Sample records for postoperative wound complications

  1. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy in patients with large postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Meissner, Wiktor; Malinger, Stanis?aw; Szmeja, Jacek; Ko?ci?ski, Tomasz; Ratajczak, Andrzej; Drews, Micha?

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a widely acknowledged method for chronic and traumatic wound healing. The feasibility of VAC therapy used for the treatment of intestinal fistulas is still a subject of debate. Complex postoperative wounds pose significant therapeutic problems, especially when there are several fistula openings in the wound area and other sites, usually at the site of previous drains. This paper describes the treatment of three patients in a critical condition, with complex postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy was based on effective drainage of the biggest fistula opening and ensuring conditions promoting the healing process of other fistulas and the wound. A considerable improvement in general condition and wound healing was noted within 2-4 weeks and both the number of fistulas and the volume of excreted contents decreased. After 5-7 weeks a significant improvement in wound healing was observed in all patients. Once the general condition of all patients was considered satisfactory (2-6 months), they underwent surgery aimed at restoration of the digestive tract continuity.In our opinion, VAC therapy used for the treatment of postoperative wounds with multiple fistulas in the wound area and other sites should aim mainly at the improvement of patients’ general condition, limitation of the number of fistulas as well as accelerated wound healing. This may lead to formation of one stoma-type fistula, which can be dressed and cared for by patients until the continuity of the digestive tract has been surgically restored. PMID:23255975

  2. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy in patients with large postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas.

    PubMed

    Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Meissner, Wiktor; Malinger, Stanis?aw; Szmeja, Jacek; Ko?ci?ski, Tomasz; Ratajczak, Andrzej; Drews, Micha?

    2011-09-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a widely acknowledged method for chronic and traumatic wound healing. The feasibility of VAC therapy used for the treatment of intestinal fistulas is still a subject of debate. Complex postoperative wounds pose significant therapeutic problems, especially when there are several fistula openings in the wound area and other sites, usually at the site of previous drains. This paper describes the treatment of three patients in a critical condition, with complex postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy was based on effective drainage of the biggest fistula opening and ensuring conditions promoting the healing process of other fistulas and the wound. A considerable improvement in general condition and wound healing was noted within 2-4 weeks and both the number of fistulas and the volume of excreted contents decreased. After 5-7 weeks a significant improvement in wound healing was observed in all patients. Once the general condition of all patients was considered satisfactory (2-6 months), they underwent surgery aimed at restoration of the digestive tract continuity.In our opinion, VAC therapy used for the treatment of postoperative wounds with multiple fistulas in the wound area and other sites should aim mainly at the improvement of patients' general condition, limitation of the number of fistulas as well as accelerated wound healing. This may lead to formation of one stoma-type fistula, which can be dressed and cared for by patients until the continuity of the digestive tract has been surgically restored. PMID:23255975

  3. Ozone\\/NO-ultrasound method in complicated postoperative wound treatment of oncological patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Naboka; V. V. Pedder; V. K. Kosenok; V. N. Mironenko; S. P. Popov; O. N. Osinkina; Y. A. Korchagina; S. V. Dmitrienko; A. Sh. Ahmetiyanov; I. V. Surgutskova; A. V. Pedder

    2009-01-01

    The summary form only given. The new high effective Ozone\\/NO ultrasonic method in complicated postoperative wound treatment of oncological patients is designed and introduced in clinic practice. Method uses the thermocontact, ultrasonic and ozone\\/NO-generating devices which is resolved for clinical application and provides the possibility for treatment the patients by the way of complex application low frequency ultrasound and high

  4. Influence of statins on postoperative wound complications after inguinal or ventral herniorrhaphy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hauer-Jensen; C. Fort; J. L. Mehta; L. M. Fink

    2006-01-01

    The lipid-lowering agents, statins, are the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in the western world. Because of their\\u000a widespread use, many patients undergo surgical procedures while on statins. Statins, in addition to cholesterol-lowering effects,\\u000a also have anticoagulant, immunosuppressive, and antiproliferative properties that may affect the risk of local wound complications.\\u000a This study investigated the relationship between statins and postoperative

  5. Postoperative surgical complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, M; Fernández, R; Fieira, E; González, D; Delgado, M; Méndez, L; Borro, J M

    2015-01-01

    This is a review article on the main postoperative complications after lung transplantation: airways complications, vascular complications, pleural complications, surgical wound complications, and abdominal complications. Incidence data, severity, and major management regimens are reported. Postoperative complications after lung transplantation result in a significantly increased morbidity and mortality, with early diagnosis and therapy being extremely important. PMID:25854134

  6. Postoperative wound dehiscence: Predictors and associations.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Fernandez, Stephen J; Evans, Karen Kim; McNish, Sean; Banerjee, Anirban N; Couch, Kara S; Mete, Mihriye; Shara, Nawar

    2015-03-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality patient safety indicators (PSI) were developed as a metric of hospital complication rates. PSI-14 measures postoperative wound dehiscence and specifically how often a surgical wound in the abdominal or pelvic area fails to heal after abdominopelvic surgery. Wound dehiscence is estimated to occur in 0.5-3.4% of abdominopelvic surgeries, and carries a mortality of up to 40%. Postoperative wound dehiscence has been adopted as a surrogate safety outcome measure as it impacts morbidity, length of stay, healthcare costs and readmission rates. Postoperative wound dehiscence cases from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample demonstrate 9.6% excess mortality, 9.4 days of excess hospitalization and $40,323 in excess hospital charges relative to matched controls. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the associations between PSI-14 and measurable medical and surgical comorbidities using the Explorys technology platform to query electronic health record data from a large hospital system serving a diverse patient population in the Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD metropolitan areas. The study population included 25,636 eligible patients who had undergone abdominopelvic surgery between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Of these cases, 786 (2.97%) had postoperative wound dehiscence. Patient-associated comorbidities were strongly associated with PSI-14, suggesting that this indicator may not solely be an indicator of hospital safety. There was a strong association between PSI-14 and opioid use after surgery and this finding merits further investigation. PMID:25683272

  7. Postoperative pulmonary complications updating.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Carreira, S; le Saché, F; Raux, M

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major contributor to the overall risk of surgery. PPCs affect the length of hospital stay and are associated with a higher in-hospital mortality. PPCs are even the leading cause of death either in cardiothoracic surgery but also in non-cardiothoracic surgery. Thus, reliable PPCs risk stratification tools are the key issue of clinical decision making in the perioperative period. When the risk is clearly identified related to the patient according the ARISCAT score and/or the type of surgery (mainly thoracic and abdominal), low-cost preemptive interventions improve outcomes and new strategies can be developed to prevent this risk. The EuSOS, PERISCOPE and IMPROVE studies demonstrated this care optimization by risk identification first, then risk stratification and new care (multifaceted) strategies implementation allowing a decrease in PPCs mortality by optimizing the clinical path of the patient and the care resources. PMID:25168300

  8. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure.

  9. Common post-operative complications in children

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Dilip

    2012-01-01

    The exact incidence of common post-operative complications in children is not known. Most common one is post-operative nausea and vomiting followed by respiratory complications leading to hypoxia. Cardiac complications are less in children without associated congenital cardiac anomaly. Post-operative shivering, agitation and delirium are seen more often in children anaesthetised with newer inhalational agents like sevoflurane and desflurane. Urinary retention in the post-operative period could be influenced by anaesthetic drugs and regional blocks. The purpose of this article is to review the literature and present to the postgraduate students comprehensive information about the current understanding and practice pattern on various common complications in the post-operative period. Extensive literature was searched with key words of various complications from Pubmed, Google scholar and specific journal, namely paediatric anaesthesia. The relevant articles, review article meta-analysis and editorials were the primary source of information for this article. PMID:23293390

  10. Common post-operative complications in children.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Dilip

    2012-09-01

    The exact incidence of common post-operative complications in children is not known. Most common one is post-operative nausea and vomiting followed by respiratory complications leading to hypoxia. Cardiac complications are less in children without associated congenital cardiac anomaly. Post-operative shivering, agitation and delirium are seen more often in children anaesthetised with newer inhalational agents like sevoflurane and desflurane. Urinary retention in the post-operative period could be influenced by anaesthetic drugs and regional blocks. The purpose of this article is to review the literature and present to the postgraduate students comprehensive information about the current understanding and practice pattern on various common complications in the post-operative period. Extensive literature was searched with key words of various complications from Pubmed, Google scholar and specific journal, namely paediatric anaesthesia. The relevant articles, review article meta-analysis and editorials were the primary source of information for this article. PMID:23293390

  11. C-reactive protein levels predict postoperative septic complications.

    PubMed

    Mustard, R A; Bohnen, J M; Haseeb, S; Kasina, R

    1987-01-01

    We studied 108 patients undergoing clean-contaminated and dirty surgical procedures to determine whether daily C-reactive protein (CRP) measurements for 14 days postoperatively could predict the occurrence of septic complications prior to clinical diagnosis. Diagnostic criteria for septic complications and positive CRP response were defined in advance of the study. The CRP assays were carried out using an automated laser nephelometer system after the patient's discharge from the hospital. Forty-six septic complications were diagnosed in 40 patients. These complications consisted of wound infection (23), urinary tract infection (11), pneumonia (six), upper respiratory tract infection (three), intra-abdominal abscess (one), and other (two). The CRP testing was found to have a positive predictive value of 69% and a negative predictive value of 78%. We conclude that serial CRP measurements may be a valuable adjunct to surgical care in patients at high risk of postoperative septic complications. PMID:3800652

  12. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and ?2 or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104–3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03–2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365–7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78–3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. PMID:23845841

  13. Hyperprolactinaemia: a cause of severe postoperative complication after reduction mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Mestak, Ondrej; Mestak, Jan; Borsky, Jiri

    2014-12-01

    Galactorrhoea is a rare complication of wound healing after breast reduction and its association with necrosis of the areolar skin in women with no recent history of breast feeding has to our knowledge never been described. Galactorrhoea is common and there are many differential diagnoses. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman who had bilateral reductions of the breast and developed hyperprolactinaemia and galactorrhoea six weeks postoperatively. Subsequently she developed dry necrosis of both areolas. All radiographic and laboratory findings were within the reference ranges except for of prolactin. PMID:25399958

  14. [The surgery of laparoceles. The postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Garavello, A; Tuccimei, U; Sadighi, A; Belardi, A; Remedi, M; Antonellis, D

