benefit with the use of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) field flooding techniques in heart valve surgery, in order to reduce postoperative neurological complications. Altogether 202 articles were found using the reported search, and six of them were used to answer the clinical question. All but one trial, were prospective, randomised. Four studies reported a significantly lower intracardiac bubble count in the CO(2) group. A significant reduction of p300 peak latencies in the CO(2) group was observed in one study. Otherwise, neurocognitive test batteries did not reveal any advantages of CO(2) field flooding in two studies. Three studies reported on postoperative cerebrovascular complications and the overall rate of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) or prolonged reversible ischemic neurological deficit was 1.2% in the CO(2) group and 2.5% in the control group (P=ns). Although the use of CO(2) field flooding has been observed to be associated with a significantly lower count of intracardiac air bubbles, and improved survival in two small studies, so far there is no evidence of a sustained reduction of cerebrovascular complications with the use of this method. PMID:19447802

  7. The Impact of Postoperative Complications on Long-term Oncologic Outcomes After Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery has technical difficulties with a higher complication rate than colon cancer. However, few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are associated with oncologic outcomes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of postoperative complications on long-term oncologic outcomes after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer.Between January 2005 and December 2012, we evaluated 686 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic low anterior resection for stage I-III rectal cancer. Patients were divided into complication (n = 175) and noncomplication (n = 511) groups. The median follow-up period was 38 months (range, 2-118). We compared perioperative clinicopathologic outcomes, 5-year survival, and local recurrence between groups and evaluated prognostic factors.Five-year overall survival rates were 91.4% and 89.2% (P = 0.234) and 5-year disease-free survival rates were 83.2% and 77.7% (P = 0.002) in the noncomplication and complication groups for all stages, respectively. For stage I cancer, both the 5-year overall survival and the 5-year disease-free survival rate of the complication group were lower than the noncomplication group. Local recurrence rates were 3.1% and 7.8% in the noncomplication and complication groups, respectively (P = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, the presence of postoperative complications was a significant predictor of 5-year disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.65; P = 0.012).Postoperative complications had a negative impact on 5-year disease-free survival after laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. The rate of local recurrence in the complication group increased more than the noncomplication group. In particular, postoperative complications were associated with poorer oncologic outcomes for stage I cancer. Laparoscopic surgery is preferred for early-stage rectal cancer so careful attention should be paid to avoid postoperative complications. PMID:27057884

  8. Predictors of Inpatient Death and Complications among Postoperative Elderly Patients with Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Rachel; Mukherjee, Debraj; Chang, David C.; Purtell, Michael; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Risks of brain surgery in elderly patients with brain metastases are not well defined. This study was designed to quantify the postoperative risk for these patients after brain surgery for metastatic disease to the brain. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998–2005). Patients aged 65 years or older who underwent tumor resection of brain metastases were identified by ICD-9 coding. Primary outcome was inpatient death. Other outcomes included systemic postoperative complications, length of stay (LOS), and total charges. Results A total of 4,907 patients (53.6% men) were identified. Mean age was 72.1 years. Mean Charlson comorbidity score was 7.8. Inpatient mortality was 4%. The most common adverse events were pulmonary complications (3.4%). Mean length of stay was 9.2 days. Mean total charges were $57,596.39. In multivariate analysis, patients up to age 80 years had no significantly greater odds of inpatient death, relative to their 65- to 69-year-old counterparts. Each 1-point increase in Charlson score was associated with 12% increased odds of death, 0.52 days increased LOS, and $1,710.61 higher hospital charges. Postoperative pulmonary complications, stroke, or thromboembolic events increased LOS and total charges by up to 9.6 days and $57,664.42, respectively. These associations were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions Surgical resection of brain metastases among the elderly up to the ninth decade of life is feasible. Age older than 80 years and higher Charlson comorbidity scores were found to be important prognostic factors for inpatient outcome. Incorporating these factors into preoperative decision making may help to select appropriately those elderly candidates for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:20809176

  9. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  10. Postoperative Ascites of Unknown Origin following Laparoscopic Appendicectomy: An Unusual Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feretis, M.; Boyd-Carson, H.; Karim, A.

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative ascites is a very rare complication of laparoscopic surgery. Significant iatrogenic injuries to the bowel, the urinary tract, and the lymphatic system should be excluded promptly to avoid devastating results for the patient. In some cases, in spite of investigating patients extensively, no definitive causative factor for the accumulation of fluid can be identified. In such cases, idiopathic allergic or inflammatory reaction of the peritoneum may be responsible for the development of ascites. We present a case of ascites of an unknown origin in a young female patient following a laparoscopic appendicectomy. PMID:24822146

  11. Effect of body mass index on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shohab, Durre; Ayub, Ramsha; Alam, Muhammad Umar; Butt, Amna; Sheikh, Sanam; Assad, Salman; Akhter, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of body mass index (BMI) on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) by comparing three BMI groups. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of 129 patients who underwent PCNL from January 2010 to August 2013. All the patients underwent PCNL by a standard technique. The patients were divided into three groups: patients having a BMI ≤24 kg/m2 were included in the normal group, those having a BMI of 24.1–30.0 kg/m2 were included in the overweight group, and those having a BMI >30 kg/m2 were included in the obese group. Three groups were compared for operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement. Results A total of 129 patients including 44 females and 85 males were included with a mean age of 45.00±1.44 years. The mean age in the normal group was 43.29±1.69 years, 47.08±1.29 years in the overweight group, and 43.61±1.25 years in the obese group. The mean stone size in the normal group was 25.46±8.92 mm, 28.01±8.40 mm in the overweight group, and 26.84±7.41 mm in the obese group. Our results showed no statistically significant difference with respect to mean operative time, mean hospital stay, and stone clearance in the normal, obese, and overweight patients undergoing PCNL. Postoperative complications and analgesia requirement were also similar in all the three groups. Conclusion There was no effect of BMI on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing PCNL. PCNL is a safe and effective procedure for the removal of renal stones in obese patients. PMID:26623145

  12. Postoperative Complications After Prophylactic Thyroidectomy for Very Young Patients With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Kluijfhout, Wouter P.; van Beek, Dirk-Jan; Verrijn Stuart, Annemarie A.; Lodewijk, Lutske; Valk, Gerlof D.; van der Zee, David C.; Vriens, Menno R.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether younger age at surgery is associated with the increased incidence of postoperative complications after prophylactic thyroidectomy in pediatric patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2. The shift toward earlier thyroidectomy has resulted in significantly less medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC)-related morbidity and mortality. However, very young pediatric patients might have a higher morbidity rate compared with older patients. Hardly any literature exists on complications in the very young. A retrospective single-center analysis was performed on the outcomes of MEN2 patients undergoing a prophylactic total thyroidectomy at the age of 17 or younger. Forty-one MEN2A and 3 MEN2B patients with thyroidectomy after January 1993 and at least 6 months of follow-up were included, subdivided in 9 patients younger than 3 years, 15 patients 3 to 6 years, and 20 patients older than 6 years. Postoperative hypocalcemia and other complications were registered. Twelve (27%) patients developed transient hypocalcemia and 9 (20%) patients suffered from permanent hypocalcemia, with a nonsignificant trend toward higher incidence with decreasing age. Three (7%) patients had other complications, of whom 2 were younger than 3 years. For patients younger than 3 years, the average length of stay (LOS) was 6.7 days, versus 1.7 and 3.5 days, respectively, for the older patient groups (P < 0.05). Patients with complications had a longer LOS compared with patients without (5.0 vs 2.0, P < 0.01). None of the patients had clinical signs of recurrent MTC after a mean follow-up of 10.5 years. Prophylactic thyroidectomy in very young children is associated with a higher rate of complications, causing a significant increased LOS. Irrespective age of surgery, MTC did not recur in any patient. In planning optimal timing of surgery, clinicians should take the risk of complications into account. We advise not to perform total thyroidectomy before the age of 3 for patients defined high risk by the American Thyroid Association guideline. PMID:26200612

  13. Comparative analyses of postoperative complications and prognosis of different surgical procedures in stage II endometrial carcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongmei; Gui, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of surgical resection extent on the postoperative complications and the prognosis in patients with stage II endometrial cancer. Methods A total of 54 patients were retrospectively reviewed, 35 patients underwent subradical hysterectomy and 19 patients received radical hysterectomy, both with simultaneous bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy. Results Comparing the surgical outcomes in subradical hysterectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, there were no significant differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay. After surgery, 37.1% vs 36.8% patients received postoperative radiotherapy in the subradical hysterectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, without statistically significant difference. As for postoperative complications, the early postoperative complication rate in patients who underwent subradical hysterectomy was 14.3%, significantly lower than that in patients submitted to radical hysterectomy (14.3% vs 42.1%), with P=0.043. However, there was no significant difference in late postoperative complication rate between the two surgical procedures. Regarding the clinical prognosis, patients receiving the subradical hysterectomy showed similar survival to their counterparts undergoing the radical procedures. The relapse rate was 5.71% vs 5.26%, respectively, without significant difference. There were no deaths in both surgical groups. Conclusion For stage II endometrial carcinoma, subradical hysterectomy presented with less early postoperative complications and similar survival duration and recurrence compared with radical hysterectomy and should be advocated in clinical treatment. PMID:26937200

  14. Comparison of short-term postoperative complications of thyroidectomy using ligature and suture ligation

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Mohammad; Ayatollahi, Shaghayegh; Kargar, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroidectomy is one of the most common forms of operations in general surgery. Regarding the status and importance of thyroidectomy and protective measures for avoiding the surgical complications, we aimed at investigating the short-term postoperative complications of thyroidectomy by applying the two methods of ligature use and suture ligation of vessels. Settings: Department of Surgery, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran. Materials and Methods: This Double-blind randomized clinical trial study conducted on 140 candidates of thyroidectomy. The patients were randomlyequally allocated assigned to two groups of 70. In the ligature group, thyroidectomy was performed via ligature use, and in the suture ligation group, it was done with suture ligature. Using a specific questionnaire, the required demographic information, type of surgical operation, duration of surgery, rate of bleeding, the preoperative and postoperative serum calcium concentration, hypocalcemia symptoms, hoarseness, and laryngoscopic findings were collected and analyzed. Results: The findings revealed that the average time of total and subtotal thyroidectomy lasted 93.94 ± 10.53 min with ligature use and 134.15 ± 13.57 min with suture ligation. No case of postoperative bleeding was observed in this study. Two patients (17.1%) in the suture ligation group and two patients in the ligature group showed signs of hypocalcemia. Six patients developed hoarseness of whom five belonged to the ligature group and one belonged to the suture ligation group. Conclusions: Regarding the fact that on the whole, duration of thyroidectomy was shorter in ligature approach compared to the suture ligation, it can be considered as a suitable method to substitute suture ligation. However, meticulous precautions should be taken specifically with regard to the efferent laryngeal nerve and hoarseness. PMID:27099850

  15. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  16. Comparison of perioperative and short-term postoperative complications of gastrointestinal biopsies via laparoscopic-assisted technique versus laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Mitterman, Laura; Bonczynski, Jennifer; Hearon, Kendra; Selmic, Laura E

    2016-04-01

    This retrospective report describes perioperative and short-term postoperative complications of gastrointestinal biopsies obtained via a laparoscopic-assisted technique compared with laparotomy in a population of 60 client-owned dogs and cats with naturally occurring gastrointestinal disease. The medical records were examined for patients that underwent surgery for diagnostic gastrointestinal biopsies. Data were collected regarding perioperative complications such as hypotension, hypercarbia, and hypoxemia, and short-term postoperative complications including seroma and incisional infection/inflammation. The perioperative complication rate was 17.6% for the laparoscopically assisted group and 16.6% for the control group. The short-term postoperative complication rate was 5.9% for the laparoscopically assisted group and 0% for the control group. There was a 0% rate of intestinal dehiscence. There were no statistically significant differences in complication rates between the 2 groups, showing that laparoscopic-assisted gastrointestinal biopsies can be performed with acceptable perioperative and short-term postoperative complication rates. PMID:27041757

  17. Preoperative Corticosteroid Usage and Hypoalbuminemia Increase Occurrence of Short-term Postoperative Complications in Chinese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji; Lyu, Hong; Yang, Hong; Li, Yue; Tan, Bei; Wei, Ming-Ming; Sun, Xi-Yu; Li, Jing-Nan; Wu, Bin; Qian, Jia-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clarifying the risk factors for postoperative complications and taking measures to minimize these complications will improve the outcomes in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). This study aimed to systemically explore the risk factors for short-term postoperative complications in Chinese UC patients undergoing ileocolorectal surgery. Methods: Forty-nine UC patients undergoing proctocolectomy or ileostomy were retrospectively enrolled. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to reveal the risk factors among the clinical, laboratory, and surgical variables as well as preoperative medications. Results: Twenty-two (44.9%) patients who suffered from at least one short-term postoperative event had more severe hypoalbuminemia (P = 0.007) and an increased prevalence of preoperative corticosteroid usage (prednisone more than 20 mg daily or equivalent) for more than 6 weeks (59.1% vs. 25.9%, P = 0.023) compared with patients without short-term postoperative complications. Based on the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) values of these two risk factors were 1.756 (0.889–3.470, P = 0.105) and 3.233 (0.916–11.406, P = 0.068), respectively. In 32 severe UC patients, prolonged preoperative hospital stay worsened the short-term postoperative outcomes. Conclusions: Preoperative corticosteroids usage and hypoalbuminemia worsened the short-term outcomes following ileocolorectal surgery in Chinese UC patients. PMID:26879017

  18. Use of Electrocautery for Coagulation and Wound Complications in Caesarean Sections

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Cristiane M.; Amaral, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety of electrocautery for coagulation during Caesarean sections. Study Design. A randomized, controlled, clinical pilot study was performed at a university maternity hospital. After admission for delivery and decision to perform a C-section, volunteers were randomized to either the intervention group (use of electrocautery for coagulation) or nonintervention group. The women were examined at the time of postpartum discharge (day 3), at days 7 to 10, and again at days 30 to 40 for signs of infection, hematoma, seroma, or dehiscence. Data were analyzed using an intention-to-treat analysis, and risk ratios were calculated. Results. No significant differences were found between the two groups. Only 2.8% of patients in the intervention group developed surgical wound complications during hospitalization. However, 7 to 10 days following discharge, these rates reached 23.0% and 15.4% in the intervention and nonintervention groups, respectively (RR = 1.50, 95% CI = 0.84–2.60). Conclusion. Further studies should confirm whether the use of electrocautery for coagulation does not increase the risk of surgical wound complications in patients undergoing Caesarean sections. PMID:25143985

  19. Anesthetic complications including two cases of postoperative respiratory depression in living liver donor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, David; Singh, Harpreet; Jochman, John; Luikart, Paul; Gruessner, Ranier; Gruessner, Angelica; Belani, Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Living liver donation is becoming a more common means to treat patients with liver failure because of a shortage of cadaveric organs and tissues. There is a potential for morbidity and mortality, however, in patients who donate a portion of their liver. The purpose of this study is to identify anesthetic complications and morbidity resulting from living liver donor surgery. Patients and Methods: The anesthetic records of all patients who donated a segment of their liver between January 1997 and January 2006 at University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical and anesthesia time, blood loss, hospitalization length, complications, morbidity, and mortality were recorded. Data were reported as absolute values, mean ± SD, or percentage. Significance (P < 0.05) was determined using Student's paired t tests. Results: Seventy-four patients (34 male, 40 female, mean age = 35.5 ± 9.8 years) donated a portion of their liver and were reviewed in the study. Fifty-seven patients (77%) donated the right hepatic lobe, while 17 (23%) donated a left hepatic segment. The average surgical time for all patients was 7.8 ± 1.5 hours, the anesthesia time was 9.0 ± 1.3 hours, and the blood loss was 423 ± 253 ml. Forty-six patients (62.2%) received autologous blood either from a cell saver or at the end of surgery following acute, normovolemic hemodilution, but none required an allogenic transfusion. Two patients were admitted to the intensive care unit due to respiratory depression. Both patients donated their right hepatic lobe. One required reintubation in the recovery room and remained intubated overnight. The other was extubated but required observation in the intensive care unit for a low respiratory rate. Twelve patients (16.2%) had complaints of nausea, and two reported nausea with vomiting during their hospital stay. There were four patients who developed complications related to positioning during the surgery: Two patients complained of numbness and tingling in the hands which resolved within two days, one patient reported a blister on the hand, and one patient complained of right elbow pain that resolved quickly. Postoperative hospitalization averaged 7.4 ± 1.5 days. There was no patient mortality. Discussion: Living liver donation can be performed with low morbidity. However, postoperative respiratory depression is a concern and is perhaps due to altered metabolism of administered narcotics and anesthetic agents. PMID:21897509

  20. The association of socioeconomic disadvantage with postoperative complications after major elective cardiovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Agabiti, N; Cesaroni, G; Picciotto, S; Bisanti, L; Caranci, N; Costa, G; Forastiere, F; Marinacci, C; Pandolfi, P; Russo, A; Perucci, C A

    2008-01-01

    Background: Understanding the mechanism by which both patient- and hospital level factors act in generating disparities has important implications for clinicians and policy-makers. Objective: To measure the association between socioeconomic position (SEP) and postoperative complications after major elective cardiovascular procedures. Design: Multicity hospital-based study. Subjects: Using Hospital Discharge Registries (ICD-9-CM codes), 19 310 patients were identified undergoing five cardiovascular operations (coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valve replacement, carotid endarterectomy, major vascular bypass, repair of unruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA repair)) in four Italian cities, 1997–2000. Measures: For each patient, a five-level median income index by census block of residence was calculated. In-hospital 30-day mortality, cardiovascular complications (CCs) and non-cardiovascular complications (NCCs) were the outcomes. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multilevel logistic regression adjusting for city of residence, gender, age and comorbidities taking into account hospital and individual dependencies. Main results: In-hospital 30-day mortality varied by type of surgery (CABG 3.7%, valve replacement 5.7%, carotid endarterectomy 0.9%, major vascular bypass 8.8%, AAA repair 4.0%). Disadvantaged people were more likely to die after CABG (lowest vs highest income OR 1.93, p trend 0.023). For other surgeries, the relationship between SEP and mortality was less clear. For cardiac surgery, SEP differences in mortality were higher for publicly funded patients in low-volume hospitals (lowest vs highest income OR 3.90, p trend 0.039) than for privately funded patients (OR 1.46, p trend 0.444); however, the difference in the SEP gradients was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Disadvantaged people seem particularly vulnerable to mortality after cardiovascular surgery. Efforts are needed to identify structural factors that may enlarge SEP disparities within hospitals. PMID:18791046

  1. Determining Surgical Complications in the Overweight (DISCOVER): a multicentre observational cohort study to evaluate the role of obesity as a risk factor for postoperative complications in general surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nepogodiev, Dmitri; Chapman, Stephen J; Glasbey, James; Kelly, Michael; Khatri, Chetan; Drake, Thomas M; Kong, Chia Yew; Mitchell, Harriet; Harrison, Ewen M; Fitzgerald, J Edward; Bhangu, Aneel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is increasingly prevalent among patients undergoing surgery. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the impact of obesity on postoperative complications. This multicentre study aims to determine whether obesity is associated with increased postoperative complications following general surgery. Methods and analysis This prospective, multicentre cohort study will be performed utilising a collaborative methodology. Consecutive adults undergoing open or laparoscopic, elective or emergency, gastrointestinal, bariatric or hepatobiliary surgery will be included. Day case patients will be excluded. The primary end point will be the overall 30-day major complication rate (Clavien-Dindo grade III–V complications). Data will be collected to risk-adjust outcomes for potential confounding factors, such as preoperative cardiac risk. This study will be disseminated through structured medical student networks using established collaborative methodology. The study will be powered to detect a two-percentage point increase in the major postoperative complication rate in obese versus non-obese patients. Ethics and dissemination Following appropriate assessment, an exemption from full ethics committee review has been received, and the study will be registered as a clinical audit or service evaluation at each participating hospital. Dissemination will take place through national and local research collaborative networks. PMID:26195471

  2. Postoperative complications necessitating right lower lobectomy in a heart-lung transplant recipient with previous sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Diethrich, E B; Bahadir, I; Gordon, M; Maki, P; Warner, M G; Clark, R; Siever, J; Silverthorn, A

    1987-09-01

    Heart-lung transplantation for treatment of end-stage cardiopulmonary disease continues to be plagued by many problems. Three primary ones are the technical difficulties that can be encountered, particularly in those patients who have undergone previous cardiac operations, the additional restriction on donor availability imposed by the lack of satisfactory preservation techniques, and the need for lung size compatibility. Two of these difficulties and others surfaced postoperatively in a heart-lung transplant recipient who presented a series of unique operative and therapeutic challenges. A 42-year-old woman with chronic pulmonary hypertension and previous atrial septal defect repair underwent a heart-lung transplantation in August 1985. The operative procedure was expectedly complicated by bleeding from extensive mediastinal adhesions from the previous sternotomy and bronchial collateralization. Excessive chest tube drainage postoperatively necessitated reoperation to control bleeding from a right bronchial artery tributary. Phrenic nerve paresis, hepatomegaly, and marked abdominal distention caused persistent atelectasis and eventual right lower lobe collapse. Arteriovenous shunting and low oxygen saturation necessitated right lower lobectomy 15 days after transplantation, believed to be the first use of this procedure in a heart-lung graft recipient. Although oxygenation improved dramatically, continued ventilatory support led to tracheostomy. An intensive, psychologically oriented physical therapy program was initiated to access and retrain intercostal and accessory muscles. The tracheostomy cannula was removed after 43 days and gradual weaning from supplemental oxygen was accomplished. During this protracted recovery period, an episode of rejection was also encountered and successfully managed with steroid therapy. The patient continued to progress satisfactorily and was discharged 83 days after transplantation. She is well and active 20 months after discharge. PMID:3114565

  3. Intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis using two types of Moria microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Karabela, Yunus; Muftuoglu, Orkun; Gulkilik, Ibrahim Gokhan; Kocabora, Mehmet Selim; Ozsutcu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, management, and visual outcomes of intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery using two types of Moria M2 microkeratomes. This retrospective analysis was performed on 806 primary LASIK cases. The intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications were identified and categorized according to type of Moria microkeratome. There were 52 intraoperative and early postoperative complications--one case of partial flap (0.124 %), one case of free flap (0.124 %), one case of small flap (0.124 %), 13 cases of epithelial defect (1.61 %), 12 cases of flap striae (1.49 %), 10 cases of diffuse lamellar keratitis (1.24 %), 10 cases of interface debris (1.24 %), three cases of epithelial ingrowth (0.37 %), and one case of microbial infection (0.124 %). The overall incidence of flap complications was 6.45 %. There were 27 right eye (6.73 %) and 25 left eye (6.17 %) complications. The incidence of complications with the Moria automated metallic head 130 microkeratome was 4.22 % and with the Moria single-use head 90 microkeratome was 2.23 %. We observed one culture-negative interface abscess which was cured with surgical cleaning and intensive medical treatment. The most common complication encountered was epithelial defects, followed by flap striae. Our study showed that LASIK with a microkeratome has a relatively low incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative flap complications. The authors have no financial interest in any of the issues contained in this article and have no proprietary interest in the development of marketing of or materials used in this study. PMID:24531872

  4. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN DIABETIC PATIENTS BEFORE GASTRIC BYPASS AS A POSSIBLE MARKER FOR POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    LINS, Daniel C.; CAMPOS, Josemberg M.; de PAULA, Patrícia S.; GALVÃO-NETO, Manoel; PACHU, Eduardo; CAVALCANTI, Ney; FERRAZ, Álvaro A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background : Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated to inflammatory state, which can be set off by the adipose tissue, once it is a metabolically active organ that can cause a chronic mild inflammatory state. Aim : To evaluate the correlation between preoperative C-reactive protein and postoperative complications risk in obese patients (grades II and III) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods : Between 2008 and 2013 were analysed 209 patients (107 with diabetes), presenting body mass index >40 kg/m2or >35 kg/m2with comorbidities. During the postoperative period, two groups were evaluated: with and without complications. Preoperative ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein was measured by immunonephelometry method. Results : Complications occurred in seven patients (pulmonary thromboembolism, fistula, two cases of suture leak, pancreatitis, evisceration and upper digestive hemorrhage). No statistical significance was found regarding lipid profile and C-reactive protein between patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus. When compared to each other, both groups (with and without complications) presented with statistical significance regarding C-reactive protein level (7,2 mg/dl vs 3,7 mg/dl, p=0,016) and had similar weight loss percentage after 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Conclusions : Preoperative C-reactive protein serum level was higher in the group which presented complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass when compared to the group without postoperative complications. PMID:26537265

  5. Evaluation of emphysema using three-dimensional computed tomography: association with postoperative complications in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kenichi; Iwano, Shingo; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) enables in vivo volumetry of total lung volume (TLV) and emphysematous low-attenuation volume (LAV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between preoperative 3D-CT volumetry and postoperative complications in lung cancer patients. We searched our institution's surgical records from December 2006 to December 2009 and selected patients who had undergone pulmonary lobectomy for primary lung cancer. From 3D-CT data, TLV and LAV <-950 HU of thresholds were retrospectively measured. The LAV% was calculated as follows: LAV% = LAV/TLV*100. The associations between the seven independent variables (LAV%, age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as percent forced vital capacity [FEV1%], and resected lobe) and the two outcomes (postoperative complications and prolonged postoperative stay [PPS]) were compared using logistic regression analysis. A total of 309 patients (222 males, 87 females; mean age, 67 years; range, 40-87 years) were evaluated. On multivariate analysis, age and LAV% were significantly correlated with postoperative complications (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively), and LAV% was significantly correlated with PPS (p = 0.031). LAV% measured using 3D-CT is more sensitive for predicting complications after lobectomy for lung cancer than FEV1%. PMID:25797976

  6. EVALUATION OF EMPHYSEMA USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: ASSOCIATION WITH POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN LUNG CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    KAWAKAMI, KENICHI; IWANO, SHINGO; HASHIMOTO, NAOZUMI; HASEGAWA, YOSHINORI; NAGANAWA, SHINJI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) enables in vivo volumetry of total lung volume (TLV) and emphysematous low-attenuation volume (LAV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between preoperative 3D-CT volumetry and postoperative complications in lung cancer patients. We searched our institution’s surgical records from December 2006 to December 2009 and selected patients who had undergone pulmonary lobectomy for primary lung cancer. From 3D-CT data, TLV and LAV <–950 HU of thresholds were retrospectively measured. The LAV% was calculated as follows: LAV% = LAV/TLV*100. The associations between the seven independent variables (LAV%, age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as percent forced vital capacity [FEV1%], and resected lobe) and the two outcomes (postoperative complications and prolonged postoperative stay [PPS]) were compared using logistic regression analysis. A total of 309 patients (222 males, 87 females; mean age, 67 years; range, 40–87 years) were evaluated. On multivariate analysis, age and LAV% were significantly correlated with postoperative complications (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively), and LAV% was significantly correlated with PPS (p = 0.031). LAV% measured using 3D-CT is more sensitive for predicting complications after lobectomy for lung cancer than FEV1%. PMID:25797976

  7. Elevated serum lactoferrin and neopterin are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Gang; Wei, Chengshou; Gu, Song; Tang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that lactoferrin (LF) and neopterin (NT) are correlated with infection. The aim of this study is to determine whether serum levels of LF and NT are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Material and methods A total of 268 patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury who underwent spinal surgery were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of LF, NT, and C-reactive protein (CRP), in addition to white blood cell count (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), were measured preoperatively and 24 h postoperatively. Results In total, 22 of 268 patients (8.2%) developed postoperative infectious complications. The levels of serum LF, NT, and CRP were significantly higher in the infected patients than in the non-infected patients. No significant differences were observed in postoperative WBC count and ESR between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that LF (OR: 1.004 (1.002–1.007)), NT (OR: 1.137 (1.054–1.227)), and CRP (OR: 1.023 (1.002–1.044)) were significantly associated with the presence of postoperative infectious complications. The area under receiver operating characteristic curves for LF, NT, and CRP was 0.709, 0.779, and 0.629, respectively. Conclusions Elevated serum concentrations of LF and NT are associated with early infection after surgery. Compared to CRP, elevated levels of LF and NT are better indicators for predicting postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:24273571

  8. Factors Associated with Complications and Postoperative Visual Outcomes of Cataract Surgery; a Study of 1,632 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Thanigasalam, Thevi; Reddy, Sagili Chandrashekara; Zaki, Rafdzah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cataract surgery is the most common intraocular surgery performed all over the world and has advanced technically in recent years. As in all surgeries, complications are unavoidable. Herein we report factors associated with complications and visual outcomes of cataract surgery. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included data of 1,632 cataract surgeries performed from 2007 to 2010 which was obtained from the cataract registry of the Malaysian National Eye Database. Demographic features, ocular and systemic comorbidites, grade of surgeon expertise and duration of surgery, type of anesthesia, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and the type of intraocular lens were recorded. Best corrected visual acuities were compared before and after the operation. Results: Mean patient age was 66.9 years with equal gender distribution. The majority of subjects had age related cataracts. Phacoemulsification was done faster than other surgeries, especially by specialist surgeons. History of prior ocular surgery and operations performed under general anesthesia were associated with greater complications. Phacoemulsification was associated with less complications and better visual outcomes. The age and etiology of cataract did not affect complications. Malays, absence of ocular comorbidities, left eyes and eyes operated under local anesthesia were more likely to experience more visual improvement. Gender, age, cause of cataract, systemic comorbidities and surgeon expertise as well as intra-and postoperative complications did not affect the visual outcomes. Conclusion: Phacoemulsification had good visual outcomes in cataract surgery. Duration of surgery, expertise of the surgeon and complications did not affect the visual outcomes. PMID:27051481

  9. Illegal tattoos complicated by Staphylococcus infections: a north Carolina wound care and medical center experience.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Alan C

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a major source of morbidity in Hamlet, NC; in 2011, there were 58 emergency room visits resulting from MRSA infections, leading to 31 admissions to Sandhills Regional Medical Center (Hamlet, NC). The situation is complicated by illegal tattoo artists offering less-expensive artwork, as their bargain prices often involve stinting on sterile technique. Three patients with infected tattoos were seen at Sandhills Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine (Hamlet, NC) with a range of tissue damage requiring different treatment plans. Closer scrutiny of tattoo ink and use of preservatives could prevent accidental or deliberate contamination, and reduce the risk of tattoo infection. . PMID:25876168

  10. A case-control study of postoperative pulmonary complications after laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, J C; Tarala, R A; Hall, J L

    1996-04-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) are common after upper abdominal surgery. The objective of this case-control study was to compare the incidence of PPC after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and open cholecystectomy (OC) within a tertiary care center. Patients were accrued from two sequential clinical trials that evaluated the role of incentive spirometry in the prevention of PPC after abdominal surgery. Included for study were patients with gallstones undergoing elective surgery who had an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification < 3. All patients included in the study were encouraged to use an incentive spirometer at least 10 times each hour while awake. Patients with chronic bronchitis were excluded from study, as were patients who received other forms of physical therapy. OC was performed through either a transverse or an oblique incision. There was an equitable dispersion of putative risk factors for PPC between the groups at baseline. PPC were defined as clinical features consistent with collapse/consolidation, an otherwise unexplained temperature above 38 degrees C, plus either confirmatory chest radiology or positive sputum microbiology. The incidence of PPC was 2.7% (1/37) after LC and 17.2% (10/58) after OC (p < 0.05). It is concluded that PPC are less common after laparoscopic cholecystectomy than after open cholecystectomy. PMID:8735045

  11. [Use of ceftriaxone in the prevention of postoperative purulent complications after surgery on the stomach and small intestine].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, V P; Khlebnikov, E P; Kubyshkin, V A; Elagina, L V; Budaev, K D; Izotova, G N; Korniak, V S; Tsvirkun, V V; Vukolov, V V

    1999-01-01

    Ceftriaxone was administered intravenously in a single dose of 1.0 g 15 minutes prior to surgical intervention for peptic ulcer and gastric or duodenum tumor in 31 patients at the age of 33 to 74 years. In all the patients primary adhesion of the surgical wound was recorded. No signs of local or general infection were observed. The indices of the total blood count, urinalysis and blood biochemical analysis came to normal by the 5th or the 7th day of the postoperative period. The levels of ceftriaxone in the blood, urine, stomach wall, small intestine tissues and subcutaneous fat were evaluated. The indices of the cellular and humoral immunity in the pre- and postoperative periods in the patients prophylactically treated with ceftriaxone were analyzed. PMID:10494379

  12. Effects of surgical wound infiltration with bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Özge Turna; Toydemir, T Seval Fatma; Kirşan, İsmail; Dokuzeylul, Banu; Gunay, Zeynep; Karacam, Esra

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners' anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a "numerical rating scale" for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  13. Effects of Surgical Wound Infiltration with Bupivacaine on Postoperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Bilateral Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    YILMAZ, Özge Turna; TOYDEMIR, T. Seval Fatma; KIRŞAN, İsmail; DOKUZEYLUL, Banu; GUNAY, Zeynep; KARACAM, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners’ anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a “numerical rating scale” for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  14. May Renal Resistive Index Be an Early Predictive Tool of Postoperative Complications in Major Surgery? Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Meco, Massimo; Ruggieri, Nadia; Cosseta, Daniele; Cirri, Silvia; Zito, Paola Cosma; Gollo, Yari; Raimondi, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Background. Patients who undergo high-risk surgery represent a large amount of post-operative ICU-admissions. These patients are at high risk of experiencing postoperative complications. Renal Resistive Index was found to be related with renal dysfunction, hypertension, and posttraumatic hemorrhagic shock, probably due to vasoconstriction. We explored whether Renal Resistive Index (RRI), measured after awakening from general anesthesia, could have any relationship with postoperative complications. Methods. In our observational, stratified dual-center trial, we enrolled patients who underwent general anesthesia for high-risk major surgery. After awakening in recovery room (or during awakening period in subjects submitted to cardiac surgery) we measured RRI by echo-color-Doppler method. Primary endpoint was the association of altered RRI (>0.70) and outcome during the first postoperative week. Results. 205 patients were enrolled: 60 (29.3%) showed RRI > 0.70. The total rate of adverse event was 27 (18.6%) in RRI ≤ 0.7 group and 19 (31.7%) in RRI > 0.7 group (P = 0.042). Significant correlation between RRI > 0.70 and complications resulted in pneumonia (P = 0.016), septic shock (P = 0.003), and acute renal failure (P = 0.001) subgroups. Patients with RRI > 0.7 showed longer ICU stay (P = 0.001) and lasting of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.004). These results were confirmed in cardiothoracic surgery subgroup. RRI > 0.7 duplicates triplicates the risk of complications, both in general (OR 2.03 93 95% CI 1.02–4.02, P = 0.044) and in cardiothoracic (OR 2.62 95% CI 1.11–6.16, P = 0.027) population. Furthermore, we found RRI > 0.70 was associated with a triplicate risk of postoperative septic shock (OR 3.04, CI 95% 1.5–7.01; P = 0.002). PMID:24967414

  15. Postoperative Complications After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have shown that patients with COPD have a higher risk of mortality than those without COPD after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, most of the previous studies were small, single-center studies with limited case numbers (or their only focus was mortality). The aim of our study was to focus on readmission, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute respiratory failure (ARF), cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism rates after CABG in an Asian COPD population. We conducted a nationwide case–control study in Taiwan using the claims database of hospitalization between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Patients with COPD before CABG were defined as the case groups. Each case was propensity score-matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease, with 2 controls selected from CABG patients without COPD. The outcomes of interest were mortality, wound infection, and the readmission rate over 30 days for the following diseases: AMI, pneumonia, ARF, cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism. There were 14,858 patients without COPD and 758 patients with COPD who underwent CABG. After propensity score matching, the 30-day mortality and 30-day readmission rates and AMI were higher in the non-COPD group. The incidences of pneumonia and ARF after CABG were higher in the COPD group. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease does not necessarily lead to mortality, readmission, or AMI after CABG, and the major respiratory complications associated with CABG in patients with COPD were pneumonia and ARF. PMID:26937939

  16. The comparative risk of developing postoperative complications in patients with distal radius fractures following different treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Jun; Li, Yi-Fan; Ji, Yun-Han; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Xian-Zhong; Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a network meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of seven most common surgical procedures to fix DRF, including bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Published studies were retrieved through PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. The database search terms used were the following keywords and MeSH terms: DRF, bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. The network meta-analysis was performed to rank the probabilities of postoperative complication risks for the seven surgical modalities in DRF patients. This network meta-analysis included data obtained from a total of 19 RCTs. Our results revealed that compared to DRF patients treated with bridging external fixation, marked differences in pin-track infection (PTI) rate were found in patients treated with plaster fixation, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Cluster analysis showed that plaster fixation is associated with the lowest probability of postoperative complication in DRF patients. Plaster fixation is associated with the lowest risk for postoperative complications in DRF patients, when compared to six other common DRF surgical methods examined. PMID:26549312

  17. The comparative risk of developing postoperative complications in patients with distal radius fractures following different treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wen-Jun; Li, Yi-Fan; Ji, Yun-Han; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Xian-Zhong; Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a network meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of seven most common surgical procedures to fix DRF, including bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Published studies were retrieved through PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. The database search terms used were the following keywords and MeSH terms: DRF, bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. The network meta-analysis was performed to rank the probabilities of postoperative complication risks for the seven surgical modalities in DRF patients. This network meta-analysis included data obtained from a total of 19 RCTs. Our results revealed that compared to DRF patients treated with bridging external fixation, marked differences in pin-track infection (PTI) rate were found in patients treated with plaster fixation, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Cluster analysis showed that plaster fixation is associated with the lowest probability of postoperative complication in DRF patients. Plaster fixation is associated with the lowest risk for postoperative complications in DRF patients, when compared to six other common DRF surgical methods examined. PMID:26549312

  18. Impact of Perioperative Blood Transfusion on Postoperative Complications and Prognosis of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients with Different Preoperative Hemoglobin Value

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Lian; Wei-Han, Zhang; Yang, Kun; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of perioperative blood transfusion on the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma patients is still controversial. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative complications and prognosis of patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma with different levels of preoperative hemoglobin value (POHb). Method. From 2003 to 2011, 1199 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were retrospectively enrolled and followed up to December 2014. Clinicopathological features and survival outcomes were compared between transfused and nontransfused patients. Results. In this study, transfused patients had more postoperative complications than nontransfused ones (P = 0.002). In survival analysis, the difference was not significant between transfused and nontransfused patients with POHb between 70 and 100 g/L (P = 0.191). However, in patients with POHb >100 g/L, transfused patients had significantly worse prognosis (P < 0.001), especially in TNM III stage patients (P = 0.002). And intraoperative blood transfusion predicted poor prognosis (P = 0.001). Conclusion. Perioperative blood transfusion might lead to poor survival in gastric adenocarcinoma patients with POHb >100 g/L and transfused patients had more postoperative complications; thus it is better to refrain from unnecessary perioperative blood transfusion especially intraoperative transfusion. PMID:26819609