    1997-05-01

    The use of prosthetic meshes in incisional hernias repairs is now very attractive, particularly for wide fascial defects; nevertheless the presence of a foreign body and placement technique may be responsible for complications sometimes leading to failure. To evaluate technical problems and complications in incisional hernia surgery the authors reviewed their 5 year experience in 70 patients; 39 mesh repairs and 31 direct sutures of the abdominal wall were performed. Local complications (fistulas, wound hematoma or infections) were more frequent in the former group; PTFE meshes showed a lower resistance to infections, particularly in diabetics, and in three patients partial or total removal was mandatory. Prosthetic meshes showed a marked reduction of recurrences in incisional hernia surgery, but their use leads to more local complications than direct repair; the authors believe that mesh placement must be evaluated for every single patient and not used as a routine procedure. PMID:9297143

  15. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  16. Increased postoperative complications after protective ileostomy closure delay: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Perez, Ines; Leon, Miguel; Pastor, Daniel; Diaz Dominguez, Joaquin; Cantero, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the morbidity and complications associated to ileostomy reversal in colorectal surgery patients, and if these are related to the time of closure. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 93 patients, who had undergone elective ileostomy closure between 2009 and 2013 was performed. Demographic, clinical and surgical variables were reviewed for analysis. All complications were recorded, and classified according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification. Statistical univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, setting a P value of 0.05 for significance. RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of 60.3 years, 58% male. The main procedure for ileostomy creation was rectal cancer (56%), and 37% had received preoperative chemo-radiotherapy. The average delay from creation to closure of the ileostomy was 10.3 mo. Postoperative complications occurred in 40% of the patients, with 1% mortality. The most frequent were ileus (13%) and wound infection (13%). Pseudomembranous colitis appeared in 4%. Increased postoperative complications were associated with delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.041). Male patients had more complications (P = 0.042), mainly wound infections (P = 0.007). Pseudomembranous colitis was also associated with the delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.003). End-to-end intestinal anastomosis without resection was significantly associated with postoperative ileus (P = 0.037). CONCLUSION: Although closure of a protective ileostomy is a fairly common surgical procedure, it has a high rate of complications, and this must be taken into account when the indication is made. The delay in stoma closure can increase the rate of complications in general, and specifically wound infections and colitis. PMID:25276286

  17. Relation of anthropometric and dynamometric variables to serious postoperative complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A M Klidjian; K J Foster; R M Kammerling; A Cooper; S J Karran

    1980-01-01

    Prediction of serious postoperative complications by using standard anthropometric and biochemical nutritional variables was attempted in 225 patients admitted for major abdominal surgery. In 102 of the patients hand-grip dynamometry was also measured, and this proved the most sensitive test, predicting complications in 48 of the 55 patients (87%) who developed them (p < 0.001). Arm muscle circumference and forearm

  18. Factors influencing wound complications: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Bucknall, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Burst abdomen, incisional herniation, sinus formation and post-operative wound infection continue to bedevil the surgeon. A prospective study of 1129 laparotomy wounds defined the extent of the problem; 1.7% incidence of dehiscence, 7.4% herniation and 6.7% sinus formation, all significantly associated with wound infection. Mass closure reduced the dehiscence rate from 3.8% to 0.76%. Infection reduced wound strength in a rat laparotomy model due to a decrease in fibroblast concentration and activity. A monofilament non-absorbable suture was shown experimentally to be the most suitable suture for closing infected abdominal wounds. Electron microscopy demonstrated bacteria in the interstices of infected multifilament sutures. A randomised clinical trial comparing polyglycolic acid and monofilament nylon in the closure of abdominal wounds confirmed the experimental findings; polyglycolic acid resulted in a significantly higher wound failure rate with no decrease in sinus formation. A mass closure technique using monofilament nylon is recommended for laparatomy closure and efforts should continue to reduce wound sepsis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:6299161

  19. Effects of immediate postoperative enteral nutrition on body composition, muscle function, and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, D; Gillanders, L; Mahr, K; Hill, G L

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-two patients undergoing bowel resection were randomized to receive either immediate postoperative nasojejunal feeding with full strength Osmolite solution for 56 hours (n = 16) or routine postoperative hypocaloric fluids and gradual reintroduction of diet (n = 16). Body composition changes were measured at 14 days after operation with in vivo neutron activation analysis, the wound healing response by subcutaneous implantation of Gortex tubes, and muscle function by grip strength, maximum ventilatory volume, and stimulation of the ulnar nerve at the wrist. Postoperative fatigue up to 3 months after operation was assessed using a 10-point analogue. Successful immediate enteral nutrition was established in 12 of the 16 patients. Enterally fed patients had a mean daily caloric intake of 1179 +/- 388 kcal/d (mean +/- SD) over the first 4 postoperative days compared with 382 +/- 71 kcal/d for the controls (p less than 0.0001). The amount of hydroxyproline accumulating in the Gortex tubes was also significantly greater (2.5 +/- 1.1 nmol/g tube vs 1.5 +/- 0.8 nmol/g tube; p less than 0.02). However, the amount and composition of the weight lost was not significantly different. Muscle function was not preserved, and postoperative fatigue occurred to an equal extent in both groups. Complications were similar in both groups, except for a preponderance of bowel obstructions in the controls. The time to passage of first flatus and first bowel motion, although shorter in the fed group, did not reach significance (p = 0.07). We conclude that immediate enteral nutrition is feasible and results in an improved wound healing response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1910100

  20. Postoperative changes in serum CO2 as an indicator of postoperative complications after radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Mark D; Wisenbaugh, Eric S; Patton, Michael; Salevitz, Daniel; Castle, Erik P

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the relationship of postoperative CO2 levels to the risk of complications after radical cystectomy. In this review, we summarize the existing body of literature on the topic as well as metabolic complications after urinary diversion. Currently, there are no studies that specifically examine CO2 levels in the context of complications after radical cystectomy; therefore, we also present our own institutional data which demonstrate that a drop in postoperative CO2 levels is highly predictive of complications, the most common of which is failure to thrive. These data indicate that significant changes in CO2 levels prior to discharge after a radical cystectomy may be a harbinger of forthcoming complications. PMID:25773345

  1. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  2. Avoiding postoperative complications with the LAP-BAND system.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Hadar; Favretti, Franco

    2002-12-01

    The most frequently occurring complications associated with the LAP-BAND (INAMED Health, Santa Barbara, CA) include gastric prolapse, stoma obstruction, esophageal and gastric pouch dilatation, erosion, and access port problems. This article describes the causes of these complications and details some points for their prevention and treatment. As techniques for placement of the LAP-BAND have evolved, complication rates have declined. For example, occurrence of gastric prolapse was reduced from the initially reported rates of 22% to less than 5%. The emergence of many problems, such as gastric pouch dilatation or prolapse, can be minimized with proper operative technique and close postoperative management and follow-up. As with other major surgical procedures, particularly those performed in the bariatric population, complications associated with the LAP-BAND system are unavoidable but are rarely life-threatening if managed appropriately. Surgeons and patients should adopt strategies that will help avoid complications and be sensitive to any indication of their emergence. PMID:12527348

  3. Early Postoperative Complications after Heart Transplantation in Adult Recipients: Asan Medical Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, Jae Joong; Kim, Joon Bum; Choo, Suk Jung; Yun, Tae-Jin; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart transplantation has become a widely accepted surgical option for end-stage heart failure in Korea since its first success in 1992. We reviewed early postoperative complications and mortality in 239 patients who underwent heart transplantation using bicaval technique in Asan Medical Center. Methods Between January 1999 and December 2011, a total of 247 patients aged over 17 received heart transplantation using bicaval technique in Asan Medical Center. After excluding four patients with concomitant kidney transplantation and four with heart-lung transplantation, 239 patients were enrolled in this study. We evaluated their early postoperative complications and mortality. Postoperative complications included primary graft failure, cerebrovascular accident, mediastinal bleeding, renal failure, low cardiac output syndrome requiring intra-aortic balloon pump or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation insertion, pericardial effusion, and inguinal lymphocele. Follow-up was 100% complete with a mean follow-up duration of 58.4±43.6 months. Results Early death occurred in three patients (1.3%). The most common complications were pericardial effusion (61.5%) followed by arrhythmia (41.8%) and mediastinal bleeding (8.4%). Among the patients complicated with pericardial effusion, only 13 (5.4%) required window operation. The incidence of other significant complications was less than 5%: stroke (1.3%), low cardiac output syndrome (2.5%), renal failure requiring renal replacement (3.8%), sternal wound infection (2.0%), and inguinal lymphocele (4.6%). Most of complications did not result in the extended length of hospital stay except mediastinal bleeding (p=0.034). Conclusion Heart transplantation is a widely accepted option of surgical treatment for end-stage heart failure with good early outcomes and relatively low catastrophic complications. PMID:24368968

  4. Postoperative wound dealing and superficial surgical site infection in open radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Fukashi; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamashita, Mauso; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soishi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-09-01

    The number of open radical prostatectomy (RP) surgeries has been decreasing owing to the spread of laparoscopic and robotic surgery, which has implications for postoperative wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate and document the current status of postoperative wound healing and superficial surgical site infection (SSI) in open RPs. One hundred and seventy-five antegrade RPs with the same or similar kinds of prophylactic antibiotic administration were divided into two groups: (i) 'no intervention' (wound covering group) and (ii) 'washing', using a washing solution from the second postoperative day to the day of skin staple removal (wound washing group). We compared these groups for the occurrence of superficial SSI. The wound covering group had three (3·03%) cases of superficial SSI, with one case caused by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). The wound washing group had nine (11·8%) cases of superficial SSI, with three cases caused by MSSA, two cases caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and one by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The wound covering group showed a significantly lower ratio of superficial SSI (P?=?0·0472). In conclusion, the postoperative wound status data in this study suggests that no wound intervention after RP resulted in a comparatively lower ratio of superficial SSI than in the wound washing group. PMID:25186077

  5. Use of intraoperative indocyanin-green angiography to minimize wound healing complications in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Bhanot, Parag; Franklin, Brenton; Albino, Frank; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2013-12-01

    Complication rates following abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) remain high. Early complications are related to skin necrosis and delayed healing, whereas late complications are related to recurrence. When concomitant body contouring procedures are performed, complication rates can be further increased. It is hypothesised that fluorescent angiography using indocyanin green (ICG) can identify poorly perfused tissues and thus reduce the incidence of delayed healing. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent AWR with concomitant panniculectomy from 2007-2012. Intraoperative ICG angiography with the SPY system (LifeCell Corp.) was used to determine the amount of resection for body contouring in patients who underwent reconstruction in a cohort of patients. SPY-Q was used to assess relative perfusion of analysed areas. Preoperative, postoperative, and operative details were analyzed. Seventeen patients met inclusion criteria, 12 patients were included in the non-ICG cohort, while five patients were included in the ICG cohorts. Wound-healing complications occurred in 5/12 (42%) patients in the non-ICG cohort vs 1/5 (20%) of the ICG cohorts. A description of the sole patient with complications in the ICG cohort is illustrated. Operative debridement and wound infection development occurred more frequently in the non-ICG cohort compared with the ICG cohort (17%, 17% vs 0%, 0%, respectively). Average time to wound healing was 41.1 days. Intraoperative ICG angiography can accurately detect perfusion abnormalities and can decrease wound healing related complications in complex hernia repair with concomitant panniculectomy. Assessing and ensuring skin viability can decrease the need for operative debridement. PMID:23596988

  6. Influence of Postoperative Complications on Relapse-Free Survival in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Attili, V. Satya Suresh; Bapsy, Poonamalle P.; Ramachandra, Chowdappa; Reddy, C. Obula; Prabhakaran, P.S.; Varma, Pratap P.; Chandra, Veligeti R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A variety of preoperative variables—such as perforation prior to surgery, poor nutritional status, and comorbid conditions such as diabetes—are already known to shorten relapse-free survival in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. However, the significance of postoperative events in gastrointestinal malignancies is still debated and has not been studied in the population of southern India. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, India, from September 2004 to 2006. Patients from a single surgical unit who had undergone surgery with curative intent for gastrointestinal malignancies were evaluated (to maintain uniformity, patients who had undergone palliative surgery were not included in the analysis). We assumed anastomotic leak, delayed wound healing, and postoperative weight loss > 10% as risk factors predictive of poor disease-free survival. These factors were evaluated in all patients, and risk for development of relapse was calculated. Results: A total of 236 patients were evaluated. Baseline parameters were similar in both groups. Compared with patients who developed no postoperative complications, we found that the risk of relapse is 9.8 times greater in patients having anastomotic leak, 8.2 times greater in those with delayed recovery, and 2.3 times greater in those having excessive weight loss. The risk was uniform in all types of gastrointestinal malignancies. Conclusion: The results suggest that anastomotic leak, delayed wound healing, and postoperative weight loss in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies confer poor disease-free survival. The presence of these complications warrants closer follow-up and management as appropriate. PMID:20084159

  7. Efficacy of postoperative continuous wound infiltration with local anesthetic after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Abadir, Adel R; Nicolas, Fred; Gharabawy, Ramiz; Shah, Trusha; Michael, Rafik

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy, safety, opioid sparing effects and improvement of respiratory function when using 0.2% ropivacaine continuous wound infiltration after major intra-abdominal surgery. Forty patients undergoing major intra-abdominal surgery requiring a midline incision of > or = 20 cm were enrolled into this IRB-approved, randomized, prospective controlled study. Group 1: 20 patients, parenteral analgesia (control group). Group II: 20 patients, with local anesthetic wound infiltration (pain pump group). At the end of the procedure, in the pain pump group of patients, a multi hole, 20-gauge catheter was inserted percutaneously, above the fascia. An initial dose of 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was injected in the wound through the catheter. A device provided continuous delivery of 0.2% ropivacaine; the infusion was initiated at 6 ml/h for the following two days. The total "rescue" morphine and oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets administered were significantly lower in the pain pump group. At all time intervals, resting pain scores were significantly lower in the pain pump group when compared with the control group. However, at the 4-48 and 12-48 hours pain scores generated after leg raise and coughing, respectively, were significantly lower in group II. The patient vital capacities were insignificantly higher in group II. We conclude that after major abdominal surgery, infiltration and continuous wound instillation with 0.2% ropivacaine decreases postoperative pain, opioid requirements and oral analgesia. Early patient rehabilitation, hastening convalescence, and preventing respiratory complications are expected outcomes of this approach. PMID:22128418

  8. The preoperative evaluation prevent the postoperative complications of thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Feng; Jeng, Yachung; Chen, Kuo-Dong; Yu, Ji-Kuen; Shih, Chao-Ming; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Chou, Fong-Fu; Shih, Ming-Lang; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Chang, Tzu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective Thyroid surgery is generally a safe surgery but its complications are still common. We wish to identify preoperative factors that predict postoperative complications. Methods A nationwide survey was conducted by senior surgeons from 16 medical centers and 5 regional hospitals in Taiwan to thyroid operations performed over 3 years. 3846 cases were retrospectively examined to identify factors influencing complications: indication for surgery, preoperative evaluation, such as ultrasonography, chest X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, isotope scanning, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and thyroid function test, and patient characteristics. Results Eighty-four percent of patients were female. Seven percent of the patients had immediate postoperative hypocalcemia (mild and severe) and 2.3%, hoarseness (recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, temporary/permanent). Logistic regression analysis identified an association between hypocalcemia and RLN injury with age, hospital category, surgical procedure types (total thyroidectomy, unilateral, bilateral subtotal or total resection). A lower incidence of hypocalcemia was related to preoperative neck ultrasound and FNAC analysis (the odds ratio (OR) = 0.5 and 0.65, [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.331–0.768 and 0.459–0.911], P = 0.0014 and 0.0127, respectively), while RLN injury was not associated with any preoperative evaluation. The ORs of hypocalcemia and RLN injury for patients older than 50 years were 0.55 and 2.15, [0.393–0.763 and 1.356–3.4], P < 0.001 and 0.0012, respectively. Conclusions The success of thyroid surgery depends on careful preoperative planning, including a preoperative neck ultrasound to determine the proximity of the nodule to the recurrent laryngeal nerve course, and the consideration of the type of anesthesia, adjuvant devices for intra-op monitoring of the RLN, and surgical modalities. Our results suggest that preoperative evaluation implementations are positively associated with strategy of surgery and postoperative hypocalcemia prevention. PMID:25685337

  9. Development of a Prediction Rule for Estimating Postoperative Pulmonary Complications

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Jung Seop; Yoo, Hongseok; Song, Wonjun; Han, Sangbin; Lee, Kyung Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O. Jung; Woo, Sookyoung; Park, Hye Yun

    2014-01-01

    Patient- and procedure-related factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) have changed over the last decade. Therefore, we sought to identify independent risk factors of PPCs and to develop a clinically applicable scoring system. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 2,059 patients who received preoperative evaluations from respiratory physicians between June 2011 and October 2012. A new scoring system for estimating PPCs was developed using beta coefficients of the final multiple regression models. Of the 2,059 patients studied, 140 (6.8%) had PPCs. A multiple logistic regression model revealed seven independent risk factors (with scores in parentheses): age ?70 years (2 points), current smoker (1 point), the presence of airflow limitation (1 point), American Society of Anesthesiologists class ?2 (1 point), serum albumin <4 g/dL (1 point), emergency surgery (2 points), and non-laparoscopic abdominal/cardiac/aortic aneurysm repair surgery (4 points). The area under the curve was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.75–0.83) with the newly developed model. The new risk stratification including laparoscopic surgery has a good discriminative ability for estimating PPCs in our study cohort. Further research is needed to validate this new prediction rule. PMID:25437175

  10. Early postoperative complications of pediatric liver transplantation: experience at one center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Araz; A Pirat; A Torgay; P Zeyneloglu; G Arslan

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the postoperative complications within the first month among 20 pediatric liver transplant recipients between April 1990 and March 2003 we retrospectively studied their medical charts to gather demographic data; primary diagnosis; operative duration; perioperative transfusions; time to extubation; length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay; mortality; perioperative laboratory values; and postoperative complications including respiratory, infections, renal, neurological, cardiovascular,

  11. [Dehiscence of laparotomy after hysterectomy - wound management].

    PubMed

    Karasová, D; Haško, M; Ziaková, K; Zúbor, P; Mikolaj?ík, A

    2012-12-01

    Authors of the paper present prospective case report about nursing process and healing of extensive dehiscence of middle lower laparotomy wound in patient after surgical procedure for endometrial carcinoma. The aim of the paper is to describe, analyse and evaluate the process of complicated postoperative wound healing using negative pressure and moist therapy. They emphasize importance of cooperation between particular departments in complicated postoperative wound therapy management. They point out using new and easily available techniques and methods, risk factors elimination and maintenance of the factors that have a positive influence on wound healing.Key words: postoperative wound dehiscence, negative pressure wound therapy, moist therapy, case report. PMID:23521188

  12. Incisional Hernia Classification Predicts Wound Complications Two Years after Repair.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ousley, Jenny M; Oyefule, Omobolanle O; Stewart, Melissa K; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2015-07-01

    Classification of ventral hernias (VHs) into categories that impact surgical outcome is not well defined. The European Hernia Society (EHS) classification divides ventral incisional hernias by midline or lateral location. This study aimed to determine whether EHS classification is associated with wound complications after VH repair, indicated by surgical site occurrences (SSOs). A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent VH repair at a tertiary referral center between July 1, 2005 and May 30, 2012, was performed. EHS classification, comorbidities, and operative details were determined. Primary outcome was SSO within two years, defined as an infection, wound dehiscence, seroma, or enterocutaneous fistula. There were 538 patients included, and 51.5 per cent were female, with a mean age of 54.2 ± 12.4 years and a mean body mass index of 32.4 ± 8.6 kg/m(2). Most patients had midline hernias (87.0%, n = 468). There were 47 patients (8.7%) who had a lateral hernia, and 23 patients (4.3%) whose repair included both midline and lateral components. Overall rate of SSO was 39 per cent (n = 211) within two years. The rate of SSO by VH location was: 39 per cent (n = 183) for midline, 23 per cent (n = 11) for lateral, and 74 per cent (n = 17) for VHs with midline and lateral components (P = <0.001). Patients whose midline hernia spanned more than one EHS category also had a higher rate of SSOs (P = 0.001). VHs are often described by transverse dimension alone, but a more descriptive classification system offers a richness that correlates with outcomes. PMID:26140887

  13. [Pathogenesis of the lethal postoperative cerebral inflammatory-purulent complications in neurooncological patients].