  19. Transcutaenous electrical nerve stimulation to manage a lower extremity wound complicated by peripheral arterial disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yarboro, Douglas D; Smith, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is used to alleviate muscle pain, and there is some evidence it may affect healing in chronic wounds. An 80-year-old male patient with a chronic left lower extremity wound and a history of peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer presented for treatment. Previous protocols of care, mainly consisting of sharp debridement and daily dressing changes, had not resulted in a decrease in wound size. The patient had right and left iliac artery stenosis - not amenable to surgical intervention - and an ankle brachial index (ABI) of 0.63 on the left and 0.59 on the right lower extremities. On presentation, the wound measured 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm with a depth of 0.3 cm and a 0.5-cm tract at the 5 o'clock position. Treatment was changed to application of an ionic silver-containing Hydrofiber™ dressing and low-frequency TENS. Electrodes were applied 2 cm superior and inferior to the wound margin at a frequency of 2 Hz with a pulse width of 250 microseconds and amplitude of 33 mA. Treatment time was 45 minutes, twice daily, for 3 months, performed at home by the patient and his caregiver. After 4 weeks, wound dimensions decreased by 1.51% per day, and the wound was completely healed (100% epithelialized) after 12 weeks. At that time, the ABI of the left (treated) leg had increased to 0.71. Research is needed to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of low-frequency TENS to help clinicians provide evidenced-based treatment for wounds complicated by decreased blood flow. PMID:25019248

  20. A retrospective analysis of massive blood transfusion and post-operative complications in patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankit; Kulkarni, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Anaesthetic management of patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries is challenging. We wanted to evaluate the effects of pre-operative co-morbid conditions, intraoperative blood loss and transfusion, haemodynamic instability on post-operative complications and hospital outcomes in patients after such surgeries. Methods: We collected data from the patient files, anaesthesia records and the electronic medical records about pre-operative morbidities, intraoperative management, complications, blood loss, fluid therapy and blood products transfused. We also collected data on post-operative complications, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS) and status at discharge. Data were summarised using percentages for categorical data and mean and median for continuous data. Results: The mean blood loss was 4567.44 ml (range 1200–16,000 ml); 95% of all patients received blood transfusion. Twenty patients needed massive blood transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma was needed in 17 patients while 1 patient needed single donor platelets. Haemodynamic instability was present in 38 patients, of which 8 needed continuous vasopressor infusion. Nineteen patients were ventilated post-operatively. Coagulopathy occurred in 22 patients while thrombocytopaenia was seen in 6 patients. The median ICU LOS was 3 (1–6) days, and median hospital stay was 17 (6–53) days. All patients were discharged alive. Conclusion: Supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries are associated with massive intraoperative blood loss and transfusion. Common complications include anaemia, coagulopathy and hyperbilirubinaemia and prolonged ICU stay. Meticulous care, anticipating the complications with timely treatment can lead to excellent outcomes. PMID:27141111

  1. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications. PMID:12760580

  2. Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation for prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications: a comprehensive review of the role of tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure, and lung recruitment maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Güldner, Andreas; Kiss, Thomas; Serpa Neto, Ary; Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Canet, Jaume; Spieth, Peter M; Rocco, Patricia R M; Schultz, Marcus J; Pelosi, Paolo; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are associated with increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and mortality after major surgery. Intraoperative lung-protective mechanical ventilation has the potential to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. This review discusses the relevant literature on definition and methods to predict the occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complication, the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury with emphasis on the noninjured lung, and protective ventilation strategies, including the respective roles of tidal volumes, positive end-expiratory pressure, and recruitment maneuvers. The authors propose an algorithm for protective intraoperative mechanical ventilation based on evidence from recent randomized controlled trials. PMID:26120769

  3. Total mechanical stapled oesophagogastric anastomosis on the neck in oesophageal cancer – prevention of postoperative mediastinal complications

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Radosław; Irga-Jaworska, Ninela; Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Oesophagogastric anastomosis after oesophagus resection is commonly performed on the neck. Even though a few different techniques of oesophagogastric anastomosis have been previously detailed, both manual and mechanical procedures have been burdened with leakages and strictures. Our simple technique of oesophagogastric anastomosis is a modification of mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler in order to prevent postoperative leak and concomitant mediastinal complications. Since 2008, we have performed nine oesophagogastric anastomoses following oesophagus resection. The mean age of the operated patients was 54 years. There was no mortality among the operated patients in the early post-operative period. The mean follow-up period for the patients operated on in our department was 17 months until the time of the analysis. None of the patients showed any leakage or stricture, and no mediastinal complications were reported in the group. Following our own experience, mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler seems to decrease the time of the operation as well as significantly reducing the incidence of leakages from the anastomosis. This type of anastomosis may decrease the number of postoperative strictures and the most dangerous mediastinal infections. PMID:26855647

  4. Full-term abdominal extrauterine pregnancy complicated by post-operative ascites with successful outcome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Advanced abdominal (extrauterine) pregnancy is a rare condition with high maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Because the placentation in advanced abdominal pregnancy is presumed to be inadequate, advanced abdominal pregnancy can be complicated by pre-eclampsia, which is another condition with high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis and management of advanced abdominal pregnancy is difficult. Case presentation We present the case of a 33-year-old African woman in her first pregnancy who had a full-term advanced abdominal pregnancy and developed gross ascites post-operatively. The patient was successfully managed; both the patient and her baby are apparently doing well. Conclusion Because most diagnoses of advanced abdominal pregnancy are missed pre-operatively, even with the use of sonography, the cornerstones of successful management seem to be quick intra-operative recognition, surgical skill, ready access to blood products, meticulous post-operative care and thorough assessment of the newborn. PMID:23302289

  5. Value of histopathology for predicting the post-operative complications of ileo-anal anastomosis (J-pouch) procedure in children with refractory ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    El Demellawy, Dina; El Hallani, Soufiane; de Nanassy, Joseph; Lee, James Young; Chan, Emily; Sullivan, Katrina; Bass, Juan; Mack, David; Nasr, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    The J-pouch is a surgical procedure offered to children with refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) who have undergone subtotal colectomy to reconstruct a reservoir function with ileo-anal anastomosis. Unfortunately, post-operative complications may occur and can compromise the pouch function. We assessed rectal histopathology to determine whether severity of inflammation in the rectum prior to the creation of the J-Pouch was associated with post-operative complications. We retrospectively reviewed the histopathology of all J-pouch procedure specimens from paediatric patients during the period 2000-2013 using an objective grading system that assesses the chronicity and activity of the UC disease. We analysed the parameters for association with the post-operative complications. A classification tree algorithm was generated to predict the risk of complication based on histopathological parameters. A total of 28 paediatric patients were identified, among whom 10 developed post-operative complications (35%). The activity score at the recto-anal margin was higher among the patients with post-operative complications (mean 7.3±3.1 versus 4.8±3.1; p=0.04). The involvement of more than 5% colonic crypts with epithelial neutrophilic infiltration at the recto-anal margin was found to be an independent parameter that would stratify the patients into low-risk or high-risk group for developing complications (17% versus 64%; p=0.04). An association between UC disease activity at the recto-anal margin and post-operative J-pouch complications was determined. Potentially, this association suggests that a histopathological assessment of the recto-anal transitional zone may have value in guiding the surgeon on the risk of post-operative complications. PMID:27130833

  6. Evidence-Based Strategies to Reduce Postoperative Complications in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Bridget; Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructive plastic surgery is vital in assisting patients with reintegration into society after events such as tumor extirpation, trauma, or infection have left them with a deficit of normal tissue. Apart from performing a technically sound operation, the plastic surgeon must stack the odds in the favor of the patient by optimizing them before and after surgery. The surgeon must look beyond the wound, at the entire patient, and apply fundamental principles of patient optimization. This article reviews the evidence behind the principles of patient optimization that are commonly used in reconstructive surgery patients. PMID:26371388

  7. Performance in the 6-minute walk test and postoperative pulmonary complications in pulmonary surgery: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna F. A.; Souza, Hugo C. D.; Miranda, Aline P. B.; Cipriano, Federico G.; Gastaldi, Ada C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess functional capacity in the preoperative phase of pulmonary surgery by comparing predicted and obtained values for the six-minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with and without postoperative pulmonary complication (PPC) METHOD: Twenty-one patients in the preoperative phase of open thoracotomy were evaluated using the 6MWT, followed by monitoring of the postoperative evolution of each participant who underwent the routine treatment. Participants were then divided into two groups: the group with PPC and the group without PPC. The results were also compared with the predicted values using reference equations for the 6MWT RESULTS: Over half (57.14%) of patients developed PPC. The 6MWT was associated with the odds for PPC (odds ratio=22, p=0.01); the group without PPC in the postoperative period walked 422.38 (SD=72.18) meters during the 6MWT, while the group with PPC walked an average of 340.89 (SD=100.93) meters (p=0.02). The distance traveled by the group without PPC was 80% of the predicted value, whereas the group with PPC averaged less than 70% (p=0.03), with more appropriate predicted values for the reference equations CONCLUSIONS: The 6MWT is an easy, safe, and feasible test for routine preoperative evaluation in pulmonary surgery and may indicate patients with a higher chance of developing PPC. PMID:26786074

  8. Health-related quality of life after cardiac surgery – the effects of age, preoperative conditions and postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Factors influencing the postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after cardiac surgery have not been well described yet, mainly in the older people. The study’s aim was to explore differences in clinical conditions and HRQOL of patients before and after cardiac surgery taking into account the influence of age and to describe factors influencing changes of HRQOL in the postoperative period. Methods This was a prospective consecutive observational study with two measurements using the SF-36 questionnaire before surgery and 1 year after surgery. It considered main clinical characteristics of participants prior to surgery as well as postoperative complications. Results At baseline assessment the study considered 310 patients, predominantly male (69%). Mean age was 65 (SD 10.4) years and 101 patients (33%), who were older than 70, constituted the older group. This older group showed greater comorbidity, higher cardiac operative risk and lower HRQOL in the preoperative period as well as a higher prevalence of postoperative complications than the younger group. Thirty-day mortality was 1.4% in the younger group and 6.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). One year mortality was 3.3% in the younger group and 10.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). There was a significant improvement in all 8 health domains of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.001) in the overall sample. There was no significant difference in change in a majority of HRQOL domains between the younger and the older group (p > 0.05). Logistic multivariate analysis identified a higher values of preoperative PCS (Physical component summary) scores (OR 1.03, CI 1.00 – 1.05, p = 0.0187) and MCS (Mental component summary) scores (OR 1.02, CI 0.997 – 1.00, p = 0.0846) as the only risk factors for potential non-improvement of HRQOL after cardiac surgery after correction for age, gender and type of surgery. Conclusions Older patients with higher operative risk have lower preoperative HRQOL but show a similar improvement in a majority of HRQOL domains after cardiac surgery as compared with younger patients. The multivariate analysis has shown the higher preoperative HRQOL status as a only significant factor of potential non-improvement of postoperative HRQOL. PMID:24618329

  9. Dilemmas surrounding the diagnosis of deep brain stimulation electrode infection without associated wound complications: A series of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background: When wounds are benign, diagnosis of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode infection and associated intraparenchymal infection can be challenging. Only a couple, such cases exist in literature. Since infections of the central nervous system can be life-threatening, prompt diagnosis is necessary to prevent neurological injury. Employed within the appropriate context, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, as well as laboratory data and clinical presentation, may help guide diagnosis. Case Descriptions: Case 1 - A 55-year-old male with bilateral DBS electrodes and generators (49 days from last procedure), who presented with confusion and fever. Pertinent positive laboratory was white blood cell 20.5K. MRI of the brain showed edema with enhancement along the right DBS electrode. Wound exploration revealed gross purulence in the subgaleal space. The entire system was removed; cultures from subgaleal space revealed Propionibacterium acnes; cultures from electrode were negative. The patient was sent home on antibiotics. Case 2 - A 68-year-old male with a right DBS electrode (11 days from placement), who presented after an unwitnessed fall, followed by confusion and amnesia. Pertinent laboratory examinations were negative. MRI of the brain showed edema with enhancement along the DBS electrode. Wound exploration revealed no infection. The DBS system was left in place; final cultures were negative; no antibiotics were prescribed. Repeat MRI showed resolving fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal and contrast enhancement. Conclusions: Contrast enhancement, T2 FLAIR, and diffusion weighted imaging are influenced by postoperative changes. Caution is stressed regarding dependence on these features for acute diagnosis of infection and indication for electrode removal. Timing of the imaging after surgery must be considered. Other factors, such as systemic signs and abnormal laboratory data, should be evaluated. Based on these guidelines, retrospectively, the patient in Case 2 should not have been rushed for a wound exploration; close observation with serial imaging and laboratory data may have prevented an unnecessary procedure. PMID:26958428

  10. Comparison of postoperative complication between Laryngeal Mask Airway and endotracheal tube during low-flow anesthesia with controlled ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Peirovifar, Ali; Eydi, Mahmood; Mirinejhad, Mir Mousa; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Mohammadi, Afsaneh; EJ Golzari, Samad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative complications between Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) and endotracheal tube (ETT) during low-flow anesthesia with controlled ventilation. Methodology: Eighty adult Patients with ASA class I or II were randomly allocated into two forty-patient groups (ETT or LMA). Cuff pressure was monitored during anesthesia. After high uptake period, fresh gas flow (FGF) was decreased to 1 lit/min and isoflurane set to 1%. Monitoring during anesthesia included non-invasive blood pressure, ECG, ETCO2 and pulse oximetry. System leakage (>100 ml/min), rebreathing and any attempt to increase FGF to overcome the leak were monitored during anesthesia. Later, patients were extubated and transferred to Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). In PACU, the incidence of sore throat, cough, difficulty in swallowing and shivering was monitored for all patients. Results: Leakage was observed in two and three cases in ETT and LMA groups respectively (P>0.05). Postoperative cough, sore throat and difficulty in swallowing were significantly less in LMA than ETT group. No significant difference was observed regarding ETCo2 values between 2 groups. Conclusion: If careful measures regarding insertion techniques, correct LMA position and routine monitoring of LMA cuff pressure are taken, LMA can be used as a safe alternative with lower incidence of post operation complication compared with ETT during low-flow controlled anesthesia with modern anesthetic machines. PMID:24353586

  11. Postoperative complications of microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm: lessons from experience of 2040 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ho; Jee, Tae Keun; Lee, Jeong Ah; Park, Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is an effective and safe treatment option that offers the prospect of definitive cure for hemifacial spasm (HFS). However, there are potential risks of complications for MVD associated with retromastoid suboccipital craniectomy (RmSOC) and cranial nerves in particular. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical characteristics of possible complications after MVD for HFS and to establish appropriate management concept of these complications. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 2040 patients who underwent RmSOC with MVD for HFS at Samsung medical center between January 1998 and March 2013. Of 2040 patients, 2027 were followed (99.4 %). Of the 2027 patients, 1841 (90.8 %) exhibited complete relief or minimal symptoms, and 113 (5.6 %) reported improved spasm but had mild remnant symptoms. After operation, the most frequently developed complications were facial nerve palsy (8.19 %), followed by middle ear effusion (4.90 %) and hearing loss (3.63 %). There were two cases of supratentorial subdural hemorrhage, three cases of infarction. MVD was found to be safe and effective treatment for HFS, in consistent with previous reports. Some of the complications such as facial nerve palsy, middle ear effusion, and hearing loss are relatively common. However, they have mild clinical courses that are usually transient. PMID:26382646

  12. A combination of subcuticular sutures and a drain for skin closure reduces wound complications in obese women undergoing surgery using vertical incisions.

    PubMed

    Inotsume-Kojima, Y; Uchida, T; Abe, M; Doi, T; Kanayama, N

    2011-02-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for surgical site or wound complications in women undergoing surgery involving vertical incisions. Several investigators have reported the efficacy of subcutaneous drains in minimising the complication rate but there is no consensus on using these for surgery in obese patients. In 2006, the Scottish Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Infection Programme showed that using subcuticular sutures rather than staples to close incisions significantly reduced the risk of surgical site infection. Before January 2008 (group 1; N = 40), wound complications occurred in some obese patients in our hospital after obstetric and gynaecological surgery when only staples were used for skin closure. In January 2008 (group 2; N = 31), we changed the method of skin closure for obese patients [body mass index (BMI) > 28 kg/m(2)] and we now use a subcutaneous drain with four channels along the running tube and subcuticular sutures with interrupted, buried 4-0 polydioxanone sutures. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of these interventions for skin closure in obese women. The general characteristics (age, weight and BMI) were similar between the two groups. There were no wound complications in group 2. In group 1, wound disruptions and a seroma occurred in five (12.5%) and one (2.5%) patients, respectively. The wound complication rate in group 2 was significantly lower than that in group 1 (P = 0.0319). Thus, new materials and techniques for skin closure can reduce the wound complication rate in obese women. PMID:20971528

  13. Prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications with CPAP, incentive spirometry, and conservative therapy.

    PubMed

    Stock, M C; Downs, J B; Gauer, P K; Alster, J M; Imrey, P B

    1985-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) administered at intervals with a mask and incentive spirometry (IS) were compared with a regimen of coughing and deep breathing (CDB) to determine which promoted the most rapid recovery of pulmonary function after upper abdominal operations in 65 adults. Postoperatively, FRC of patients in all groups was similar relative to preoperative values. However, mean FRC of patients who received CPAP increased more rapidly than did mean FRC of those receiving CDB when compared to the values obtained following operation (p less than 0.05). Incentive spirometry did not increase FRC to a greater extent than did CDB. Roentgenographic evidence of atelectasis 72 hours postoperatively was observed in 23 percent of CPAP patients (five of 22) and 42 percent and 41 percent of patients who received CDB (eight of 19) and IS (nine of 22). Two patients (3 percent) developed pneumonia. The low incidence of pneumonia regardless of the type of therapy may be attributable to vigorous, vigilant respiratory care in a population at high risk for developing pneumonia. Frequency and supervision of respiratory therapy may be more important than the type of therapy delivered after upper abdominal operations. Mask CPAP offers advantages because it requires no effort from the patient, and therapy is not painful. PMID:3881226

  14. Is the Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio more correlated than C-reactive protein with postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Dinant, Valérie; De Kock, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) is an inflammatory marker that has proven usefulness for predicting late complications. Whether it is associated with immediate postoperative complications after abdominal surgery is not known. In this study, we attempted to correlate the NLR and the C-reactive protein (CRP) with postoperative complications rate. Methods. We performed a post-hoc analysis of previously collected data concerning 82 consecutive patients (median age: 62 years, range: 27–80, female/male 32/50) undergoing major abdominal surgeries. For each patient, we recorded preoperative characteristics, the NLR and CRP values, and postoperative complications (between D + 8 and D + 30) such as infections (N = 29), cardiovascular complications (N = 12) and other complications (N = 28). We performed uni- and multivariate analyses using logistic/linear regression models. Results. Patients with complications did not present a higher preoperative NLR than those without, but a higher ratio at D + 7 (10.73 ± 9.86 vs. 4.73 ± 3.38 without complication) (P < 0.001). In the univariate analysis, the NLR at D + 7 was associated with postoperative complications (P < 0.001). At D + 7, in the multivariate analysis, an increased NLR was associated with more complications (P < 0.001), whereas none of the other factors, including CRP, showed any correlation. Conclusion. Postoperative NLR at day 7 after major abdominal surgery is associated with complications during the first postsurgical month, in contrast with the CRP level. The NLR is a simple and interesting parameter in the perioperative period. PMID:25653901

  15. [A case of primary lung cancer complicated with post-operative intractable pulmonary fistula].

    PubMed

    Morio, A; Miyamoto, H; Yamazaki, A; Anami, Y; Oh, S; Izumi, H; Hosoda, Y; Fukuchi, Y

    2000-12-01

    The case was a 76-year-old male. After thoracoscopic left upper lobectomy against primary lung cancer with poor risks such as complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pulmonary emphysema, oral steroid treatment, heavy smoker, decreased renal function, the patient was complicated with intractable pulmonary fistula and MRSA pyothorax. Intracavitary administration of albumin preparation and fibrin glue (Beriplast P) was effective against pulmonary fistula though it was not helpful in the pleurodesis which was conducted 7 times. Teicoplanin (Targosid) was effective against MRSA pyothorax and maintained the renal function. PMID:11127565

  16. Vitamin a deficiency after gastric bypass surgery: an underreported postoperative complication.

    PubMed

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C; Miller, Wendy M; Franklin, Barry; Mudugal, Dharani; Rao Buragadda, Avdesh; Boura, Judith; Nori-Janosz, Katherine; Chengelis, David L; Krause, Kevin R; McCullough, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Few data are available on vitamin A deficiency in the gastric bypass population. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of gastric bypass patients (n = 69, 74% female). The relationship between serum vitamin A concentration and markers of protein metabolism at 6-weeks and 1-year post-operative were assessed. Results. The average weight loss at 6-weeks and 1-year following surgery was 20.1 ± 9.1 kg and 44.1 ± 17.1 kg, respectively. At 6 weeks and 1 year after surgery, 35% and 18% of patients were vitamin A deficient, (<325 mcg/L). Similarly, 34% and 19% had low pre-albumin levels (<18 mg/dL), at these time intervals. Vitamin A directly correlated with pre-albumin levels at 6 weeks (r = 0.67, P < 0.001) and 1-year (r = 0.67,  P < 0.0001). There was no correlation between the roux limb length measurement and pre-albumin or vitamin A serum concentrations at these post-operative follow-ups. Vitamin A levels and markers of liver function testing were also unrelated. Conclusion. Vitamin A deficiency is common after bariatric surgery and is associated with a low serum concentration of pre-albumin. This fat-soluble vitamin should be measured in patients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery and deficiency should be suspected in those with evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition. PMID:20871833

  17. Impact of preoperative patient education on prevention of postoperative complications after major visceral surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (PEDUCAT trial)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In line with the growing number of surgical procedures being performed worldwide, postoperative complications are also increasing proportionately. Prevention of these postoperative complications is a high medical priority. Preoperative education of patients, including provision of preparatory information about the correct behavior after surgery, could improve the postoperative outcome, but the evidence for this is inconclusive. The aim of the PEDUCAT trial is to evaluate the feasibility and the impact of preoperative patient education on postoperative morbidity, mortality and quality of life in patients scheduled for elective major visceral surgery. Methods/design PEDUCAT is designed as a cluster-randomized controlled pilot study. The experimental group will visit a standardized preoperative seminar to learn how best to behave after surgery in addition to being given a standard information brochure, whereas the control group will only receive the information brochure. Outcome measures such as postoperative morbidity, postoperative pain, postoperative anxiety and depression, patient satisfaction, quality of life, length of hospital stay and postoperative mortality will be evaluated. Statistical analysis will be based on the intention-to-treat population. Analysis of covariance will be applied for the intervention group comparison, adjusting for age, center and quality of life before surgery. This is a pilot study to show the feasibility of the concept. Nevertheless, the planned sample size of n = 204 is large enough to show an effect with power of 90% and a significance level of 5%. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Register number: DRKS00004226. PMID:23978275

  18. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit. PMID:25861890

  19. Gallbladder perforation: a rare complication of postoperative chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanlai; Song, Wentao; Hou, Qingsheng; Li, Jianning; Guo, Hongliang

    2015-01-01

    A middle-aged man presented 1 day after being discharged from hospital with completing the first course of postoperative chemotherapy. He suffered a sudden persistent high fever and chills. It was noted that he had a history of a total gastrectomy (with D2 lymphadenectomy) 1 month ago. His admission bloods revealed total bilirubin was 142.2 umol/L, indirect bilirubin of 107.6 umol/L and white cell count of 20.05×10(9)/L. A color doppler ultrasound scan confirmed fluid and gas around liver and hilus lienis while the gallbladder cannot be detected. During Computed Tomography (CT) guided puncture positioning technology and setting a three-channel tube, about 400 ml of foul smell hazel turbid liquid was drained out. He was diagnosed as gallbladder perforation and he was underwent conservative treatment consist of drainage, banning diet, total parenteral nutrition and intravenous antibiotics. Then he recovered well within the subsequent 10 days and was discharged. PMID:26271278

  20. Postoperative analgesia and flap perfusion after pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction - continuous wound instillation with ropivacaine 0.2%. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dagtekin, Oguzhan; Hotz, Alexandra; Kampe, Sandra; Auweiler, Marion; Warm, Mathias

    2009-05-01

    Transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap surgery is a complex procedure characterised by an extensive wound site. We present a pilot study with 17 patients receiving continuous wound instillation with ropivacaine or isotonic saline. Patients undergoing TRAM flap surgery were included in the study and randomised to the ropi group or the control group. Two catheters were placed subcutaneously before wound site closure. At the end of surgery patients received a single shot dose of 20 ml ropivacaine 0.2% or isotonic saline. After surgery the continuous instillation of ropivacaine or isotonic saline was commenced at an infusion rate of 10 ml/h per catheter. The perfusion of the TRAM flap was measured intraoperatively and postoperatively over 48 h. Pain scores, patient satisfaction, and the quality of recovery score were also assessed postoperatively over 48 h. Ropivacaine plasma levels were quantified 24 and 48 h after start of infusion. Pain scores at rest and on coughing were lower for the ropi group and reached significance in the first 8h at rest (P=0.007). Patient satisfaction, quality of recovery score, and adverse events were also comparable between the groups. Patients of the ropi group had bowel movement earlier than the control group (P=0.003). No differences were seen in the flap perfusion. Ropivacaine plasma levels were within therapeutic range. Our data show a trend that continuous wound instillation of ropivacaine 0.2% increases pain relief after TRAM flap surgery with earlier bowel movement than intravenous opioid patient controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) alone. A does of 960 mg of ropivacaine daily did not result in toxic plasma concentrations. Ropivacaine 0.2% did not show a vasoconstrictor effect. PMID:18387865

  1. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion.

    PubMed

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, al-though the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds. PMID:27194978

  2. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, al-though the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds. PMID:27194978

  3. A retrospective study of deep sternal wound infections: clinical and microbiological characteristics, treatment, and risk factors for complications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Monica; Yusuf, Erlangga; Giulieri, Stefano; Perrottet, Nancy; Von Segesser, Ludwig; Borens, Olivier; Trampuz, Andrej

    2016-03-01

    Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a feared complication following cardiac surgery. This study describes clinical, microbiological, and treatment outcomes of DSWI and determines risk factors for complications. Of 55 patients with DSWI, 66% were male and mean age was 68.2years. Initial sternotomy was for coronary artery bypass graft in 49% of patients. Sternal debridement at mean 25.4±18.3days showed monomicrobial (94%), mainly Gram-positive infection. Secondary sternal wound infection (SSWI) occurred in 31% of patients, was mostly polymicrobial (71%), and was predominantly due to Gram-negative bacilli. Risk factors for SSWI were at least 1 revision surgery (odds ratio [OR] 4.8 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.0-22.4], P=0.047), sternal closure by muscle flap (OR 4.6 [1.3-16.8], P=0.02), delayed sternal closure (mean 27 versus 14days, P=0.03), and use of vacuum-assisted closure device (100% versus 58%, P=0.008). Hospital stay was significantly longer in patients with SSWI (69days versus 48days, P=0.04). PMID:26707065

  4. Aorta-Left Renal Vein Fistula Complicating an Aortic Aneurysm: Preoperative and Postoperative Multislice CT Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Barrier, Pierre Otal, Philippe; Garcia, Olivier; Vahdat, Olivier; Domenech, Brice; Lannareix, Valerie; Joffre, Francis; Rousseau, Herve

    2007-06-15

    Fistulas complicating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are rare, and fistulas involving the left renal vein are particularly uncommon. We highlight here a fistula between an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a retroaortic left renal vein, revealed by left flank pain associated with hematuria and acute renal failure. The multislice CT angiography performed in this 68-year-old patient revealed communication and equal enhancement between the aorta and the left gonadic vein, suggesting the presence of a fistula. The three-dimensional VRT reconstructions presented in this case were of great value in the preoperative planning, enabling immediate visualization of this unusual feature. Alternative diagnoses to consider when encountering this clinical presentation are reviewed.

  5. Low Serum Albumin Level, Male Sex, and Total Gastrectomy Are Risk Factors of Severe Postoperative Complications in Elderly Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Chan; Kim, Hyun Il

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that old age is a risk factor for postoperative complications. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the risk factors for poor postoperative surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Materials and Methods Between January 2006 and December 2015, 247 elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were reviewed. In this study, an elderly patient was defined as a patient aged ≥65 years. All possible variables were used to explore the risk factors for poor early surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Results Based on multivariate analyses of preoperative risk factors, preoperative low serum albumin level (<3.5 g/dl) and male sex showed statistical significance in predicting severe postoperative complications. Additionally, in an analysis of surgery-related risk factors, total gastrectomy was a risk factor for severe postoperative complications. Conclusions Our study findings suggest that low serum albumin level, male sex, and total gastrectomy could be risk factors of severe postoperative complications in elderly gastric cancer patients. Therefore, surgeons should work carefully in cases of elderly gastric cancer patients with low preoperative serum albumin level and male sex. We believe that efforts should be made to avoid total gastrectomy in elderly gastric cancer patients. PMID:27104026

  6. The predictive value of multiple electrode platelet aggregometry for postoperative bleeding complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Karolina; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Kruk, Mariusz; Różański, Jacek; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative bleeding is one of the most serious complications of cardiac surgery and requires transfusion of blood or blood products. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel (CLO) are the two most commonly used antiplatelet agents; when used in combination (i.e., as dual antiplatelet therapy [DAPT]), they exert a synergistic effect. Dual antiplatelet therapy, however, significantly increases the risk of postoperative bleeding. The effect of antiplatelet therapy can be monitored by platelet aggregation testing. One of the most commonly methods used for assessing platelet reactivity is multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) which can be performed with the use of Multiplate analyzer. Although the method has long been used in interventional cardiology to assess the effect of antiplatelet therapy, it is not available at cardiac surgery departments as a standard diagnostic procedure. The aim of the study was to establish the frequency of bleeding complications following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in patients on single antiplatelet therapy (SAPT) and patients on DAPT and to determine the usefulness of routine measurement of platelet responsiveness before CABG surgery in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy. Material and methods A consecutive cohort of 200 patients referred for elective surgical treatment of stable coronary artery disease was enrolled (100 consecutive patients on SAPT [ASA 75 mg/day] and 100 consecutive patients on DAPT [ASA 75 mg/day + CLO 75 mg/day]). All subjects continued their antiplatelet therapy until the day before surgery. For each subject, platelet aggregation testing in the form of an ASPI test and an ADP test was performed on the Multiplate analyzer. Each subject underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. For the primary and secondary endpoints in our study we adopted the definition provided in ‘Standardised Bleeding Definitions for Cardiovascular Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report from the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium’ (‘Circulation’, 2011) for BARC type 4 bleeding (i.e. CABG-related bleeding). Results An ROC curve was constructed for the ASPI test and ADP test for a total of 200 patients. No significant correlations were demonstrated between the ASPI test results and either the primary endpoint or the secondary endpoints. A correlation was found between the ADP test results and the composite primary endpoint and each of the secondary endpoints. The primary endpoint of major postoperative bleeding occurred in 16 subjects. From the ROC curve, we established the optimal cut-off value for the ADP test of 26 U at sensitivity of 72%, specificity of 69%, positive predictive value of 69.90%, and negative predictive value of 71.13%. Conclusions In patients on antiplatelet therapy, an ADP test result of < 26 U is strongly predictive of serious bleeding complications after CABG surgery. The MEA ADP test allows to identify the group of patients at an increased risk of postoperative bleeding. PMID:27212971

  7. Application of Minimum Effective Cuff Inflating Volume for Laryngeal Mask Airway and its Impact on Postoperative Pharyngeal Complications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing-Bing; Yan, Jie; Zhou, Hong-Gang; Hao, Jing; Liu, Ai-Jia; Ma, Zheng-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background: High intracuff pressure can cause severe pharyngeal complications including sore throat or hoarseness after laryngeal mask airway (LMA) removal postoperatively. Though the application of minimum effective cuff inflating volume is suggested to maintain airway sealing and adequacy of ventilation for patients receiving general anesthesia with LMA at lower level of the intracuff pressure, it is currently not a standard care in most of the anesthetic departments. In this study, the minimum effective cuff inflating volume was determined for classic LMA Well Lead™ (Well Lead Medical Co., Ltd., China) and its impact on postoperative pharyngeal complications was also explored. Methods: Patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (I–III) undergoing the short-duration urological surgery were recruited in this trial. First, the minimum effective cuff inflating volume was determined for size 4 or 5 LMA Well LeadTM in the study 1. Immediately following placement and confirmation of ideal LMA position, the cuff was inflated with 5, 7, 10 ml of air and up to 30 ml at 5 ml increment. The intracuff pressure, oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP), and inspiratory peak airway pressure under positive pressure ventilation at the corresponding cuff volume as indicated above were recorded. Second, the enrolled patients were randomly allocated into minimum effective cuff inflating volume group (MC) and routine care (RC) group in the study 2. The minimum effective cuff inflating volume was applied and maintained in MC group, whereas the cuff volume was inflated with half of the maximum cuff inflating volume recommended by manufacturer in RC group throughout the surgical procedure and stay in postanesthesia care unit prior to LMA removal. The incidence of pharyngeal complications at 0, 2, 24, and 48 h after removal of LMA and other intra-operative adverse events were also documented. Results: The intracuff pressure varied with the cuff inflating volume in a positive linear correlation manner (Y = 11.68X − 42.1, r2 = 0.9191) under the range of 5–30 ml for size 4 LMA. In similar with size 4 LMA, the data were also showed the linear relationship between the intracuff pressure and the cuff inflating volume (Y = 7.39X − 10.9, r2 = 0.8855) for size 5 LMA. The minimal effective cuff inflating volume for size 4 or 5 LMA was 7–9 ml in combination of considering OLP needed to maintain airway sealing during intermittently positive pressure ventilation. The intracuff pressure in MC group was lower compared with RC group (63.0 ± 3.7 vs. 126.4 ± 24.0 cmH2O for size 4 LMA; 55.6 ± 2.4 vs. 138.5± 26.8 cmH2O for size 5 LMA; P < 0.0001). The incidence of pharyngeal adverse events was lower in MC group versus the RC group at 2, 24 h after LMA removal. Conclusions: The relationship between the cuff inflating volume and the intracuff pressure for size 4 or 5 LMA Well Lead™ is in a linear correlation manner at the range of 5–30 ml. The minimal cuff inflating volume is adequate for satisfactory airway sealing and consequently associated with lower incidence of postoperative pharyngeal complications for LMA Well Lead.™ PMID:26415792

  8. Management of gunshot wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  9. Impaired biomechanical properties of diabetic skin implications in pathogenesis of diabetic wound complications.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Dustin M; Herdrich, Benjamin J; Xu, Junwang; Lind, Robert; Beason, David P; Mitchell, Marc E; Soslowsky, Louis J; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2011-05-01

    Diabetic skin is known to have deficient wound healing properties, but little is known of its intrinsic biomechanical properties. We hypothesize that diabetic skin possesses inferior biomechanical properties at baseline, rendering it more prone to injury. Skin from diabetic and nondiabetic mice and humans underwent biomechanical testing. Real-time PCR was performed for genes integral to collagen synthesis and degradation. MMP-2 and MMP-9, and TIMP-1 protein levels were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Collagen I and III content was assessed using Western blot analysis. At baseline, both murine and human diabetic skin was biomechanically inferior compared to nondiabetic skin, with decreased maximum stress and decreased modulus (P < 0.001 and < 0.05, respectively). Surprisingly, the expression of genes involved in collagen synthesis were significantly up-regulated, and genes involved in collagen degradation were significantly down-regulated in murine diabetic skin (P < 0.01). In addition, MMP-2 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 protein ratios were significantly lower in murine diabetic skin (P < 0.05). Collagen I levels and I:III ratios were lower in diabetic skin (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the predisposition of diabetics to wounds may be the result of impaired tissue integrity at baseline, and are due, in part, to a defect in the regulation of collagen protein synthesis at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:21514435

  10. Incidence and risk factors for post-operative complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy : a comparison with other neuromuscular conditions.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, A D; Mitchell, M J; Tsirikos, A I

    2014-07-01

    We report the incidence of and risk factors for complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and compare them with those of other neuromuscular conditions. We identified 110 (64 males, 46 females) consecutive patients with a neuromuscular disorder who underwent correction of the scoliosis at a mean age of 14 years (7 to 19) and had a minimum two-year follow-up. We recorded demographic and peri-operative data, including complications and re-operations. There were 60 patients with cerebral palsy (54.5%) and 26 with DMD (23.6%). The overall complication rate was 22% (24 patients), the most common of which were deep wound infection (9, 8.1%), gastrointestinal complications (5, 4.5%) and hepatotoxicity (4, 3.6%). The complication rate was higher in patients with DMD (10/26, 38.5%) than in those with other neuromuscular conditions (14/84, 16.7% (p = 0.019). All hepatotoxicity occurred in patients with DMD (p = 0.003), who also had an increased rate of deep wound infection (19% vs 5%) (p = 0.033). In the DMD group, no peri-operative factors were significantly associated with the rate of overall complications or deep wound infection. Increased intra-operative blood loss was associated with hepatotoxicity (p = 0.036). In our series, correction of a neuromuscular scoliosis had an acceptable rate of complications: patients with DMD had an increased overall rate compared with those with other neuromuscular conditions. These included deep wound infection and hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was unique to DMD patients, and we recommend peri-operative vigilance after correction of a scoliosis in this group. PMID:24986949

  11. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5 values, and absolute and relative V5 values in male vs. female patients. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine correlations between dosimetric factors. Results: Eighteen (16.4%) of the 110 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications. Two of these died of progressive pneumonia. Hospitalizations were significantly longer for patients with postoperative pulmonary complications than for those without (median, 15 days vs. 11 days, p = 0.003). On univariate analysis, female gender (p = 0.017), higher mean lung dose (p = 0.036), higher relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy (V5) (p = 0.023), and smaller volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5-35 Gy (VS5-VS35) (p < 0.05) were all significantly associated with an increased incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. No other clinical factors were significantly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort. On multivariate analysis, the volume of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5) was the only significant independent factor associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Dosimetric factors but not clinical factors were found to be strongly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation plus surgery. The volume of the lung spared from doses of {>=}5 Gy was the only independent dosimetric factor in multivariate analysis. This suggests that ensuring an adequate volume of lung unexposed to radiation might reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications.

  12. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing. PMID:27129711

  13. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka ; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

  14. Preoperative and postoperative care in cosmetic laser resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Adam T.; Becker, Daniel G.

    2001-05-01

    Advances in laser technology have allowed the application of lasers to cosmetic facial skin resurfacing. While this application has been extremely advantageous to patients, the development of pre- and postoperative therapeutic regimens was necessary to mitigate potential complications associated with laser resurfacing. Potential complications of laser resurfacing include prolonged postoperative erythema, hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, herpetic, bacterial or candidal infection, and other concerns including scarring and abnormal wound healing. In this report we review the state of the art of preoperative and postoperative care for cosmetic laser resurfacing.

  15. Intraoperative ventilation strategies to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications: Systematic review, meta-analysis, and trial sequential analysis.

    PubMed

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Schultz, Marcus J; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    For many years, mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes (V(T)) was common practice in operating theaters because this strategy recruits collapsed lung tissue, improves ventilation-perfusion mismatch, and thus decreases the need for high oxygen fractions. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was seldom used because it could cause cardiac compromise. Increasing advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury from animal studies and randomized controlled trials in patients with uninjured lungs in intensive care unit and operation room have pushed anesthesiologists to consider lung-protective strategies during intraoperative ventilation. These strategies at least include the use of low V(T), and perhaps also the use of PEEP, which when compared to high V(T) with low PEEP may prevent the occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). Such protective effects, however, are likely ascribed to low V(T) rather than to PEEP. In fact, at least in nonobese patients undergoing open abdominal surgery, high PEEP does not protect against PPCs, and it can impair the hemodynamics. Further studies shall determine whether a strategy consisting of low V(T) combined with PEEP and recruitment maneuvers reduces PPCs in obese patients and other types of surgery (e.g., laparoscopic and thoracic), compared to low V(T) with low PEEP. Furthermore, the role of driving pressure for titrating ventilation settings in patients with uninjured lungs shall be investigated. PMID:26643098

  16. Postoperative infections after oesophageal resections: the role of blood transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Rovera, Francesca; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Imperatori, Andrea; Tabacchi, Alessandra; Carcano, Giulio; Diurni, Mario; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Background Perioperative blood transfusion carries numerous potential risks concerning the transmission of infective diseases and immunodepression that can facilitate the occurrence of postoperative infectious complications. Explanation of connections between perioperative blood transfusion and postoperative septic complication worldwide is not well documented. Many studies have described a correlation between perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative infections. On the contrary, other studies indicate that factors influencing the need for blood transfusions during surgery have a greater bearing than blood transfusion per se on the occurrence of postoperative complications. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted in our Department on 110 consecutive patients undergoing oesophageal resection for primary cancer, in order to evaluate the incidence of postoperative infections related to perioperative allogenic blood transfusions. For each patient we preoperatively recorded in a computerized data-base several known risk-factors for postoperative infections; in detail we registered the administration of allogenic perioperative blood transfusions (period of administration, number of packages administered). Results Among the enrolled 110 patients, 53 (48%) received perioperative blood transfusions: in this group postoperative infections (overall infective complications) occurred in 27 patients. After a multivariate analysis we observed that perioperative blood transfusions significantly affected as an independent variable the development of wound infections (p = 0.02). Conclusion Blood transfusions independently affected the incidence of wound infections in patients who underwent oesophageal resection for primary cancer. PMID:17118175

  17. Postoperative Infectious Complications in Our Early Experience With Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazushi; Haraguchi, Takahiro; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Muramaki, Mototsugu; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate postoperative infectious complications (PICs) in our early experience with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) followed by mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of the clinical data for 90 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between February 2008 and March 2011. All patients were evaluated for the emergence of PICs, including prophylactic antibiotic administration (PAA) and the influence of the kind or duration of PAA on PIC. The details of cases with PICs were also examined. Results The patients' mean age was 71 years (range, 50 to 95 years), and their mean prostate volume was 60 mL (range, 2 to 250 mL). There were 7 cases (7.78%) with PICs; in detail, 3 patients were diagnosed with prostatitis, 2 with pyelonephritis, and 2 with epididymitis. Three patients had positive urine cultures: 1 had Serratia marcescens/Proteus mirabilis, 1 had S. marcescens, and 1 had Klebsiella pneumonia; only one case had urological sepsis. Our statistical data showed no significant differences between 2 or fewer days and 3 or more days of PAA and PIC occurrence. There was also no significant effect on PIC occurrence of sulbactam/ampicillin compared with other antibiotics. Conclusions The results of this retrospective study showed that PIC occurrence did not depend on the duration or the kind of PAA. Further prospective study is necessary for the evaluation and establishment of prophylactic measures for PICs. PMID:23526729

  18. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea risk on postoperative respiratory complications: protocol for a hospital-based registry study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Christina H; Zaremba, Sebastian; Devine, Scott; Nikolov, Milcho; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with significant immediate and long-term morbidity, including fragmented sleep and impaired daytime functioning, as well as more severe consequences, such as hypertension, impaired cognitive function and reduced quality of life. Perioperatively, OSA occurs frequently as a consequence of pre-existing vulnerability, surgery and drug effects. The impact of OSA on postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) needs to be better characterised. As OSA is associated with significant comorbidities, such as obesity, pulmonary hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke, it is unclear whether OSA or its comorbidities are the mechanism of PRCs. This project aims to (1) develop a novel prediction score identifying surgical patients at high risk of OSA, (2) evaluate the association of OSA risk on PRCs and (3) evaluate if pharmacological agents used during surgery modify this association. Methods Retrospective cohort study using hospital-based electronic patient data and perioperative data on medications administered and vital signs. We will use data from Partners Healthcare clinical databases, Boston, Massachusetts. First, a prediction model for OSA will be developed using OSA diagnostic codes and polysomnography procedural codes as the reference standard, and will be validated by medical record review. Results of the prediction model will be used to classify patients in the database as high, medium or low risk of OSA, and we will investigate the effect of OSA on risk of PRCs. Finally, we will test whether the effect of OSA on PRCs is modified by the use of intraoperative pharmacological agents known to increase upper airway instability, including neuromuscular blockade, neostigmine, opioids, anaesthetics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination The Partners Human Research Committee approved this study (protocol number: 2014P000218). Study results will be made available in the form of manuscripts for publication and presentations at national and international meetings. PMID:26769778

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  20. [The clinical laboratory assessment of vancomycin (Edicin) efficacy in treating suppurative wounds of the skin and soft tissues, burn wounds and the infectious complications of burns].

    PubMed

    Blatun, L A; Krutikov, M G; Grishina, I A; Bobrovnikov, A E; Alekseev, A A; Svetukhin, A M; Iakovlev, V P

    2000-01-01

    Clinical and bacteriological efficacies of vancomycin (Edicin, LEK) in the treatment of 17 patients with wound infection and 13 patients with thermal affections were studied. The clinical efficacy in the group of the patients with purulent wounds of the soft tissues amounted to 94.1 per cent and that in the patients with thermal affections was 92.3 per cent. The bacteriological effect was recorded in 86.6 per cent of the patients with purulent wounds of the soft tissues and in 69.3 per cent of the patients with burn infections. The drug intolerability was observed in two cases. PMID:10707803

  1. Postoperative Complications, In-Hospital Mortality and 5-Year Survival After Surgical Resection for Patients with a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jilesen, Anneke P J; van Eijck, Casper H J; In't Hof, K H; van Dieren, S; Gouma, Dirk J; Nieveen van Dijkum, Els J M

    2016-03-01

    Studies on postoperative complications and survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are sparse and randomized controlled trials are not available. We reviewed all studies on postoperative complications and survival after resection of pNET. A systematic search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE from 2000-2013. Inclusion criteria were studies of resected pNET, which described postoperative complications separately for each surgical procedure and/or 5-year survival after resection. Prospective and retrospective studies were pooled separately and overall pooled if heterogeneity was below 75 %. The random-effect model was used. Overall, 2643 studies were identified and after full-text analysis 62 studies were included. Pancreatic fistula (PF) rate of the prospective studies after tumor enucleation was 45 %; PF-rates after distal pancreatectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, or central pancreatectomy were, respectively, 14-14-58 %. Delayed gastric emptying rates were, respectively, 5-5-18-16 %. Postoperative hemorrhage rates were, respectively, 6-1-7-4 %. In-hospital mortality rates were, respectively, 3-4-6-4 %. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) of resected pNET without synchronous resected liver metastases were, respectively, 85-93 %. Heterogeneity between included studies on 5-year OS in patients with synchronous resected liver metastases was too high to pool all studies. The 5-year DSS in patients with liver metastases was 80 %. Morbidity after pancreatic resection for pNET was mainly caused by PF. Liver resection in patients with liver metastases seems to have a positive effect on DSS. To reduce heterogeneity, ISGPS criteria and uniform patient groups should be used in the analysis of postoperative outcome and survival. PMID:26661846

  2. Stan Scheller: The Forerunner of Clinical Studies on Using Propolis for Poor and Chronic Nonhealing Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzewski, M.; Kubacka, S.; Urbanek, T.; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K.; Morawiec, T.

    2013-01-01

    For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds. PMID:23710220

  3. Evaluation of Response to Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Surgery Alone in Gastroesophageal Cancer: Tumor Resectability, Pathologic Results and Post-Operative Complications.

    PubMed

    Kashefi Marandi, Aref; Shojaiefard, Abolfazl; Soroush, Ahmadreza; Ghorbani Abdegah, Ali; Jafari, Mehdi; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Mahmoudzade, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. Despite significant developments in management, 5-year survival in the developing world is less than 20 percent. Due to restricted research about the impact of preoperative chemotherapy (POC) on tumor resection, pathological response and postoperative complications in Iran, we designed and implemented ‎the present retrospective cross- sectional study on 156 patients with gastroesophageal cancer (GEc) between 2013 and 2015 at Shariati Hospital of Tehran. Two groups were included, the first group had previously received preoperative chemotherapy and the second group had only undergone surgery. All patients were followed for at least one year after the operation in terms of tumor recurrence, relapse free survival and one-year survival. The two groups were eventually compared regarding tumor resection, pathological response, postoperative complications, recurrence rate and survival. The mean age was 66.5± 7.3 years and 78 percent were male. The tumor resectability, pathological response and postoperative complications in the group which received POC were 93.5%, 21.8% and 12.8%, respectively, and in the surgery alone group figures for tumor resection and postoperative complications were 76% and 29.5%, respectively. Also based on our study the 5-year survival in the POC group was better (79.5% vs. 66.5%). Using standard neoadjuvant regimens (preoperative chemotherapy/ chemoradiotherapy) beforesurgery could increase tumor resectability, pathological response, and improve the general status of the patients. Therefore using POC may be recommended over surgery alone. PMID:27165231

  4. Lack of association between arterial oxygen tensions in horses during exploratory coeliotomy and post-operative incisional complications: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Robson, Katherine; Cripps, Peter; Bardell, David

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if there was an association between the lowest arterial blood oxygen tensions (PaO2) measured during anaesthesia and post-operative incisional complications in horses. Clinical records of 278 horses undergoing ventral midline coeliotomy from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2013 were examined. The frequency of incisional complications was 32.0% (n = 89). In a multivariable model, intra-operative arterial blood oxygen tensions (PaO2) were not significantly associated with development of an incisional complication (P = 0.351). Using hypertonic (7.2%) saline (P = 0.028, OR 3.167, 95% CI 1.132-8.861), increasing total plasma protein concentration (TP) (P = 0.002, OR 1.061 per g/L, 95% CI 1.021-1.102), an intestinal resection (P <0.001, OR 4.056, 95% CI 2.231-9.323), increasing body mass (P = 0.004, OR 1.004 per kg, 95% CI 1.001-1.006) and the use of penicillin alone compared with penicillin and gentamicin pre-operatively (P = 0.009, OR 4.145, 95% CI 1.568-10.958) increased the risk of incisional complications. The study was unable to demonstrate a link between low intra-operative PaO2 and increased risk of post-operative incisional complications. PMID:26975449

  5. Influence of two different surgical techniques on the difficulty of impacted lower third molar extraction and their post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Ohanyan, Ani; Kechagias, Nikos; Tsekos, Antonis; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative complications of various degrees of severity are commonly observed in third molar impaction surgery. For this reason, a surgical procedure that decreases the trauma of bone and soft tissues should be a priority for surgeons. In the present study, we compare the efficacy and the post-operative complications of patients to whom two different surgical techniques were applied for impacted lower third molar extraction. Material and Methods Patients of the first group underwent the classical bur technique, while patients of the second group underwent another technique, in which an elevator was placed on the buccal surface of the impacted molar in order to luxate the alveolar socket more easily. Results Comparing the two techniques, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the duration of the procedure and in the need for tooth sectioning when applying the second surgical technique, while the post-operative complications were similar in the two groups. We also found a statistically significant lower incidence of lingual nerve lesions and only a slightly higher frequency of sharp mandibular bone irregularities in the second group, which however was not statistically significant. Conclusions The results of our study indicate that the surgical technique using an elevator on the buccal surface of the tooth seems to be a reliable method to extract impacted third molars safely, easily, quickly and with the minimum trauma to the surrounding tissues. Key words:Mandibular third molar, impacted, surgical technique, extraction, elevator. PMID:26116843

  6. Postoperative survival for patients with thymoma complicating myasthenia gravis—preliminary retrospective results of the ChART database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangrui; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Gu, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    Background It is so far not clear that how myasthenia gravis (MG) affected the prognosis of thymoma patients. The aim of this assay is to compare the postoperative survival between patients with thymoma only and those with both thymoma and MG. Methods The Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) registry recruited patients with thymoma from 18 centers over the country on an intention to treat basis from 1992 to 2012. Two groups were formed according to whether the patient complicated MG. Demographic and clinical data were reviewed, patients were followed and their survival status were analyzed. Results There were 1,850 patients included in this study, including 421 with and 1,429 without MG. Complete thymectomy were done in 91.2% patients in MG group and 71.0% in non-MG group (P<0.05). There were more percentage of patients with the histology of thymoma AB, B1, or B2 (P<0.05) in MG group, and more percentage of patients with MG were in Masaoka stage I and II. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were both higher in MG group (93% vs. 88%; 83% vs. 81%, P=0.034) respectively. The survival rate was significantly higher in patients with MG when the Masaoka staging was 3/4 (P=0.003). Among patients with advanced stage thymoma (stage 3, 4a, 4b), the constituent ratios of 3, 4a, 4b were similar between MG and non-MG group. Histologically, however, there were significantly more proportion of AB/B1/B2/B3 in the MG group while there were more C in the non-MG group (P=0.000). Univariate analyses for all patients showed that MG, WHO classification, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, chemotherapy and radiotherapy and resectability were significant factors, and multivariate analysis showed WHO classification, Masaoka stage, and resectability were strong independent prognostic indicators. Conclusions Although MG is not an independent prognostic factor, the survival of patients with thymoma was superior when MG was present, especially in late Masaoka stage patients. Possible reasons included early diagnosis of the tumor, better histologic types, an overall higher R0 resection and less recurrence.

  7. Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. . E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Wang, Shulian; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

  8. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below. PMID:26157306

  9. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below. PMID:26157306

  10. Early Postoperative Results and Complications of using the EX-PRESS Shunt in uncontrolled Uveitic Glaucoma: A Case Series of Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jonathan CH; Qing, Li; Lai, Jimmy SM

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this case series is to describe the efficacy of the EX-PRESS shunt in uveitic glaucoma. Methods: This prospective case series sequentially recruited uveitic glaucoma subjects with intraocular pressure (IOP) > 21 mm Hg despite maximal topical antiglaucoma medications from July 2012 to July 2013 in Hong Kong. All subjects received a trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (MMC) and EX-PRESS shunt implantation. The primary outcome measures included preope-rative IOP and postoperative IOP on day 1, 1 week, 1 month, and every 3 months thereafter. The secondary outcome measures included postoperative complications and follow-up procedures, pre- and postoperative Snellen best corrected visual acuity and cup-disc ratio, as well as the number of antiglaucoma medication required. Results: In a case series of five subjects with uncontrolled uveitic glaucoma, two had inactive anterior uveitis, and three had active panuveitis. The mean preoperative IOP was 35.4 ± 12.6 mm Hg on 3.8 ± 0.5 antiglaucoma eye drops. The mean day 1, 1 week and 1 month IOP's were 6.6 ± 3.7 mm Hg, 7.2 ± 3.2 mm Hg, and 12.6 ± 8.2 mm Hg, respectively. One case required subconjunctival MMC injections postoperatively; two required conjunctival resuture for leakage; and two had early postoperative hypotony that resolved after oral prednisolone. At 6 months, the mean IOP was 13.2 ± 4.6 mm Hg. Four out of five subjects had IOP < 21 mm Hg without medication, and all had IOP < 21 mm Hg with antiglaucoma medication. Conclusion: The EX-PRESS shunt demonstrates good IOP control with a propensity for hypotony in the early postoperative period in this small uveitic glaucoma series. How to cite this article: Lee JWY, Chan JCH, Qing L, Lai JSM. Early Postoperative Results and Complications of using the EXPRESS Shunt in uncontrolled Uveitic Glaucoma: A Case Series of Preliminary Results. J Current Glau Prac 2014;8(1):20-24.

  11. Local Anaesthetic Infiltration and Indwelling Postoperative Wound Catheters for Patients with Hip Fracture Reduce Death Rates and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Lees, Deborah; A'Court, Jamie; Ankers, Thomas; Harper, Ian; Inman, Dominic; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An analgesic enhanced recovery (ER) protocol for patients with a hip fracture was introduced. It was hypothesised that the ER would reduce pain, length of stay and improve clinical outcomes. The protocol used intraoperative infiltration of levobupivacaine followed by ongoing wound infusions. Methods. Consecutive patients admitted to two hospitals were eligible for the ER protocol. Numerical Reporting Scale pain scores (0–10) were recorded alongside opiate requirements. 434 patients in the ER group (316 full ER, 90 partial ER, and 28 no ER) were compared to a control group (CG) of 100 consecutive patients managed with traditional opiate analgesia. Results. Mean opiate requirement was 49.2 mg (CG) versus 32.5 mg (ER). Pain scores were significantly reduced in the full ER group, p < 0.0001. Direct discharge home and mean acute inpatient stay were significantly reduced (p = 0.0031 and p < 0.0001, resp.). 30-day mortality was 15% (CG) versus 5.5% (ER), p = 0.0024. Conclusions. This analgesic ER protocol for patients with a hip fracture was safe and effective and was associated with reduced inpatient stay and mortality. PMID:26649330

  12. Local Anaesthetic Infiltration and Indwelling Postoperative Wound Catheters for Patients with Hip Fracture Reduce Death Rates and Length of Stay.

    PubMed

    Harrison, William D; Lees, Deborah; A'Court, Jamie; Ankers, Thomas; Harper, Ian; Inman, Dominic; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background. An analgesic enhanced recovery (ER) protocol for patients with a hip fracture was introduced. It was hypothesised that the ER would reduce pain, length of stay and improve clinical outcomes. The protocol used intraoperative infiltration of levobupivacaine followed by ongoing wound infusions. Methods. Consecutive patients admitted to two hospitals were eligible for the ER protocol. Numerical Reporting Scale pain scores (0-10) were recorded alongside opiate requirements. 434 patients in the ER group (316 full ER, 90 partial ER, and 28 no ER) were compared to a control group (CG) of 100 consecutive patients managed with traditional opiate analgesia. Results. Mean opiate requirement was 49.2?mg (CG) versus 32.5?mg (ER). Pain scores were significantly reduced in the full ER group, p < 0.0001. Direct discharge home and mean acute inpatient stay were significantly reduced (p = 0.0031 and p < 0.0001, resp.). 30-day mortality was 15% (CG) versus 5.5% (ER), p = 0.0024. Conclusions. This analgesic ER protocol for patients with a hip fracture was safe and effective and was associated with reduced inpatient stay and mortality. PMID:26649330

  13. Tracheal tube cuff inflation guided by pressure volume loop closure associated with lower postoperative cuff-related complications: Prospective, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Almarakbi, Waleed A.; Kaki, Abdullah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main function of an endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff is to prevent aspiration. High cuff pressure is usually associated with postoperative complications. We tried to compare cuff inflation guided by pressure volume loop closure (PV-L) with those by just to seal technique (JS) and assess the postoperative incidence of sore throat, cough and hoarseness. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, 100 patients’ tracheas were intubated. In the first group (n = 50), ETT cuff inflation was guided by PV-L, while in the second group (n. = 50) the ETT cuff was inflated using the JS technique. Intracuff pressures and volumes were measured. The incidence of postoperative cuff-related complications was reported. Results: Demographic data and durations of intubation were comparable between the groups. The use of PV-L was associated with a lesser amount of intracuff air [4.05 (3.7-4.5) vs 5 (4.8-5.5), P < 0.001] and lower cuff pressure than those in the JS group [18.25 (18-19) vs 33 (32-35), P ≤ 0.001]. The incidence of postextubation cuff-related complications was significantly less frequent among the PV-L group patients as compared with the JS group patients (P ≤ 0.009), except for hoarseness of voice, which was less frequent among the PV-L group, but not statistically significant (P ≤ 0.065). Multiple regression models for prediction of intra-cuff pressure after intubation and before extubation revealed a statistically significant association with the technique used for cuff inflation (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The study confirms that PV-L-guided ETT cuff inflation is an effective way to seal the airway and associates with a lower ETT cuff pressure and lower incidence of cuff-related complications. PMID:25191181

  14. Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT. PMID:24106562

  15. Measuring alterations in intra-abdominal pressure during abdominoplasty as a predictive value for possible postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Talisman, Ran; Kaplan, Baruch; Haik, Josef; Aronov, Stanislav; Shraga, Arkadi; Orenstein, Arie

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the changes in Intra-Abdominal Pressure (IAP) during abdominoplasty and the relevance of these changes to the immediate postoperative recovery period. Eighteen patients (17 females and one male) who underwent abdominoplasty for aesthetic reasons participated in the study. The data collected included measurements of height, weight, and measurements of the intra-urinary bladder pressure prior to surgery, immediately post operative, and 18-24 hours postoperative. Changes in tidal volume and ventilation pressures were also measured prior to surgery and immediately postoperative. The weight of the excised tissue ranged between 1150 g-6500 g with an average of 2700 g. Three patients had significant diasthesis recti repair during surgery. In these patients the measured intra-vesicular pressure was above 24 cm of H(2)O by the end of the operation and above 20 cm of H(2)O the day following surgery. Two out of the three patients were treated with anticoagulants and the symptoms subsided within a week. The third patient recovered spontaneously by the third day. In conclusion, patients with an intra-urinary bladder pressure above 20 cm of H(2)O following abdominoplasty were felt to be at significant risk for development of respiratory distress in the immediate postoperative period. PMID:12140697

  16. [Infectious complications after brain tumor removal: some aspects of their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'ev, A N; Nazarov, R V; Kondrat'eva, E A; Gegraeva, L O; Mikhaĭliuk, V G; Unzhakov, V V

    2007-01-01

    A hundred and fifty-five case histories of neurosurgical patients with the complicated early postoperative period were analyzed. Early postoperative regional pyoinflammatory complications were developed in 21 (4.4%) of 481 patients. There was meningitis in 17 (3.5%) cases, ventriculitis in 2 (0.4%), and wound infection (skin flap suppuration and postoperative wound fistula). Systemic pyoinflammatory complications were observed in 8% of the patients. Among them, there were pyoinflammatory complications in the respiratory system in 30 (6.2%) cases, pyonecrotic cystitis in 5 (1%), and sepsis in 2 (0.4%). Risk factors for regional and systemic complications are shown. Based on the findings, recommendations are given to prevent and treat pyoseptic complications in neurosurgical patients. PMID:17684994

  17. Prospective Study of Postoperative Complications After Total Thyroidectomy for Multinodular Goiters by Surgeons With Experience in Endocrine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zambudio, Antonio Ros; Rodrguez, Jos; Riquelme, Juan; Soria, Teresa; Canteras, Manuel; Parrilla, Pascual

    2004-01-01

    Objetives: (1) To show that total thyroidectomy (TT) can be performed in multinodular goiter (MG) by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery with a definitive complication rate of 1% or less; and (2) to analyze the risk factors for complications in these patients. Summary Background Data: There is current controversy over the role of TT in the treatment of MG; although there are potential benefits, high rates of complications are not acceptable in surgery for a benign pathology. Patients and Method: A prospective study was conducted on 301 MGs meeting the following criteria: (1) bilateral MG; (2) no prior cervical surgery; (3) operation by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery; (4) no associated parathyroid pathology; (5) no initial thoracic approach; and (6) minimum follow-up of 1 year. Age, sex, time of evolution, symptoms, cervical goiter grade, intrathoracic component, thyroid weight, and presence of associated carcinoma were analyzed as risk factors for complications. The ?2 test and a logistic regression analysis were applied. Results: Complications were presented by 62 patients (21%), corresponding to 29 hypoparathyroidisms, 26 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries, 4 lesions of the superior laryngeal nerve, 3 cervical hematomas, and 1 infection of the cervicotomy. The variables associated with the presence of these complications were hyperthyroidism (P = 0.0033), compressive symptoms (P = 0.0455), intrathoracic component (P = 0.0366), goiter grade (P = 0.0195), and weight of excised specimen (P = 0.0302); hyperthyroidism (relative risk [RR] 2.5) and intrathoracic component (RR 1.5) persisted as independent risk factors. Definitive complications appeared in 3 patients (1%), corresponding to 2 hypoparathyroidisms and 1 recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Two cases corresponded to a toxic goiter, and the third to an intrathoracic goiter with compressive symptoms. Conclusion: In endocrine surgery units, TT can be performed for MG with a definitive complication rate of around 1%; the main independent risk factors for the development of complications are hyperthyroidism and goiter size. PMID:15213613

  18. Tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sonal Tina; Banipal, Raja Paramjeet Singh; Bhatti, Deepak John

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the integrity and functional outcomes of skin grafts following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 15 patients, in whom EBRT was planned after their wound coverage with split-thickness skin graft (STSG). Parameters evaluated include defect size, time to postoperative radiotherapy, total radiotherapy dose, delays and interruptions in radiotherapy, wound complications, and the need for further surgical interventions. Results: In all the 15 (6 men, 9 women) patients of STSG, radical doses of EBRT, that is, 50–70 Gy in 25–35 fractions are delivered over around 6 weeks. All STSGs were placed on healthy vascular tissue beds. Median time to initial radiotherapy after grafting was 3 weeks (range 3–6 weeks). There were no interruptions in radiotherapy treatment. In one patient, there was partial skin graft loss after radiotherapy that was adequately managed with conservative treatment. No patient requires further surgical intervention. Conclusion: Adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy can be delivered to STSGs without significant complications. Postoperative radiotherapy can be started as early as 3–4 weeks after skin grafting. Skin grafts should be placed on well-vascularized healthy tissues. Minor skin graft loss resulting from postoperative radiotherapy can usually be treated conservatively. PMID:26539368

  19. Genetic variation in the TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase signaling pathway as markers for postoperative pulmonary complications in lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Roth, Jack A.; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Correa, Arlene M.; Kim, Jae Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications are the most common morbidity associated with lung resection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase pathway is activated by stress stimuli and inflammatory signals. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms within this pathway may contribute to risk of complications. In this case-only study, we genotyped 173 germline genetic variants in a discovery population of 264 NSCLC patients who underwent a lobectomy followed by genotyping of the top variants in a replication population of 264 patients. Complications data was obtained from a prospective database at MD Anderson. MAP2K4:rs12452497 was significantly associated with a decreased risk in both phases, resulting in a 40% reduction in the pooled population (95% CI:0.43–0.83, P = 0.0018). In total, seven variants were significant for risk in the pooled analysis. Gene-based analysis supported the involvement of TRAF2, MAP2K4, and MAP3K5 as mediating complications risk and a highly significant trend was identified between the number of risk genotypes and complications risk (P = 1.63 × 10−8). An inverse relationship was observed between association with clinical outcomes and complications for two variants. These results implicate the TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase pathway in modulating risk of pulmonary complications following lobectomy and may be useful biomarkers to identify patients at high risk. PMID:26165383

  20. Complications Following Direct Anterior Hip Procedures: Costs to Both Patients and Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwo-Chin; Marconi, Dante

    2015-09-01

    A systematic review of the literature on clinical outcomes following direct anterior approach (DAA) hip arthroplasty was performed. An aggregated 11,810 hip procedures were analyzed for intraoperative and early postoperative complications. The most common complication following DAA hip arthroplasty was nerve dysfunction (2.8%) followed by intraoperative fractures (2.3%). Postoperative dislocation, wound complications, and revision THA within the first 12 months were reported in 1.2% of cases. Thus, while DAA hip arthroplasty can be successfully performed, it is not without complications. Without definitive evidence of clinical superiority, surgeons considering switching to DAA should benchmark their personal complication rates against published reports. PMID:26118568

  1. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  2. In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

    2012-01-01

    Objective To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Methods Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. Results With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. Conclusions It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated. PMID:23569962

  3. [Ineffectiveness of incentive spirometry as coadjuvant of conventional physiotherapy for the prevention of postoperative respiratory complications after thoracic and esophageal surgery].

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, J; Sabaté, A; Ramon, R; Gasolibe, V; Villalonga, R

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the efficacy of routine use of incentive spirometry (IS) in two groups of patients: group 1 (n = 18) with IS, and group 2 (n = 19), no IS. All patients suffered from lung or esophagus neoplasm and received respiratory physiotherapy before and after the operation. They underwent high chest and abdomen surgery. The incidence of alterations of pulmonary auscultation, roentgenologic abnormalities and alterations of the alveolar-arterial difference of oxygen (D[A-a]O2) as well as postoperative complications were similar in both groups. Patients undergoing digestive surgery presented a higher frequency of pleural effusion (p less than 0.05) and of them, the subgroup with IS stayed at the hospital for a longer time (47.2 +/- 32 days) than the subgroup undergoing digestive surgery not submitted to IS (p less than 0.01) probably because of the higher incidence of neoplasms of the mean third of the esophagus in such group. In our study and in the context of the type of surgery studied, the routine use of IS does not decrease the frequency of clinical and roentgenologic alterations neither improves the efficacy of postoperative gas interchange. PMID:2098873

  4. [Use of immunochemical studies to predict the course of fibrous cavernous tuberculosis of lung and postoperative complications in patients on chemo and laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, L V; Dobkin, V G; Baenski, A V; Kulikovskaia, N V; Litvinov, V I

    1997-01-01

    A total of 103 patients with fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lung were examined. They all received chemotherapy, including 3 - 4 antituberculous agents. Laser therapy was performed with a UZOR-2K low-energy semiconductor laser. In patients with profound changes in the serum level of protein, with high antigenemia and antibody production, the course of the disease was found to be poor; X-ray positive changes were achieved to a lesser extent, bacterial expellation stopped less frequently and more slowly. The decreases in the serum content of the proteins tested, in the level of antigenemia and antibody production which occur with drug and laser therapies are also an important factor of preoperative preparation, which is highly effective in preventing postoperative complications. PMID:9333810

  5. Acute Pulmonary Oedema: A Post-Operative Complication Due to Neostigmine and Post Obstructive Pulmonary Oedema in a Case of Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Durve, Shubhada R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema has been described in relation to perioperative period. The aetiology may be multifactorial and its management poses a challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Its occurrence in a normal healthy person with no other medical history makes the diagnosis difficult. The causes of pulmonary oedema are cardiac failure, fluid overload, airway obstruction, acid aspiration, gas embolism, anaesthetic drugs, sepsis, anaphylactic reaction and reaction to blood & blood products. Early detection, prompt management by an anaesthesiologist will help to prevent further postoperative complications. We report a case of 9-year-old male child, posted for tonsillectomy under general anaesthesia, who developed acute pulmonary oedema following extubation after reversal with neostigmine and how we managed it successfully. PMID:26266194

  6. Use of “custom made” porous hydroxyapatite implants for cranioplasty: postoperative analysis of complications in 1549 patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefini, Roberto; Esposito, Giacomo; Zanotti, Bruno; Iaccarino, Corrado; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Servadei, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cranioplasty is a surgical intervention aimed at reestablishing the integrity of skull defects, and should be considered the conclusion of a surgical act that began with bone flap removal. Autologous bone is still considered the treatment of choice for cranioplasty. An alternative choice is bioceramic porous hydroxyapatite (HA) as it is one of the materials that meets and comes closest to the biomimetic characteristics of bone. Methods: The authors analyzed the clinical charts, compiled by the neurosurgeon, of all patients treated with custom-made porous HA devices (Custom Bone Service Fin-Ceramica, Faenza) from which epidemiological and pathological data as well as material-related complications were extrapolated. Results: From November 1997 to December 2010, 1549 patients underwent cranioplasty with the implantation of 1608 custom-made porous HA devices. HA was used in 53.8% of patients for decompressive craniectomy after trauma or intracranial hemorrhage, while the remaining cases were for treated for comminuted fracture, cutaneous or osseous resection, cranial malformation, autologous bone reabsorption or infection or rejection of previously implanted material. The incidence of adverse events in patients treated for cranioplasty, as first line treatment was 4.78% (56 events/1171 patients), and 5.02%, (19 events/378 patients) at second line. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that HA is a safe and effective material, is well tolerated in both adult and pediatric patients, and meets the requirements necessary to repair craniolacunia. PMID:23493459

  7. The postoperative spine.

    PubMed

    Rankine, James J

    2014-07-01

    Potential complications following spinal surgery include neural compression due to hematoma, recurrent disk herniation, epidural fibrosis, dural tear with pseudomeningocele formation, and infection. Specific complications relate to the use of spinal instrumentation that include incorrectly positioned instrumentation and failure of spinal fusion leading to instrumentation loosening or breakage. To interpret the postoperative imaging correctly, it is necessary to understand the nature of the surgical procedure that has been performed and the normal postoperative appearances. Magnetic resonance imaging is the mainstay in the evaluation of the postoperative spine. Radiographs and computed tomography continue to have a major role in assessing fusion and in the assessment of complications related to instrumentation. PMID:24896745

  8. Anal cushion lifting method is a novel radical management strategy for hemorrhoids that does not involve excision or cause postoperative anal complications

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Gentaro; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ishiyama, Yuji; Nishio, Akihiko; Tarumi, Ken; Kawamura, Maiko; Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Fujimiya, Mineko; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the anal cushion lifting (ACL) method with preliminary clinical results. METHODS: Between January to September 2007, 127 patients who received ACL method for hemorrhoid was investigated with informed consent. In this study, three surgeons who specialized in anorectal surgery performed the procedures. Patients with grade two or more severe hemorrhoids according to Goligher’s classification were considered to be indicated for surgery. The patients were given the choice to undergo either the ACL method or the ligation and excision method. ACL method is an original technique for managing hemorrhoids without excision. After dissecting the anal cushion from the internal sphincter muscle, the anal cushion was lifted to oral side and ligated at the proper position. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients were recorded including complications after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 127 patients were enrolled. Their median age was 42 (19-84) years, and 74.8% were female. In addition, more than 99% of the patients had grade 3 or worse hemorrhoids. The median follow-up period was 26 (0-88) mo, and the median operative time was 15 (4-30) min. After surgery, analgesics were used for a median period of three days (0-21). Pain control was achieved using extra-oral analgesic drugs, although some patients required intravenous injections of analgesic drugs. The median duration of the patients’ postoperative hospital stay was 7 (2-13) d. A total of 10 complications (7.9%) occurred. Bleeding was observed in one patient and was successfully controlled with manual compression. Urinary retention occurred in 6 patients, but it disappeared spontaneously in all cases. Recurrent hemorrhoids developed in 3 patients after 36, 47, and 61 mo, respectively. No anal stenosis or persistent anal pain occurred. CONCLUSION: We consider that the ACL method might be better than all other current methods for managing hemorrhoids. PMID:26525139

  9. A comparison of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing in the prediction of postoperative cardiac complications in patients requiring arterial reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    McPhail, N.V.; Ruddy, T.D.; Calvin, J.E.; Davies, R.A.; Barber, G.G.

    1989-07-01

    The individual and combined predictive values of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing were compared in a prospective study of 70 patients who had abdominal aortic aneurysms or aortoiliac occlusive disease that required surgical repair. All patients were evaluated clinically by the same cardiologist and had exercise stress testing and dipyridamole-thallium imaging before admission for surgery. Ten patients were excluded from the study because they had evidence of severe ischemia when tested (ST segment depression greater than 2 mm on exercise testing, severe multivessel disease on thallium imaging). The remaining 60 patients were operated on (abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, 40; aortobifemoral repair, 17; femorofemoral graft, 3). The test results were withheld from the surgeon, anesthetist, and cardiologist before surgery. A total of 22 patients experienced major cardiac complications postoperatively (acute pulmonary edema, 17; acute myocardial infarction, 5; cardiac death, 2). Thallium imaging showed myocardial ischemia in 31/60 patients. Exercise testing was positive (greater than or equal to 1 mm ST segment depression) in 10/60 patients. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging with a high sensitivity and reasonable specificity is the initial test of choice. Exercise testing is a poor screening test because of its low sensitivity. The combination of the two tests gives the highest positive predictive value and the greatest likelihood ratio. Thus patients assessed initially and found to have positive thallium scan results may be further stratified by exercise testing.

  10. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. PMID:26515943

  11. Puncture Wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ankle Conditions » Puncture Wounds Text Size Print Bookmark Puncture Wounds What Is a Puncture Wound? Puncture wounds are not the same as ... seeks professional treatment right away. Foreign Bodies in Puncture Wounds A variety of foreign bodies can become ...