    PubMed

    Hlavats'ky?, O Ia; Lysenko, S M; Koliada, O L; Danchuk, S V

    2007-01-01

    The main and immediate causes of death, pathogenetic mechanisms of postoperative cerebral inflammatory-purulent complications (CIPC) in patients, suffering the brain tumour, were analyzed. The main pathogenetic patterns of the postoperative period course in the CIPC occurrence were studied, basing on the data of analysis of 30 patients, who died after the operation. There was proved, that the sepsis occurrence on the background of postoperative meningoencephalitis means the lethal ending of the disease. There was established, that in occurrence of septic complications, connected with postoperative meningoencephalitis, the most frequently the affection of respiratory and urinary systems occurs. PMID:18402039

  14. Causes and managements of postoperative complications after degenerative scoliosis treatments with internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Hong; Zheng, Jie; Lou, Shu-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the causes and managements of early postoperative complications of degenerative scoliosis (DS) treated with internal pedicle screw fixation. Methods: From Jan 2000 to Apr 2013, 325 DS patients treated with internal pedicle screw fixation in our hospital were retrospectively involved. The categories, causes, managements and outcomes of early postoperative complications were statistically analyzed. Results: Early postoperative complications occurred in 10.76% of the patients including 16 cases of lower limb numb or pain, 6 cases of decreased lower limb sensitivity and motor functions, which accounted for 62.86% of all complications, followed by incision infections (4/35, 11.43%) and rare cases of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, cardiac and renal inadequacy, urinary system and pulmonary infections. The incidence of overall complications (19.79%, p = 0.001) and nerve injuries (11.46%, p = 0.000) were significantly higher in long-segment than in short-segment fixations. Improper screw implanting, over correction of scoliosis and insufficient blood supply of the spinal cord during operation were risk factors for early postoperative complications and most of them were cured by anti-infection medication, incision dressing change, nerve nourishment, adjusting the screws and anti-osteoporosis treatments within 6 months after surgery. Only three cases with severe nerve injury did not improve until the 6 months postoperative follow-up. Conclusions: Most of the postoperative complications in our DS patients disappeared within 6 months after surgery and more than half of complications were nerve injuries. PMID:25550945

  15. Risk factors for postoperative respiratory complications in adult liver transplant recipients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Pirat; S Özgur; A Torgay; S Candan; P Zeynelo?lu; G Arslan

    2004-01-01

    To determine the types and the incidence of as well as risk factors for early postoperative (<30 days) respiratory complications in adult liver transplant (LT) recipients, we reviewed The data of 44 consecutive adult LT recipients who received their grafts from January 1995 through December 2002. The data included demographic features; primary diagnosis; number of intraoperative transfusions; preoperative and postoperative

  16. Reconstruction of the alveolar cleft: effect of preoperative extraction of deciduous teeth at the sites of clefts on the incidence of postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Almasri, Mazen

    2012-03-01

    Our objective was to find out if the extraction of deciduous teeth at the sites of clefts 3-8 weeks before alveolar bone grafting (ABG) would reduce the number of postoperative complications. Chart reviews were reviewed retrospectively of patients who had had ABG from March 2006 to June 2009. To reduce variables only healthy, non-syndromic, cooperative patients were included. Eleven patients had had their deciduous teeth extracted at the cleft sites 3-8 weeks before ABG and 10 patients had had the extractions done intraoperatively at the same time as ABG. There was a single case of postoperative infection and no wound dehiscence in the preoperative extraction group, and there were no delays in postoperative orthodontic treatment. In the intraoperative group there were 3 cases of local wound infection and 6 cases of minor dehiscence, and orthodontic treatment was delayed for 3-6 months in all patients with complications. All patients had successful ABG, eruption of teeth, and orthodontic treatment; but patients who had their deciduous teeth at the cleft sites extracted preoperatively had fewer wound complications than patients whose extractions were done at the same time as the ABG. PMID:21277660

  17. Risk factors for postoperative respiratory complications in adult liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pirat, A; Ozgur, S; Torgay, A; Candan, S; Zeynelo?lu, P; Arslan, G

    2004-01-01

    To determine the types and the incidence of as well as risk factors for early postoperative (<30 days) respiratory complications in adult liver transplant (LT) recipients, we reviewed The data of 44 consecutive adult LT recipients who received their grafts from January 1995 through December 2002. The data included demographic features; primary diagnosis; number of intraoperative transfusions; preoperative and postoperative laboratory values; intraoperative and postoperative characteristics; and early postoperative (<30 days) mortality. Pulmonary atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, respiratory failure, and pulmonary edema were the respiratory complications investigated. Twenty-six patients (59.1%) developed at least one respiratory complication during the early postoperative period. The most frequent complication was pleural effusion (n = 18, 40.9%), followed by atelectasis (n = 13, 29.5%), pneumonia (n = 10, 22.7%), acute respiratory failure (n = 5, 11.4%), pulmonary edema (n = 3, 6.8%), and pneumothorax (n = 2, 4.5%). Compared to the patients who did not develop these problems, the affected cohort was significantly older (27 +/- 12 years vs 36 +/- 14 years, respectively; P =.039) and required more intraoperative transfusions (P =.005). Among the overall mortality rate of 15.9%, patients who developed pneumonia showed a significantly higher mortality (40.0% vs 8.8%, respectively; P =.037). Pleural effusion, atelectasis, and pneumonia are the main respriatory complications that occur in adult LT recipients. Patient age and intraoperative transfusion requirements are important predictors of early postoperative complications. Pneumonia is associated with a poor prognosis in this patient group. PMID:15013351

  18. The utility of midtrimester ultrasound assessment of the subcutaneous space in predicting cesarean wound complications.

    PubMed

    Shainker, Scott A; Raghuraman, Nandini; Modest, Anna M; Schnettler, William T; Hacker, Michele R; Ralston, Steven J

    2014-11-11

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the association between cesarean wound complications and thickness of the subcutaneous space within the anterior abdomen at the midtrimester fetal anatomical survey. Methods: In this case-control study, cases were identified using an ICD9 code for wound complications of cesarean delivery. For each case, we identified the woman with the next consecutive midtrimester ultrasound who had a cesarean delivery without a wound complication, matched on age and race, as the control. A blinded investigator measured subcutaneous space at three distinct suprapubic levels in the midsagital plane. Results: Of 7228 women with a cesarean delivery, 123 (1.7%) had a wound complication. Seventy-nine cases were eligible. Midline suprapubic subcutaneous thickness did not differ between cases and controls at the superior, middle or inferior locations (p???0.35). Body mass index was moderately correlated with ultrasound-derived measurements (r???0.63; p?wound complication risk with increasing subcutaneous space thickness, even after adjustment (p???0.34). Conclusion: Prenatal ultrasound can quantify the subcutaneous space. Vertical skin incision, stapled wound closure, and a classical hysterotomy were associated with cesarean wound complication, but midtrimester subcutaneous thickness was not. PMID:25302863

  19. Veterans Administration Cooperative Study on Bowel Preparation for Elective Colorectal Operations: impact of oral antibiotic regimen on colonic flora, wound irrigation cultures and bacteriology of septic complications.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J G; Condon, R E; Gorbach, S L; Clarke, J S; Nichols, R L; Ochi, S

    1978-01-01

    A ten hospital cooperative study comparing prophylactic oral neomycin and erythromycin base versus placebo demonstrated clinical efficacy of the antibiotics in preventing septic complications following elective colon operations. The present report concerns microbiological studies accomplished during this trial. Cultures of colon contents during surgery showed the antibiotic prep reduced concentrations of both aerobes and anaerobes by approximately 10(5) bacteria/ml. Virtually all major bacterial components of the normal flora were affected. Wound irrigation specimens at the time of closure failed to predict subsequent wound infection, but significantly fewer antibiotic recipients had positive irrigation cultures. Postoperative stool specimens showed that the oral antibiotics did not cause an emergence in resistant forms. Bacteriological studies of postoperative infections indicated that most postoperative infections involved a mixed aerobic-anaerobic flora, and that Bacteroides fragilis accounted for six of eight episodes of bacteremia. PMID:686893

  20. Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement: Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl Wierks; Richard L. Skolasky; Jong Hun Ji; Edward G. McFarland

    2009-01-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a treatment option for patients with symptomatic glenohumeral arthritis and a deficient\\u000a rotator cuff. The reported complication rates vary from 0% to 68%. Given this variation, our purposes were to (1) determine\\u000a the learning curve for the procedure, (2) identify complications and surgical pitfalls, and (3) compare our results with those\\u000a of similar published series.

  1. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  2. [Tension pneumopericardium: a rare complication after thoracic stab wound].

    PubMed

    Faroudy, M; Marzouk, N; Ababou, A; Lazreq, C; Sbihi, A

    2002-11-01

    The authors report a case involving a patient with thoracic stab wound. The patient developed tension pneumopericardium with acute cardiac tamponade. The clinical and radiological features of tension pneumopericardium and its treatment are discussed. PMID:12494808

  3. Utility of B-type natriuretic peptide in predicting postoperative complications and outcomes in patients undergoing heart surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan Hutfless; Radmila Kazanegra; Michael Madani; Meenakshi Awasthi Bhalla; Alisi Tulua-Tata; Amelia Chen; Paul Clopton; Cherimarie James; Albert Chiu; Alan S Maisel

    2004-01-01

    ObjectivesThe purpose of the present study was to assess whether preoperative and postoperative B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels could be used as predictors of postoperative complications and outcomes in patients after open-heart surgery.

  4. Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, K. B.; Bremmelgaard, A.; Sørensen, A. I.; Raahave, D.; Petersen, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures. PMID:7925666

  5. The postoperative use of wound adhesives. Gum mastic versus benzoin, USP.

    PubMed

    Lesesne, C B

    1992-11-01

    Our results, combined with the work of previous authors, show that gum mastic not only offers superior adhesive qualities compared with benzoin, USP but also has a lower incidence of postoperative contact dermatitis and subsequent skin discoloration. In light of the widespread use of surgical adhesives, this study is important in documenting the low incidence of complications and the advantages of gum mastic compared with benzoin, USP. PMID:1430556

  6. [Laparoscopic gastric bypass: computed tomography appearance of common postoperative changes and complications].

    PubMed

    Caracela Zeballos, C R; Diéguez Tapias, S; Cereceda Pérez, C N; Pinto Varela, J M

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y bypass is being increasingly used for weight reduction in patients with morbid obesity. Unfortunately, some complications can occur after this procedure, the most frequent being intestinal obstruction (due to stenosis of the anastomosis at the distal end of the loop, internal hernias, bands, and adhesions), anastomotic leaks, and bleeding. This article provides basic knowledge about the surgical technique and its correlation with the common postoperative changes with the aim of facilitating the interpretation of CT findings and the identification of postoperative complications in these patients. PMID:24508056

  7. Early postoperative complications of pediatric liver transplantation: experience at one center.

    PubMed

    Araz, C; Pirat, A; Torgay, A; Zeyneloglu, P; Arslan, G

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the postoperative complications within the first month among 20 pediatric liver transplant recipients between April 1990 and March 2003 we retrospectively studied their medical charts to gather demographic data; primary diagnosis; operative duration; perioperative transfusions; time to extubation; length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay; mortality; perioperative laboratory values; and postoperative complications including respiratory, infections, renal, neurological, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) complications. Ten male and ten female patients of mean age 8 +/- 4 years had a mean operative duration, time to extubation, and length of stay in the ICU of 12.1 +/- 2.3 hours, 11.1 +/- 15.0 hours, and 7.2 +/- 5.5 days, respectively. The most frequent postoperative complication was respiratory (n = 14, 70%), followed by infections (n = 13, 65%), renal (n = 8, 40%), neurological (n = 7, 35%), cardiovascular (n = 4, 20%), and GIT (n = 4, 20%) infections. The overall mortality rate was 25% (n = 5). Compared with patients who survived, those who died displayed significantly lower perioperative platelet counts (P <.05), as well as a significantly higher incidence of postoperative neurological disorders (P =.031), and cardiovascular complications (P =.032). PMID:15013350

  8. Anti-Angiogenic Drugs: Involvement in Cutaneous Side Effects and Wound-Healing Complication

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The uses of anti-angiogenic drugs have not only made an impact on the battle to eliminate cancer but are also responsible for a number of medical complications. The long-term use of these drugs has increased the spectrum and incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the overall impact that these drugs have on patient care. Recent Advances: This review highlights the role of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in angiogenesis and wound healing and looks at how angiogenic inhibitors promote wound-healing complications. Critical Issues: With an increased use of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of various cancers and ocular diseases, there is an increased need for clinicians to define the risks and to optimize the usage of these drugs to reduce the incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. In addition, awareness is needed when treating patients on anti-angiogenic drugs so as not to exacerbate potential wound-healing complications when performing surgical procedures. Future Directions: Clinicians and surgeons will need to develop management guidelines to optimize patient care to reduce the risk of morbidity. When performing a surgical procedure, the impact of adverse effects from the use of anti-angiogenic drugs should be considered to ensure the welfare of the patient. In addition, the development of more specific inhibitors is necessary to reduce target effects to reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. PMID:25302138

  9. Postoperative and mid-term wound disturbance outcomes of minimally invasive saphenous vein harvest using the VEGA system.

    PubMed

    Simek, Martin; Nemec, Petr

    2007-03-01

    Great saphenous vein harvest is associated with a significant risk of impaired wound healing. The purpose of this study was to determine efficacy of one system designed for minimally invasive vein harvest (MIVH) and to assess postoperative and mid-term wound-healing disturbances. From February 2004 to June 2005, great saphenous harvest for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was performed in a group of 120 consecutive patients employing the VEGA system (B/Braun-Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany). Patients were evaluated on 7th postoperative day, at the 3-month and 1-year follow-up for wound healing disturbances, residual leg edema, and saphenous neuropathy. The mean age was 67.3 years, male patients dominated (70%), and the leading procedure was CABG (83%). The mean number of harvested venous grafts was 1.9 +/- 1.2 and the mean number of skin incisions was 3.7 +/- 2.2. The mean total vein harvesting time was 40.2 +/- 16.8 minutes. Satisfactory healing was achieved in 98% patients on 7th postoperative day and at the 3-month follow-up all wounds were completely healed. Saphenous neuralgia remained a significant cause of morbidity, although its incidence decreased from 25% presented on 7th postoperative day to 8% presented at 1-year follow-up. Likewise, the incidence of leg edema decreased from 34% on the 7th postoperative day to 7% at 1-year follow-up. Minimally invasive vein harvest is a safe method associated with a significant reduction of wound disturbances. The VEGA system appears to be suitable and effective equipment for MIVH. Nevertheless, residual edema and mainly saphenous neuropathy represent a relatively frequent cause of patient morbidity at the postoperative and mid-term follow-up. PMID:17390203

  10. [Pre-operative, operative and postoperative complications in 2266 cases of transurethral resection of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Adachi, K; Ao, T; Fujino, A; Omata, T; Yoshizawa, K; Kurokawa, J; Kadowaki, K; Shoji, K; Yokoyama, E

    1993-05-01

    Pre-operative and operative complications in 2266 patients having undergone transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for the past 20 years at Kitasato University Hospital were analyzed. They consisted of 2008 benign prostatic hyperplasia and 258 prostate cancer patients. Seven hundred and fifty four patients showed some of physical disorders prior to TUR:hypertension in 147 cases, diabetes mallitus in 87, ischemic heart disease in 46, chronic obstructive lung disease in 41 and others. Operative and postoperative complications of TURP were seen in 308 cases (13.6%). Perforation of the prostatic capsule was seen in 100 cases (4.4%) and bladder perforation into intraperitoneal cavity in 6 cases (0.3%). Transurethral fulgulation for postoperative hemorrhage was conducted on 79 cases (3.5%). Hyponatremia lower than 130 mEq/L was noted in 14 cases (0.6%). Severe urinary tract infection leading to bacteremia was observed in 9 cases (0.4%). Postoperative epididymitis was evident in 20 cases (0.8%). There was postoperative urinary incontinence in 19 cases, 3 of which was treated with Teflon-paste injection successfully. One patient had to undergo AMS-800 artificial sphincter implantation. The number of postoperative urethral stricture patients requiring urethral dilatation or internal urethrotomy was 12 (0.5%) and postoperative bladder neck contracture was seen in 20 cases (0.9%). One patient (0.04%) who developed DIC after profuse postoperative hemorrhage died on the 37th postoperative day. The efficiency of TURP depends not so much on the skill of cutting as on the speed and accuracy of orientation and haemostasis. The quick recognition of anatomical landmarks will assure effective and safe resection. PMID:7686590

  11. Perioperative synbiotics decrease postoperative complications in periampullary neoplasms: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sommacal, Heloisa Martins; Bersch, Vivian Pierri; Vitola, Santo Pascoal; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch

    2015-01-01

    Periampullary neoplasms are rapidly progressive tumors with a poor prognosis and high morbidity and mortality rates, which have a negative influence on patient outcomes. Some probiotics and prebiotics have the ability to protect the intestinal barrier and prevent bacterial translocation, infection, and postoperative complications. We evaluated the use of synbiotics in a prospective, double-blind study of patients undergoing surgery for periampullary neoplasms (PNs) and assessed the effect of these agents on nutritional status, postoperative complications, antibiotic use, length of hospital stay, and mortality. Patients were randomized to receive probiotics and prebiotics-synbiotics--group S [Lactobacillus acidophilus 10, 1 × 10(9)CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HS 111, 1 × 10(9) CFU, Lactobacillus casei 10, 1 × 10(9) CFU, Bifidobacterium bifidum, 1 × 10(9)CFU, and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) 100 mg]--or placebo-controls--group C, twice daily, for a total of 14 days. Risk, clinical status, and postoperative complication rates were assessed. Twenty-three patients were allocated to each group. The incidence of postoperative infection was significantly lower in group S (6 of 23 patients, 26.1%) than in group C (16 of 23 patients, 69.6%) (P = 0.00). Duration of antibiotic therapy was also shorter in group S (mean = 9 days vs. 15 days in group C; P = 0.01). Noninfectious complications were less common in group S (6 of 23 vs. 14 of 23 patients in group C; P = 0.03). Mean length of hospital stay was 12 ± 5 days in group S vs. 23 ± 14 days in group C (P = 0.00). No deaths occurred in group S, whereas 6 deaths occurred in group C (P = 0.02). Perioperative administration of synbiotics reduces postoperative mortality and complication rates in patients undergoing surgery for PNs. PMID:25803626

  12. Analysis of postoperative complications after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer in patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reiki Eguchi; Hiroko Ide; Tsutomu Nakamura; Kazuhiko Hayashi; Masaho Ohta; Fumiki Okamoto; Hiroyuki Itoh; Ken Takasaki

    1999-01-01

    Postoperative complications were investigated in 72 patients who received neoadjuvant therapy with esophagectomy. Preoperative\\u000a chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil (700 mg\\/m2\\/day, on days 1 to 5), cisplatinum (70 mg\\/m2\\/day, on day 1), and leucovorin\\u000a (20 mg\\/m2\\/day, on days 1 to 5). Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of cisplatinum combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy\\u000a (total dosage of 30–70 Gy). The incidence of postoperative pneumonia (16%)

  13. Diagnosis and management of the postoperative surgical and medical complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Montravers, Philippe; Augustin, Pascal; Zappella, Nathalie; Dufour, Guillaume; Arapis, Konstantinos; Chosidow, Denis; Fournier, Pierre; Ribeiro-Parienti, Lara; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Desmard, Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Perioperative complications following bariatric surgery (BS) have been poorly analysed and their management is not clearly assessed. The associated frequency of ICU admission is difficult to estimate. Among surgical complications, digestive perforations are the most frequent. The most common postoperative complications of sleeve gastrectomy are fistulas, but bleeding on the stapling line is also commonly reported. Complication rates are higher after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, mainly due to anastomotic leaks. Medical complications are mainly thromboembolic or respiratory complications. All these surgical and medical complications are not easily detected; clinical signs can be atypical or insidious, often resulting in delayed management. Respiratory signs can be predominant and lead erroneously to pulmonary or thromboembolic diseases. Diagnostic criteria are based on minor clinical signs, tachycardia being probably the most frequent one. Lately, complications are revealed by haemodynamic instability, respiratory failure or renal dysfunction and radiographic findings. Management decision according to these abnormal signs is based on a combined multidisciplanary approach including surgical and/or endoscopic procedures and medical care, depending on the nature and severity of the surgical complication. Medical management is based on supportive ICU care of organ dysfunctions, curative anticoagulation if required, nutritional support, and appropriate anti-infective therapy. Pharmacological data are limited in morbidly obese patients and the appropriate doses are debated, especially for anti-infective agents. Complicated BS cases have a poor outcome, probably largely related to delayed diagnosis and reoperation. PMID:25829315

  14. Management of complicated gastroschisis with porcine small intestinal submucosa and negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allen Gabriel; Gerald Gollin

    2006-01-01

    IntroductionIn almost all cases of gastroschisis, fascial closure may be achieved primarily or after silo reduction. Rarely, fascial and skin closure are impossible. We report our experience with visceral coverage in complicated cases of gastroschisis with porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) augmented by negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT).