  12. Abdominoperineal resection without an abdominal incision for rectal cancer has the advantage of no abdominal wound complication and easier stoma care.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Abdominoperineal resection has been used for years for the management of low rectal cancer. However, the abdominal incision is associated with many complications and causes interference of the stoma care. If the abdominal incision can be avoided, it would be beneficial to the patient. The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility and safety of performing abdominoperineal resection and the oncology result without an abdominal incision. From September 2001 to May 2010, 40 patients with rectal malignancies received excision of the rectum, anus, and perineum through a perineal incision and a skin hole created for stomy. No harmonic scalpel or laser was used during surgery. No laparoscope or hand port was used in the procedure. There were 19 males and 21 females. Age ranged from 31 to 87 years old (average, 62.9 years). There were 39 adenocarcinomas and one malignant gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor. There was no operative mortality. Six patients had postoperative complications; three patients had intestinal obstructions; and one patient each had bleeding, urinary tract infection, and colostomy separation from the skin. The lymph nodes in the specimens ranged from 9 to 33 cm (average, 16.8 cm). The survival is similar to the traditional abdominoperineal resection. This limited experience suggests that an abdominal incision is not necessary for radical resection of the rectum, anus, and perineum in patients with low-lying rectal cancer. It also offers the patient easier care of stoma without interference of the abdominal incision. PMID:22369824

  13. Conservative Management of Wound Dehiscence Following Pediatric Cavus Foot Surgery: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cavus foot surgeries are relatively common procedures in pediatric orthopedics. Following surgery, the tensile forces exerted on the wound by the newly corrected foot may hinder soft tissue healing and lead to wound dehiscence. Treatments including skin grafting and other plastic surgery procedures have been described in order to manage this complication. However, the effectiveness of conservative treatment regimens in cases of large dehiscence of these wounds has not yet been reported. Methods: The charts of 7 patients between the ages of 7 and 19 who had surgical correction of severe cavus deformity and who developed wound dehiscence postoperatively were reviewed. All patients were treated conservatively with regular cleaning with chlorhexedine and application of different ointments and dressings along with surgical debridements. Three patients also received antibiotics. The primary outcome was wound healing as documented by clinical notes and photographs. Results: The treatment was successful in producing the desired outcome in all cases with no other systemic or wound complications developing. Complete wound healing was obtained within a median time of 6 months and 5 days of treatment without the need for skin grafting or other plastic surgery procedures. Conclusions: In pediatric patients with wound dehiscence postcavus foot surgery, conservative management with minimal surgical debridement and regular cleaning and dressing of the wound is a viable treatment option that has been shown to be effective in 7 cases. It should be considered in such patients before proceeding to more invasive surgical treatment. PMID:26894015

  14. Management of postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Melissa; Magnuson, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Postoperative ileus, a temporary cessation in bowel motility, is a common and significant complication of major surgery. Consequences of postoperative ileus include increased patient discomfort, delayed time to adequate nutrition, prolonged length of stay, and increased cost to the patient and healthcare system. The traditional, multi-modal approach to the resolution of postoperative ileus includes opioid minimization, early ambulation, and early feeding. Newer medications, such as methlynaltrexone and alvimopan (which are peripherally acting mu opioid receptor antagonists), have become available and have proven beneficial for use with postoperative ileus. PMID:22385598

  15. Impact of GOLD groups of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Choi, Sun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased postoperative complications. Recently, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classified COPD patients into four groups based on spirometry results and the severity of symptoms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of GOLD groups on postoperative complications. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of COPD patients who underwent preoperative spirometry between April and August 2013 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. We divided the patients into GOLD groups according to the results of spirometry and self-administered questionnaires that assessed the symptom severity and exacerbation history. GOLD groups, demographic characteristics, and operative conditions were analyzed. Results Among a total of 405 COPD patients, 70 (17.3%) patients experienced various postoperative complications, including infection, wound, or pulmonary complications. Thoracic surgery, upper abdominal surgery, general anesthesia, large estimated blood loss during surgery, and longer anesthesia time were significant risk factors for postoperative complications. Patients in high-risk group (GOLD groups C or D) had an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those in low-risk group (GOLD groups A or B). Conclusion COPD patients in GOLD groups representing a high exacerbation risk have an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those with low risk. PMID:26929613

  16. Complications Following Anorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, Hiroko; Poylin, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Anorectal surgery is well tolerated. Rates of minor complications are relatively high, but major postoperative complications are uncommon. Prompt identification of postoperative complications is necessary to avoid significant patient morbidity. The most common acute complications include bleeding, infection, and urinary retention. Pelvic sepsis, while may result in dramatic morbidity and even mortality, is relatively rare. The most feared long-term complications include fecal incontinence, anal stenosis, and chronic pelvic pain. PMID:26929747

  17. A comparative study of wound dressings on full-thickness wounds in micropigs.

    PubMed

    Gokoo, C; Burhop, K

    1993-09-01

    Eight full-thickness (to the depth of adipose tissue) skin wounds were surgically inscribed on the backs of four Yucatan micropigs (32 wound sites in total). Wound sites were created to allow for controlled comparative evaluation between wound sites, wound dressings, and specified postoperative healing time. The wounds were dressed with either ClearSite hydrogel dressing (New Dimensions in Medicine, Dayton, Ohio) or Duoderm hydrocolloid wound dressing (ConvaTec Inc., Princeton, New Jersey). Tracings and photographs of each wound site were made and computerized planimetry was done to compare the rate of epithelialization for like wounds and like wound dressings. Histomorphometric measurements were also made to compare the effects of the dressing on the wounds at the cellular level. The results of this study indicate that the wounds covered with the hydrogel dressing exhibited a more rapid rate of closure and reepithelialization as compared with the hydrocolloid wound dressing. PMID:8286020

  18. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage with Postoperative Morbidity after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Lu, Jian-Wen; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background. The advantages or disadvantages of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) prior to pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) remain unclear. Methods. A prospectively maintained database was queried for 335 consecutive patients undergoing standard PD surgery between 2009 and 2013. Clinical data and postoperative complications of the 47 patients receiving PBD and 288 patients with early surgery were compared. A matching analysis was also performed between patients receiving or not receiving PBD (no-PBD). Results. The indication for PBD was severe obstructive jaundice (81%) and cholangitis (26%) at the time of PBD. 47 PBD patients had higher bilirubin level than 288 no-PBD patients preoperatively (363.2 μmol/L versus 136.0 μmol/L, p < 0.001). Although no significant difference of any complications could be observed between the two groups, positive intraoperative bile culture and wound infection seemed to be moderately increased in PBD compared to no-PBD patients (p = 0.084 and 0.183, resp.). In the matched-pair comparison, the incidence of wound infection was three times higher in PBD than no-PBD patients (14.9% versus 4.3%, p = 0.080). Conclusions. PBD seems to moderately increase the risk of postoperative wound and bile duct infection. Therefore, PBD should be selectively performed prior to PD. PMID:26798333

  19. Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

  20. Airway Compromise Due to Wound Hematoma Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Mark A; Aidlen, Jessica Pelow; Daniels, Alan H; Thakur, Nikhil A; Caiati, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    One of the most serious adverse events associated with anterior cervical spine surgery is wound hematoma resulting in airway compromise. The reported incidence of this postoperative complication has varied from 0.2% to 1.9%. Obstruction of the airway secondary to bleeding presents a challenging clinical scenario given the rapidity of onset, distorted anatomy of the upper respiratory tract, urgent need to act and potential for catastrophic consequences. This high-risk, life-threatening clinical scenario requires specialized knowledge and a well-designed treatment protocol to achieve a positive outcome. In this review, we report a case of airway compromise secondary to wound hematoma following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, followed by a review of relevant literature, anatomy, etiologic factors and diagnostic considerations. We also propose guidelines for the prevention and management of postoperative airway obstruction due to wound hematoma. PMID:22431955

  1. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development. PMID:26611234

  2. Wound care in horses.

    PubMed

    Caston, Stephanie S

    2012-04-01

    Care of equine wounds in the field can be a challenging endeavor. Many times, wound care is complicated by chronicity or by prior inappropriate care in addition to the great degree of tissue trauma that occurred when the horse was wounded. Recognizing involvement of synovial structures, loss of skin, and damage to bone are critical in the initial examination of wounds and will guide future care. Education of clients is also important in that preparing them for possible outcomes during healing may help improve compliance and proper treatment of wound. Owners and trainers often perform much of the daily care and monitoring of equine wounds and thus can greatly assist or impede the progress. Bandaging is important to management of equine wounds-especially on the limbs-and is sometimes overlooked because of its labor-intensive nature and the desire for a spray, ointment, or salve that will heal the wound. The practitioner that improves and utilizes his or her understanding of the wound-healing process in concert with his or her knowledge of local anatomy will be the one who is best equipped to care for wounds in ambulatory practice. PMID:22640581

  3. Obesity and Surgical Wound Healing: A Current Review

    PubMed Central

    Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Dinh, Trish Phuong; Salas, R. Emerick; Johnson, Erika L.; Wright, Terry G.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The correlation between obesity and deficient wound healing has long been established. This review examines the current literature on the mechanisms involved in obesity-related perioperative morbidity. Methods. A literature search was performed using Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Internet searches. Keywords used include obesity, wound healing, adipose healing, and bariatric and surgical complications. Results. Substantial evidence exists demonstrating that obesity is associated with a number of postoperative complications. Specifically in relation to wound healing, explanations include inherent anatomic features of adipose tissue, vascular insufficiencies, cellular and composition modifications, oxidative stress, alterations in immune mediators, and nutritional deficiencies. Most recently, advances made in the field of gene array have allowed researchers to determine a few plausible alterations and deficiencies in obese individuals that contribute to their increased risk of morbidity and mortality, especially wound complications. Conclusion. While the literature discusses how obesity may negatively affect health on various of medical fronts, there is yet to be a comprehensive study detailing all the mechanisms involved in obesity-related morbidities in their entirety. Improved knowledge and understanding of obesity-induced physiological, cellular, molecular, and chemical changes will facilitate better assessments of surgical risks and outcomes and create efficient treatment protocols for improved patient care of the obese patient population. PMID:24701367

  4. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. PMID:22147959

  5. Effects of Postoperative Pain Management on Immune Function After Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Hur, Hyuk; Lee, Jinae; Noh, Hyun-Young; Lee, Jong Ho; Koo, Bon-Neyo

    2016-05-01

    There has been a rising interest in the possible association between perioperative opioid use and postoperative outcomes in cancer patients. Continuous surgical wound infiltration with local anesthetics is a nonopioid analgesic technique that can be used as a postoperative pain management alternative to opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an opioid-based analgesic regimen versus a local anesthetic wound infiltration-based analgesic regimen on immune modulation and short-term cancer recurrence or metastasis in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer.Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to either the opioid group or the ON-Q group. For postoperative analgesia during the first 48 hours, the opioid group (n = 30) received fentanyl via IV PCA, whereas the ON-Q group (n = 30) received continuous wound infiltration of 0.5% ropivacaine with an ON-Q pump and tramadol via IV PCA. Pethidine for the opioid group and ketorolac or propacetamol for the ON-Q group were used as rescue analgesics. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. The primary outcome was postoperative immune function assessed by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) and interleukin-2. Secondary outcomes were postoperative complications, cancer recurrence, or metastasis within 1 year after surgery, and postoperative inflammatory responses measured by white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, and C-reactive protein. Immune function and inflammatory responses were measured before surgery and 24 and 48 hours after surgery.Fifty-nine patients completed the study. In the circumstance of similar pain control efficacy between the opioid group and the ON-Q group, postoperative NKCC and interleukin-2 levels did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of postoperative complications and recurrence or metastasis within 1 year after surgery was comparable between the groups. Postoperative inflammatory responses were also similar between the groups.When compared with ropivacaine wound infiltration-based analgesia, fentanyl-based analgesia did not further decrease NKCC or affect short-term cancer recurrence or metastasis. Thus, a fentanyl-based analgesic regimen and a ropivacaine wound infiltration-based analgesic regimen can both be used for postoperative pain management in laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer. PMID:27175664

  6. Laparoscopy in trauma: An overview of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kindel, Tammy; Latchana, Nicholas; Swaroop, Mamta; Chaudhry, Umer I; Noria, Sabrena F; Choron, Rachel L; Seamon, Mark J; Lin, Maggie J; Mao, Melissa; Cipolla, James; El Chaar, Maher; Scantling, Dane; Martin, Niels D; Evans, David C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of laparoscopy has provided trauma surgeons with a valuable diagnostic and, at times, therapeutic option. The minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic surgery, combined with potentially quicker postoperative recovery, simplified wound care, as well as a growing number of viable intraoperative therapeutic modalities, presents an attractive alternative for many traumatologists when managing hemodynamically stable patients with selected penetrating and blunt traumatic abdominal injuries. At the same time, laparoscopy has its own unique complication profile. This article provides an overview of potential complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in trauma, focusing on practical aspects of identification and management of laparoscopy-related adverse events. PMID:26557490

  7. A single-center experience of hemofiltration treatment for acute aortic dissection (Stanford type A) complicated with postoperative acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Peng; Zhang, Xi-Quan; Pang, Xin-Yan; Cao, Guang-Qing; Fang, Chang-Cun; Wu, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for aortic dissection patients with acute renal failure after surgery in retrospective manner. Methods: A total of thirty-seven aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure accepted CVVH therapy. The effect of CVVH was evaluated by analyzing clinical condition changes and laboratory examination results. Results: After treatment of CVVH, renal function and clinical symptoms were significantly improved in thirty patients. Eight of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within two weeks after CVVH therapy; and twenty-two of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within four weeks after CVVH therapy. Nevertheless, seven patients got no benefit from CVVH therapy with poor prognosis. Conclusion: CVVH is an effective treatment to most aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure. The effect of CVVH was correlated with original renal function, early CVVH therapy, and continuous intensive care. PMID:26550312

  8. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of events, beginning with tissue injury, mediated by inflammation, and ending long after reepithelialization is complete. Research and controlled clinical experience have provided a better understanding so that clinicians can influence the events of healing to decrease pain, control bleeding, infection, and cosmetic result as well as speed the time for complete healing. The following is a summary of guidelines for the management of wound healing: (1) wound creation; wounds should be created with minimal necrosis of tissue in order to prevent delays in healing. Electrosurgical, cryosurgical, and laser surgical wounds heal more slowly than wounds created by scalpel excision or curettage. Electro-coagulation should be used sparingly in sutured wounds. Large lesions are best treated in a single stage rather than in divided treatments since the rate of wound healing is not proportional to the area but instead to the logarithm of the area. Thus, the total healing time is much shorter if done in a single treatment session. (2) use of drugs; corticosteroids given before or within three days of wounding in dose of prednisone 40 mg or greater will inhibit wound healing. Vitamin A topically or systemically may reverse this inhibition. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are more important for their effects on platelet function and bleeding than on wound healing. (3) wound dressings; the use of occlusive dressings to promote moist wound healing is the most significant advance in wound management. Occlusive dressings shorten the time for healing, decrease pain, reduce wound contamination, and improve the cosmetic result. (4) control of wound contraction and scar formation; at the time of wound formation, guiding sutures may be helpful in wound healing by secondary intention in order to control the direction of wound contraction and prevent distortion. Intralesional steroids may be useful for hypertrophic scars and keloids. (5) identification of complications; early identification of certain complications can prevent the delays in healing. These include infection, remembering infrequently cultured organisms such as yeast, malnourishment with protein and mineral deficiency, and the knowledge that adhesive-backed wound dressings can cause rewounding of otherwise normally healing wounds. (6) predicting the cosmetic result; wounds healed by secondary intention may provide a cosmetic result superior to surgical repair. Wounds in concave areas usually heal with a better result than wounds managed by flaps or grafts although wounds on convex surfaces usually look best if a skillful primary closure can be performed without distortion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3079257

  9. Wound Dehiscence and Device Migration after Subconjunctival Bevacizumab Injection with Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Miraftabi, Arezoo; Nilforushan, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a complication pertaining to subconjunctival bevacizumab injection as an adjunct to Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (AGV) implantation. Case Report: A 54-year-old woman with history of complicated cataract surgery was referred for advanced intractable glaucoma. AGV implantation with adjunctive subconjunctival bevacizumab (1.25 mg) was performed with satisfactory results during the first postoperative week. However, 10 days after surgery, she developed wound dehiscence and tube exposure. The second case was a 33-year-old man with history of congenital glaucoma and uncontrolled IOP who developed AGV exposure and wound dehiscence after surgery. In both cases, for prevention of endophthalmitis and corneal damage by the unstable tube, the shunt was removed and the conjunctiva was re-sutured. Conclusion: The potential adverse effect of subconjunctival bevacizumab injection on wound healing should be considered in AGV surgery. PMID:27195095

  10. Computed tomography of the postoperative abdominal aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, S.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.; Bosniak, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen was performed on 46 patients who had undergone graft replacement of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twelve post-operative complications were found in nine patients. They included hemorrhage, infection, anastomotic pseudoaneurysms, major vessel occlusion, postoperative pancreatitis, and others. The varied apperance of the normal postoperative graft is also presented. It is concluded that CT is a rapid, sensitive, and noninvasive method for detecting or excluding postoperative complications of abdominal aortic surgery.

  11. Management of Complications Following Emergency and Elective Surgery for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical spectrum of sigmoid diverticulitis (SD) varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications. Sigmoid colectomy with restoration of continuity has been the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent SD, and is often performed as a laparoscopy-assisted procedure. For elective sigmoid colectomy, the postoperative morbidity rate is 15-20% whereas morbidity rates reach up to 30% in patients who undergo emergency surgery for perforated SD. Some of the more common and serious surgical complications after sigmoid colectomy are anastomotic leaks and peritonitis, wound infections, small bowel obstruction, postoperative bleeding, and injuries to the urinary tract structures. Regarding the management of complications, it makes no difference whether the complication is a result of an emergency or an elective procedure. Methods The present work gives an overview of the management of complications in the surgical treatment of SD based on the current literature. Results To achieve successful management, early diagnosis is mandatory in cases of deviation from the normal postoperative course. If diagnostic procedures fail to deliver a correlate for the clinical situation of the patient, re-laparotomy or re-laparoscopy still remain among the most important diagnostic and/or therapeutic principles in visceral surgery when a patient's clinical status deteriorates. Conclusion The ability to recognize and successfully manage complications is a crucial part of the surgical treatment of diverticular disease and should be mastered by any surgeon qualified in this field. PMID:26989382

  12. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  13. Wound dressings for primary and revision total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing post-surgical complications after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is of great importance, and application of an appropriate wound dressing is necessary. Since no dressing encompasses all the parameters required for ideal wound healing, a comparison of the available dressing types can assist the surgeon to choose the best dressing after TJA. Methods Studies evaluating postoperative wound dressings after TJA were reviewed in order to assess the outcomes, complications and costs associated with dressing types. Results Traditional cotton dressings have a high ability to absorb exudate. However, they dry out sooner and there is a risk of pain and additional trauma during dressing changes. Although vapor permeable dressings allow transmission of moisture, but they have low absorptive capacity and require frequent changes even with moderately exudating wounds. On the other hand, hydrofiber and hydrocolloid dressings have high absorptive capacity and permeability, and can cope with exudate production. They are changed less often and have low blistering rates, which may reduce surgical site infection (SSI). Although the unit cost associated with advanced dressings is much higher than the traditional dressings, the decreased rate of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) and the cost associated with treating PJI more than compensate for it. Conclusions Choice of dressing type after TJA should depend upon permeability, absorptive capacity, documented rate of SSI and cost effectiveness with its use, apart from a surgeon’s past clinical experience and familiarity. PMID:26605314

  14. [Wounds and dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Bulić, Suzana Ozanić; Kotrulja, Lena; Sjerobabski-Masnec, Ines

    2012-10-01

    Wounds are a hallmark of various skin diseases. Most patients with wounds suffer from chronic venous insufficiency or other vascular diseases. Autoimmune, infective, metabolic, malignant, some psychiatric and diseases caused by environmental factors like radiation, present with skin and mucosal erosions and ulcerations. Lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Kaposi sarcoma, genodermatoses like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease belong to different dermatological entities, they have different etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation, but at some stage ulcerations and erosions dominate through the disease course as a result of complications of untreated disease or as part of a complex clinical presentation. Wounds demand a different multidisciplinary therapeutic approach, sometimes even in intensive care unit, where special care is available. Most patients are followed-up to avoid fatal complications like sepsis, as well as a potential malignant transformation of cells in the environment of chronic inflammation. Wounds are found in female genital lichen planus and lichen sclerosus. Oral lichen planus has a potential for malignant transformation and is considered a precancerous disease. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a life threatening disease similar to burns. Wounds cover most of the body surface as well as mucosa. The high mortality rate is due to complications like sepsis, loss of thermoregulation, electrolyte and fluid disbalance and shock. Chronic wounds are also a hallmark of skin tumors and other skin malignancies like Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The primary treatment goal in genodermatoses like epidermolysis bullosa is wound care, and to a less extent in other inherited skin diseases like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease wound healing is important for sustaining a good quality of life in affected individuals. PMID:23193818

  15. [Therapy of both surgical and non-surgical related complication of gastric cancer for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zheng, Jiabin

    2016-05-25

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common digestive malignant tumors. More and more elderly gastric cancer patients are diagnosed and need to undergo surgical treatment as the population ages. Since the elderly patients decrease in organ function and increase in internal diseases, the tolerance to anesthesia and surgery is poor. As a result, the incidence of surgical and postoperative complications is obviously higher. Complications can be divided into surgical complications and non-surgical related complications. Surgical complications consist mainly of hemorrhage, anastomotic leakage, anastomotic dehiscence and intestinal obstruction, while non-surgical related complications include deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary infection, anesthesia-related complication, abdominal infection, urinary infection, incision infection, poor wound healing, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, dumping syndrome and so on. Hence, we should consider more about the elderly patients' physical condition instead of the extent of radical operation. To reduce complications, we should evaluate the organ function and take an active role in underlying diseases before operation. Meanwhile, high quality nursing, powerful analgesia, anti-inflammation, keeping water electrolyte balance and nutrition support are also required postoperatively. Moreover, laparoscopic surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) can reduce the postoperative complications in elderly patients with gastric cancer as well. Further prospective randomized controlled trials about elderly gastric cancer should be carried out in the future, which can provide advanced evidences for treatment. PMID:27215514

  16. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  17. Clinical Outcome and Wound Healing following Carpal Tunnel Decompression: A Comparison of Two Common Suture Materials

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, Robert J.; Donnelly, Thomas D.; Morapudi, Syam; Waseem, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Debate exists amongst surgeons regarding the ideal suture material for skin closure in carpal tunnel decompression (CTD). This study compares wound related complications, patient satisfaction, and functional outcome following open carpal tunnel decompression in patients undergoing wound closure with either of two common absorbable and nonabsorbable suture types. Materials and Methods. 53 patients underwent CTD with either 4/0 polypropylene (ProleneTM, n = 28) or 4/0 polyglactin (Vicryl RapideTM, n = 25) for skin closure. QuickDASH, VAS satisfaction scores, and Southampton wound scores were assessed preoperatively and at 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively. Results. At 6 weeks the mean QuickDASH scores postoperatively were 18.54 and 17.70 for absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures, respectively, (P = 0.86). The mean VAS scores were 0.61 and 0.42 (P = 0.91), respectively. All patients achieved a Southampton wound score of 0 by 6 weeks except one, who achieved 1C in the nonabsorbable group, equivalent to mild erythema. There were no complications in either group. Conclusion. Both suture types are safe and effective materials for CTD, and we recommend surgeons to choose according to personal preference, handling properties, and resources available for suture removal. PMID:25165693

  18. Effect of Wound Classification on Risk-Adjustment in American College of Surgeons NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Mila H.; Cohen, Mark E.; Bilimoria, Karl Y.; Latus, Melissa S.; Scholl, Lisa M.; Schwab, Bradley J.; Byrd, Claudia M.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Hall, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical wound classification has been used in risk-adjustment models. However, it can be subjective and potentially improperly bias hospital quality comparisons. The objective is to examine the effect of wound classification on hospital performance risk-adjustment models. Study Design Retrospective review of the 2011 ACS NSQIP database was conducted for wound classification categories: clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. To assess the influence of wound classification on risk-adjustment, two models were developed for each outcome: one including and one excluding wound classification. For each model, hospital postoperative complications were estimated using hierarchical multivariable regression methods. Absolute changes in hospital rank, correlations of odds-ratios, and outlier status agreement between models were examined. Results Of the 442,149 cases performed in 315 hospitals: 53.6% were classified as clean; 34.2% clean/contaminated; 6.7% contaminated; and 5.5% dirty/infected. The surgical site infection (SSI) rate was highest in dirty/infected (8.5%) and lowest in clean (1.8%) cases. For overall SSI, the absolute change in risk-adjusted hospital performance rank between models including vs. excluding wound classification was minimal (mean 4.5 out of 315 positions). The correlations between odds ratios of the two performance models were nearly perfect (R=0.9976, P<0.0001), and outlier status agreement was excellent (Kappa=0.9508, P<0.0001). Similar findings were observed in models of subgroups of SSI and other postoperative outcomes. Conclusions In circumstances where alternate information is available for risk-adjustment, there appear to be minimal differences in performance models that include vs. exclude wound classification. Therefore, ACS NSQIP is critically evaluating the continued use of wound classification in hospital performance risk-adjustment models. PMID:25053222

  19. Postoperative Spinal Wound Infections and Postprocedural Diskitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Vives, Michael J; Basra, Sushil K; Reiter, Mitchell F

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Postprocedural infections are a significant cause of morbidity after spinal interventions. Methods: Literature review. An extensive literature review was conducted on postprocedural spinal infections. Relevant articles were reviewed in detail and additional case images were included. Results: Clinical findings, laboratory markers, and imaging modalities play important roles in the detection of postprocedural spinal infections. Treatment may range from biopsy and antibiotics to multiple operations with complex strategies for soft tissue management. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postprocedural spinal infections and limiting their long-term sequelae. PMID:18092559

  20. [Completion pneumonectomy: indications, complications, and results].

    PubMed

    Kiral, Hakan; Koşar, Altuğ; Orki, Alpay; Temurtürkan, Kemal; Urek, Senol; Keleş, Murat; Dudu, Canan Senol; Arman, Bülent

    2004-01-01

    Completion pneumonectomy is reported to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially when performed in patients with benign diseases. In our study we aimed to evaluate all patients underwent completion pneumonectomy in our clinic and to compare indications, complications and postoperative results with the literatures. Between January 1987 and December 2001, 27 consecutive patients who underwent completion pneumonectomy in our clinic were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were calculated according to indications and the results were compared to the standard pneumonectomies. There were 27 patients, 13 (48.1%) women and 14 (51.9%) men, with a median age of 26 (range, 10 to 62 years). Completion pneumonectomy was performed for benign diseases in 23 (85.2%) patients and for malign diseases in 4 (14.8%). Malign indications included 2 second primary tumors and 2 local recurrences. In the group with benign diseases; completion pneumonectomy was performed for tuberculosis in 5, bronchiectasis in 14, bronchopleural fistula in 2 and necrosis of lung in 2. Hospital mortality was 7.4% including 1 intraoperative and 1 postoperative deaths and both of them had undergone completion pneumonectomy for benign diseases. Complications occurred in 9 (33.3 %) patients, bronchopleural fistula + empyema were seen in 6 patients, cardiac rhythm disorders in 2 and wound infection in 1. All complications occurred in the patients operated for benign indications (39.1%). Completion pneumonectomy can be performed with an acceptable morbidity and mortality (similar to standard pneumonectomy) in selected cases. But the complication risk is higher in benign diseases, especially in tuberculosis. Surgical technique is important to avoid serious complications such as bronchopleural fistula and empyema. PMID:15143374

  1. Management of complications and compromised free flaps following major head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Durmus, Kasim; Uysal, Ismail O; Old, Matthew; Agrawal, Amit; Arshad, Hassan; Teknos, Theodoros N; Ozer, Enver

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are preferred for most major head and neck reconstruction surgeries because of better functional outcomes, improved esthetics, and generally higher success rates. Numerous studies have investigated measures to prevent flap loss, but few have evaluated the optimal treatment for free flap complications. This study aimed to determine the complication rate after free flap reconstructions and discusses our management strategies. Medical records of 260 consecutive patients who underwent free flap reconstructions for head and neck defects between July 2006 and June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed for patient and surgical characteristics and postoperative complications. The results revealed that microvascular free flaps were extremely reliable, with a 3.5 % incidence of flap failure. There were 78 surgical site complications. The most common complication was neck wound infection, followed by dehiscence, vascular congestion, abscess, flap necrosis, hematoma, osteoradionecrosis, and brisk bleeding. Twenty patients with poor wound healing received hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which was ineffective in three patients who eventually experienced complete flap loss. Eleven patients with vascular congestion underwent medicinal leech therapy, which was effective. Among the 78 patients with complications, 44 required repeat surgery, which was performed for postoperative brisk bleeding in three. Eventually, ten patients experienced partial flap loss and nine experienced complete flap loss, with the latter requiring subsequent pectoralis major flap reconstruction. Microvascular free flap reconstruction represents an essential and reliable technique for head and neck defects and allows surgeons to perform radical resection with satisfactory functional results and acceptable complication rates. PMID:25575841

  2. Effect of oral factor Xa inhibitor and low-molecular-weight heparin on surgical complications following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Moon, Young-Wan; Lim, Seung-Jae; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Youn-Soo

    2016-02-29

    This prospective study was conducted to report the effect of oral factor Xa inhibitor and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) on surgical complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA). The patients with an age postoperatively and continued for two weeks after surgery. Primary measure outcome was major surgical wound complications defined as haematoma requiring any intervention, superficial wound infection, deep periprosthetic infection, and increased wound bleeding. Secondary measured outcome included minor surgical complications (swelling, drainage, erythema, and oozing), organ bleeding, and venous thromboembolic (VTE) events. A total of 184 patients aged complications associated with thromboprophylaxis was 6.5?% (58/886). There were no significant differences in the rate of major surgical complications among all the three groups of the patients aged wound oozing continued significantly longer in the pharmacological group than in the placebo group, but wound infection did not occur in any case. The VTE events were similar in all the groups. PMID:26790579

  3. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  4. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group. PMID:26310621

  5. Current concepts in negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Howe, Lisa M

    2015-05-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming recognized in veterinary medicine as a viable option for the management of complex wounds. NPWT has many advantages over traditional wound care and results in quicker and improved wound healing in many instances. This article discusses the art and science of NPWT, as well as the many current indications, complications, advantages and disadvantages, and future directions of NPWT in small animal veterinary medicine. This therapy will likely have a growing role in veterinary medical practice for complicated wound management and other usages in coming years. PMID:25744142

  6. Bioelectrical impedance assessment of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, Henry C; Moore, Micheal

    2012-01-01

    Objective assessment of wound healing is fundamental to evaluate therapeutic and nutritional interventions and to identify complications. Despite availability of many techniques to monitor wounds, there is a need for a safe, practical, accurate, and effective method. A new method is localized bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) that noninvasively provides information describing cellular changes that occur during healing and signal complications to wound healing. This article describes the theory and application of localized BIA and provides examples of its use among patients with lower leg wounds. This promising method may afford clinicians a novel technique for routine monitoring of interventions and surveillance of wounds. PMID:22401341

  7. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  8. Comparison of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) &conventional wound dressings in the open fracture wounds

    PubMed Central

    Arti, Hamidreza; Khorami, Mohsen; Ebrahimi-Nejad, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Successful closure is a primary step of treatment in open fracture wounds. Delayed healing or complications can lead to increased treatment duration, costs and disability rates. The aim of this study was to compare Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) and conventional wound dressings in patients with open fracture wounds. Methods: In a prospective randomized clinical trial study, 90 patients with open fractures that were referred for treatment were enrolled between February 2013 to March 2015. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I underwent NPWT and group II underwent conventional wound dressing. Then patients were followed up for one month. Within the one month, the number of dressing change varied based on the extent of the wound. Duration of wound healing, presence of infection and the number of hospitalization days in these patients were recorded and compared at the end of the study between the two groups. Questionnaires and check lists were used to collect data. Analysis was done with SPSS 20, paired sample T-test, and chi-square tests. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the rate of wound healing in the group one or NPWT group and group II (conventional wound dressings) P<0.05. There was no significant difference between two groups in incidence of infection (P=0.6). Conclusion: Using NPWT expedites the healing process of extremity wounds. It is more economical and can be considered as a substitute for the treatment of extremity wounds. PMID:27022347

  9. Gastric partitioning complicated by peripheral neuropathy with lumbosacral plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Harwood, S C; Chodoroff, G; Ellenberg, M R

    1987-05-01

    Gastric bypass and partitioning are the two surgical procedures most commonly used in the treatment of morbid obesity. They are, however, not without their postoperative complications. These include acute and chronic problems such as wound infection, gastric leak, obstruction, embolism, and neurologic sequelae. Many studies have mentioned the frequent occurrence of polyneuropathy in the postgastrectomy state. This report describes a 38-year-old patient who developed an asymmetric peripheral neuropathy with lumbosacral plexus involvement following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. PMID:3034193

  10. Etiology, treatment, and complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Munante-Cardenas, Jose Luis; Facchina Nunes, Paulo Henrique; Passeri, Luis Augusto

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate some epidemiological characteristics, surgical treatment methods, and complications of cases involving mandibular fractures. Records from 119 patients treated for mandibular fractures between January 2006 and December 2011 were analyzed. We find mandibular fractures mostly affect Caucasian (72.2%) men (80.7%). The mean age of the patients was 28.1 years. Road traffic accidents (RTA) caused the most fractures (49.5%), followed by physical violence, including gunshot wounds (21%). Motorcycle accidents were the most common cause of RTA (76.2%). The most affected mandibular regions were the parasymphysis (26.9%) and the mandible angle (25.1%). Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments were applied (90.4% and 9.6%, respectively). The most common surgical approach was the intraoral (64.9%), using the 2.0-mm fixation system (88.0%). Complications such as postoperative infections, malocclusion, and paresthesia occurred in 36 patients (30.2%). This research revealed interesting features about the etiology of mandibular fractures that were mostly associated with RTA. Severity of the trauma and noncompliance of the patients were factors that contributed to the development of postoperative complications. PMID:25643329

  11. Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials – one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery – show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:276–84. PMID:24352756

  12. [Case of successful prevention of multiple organ dysfunctions in 74 years old patient with sepsis after Crawford surgery complicated with pleural empyema, chest wall tissues infection and osteomyelitis of ribs].

    PubMed

    Babaev, M A; Eremenko, A A; Charchian, É R; Kononets, P V; Bazarov, D V; Ziuliaeva, T P; Oreshkina, T D; Bogopol'skaia, O M; Kim, S Iu; Titova, I V; Fedorov, D S

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with a clinical case demonstrating that patient's elderly age is not an absolute contraindication for complex surgery in spite of high risk of postoperative complications. Early diagnostics, target treatment of the infection cite with vacuum-assisted therapy for wounds and the treatment of infectious complications based on individual characteristics of elderly patient with sepsis as an outcome of prosthetic thoracoabdominal aortic repair allowed avoiding multiple organ dysfunctions in the patient. PMID:24749312

  13. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  14. Infection in conflict wounded.