  15. Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: hospital based registry study

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Karim; Vidal Melo, Marcos F; McLean, Duncan J; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Grabitz, Stephanie D; Kurth, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of intraoperative protective ventilation on major postoperative respiratory complications and to define safe intraoperative mechanical ventilator settings that do not translate into an increased risk of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Hospital based registry study. Setting Academic tertiary care hospital and two affiliated community hospitals in Massachusetts, United States. Participants 69?265 consecutively enrolled patients over the age of 18 who underwent a non-cardiac surgical procedure between January 2007 and August 2014 and required general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Interventions Protective ventilation, defined as a median positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cmH2O or more, a median tidal volume of less than 10 mL/kg of predicted body weight, and a median plateau pressure of less than 30 cmH2O. Main outcome measure Composite outcome of major respiratory complications, including pulmonary edema, respiratory failure, pneumonia, and re-intubation. Results Of the 69?265 enrolled patients 34?800 (50.2%) received protective ventilation and 34?465 (49.8%) received non-protective ventilation intraoperatively. Protective ventilation was associated with a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications in multivariable regression (adjusted odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 0.98, P=0.013). The results were similar in the propensity score matched cohort (odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 0.97, P=0.004). A PEEP of 5 cmH2O and median plateau pressures of 16 cmH2O or less were associated with the lowest risk of postoperative respiratory complications. Conclusions Intraoperative protective ventilation was associated with a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications. A PEEP of 5 cmH2O and a plateau pressure of 16 cmH2O or less were identified as protective mechanical ventilator settings. These findings suggest that protective thresholds differ for intraoperative ventilation in patients with normal lungs compared with those used for patients with acute lung injury. PMID:26174419

  16. Postoperative respiratory complications and peak airway pressure during laparoscopic colectomy in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang Bong; Park, Hye Kyeong; Hong, Joon Hwa; Kim, Beom Gyu; Kang, Hyun

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications increases in patients with high peak airway pressure (?30 cm H2O) during laparoscopic colectomy, we investigated consecutive patients with colorectal cancer who had undergone laparoscopic colectomy. Of the 115 enrolled patients, 34 patients (30%) had peak airway pressure ?30 cm H2O (an overload group). Compared with a nonoverload group (peak airway pressure <30 cm H2O), the overload group had a 5-fold greater incidence of postoperative respiratory complications and operations of longer duration, longer postanesthesia care unit stays, greater alveolar-arterial O2 differences, greater alveolar dead space-to-tidal volume ratios, and lower PaO2 measurements. Body mass index and preoperative alveolar-arterial O2 difference significantly affect higher peak airway pressure occurring during laparoscopic colectomy. Patients who had peak airway pressures ?30 cm H2O during laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer had higher incidence of postoperative respiratory complications than those whose peak airway pressures remained <30 cm H2O. PMID:24752158

  17. Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Site-Specific Cefazolin Delivery Using Biodegradable Implants in the Prevention of Post-operative Wound Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saleh Allababidi; Jaymin C. Shah

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. The study objective was to evaluate the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of cefazolin delivered locally as a glyceryl monostearate (GMS) based biocompatible implant for prevention of post-operative wound infection in Sprague Dawley rats subcutaneously inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus.

  18. [Two cases of advanced gastric cancer with postoperative severe complications after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Keiji; Wada, Hideo; Mochinaga, Hiroshi; Shigemasa, Yu; Sasaki, Nobufumi; Ikari, Hideki; Shimizu, Teruhisa; Kunizaki, Tadaomi; Yonemitsu, Nobuhisa

    2008-11-01

    We report two cases of advanced gastric cancer with severe postoperative complications after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The first case is a 60-year-old man who was diagnosed as a type 2 advanced gastric cancer with paraaortic lymph node metastases and the elevation of serum CA19-9 level. NAC was started, but no reductions were noted after 3 courses. Palliative total gastrectomy with distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy, cholecystectomy, and partial hepatectomy for T4 gastric cancer exhibiting obstruction were performed in June 2007. On postoperative day 10, abdominal CT scan revealed left subphrenic abscess, then CT-guided percutaneous drainage was performed. A culture of the abscess yielded Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. The second case is a 58-year-old man who was diagnosed as a type 2 advanced gastric cancer with multiple lymph node metastases and the elevation of serum CA19-9 level. NAC were performed, but no reductions were noted. A distal gastrectomy was performed in January 2008. On the first postoperative day, a severe abdominal distension was appeared suddenly and increasingly. An emergency laparotomy was undergone, but no findings of the bowel obstruction were observed. On postoperative day 2, a rise of serum beta-D-glucan level was recognized. Both cases were improved by an antifungal drug therapy. PMID:19106528

  19. Wound construction.

    PubMed

    Trichonas, George; Kaiser, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Wound construction is critical in microincision vitrectomy surgery. The three main steps in constructing a proper wound include displacing the conjunctiva away from the sclera, flattening the sclera on insertion, and angling the incision. Each one of these steps helps create wounds that will not leak. Misaligning the conjunctiva from the scleral hole prevents a vitreous wick from extending external to the conjunctiva. Flattening the sclera on trocar insertion provides a longer wound cord length, which is less likely to leak, and angling the incision has been proven to seal better in both anterior and posterior segment incisions. When you make an angled incision, you initially insert the blade at a 30° angle (at least). This will make the wound more stable because it is less likely to cause internal disruption of the wound edges. These three basic steps are simple, but very important to follow when constructing a microincision wound in order to limit postoperative complications including wound leakage, gas leak, hypotony, and endophthalmitis. PMID:25196754

  20. Immediate Postoperative Complications in Patients Undergoing CABG; Investigating the Role of Prior Coronary Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Negargar, Sohrab; Anvari, Shahriar; Abbasi, Kyomars; Enamzadeh, Elgar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately 15 to 30% of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) will require repeated revascularization. There is an ongoing debate concerning the impact of prior PCI on subsequent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. This study sought to compare immediate post-CABG complications between patients with and without previous coronary stenting. Methods: A total of 556 CABG candidates including 73 patients with previous coronary stenting and 483 patients without prior stenting were enrolled in this retrospective-prospective study. Demographic information, cardiac markers (CK-MB, Troponin T), and postoperative data including inotrope administration, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) use, bleeding, pathological electrocardiography (ECG) changes, and overall complications were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean age of the patients in stented group was significantly higher than that in unstented group (63.49±7.71 vs. 61.37±9.80 years, p=0.05). The mean serum level of Troponin T 12 h postoperation was significantly higher in the same group (323.26±33.16 vs. 243.30±11.52 ng/dL; p=0.03). Comparing the stented and unstented groups, the rates of inotrope use (17.8% vs. 7.2%; p=0.003), significant bleeding (15.1% vs. 4.3%; p=0.001), and overall complications (32.9% vs. 11.6%; odds ratio: 3.74 with 95% confidence interval of 2.13-6.55, p<0.001) were significantly higher in the former group. The association between overall complications and prior stenting was independent (odd ratio: 3.06). No significant connections were found between postoperative complications and stent number or type. Conclusion: A positive history of previous coronary stenting significantly increases the risk of immediate post-CABG complications. PMID:25610554

  1. Carotid artery-sygmoid sinus fistula: a rare complication of gunshot wound on the base of the cranium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Vieira Botelho; Paulo Cesar Romero; Rita Valeria Machado Coelho; Emilio Afonso França Fontoura

    1999-01-01

    Vascular lesions without clinical manifestation may occur in cranial-facial wounds produced by bullets that course the base\\u000a of the cranium. This work describes a rare kind of vascular complication in cranial-facial gunshot wound. The authors present\\u000a the case of a patient, the victim of a cranium-maxillary gunshot wound. Carotid angiography revealed a carotid-sygmoid sinus\\u000a fistula that filled the sygmoid and

  2. Imaging in bariatric surgery: service set-up, post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S; Shah, V; Ahmed, A R; Blunt, D M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent and costly problem faced by the healthcare system. The role of bariatric surgery in managing obesity has also increased with evidence showing a reduction in long-term morbidity and mortality. There are unique challenges faced by the radiology department in providing an imaging service for this population of patients, from technical and staffing requirements through to the interpretation of challenging post-surgical images. We describe these challenges and provide an overview of the most frequently performed procedures, normal post-operative imaging findings and the appearance of common complications. PMID:21045066

  3. Comparison of Prospective Risk Estimates for Postoperative Complications: Human vs Computer Model

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Robert E; Hawn, Mary T; Hosokawa, Patrick W; Henderson, William G; Min, Sung-Joon; Richman, Joshua S; Tomeh, Majed G; Campbell, Darrell; Neumayer, Leigh A

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical quality improvement tools such as NSQIP, are limited in their ability to prospectively impact individual patient care by the retrospective audit and feedback nature of their design. We hypothesized that statistical models using patient preoperative characteristics could prospectively provide risk estimates of postoperative adverse events comparable to risk estimates provided by experienced surgeons, and could be useful for stratifying preoperative assessment of patient risk. Study Design Prospective observational cohort. Using previously developed models for 30- day postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, cardiac, thromboembolic, pulmonary, renal, and SSI complications, model and surgeon estimates of risk were compared to each other and to actual 30-day outcomes. Results The study cohort included 1791 general surgery patients operated between June, 2010 and January, 2012. Observed outcomes were: mortality(0.2%), overall morbidity(8.2%) {pulmonary(1.3%), cardiac(0.3%), thromboembolism(0.2%), renal(0.4%), SSI(3.8%)}. Model and surgeon risk estimates showed significant correlation (p<0.0001) for each outcome category. When surgeons perceived patient risk for overall morbidity to be low, the model predicted risk and observed morbidity rates were 2.8% and 4.1%, respectively, compared to 10% and 18% in perceived high risk patients. Patients in the highest quartile of model predicted risk accounted for 75% of observed mortality and 52% of morbidity. Conclusions Across a broad range of general surgical operations, we confirmed that the model risk estimates are in fairly good agreement with risk estimates of experienced surgeons. Using these models prospectively can identify patients at high risk for morbidity and mortality who could then be targeted for intervention to reduce postoperative complications. PMID:24440066

  4. Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ?20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

  5. The Role of MicroRNAs in Diabetic Complications—Special Emphasis on Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Moura, João; Børsheim, Elisabet; Carvalho, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major problems in today’s society, driving the prevalence of diabetes and its related complications. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the chronic complications in diabetes in order to develop better therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Some of the most important complications include macrovascular abnormalities, e.g., heart disease and atherosclerosis, and microvascular abnormalities, e.g., retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, in particular diabetic foot ulceration. The highly conserved endogenous small non-coding RNA molecules, the micro RNAs (miRNAs) have in recent years been found to be involved in a number of biological processes, including the pathogenesis of disease. Their main function is to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), leading to mRNA degradation, suppression of translation or even gene activation. These molecules are promising therapeutic targets and demonstrate great potential as diagnostic biomarkers for disease. This review aims to describe the most recent findings regarding the important roles of miRNAs in diabetes and its complications, with special attention given to the different phases of diabetic wound healing. PMID:25268390

  6. Wound complication of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in distal tibia fractures

    PubMed Central

    Leung, F.; Chan, C. F.; Chow, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) in the management of fracture of the distal tibia is common. The various advantages of the MIPO technique, namely, preserving blood supply and better bone healing, have been described extensively in the literature. However, this technique is not without complication. Among all the complications, infection is one of the commonest. In the last 3 years, we have performed 48 cases of MIPO in treating distal tibia fractures. Our study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of these cases, with special attention to the infection rate and our experience in managing these infection cases. Our results showed that the average time until the patient started to bear full weight was 9.4 weeks. The average time for bony union was 18.7 weeks. There were 7 cases of late infection among these 48 cases. The rate was 15%. The presence of late infection had no obvious effect on the time to bony union. Twenty-five patients (52%) had the implants removed and the most common reason was skin impingement by the implant. The clinical presentation and management of these late infections are discussed. In conclusion, MIPO fixation of distal tibia fractures using a metaphyseal locking plate is safe and efficient. However, complications such as late wound infection and impingement are relatively common. The overall clinical outcome is still good despite the presence of these complications. PMID:17572892

  7. EVALUATION OF EMPHYSEMA USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: ASSOCIATION WITH POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN LUNG CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    KAWAKAMI, KENICHI; IWANO, SHINGO; HASHIMOTO, NAOZUMI; HASEGAWA, YOSHINORI; NAGANAWA, SHINJI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) enables in vivo volumetry of total lung volume (TLV) and emphysematous low-attenuation volume (LAV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between preoperative 3D-CT volumetry and postoperative complications in lung cancer patients. We searched our institution’s surgical records from December 2006 to December 2009 and selected patients who had undergone pulmonary lobectomy for primary lung cancer. From 3D-CT data, TLV and LAV <–950 HU of thresholds were retrospectively measured. The LAV% was calculated as follows: LAV% = LAV/TLV*100. The associations between the seven independent variables (LAV%, age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as percent forced vital capacity [FEV1%], and resected lobe) and the two outcomes (postoperative complications and prolonged postoperative stay [PPS]) were compared using logistic regression analysis. A total of 309 patients (222 males, 87 females; mean age, 67 years; range, 40–87 years) were evaluated. On multivariate analysis, age and LAV% were significantly correlated with postoperative complications (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively), and LAV% was significantly correlated with PPS (p = 0.031). LAV% measured using 3D-CT is more sensitive for predicting complications after lobectomy for lung cancer than FEV1%. PMID:25797976

  8. Evaluation of emphysema using three-dimensional computed tomography: association with postoperative complications in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kenichi; Iwano, Shingo; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) enables in vivo volumetry of total lung volume (TLV) and emphysematous low-attenuation volume (LAV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between preoperative 3D-CT volumetry and postoperative complications in lung cancer patients. We searched our institution's surgical records from December 2006 to December 2009 and selected patients who had undergone pulmonary lobectomy for primary lung cancer. From 3D-CT data, TLV and LAV <-950 HU of thresholds were retrospectively measured. The LAV% was calculated as follows: LAV% = LAV/TLV*100. The associations between the seven independent variables (LAV%, age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as percent forced vital capacity [FEV1%], and resected lobe) and the two outcomes (postoperative complications and prolonged postoperative stay [PPS]) were compared using logistic regression analysis. A total of 309 patients (222 males, 87 females; mean age, 67 years; range, 40-87 years) were evaluated. On multivariate analysis, age and LAV% were significantly correlated with postoperative complications (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively), and LAV% was significantly correlated with PPS (p = 0.031). LAV% measured using 3D-CT is more sensitive for predicting complications after lobectomy for lung cancer than FEV1%. PMID:25797976

  9. Effects of Surgical Wound Infiltration with Bupivacaine on Postoperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Bilateral Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    YILMAZ, Özge Turna; TOYDEMIR, T. Seval Fatma; KIR?AN, ?smail; DOKUZEYLUL, Banu; GUNAY, Zeynep; KARACAM, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners’ anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a “numerical rating scale” for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  10. [Endoscopic collection of v. saphena magna--early complication rates].

    PubMed

    Kurfirst, V; Dusil, I; Rezler, M; Mokrácek, A

    2009-11-01

    Endoscopic harvesting of v. saphena magna for CABG procedures represents a modern method, which in comparison to conventional methods reduces postoperative wound complications. We have analyzed 40 patients, who uderwent CABG procedure with endoscopic harvested venous graft. PMID:20662442

  11. The arterial supply of the cervical and thoracic spinal muscles and overlying skin: Anatomical study with implications for surgical wound complications.

    PubMed

    Yue, Brian Yin Ting; le Roux, Cara Michelle; Corlett, Russell; De La Harpe, David; Richardson, Martin; Ashton, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Postoperative spinal wound dehiscence is a significant complication following the posterior midline approach. It is postulated that this approach disrupts the vasculature supplying the paraspinal muscles and overlying skin. Although the spinal vasculature has been investigated previously, the smaller arterioles have not been described in the context of the posterior midline approach. Eight cadaveric neck and posterior torso specimens were dissected after injection with a radio-opaque lead oxide mixture and subsequent radiographs taken were analyzed. The deep cervical, vertebral, superficial cervical, and occipital arteries consistently supplied the cervical paraspinal muscles. The latter two arteries also vascularized the overlying skin. The deep cervical arteries were found to be located lateral to the C3 to C6 vertebrae, vulnerable to damage with the posterior approach. In the thoracic region, the superior and posterior intercostal arteries consistently supplied the spinal muscles. In all specimens, two small anastomotic vessels posterior to the laminae were found connecting the intercostal artery perforators. Both the arterial perforators and their anastomotic channels were situated in the surgical field and susceptible to damage with the posterior approach. It is likely that the disruption in spinal vasculature contributes to the multifactorial problem of wound dehiscence with the posterior midline approach. PMID:22887027

  12. Routine Doppler ultrasound for the detection of clinically unsuspected vascular complications in the early postoperative phase after orthotopic liver transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kok; M. J. H. Slooff; C. J. P. Thijn; P. M. J. G. Peeters; R. Verwer; C. M. A. Bijleveld; A. P. van den Berg; E. B. Haagsma; I. J. Klompmaker

    1998-01-01

    To assess the role of routine Doppler ultrasound in the detection of clinically unsuspected vascular complications in the\\u000a early postoperative phase after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), the findings of 858 routinely performed Doppler ultrasound\\u000a examinations were analyzed in 268 transplants. At various time intervals after OLT, we encountered 46 abnormal Doppler findings:\\u000a hepatic artery (thrombosis), portal vein [anastomotic stenosis, (non)occlusive

  13. Post-operative complications after removal of sporadic vestibular schwannoma via retrosigmoid-suboccipital approach: current diagnosis and management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stylianos Charalampakis; Dimitrios Koutsimpelas; Haralampos Gouveris; Wolf Mann

    2011-01-01

    The retrosigmoid (suboccipital) approach is one of four surgical approaches for the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (acoustic\\u000a neuromas). It is increasingly used by otologic surgeons, and in experienced hands is associated with improved results and\\u000a more limited complications. Mortality rates are minimal and often zero, while postoperative sequelae, on the other hand, are\\u000a not rare. In order to not only

  14. Intermediate acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during general anesthesia increases the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Prospective, propensity score matched cohort study. Setting General teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 2006-10. Participants 18?579 surgical patients who received intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during surgery were matched by propensity score to 18?579 reference patients who did not receive such agents. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were oxygen desaturation after extubation (hemoglobin oxygen saturation <90% with a decrease in oxygen saturation after extubation of >3%) and reintubations requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit within seven days of surgery. We also evaluated effects on these outcome variables of qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission (train-of-four ratio) and reversal of neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade. Results The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents was associated with an increased risk of postoperative desaturation less than 90% after extubation (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.51) and reintubation requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit (1.40, 1.09 to 1.80). Qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission did not decrease this risk and neostigmine reversal increased the risk of postoperative desaturation to values less than 90% (1.32, 1.20 to 1.46) and reintubation (1.76, 1.38 to 2.26). Conclusion The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during anesthesia was associated with an increased risk of clinically meaningful respiratory complications. Our data suggest that the strategies used in our trial to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade should be revisited. PMID:23077290

  15. Evaluation of the role of antibiotics in preventing postoperative complication after routine periodontal surgery: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rosh Radhika; Doraswamy, Dwarakanath Chinni; Hussain, Ahad M.; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Jayaprakash, Deepika

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Aim of this randomly controlled clinical study was to evaluate the role of antibiotics to prevent postoperative complications after routine periodontal surgery and also to determine whether their administration improved the surgical outcome. Materials and Methods: Forty-five systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis requiring flap surgery were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, and control groups. Surgical procedures were carried out with complete asepsis as per the protocol. Postoperative assessment of patient variables like swelling, pain, temperature, infection, ulceration, necrosis, and trismus was performed at intervals of 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 3 months. Changes in clinical parameters such as gingival index, plaque index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were also recorded. Results: There was no incidence of postoperative infection in any of the patients. Patient variables were comparable in all the three groups. Though there was significant improvement in the periodontal parameters in all the groups, no statistically significant result was observed for any group over the others. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that when periodontal surgical procedures were performed following strict asepsis, the incidence of clinical infection was not significant among all the three groups, and also that antibiotic administration did not influence the outcome of surgery. Therefore, prophylactic antibiotics for patients who are otherwise healthy administered following routine periodontal surgery to prevent postoperative infection are unnecessary and have no demonstrable additional benefits. PMID:24872630

  16. Minimally Invasive Component Separation Results in Fewer Wound-Healing Complications than Open Component Separation for Large Ventral Hernia Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Shadi; Turza, Kristin C; Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Minimally invasive component separation (CS) with inlay bioprosthetic mesh (MICSIB) is a recently developed technique for abdominal wall reconstruction that preserves the rectus abdominis perforators and minimizes subcutaneous dead space using limited-access tunneled incisions. We hypothesized that MICSIB would result in better surgical outcomes than would conventional open CS. STUDY DESIGN All consecutive patients who underwent CS (open or minimally invasive) with inlay bioprosthetic mesh for ventral hernia repair from 2005 to 2010 were included in a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Surgical outcomes including wound-healing complications, hernia recurrences, and abdominal bulge/laxity rates were compared between patient groups based on the type of CS repair: MICSIB or open. RESULTS Fifty-seven patients who underwent MICSIB and 50 who underwent open CS were included. The mean follow-ups were 15.2±7.7 months and 20.7±14.3 months, respectively. The mean fascial defect size was significantly larger in the MICSIB group (405.4±193.6 cm2 vs. 273.8±186.8 cm2; p =0.002). The incidences of skin dehiscence (11% vs. 28%; p=0.011), all wound-healing complications (14% vs. 32%; p=0.026), abdominal wall laxity/bulge (4% vs. 14%; p=0.056), and hernia recurrence (4% vs. 8%; p=0.3) were lower in the MICSIB group than in the open CS group. CONCLUSIONS MICSIB resulted in fewer wound-healing complications than did open CS used for complex abdominal wall reconstructions. These findings are likely attributable to the preservation of paramedian skin vascularity and reduction in subcutaneous dead space with MICSIB. MICSIB should be considered for complex abdominal wall reconstructions, particularly in patients at increased risk of wound-healing complications. PMID:22521439