    PubMed

    Eardley, W G P; Brown, K V; Bonner, T J; Green, A D; Clasper, J C

    2011-01-27

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  15. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as traditional or conventional therapy in the literature, although they typically are not the first line of treatment in Ontario. Modern moist interactive dressings are foams, calcium alginates, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, and films. Topical antibacterial agents—antiseptics, topical antibiotics, and newer antimicrobial dressings—are used to treat infection. The Technology Being Reviewed Negative pressure wound therapy is not a new concept in wound therapy. It is also called subatmospheric pressure therapy, vacuum sealing, vacuum pack therapy, and sealing aspirative therapy. The aim of the procedure is to use negative pressure to create suction, which drains the wound of exudate (i.e., fluid, cells, and cellular waste that has escaped from blood vessels and seeped into tissue) and influences the shape and growth of the surface tissues in a way that helps healing. During the procedure, a piece of foam is placed over the wound, and a drain tube is placed over the foam. A large piece of transparent tape is placed over the whole area, including the healthy tissue, to secure the foam and drain the wound. The tube is connected to a vacuum source, and fluid is drawn from the wound through the foam into a disposable canister. Thus, the entire wound area is subjected to negative pressure. The device can be programmed to provide varying degrees of pressure either continuously or intermittently. It has an alarm to alert the provider or patient if the pressure seal breaks or the canister is full. Negative pressure wound therapy may be used for patients with chronic and acute wounds; subacute wounds (dehisced incisions); chronic, diabetic wounds or pressure ulcers; meshed grafts (before and after); or flaps. It should not be used for patients with fistulae to organs/body cavities, necrotic tissue that has not been debrided, untreated osteomyelitis, wound malignancy, wounds that require hemostasis, or for patients who are taking anticoagulants. Review Strategy The inclusion criteria were as follows: Randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a sample size of 20 or more Human study Published in English Summary of Findings Seven international health technology assessments on NPWT were identified. Included in this list of health technology assessments is the original health technology review on NPWT by the Medical Advisory Secretariat from 2004. The Medical Advisory Secretariat found that the health technology assessments consistently reported that NPWT may be useful for healing various types of wounds, but that its effectiveness could not be empirically quantified because the studies were poorly done, the patient populations and outcome measures could not be compared, and the sample sizes were small. Six RCTs were identified that compared NPWT to standard care. Five of the 6 studies were of low or very low quality according to Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. The low and very low quality RCTs were flawed owing to small sample sizes, inconsistent reporting of results, and patients lost to follow-up. The highest quality study, which forms the basis of this health technology policy assessment, found that: There was not a statistically significant difference (≥ 20%) between NPWT and standard care in the rate of complete wound closure in patients who had complete wound closure but did not undergo surgical wound closure (P = .15). The authors of this study did not report the length of time to complete wound closure between NPWT and standard care in patients who had complete wound closure but who did not undergo surgical wound closure There was no statistically significant difference (≥ 20%) in the rate of secondary amputations between the patients that received NPWT and those that had standard care (P = .06) There may be an increased risk of wound infection in patients that receive NPWT compared with those that receive standard care. Conclusion Based on the evidence to date, the clinical effectiveness of NPWT to heal wounds is unclear. Furthermore, saline dressings are not standard practice in Ontario, thereby rendering the literature base irrelevant in an Ontario context. Nonetheless, despite the lack of methodologically sound studies, NPWT has diffused across Ontario. Discussions with Ontario clinical experts have highlighted some deficiencies in the current approach to wound management, especially in the community. Because NPWT is readily available, easy to administer, and may save costs, compared with multiple daily conventional dressing changes, it may be used inappropriately. The discussion group highlighted the need to put in place a coordinated, multidisciplinary strategy for wound care in Ontario to ensure the best, continuous care of patients. PMID:23074484

  16. Modern wound care - practical aspects of non-interventional topical treatment of patients with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Dissemond, Joachim; Augustin, Matthias; Eming, Sabine A; Goerge, Tobias; Horn, Thomas; Karrer, Sigrid; Schumann, Hauke; Stücker, Markus

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic wounds is becoming increasingly complex. It was therefore the aim of the members of the working group for wound healing (AGW) of the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) to report on the currently relevant aspects of non-interventional, topical wound treatment for daily practice. -Beside necessary procedures, such as wound cleansing and débridement, we describe commonly used wound dressings, their indications and practical use. Modern antiseptics, which are currently used in wound therapy, usually contain polyhexanide or octenidine. Physical methods, such as negative-pressure treatment, are also interesting options. It is always important to objectify and adequately treat pain symptoms which often affect these patients. Modern moist wound therapy may promote healing, reduce complications, and improve the quality of life in patients with chronic wounds. Together with the improvement of the underlying causes, modern wound therapy is an important aspect in the overall treatment regime for patients with chronic wounds. PMID:24813380

  17. Complications of Elbow Trauma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emilie V; Sarkissian, Eric J

    2015-11-01

    The elbow is a highly congruent trochoginglymoid joint allowing motion in both flexion-extension and pronosupination across 3 articulations. Therefore, treatment of fractures of the elbow can be technically challenging to manage, even after initial surgery. The posttraumatic elbow is prone to complications such as stiffness associated with heterotopic ossification, instability or subluxation (posterolateral rotatory instability and varus posteromedial instability patterns), and wound complications. This article discusses the pathoanatomy, prevention, and treatment of these complications. PMID:26498555

  18. Delayed Complications after Anterior Craniofacial Resection of Malignant Skull Base Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Stacey T.; Lin, Alice; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Busse, Paul; Sanan, Akshay; Deschler, Daniel G.; Lin, Derrick T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report complications occurring at least 6 months after completion of treatment for patients with anterior skull base malignancy undergoing anterior craniofacial resection (CFR). Design Retrospective review of medical records of all patients undergoing traditional CFR for treatment of anterior skull base malignancy from 2002 through 2011. Setting Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Cranial Base Center. Participants Thirty-one consecutive patients who had at least 18 months of follow-up for analysis were reviewed. All patients underwent traditional CFR. A total of 28 patients received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy. Eleven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Main Outcome Measures A delayed complication was any complication occurring at least 6 months after the completion of treatment. Results Seventeen patients had delayed complications. Orbital complications were the most common type (13 patients) followed by issues with wound healing (6 patients). The most common orbital complication was epiphora (7 patients). The most common wound complication was a nasocutaneous fistula (5 patients). Conclusions Patients with anterior skull malignancy can develop complications months to years after the completion of treatment. Therefore, it is important to continue to follow and report complications for several years when deciding on the optimal approach for treatment of these patients. PMID:24719797

  19. Complication Rates of the 720 Video-Assisted Minilaparotomy Living Donor Nephrectomies: Supplementing Clavien Classification

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ha Bum; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Yang, Seung Choul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN) has been reported to be as safe and effective as open surgery. We systematically evaluated the safety of video-assisted minilaparotomy surgery-living donor nephrectomy (VAMS-LDN) with use of the modified Clavien classification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed complications in 720 cases of VAMS-LDN conducted in our institute from 2003 to 2010 by use of the modified Clavien classification of surgical complications. Results The mean age of the donors was 39.3 years (range, 16 to 66 years) and their mean body mass index was 23.3 kg/m2 (range, 15.8 to 36.4 kg/m2). A total of 67 complications occurred (9.3%). Based on the modified Clavien classification, grade 1, 2a, and 2b complications occurred in 49 (6.8%), 16 (2.2%), and 2 (0.3%) of the donors, respectively. Most grade 1 complications involved mild vascular injuries that were immediately repaired with polypropylene sutures during the surgery. These did not cause any postoperative problems. The other grade 1 complications were wound dehiscence, not requiring secondary closure, and wound site pain in 11 (1.5%) and 5 (0.7%) cases, respectively. Grade 2a complications occurred in 16 (2.2%) cases: 9 (1.3%) involved postoperative transfusions and 1 (0.1%) involved a renal fossa hematoma. One grade 2b complication occurred; it was a lymphocele that resolved with placement of a pigtail catheter. No complications classified as grade 2c or worse occurred. Conclusions According to the present analysis of complications, VAMS-LDN is a safe procedure with complication rates comparable to those of LLDN as evaluated in previous studies. PMID:22323976

  20. [Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2012-10-01

    Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described. PMID:23193824

  1. Prevalence and predictors of complications following facial reconstruction procedures.

    PubMed

    Prakasam, S; Stein, K; Lee, M K; Rampa, S; Nalliah, R; Allareddy, V; Allareddy, V

    2016-06-01

    Facial reconstruction procedures are immensely challenging and are done for a multitude of reasons. The purpose of this report is to provide nationally representative estimates of different types of facial reconstructive procedures and to examine prevalence and predictors of a wide range of complications associated with these procedures in the USA. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the largest inpatient dataset for the USA, was used. Data for the years 2004-2010 related to facial reconstruction procedures were identified through ICD-9-CM procedure codes. Associated complications were identified using secondary diagnosis field codes. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association between patient/hospital-level factors and the occurrence of complications. A total 26,374 facial reconstruction procedures were performed. About 20% of all patients who had facial reconstruction procedures developed a complication. Frequently occurring complications included postoperative pneumonia (4.9% of hospitalizations), hemorrhage (3.9%), other infections (3.6%), non-healing wounds (3.5%), and iatrogenically induced complications (3.2%). Significant factors found to be consistently associated with different types of complications included age, co-morbid burden, sex, and type of admission. The reported results are generalizable within limitations and can be used by health care providers to tailor quality improvement initiatives to minimize or better treat complications in the high-risk cohorts. PMID:26819151

  2. Aloe vera dermal wound gel is associated with a delay in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J M; Greenspoon, J S

    1991-07-01

    We evaluated the time interval required for wound healing using a standard wound management protocol with and without aloe vera gel. Twenty-one women were studied who had wound complications requiring healing by second intention after cesarean delivery or laparotomy for gynecologic surgery. Wounds treated with standard management healed in a mean (+/- SD) time interval of 53 +/- 24 days, whereas those treated with aloe vera gel required 83 +/- 28 days (P = .003). The use of aloe vera dermal wound gel was associated with a significant delay in wound healing compared with treatment with an otherwise identical regimen that did not include aloe vera. PMID:2047051

  3. A comparative study of postoperative pain for open thyroidectomy versus bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic thyroidectomy using a self-reporting application for iPad

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Young Jun; Song, Junho; Kang, Jiyoung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Song, Ra-Yeong; Kwon, Hyungju; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, June Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative pain for robotic thyroid surgeries including bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) has not been well studied. In this study, we have developed a self-reporting application (SRA) for iPad and prospectively collected pain scores from open thyroidectomy (OT) and BABA robotic thyroidectomy (RT) patients. Methods Female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma were included. Patients recorded pain scores for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, chest, and back on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. Once discharged, on postoperative day 14, a survey was also conducted on satisfaction of SRA and cosmesis. Results A total of 54 patients were enrolled (27 BABA RT and 27 OT). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative complication rates. Postoperative pain scores at days 1, 2, 3, and 14 were not significantly different between the groups for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, or back. Postoperative analgesic requirements were similar between the 2 groups. Wound satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the BABA RT group (BABA RT 7.4 vs. OT 5.7; P = 0.016). Satisfaction scores for the usefulness of SRA were above 7.2 for all four questionnaire items on the 10-point scale. Conclusion Postoperative pain for BABA RT is equivalent to OT but offers greater cosmetic satisfaction for patients. A mobile device application such as SRA may facilitate proper assessment and management of pain in postoperative patients. PMID:27186567

  4. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  5. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  6. [Prevention of postoperative surgical site infections : Between tradition and evidence].

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, S; Artelt, T; Bauer, M; Waeschle, R M

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative wound infections represent a relevant complication of invasive interventions. Current European prevalence data show that for participating hospitals from Germany (n = 132) surgical site infections represent the most commonly occurring nosocomial infection with 24.3 %. This corresponds to a point prevalence of 1.31 %. It is assumed that approximately 25-33 % of all infections acquired in hospital could be prevented if all possible precautions would be taken. Recent studies have indicated that this rate might be even higher for individual infection entities. Infection control measures can be divided into general measures, which are valid for prevention in many fields and for many infection entities and into specific precautions related to hospital-specific circumstances or specific infection entities. In this article the various hygiene measures and recommendations are presented with respect to the level of evidence. PMID:27146286

  7. Conventional single-port laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis in children: Efficient and cost-effective

    PubMed Central

    Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Ulusoy, Oktay; Ateş, Oğuz; Hakgüder, Gülce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is gradually gaining popularity among paediatric surgeons for complicated appendicitis. A retrospective study was conducted to compare conventional single port LA, multiport LA and open appendectomy (OA) for complicated appendicitis in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1995 from December 2014, 1,408 patients (604 girls, 804 boys) underwent surgery for uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. The patient characteristics, operation times, duration of hospitalization, operative costs, and postoperative complications were recorded. A 10-mm 0° scope with a parallel eye piece and an integrated 6 mm working channel were inserted through an 11-mm “conventional umbilical port” for single port LA. RESULTS: A total of 314 patients with complicated appendicitis (128 girls, 186 boys) underwent appendectomy. Among these, 102 patients (32.4%) underwent single port LA, 17 patients (5.4%) underwent multiport LA and 195 patients (62.1%) underwent OA. The hospital stay of the single port LA group was significantly less (3.88 ± 1.1) compared with multiport LA (5.41 ± 1.2) and OA groups (6.14 ± 1.1) (P < 0.001). Drain usage, wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates were significantly high in the OA group. There was no significant difference between the groups in postoperative intraabdominal abscess formation. Single-port LA performed for complicated appendicitis was cheaper compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has shown that single-port LA for complicated appendicitis can be conducted in a reasonable operative time; it shortens the hospitalization period, markedly reduces postoperative wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates and does not increase the operative cost. PMID:26917914

  8. Effect of laparoscopic cholecystectomy techniques on postoperative pain: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Oguzhan; Apiliogullari, Seza; Acar, Fahrettin; Alptekin, Husnu; Calisir, Akın; Sahin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive surgical technics have benefits such as decreased pain, reduced surgical trauma, and increased potential to perform as day case surgery, and cost benefit. The primary aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled study was to compare the effects of single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) and conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) procedures regarding postoperative pain. Methods Ninety adult patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomized to either SILC or CLC. Patient characteristics, postoperative abdominal and shoulder pain scores, rescue analgesic use, and intraoperative and early postoperative complications were recorded. Results A total of 83 patients completed the study. Patient characteristics, postoperative abdominal and shoulder pain scores and rescue analgesic requirement were similar between each group except with the lower abdominal pain score in CLC group at 30th minute (P = 0.04). Wound infection was seen in 1 patient in each group. Nausea occurred in 13 of 43 patients (30%) in the SILC group and 8 of 40 patients (20%) in the CLC group (P > 0.05). Despite ondansetron treatment, 6 patients in SILC group and 7 patients in CLC group vomited (P > 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery, SILC or CLC techniques does not influence the postoperative pain and analgesic medication requirements. Our results also suggest that all laparoscopy patients suffer moderate and/or severe abdominal pain and nearly half of these patients also suffer from some form of shoulder pain. PMID:24106680

  9. Necrotizing postsurgical infection complicating midurethral sling procedure with unrecognized cystotomy.

    PubMed

    Mahal, Amandeep Singh; Bradley, Catherine S

    2012-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with stress urinary incontinence underwent a retropubic midurethral sling procedure. On postoperative day 1, she presented with persistent abdominal pain and fever. A computed tomographic scan showed subcutaneous lower abdominal wall edema and gas above the fascia suggesting a necrotizing soft tissue infection. She was surgically debrided twice, which included removal of the mesh sling on postoperative day 4. Cystoscopy suggested unrecognized bladder perforation had occurred during the initial procedure, and record rerevealed untreated bacteriuria before sling placement. The patient required wound vacuum therapy and a later secondary wound closure procedure. Six months after the initial surgery, she was reevaluated for stress urinary incontinence and underwent a transobturator midurethral sling procedure with resolution of these symptoms. Necrotizing postsurgical infection is a rarely described complication of midurethral slings. Treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication includes aggressive surgical debridement, administration of broad-spectrum antibiotic, removal of infected implants, and supportive therapy. Unrecognized bladder injury and preoperative bacteriuria are discussed as potential risk factors for postsling necrotizing infection. PMID:22543774

  10. Complications in laparoscopic colorectal resection: main types and prevention.

    PubMed

    Regadas, F S; Rodrigues, L V; Nicodemo, A M; Siebra, J A; Furtado, D C; Regadas, S M

    1998-06-01

    Most colorectal procedures can be done laparoscopically, as has been described by many authors. In the first 5 years of colorectal laparoscopic surgery, many complications have ensued, such as intestinal perforation, bleeding, infection, anastomotic leakage, and dehiscence. In 146 patients who underwent laparoscopic procedures from December 1991 to August 1996, 92 colorectal resections were performed. Most resections were performed for malignant diseases (48.9%) and the most common surgical procedure was rectosigmoidectomy (32.6%). Sixty-six patients (71.7%) were female, and the mean age was 59.4 years. Transoperative complications occurred in three patients (3.3%): one sigmoid perforation, one rectal perforation, and one case of left ureter transection. Postoperative complications occurred in 24 patients (29.3%): anastomotic leakage (4), intestinal perforation (1), incisional hernia (4), wound infection (8), shoulder pain (1), dehiscence of perineal wound (4), and colostomy necrosis (2). We concluded that laparoscopic colorectal resection is a safe surgical method and that the rate of complications is similar to that of the conventional method. PMID:9649041

  11. Barbed versus traditional sutures for wound closure in knee arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Deting; Yin, Houfa; Xie, Hui; Ma, Honghai; Chen, Erman; Hu, Dongcai; Pan, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Sutures are an increasing focus of research in knee arthroplasty (KA). Whether knotless barbed sutures (KBS) are safe and efficient in KA remains controversial. The objective of our study is to compare the clinical outcomes of KA according to wound closure method: KBS versus knotted traditional sutures (KTS). To clarify this, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nine articles involving 10 studies were included in this study. The dataset consisted of 1729 patients with 1754 KA. Among these, 814 patients’ wounds were closed with KBS and 915 with KTS. Our analysis indicates that KBS is preferable for KA wound closure given its shorter wound closure time and lower total cost; postoperative Knee Society scores and complication rates were similar to those of surgeries using KTS. The subgroup analysis revealed that closure of arthrotomy with KBS appears to be associated with a lower risk of complications. This meta-analysis indicates that use of KBS in KA reduces operative time and cost. KBS is the preferred option for wound closures, including arthrotomy and reattachment of subcutaneous and subcuticular tissues. Given the possible biases, adequately powered and better-designed studies with longer follow-up are required to reach a firmer conclusion. PMID:26805714

  12. The association between gastrostomy tube placement, poor post-operative outcomes, and hospital re-admissions in head and neck cancer patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ashley C.; Worley, Mitchell; Ackall, Feras; D'Agostino, Ralph; Waltonen, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Investigate the relationship of G-tube placement timing on post-operative outcomes. Participants 908 patients underwent resection of head and neck upper aerodigestive tract tumors between 2007 and 2013. Patient charts were retrospectively screened for patient demographics, pre-operative nutrition variables, co-morbid conditions, Tumor-Node-Metastasis staging, surgical treatment type, and timing of G-tube placement. Exclusionary criteria included death within the first three months of the resection and resections performed solely for nodal disease. Main Outcomes Post-surgical outcomes, including wound and medical complications, hospital re-admissions, length of inpatient hospital stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) time. Results 793 surgeries were included: 8% of patients had G-tubes pre-operatively and 25% had G-tubes placed post-operatively. Patients with G-tubes (pre-operative or post-operative) were more likely to have complications and prolonged hospital care as compared to those without G-tubes (p < 0.001). Patients with pre-operative G-tubes had shortened length of stay (p = 0.007), less weight loss (p = 0.03), and fewer wound care needs (p < 0.0001), when compared to those that received G-tubes post-operatively. Those with G-tubes placed post-operatively had worse outcomes in all categories, except pre-operative BMI. Conclusions Though having enteral access in the form of a G-tube at any point suggests a more high risk patient, having a G-tube placed in the pre-operative period may protect against poor post-operative outcomes. Post-operative outcomes can be predicted based on patient characteristics available to the physician in the pre-operative period. PMID:26321115

  13. The Outcome of Using Closed Suction Wound Drains in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Waly, Feras; Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Abduljabbar, Fahad H.; Landry, Tara; Ouellet, Jean; Moran, Kathryn; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective Determine whether closed suction wound drains decrease the incidence of postoperative complications compared with no drain use in patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched up through January 22, 2015, to identify studies comparing the use of closed suction wound drains with no drains in spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Outcomes assessed included the cumulative incidence of epidural hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, and postoperative blood transfusion. The overall strength of evidence across studies was based on precepts outlined by the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. Results Five heterogeneous studies, three randomized controlled trials, and two cohort studies form the evidence basis for this report. There was no difference in the incidence of hematoma, superficial wound infection, or deep infection in patients with compared with patients without closed suction wound drains after lumbar surgery. The upper bounds of the 95% confidence interval for hematoma ranged from 1.1 to 16.7%; for superficial infection, 1.0 to 7.3%; and for deep infection, 1.0 to 7.1%. One observational study reported a 3.5-fold increase in the risk of blood transfusion in patients with a drain. The overall strength of evidence for these findings is considered low or insufficient. Conclusions Conclusions from this systematic review are limited by the quality of included studies that assessed the use of closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgeries for degenerative conditions. We believe that spine surgeons should not routinely rely on closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgery until a higher level of evidence becomes available to support its use. PMID:26682098

  14. Telemedicine and wound care.

    PubMed

    Ong, Cheri A

    2008-01-01

    Although wound care has been practiced for centuries, telewound care is a relatively new concept. Currently, only a few pilot programs are in existence. Telewound care has yet to achieve the popularity and recognition of its other telemedicine predecessors amongst members of the health care industry and public alike. The tremendous potential of incorporating the technology of telemedicine into wound care needs to be realized. Wound care is a representation of the care of chronic and debilitating conditions that require long-term specialized care. We have seen the positive effects of improved living conditions and advances in health care globally. The result: people are now living longer. Every day a small piece is added to the pie: the percentage of world's elderly and those with chronic medical conditions that would require medical attention is rising. With the escalating costs of health care, and the push of the industry towards outpatient care, this is a part of the health care crisis that is demanding our immediate attention. We have seen positive outcomes in the care of other chronic medial conditions using telemedicine such as home telecare programs. In addition, the effectiveness of several programs using available advances in technology such as the field of radiology has been established. Wound care can build on success created in these fields to create an effective and useful method of care. The aim of this chapter is to recognize the impact of this problem, to introduce several pilot programs in several different aspects of wound care and to build on current resources in order to achieve a novel method of wound care. The goal would be to create a technologically advanced, cost-effective and user-friendly program, and be able to bridge the gap between the sick and available specialized care. Both store-and-forward technology and televideo have a role to play in telewound care, the latter greater in the role of home telecare and teleconsultation, and the former in post-operative patients and the follow-up of chronic wounds. Either way, both have been underutilized and underdeveloped. With the advances in the field of telecommunications in connecting people across distances at a fraction of the time and costs, improved outcomes reported in other fields of telemedicine and positive legislative changes, there is an enormous potential in this field. We now have the ability, knowledge and resources to develop telewound care programs, which can provide high quality patient care in a more concise and cost-effective way. It is certainly a welcoming relief to a field that has traditionally been known to pose an emotional, physical and financial drain to all those involved. PMID:18305332

  15. Intra- and postoperative catumaxomab in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: safety and two-year efficacy results from a multicentre, single-arm, phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J; Reinthaller, A; Marth, C; Reimer, D; Reimer, T; Stummvoll, W; Angleitner-Boubenizek, L; Brandt, B; Chekerov, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: This is the first study investigating the safety and efficacy of the trifunctional antibody catumaxomab administered i.p. at the end of cytoreductive surgery and postoperatively prior to standard chemotherapy in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Patients received i.p. catumaxomab 10 μg intraoperatively and 10, 20, 50 and 150 μg on days 7, 10, 13 and 16, respectively, postoperatively. After the study, patients received standard chemotherapy and were followed for 23 months. The primary endpoint was the rate of postoperative complications. Results: Forty-one patients entered the study and were evaluable for safety and 34 were alive at 24 months. Complete tumour resection rate was 68%. Postoperative complications were observed in 51%, the most common anastomotic leakage (7%) and wound infections (5%). The most common catumaxomab-related adverse events were abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and pyrexia. Thirty-nine percent discontinued catumaxomab therapy, and 98% received chemotherapy post study. Kaplan–Meier estimates of disease-free and overall survival after 24 months were 56% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Intra- and close postoperative catumaxomab seems feasible, but efficacy and safety were limited by postsurgical complications. In the future prospective trials are needed to investigate the best schedule of integration of catumaxomab into current treatment strategies for EOC. PMID:25225907

  16. Surgical complications and their impact on patients’ psychosocial well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Anna; Faiz, Omar; Davis, Rachel; Almoudaris, Alex; Vincent, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical complications may affect patients psychologically due to challenges such as prolonged recovery or long-lasting disability. Psychological distress could further delay patients’ recovery as stress delays wound healing and compromises immunity. This review investigates whether surgical complications adversely affect patients’ postoperative well-being and the duration of this impact. Methods The primary data sources were ‘PsychINFO’, ‘EMBASE’ and ‘MEDLINE’ through OvidSP (year 2000 to May 2012). The reference lists of eligible articles were also reviewed. Studies were eligible if they measured the association of complications after major surgery from 4 surgical specialties (ie, cardiac, thoracic, gastrointestinal and vascular) with adult patients’ postoperative psychosocial outcomes using validated tools or psychological assessment. 13 605 articles were identified. 2 researchers independently extracted information from the included articles on study aims, participants’ characteristics, study design, surgical procedures, surgical complications, psychosocial outcomes and findings. The studies were synthesised narratively (ie, using text). Supplementary meta-analyses of the impact of surgical complications on psychosocial outcomes were also conducted. Results 50 studies were included in the narrative synthesis. Two-thirds of the studies found that patients who suffered surgical complications had significantly worse postoperative psychosocial outcomes even after controlling for preoperative psychosocial outcomes, clinical and demographic factors. Half of the studies with significant findings reported significant adverse effects of complications on patient psychosocial outcomes at 12 months (or more) postsurgery. 3 supplementary meta-analyses were completed, 1 on anxiety (including 2 studies) and 2 on physical and mental quality of life (including 3 studies). The latter indicated statistically significantly lower physical and mental quality of life (p<0.001) for patients who suffered surgical complications. Conclusions Surgical complications appear to be a significant and often long-term predictor of patient postoperative psychosocial outcomes. The results highlight the importance of attending to patients’ psychological needs in the aftermath of surgical complications. PMID:26883234

  17. The effects of different preoperative biliary drainage methods on complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Liang, Bin; Zhao, Xiang-Qian; Zhang, Fu-Bo; Wang, Xi-Tao; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) methods on complications in jaundiced patients following pancreaticoduodenectomy. We retrospectively analyzed 270 extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. A total of 170 patients without PBD treatment were defined as the non-PBD group. According to different PBD methods, 45, 18, and 37 patients were classified into the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD), and endoscopic retrograde biliary stent (ERBS) groups, respectively. Clinical characteristics and complications were compared among the 4 groups. Preoperative cholangitis occurred in 14 (8.2%) and 8 (21.6%) patients in the non-PBD and ERBS group, respectively (P = 0.04). Compared with the non-PBD group, delayed gastric emptying (DGE) and wound infection occurred significantly more often in the ERBS group. The incidence of severe complications was significantly lower in the PTBD group than the non-PBD group (P = 0.03). Postoperative hospital stay and complication rates were significantly higher in the ERBS group than the PTBD group. There were no significant differences in complications between ENBD and other groups. In conclusion, PTBD can improve surgical outcomes by reducing severe complication rate in jaundiced patients following pancreaticoduodenectomy. ERBS increased the rates of DGE and wound infection due to high incidence of cholangitis before operative intervention and should be avoided. ENBD carried no special effect on complications and needs further analysis. PMID:25860221

  18. Fatal complications of tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Stemmer, E A; Oliver, C; Carey, J P; Connolly, J E

    1976-03-01

    Thirty-six of 403 deaths after tracheotomy were direct complications of that procedure. Arterial hemorrhage caused three deaths, venous bleeding, seven. Airway obstruction resulted in six fatalities. Tracheoesophageal fistula caused five deaths. Eight deaths were due to infection and sepsis. Tension pneumothorax developed in one patient and the remaining six deaths were due to cardiopulmonary collapse. Many of the complications of tracheotomy can be avoided with accurate knowledge of anatomic variations, ideal operating conditions, proper technic, careful arterial and venous hemostasis, routine postoperative chest x-ray films, sterile suction technic, proper use of soft cuffed tracheotomy tubes, adequate humidification, and careful postoperative blood gas monitoring. PMID:769582

  19. Necrotizing scleritis as a complication of cosmetic eye whitening procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report necrotizing scleritis as a serious complication of a cosmetic eye whitening procedure that involves the use of intraoperative and postoperative topical mitomycin C. Findings This is a single case report. A 59-year-old Caucasian male with a history of blepharitis status post uncomplicated LASIK refractive surgery reported chronic conjunctival hyperemia for 15 years prior to undergoing a cosmetic eye whitening procedure. He presented to our clinic 12 months after the cosmetic eye whitening procedure with progressive bilateral necrotizing scleritis and scleral calcification. Conclusions Chronic conjunctival hyperemia may prompt patients to seek surgical correction with cosmetic eye whitening procedures. However, conjunctival hyperemia secondary to tear deficiency and evaporative dry eye may predispose to poor wound healing. Serious complications including necrotizing scleritis may result from cosmetic eye whitening procedures and the use of topical mitomycin C. PMID:23514228

  20. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  1. An update on the evaluation and management of plantar puncture wounds and Pseudomonas osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A S; Zukin, D D; Perro, M

    1992-02-01

    The management of children who present to the ED with plantar puncture wounds is dependent upon the nature of the injury, the examination of the puncture site, and the potential risk of a retained foreign body. Not all patients will require wound enlargement and a search for a retained foreign body. Close follow-up of all children who are being treated as outpatients is of vital importance in detecting an early development of an infectious complication. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis should be suspected in all patients who present with foot pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to bear weight after sustaining a nail puncture through a sneaker. The current consensus favors open surgical débridement followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. The exact duration of the postoperative antibiotic course is still being debated. PMID:1603689

  2. Wound drainages in total hip arthroplasty: to use or not to use? Review of the literature on current practice.

    PubMed

    Nanni, M; Perna, F; Calamelli, C; Donati, D; Ferrara, O; Parlato, A; D'Arienzo, M; Faldini, C

    2013-08-01

    Aim of this study is to analyze data reported in literature concerning the efficacy of using wound low-vacuum suction drainages in orthopedic surgery after total hip arthroplasty. We analyzed studies concerning the use of drainages in prosthetic hip replacement surgery, performing our research through Pubmed, Cochrane database and Google Scholar, and selecting the ones evaluating the following parameters: bleeding, the need for blood transfusions, number or reinforcement of post-operative medications, length of hospitalization, functional results, periprosthetic and surgical wound infection, post-operative hematoma. Our review did not show any demonstrated advantage from the use of wound drainages in total hip arthroplasty. Moreover, some studies enlighted a possible complication related to their employment, represented by the greater need for blood transfusions. Despite the absence of a statistically demonstrated positive influence on wound outcome using suction drains after total hip replacement, many orthopedic surgeons still recommend using drainages, just because there is no certified proof of a negative effect. PMID:23709186

  3. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

  4. Extensive intratemporal cholesteatomas: presentation, complications and surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vashishth, Ashish; Singh Nagar, Tilak Raj; Mandal, Shantanu; Venkatachalam, Vellore Pattabhiram

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the clinical features, complications, surgical management and post-operative outcomes of medially invasive extensive cholesteatomas and intracranial complications of cholesteatoma. The retrospective review was carried out at a tertiary referral center and included 20 patients presenting with extensive intratemporal cholesteatomas between 2011 and 2013. Inclusion criteria were involvement of the labyrinth, facial nerve, posterior fossa dura and intracranial complications. The mean age of the patients was 20 years. Profuse foul-smelling otorrhoea and severe otalgia/temporal headache were the most common presenting features. Intracranial complications were observed in nine patients, most commonly temporal lobe abscess; 14/20 patients exhibited profound hearing loss. One case exhibited massive labyrinthine petrous apex cholesteatoma. Labyrinthine destruction was seen in all cases of facial nerve involvement. Management of intracranial complications preceded canal wall-down mastoidectomy with or without partial labyrinthectomy and subtotal petrosectomy (transotic) with blind sac closure for petrous cholesteatoma. Facial nerve infiltration was observed in one case, whereas eight cases exhibited gross dehiscence of the fallopian canal. Disease clearance was complete in all cases with two mortalities in patients with intracranial complications. Post-operative course was uncomplicated in all other patients apart from a case of wound dehiscence. All patients remain disease free after a minimum and maximum follow-up of 6 months and 2 years, respectively. Extensive intratemporal cholesteatomas and intracranial complications caused by them continue to pose a challenge to the management of otitis media in the current era and merit early recognition, surgical management and follow-up. PMID:24318471

  5. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment. PMID:22363072

  6. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  7. Unusual auricular complications in cutaneous oncology.

    PubMed

    Leshin, B; Hess, S P; White, W L; Matthews, B L; Koufman, J A

    1991-11-01

    The anatomic complexity of the pinna predisposes that structure to a variety of unique, site specific postoperative complications following management of skin cancer. We describe four unusual auricular complications: 1) radiochondronecrosis; 2) autonecrosis of skin during second intention healing; 3) hearing loss secondary to tragal retraction over the external auditory canal; and 4) extension of tumor through fenestrated cartilage. Well-known postoperative auricular complications are reviewed and anticipation and recognition of these unusual complications are emphasized. PMID:1757651

  8. Radiologic evaluation of postoperative gastropericardial fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeffrey S.; Hal, Hassan M.; Tappouni, Rafel F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the current standard surgical option for complicated GERD and symptomatic hiatal hernia. Though comparable in safety, short-term efficacy, and patient satisfaction when compared with open operation, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has demonstrated shorter hospital stays and recuperative times. Commonly reported complications include gastric or esophageal injury, splenic injury, pneumothorax, bleeding, pneumonia, fever, wound infections, and dysphagia. We present an unusual case of gastropericardial fistula that developed as a late complication of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication performed 4 years earlier.

  9. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  10. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  11. [Coxibs for postoperative analgesia].

    PubMed

    Voloshin, A G; Nikoda, V V

    2013-01-01

    Coxibs can be regarded as an effective way of postoperative pain treatment with proven analgesic and opioid-saving effects. When comparing the opioid-saving effect after the large surgical interventions, COX-2 inhibitors are not inferior to NSAIDs and surpass paracetamol. The combination of coxibs and opiate receptors antagonists, as well as epidural analgesia is effective in the frames of multimodal analgesia. The reasonability of coxibs and paracetamol combination is questionable. In patients at risk of gastrointestinal complications development, but with none cardiovascular risk, COX-2 inhibitors are more safe, than the combination of NSAIDs and proton pump inhibitors. Due to no cross-reactivity with aspirin and NSAIDs, coxibs can be recommended to patients with aspirin asthma and related diseases. Specific COX-2 inhibitors prescription is able to inhibit comissure formation after laparotomy, suppressing blood vessels proliferation. It is assumed that the COX-2 inhibitors may inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor of the tumor and so inhibit angiogenesis of solitary tumors and metastases, without affecting the normal endothelium. Thus, today coxibs are not inferior in eficiency to certain opioid analgesics and have improved safety profile compared with traditional NSAIDs. These qualities allow to consider them as a group of non-opioid analgesics for postoperative analgesia. PMID:24000661

  12. Sutureless closure of scleral wounds in animal models by the use of laser welded biocompatible patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Menabuoni, Luca; Lenzetti, Ivo; Pini, Roberto

    2011-03-01

    The common procedures used to seal the scleral or conjunctival injuries are based on the traditional suturing techniques, that may induce foreign body reaction during the follow up, with subsequent inflammation and distress for the patient. In this work we present an experimental study on the laser welding of biocompatible patches onto ocular tissues, for the closure of surgical or trauma wounds. The study was performed ex vivo in animal models (porcine eyes). A penetrating perforation of the ocular tissue was performed with a surgical knife. The wound walls were approximated, and a biocompatible patch was put onto the outer surface of the tissue, in order to completely cover the wound as a plaster. The patches were prepared with a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, showing high mechanical strength, good elasticity, high permeability for vapour and gases and rather low biodegradation. During preparation, Indocyanine Green (ICG) was included in the biopolymeric matrix, so that the films presented high absorption at 810 nm. Effective adhesion of the membranes to the ocular tissues was obtained by using diode laser light emitted from an 810 nm diode laser and delivered by means of a 300 μm core diameter optical fiber, to produce spots of local film/tissue adhesion, due to the photothermal effect at the interface. The result is an immediate closure of the wound, thus reducing post-operative complications due to inflammation.

  13. The management of wounds following primary lower limb arthroplasty: a prospective, randomised study comparing hydrofibre and central pad dressings.

    PubMed

    Abuzakuk, Tarek M; Coward, Pamela; Shenava, Y; Kumar, V Senthil; Skinner, John A

    2006-06-01

    Wound care following lower limb arthroplasty has not been subject to in-depth clinical research, primarily because such wounds usually heal without complication. However, when prosthetic implants are used, serious wound problems can be disastrous (Whitehouse et al. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2002;23:183-9; Lindwell OM. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1986;211:91-103). We report the results of a prospective, randomised, controlled trial comparing a hydrofibre (Aquacel) and central pad (Mepore) dressing in the management of acute wounds following primary total hip or knee arthroplasty left to heal by primary intention. Dressing performance was measured in 61 patients receiving total hip or knee replacements. There was a significant reduction in the requirement for dressing changes before five postoperative days in the hydrofibre group (43% compared with 77% in the central pad group), and there were fewer blisters amongst patients in the hydrofibre group (13% compared with 26% in the central pad group). We conclude that there is a potential role for hydrofibre dressing in the management of arthroplasty wounds. PMID:17007343

  14. A mathematical model of ischemic cutaneous wounds

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chuan; Friedman, Avner; Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a major public health problem affecting 6.5 million people in the United States. Ischemia, primarily caused by peripheral artery diseases, represents a major complicating factor in cutaneous wound healing. In this work, we sought to develop a mathematical model of ischemic dermal wounds. The model consists of a coupled system of partial differential equations in the partially healed region, with the wound boundary as a free boundary. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is assumed to be viscoelastic, and the free boundary moves with the velocity of the ECM at the boundary. The model equations involve the concentration of oxygen, PDGF and VEGF, the densities of macrophages, fibroblasts, capillary tips and sprouts, and the density and velocity of the ECM. Simulations of the model demonstrate how ischemic conditions may limit macrophage recruitment to the wound-site and impair wound closure. The results are in general agreement with experimental findings. PMID:19805373

  15. Surgical wound infection surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lee, J T

    2003-12-01

    Measuring the frequency of a defined outcome flaw for a series of patients undergoing operative procedures generates information for performance evaluation. Such data influence decisions to improve care if used responsibly. Wound infection (WI), bacterial invasion of the incision, is the most common infectious complication of surgical care and WI prevention has value because the complication affects economic, patient satisfaction, and patient functional status outcomes. WI frequency, one kind of surgical outcome flaw rate, is traditionally used to judge one aspect of surgical care quality. At the author's institution, global WI surveillance was conducted without interruption for 20 years. Results for 85,260 consecutive inpatient operations performed during the period showed that secular changes in infection rates occurred but were not necessarily caused by surgical care quality decrements. PMID:14750065

  16. A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. Methods: A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 2007–2012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. Results: The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (p<0.0001). There were no substantial changes in the patient population risk factors over this time. As a result of the changes in incision management practice, a total of 92 cesarean post-operative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Conclusion: Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI. PMID:25826622

  17. [Modern wound dressings].

    PubMed

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Planinsek Rucigaj, Tanja

    2013-10-01

    Chronic wounds are, due to the slow healing, a major clinical problem. In addition to classic materials, a great number of supportive wound dressings for chronic wound treatment, developed on the basis of new knowledge about the pathophysiological events in non-healing wounds, are available on the market. Today we know that modern wound dressings provide the best local environment for optimal healing (moisture, warmth, appropriate pH). Wound dressings control the amount of exudate from the wound and bacterial load, thus protecting local skin from the wound exudate and the wound from secondary infections from the environment. Using supportive wound dressings makes sense only when the wound has been properly assessed, the etiologic factors have been clarified and the obstacles making the wound chronic identified. The choice of dressing is correlated with the characteristics of the wound, the knowledge and experience of the medical staff, and the patient's needs. We believe that the main advantage of modern wound dressing versus conventional dressing is more effective wound cleaning, simple dressing application, painless bandaging owing to reduced adhesion to the wound, and increased absorption of the wound exudate. Faster wound granulation shortens the length of patient hospitalization, and eventually facilitates the work of medical staff. The overall cost of treatment is a minor issue due to faster wound healing despite the fact that modern supportive wound dressings are more expensive than conventional bandaging. The article describes different types of modern supportive wound dressings, as well as their characteristics and indications for use. PMID:24371980

  18. Exploring Predictors of Complication in Older Surgical Patients: A Deficit Accumulation Index and the Braden Scale

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rachel-Rose; Lagoo-Deenadayalan, Sandhya A.; Heflin, Mitchell T.; Sloane, Richard; Eisen, Irvin; Thacker, Julie M.; Whitson, Heather E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether readily collected perioperative information might identify older surgical patients at higher risk for complication. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study SETTING Medical chart review at a single academic institution PARTICIPANTS 102 patients aged 65 years and older who underwent abdominal surgery between January 2007 and December 2009. MEASUREMENTS Primary predictor variables were the first postoperative Braden Scale score (within 24 hours of surgery) and a Deficit Accumulation Index (DAI) constructed based on 39 available preoperative variables. The primary outcome was presence or absence of complication within 30 days of surgery date. RESULTS Of 102 patients, 64 experienced at least one complication with wound infection being the most common complication. In models adjusted for age, race, sex, and open vs. laparoscopic surgery, lower Braden Scale scores were predictive of 30-day postoperative complication (OR 1.30 [CI 95%, 1.06, 1.60]), longer length of stay (â = 1.44 (0.25) days; pvalue = ≤ 0.0001) and discharge to institution rather than home (OR 1.23 [CI 95%, 1.02, 1.48]). The cut-off value for the Braden Score with the highest predictive value for complication was ≤ 18 (OR 3.63 [CI 95%, 1.43, 9.19]; c statistic of 0.744). The DAI and several traditional surgical risk factors were not significantly associated with 30-day postoperative complications in this cohort. CONCLUSION This is the first study to identify the perioperative score on the Braden Scale, a widely used risk-stratifier for pressure ulcers, as an independent predictor of other adverse outcomes in geriatric surgical patients. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding as well as investigate other utilizations for this tool, which correlates well to phenotypic models of frailty. PMID:22906222

  19. [Management of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K; Sekulla, C; Kern, J; Dralle, H

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery stands at 1%-2 %. This low incidence contrasts with the significant potential complications of postoperative hemorrhage. Influencing factors and measures mentioned in the literature and own studies are discussed. Although an improvement in the postoperative hemorrhage rate was to be expected indirectly due to the increasing use of coagulation-relevant medication, there has been neither an increase in incidence nor a reduction in resultant complications, including primarily recurrent vocal cord paresis, tracheotomy and mortality. Factors that influence surgical success include a meticulous technique and caution, as well as ensuring intensive and qualified postoperative monitoring for a minimum of 4-6 h, thereby permitting immediate revision surgery at any time. PMID:25532753

  20. Hybrid technique for postoperative ventral hernias – own experience

    PubMed Central

    Okniński, Tomasz; Pawlak, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are many techniques which may be involved in abdominal hernia repair, from classical to tension-free. Treatment of complicated hernias has undergone evolution. Many surgeons consider the laparoscopic method as a method of choice for incisional hernia repair. Sometimes miniinvasive repair of complicated hernia is not so easy to perform. We are convinced that selected patients may benefit from combined open and laparoscopic techniques. Aim To present the operating technique and early results of treatment of 15 patients operated on using the 3 hybrid technique. Material and methods Fifteen patients suffering from recurrent incisional hernias underwent the hybrid technique for their repair between June 2012 and April 2015. The hybrid technique was performed using synthetic meshes in 14 cases and a biological implant in 1 case. Results The early postoperative period was uncomplicated in all cases. Within a maximum follow-up period of 32 months, two deep wound infections were observed. Conclusions The hybrid technique may be used in patients with recurrent incisional hernias. PMID:26865889

  1. Perioperative Complications in Abdominal Sacrocolpopexy, Sacrospinous Ligament Fixation and Prolift Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Fuat; Demirci, Oya; Dolgun, Zehra Nihal; Karakoç, Birgül; Demirci, Elif; Somunkıran, Aslı; İyibozkurt, Cem; Karaalp, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse is an important problem for women. To overcome this issue, different operational technics are in use, such as abdominal sacrocolpopexy, sacrospinous fixation, and the total Prolift procedure. Aims: This study assessed perioperative complications in abdominal sacrocolpopexy, sacrospinous fixation, and the total Prolift procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Perioperative complications were defined as any complication occurring during surgery or the first 6 weeks postoperatively. Forty-five patients underwent abdominal procedures, 60 patients underwent sacrospinous fixation, and 43 patients underwent the total Prolift procedure. Results: In the abdominal group, one bladder injury, four hemorrhages, and three wound dehiscences occurred. In the sacrospinous group, one rectal injury and one postoperative vault infection occurred. In the Prolift group, one bladder injury and one hemorrhage occurred. Minor complications were more frequent in the abdominal group than the others. The operating time and hospital stay of the abdominal group were significantly longer than the others. The Pro-lift procedure had less operating time and hospital stay than other procedures. Conclusion: The total Prolift may be a novel alternative for apical prolapse with low perioperative morbidities and complications. PMID:25207189

  2. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  3. Postoperative Immunosuppression After Open and Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Assessment of Cellular Immune Function and Monocytic HLA-DR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Schmidt, Sven C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Major abdominal procedures are strongly associated with postoperative immunosuppression and subsequent increased patient morbidity. It is believed that laparoscopic surgery causes less depletion of the systemic immune function because of the reduced tissue trauma. Various cytokines and monocytic HLA-DR expression have been successfully implemented to assess postoperative immune function. The aim of our study was to show the difference in immunologic profiles after minimally invasive versus conventional liver resection. Methods: Ten animals underwent either laparoscopic or conventional open left lateral liver resection. Flow cytometric characteristics of HLA-DR expression on monocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cellular secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were measured and analyzed in ex vivo whole blood samples. Intraoperative and postoperative clinical outcome parameters were also documented and evaluated. Results: All animals survived the procedures. Postoperative complications were fever (n = 3), wound infections (n = 2), and biloma (n = 1). Open surgery showed a morbidity rate of 80% compared with 40% after laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic liver resection showed no postoperative immunoparalysis. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression in this group was elevated, whereas the open surgery group showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class II expression on postoperative day 1. Postoperative secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and interferon γ was lower in the open surgery group. Elevated transaminase levels after laparoscopy might have resulted from an ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by the capnoperitoneum. Conclusion: Major immunoparalysis depression was not observed in either group. Laparoscopic surgery shows a tendency to improve immunologic recovery after liver resection. PMID:24398205

  4. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Schenning, Katie J; Deiner, Stacie G

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients older than 65 years receive greater than one-third of the more than 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. PMID:26315635

  5. [New approach to postoperative delirium treatment].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, I N; Makhlaĭ, A V; Tepliakova, A N; Gubaĭdullin, R R; Sal'nikov, P S; Borisov, A Iu; Berezenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of different drugs for sedation was studied in 51 patients after large abdominal operations complicated by postoperative delirium. Diagnosis of postoperative delirium was established according to CAM-ICU criteria. Dexmedetomidine has demonstrated significantly decreased duration of delirium and hospital stay in intensive care unit in comparison with haloperidol. Besides, patients which received dexmedetomidine preserved opportunity for verbal contact. Also these patients interacted better with department's stuff. PMID:26031955

  6. Exceptional laceration of flexor digitorum tendons proximal to a severe palmar hand wound: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ennaciri, Badr; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Hand wounds are common, poor functional outcomes are marked because of sequelae inherent to posttraumatic and postoperative complications. Suitable surgery repair in emergency can ensure best results. Classically, tendon's injuries occur near the injured area and their repair depend on traumatized zone, sutures techniques, associated lesions and surgeon's abilities. We report a case of a farmer who has sustained of a severe hand wound due to blades of a combine harvester. Clinical examination showed exceptional laceration of 2nd and 3rd flexor digitorum tendons from musculo-tendinous junction, without any lesion in their palmar section. We proceeded; after extensive debridement, abundant lavage and removal of foreign body; to modified Kessler sutures using PDS 4.0 followed by dorsal splint for protecting tendons repair, and progressive rehabilitation program. Final result was interesting after 12 weeks. Thinking to tendon laceration is important, when manipulating machines with rotational movements.

  7. Outcome following deep wound contamination in cemented arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Morris, S.; McCarthy, T.; Quinlan, W.; O’Byrne, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Infection remains a devastating complication of joint replacement surgery causing a significant burden to both patient and surgeon. However, despite exhaustive prophylactic measures, intraoperative contamination still occurs during cemented arthroplasty with current infection rates of 1–2%. A study was undertaken to determine the incidence of perioperative contamination in cemented arthroplasty patients, to identify contaminating organisms, to identify contaminated regions within the operative wound, to identify factors associated with increased contamination, and finally to assess the medium-term clinical outcome in patients with confirmed intraoperative wound contamination. Eighty consecutive patients undergoing hip and knee cemented arthroplasty were prospectively enrolled over a 6-month period. All scrubbed personnel wore total body exhaust isolation suits and procedures were carried out in ultra-clean air theatres. Of 441 samples, contamination was identified at 21 sites (4.8%) representing a cohort of 18 patients (22.5%). Longer duration of surgery predisposed to higher contamination rates while lower contamination rates were significantly related to fewer gowned personnel within the ultra-clean system, and fewer total personnel in theatre during the procedure. None of the patients developed clinical evidence of deep prosthetic infection at follow-up. We noted a high incidence of intraoperative contamination despite standard prophylaxis. However, this was not reflected by a similar rate of postoperative infection. This may be due to a small bacterial inoculum in each case or may be due to the therapeutic effect of perioperative intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:16586132

  8. Is there a need for postoperative surveillance after day case groin surgery in children?

    PubMed

    Powell, S F; Brown, R A; Millar, A J W; De Wet, P M; Rode, H

    2002-08-01

    There is increasing awareness of the value of day case paediatric surgery in fulfilling the needs of the community. Is this cost effective, are there hidden complications and is there a need for routine follow-up? Seven hundred and thirty-one children attending the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital day surgery unit over a 32-month period, and undergoing 912 procedures confined to the inguinoscrotal region, were enrolled in the study. Surgical procedures performed included inguinal herniotomy, orchidopexy and circumcision. Of the 731 children, 159 consecutive children had their inguinal and perineal skin flora analysed preoperatively and in 59 of these children three skin swabs were taken from the groin area: before routine skin preparation for surgery, after the skin preparation and on completion of the operation. Staphylococcus epidermidis predominated as the normal skin flora (70%), followed by Escherichia coli (19%) and Proteus mirabilis (10%), while S. aureus was only found in 2.5% of cases. The efficacy of cleaning with 4% chlorhexidine and 2% povidone-iodine in 70% alcohol is shown by virtual complete eradication of the organisms isolated from the preoperative skin cultures. In only 2 cases (3.4%) were organisms (S. aureus and S. epidermidis respectively) isolated following skin preparation. Cultures taken at the end of operative procedures grew predominantly S. epidermidis (5 cases, 8.5%). Children were discharged from the day unit once they had taken fluids and had passed urine. The wounds were also checked for any evidence of bleeding. Follow-up was done 2 weeks later by means of a visit to the day unit where the same surgeon assessed wound healing according to the Southampton Wound Assessment Scale. Ninety-four per cent of the wounds had healed by primary intention; 4.5% had minor complications and 1.5% had septic complications. Our trial confirms that wound sepsis is an infrequent but significant complication of day case groin surgery. Routine follow-up by surgical day units of minor surgical cases is not warranted and will incur unnecessary cost. Only 1.5% of postoperative cases will require further medical attention and septic lesions in the lymphatic drainage area should be regarded as risk factors. PMID:12387217

  9. Four-fold benefit of wound closure under high magnification

    PubMed Central

    Kivelev, Juri; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Unaffected wound healing and good cosmetic result after a neurosurgical procedure are important factors measuring a level of care. The usefulness of high magnification of the operating microscope during closure of neurosurgical wounds is evaluated. Methods: During a one-year microneurosurgical fellowship, the first author (JK) performed wound closure under the microscope in 200 of 524 neurosurgical operations carried out by the senior author (JH) at the Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Supratentorial approaches were employed most frequently in 143 patients (72%). Surgeries for infratentorial lesions and the spinal canal comprised 48 (24%) and 9 procedures (4%), respectively. Mean duration of the surgery from skin to skin was 1.8 (range 0.5-6.2) hours. After intradural hemostasis was completed by the senior author, further steps including dural suturing, bone flap fixation, and wound closure were performed by the first author. Wound condition was assessed during the early and late postoperative period. Mean follow-up was 3.2 (range 1-10) months. Results: Early postoperative healing of the wound was uneventful in 180 patients (90%). No wound rupture or postoperative hematoma occurred. In five patients (2.5%), lumbar puncture or spinal drainage was necessary due to significant subcutaneous liquor collection. No wound revision was required. At follow-up, in 196 patients (98%) the postoperative scar was in perfect condition. Neither skin necrosis nor healing problems occurred. Conclusion: Based on our results, we found the high magnification of operating microscope to be beneficial when closing neurosurgical wounds; it allows (1) better hemostasis, (2) precise wound margin approximation, (3) atraumatic handling of the tissues, and (4) improvement of the manual dexterity of the neurosurgeon. PMID:24083051

  10. Retained Sponge: A Rare Complication in Acetabular Osteosinthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chana-Rodríguez, Francisco; Mañanes, Rubén Pérez; Rojo-Manaute, José; Moran-Blanco, Luz María; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Retained sponges after a surgical treatment of polytrauma may cause a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and present a difficult diagnostic problem. We report a case of retained surgical sponge in a 35-year-old man transferred from another hospital, that sustained a open acetabular fracture. The fracture was reduced through a limited ilio-inguinal approach. After 4 days, he presented massive wound dehiscence of the surgical approach. An abdominal CT scan showed, lying adjacent to the outer aspect of the left iliac crest, a mass of 10 cm, identified as probable foreign body. The possibility of this rare complication should be in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative patient who presents with pain, infection, or palpable mass. PMID:26312116

  11. Abdominal compartment syndrome: an underrated complication in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Bertocchi, M; Centanaro, M; Varotti, G; Santori, G; Mondello, R; Tagliamacco, A; Cupo, P; Barabani, C; Palombo, D

    2014-09-01

    The transplantation of a large kidney in small children can lead to many complications, including an underrated complication known as abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), which is defined as intra-abdominal pressure (IAP)≥20 mm Hg with dysfunction of at least one thoracoabdominal organ. Presenting signs of ACS include firm tense abdomen, increased peak inspiratory pressures, oliguria, and hypotension. Between June 1, 1985, and September 30, 2013, our center performed 420 kidney transplants (deceased/living related donors: 381/39) in 314 pediatric recipients (female/male: 147/167). ACS occurred in 9 pediatric patients (weight<15 kg) who received a large kidney from adult donors. In 1 case, the patient underwent abdominal decompression with re-exploration and closure with mesh in the immediate postoperative period. In a second case, the patient developed a significant respiratory compromise with hemodynamic instability necessitating catecholamines, sedation, and assisted ventilation. For small children transplanted with a large kidney, an early diagnosis of ACS represents a critical step. From 2005 we have measured IAP during transplantation via urinary bladder pressure, and immediately after wound closure we use intraoperative and postoperative duplex sonography to value flow dynamics changes. We recommend that bladder pressure should be routinely checked in small pediatric kidney recipients who are transplanted with a large graft. PMID:25242763

  12. Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development. PMID:20351978

  13. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  14. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  15. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life. PMID:16471044

  16. Ethics of treating postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, James W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2012-02-01

    You received a call advising that Mr S. H. Irk was in the emergency room having considerable wound pain following an above-knee amputation you performed 6 months ago. You discharged him from your clinic 6 weeks postoperatively to his primary care physician, still complaining of more pain than usual. Your examination, clinical lab tests, and X-rays do not reveal any serious problems, but he is writhing in pain and begging for relief. Mr Irk has been to a number of different physicians in the interlude including a chiropractor, a pain specialist, several primary care physicians, and a psychiatrist without relief. He has braced up with increasing amounts of analgesics, the latest of which was oral Dilaudid. His last source of pain meds on the street has dried up. You admit him with orders for analgesics. What should your treatment plan be? PMID:22264808

  17. A Repot of Surgical Complications in a Series of 262 Consecutive Pediatric Cochlear Implantations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajallouyean, Mohammad; Amirsalari, Susan; Yousefi, Jaleh; Raeesi, Mohammad-Ali; Radfar, Shokofeh; Hassanalifard, Mahdieh

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implantations have become a routinely performed and successful surgical intervention in both adults and children. The current article reports the complications encountered in various age groups of consecutive children who underwent implantation in our center. Methods We performed a prospective analysis of all profoundly deaf children who underwent cochlear implantation from March 2006 to July 2009 at Baqhiyatallah Cochlear Implantation Center. All patients were younger than 5 years old at the time of implantation. Findings The minor complications occurred in 49 (18.7%) cases, The most common postoperative complications were temporary facial weakness detected in 15 cases (5.7%) all of which were reversible. Magnet wound was observed in 14 (5.3%) patients, keloid formation in 10 (3.8%), wound infection in 2 (0.8%), otitis media in 5 (2%), and electrode movement, meningitis, vertigo, Laryngospasm each in 1 (0.4%) case was detected among our patients. Conclusion Cochlear implantation in children continues to be reliable and safe in experienced hands, with a low percentage of severe complications as long as the patient is monitored closely. PMID:23056831

  18. Avoiding Complications in Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Kling, Russell E; Tobler, William D; Gusenoff, Jeffrey A; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gigantomastia is a disabling condition for patients and presents unique challenges to plastic surgeons. Presentation can occur throughout different phases of life, and treatment often begins with nonoperative measures; however, the most effective way to relieve symptoms is surgical breast reduction. Because of the large amount of tissue removed, surgeons can encounter different intraoperative and postoperative complications. By understanding this disease process and these complications, surgeons can attempt to minimize their occurrences. The authors present an overview of the cause, preoperative evaluation, techniques, and outcomes. Additionally, they present outcomes data from their center on 40 patients. PMID:27012802

  19. [Complications of liposuction].

    PubMed

    Sattler, G; Eichner, S

    2013-03-01

    Liposuction is the most frequent aesthetic procedure worldwide for adipose tissue reduction and treatment of lipedema. It is being employed with increasing frequency. In 2010, in the USA more than 200.000 liposuctions were performed. Apart from aesthetic indications, liposuction also is suitable for treatment of benign adipose tissue diseases. This intervention is not a simple procedure but requires extensive knowledge and experience to prevent irreversible medical or aesthetic complications. Severe complications including necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, hemorrhage, perforation of inner organs und pulmonary embolism - some even with lethal outcome - occasionally have been reported. These complications were mostly due to inadequate hygiene measures, inappropriate patient selection, use of excessive local anesthesia during mega-liposuction (tumescent technique) and inadequate post-operative surveillance. The complication rate usually reflects a lack of medical experience as well as technical inadequacies. PMID:23494094

  20. [Chronic wounds: differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja

    2013-10-01

    Wound is a disruption of anatomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. According to the healing process, wounds are classified as acute and chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if standard medical procedures do not lead to the expected healing, or if the wound does not heal within six weeks. Chronic wounds are classified as typical and atypical. Typical wounds include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic wounds. Diabetic foot and decubitus ulcers stand out as a specific entity among typical wounds. About 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder are mostly neuropathic ulcers. About 95 percent of chronic wounds manifest as one of the above-mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds are atypical chronic wounds, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, psychiatric disorders, drug related reactions, etc. Numerous systemic diseases can present with atypical wounds. The primary cause of the wound can be either systemic disease itself (Crohn's disease) or aberrant immune response due to systemic disease (pyoderma gangrenosum, paraneoplastic syndrome). Although atypical wounds are a rare cause of chronic wounds, it should always be taken in consideration during diagnostic procedure. PMID:24371971

  1. Use of Cryopreserved, Particulate Human Amniotic Membrane and Umbilical Cord (AM/UC) Tissue: A Case Series Study for Application in the Healing of Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Swan, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Human amniotic membrane and umbilical cord tissues (AM/UC) are fetal tissues that contain proteins, cytokines, and growth factors that, when transplanted, can modulate inflammation and promote healing. Lyophilized, particulate AM/UC tissues can be used as wound coverings for chronic dermal ulcers or defects to promote granulation tissue formation and rapid re-epithelialization. This study reviews a case series of 5 patients presenting with chronic nonhealing wounds that received particulate AM/UC tissues (NEOX® FLO, Amniox Medical, Atlanta, GA). For all cases, wounds were debrided in the office setting and a single application of lyophilized particulate was used with minimal additional dressings. The lyophilized AM/UC tissue was placed within the wound bed and a dressing consisting of Adaptic®, 2x2 or 4x4 (Systagenix, Quincy, MA), Kling® (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ), and ACE™ (3M, St. Paul, MN) wrap were applied. Dressings were kept in place until weekly follow-up appointments in which a new Adaptic, 2x2 and Kling were applied. Overall, healing of wounds was noted to have a mean of 5 weeks to complete epithelialization. Upon complete healing patients were able to return to planned postoperative care and rehabilitation. Wound complications occur despite the best standard of care. Chronic wounds that remain weeks after surgery inhibit patients from progressing to physical rehabilitation and significantly affect patients both physically and mentally. These case presentations demonstrate how use of human AM/UC tissue may help wounds heal quickly and help patients return to normal function. PMID:25396322

  2. Current issues in postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Narinder

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pain has been poorly managed for decades. Recent surveys from USA and Europe do not show any major improvement. Persistent postoperative pain is common after most surgical procedures, and after thoracotomy and mastectomy, about 50% of patients may experience it. Opioids remain the mainstay of postoperative pain treatment in spite of strong evidence of their drawbacks. Multimodal analgesic techniques are widely used but new evidence is disappointing. Regional anaesthetic techniques are the most effective methods to treat postoperative pain. Current evidence suggests that epidural analgesia can no longer be considered the 'gold standard'. Perineural techniques are good alternatives for major orthopaedic surgery but remain underused. Infiltrative techniques with or without catheters are useful for almost all types of surgery. Simple surgeon-delivered local anaesthetic techniques such as wound infiltration, preperitoneal/intraperitoneal administration, transversus abdominis plane block and local infiltration analgesia can play a significant role in improvement of postoperative care, and the last of these has changed orthopaedic practice in many institutions. Current postoperative pain management guidelines are generally 'one size fits all'. It is well known that pain characteristics such as type, location, intensity and duration vary considerably after different surgical procedures. Procedure-specific postoperative pain management recommendations are evidence based, and also take into consideration the role of anaesthetic and surgical techniques, clinical routines and risk-benefit aspects. The role of acute pain services to improve pain management and outcome is well accepted but implementation seems challenging. The need for upgrading the role of surgical ward nurses and collaboration with surgeons to implement enhanced recovery after surgery protocols with regular audits to improve postoperative outcome cannot be overstated. PMID:26509324

  3. Muscle Flaps and Thoracomyoplasty as a Re-redo Procedure for Postoperative Empyema.

    PubMed

    Botianu, Petre Vlah-Horea; Botianu, Alexandru Mihail; Bacarea, Vladimir Constantin

    2016-04-01

    Background The role of muscle flaps and thoracomyoplasty in the treatment of postoperative empyema is controversial. The major difficulty is given by the sectioning of the muscular masses during the previous thoracotomy/thoracotomies, resulting in a limitation of the volume and mobility of the available neighborhood flaps. Materials and Methods Between January 1, 2004, and January 1, 2012, we used muscle flaps and thoracomyoplasty as a re-redo procedure in seven patients having a history of at least two major procedures performed through thoracotomy (without considering tube thoracostomy and open thoracic window). In all the cases, the indication for thoracomyoplasty was the presence of an empyema which could not be controlled by the previous procedures. The principle of our procedure was to perform a complete obliteration of the cavity, closure reinforcement of the bronchial fistulae using muscle flaps (in four cases), drainage, and primary closure of the new operative wound. Results We encountered no mortality, one bronchopneumonia requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment, and one intermuscular seroma; there was no need for prolonged mechanical ventilation or major inotropic support. In all the patients, we achieved complete obliteration of the cavity and per primam wound healing, with postoperative hospitalizations ranging between 30 and 51 days. At late follow-up (1-8 years), we encountered no recurrence and no major functional sequelae. Conclusions Thoracomyoplasty may be a definitive solution in cases with recurrent postoperative complications. A careful analysis of the local anatomy allows the use of muscle flaps even after more procedures involving opening of the chest. PMID:25207489

  4. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis – unusual management of unusual complication of Whipple procedure

    PubMed Central

    Huťan, Martin; Bartko, Christian; Slyško, Roman; Sekáč, Jaroslav; Prochotský, Augustín; Majeský, Ivan; Škultéty, Ján

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatoduodenectomy is an extensive procedure carrying risk of a number of postoperative complications. Of these the most common are surgical site infections (SSI), bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, and anastomotic leakage. However, the most serious complications are ones, that are rare, clinically hardly diagnosed, and if untreated, leading to the death of a patient. Among the latter complications is thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Its clinical signs are unspecific and diagnostics complicated. Treatment requires aggressive approach. If this is absent, intestinal necrosis with septic state, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) lead to a death of a patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE Authors present a case of a patient after pancreatoduodenectomy, complicated by the thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Patient was managed by resection of the necrotic bowel, venous decompression by venous bypass from superior mesenteric vein to the right ovarian vein, and open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Patient suffered severe abdominal sepsis with need for intensive organ support. Abdomen was definitely closed on fourth NPWT redress. Patient healed without any further complications, is well and was released to the ambulatory setting. DISCUSSION Superior mesenteric vein (VMS) thrombosis is a rare complication. It diagnosis requires high level of vigilance and once diagnosed, aggressive therapy is essential. Two goals of surgical treatment exist: resection of the necrotic bowel and facilitation of the blood outflow. CONCLUSION Mesenteroovarian anastomosis is one of the options in treatment of thrombosis of VMS if thrombectomy is not feasible. PMID:25255475

  5. A novel treatment in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia - hyperbaric oxygen therapy in refractory chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Steele, C L; Cridge, C; Edgar, J D M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic wounds are a rare complication of X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA). Fastidious organisms such as helicobacter bills have been reported in XLA with chronic wounds but sterile chronic wounds also occur. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy has been used in chronic wounds but has not previously been reported in primary antibody deficiencies. We present a case of a chronic wound in a patient with XLA refractory to antimicrobial therapy that made a remarkable recovery following Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy. PMID:25091287

  6. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  7. Role of Fixation and Postoperative Regimens in the Long-Term Outcomes of Distal Chevron Osteotomy: A Randomized Controlled Two-by-Two Factorial Trial of 100 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pentikäinen, Ilkka; Piippo, Jouni; Ohtonen, Pasi; Junila, Juhani; Leppilahti, Juhana

    2015-01-01

    The necessity of chevron osteotomy fixation is controversial and evidence for the effectiveness of postoperative regimens is limited. In a prospective, randomized study, we compared the long-term results of 2 operative techniques (osteotomy fixation versus no fixation) and 2 postoperative regimens (a soft cast versus an elastic bandage) in 100 patients who underwent surgery for hallux valgus. Clinical evaluations with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale scoring were performed at baseline and 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and a mean of 7.9 years postoperatively. The mean AOFAS function score were better in the group treated without osteotomy fixation and with an elastic bandage at 6 weeks postoperatively, but the differences then disappeared. The total AOFAS scores improved significantly in all 4 subgroups during the first 12 months; however, in the long term, some deterioration occurred. In the AOFAS scores, the average function, alignment, and total points were significantly worse when the preoperative hallux valgus angles exceeded 30°. The incidence of complication was low (1%); there was 1 superficial wound infection. The AOFAS score did not differ statistically among the groups in our population. An elastic bandage for postoperative treatment is recommended. The risk of recurrence is greater and functional result worse if the preoperative hallux valgus angle exceeds 30°. PMID:25441855

  8. Surgical wound healing in bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E C

    2012-07-01

    Animal experiments have shown that a number of bleeding disorders may affect wound healing (WH), including haemophilia B, deficiency of factor XIII and abnormalities of fibrinogen. Therefore, normal healing requires adequate haemostatic function for the appropriate time frame (up to 4 weeks in the clean and uncontaminated wound). Many factors may affect WH, including impaired haemostasis, diabetes, poor nutrition, insufficient oxygenation, infection, smoking, alcoholism, old age, stress and obesity. The gold standard for the correct care of surgical wounds in patients with bleeding disorders includes wound dressing and comprehensive standard care (haemostasis, nutritional support, treatment of co-morbidities, offloading, reperfusion therapy and compression). Although complications of surgical wounds healing in patients with bleeding disorders are uncommon, a low level of the deficient factor for an insufficient period of time could cause WH complications such as haematomas, infection, and skin necrosis and dehiscence. Clinical experience and animal experiments appear to indicate that, to get a satisfactory healing of surgical wounds and avoid potential complications of WH, a good level of haemostasis is necessary for 2-3 weeks after surgery. However, many treaters would regard this recommendation at odds with (i.e. more aggressive than) current standards. Unfortunately no additional clinical evidence for this recommendation can be provided. PMID:22335628

  9. Perioperative Surgical Complications and Learning Curve Associated with Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Single-Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Bin; Seok, Sang Ok; Jo, Byung Woo; Ha, Joong Won

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgical complications tend to occur more frequently in the beginning stages of a surgeon's career, knowledge of perioperative complications is important to perform a safe procedure, especially if the surgeon is a novice. We sought to identify and describe perioperative complications and their management in connection with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive TLIF. The primary outcome measure was adverse events during the perioperative period, including neurovascular injury, implant-related complications, and wound infection. Pseudarthroses and adjacent segment pathologies were not included in this review. Adverse events that were not specifically related to spinal surgery and did not affect recovery were also excluded. Results Perioperative complications occurred in 9% of patients (11/124); including three cases of temporary postoperative neuralgia, two deep wound infections, two pedicle screw misplacements, two cage migrations, one dural tear, and one grafted bone extrusion. No neurologic deficits were reported. Eight complications occurred in the first one-third of the series and only 3 complications occurred in the last two-thirds of the series. Additional surgeries were performed in 6% of patients (7/124); including four reoperations (two for cage migrations, one for a misplaced screw, and one for an extruded graft bone fragment) and three hardware removals (one for a misplaced screw and two for infected cages). Conclusions We found perioperative complications occurred more often in the early period of a surgeon's experience with minimally invasive TLIF. Implant-related complications were common and successfully managed by additional surgeries in this series. We suggest greater caution should be exercised to avoid the potential complications, especially when surgeon is a novice to this procedure. PMID:25729524

  10. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events. PMID:26948356

  11. Corneal injection track: an unusual complication of intraocular lens implantation and review

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Julie Y.C.; Young, Alvin L.

    2015-01-01

    Phacoemulsification is the main gold standard for cataract operation in the developed world together with foldable intraocular lens (IOL) implantation by injection, allowing for stable wound construction and less postoperative astigmatism. It is a safe procedure with high success rate with the advancement in machines, improvement of IOL injection systems and further maturation of surgeons' techniques. Despite the large number of operations performed every day, foldable IOL injection leading to an intra-stromal corneal track is a very rare complication. We report a case of this unusual finding in a 70-year-old gentleman who has undergone cataract operation in November 2011 in our hospital and will review on the complications related to foldable IOL injection. PMID:26086020

  12. Wound Healing in PatientsWith Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Wyatt G.; Naidu, Deepak K.; Wheeler, Chad K.; Barkoe, David; Mentis, Marni; Salas, R. Emerick; Smith, David J.; Robson, Martin C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of patients with cancer has advanced into a complex, multimodal approach incorporating surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Managing wounds in this population is complicated by tumor biology, the patient's disease state, and additional comorbidities, some of which may be iatrogenic. Radiation therapy, frequently employed for local-regional control of disease following surgical resection, has quantifiable negative healing effects due to local tissue fibrosis and vascular effects. Chemotherapeutic agents, either administered alone or as combination therapy with surgery and radiation, may have detrimental effects on the rapidly dividing tissues of healing wounds. Overall nutritional status, often diminished in patients with cancer, is an important aspect to the ability of patients to heal after surgical procedures and/or treatment regimens. Methods: An extensive literature search was performed to gather pertinent information on the topic of wound healing in patients with cancer. The effects that surgical procedures, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and nutritional deficits play in wound healing in these patients were reviewed and collated. Results: The current knowledge and treatment of these aspects of wound healing in cancer patients are discussed, and observations and recommendations for optimal wound healing results are considered. Conclusion: Although wound healing may proceed in a relatively unimpeded manner for many patients with cancer, there is a potential for wound failure due to the nature and effects of the oncologic disease process and its treatments. PMID:18264518

  13. Obesity and early complications following reduction mammaplasty: an analysis of 4545 patients from the 2005-2011 NSQIP datasets.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonas A; Fischer, John P; Chung, Cyndi U; West, Ari; Tuggle, Charles T; Serletti, Joseph M; Kovach, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Reduction mammoplasty is a proven treatment for symptomatic macromastia, but the association between obesity and early postoperative complications is unclear. The purpose of this study was to perform a population level analysis in an effort to determine the impact of obesity on early complications after reduction mammaplasty. This study examined the 2005-2011 NSQIP datasets and identified all patients who underwent reduction mammoplasty. Patients were then categorised according to the World Health Organisation obesity classification. Demographics, comorbidities, and perioperative risk factors were identified among the NSQIP variables. Data was then analysed for surgical complications, wound complications, and medical complications within 30 days of surgery. In total, 4545 patients were identified; 54.4% of patients were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)), of which 1308 (28.8%) were Class I (BMI = 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), 686 (15.1%) were Class II (BMI = 35-39.9 kg/m(2)), and 439 (9.7%) were Class III (BMI > 40 kg/m(2)). The presence of comorbid conditions increased across obesity classifications (p < 0.001), with significant differences noted in all cohort comparisons except when comparing class I to class II (p = 0.12). Early complications were rare (6.1%), with superficial skin and soft tissue infections accounting for 45.8% of complications. Examining any complication, a significant increase was noted with increasing obesity class (p < 0.001). This was further isolated when comparing morbidly obese patients to non-obese (p < 0.001), class I (p < 0.001), and class II (p = 0.01) patients. This population-wide analysis - the largest and most heterogeneous study to date - has demonstrated that increasing obesity class is associated with increased early postoperative complications. Morbidly obese patients are at the highest risk, with complications occurring in nearly 12% of this cohort. PMID:24506446

  14. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  15. The Burn Wound Exudate – an under-utilized resource

    PubMed Central

    Widgerow, Alan D; King, Kassandra; Tussardi, Ilaria Tocco; Banyard, Derek A.; Chiang, Ryan; Awad, Antony; Afzel, Hassan; Bhatnager, Shweta; Melkumyan, Satenik; Wirth, Garrett; Evans, Gregory R.D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burn wound exudate represents the burn tissue microenvironment. Extracting information from the exudate relating to cellular components, signaling mediators and protein content can provide much needed data relating to the local tissue damage, depth of the wound and probable systemic complications. This review examines the scientific data extracted from burn wound exudates over the years and proposes new investigations that will provide useful information from this underutilized resource. Method A literature review was conducted using the electronic database PubMed to search for literature pertaining to burn wound or blister fluid analysis. Key words included burn exudate, blister fluid, wound exudate, cytokine burn fluid, subeschar fluid, cytokine burns, serum cytokines. 32 relevant article were examined and 29 selected as relevant to the review. 3 papers were discarded due to questionable methodology or conclusions. The reports were assessed for their affect on management decisions and diagnostics. Furthermore, traditional blood level analysis of these mediators was made to compare the accuracy of blood versus exudate in burn wound management. Extrapolations are made for new possibilities of burn wound exudate analysis. Results Studies pertaining to burn wound exudate, subeschar fluid and blister fluid analyses may have contributed to burn wound management decisions particularly related to escharectomies and early burn wound excision. In addition, information from these studies have the potential to impact on areas such as healing, scarring, burn wound conversion and burn wound depth analysis. Conclusion Burn wound exudate analysis has proven useful in burn wound management decisions. It appears to offer a far more accurate reflection of the burn wound pathophysiology than the traditional blood/serum investigations undertaken in the past. New approaches to diagnostics and treatment efficacy assessment are possible utilizing data from this fluid. Burn wound exudate is a useful, currently under-utilized resource that is likely to take a more prominent role in burn wound management. PMID:24986597

  16. Postoperative jejunal feeding and outcome of pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Baradi, Hani; Walsh, R Matthew; Henderson, J Michael; Vogt, David; Popovich, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy are common, partly because of nutritional debilitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of early postoperative tube feeding on outcome of pancreaticoduodenectomy and determine the best method for delivering enteral feeding. A retrospective review of 180 consecutive patients undergoing Whipple operations from 1994 to 2000 was performed. Two nonrandomized patient groups were retrospectively studied: those with early postoperative tube feeding vs. those with no planned feeding. Ninety-eight patients (54%) received postoperative jejunal feeding, whereas 82 patients (46%) did not. Jejunal feeding was delivered via a bridled nasojejunal tube in 55 patients (56%) and a gastrojejunal tube in 43 (44%). Vomiting (10% vs. 29%; P=0.002) and use of total parenteral nutrition (6% vs. 27%; P < 0.0001) were less in the jejunal feeding group as well as rates of readmission (12% vs. 27%; P=0.022), early (52% vs. 62%; P=0.223) and late (12% vs. 31%, P=0.005) complications, and infections (13% vs. 20%, P=0.014). Tube-related complications occurred in 6 of 98 patients, all of which were associated with gastrojejunal tubes (P=0.021). Early postoperative tube feeding after pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with significantly less use of total parenteral nutrition and lower rates of readmission and complications. A bridled nasojejunal feeding tube appears to be a safe and reliable method of short-term enteral feeding. PMID:15120367

  17. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  18. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Woo; Baek, Seung Ryeol; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Sang Ho; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo Yun; Moh, Ji Hong; Kondo, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Background Rosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice. Methods Sixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg) was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test. Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-β1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA. Conclusions Rose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing. PMID:26618114

  19. Stab Wound in the Skull Treated with a Medial Supraorbital Craniotomy Through an Incision in the Eyebrow-a Minimally Invasive Approach.