  17. Free tissue coverage of wound complications following Achilles tendon rupture surgery.

    PubMed

    Leppilahti, J; Kaarela, O; Teerikangas, H; Raatikainen, T; Orava, S; Waris, T

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the long term functional results following free tissue coverage in 4 patients who developed wound complications after surgical treatment of partial or total Achilles tendon rupture. Between 1987 and 1993, 3 radial forearm flaps and 1 lateral arm flap were used. Two Achilles tendons were reinforced, 1 with palmaris longus tendon, and 1 with extensor carpi radialis and palmaris longus tendons. The patients were seen during followup an average of 3.1 years after the reconstruction. All patients were able to return to their preoperative level of activity within a year, and the aesthetic outcome was good in all cases. Isometric and isokinetic calf muscle performance was evaluated with a Lido Multi Joint II dynamometer, which showed the mean of isometric test values in 3 patients to be greater than 90% of that of the normal unaffected side, and probably abnormal (80%) in 1 patient. The mean isometric values obtained in 3 ankle positions, 20 degrees plantar flexion, neutral, and 10 degrees dorsiflexion, were 114%, 104%, and 94%, respectively. Isokinetic peak torque values were normal in 3 patients at a velocity of 30 degrees per second, and in 2 at 90 degrees per second. The mean peak torque value was 90% of normal at both angle velocities. The cross sectional area of the calf muscle was greater than 90% of the normal unaffected side. Ultrasonography indicated that the diameters of 2 reinforced tendons were larger than those on the control sides. Posterior peritendinous fibrosis was found in the upper corner of the scar in 2 patients. PMID:8653952

  18. Morphine Spinal Block Anesthesia in Patients Who Undergo an Open Hemorrhoidectomy: A Prospective Analysis of Pain Control and Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, José PT; Isaac, Raniere R; Alves-Neto, Onofre; Moreira, Thiago AC; Vieira, Tiago HM; Brasil, Andressa MS

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the use of adding morphine to bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia for pain control in patients who underwent an open hemorrhoidectomy. Methods Forty patients were prospectively selected for an open hemorrhoidectomy at the same institution and were randomized into two groups of 20 patients each: group 1 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with 80 µg of morphine (0.2 mg/mL). Group 2 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with distilled water, achieving the same volume of spinal infusion as that of group 1. Both groups were prescribed the same pain control medicine during the postoperative period. Pain scores were evaluated at the anesthetic recovery room and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Postoperative complications, including pruritus, nausea, headaches, and urinary retention, were also recorded. Results There were no anthropometric statistical differences between the two groups. Pain in the anesthetic recovery room and 3 hours after surgery was similar for both groups. However, pain was better controlled in group 1 at 6 and 12 hours after surgery. Although pain was better controlled for group 1 after 24 hours of surgery, the difference between the groups didn't achieved statistical significance. Complications were more common in group 1. Six patients (6/20) presented coetaneous pruritus and 3 with (3/20) urinary retention. Conclusion A hemorrhoidectomy under a spinal with morphine provides better pain control between 6 and 12 hours after surgery. However, postoperative complications, including cutaneous pruritus (30%) and urinary retention (15%), should be considered as a negative side of this procedure. PMID:24999465

  19. Management for Postoperative Complications of Breast Augmentation by Injected Polyacrylamide Hydrogel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qun Qiao; Xiancheng Wang; Jiaming Sun; Ru Zhao; Zhifei Liu; Yang Wang; Baodong Sun; Yinjun Yan; Keming Qi

    2005-01-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogel, a new biomaterial, has been used for injected breast augmentation in China since 1997. A series of 30 patients with various complications after injected polyacrylamide hydrogel visited the author’s department. Most of these patients had undergone injection of both breasts. The average age of the patients was 27.6 years, and the time of consultation for the complications was

  20. Postoperative complications do not influence the pattern of early lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer in patients at risk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pattern and factors influencing the lung function recovery in the first postoperative days are still not fully elucidated, especially in patients at increased risk. Methods Prospective study on 60 patients at increased risk, who underwent a lung resection for primary lung cancer. Inclusion criteria: complete resection and one or more known risk factors in form of COPD, cardiovascular disorders, advanced age or other comorbidities. Previous myocardial infarction, myocardial revascularization or stenting, cardiac rhythm disorders, arterial hypertension and myocardiopathy determined the increased cardiac risk. The severity of COPD was graded according to GOLD criteria. The trend of the postoperative lung function recovery was assessed by performing spirometry with a portable spirometer. Results Cardiac comorbidity existed in 55%, mild and moderate COPD in 20% and 35% of patients respectively. Measured values of FVC% and FEV1% on postoperative days one, three and seven, showed continuous improvement, with significant difference between the days of measurement, especially between days three and seven. There was no difference in the trend of the lung function recovery between patients with and without postoperative complications. Whilst pO2 was decreasing during the first three days in a roughly parallel fashion in patients with respiratory, surgical complications and in patients without complications, a slight hypercapnia registered on the first postoperative day was gradually abolished in all groups except in patients with cardiac complications. Conclusion Extent of the lung resection and postoperative complications do not significantly influence the trend of the lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer. PMID:24884793

  1. Health-related quality of life after cardiac surgery – the effects of age, preoperative conditions and postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Factors influencing the postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after cardiac surgery have not been well described yet, mainly in the older people. The study’s aim was to explore differences in clinical conditions and HRQOL of patients before and after cardiac surgery taking into account the influence of age and to describe factors influencing changes of HRQOL in the postoperative period. Methods This was a prospective consecutive observational study with two measurements using the SF-36 questionnaire before surgery and 1 year after surgery. It considered main clinical characteristics of participants prior to surgery as well as postoperative complications. Results At baseline assessment the study considered 310 patients, predominantly male (69%). Mean age was 65 (SD 10.4) years and 101 patients (33%), who were older than 70, constituted the older group. This older group showed greater comorbidity, higher cardiac operative risk and lower HRQOL in the preoperative period as well as a higher prevalence of postoperative complications than the younger group. Thirty-day mortality was 1.4% in the younger group and 6.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). One year mortality was 3.3% in the younger group and 10.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). There was a significant improvement in all 8 health domains of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.001) in the overall sample. There was no significant difference in change in a majority of HRQOL domains between the younger and the older group (p > 0.05). Logistic multivariate analysis identified a higher values of preoperative PCS (Physical component summary) scores (OR 1.03, CI 1.00 – 1.05, p = 0.0187) and MCS (Mental component summary) scores (OR 1.02, CI 0.997 – 1.00, p = 0.0846) as the only risk factors for potential non-improvement of HRQOL after cardiac surgery after correction for age, gender and type of surgery. Conclusions Older patients with higher operative risk have lower preoperative HRQOL but show a similar improvement in a majority of HRQOL domains after cardiac surgery as compared with younger patients. The multivariate analysis has shown the higher preoperative HRQOL status as a only significant factor of potential non-improvement of postoperative HRQOL. PMID:24618329

  2. [Application of a hemostatic glue for the prevention of intra- and postoperative complications of septoplasty].

    PubMed

    Berezova, D K; Popadiuk, V I; Aksenov, V M; Sidorova, T P; Tsnobiladze, G Z

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the application of a hemostatic glue between the mucoperichondrial layers for the prevention of development of nasal septum hematoma and other possible complications of septoplasty. Analysis of the efficiency of the treatment of 30 patients by septoplasty with intraoperative application of the hemostatic glue has demonstrated the possibility of its use during surgery on the nasal septum. PMID:21311462

  3. Vacuum-assisted closure for open perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In colorectal cancer surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication, and especially, perineal wound complications after abdominoperineal resection (APR) remain to be serious clinical problems. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was first reported in another surgical field in 1997, and it is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. VAC therapy has been recently used for open abdominal wounds. We introduced VAC for treating open perineal wound of APR and report the usefulness of it. Presentation of case We treated four patients. Firstly, in cases 1 and 2, we introduced VAC therapy to the management of SSI of the perineal wound after APR, and it was useful to control postoperative perineal wound infection. And also, in cases 3 and 4, we introduced VAC therapy to prevent perineal wound infection. Perineal wound infection did not happen. Discussion A vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been reported to decrease perineal wound complications including pelvic abscess and open perineal wound; however it results in significant operative blood loss, increased operative time, and additional surgical complications. In our cases, there were no complications relating to VAC therapy and it promoted rapid wound healing. Our results suggested that it is an effective treatment for APR in a high-risk case of an open perineal wound. Conclusion VAC therapy is a less invasive method and a useful treatment for open perineal wound of APR. PMID:25942750

  4. Treatment and prevention of postoperative complications in hip fracture patients: infections and delirium.

    PubMed

    Dovjak, Peter; Iglseder, Bernhard; Mikosch, Peter; Gosch, Markus; Müller, Ernst; Pinter, Georg; Pils, Katharina; Gerstofer, Inge; Thaler, Heinrich; Zmaritz, Michaela; Weissenberger-Leduc, Monique; Müller, Walter

    2013-10-01

    The course of older patients with hip fractures is often complicated by infections and delirium. Accurate care and high suspicion for these complications are essential, since these conditions are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay and nursing home placement, poorer mobility, and functional decline. Because of immunosenescence and higher infection rates, older patients need specific care, immediate diagnosis, and treatment of infections. Numerous guidelines of various medical societies outline the management of nosocomial infections, but there is a need of an individualized treatment plan because of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Hygiene measures have first priority to reduce the rate of infections. Treatment of geriatric syndromes like malnutrition, exsiccosis, gait disorders, falls, delirium, urine incontinence, and organ insufficiency are as important as immunization against pneumococci and influenza. Advanced age, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, peripheral vascular disease, prior delirium episodes, sight disorders, and polypharmacy are established risk factors for delirium; thus, older people with several chronic diseases are prone to delirium. A multifactorial approach, comprising standardized screening, oxygen support, intravenous fluid administration and augmented nutrition, monitoring of vital signs, pain treatment, optimized medication, and modification in perioperative management, significantly reduces delirium incidence during hospitalization for hip fracture. An interdisciplinary approach between surgeons and geriatricians may warrant optimized satisfaction of patients' needs. PMID:23949565

  5. Unanticipated complication of a malpositioned central venous catheter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pankaj Kundra; Bathala V. Sai Chandran; Kasturi S. V. K. Subbarao

    2009-01-01

    We report an unusual complication that occurred late in the postoperative period, due to a damaged and malpositioned peripherally\\u000a inserted central catheter (PICC) used for central venous pressure monitoring during esophagocoloplasty and for postoperative\\u000a parenteral nutrition. On the seventh postoperative day, the development of a leak from the neck wound coincided with the administration\\u000a of intravenous fluids via the PICC.

  6. Incidence and risk factors for post-operative complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy : a comparison with other neuromuscular conditions.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, A D; Mitchell, M J; Tsirikos, A I

    2014-07-01

    We report the incidence of and risk factors for complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and compare them with those of other neuromuscular conditions. We identified 110 (