    PubMed

    Araujo, João Luiz Vitorino; Ferraz, Vinicius Ricieri; Vilela, Denes; Sette, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    The eyebrow incision associated with medial supraorbital craniotomy is a minimally invasive alternative approach to the lesions located in the medial anterior cranial fossa. The main advantages of the medial supraorbital craniotomy regarding frontolateral supraorbital craniotomy are the absence of manipulation of the temporal muscle, less risk of injury to the frontotemporal branch of the facial nerve and a more medial view of the anterior structures such as frontal sinus, olfatory groove and frontal lobe. We report a unique case of cranial stab wound in which a piece of the knife stayed in the frontal sinus and removal was performed using the medial supraorbital approach. There were no complications during surgery, the patient reported mild hypoesthesia in the left frontal region and was discharged on the 7th postoperative day. During follow-up after 2 months, good cosmetic result of the surgical wound and preserved sensitivity of the left frontal region were noted. PMID:26884664

  20. Maxillofacial gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Olga; de Régloix, Stanislas; Dubourdieu, Stéphane; Lefort, Hugues; Boizat, Stéphane; Houze, Benoit; Culoma, Jennifer; Burlaton, Guillaume; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The majority of maxillofacial gunshot wounds are caused by suicide attempts. Young men are affected most often. When the lower one-third of the face is involved, airway patency (1.6% of the cases) and hemorrhage control (1.9% of the cases) are the two most urgent complications to monitor and prevent. Spinal fractures are observed with 10% of maxillary injuries and in 20% of orbital injuries. Actions to treat the facial gunshot victim need to be performed, keeping in mind spine immobilization until radiographic imaging is complete and any required spinal stabilization accomplished. Patients should be transported to a trauma center equipped to deal with maxillofacial and neurosurgery because 40% require emergency surgery. The mortality rate of maxillofacial injuries shortly after arrival at a hospital varies from 2.8% to 11.0%. Complications such as hemiparesis or cranial nerve paralysis occur in 20% of survivors. This case has been reported on a victim of four gunshot injuries. One of the gunshots was to the left mandibular ramus and became lodged in the C4 vertebral bone. PMID:25868553

  1. Acceleration of wound repair by curcumin in the excision wound of mice exposed to different doses of fractionated γ radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Rajanikant, Golgod Krishnamurthy

    2012-02-01

    Fractionated irradiation (IR) before or after surgery of malignant tumours causes a high frequency of wound healing complications. Our aim was to investigate the effect of curcumin (CUM) on the healing of deep excision wound of mice exposed to fractionated IR by mimicking clinical conditions. A full-thickness dermal excision wound was created on the shaved dorsum of mice that were orally administered or not with 100 mg of CUM per kilogram body weight before partial body exposure to 10, 20 or 40 Gy given as 2 Gy/day for 5, 10 or 20 days. The wound contraction was determined periodically by capturing video images of the wound from day 1 until complete healing of wounds. Fractionated IR caused a dose-dependent delay in the wound contraction and prolonged wound healing time, whereas CUM administration before fractionated IR caused a significant elevation in the wound contraction and reduced mean wound healing time. Fractionated IR reduced the synthesis of collagen, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and nitric oxide (NO) at different post-IR times and treatment of mice with CUM before IR elevated the synthesis of collagen, DNA and NO significantly. Histological examination showed a reduction in the collagen deposition, fibroblast and vascular densities after fractionated IR, whereas CUM pre-treatment inhibited this decline significantly. Our study shows that CUM pre-treatment accelerated healing of irradiated wound and could be a substantial therapeutic strategy in the management of irradiated wounds. PMID:21883936

  2. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease. PMID:26342531

  3. Treatment of complications of parotid gland surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marchese-Ragona, R; De Filippis, C; Marioni, G; Staffieri, A

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although several reports in the literature have documented the surgical technique, and the oncological outcome achieved with parotidectomy, only a few articles have described the complications of parotid gland surgery and their management. Several complications have been reported in parotid surgery. We re-classified the complications of parotidectomy in intra-operative and post-operative (early and late). The commonest complications after parotidectomy are temporary or permanent facial palsy and Frey’s syndrome. PMID:16450773

  4. The Role of Wound Healing and Its Everyday Application in Plastic Surgery: A Practical Perspective and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ireton, Jordan E.; Unger, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After surgery it is often recommended that patients should refrain from strenuous physical activity for 4–6 weeks. This recommendation is based on the time course of wound healing. Here, we present an overview of incisional wound healing with a focus on 2 principles that guide our postoperative recommendations: the gain of tensile strength of a wound over time and the effect of mechanical stress on wound healing. Methods: A systematic search of the English literature was conducted using OVID, Cochrane databases, and PubMed. Inclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing the dynamics of incisional wound healing, and exclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing nonincisional wounds. Results: Experiments as early as 1929 laid the groundwork for our postoperative activity recommendations. Research using animal models has shown that the gain in tensile strength of a surgical wound is sigmoidal in trajectory, reaching maximal strength approximately 6 weeks postoperatively. Although human and clinical data are limited, the principles gained from laboratory investigation have provided important insights into the relationship among mechanical stress, collagen dynamics, and the time course of wound healing. Conclusion: Our postoperative activity recommendations are based on a series of animal studies. Clinical research supporting these recommendations is minimal, with the most relevant clinical data stemming from early motion protocols in the orthopedic literature. We must seek to establish clinical data to support our postoperative activity recommendations so that we can maximize the physiologic relationships between wound healing and mechanical stress. PMID:25289204

  5. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers-including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes-affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. PMID:26979353

  6. Management of gunshot wounds to the mandible.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Michael; Sawatari, Yoh

    2010-07-01

    The gunshot wound to the mandible is a unique traumatic injury. The resultant injury from the gunshot wound is diverse because of the variability of the projectile, motion, velocity, and tissue characteristics. When a high-velocity projectile strikes the mandible, often times the wound will consist of a severely comminuted mandible surrounded by nonvital soft tissues and the implantation of multiple foreign bodies. This represents a challenge for the treating surgeon. The anatomy and function of the mandible make it such that the care of the gunshot wound requires a combination of trauma and reconstructive surgeries. There are varying techniques advocated for the management of gunshot wound to the face. However, for the comminuted mandible fracture sustained from a gunshot wound, an approach involving the fabrication of an occlusal splint, intermaxillary fixation, aggressive debridement of hard and soft tissues, and immediate reconstruction with a titanium plate is a comprehensive approach that can restore the appropriate function and contour of the patient. At the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Miami, this approach to the comminuted mandible fracture secondary to the gunshot wound has led to the effective management of this specific subset of injury. The complication rate is comparable with the current literature and provides an advantage as a 1-stage management to restore appropriate function and cosmesis to the patient. PMID:20613603

  7. Non-healing wounds: the geriatric approach.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2009-01-01

    The most common types of non-healing wounds are four types: pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischemic ulcers and venous ulcers. Many of those wounds develop among the elderly, becoming non-healing to the extent that the patient may live with them all of his life, or even die because of them. Not enough attention is paid to the underlying contributing problems specific to the elderly patient. Those factors are physiologic (aging skin, immune state and atherosclerosis) and pathologic situation (diabetic disease, ischemia of leg). Therefore, the geriatric approach to a non-healing wound is comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Those including: patient's co-morbidities, functional state as measured by the activities of daily living (ADL) scale, nutritional status, social support, ethical beliefs and quality of life and not only the wound itself. Each discipline (the nursing staff, physician, dietitian, occupational, physical therapists and social worker) has its own task in preventing and treating such wounds. The ultimate goal therefore has been altered from healing of the wounds to symptom control, prevention of complications and to contribute to the patient's overall wellbeing. This review discusses all those items in a geriatric point of view, and how to deal with the non-healing wounds as a geriatric syndrome. PMID:18838182

  8. The effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing in horses.

    PubMed

    Petersen, S L; Botes, C; Olivier, A; Guthrie, A J

    1999-05-01

    Laser therapy is used in many countries, including South Africa, for the treatment of skin wounds. Low level galium aluminium arsenide (GaAlAs) laser was administered to full thickness skin wounds (3 x 3 cm) induced surgically on the dorsal aspect of the metacarpophalangeal joints of 6 crossbred horses in a randomised, blind, controlled study. Treated wounds that received a daily laser dosage of 2 J/cm2 were compared with nontreated control wounds on the opposite leg. There were no wound complications. Both groups of wounds were cleaned daily using tap water. Wound contraction and epithelialisation were evaluated using photoplanimetry. There were no significant differences in wound contraction or epithelialisation between the laser treated and the control wounds. It was therefore concluded that laser therapy had no clinically significant effect on second intention wound healing in this study. PMID:10402136

  9. Metabolic dysfunction in lymphocytes promotes postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark R; Sultan, Pervez; del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Whittle, John; Karmali, Shamir N; Moonesinghe, S Ramani; Haddad, Fares S; Mythen, Michael G; Singer, Mervyn; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-09-01

    Perioperative lymphopenia has been linked with an increased risk of postoperative infectious complications, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that bioenergetic dysfunction is an important mechanism underlying lymphopenia, impaired functionality and infectious complications. In two cohorts of patients (61-82 years old) undergoing orthopaedic joint replacement (n=417 and 328, respectively), we confirmed prospectively that preoperative lymphopenia (≤1.3 x 10(9)·l(-1); <20% white cell count; prevalence 15-18%) was associated with infectious complications (relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.0); P=0.008) and prolonged hospital stay. Lymphocyte respirometry, mitochondrial bioenergetics and function were assessed (n=93 patients). Postoperative lymphocytes showed a median 43% fall (range: 26-65%; P=0.029; n=13 patients) in spare respiratory capacity, the extra capacity available to produce energy in response to stress. This was accompanied by reduced glycolytic capacity. A similar hypometabolic phenotype was observed in lymphocytes sampled preoperatively from chronically lymphopenic patients (n=21). This hypometabolic phenotype was associated with functional lymphocyte impairment including reduced T-cell proliferation, lower intracellular cytokine production and excess apoptosis induced by a range of common stressors. Glucocorticoids, which are ubiquitously elevated for a prolonged period postoperatively, generated increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, activated caspase-1 and mature interleukin (IL)-1β in human lymphocytes, suggesting inflammasome activation. mRNA transcription of the NLRP1 inflammasome was increased in lymphocytes postoperatively. Genetic ablation of the murine NLRP3 inflammasome failed to prevent glucocorticoid-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and caspase-1 activity, but increased NLRP1 protein expression. Our findings suggest that the hypometabolic phenotype observed in chronically lymphopenic patients and/or acquired postoperatively increases the risk of postoperative infection through glucocorticoid activation of caspase-1 via the NLRP1 inflammasome. PMID:25891048

  10. Difficult wounds: an update.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Drake, David B

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to describe revolutionary advances in the treatment of Gardner's syndrome (GS), pseudofolliculitis barbae, nasal septal perforation, factitious wounds, and hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Gardner's syndrome or familial polyposis has various manifestations that appear to be controlled by a single genetic locus. Apart from the large bowel adenomas, which are always present, a common extracolonic symptom of Gardner's syndrome is the occurrence of epidermal cysts. These cysts can be seen before the intestinal polyps are evident. Because epidermal cysts in patients with Gardner's syndrome are always benign, we excise these cysts using incisions that are commonly used for rhytidectomy. Pseudofolliculitis barbae, a pseudofolliculitis caused by ingrown hairs, effects 85% of blacks who shave their beards. When this disease is allowed to progress to keloid formation, we use a surgical approach that includes excision of the keloidal scar, meticulous debridement of all residual ingrown hairs in the underlying wound, and coverage of the defect with a split-thickness skin graft. More recently, laser therapy has revolutionized the treatment of pseudofolliculitis barbae and has enabled a cure for the first time for those plagued with this disorder and for whom a beardless face is acceptable. Nasal septal perforation is a well recognized complication of septal surgery. Other iatrogenic causes of perforation include cryosurgery, electrocoagulation for epitaxis, nasotracheal intubation, or nose packing. In recent years drugs such as cocaine account for an increasing number of perforations. It has only been with the use of an external approach for the repair of the nasal septal defect that surgical closure has become easier and more reliable. The external approach allows for greater surgical closure and enables the surgeon to use both hands with the aid of binocular vision to mobilize and suture local mucosal advancement flaps and the intraseptal connective tissue grafts. More recently, surgeons have repaired large septal perforations with a radial forearm free flap. Because of its availability and deep emotional significance, the skin is a common site for self-destructive behavior with the development of factitious skin wounds. When suspected, psychiatric care must proceed immediately. Second, the ulcer can then be healed by appropriate techniques and wound repair. It is important to emphasize that the treating physician must first confront the patient, and then a psychiatrist should provide appropriate psychotherapy. Hidradenitis suppurativa is an inflammatory disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that occurs in apocrine-gland-bearing areas distributed in the axilla, mammary nipple areola, mons pubis, groin, scrotum, perineum, perianal region, and umbilicus. The condition has an insidious onset. The susceptibility of women's axillary skin to hidradenitis suppurativa may be related, in part, to the practice of axillary removal of hair with a safety razor. Consequently, the use of safety razors must be avoided and replaced with the use of an electric razor. The method of treatment will vary with the stage of the disease. Treatment of the chronic stage of axillary hidradenitis suppurativa is primarily surgical. More recently, carbon dioxide laser treatment, with healing by secondary intention, is proving to be a rapid, efficient, and economic treatment of this difficult wound. PMID:16022640

  11. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... days after surgery. Surgical wound infections may have pus draining from them and can be red, painful ... your antibiotics, even if you feel better. The pus from your wound may be tested to figure ...

  12. Gunshot wounds - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

  13. Postoperative blood loss reduction in computer-assisted surgery total knee replacement by low dose intra-articular tranexamic acid injection together with 2-hour clamp drain: a prospective triple-blinded randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Channoom, Thanaphot; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Wibulpolprasert, Bussanee; Wongsak, Siwadol; Udomsubpayakul, Umaporn; Wechmongkolgorn, Supaporn; Lekpittaya, Nantaporn

    2011-01-01

    A high-dose local tranexamic acid has been introduced in total knee arthroplasty for bleeding control. We are not sure about the systemic absorption and side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low dosage of intra-articular tranexamic acid injection combined with 2-hour clamp drain in minimally bleeding computer-assisted surgery total knee replacement (CAS-TKR). A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in a total of 48 patients underwent CAS-TKR. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either of a mixed intra-articular solution of tranexamic acid 250 mg with physiologic saline (TXA group), or physiologic saline (control group) and then followed by clamp drain for 2 hours. Postoperative blood loss was measured by three different methods as drainage volume, total hemoglobin loss and calculated total blood loss. Transfusion requirement and postoperative complications were recorded. All patients were screened for deep vein thrombosis and the functional outcomes were evaluated at 6 months after surgery. The mean postoperative drainage volume, total hemoglobin loss and calculated total blood loss in TXA group were 308.8 mL, 2.1 g/dL and 206.3 mL compared to 529.0 mL, 3.0 g/dL and 385.1 mL in the control group (P=0.0003, 0.0005 and <0.0001 respectively). Allogenic blood transfusion was needed for one patient (4.2%) in TXA group and for eight patients (33.3%) in the control group. Postoperative knee scores were not significantly different between groups. No deep vein thrombosis, infection or wound complication was detected in both groups. In this study, low dose intra-articular tranexamic acid injection combined with 2-hour clamping drain was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirement in CAS-TKR without significant difference in postoperative complications or functional outcomes. PMID:22053253

  14. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care. PMID:24247310

  15. Non-equilibrium Air Plasma for Wound Bleeding Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Lin, Chuan-Shun; Chiang, Shu-Hsing

    A low temperature non-equilibrium air plasma spray is tested as a blood coagulator. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma effluent indicates that it carries abundant reactive atomic oxygen (RAO), which can activate erythrocyte - platelet interactions to enhance blood coagulation for plug formation. Tests of the device for wound bleeding control were performed on pigs. Four types of wounds, straight cut and cross cut in the ham area, a hole in an ear saphenous vein, and a cut to an ear artery, were examined. The results showed that this plasma spray could effectively stop the bleeding and reduced the bleeding time considerably. Post-Operative observation of straight cut and cross cut wound healing was carried out. It was found that the plasma treatment had a positive impact on wound healing, in particular, of the cross cut wound; its healing time was shortened by a half.

  16. [Some immunologic aspects in postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Perfil'ev, D F

    1998-01-01

    Examination of blood serum and cellular elements of 45 patients with postoperative diffuse purulent peritonitis shows that in the majority of examined persons before and in the first days after the operation immunodepression exists. The dynamics of immunologic disturbances (antibody titers, phagocytosis, immunoglobulines, T- and B-lymphocytes) are sufficiently informative and as a rule, correlate with clinical course of peritonitis. Adequate reaction of the organism to infection resulted in a favourable outcome. Low values of immunologic indices in postoperative period necessitate the use of stimulant therapy in combined treatment of this complication. PMID:9916429

  17. Wound care centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... that don't heal. You have a non-healing wound if it: Hasn't started to heal ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical wounds Radiation sores Foot ulcers due to diabetes, poor blood flow, or swollen legs Certain ...

  18. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  19. [General principles of wound management in emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Zacher, M T; Högele, A M; Hanschen, M; von Matthey, F; Beer, A-K; Gebhardt, F; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2016-04-01

    Wound management is one of the major tasks in emergency departments. The surrounding intact skin but not the wound itself should be disinfected before starting definitive wound treatment. Hair should first be removed by clipping to 1-2 mm above the skin with scissors or clippers as shaving the area with a razor damages the hair follicles and increases the risk of wound infections. Administration of local anesthetics should be performed directly through the exposed edges of the wound. After wound examination, irrigation is performed with Ringer's solution, normal saline or distilled water. The next step is débridement of contaminated and devitalized tissue. There are several wound closure techniques available, including adhesive tapes, staples, tissue adhesives and numerous forms of sutures. Management of specific wounds requires particular strategies. A bleeding control problem frequently occurs with scalp lacerations. Superficial scalp lacerations can be closed by alternative wound closure methods, for example by twisting and fixing hair and the use of tissue adhesives, i.e. hair apposition technique (HAT). For strongly bleeding lacerations of the scalp, the epicranial aponeurosis should be incorporated into the hemostasis. Aftercare varies depending on both the characteristics of the wound and those of the patient and includes adequate analgesia as well as minimizing the risk of infection. Sufficient wound aftercare starts with the treating physician informing the patient about the course of events, potential complications and providing relevant instructions. PMID:27059794

  20. Advanced Therapeutic Dressings for Effective Wound Healing--A Review.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Catanzano, Ovidio

    2015-11-01

    Advanced therapeutic dressings that take active part in wound healing to achieve rapid and complete healing of chronic wounds is of current research interest. There is a desire for novel strategies to achieve expeditious wound healing because of the enormous financial burden worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of wound healing and wound management products, with emphasis on the demand for more advanced forms of wound therapy and some of the current challenges and driving forces behind this demand. The paper reviews information mainly from peer-reviewed literature and other publicly available sources such as the US FDA. A major focus is the treatment of chronic wounds including amputations, diabetic and leg ulcers, pressure sores, and surgical and traumatic wounds (e.g., accidents and burns) where patient immunity is low and the risk of infections and complications are high. The main dressings include medicated moist dressings, tissue-engineered substitutes, biomaterials-based biological dressings, biological and naturally derived dressings, medicated sutures, and various combinations of the above classes. Finally, the review briefly discusses possible prospects of advanced wound healing including some of the emerging physical approaches such as hyperbaric oxygen, negative pressure wound therapy and laser wound healing, in routine clinical care. PMID:26308473

  1. Thyroid surgery in octogenarians is associated with higher complication rates

    PubMed Central

    Mekel, Michal; Stephen, Antonia E.; Gaz, Randall D.; Muzikansky, Alona; Hodin, Richard A.; Parangi, Sareh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether thyroid surgery in patients ≥80 is associated with higher complication rates. Background The incidence of thyroid nodules increases with age and little information is available regarding the risks of thyroid surgery in elderly patients. Methods Out of 3568 patients undergoing thyroid surgery between July 2001 and October 2007 at a single institution, the records of 90 consecutive patients ≥80 years were retrospectively reviewed and compared to a cohort of 242 randomly selected patients aged 18–79, who underwent thyroid surgery during the same time period, using SAS statistical software. Clinical variables included age group, sex, medical co-morbidities, pre-operative diagnosis, substernal component, previous surgery, final pathology, length of stay (LOS), postoperative complications and mortality. Results Preoperative indications for surgery included benign disease in 51.1% vs. 40.9%, suspected malignancy in 18.9% vs. 26% and suspected follicular neoplasms including indeterminate/microfollicular cytology in 30% vs. 33.1% in the octogenarian patient group (≥80 yrs old) vs. the younger patient cohort (p=NS). Octogenarians had a 21.1% rate of significant malignancy on final pathology vs. 28.1% in the younger cohort (p=NS). The overall complication rate in the octogenarian group was 23.3% vs. 9.1% in the younger cohort (p=.0006). Male sex and lung disease were independent risk factors for perioperative complications. Complications unique to octogenarians included heart failure, atrial fibrillation, pneumonia, tracheotomy, urosepsis, blood transfusion, wound infection and ischemic colitis. There was no mortality in either group. Conclusions Patients ≥80 years of age can undergo successful thyroid surgery but with significantly higher morbidity. Earlier surgical intervention may be advised in those who are at high risk for disease progression whereas follow-up strategies without surgery may be advised for others. PMID:19744461

  2. The Wound Microbiome: Modern Approaches to Examining the Role of Microorganisms in Impaired Chronic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Misic, Ana M; Gardner, Sue E; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-01

    Significance: Bacterial burden is believed to play a significant role in impaired wound healing of chronic wounds and the development of infection-related complications. The standard of care in the clinic relies upon cultivation-dependent methods to identify microorganisms. These assays are biased toward microorganisms that thrive in isolation under laboratory conditions. Recent Advances: Significant advances in genomic technologies have enabled less-biased, culture-independent approaches to characterize microbial communities, or microbiomes. The aggregate sequencing and analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA genes has demonstrated that cultures under-represent true microbial diversity and load. Critical Issues: Despite recent advances that enable culture-independent analyses of microbiomes, those organisms that are important in impaired healing remain ambiguous. Inconsistent findings across various studies highlight the need to characterize microbiomes of chronic wounds with homogenous etiology to determine differences in microbiomes that may be driven by the wound environment and that may affect wound outcomes. Rigorous analyses of wound microbiomes in light of the three dimensions of bioburden (microbial diversity, microbial load, and pathogenic organisms), clinical metadata, and wound outcomes will be a significant step forward in our quest to understand the role of microorganisms in impaired healing. Future Directions: Longitudinal studies employing serial sampling are needed to appreciate the role of the dynamic microbial community in chronic wound healing. The value of clinical metadata needs to be examined as potential biomarkers of problematic microbiota and wound outcomes. Lastly, better characterization and understanding of wound microbiomes will open avenues for improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the nonhealing wound. PMID:25032070

  3. Supplemental Intravenous Crystalloid Administration Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kabon, Barbara; Akça, Ozan; Taguchi, Akiko; Nagele, Angelika; Jebadurai, Ratnaraj; Arkilic, Cem F.; Sharma, Neeru; Ahluwalia, Arundhathi; Galandiuk, Susan; Fleshman, James; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Wound perfusion and oxygenation are important determinants of the development of postoperative wound infections. Supplemental fluid administration significantly increases tissue oxygenation in surrogate wounds in the subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm in perioperative surgical patients. We tested the hypothesis that supplemental fluid administration during and after elective colon resections decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Patients undergoing open colon resection were randomly assigned to small (n=124, 8 mL·kg-1·h-1) or large volume (n=129, 16-18 mL·kg-1·h-1) fluid management. Our major outcomes were two distinct criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections: 1) purulent exudate combined with a culture positive for pathogenic bacteria and 2) Center for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections. All wound infections diagnosed using either criterion by a blinded observer in the 15 days following surgery were considered in the analysis. Wound healing was evaluated with the ASEPSIS scoring system. Of the patients given small fluid administration, 14 had surgical wound infections; 11 given large fluid therapy had infections, P=0.46. ASEPSIS wound healing scores were similar in both groups: 7±16 (small volume) vs. 8±14 (large volume), P=0.70. Our results suggest that supplemental hydration in the range tested does not impact wound infection rate. PMID:16244030

  4. G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Aleah L.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation following Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (34 month) and aged (1820 month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal, subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 ?l/injection) or saline control (50 ?l/injection) 30 minutes after wound infection. Mice were sacrificed at days 3 and 7 post wound infection and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no affect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of post-operative wound infection or chronic, non-healing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

  5. Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wounding following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI) increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co γ-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI) vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in γ-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in γ-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI) included continuously decreased γ-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI) included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined injury and reduce related mortality. PMID:22686656

  6. Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy D. Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kirsch, David G.; Suit, Herman D.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Gebhardt, Marc C.; Mankin, Henry J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

  7. Special postoperative diet orders: Irrational, obsolete, and imprudent.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Ramasubramanian, Vidhya; Meguid, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    There are no indications to prescribed special diets for postoperative patients. Low-sodium and low-fat or low-cholesterol diets are examples of restricted diets, especially in patients with heart disease and atherosclerosis. These restricted diets are unpalatable. Postoperative nausea, paralytic ileus, and vomiting caused by residual anesthetic effects and opioids used for pain control further contribute to the problem. Long-term adherence to these diets is necessary to derive benefits. Prescribing regular and palatable diets in the immediate postoperative period to meet protein and energy goals is important for wound healing and is commensurate with best clinical practices. In the following, we review the pertinent literature and offer clinical evidence that routine special diet orders for postoperative patients are not necessary. PMID:26746678

  8. Air leakage on the postoperative day: powerful factor of postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyun Woo; Kye, Yeo Kon; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a relatively common disorder in young patients. Although various surgical techniques have been introduced, recurrence after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) remains high. The aim of study was to identify the risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in the spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods From January 2011 through March 2013, two hundreds and thirty two patients underwent surgery because of pneumothorax. Patients with a secondary pneumothorax, as well as cases of single port surgery, an open procedure, additional pleural procedure (pleurectomy, pleural abrasion) or lack of medical records were excluded. The records of 147 patients with PSP undergoing 3-port video-assisted thoracoscopic bullectomy with staple line coverage using an absorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 19 years (range, 11−34 years) with male predominance (87.8%). Median postoperative hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1−10 days) without mortality. Complications were developed in five patients. A total of 24 patients showed postoperative recurrence (16.3%). Younger age less than 17 years old and immediate postoperative air leakage were risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Immediate postoperative air leakage was the risk factor for postoperative recurrence. However, further study will be required for the correlation of air leakage with recurrence. PMID:26904217

  9. Multiple recurrent postoperative spinal infections due to an unrecognized presacral abscess following placement of bicortical sacral screws: case report.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Laura; Burks, S Shelby; Levi, Allan D

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative wound infections in spinal surgery remain an important complication to diagnose and treat successfully. In most cases of deep infection, even with instrumentation, aggressive soft-tissue debridement followed by intravenous antibiotics is sufficient. This report presents a patient who underwent L3-S1 laminectomy and pedicle screw placement including bicortical sacral screws. This patient went on to develop multiple (7) recurrent infections at the operative site over a 5-year period. Continued investigation eventually revealed a large presacral abscess, which remained the source of recurrent bacterial seeding via the remaining bone tracts of the bicortical sacral screws placed during the original lumbar surgery. Two years after drainage of this presacral collection via a retroperitoneal approach, the patient remains symptom free. PMID:26613281

  10. VLAP: results immediately post-op

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Robert S.

    1996-05-01

    Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) has been shown to be as effective with fewer complications than TURP in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Questions have been raised about VLAP regarding prolonged irritative and obstructive voiding symptoms postoperatively. It is postulated that these symptoms are due to the slow slough of necrotic debris following VLAP. In an effort to improve upon the technique of VLAP, patients underwent lasing of the prostate in the routine manner (2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions with sixty watts for sixty seconds) using Nd:YAG free beam energy. A bladder neck incision was then performed using a contact laser fiber. International prostate symptom score assessments were done preoperatively; one week and six weeks postoperatively. Post void residual urine volumes and prostate size were also evaluated. The findings indicate that symptom scores and post void residual urine volumes have significantly improved within ten days postoperatively using this technique.

  11. Fracture complications.

    PubMed

    Hershey, Kristen

    2013-06-01

    This article highlights 2 important complications of fracture: acute compartment syndrome and fat embolism syndrome (FES). FES is most commonly associated with long-bone and pelvic fracture, whereas acute compartment syndrome is often associated with tibia or forearm fracture. The onset of both of these complications may be difficult to assess in the nonverbal patient or in the patient with multiple trauma. Careful, serial assessment of the patient with fracture is necessary to recognize and treat these complications promptly. Early treatment and supportive care are crucial to positive outcomes for patients with complications of fracture. PMID:23692947

  12. Dynamic Scintigraphy With SPECT-CT of Postoperative Salivary Leak.

    PubMed

    Weyts, Kathleen; Spinato, Linda; Bisschop, Pierre; Jaudet, Cyril; Hambÿe, Anne Sophie

    2016-05-01

    This 65 year-old woman, 1 month postoperative after maxillary sinus carcinoma (pT4N0cM0) excision and reconstruction, presented with significant left facial clear fluid wound leakage. A salivary or cerebrospinal leakage was suspected. Fluid analysis, CT, and MRI were noncontributory. Dynamic salivary scintigraphy with SPECT-CT allowed for the detection and localization of the leakage from the left parotid gland. Radioactive dose rate of the wound bandage was 50 μSv/h compared with 0.05 μSv/h for background and confirmed the diagnosis. Left total parotidectomy resulted in resolution. PMID:26859202

  13. Spinal cord detethering procedures in children: a 5 year retrospective cohort study of the early post-operative course.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Matthew; Chaseling, Raymond; Fowler, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Tethered spinal cord can cause neurological, orthopaedic and sphincteric problems in children and detethering surgery may prevent or reverse these problems. This 5 year retrospective cohort study aimed to review our experience of detethering surgery at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia, particularly examining the early post-operative complications of this procedure. Between 2007 and 2012, 61 children underwent 63 detethering procedures. The median age at detethering surgery was 1.4 years old (interquartile range: 0.7-5.6 years). Fifty-five children (90.1%) had lumbosacral procedures, 31 (50.8%) were asymptomatic from tethering, 11 (18.0%) had motor or gait disturbance, 11 (18.0%) sphincteric disturbance, eight (13.1%) lower limb orthopaedic deformities, eight (13.1%) scoliosis, six (9.8%) back or leg pain and two (3.3%) sensory disturbance. The most common tethering pathologies were spinal lipomas in 32 children (52.5%), filum abnormalities in 23 (37.7%), dorsal sinus tracts in eight (13.1%) and diastematomyelia in seven (11.5%). Twenty-six children (42.6%) had either a syrinx or central canal dilatation preoperatively. The most common complications were wound infection and cerebrospinal fluid leak. Six children (9.8%) required reoperation for wound issues and two patients (3.3%) required subsequent reoperation for cord retethering during the study period. There were no deaths and no new neurological deficits. Of the children with the above preoperative deficits, 26.7% were documented to have improvement or resolution of their symptoms post-operatively. The highest rate of improvement occurred in children with motor or gait disturbance (36.4%) or sphincteric disturbance (27.3%). PMID:25818162

  14. Is the Center for Medicare and Medicaid's Lack of Reimbursement for Postoperative Urinary Tract Infections in Elderly Emergency Surgery Patients Justified?

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D.; Thomsen, Kristine M.; Polites, Stephanie F.; Khasawneh, Mohammad A.; Jenkins, Donald H.; Habermann, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Urinary tract infections (UTI), a risk factor for readmission, have been deemed a potentially preventable problem, and therefore not reimbursable, by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) since 2008. Defining the risk factors for UTI development in the postoperative period will provide risk stratification for UTI development in these challenging patients. Methods Pre-, intra-, and postoperative characteristics were collected for patients≥ 65 years old who underwent an emergency abdominal operation from the 2005–2012 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Participant User File (PUF), a database of 374 participating hospitals. In-hospital UTIs occurring within 30 days of the operation were identified. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify UTI risk factors. Results In total, 53,879 patients were included, 1881 (3.5%) of whom were diagnosed with a postoperative UTI prior to discharge. In-hospital UTI was associated with a greater hospital stay (27 vs 13 days, p<0.001) and greater 30-day mortality rates (18% vs 16%, p=0.003). The rate of UTI dropped from 4.5% prior to the CMS decree to 3.2% thereafter (p<0.001). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated advanced age, female sex, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, dependent functional status, open wound, hypoalbuminemia, elevated ASA class, operative approach, and prolonged operative time were independent risk factors for postoperative UTI development (Table). Conclusion While postoperative UTI rates dropped after the CMS decree, the lack of reimbursement is not justified as few modifiable risk factors to further improve postoperative UTI rates in elderly emergency surgical patients were identified. While targeted interventions may be developed, this complication is not easily preventable and will continue to plague acute care surgeons taking care of this challenging patient population. PMID:25239361

  15. Reconstruction option of abdominal wounds with large tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal wall defects result from trauma, abdominal wall tumors, necrotizing infections or complications of previous abdominal surgeries. Apart from cosmetics, abdominal wall defects have strong negative functional impact on the patients. Many different techniques exist for abdominal wall repair. Most problematic and troublesome are defects, where major part of abdominal wall had to be resected and tissue for transfer or reconstruction is absent. Case presentation Authors of the article present operative technique, in which reconstruction of abdominal wall was managed by composite polypropylene mesh with absorbable collagen film, creation of granulation tissue with use of NPWT (negative pressure wound therapy), and subsequent split skin grafting. Three patients with massive abdominal wall defect were successfully managed and abdominal wall reconstruction was performed by mentioned technique. Functional and cosmetic effect is acceptable and patients have good postoperative quality of life. Conclusions Patients with giant abdominal defects can benefit from described technique. It serves as the only option, with which abdominal wall is fully reconstructed without need for the secondary intervention. PMID:25103782

  16. Risk factors for fever, endometritis and wound infection after abdominal delivery.

    PubMed

    Suonio, S; Saarikoski, S; Vohlonen, I; Kauhanen, O

    1989-06-01

    Risk factors for postoperative fever, endometritis and wound infection were analyzed in 761 consecutive cesarean sections. Postoperative fever was observed in 12%, endometritis in 4.7% and wound infection in 3% of cases. The relative risk for postoperative fever was increased in cases with postoperative hematoma (relative risk = 16.0), in cases with blood loss over 500 g (relative risk = 1.8) and if the duration of labor exceeded 6 h (relative risk = 1.9). The only significant risk factors for endometritis were amnionitis (relative risk = 8.7), postoperative hematoma (relative risk = 5.0) and age under 24 years (relative risk = 3.0). Wound infections were less frequent in cases with previous cesarean sections (relative risk = 0.15) and after elective cesarean sections (relative risk = 0.22), but duration of operation over 1 h (relative risk = 2.8), induction of labor (relative risk = 3.2) and puerperal endometritis (relative risk = 7.9) increased the risk of wound infection. By elimination of amnionitis and postoperative hematomas the rate of endometritis would have diminished only from 4.7% to 3.8%, a percentage equally unacceptable; diagnostics and prevention should be directed to young patients undergoing caesarean section. Besides technical procedures prevention of endometritis is important for the prevention of wound infection. In hospitals with low postcesarean infectious morbidity antibiotic prophylaxis seems to be unwarranted. PMID:2568288

  17. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  18. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  19. Bio-Conjugated Polycaprolactone Membranes: A Novel Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Teo, Erin Yiling; Jing, Lim; Koh, Yun Pei; Qian, Tan Si; Wen, Feng; Lee, James Wai Kit; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Yap, Yan Lin; Lee, Hanjing; Lee, Chuen Neng; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Lim, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of polycaprolactone and hyaluronic acid creates an ideal environment for wound healing. Hyaluronic acid maintains a moist wound environment and accelerates the in-growth of granulation tissue. Polycaprolactone has excellent mechanical strength, limits inflammation and is biocompatible. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of bio-conjugated polycaprolactone membranes (BPM) as a wound dressing. Methods 16 New Zealand white rabbits were sedated and local anaesthesia was administered. Two 3.0×3.0 cm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of each rabbit, between the lowest rib and the pelvic bone. The wounds were dressed with either BPM (n=12) or Mepitel (n=12) (control), a polyamide-silicon wound dressing. These were evaluated macroscopically on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days for granulation, re-epithelialization, infection, and wound size, and histologically for epidermal and dermal regeneration. Results Both groups showed a comparable extent of granulation and re-epithelialization. No signs of infection were observed. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in wound size between the two groups. BPM (n=6): 8.33 cm2, 4.90 cm2, 3.12 cm2, 1.84 cm2; Mepitel (n=6): 10.29 cm2, 5.53 cm2, 3.63 cm2, 2.02 cm2; at the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days. The extents of epidermal and dermal regeneration were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions BPM is comparable to Mepitel as a safe and efficacious wound dressing. PMID:25396174

  20. Benefits of early postoperative jejunal feeding in patients undergoing duodenohemipancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Michiya; Nishimori, Isao; Sugimoto, Tekeki; Akimori, Toyokazu; Namikawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Ken; Onishi, Saburo; Araki, Keijiro

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether early postoperative enteral nutrition reduces the incidence of complications and/or improves nutritional status following duodenohemipancreatectomy (DHP). METHODS: We studied 39 patients who underwent DHP for a peri-ampullary mass. Twenty-three patients received total parental nutrition and then started to have an oral intake of nutrition between postoperative day (POD) 7 and 14 [late postoperative enteral nutrition (LPEN) group]. Sixteen patients started to have enteral feeding through a jejunostomy catheter the day after the operation [early postoperative enteral nutrition (EPEN) group]. The incidence of complications and laboratory data at the early postoperative stage were studied in comparison between LPEN and EPEN groups. RESULTS: Serum levels of albumin and total protein in the EPEN group were significantly higher than those in the LPEN group. The loss of body mass index was significantly suppressed in the EPEN group as compared to the LPEN group. The lymphocyte count decreased immediately after the operation was restored significantly faster in the EPEN group than in the LPEN group. The EPEN group showed significantly fewer incidences of postoperative pancreatic fistulas, as well as a significantly shorter length of hospitalization than the LPEN group. There were no significant differences in the incidences of other postoperative complications between the two groups, such as delayed gastric emptying, surgical site infection, cholangitis, and small bowel obstruction. CONCLUSION: EPEN is a safe and beneficial opportunity for patients who have undergone DHP for a peri-ampullary mass. PMID:16440423

  1. Postoperative strategies to treat permanent air leaks.

    PubMed

    Venuta, Federico; Rendina, Erino A; De Giacomo, Tiziano; Coloni, Giorgio F

    2010-08-01

    Air leakage after pulmonary resections is considered the most prevalent postoperative problem, and it is often the only morbidity identified. Ideally, treatment begins with prevention; the onset of this complication should be anticipated and recognized during surgery, and intraoperative strategies should be attempted to avoid it and reduce the impact on the clinical course. Once an air leak develops, in most of the cases it seals spontaneously within 2 or 3 days of operation. When it persists, it might elicit the onset of other complications and increase costs and length of hospitalization. The postoperative approaches to a prolonged air leak include management of the pleural drainage and residual space, pleurodesis, pneumoperitoneum, endobronchial one-way valve placement, and potential reoperation. PMID:20619230

  2. Review of recent research on biomedical applications of electrospun polymer nanofibers for improved wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hassiba, Alaa J; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Webster, Thomas J; Luyt, Adriaan S; Abdullah, Aboubakr M; Elzatahry, Ahmed A

    2016-03-01

    Wound dressings play an important role in a patient's recovery from health problems, as unattended wounds could lead to serious complications such as infections or, ultimately, even death. Therefore, wound dressings since ancient times have been continuously developed, starting from simple dressings from natural materials for covering wounds to modern dressings with functionalized materials to aid in the wound healing process and enhance tissue repair. However, understanding the nature of a wound and the subsequent healing process is vital information upon which dressings can be tailored to ensure a patient's recovery. To date, much progress has been made through the use of nanomedicine in wound healing due to the ability of such materials to mimic the natural dimensions of tissue. This review provides an overview of recent studies on the physiology of wound healing and various wound dressing materials made of nanofibers fabricated using the electrospinning technique. PMID:26744905

  3. Gastrointestinal Complications and Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .387%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  4. Gastrointestinal complications and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sara J

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3-87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  5. Post-operative Abdominal Wall Mucormycosis-a Case Series.

    PubMed

    Nain, Prabhdeep Singh; Matta, Harish; Singh, Kuldip; Chhina, Deepinder; Trehan, Munish; Batta, Nishant

    2015-12-01

    Mucormycosis is caused by saprophtytic fungi which cause acute invasive zygomycosis. It clinically presents with necrosis, and on histopathology, acute and chronic infiltrates are seen. It rarely infects a healthy host, but is devastating in an immunocompromised host. We studied five cases with post-operative abdominal wall mucormycosis, three females and two males. Three patients were post-operative while the other two had mucormycosis following trauma and infection was found in sutured wound. All were initially diagnosed as cases of necrotizing fasciitis. Two patients eventually survived after intensive medical therapy and extensive debridements. PMID:26730004

  6. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  7. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for reduction of fracture. PMID:25142353

  8. Serum cholesterol levels and postoperative atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-operative atrial fibrillation is an important complication after coronary bypass surgery. As inflammation and oxidative stress were makedly encountered in the etiology, high cholesterol was also defined to provoke atrial fibrillation. In this present study, the relationship between postoperative atrial fibrillation and preoperative serum lipid levels were evaluated. Methods A total of 100 patients, who were operated at the department of Cardiovascular Surgery of our hospital were included to the study analysis. Patients, who had preoperative atrial fibrillation, thyroid dysfunction, or left atrial dilatation (above 4.5 cm) were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into two groups with postoperative atrial fibrillation development (Group I n = 36), and without atrial fibrillation development (Group II n = 64). Preoperative routine blood analyses, ECG, echocardiography were evaluated. Patients were followed for atrial fibrillation development for one month starting from the intensive care unit at the postoperative period. Serum lipid profiles and thyroid function were measured. For homogenization of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress, treatments other than statins, betablockers, calcium channel blockers, aspirin, ACE inhibitors, and ARB were stopped for 10 days. Atrial fibrillation for at least ≥5 minutes in the intensive care unit was accepted as postoperative atrial fibrillation. Results Demographic data were similiar between groups (p > 0.05). There was no difference in TC levels between groups, whereas LDL-C levels were statistically lower in patients developing post-operative atrial fibrillation (106.67 ± 28.36 vs 118.75 ± 27.75; P < 0.05). Conclusion The more lowered is the LDL-C in the preoperative period, the more reduced risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation development. High levels of LDL-C in the preoperative period could be predictor of atrial fibrillation development in the post operative period. PMID:24712763

  9. Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

    2011-03-01

    The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

  10. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  11. Complications of Distal Biceps Repair.

    PubMed

    Garon, Mark Tyson; Greenberg, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Modern techniques to repair the distal biceps tendon include one-incision and 2-incision techniques that use transosseous sutures, suture anchors, interference screws, and/or cortical buttons to achieve a strong repair of the distal biceps brachii. Repair using these techniques has led to improved functional outcomes when compared with nonoperative treatment. Most complications consist of neuropraxic injuries to the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve, posterior interosseous nerve, stiffness and weakness with forearm rotation, heterotopic ossification, and wound infections. Although complications certainly affect outcomes, patients with distal biceps repairs report a high satisfaction rate after repair. PMID:26772952

  12. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  13. Infected ptosis surgery - a rare complication from a multidrug-resistant organism.

    PubMed

    Jan-Bond, Chan; Norazah, Abdul-Rahman; Sree-Kumar, Palani; Zunaina, Embong; Fazilawati, Qamarruddin

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy had a case of congenital ptosis of the right eye and has undergone frontalis sling surgery using Gore-tex material. There was no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication. However, the patient defaulted his follow-up and presented with right eye preseptal abscess secondary to infected surgical wound 1 month after surgery. He was treated with multiple antibiotics and underwent repeated incision and drainage procedures. However, there was still no resolution of the right eye preseptal abscess. The patient's condition subsequently improved after removal of the Gore-tex material and treatment with an antibiotic combination of ceftazidime and amikacin. Microbiological analysis finally isolated the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species. At 6 months follow-up, his right upper eyelid was healed with scarring, but without ptosis. PMID:25945032

  14. Infected ptosis surgery a rare complication from a multidrug-resistant organism

    PubMed Central

    Jan-Bond, Chan; Norazah, Abdul-Rahman; Sree-Kumar, Palani; Zunaina, Embong; Fazilawati, Qamarruddin

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy had a case of congenital ptosis of the right eye and has undergone frontalis sling surgery using Gore-tex material. There was no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication. However, the patient defaulted his follow-up and presented with right eye preseptal abscess secondary to infected surgical wound 1 month after surgery. He was treated with multiple antibiotics and underwent repeated incision and drainage procedures. However, there was still no resolution of the right eye preseptal abscess. The patients condition subsequently improved after removal of the Gore-tex material and treatment with an antibiotic combination of ceftazidime and amikacin. Microbiological analysis finally isolated the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species. At 6 months follow-up, his right upper eyelid was healed with scarring, but without ptosis. PMID:25945032

  15. Postoperative analgesia in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Elisabeth; Hoffmann, Clément; Keita, Hawa

    2013-02-01

    Elderly people represent the fastest-growing segment of our society and undergo surgery more frequently than other age groups. Effective postoperative analgesia is essential in these patients because inadequate pain control after surgery is associated with adverse outcomes in elderly patients. However, management of postoperative pain in older patients may be complicated by a number of factors, including a higher risk of age- and disease-related changes in physiology and disease-drug and drug-drug interactions. Physiological changes related to aging need to be carefully considered because aging is individualized and progressive. Assessment of pain management needs to include chronological age, biological age with regard to renal, liver and cardiac functions, and the individual profile of pathology and prescribed medications. In addition, ways in which pain should be assessed, particularly in patients with cognitive impairment, must be considered. Cognitively intact older patients can use most commonly used unidimensional pain scales such as the visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), numeric rating scale (NRS) and facial pain scale (FPS). VRS and NRS are the most appropriate pain scales for the elderly. In older patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment, the VRS is a better tool. For severe cognitively impaired older patients, behavioural scales validated in the postoperative context, such as Doloplus-2 or Algoplus, are appropriate. For postoperative pain treatment, most drugs (e.g. paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nefopam, tramadol, codeine, morphine, local anaesthetics), techniques (e.g. intravenous morphine titration, subcutaneous morphine, intravenous or epidural patient-controlled analgesia, intrathecal morphine, peripheral nerve block) and strategies (e.g. anticipated intraoperative analgesia or multimodal analgesia) used for acute pain management can be used in older patients. However, in view of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes in older persons, the higher incidence of co-morbidities and concurrent use of other drugs, each must be carefully adjusted to suit each patient. Evaluation of treatment efficacy and incidence and severity of adverse events should be monitored closely, and the concept of 'start low and go slow' should be adopted for most analgesic strategies. PMID:23288604

  16. Early application of negative pressure wound therapy to acute wounds contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus: An effective approach to preventing biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    LI, TONGTONG; ZHANG, LIHAI; HAN, LI; WANG, GUOQI; YIN, PENG; LI, ZHIRUI; ZHANG, LICHENG; GUO, QI; LIU, DAOHONG; TANG, PEIFU

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been demonstrated to be effective at preventing biofilm-associated infections; however, its role in biofilm prevention is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of NPWT on biofilm prevention when rapidly initiated following wound contamination. Full-thickness dermal wounds (8 mm) were created in rabbit ears and inoculated with green fluorescent protein-labeled Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). At 6 h following inoculation, continuous NPWT at −125 mmHg was initiated, with the wounds on the contralateral ear left untreated in order to serve as self-controls. S. aureus rapidly formed mature biofilms in the wound beds post-inoculation, with a persistent bacterial burden of ~105−107 colony-forming units (CFUs)/wound and impaired wound healing. Compared with the untreated group, NPWT resulted in a significant reduction in biofilm matrix, which was verified by scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence. A reduction in bacterial counts followed (P<0.05) with ~103 CFUs/wound on postoperative day 13 and improvement in all healing parameters (P<0.05) relative to control wounds. The results of the present investigation suggest that NPWT is an effective strategy to impeding the formation of S. aureus wound biofilms when initiated rapidly following bacterial contamination. The early application of NPWT, aimed at biofilm prevention, may improve wound care. PMID:26997991

  17. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  18. Telemedicine for wound management

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi K.

    2012-01-01

    The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process. PMID:23162242

  19. Saliva and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Veerman, Enno C I

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing. Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation. A synthetic cyclic variant of histatin exhibits a 1,000-fold higher activity than linear histatin, which makes this cyclic variant a promising agent for the development of a new wound healing medication. Conclusively, recognition of the many roles salivary proteins play in wound healing makes saliva a promising source for the development of new drugs involved in tissue regeneration. PMID:24862594

  20. The use of desiccation to treat Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Park, Eugene; Long, Sarah A; Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew; Xu, Wei; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Leung, Kai; Hong, Seok Jong; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2016-03-01

    Chronic wounds colonized with biofilm present a major burden to our healthcare system. While the current paradigm for wound healing is to maintain a moist environment, we sought to evaluate the effects of desiccation, and the ability of honey to desiccate wounds, on wound healing characteristics in Staphylococcus aureus biofilm wounds. In vivo biofilm wound healing after exposure to open-air desiccation, honey, molasses, and saline was analyzed using a rabbit ear model of S. aureus biofilm wounds previously developed by our group. Wound morphology was examined using scanning electron microscopy and granulation tissue deposition was measured using light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Viable bacterial counts in rabbit ear biofilm wounds and scabs were measured using a drop dilution method. In vitro S. aureus growth curves were established using tryptic soy broth containing honey and glycerol. Gene expression analysis of rabbit ear wounds was performed using reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Rabbit ear S. aureus biofilm wounds exposed to open-air desiccation, honey, and molasses developed a dry scab, which displaced the majority of biofilm bacteria off of the wound bed. Wounds treated with open-air desiccation, honey, and molasses expressed lower levels of the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β at postoperative day 12 compared with wounds treated with saline, and had increased levels of granulation tissue formation. In vitro growth of S. aureus in tryptic soy broth was inhibited by the presence of honey to a greater extent than by the presence of osmolality-matched glycerol. Desiccation of chronic wounds colonized with biofilm via exposure to open air or honey leads to improved wound healing by decreasing bacterial burden and inflammation, and increasing granulation tissue formation. The ability of honey to help heal chronic wounds is at least in part due to its ability to desiccate bacterial biofilm, but other factors clearly contribute. PMID:26519217

  1. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  2. Eye Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Eye Complications You may have heard that diabetes causes ... work well if you begin them right away. Eye Insight To understand what happens in eye disorders, ...

  3. Preventing chronic postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postoperative pain is common. Nerve injury and inflammation promote chronic pain, the risk of which is influenced by patient factors, including psychological characteristics. Interventional trials to prevent chronic postoperative pain have been underpowered with inadequate patient follow-up. Ketamine may reduce chronic postoperative pain, although the optimum treatment duration and dose for different operations have yet to be identified. The evidence for gabapentin and pregabalin is encouraging but weak; further work is needed before these drugs can be recommended for the prevention of chronic pain. Regional techniques reduce the rates of chronic pain after thoracotomy and breast cancer surgery. Nerve-sparing surgical techniques may be of benefit, although nerve injury is not necessary or sufficient for chronic pain to develop. PMID:26620149

  4. Management of the perineal wound after rectal excision for carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maria, G; Mattana, C; Bonatti, P; Pescatori, M

    1984-01-01

    Two methods of treating the perineal wound after proctectomy are compared. One hundred and eleven patients had a Miles operation for rectal cancer: in 81 the perineal wound was left open, in 30, primary suture and suction were performed. A significant (p less than 0.001) decrease in the mean (+/- s.d.) duration of the postoperative period was observed after primary suture: 22 +/- 1.7 days, as compared with 44 +/- 2.2 days after healing by second intention. The occurrence of wound infection was similar in the two groups, whereas in 15 per cent of the patients treated without direct closure, a perineal sinus persisted. According to these data, primary closure seems to be very satisfactory in the management of the perineal wound after excision of the rectum. PMID:6500884

  5. [Lethal complications caused by perforating esophageal injuries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thiel, M

    1981-01-01

    Symptoms, complications, and pathoanatomic findings of three cases, in which the esophageal perforation originally caused the death, are demonstrated. The first case deals with an pressure-errosion as a result of gavage, the second an incised wound by a razor blade, and the third a through-and-through gunshot wound of the upper part of the esophagus. PMID:7234137

  6. Anesthesia, Microcirculation and Wound Repair in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bentov, Itay; Reed, May J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related changes in skin contribute to impaired wound healing after surgical procedures. Changes in skin with age include decline in thickness and composition, a decrease in the number of most cell types and diminished microcirculation. The microcirculation provides tissue perfusion, fluid homeostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause further disruption of the microvasculature of aged skin. Perioperative management can be modified to minimize insults to aged tissues. Judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control and increased tissue oxygen tension are examples of adjustable variables that support the microcirculation. Anesthetic agents influence the microcirculation from a combination of effects on cardiac output, arterial pressure and local micro-vascular changes. We examine the role of anesthetic management in optimizing the microcirculation and potentially improving post-operative wound repair in older persons. PMID:24195972

  7. Corneal wound healing after laser vision correction.

    PubMed

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Giammaria, Daniele; Trabucco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Any trauma can trigger a cascade of responses in tissues, with the purpose of safeguarding the integrity of the organ affected by the trauma and of preventing possible damage to nearby organs. Subsequently, the body tries to restore the function of the organ affected. The introduction of the excimer laser for keratorefractive surgery has changed the treatment landscape for correcting refractive errors, such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. In recent years, with the increased understanding of the basic science of refractive errors, higher-order aberrations, biomechanics, and the biology of corneal wound healing, a reduction in the surgical complications of keratorefractive surgery has been achieved. The understanding of the cascade of events involved in the corneal wound healing process and the examination of how corneal wound healing influences corneal biomechanics and optics are crucial to improving the efficacy and safety of laser vision correction. PMID:26405102

  8. The emergency care of traumatic wounds: current recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, R W; Crowe, D T

    1994-11-01

    Emergency management of wounds involves examination and protection of the wound with a wet dressing (when possible) to prevent further contamination and desiccation. Analgesia (or preferably anesthesia) is provided and the patient and the wound are prepared for surgery. Copious amounts of lavage solution are used under moderate pressure. Proper and thorough debridement under irrigation is tedious and time consuming, but is the most important factor that influences subsequent wound healing. Incomplete removal of devitalized or contaminated tissue and debris are a common cause of wound infection, breakdown, and delayed healing. Wound closure is only accomplished when the veterinarian is certain that all devitalized and contaminated tissue has been removed and there is adequate skin. Covering the wound to heal by second intention or delayed closure should be considered more often in veterinary medicine. All too often, the wound is closed prematurely, resulting in dehiscence and infection a few days later. This provides a source of complications to the pet, as well as a source of dissatisfaction for the client. If, after initial debridement and irrigation, there is any doubt about the advisability of surgical closure, the clinician should cover the wound with a proper dressing and continue daily (or more often) dressing changes with local irrigation and debridement as required. Drainage of wound fluid is critical to healing in contaminated wounds. Wound fluids interfere with healing and increase the likelihood of infection. Passive drains (Penrose) are frequently used, often incorrectly. The exposed end of passive drains should be covered with a sterile, absorbent dressing. Active drainage is more efficient than passive drainage and can be accomplished with minimal additional skill and material. Improper use of drains can cause more problems than no drainage at all. Patients suffering painful traumatic (or surgical) wounds should receive analgesic medications. The patient's response to pain may cause immunocompromise, resulting in increased infection rate. It may also induce a hypermetabolic state that may result in impaired wound healing, multiple organ dysfunction, and, possibly, death. Swelling in the area of wounds can create tension on the wound, which compromises the blood supply. Light pressure bandages are recommended to minimize swelling. Nutritional considerations should be given to the wounded patient. Additional protein, vitamins, and minerals may be required for immune function and wound repair.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7879362

  9. Pulmonary complications of general surgery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, A K; Robertson, J

    1977-01-01

    1. Patients should be divided preoperatively into low- or high-risk categories, depending on their probability of developing postoperative pulmonary complications. The evaluation should include spirometry as well as an assessment of the previously defined risk factors. 2. Patients in a low-risk category need only instruction in deep breathing pre- and postoperatively. Routine use of supplemented oxygen postoperatively is reasonable until it can be demonstrated whether such is necessary. 3. High-risk patients should be as free as possible of respiratory secretions at the time of surgery. A regimen for this purpose includes cessation of smoking, and administration of inhaled bronchodilators followed by chest percussion and postural drainage. 4. High-risk patients should be carefully instructed in deep breathing and coughing preoperatively. A mechanical device such as an incentive spirometer may be beneficial in this regard. If it is not possible to achieve spontaneous deep breathing, an attempt to accomplish this by IPPB may be undertaken. The tidal volume desired should be ordered. If IPPB does not result in large tidal volumes, it should be discontinued. 5. The deep breathing procedure found to be most successful preoperativelly should be continued postoperatively. 6. The patient should be as mobile as possible while in bed and ambulated as soon as is feasible. 7. Patients with preoperative expiratory flows of less than 20% of predicted values or with chronic hypercapnia should be carefully observed for postoperative ventilatory failure. PMID:324360

  10. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine) for postoperative analgesia after PAO. Patients and methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00815503) in 53 patients undergoing PAO to evaluate the effect of local anesthetic infiltration on postoperative pain and on postoperative opioid consumption. All subjects received intraoperative infiltration followed by 5 postoperative injections in 10-hour intervals through a multi-holed catheter placed at the surgical site. 26 patients received ropivacaine and 27 received saline. The intervention period was 2 days and the observational period was 4 days. All subjects received patient-controlled opioid analgesia without any restrictions on the total daily dose. Pain was assessed at specific postoperative time points and the daily opioid usage was registered. Results Infiltration with 75 mL (150 mg) of ropivacaine did not reduce postoperative pain or opioid requirements during the first 4 days. Interpretation The clinical importance of ropivacaine as single component in postoperative treatment of pain is questionable, and we are planning further studies to explore the potential of LIA in larger volume—and also a multimodal regimen—to treat pain in this category of patients. PMID:24650022

  11. Scars and Wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect the skin on the surface and beneath it. An incision (cut) from surgery is a wound. A wound also can be ... change dressings if the patient can’t do it alone. If you can, wear a fresh pair of disposable plastic gloves each time you clean the area and ...

  12. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of collagen. So they're tougher and less flexible than the skin around them. Caring for Serious Wounds at Home Serious wounds don't heal overnight. It can take weeks for the body to build new tissue. So after you leave ...

  13. [Prevention of respiratory complications after abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Rezaiguia, S; Jayr, C

    1996-01-01

    Abdominal surgery, especially upper abdominal surgical procedures are known to adversely affect pulmonary function. Pulmonary complications are the most frequent cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This review article aimed to analyse the incidence and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary morbidity and their prevention. The most important means for preoperative assessment is the clinical examination; pulmonary function tests (spirometry) are not reliably predictive for postoperative pulmonary complications. Age, type of surgical procedure, smoking and nutritional state have all been identified as potential predictors for postoperative complications. However, usually there is not enough preoperative time available to obtain beneficial effects of stopping smoking and improvement of nutritional state. In patients with COPD, a preoperative multidisciplinary evaluation including the primary care physician, pulmonologist/intensivist, anesthesiologist and surgeon is required. Consensus as to preoperative physiologic state, therapeutic preparation, and postoperative management is essential. Simple spirometry and arterial blood gas analysis are indicated in patients exhibiting symptoms of obstructive airway disease. There are no values that contra-indicate an essential surgical procedure. Smoking should stop at least 8 weeks preoperatively. Preoperative therapy for elective surgery with antibiotics, beta2-agonist, or anticholinergic bronchodilator aerosols, as well as training in cough and lung expansion techniques should begin at least 24 to 48 hours preoperatively. Postoperative therapy should be continued for 3 to 5 days. Usually, anaesthesia is responsible for early complications, whereas surgical procedures are often associated with delayed morbidity. Laparoscopic procedures are recommended, as postoperative morbidity and hospital stay seem reduced in patients without COPD. Regional anaesthesia is given as having less adverse effects on pulmonary function than general anaesthesia. However, for unknown reasons these benefits are not associated with a decrease in postoperative respiratory complications. Moreover, the quality or the type of postoperative analgesia does not influence postoperative respiratory morbidity. Postoperatively, oxygen administration increases SaO2, but cannot abolish desaturation due to obstructive apnea. The various techniques of physiotherapy (chest physiotherapy, incentive spirometry, continuous positive airway pressure breathing) seem to be equivalent in efficacy; but intermittent positive pressure breathing has no advantages, compared with the other treatments and could even be deleterious. Chest physiotherapy and incentive spirometry are the most practical methods available for decreasing secretion contents of airways, whereas continuous positive airway pressure breathing is efficient on atelectasis. In stage II or III COPD patients, admission in a intensive therapy unit and prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required. PMID:9033757

  14. Vaginal Evisceration: An Unexpected Complication of Conization

    PubMed Central

    Ghassani, Ali; Andre, Benoit; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Tanguy le Gac, Yann; Martinez, Alejandra; Vidal, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Background. Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) is routinely performed for the management of high grade intracervical neoplasia (CIN). Several uncommon complications have been described, including postoperative peritonitis, pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery, and bowel fistula. We report a unique case of postoperative vaginal evisceration and the subsequent management. Case. A 73-years-old woman underwent LLETZ for high grade CIN. On postoperative day 3, she was admitted for small bowel evisceration through the vagina. Surgical management was based on combined laparoscopic and transvaginal approach and consisted in bowel inspection and reinstatement, peritoneal washing, and dehiscence repair. Conclusions. Vaginal evisceration is a rare but potentially serious complication of pelvic surgery. This case report is to make clinicians aware of such complication following LLETZ and its management. PMID:25506010

  15. [Post-operative pain management in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology].

    PubMed

    Giesa, M; Jage, J; Meurer, A

    2006-02-01

    Provision of sufficient post-operative pain therapy is an obligation in the clinical management of patients. A wide range of medical, technical and organizational options is used to improve post-operative pain management in orthopaedic surgery. Measurement of pain is as important as the correct use of analgesics and application techniques. Standardized pain therapy algorithms should facilitate autonomous treatment of patients. Additional procedures like patient-controlled analgesia or local catheter for pain are necessary for individualized or operation-specific pain therapy. The balanced combination in postoperative pain therapy could reduce side effects and complication rates, increase mobility and enhance patient satisfaction. PMID:16435112

  16. Post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    2016-04-20

    Essential facts According to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, about 60% of people who have surgery will experience severe pain post-operatively. Controlling this pain minimises patients' discomfort and distress, contributes to recovery and rehabilitation, and may prevent patients progressing from acute to chronic pain. PMID:27097185

  17. Effect of low-power density laser radiation on heatling of open skin wounds in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kana, J.S.; Hutschenreiter, G.; Haina, D.; Waidelich, W.

    1981-03-01

    Researchers performed a study to determine whether laser radation of low-power density would affect the healing of open skin wounds in rats. The wounds were irradiated daily with a helium-neon laser and an argon laser at a constant power density of 45 mW/sq cm. The rate of wound closure was followed by photographing the wounds in a standardized way. The collagen hydroxyproline concentration in the scar tissue was determined on the 18th postoperative day. Helium-neon laser radiation had a statistically significant stimulating effect on collagen synthesis in the wound, with a maximum effect at an energy density of 4 joules/sq cm. The rate of wound closure was enhanced significantly between the third and 12th postoperative days. The argon laser exposure produced a significant increase in collagen concentration both in irradiated and nonirradiated contralateral wounds. However, an acceleration of the healing rate was not registered in this case. The wound contraction up to the fourth day of the experiment was inhibited under helium-neon and argon laser exposure to 20 joules/sq cm. The described effects were not specific for the laser light. There may be a wavelength-selective influence of coherent light on the metabolic and proliferation processes in wound healing, with the associated problem of the possible carcinogenic effects of laser radiation.

  18. Approach-Related Complications of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Combined Spine and Vascular Surgical Team.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Daly, Daniel; Rao, Prashanth J; Lennox, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cohort data. Objective Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Detailed and comprehensive descriptions of intra- and postoperative complications of ALIF are surprisingly limited in the literature. In this report, we describe our experience with a team model for ALIF and report all complications occurring in our patient series. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled between January 2009 and January 2013 by a combined spine surgeon and vascular surgeon team. All patients underwent an open ALIF using an anterior approach to the lumbosacral spine. Results From the 227 ALIF cases, mean operative blood loss was 103 mL, ranging from 30 to 900 mL. Mean operative time was 78 minutes. The average length of stay was 5.2 days. Intraoperative vascular injury requiring primary repair with suturing occurred in 15 patients (6.6%). There were 2 cases of postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma. Three patients (1.3%) had incisional hernia requiring revision surgery; 7 (3.1%) patients had prolonged ileus (>7 days) managed conservatively. Four patients described retrograde ejaculation. Sympathetic dysfunction occurred in 15 (6.6%) patients. There were 5 (2.2%) cases of superficial wound infection treated with oral antibiotics, with no deep wound infections requiring reoperation or intravenous therapy. There were no mortalities in this series. Conclusions ALIF is a safe procedure when performed by a combined vascular surgeon and spine surgeon team with acceptably low complication rates. Our series confirms that the team approach results in short operative times and length of stay, with rapid control of intraoperative vessel injury and low overall blood loss. PMID:26933616

  19. Approach-Related Complications of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Combined Spine and Vascular Surgical Team

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.; Phan, Kevin; Daly, Daniel; Rao, Prashanth J.; Lennox, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cohort data. Objective Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Detailed and comprehensive descriptions of intra- and postoperative complications of ALIF are surprisingly limited in the literature. In this report, we describe our experience with a team model for ALIF and report all complications occurring in our patient series. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled between January 2009 and January 2013 by a combined spine surgeon and vascular surgeon team. All patients underwent an open ALIF using an anterior approach to the lumbosacral spine. Results From the 227 ALIF cases, mean operative blood loss was 103 mL, ranging from 30 to 900 mL. Mean operative time was 78 minutes. The average length of stay was 5.2 days. Intraoperative vascular injury requiring primary repair with suturing occurred in 15 patients (6.6%). There were 2 cases of postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma. Three patients (1.3%) had incisional hernia requiring revision surgery; 7 (3.1%) patients had prolonged ileus (>7 days) managed conservatively. Four patients described retrograde ejaculation. Sympathetic dysfunction occurred in 15 (6.6%) patients. There were 5 (2.2%) cases of superficial wound infection treated with oral antibiotics, with no deep wound infections requiring reoperation or intravenous therapy. There were no mortalities in this series. Conclusions ALIF is a safe procedure when performed by a combined vascular surgeon and spine surgeon team with acceptably low complication rates. Our series confirms that the team approach results in short operative times and length of stay, with rapid control of intraoperative vessel injury and low overall blood loss. PMID:26933616

  20. Influence of wound shape on wound contraction in horses.

    PubMed

    Madison, J B; Gronwall, R R

    1992-09-01

    Three sets of paired circular and square full-thickness skin wounds were made on the dorsum of the metacarpus (n = 48) of 8 horses. Each wound was 6.25 cm2 in area. The wounds were treated topically with an ointment, nonadherent dressing, and bandaged with a snug elastic wrap. Wounds were photographed every other day until healing was complete. Wound areas were measured and exponential and linear wound healing models were applied to the wound healing data generated. Wound healing variables measured for each wound were: number of days to healing, maximal size attained, rate of wound contraction (calculated by use of first-order and linear models), final wound size, and percentage of wound that healed by contraction. The exponential model fit the data significantly better than the linear model. The maximal size attained by circular wounds was significantly smaller than the maximal size attained by square wounds. Wound shape did not influence the rate of wound healing. On the basis of our findings, conversion of circular defects to square defects would not speed wound healing. PMID:1416358

  1. Thirty-day complications in rheumatoid patients following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Dixit, Anant; Naziri, Qais; Hip-Flores, David J; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Although total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is highly successful for patients with end-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the risks and complications associated with surgery in this cohort are less defined. The objectives of our study were to analyze the demographic and perioperative factors of RA patients that may affect post-TKA outcomes, as well as to assess the 30-day complication rates compared to osteoarthritis patients. We retrospectively evaluated the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from 2006 to 2012 to assess all patients who underwent a primary TKA and had a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (n?=?141) or primary knee osteoarthritis (n?=?7125). We evaluated and compared the demographic factors, social factors, preoperative factors, operative factors, and postoperative complications. The RA cohort had a lower mean age and body mass index than patients in the OA group. There was also a significantly higher incidence of women and Hispanics in the RA cohort. There was a lower incidence of diabetes and hypertension requiring medication in the rheumatoid cohort, but also a higher incidence of bleeding disorders. The RA cohort had an increased proportion of patients requiring blood transfusions and had a longer mean length of stay. The incidence of pneumonia and postoperative bleeding that required transfusion was also higher in RA patients. Rheumatoid patients had higher rates of wound infections, pulmonary embolisms, and deep vein thrombosis; however, these findings were not significant. Although RA patients with end-stage knee arthritis may benefit from TKA, these patients should be preoperatively optimized to minimize complication risks. PMID:26238666

  2. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy. PMID:26424336

  3. Biomechanics and Wound Healing in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Dupps, William J.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    The biomechanical and wound healing properties of the cornea undermine the predictability and stability of refractive surgery and contribute to discrepancies between attempted and achieved visual outcomes after LASIK, surface ablation and other keratorefractive procedures. Furthermore, patients predisposed to biomechanical failure or abnormal wound healing can experience serious complications such as keratectasia or clinically significant corneal haze, and more effective means for the identification of such patients prior to surgery are needed. In this review, we describe the cornea as a complex structural composite material with pronounced anisotropy and heterogeneity, summarize current understanding of major biomechanical and reparative pathways that contribute to the corneal response to laser vision correction, and review the role of these processes in ectasia, intraocular pressure measurement artifact, diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and corneal haze. The current understanding of differences in the corneal response after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), LASIK and femtosecond-assisted LASIK are reviewed. Surgical and disease models that integrate corneal geometric data, substructural anatomy, elastic and viscoelastic material properties and wound healing behavior have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and minimize complications but depend on the identification of preoperative predictors of biomechanical and wound healing responses in individual patients. PMID:16720023

  4. Postoperative incentive spirometry use.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Jain, Amit; Tan, Eric W; Stein, Benjamin E; Van Hoy, Megan L; Stewart, Nadine N; Lemma, Mesfin A

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that the use of incentive spirometry by orthopedic patients is less than the recommended level and is affected by patient-related factors and type of surgery. To determine its postoperative use, the authors prospectively surveyed all patients in their institution's general orthopedic ward who had undergone elective spine surgery or total knee or hip arthroplasty during a consecutive 3-month period in 2010, excluding patients with postoperative delirium or requiring a monitored bed. All 182 patients (74 men, 108 women; average age, 64.5 years; range, 32-88 years; spine group, n=55; arthroplasty group, n=127), per protocol, received preoperative spirometry education by a licensed respiratory therapist (recommended use, 10 times hourly) and reinforcement education by nurses. Patients were asked twice daily (morning and evening) regarding their spirometry use during the previous 1-hour period by a registered nurse on postoperative days 1 through 3. All data were collected by the same 2 nurses using the same standardized questionnaire. Spirometry use was correlated with surgery type, postoperative day/time, and patient's age and sex. Student's t test, Spearman test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare differences (P<.05). Spirometry use averaged 4.1 times per hour (range, 0-10 times). No statistical correlations were found between spirometry use and age. Sex did not influence spirometry use. The arthroplasty group reported significantly higher use than did the spine group: 4.3 and 3.5 times per hour, respectively. Mean use increased significantly between postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. PMID:22691669

  5. Evidence-based Management Strategies for Treatment of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Werdin, Frank; Tennenhaus, Mayer; Schaller, Hans-Eberhardt; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The care and management of patients with chronic wounds and their far-reaching effects challenge both the patient and the practitioner. Further complicating this situation is the paucity of evidence-based treatment strategies for chronic wound care. After searching both MEDLINE and Cochrane databases, we reviewed currently available articles concerning chronic wound care. Utilizing this information, we have outlined a review of current, evidence-based concepts as they pertain to the treatment of chronic wounds, focusing on fundamental treatment principles for the management of venous, arterial, diabetic, and pressure ulcers. Individualized treatment options as well as general wound management principles applicable to all varieties of chronic wounds are described. Classification and treatment guidelines as well as the adoption of the TIME acronym facilitate an organized conceptional approach to wound care. In so doing, individual aspects of generalized wound care such as debridement, infection, and moisture control as well as attention to the qualities of the wound edge are comprehensively evaluated, communicated, and addressed. Effective adjuvant agents for the therapy of chronic wounds including nutritional and social support measures are listed, as is a brief review of strategies helpful for preventing recurrence. An appreciation of evidence-based treatment pathways and an understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic wounds are important elements in the management of patients with chronic wounds. To achieve effective and long-lasting results, a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, focused on the education and coordination of patient, family as well as medical and support staff can prove invaluable. PMID:19578487

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-Ying; Wang, Guo-Guang; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Lu, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Ping-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ulcers are one of the most serious and costly chronic complications for diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress may play an important role in diabetes and its complications. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of heme oxygenase-1 on wound closure in diabetic rats. Diabetic wound model was prepared by making an incision with full thickness in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Wounds from diabetic rats were treated with 10% hemin ointment for 21 days. Increase of HO-1 protein expression enhanced anti-inflammation and antioxidant in diabetic rats. Furthermore, HO-1 increased the levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and expressions of CBS and CSE protein. In summary, HO-1 promoted the wound closure by augmenting anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and angiogenesis in diabetic rats. PMID:26798657

  7. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. This suggests that preoperative biliary drainage should be avoided whenever possible in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Such a change in current preoperative management may improve patient outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:10450725

  8. Wound prophylaxis in thoracic surgery: a new approach.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, W S; Faichney, A; Raychaudhury, T; Prescott, R J; Calder, M A; Sang, C T; Cameron, E W; Walbaum, P R

    1984-01-01

    A prospective double blind, randomised study was performed in 100 patients undergoing major elective thoracic surgery to assess a new method of prophylaxis of wound infection using one preincisional intraparietal infiltration of cefuroxime sodium along the line of proposed incision as the sole protection against wound infection. A significant (p less than 0.01) reduction in the incidence of wound infection occurred in the antibiotic treated group (2%) compared with the control group (20%), who received by the same route the same volume of saline only. The groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, pathological condition, and operative variables. The use of additional antibiotics was significantly greater in the control group (p less than 0.01), largely owing to a much greater incidence of postoperative pulmonary infection in the control group (60%) than in the antibiotic treated group (40%). No morbidity was associated with this technique. The organisms found in oesophageal and bronchial operative luminal specimens did not correlate with postoperative wound or pulmonary infection or with organisms causing these infections. Reductions in wound and pulmonary infection rates equivalent to those produced by conventional multiple dose parenteral regimens were achieved by this technique. PMID:6367129

  9. Maggot Debridement Therapy in the Treatment of Complex Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Mark T; Swenor, Karen M; Eron, Lawrence J

    2011-01-01

    The growth and aging of the population of Hawai‘i with a high incidence of diabetes mandates a need for more effective strategies to manage the healing of complicated wounds. Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is one alternative utilized with successful results. Observations have indicated that maggots have the ability to debride wound beds, provide anti-microbial activity and also stimulate wound healing in diabetic patients. None of the patients refused MDT due to aversion of this treatment modality and the majority of patients had minimal discomfort. In 17 of 23 patients with multiple co-morbidities, the treatment of their complex diabetic wounds by MDT resulted in improvement or cure. Maggot debridement therapy is an effective treatment of diabetic wounds. PMID:22162609

  10. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  11. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, Mira; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60 kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7 days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030 g/cm(2) at an EBI dose of 30 kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. PMID:26117742

  12. Integrins in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Regulation of cell adhesions during tissue repair is fundamentally important for cell migration, proliferation, and protein production. All cells interact with extracellular matrix proteins with cell surface integrin receptors that convey signals from the environment into the nucleus, regulating gene expression and cell behavior. Integrins also interact with a variety of other proteins, such as growth factors, their receptors, and proteolytic enzymes. Re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation are crucially dependent on the temporospatial function of multiple integrins. This review explains how integrins function in wound repair. Recent Advances: Certain integrins can activate latent transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) that modulates wound inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Dysregulation of TGF-β1 function is associated with scarring and fibrotic disorders. Therefore, these integrins represent targets for therapeutic intervention in fibrosis. Critical Issues: Integrins have multifaceted functions and extensive crosstalk with other cell surface receptors and molecules. Moreover, in aberrant healing, integrins may assume different functions, further increasing the complexity of their functionality. Discovering and understanding the role that integrins play in wound healing provides an opportunity to identify the mechanisms for medical conditions, such as excessive scarring, chronic wounds, and even cancer. Future Directions: Integrin functions in acute and chronic wounds should be further addressed in models better mimicking human wounds. Application of any products in acute or chronic wounds will potentially alter integrin functions that need to be carefully considered in the design. PMID:25493210

  13. Management of acute postoperative hemorrhage in the bariatric patient.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lincoln E V V; Song, Louis M Wong Kee; Baron, Todd H

    2011-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is one of the treatment options for achieving and preserving weight loss and managing medical complications related to obesity. After bariatric surgery, early or late adverse events, such as intraluminal or extraluminal gastrointestinal hemorrhage, can occur. Early gastrointestinal bleeding is more often a complication associated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery than other bariatric procedures and usually arises from the gastrojejunal anastomosis. Early postoperative bleeding may be potentially life threatening, although death after postbariatric surgery as a consequence of acute bleeding is uncommon. Although early postoperative intraluminal bleeding can usually be managed conservatively, endoscopic therapy may be required. PMID:21569980

  14. An improved method of wound management for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lobe, T E; Anderson, G F; King, D R; Boles, E T

    1980-12-01

    Polyurethane moisture-vapor permeable film (MVPF), a new product for the management of superficial wounds, was studied in an uncontrolled clinical trial in 50 pediatric patients. MVPF was used in the management of skin graft donor sites, partial thickness burns, traumatic abrasions, decubitus ulcers, intravenous skin sloughs, and a variety of other wounds. Advantages of this material over standard dressing techniques include: more comfort, freedom of motion of the injured part, fewer dressing changes, and apparently faster epithelialization in many cases. Folliculitis, noted in one patient, was the only complication. MVPF is easily adaptable to outpatient wound management, and has gained rapid acceptance by nurses, patients and parents. PMID:7463291

  15. Pneumorrhachis of thoracic spine after gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Gill, Zaheer Ahmad; Amjad Yasin, Malik Muhammad

    2012-08-01

    Air in the spinal canal (Pneumorrhachis) is a rare complication of traumatic spinal injuries reported at various levels of the spinal canal. Pneumorrhachis resolves spontaneously most of the times. Rarely, it may cause cord compression. It is important to rule out potentially serious causes like basilar skull fracture, injury to lungs, mediastinum, mastoid air cells, frontal sinuses or intestine. We present a case of pneumorrhachis in a young soldier who sustained gunshot wound in neck, resulting in spinal cord injury, He was managed conservatively and pneumorrhachis resolved spontaneously without complications. Pathogenesis along with review of relevant literature is presented. PMID:22868022

  16. Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction and its subsequent complications: a comparison between obese and non-obese women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jinhai; Smith, Benjamin D; Giordano, Sharon H; Reece, Gregory P; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina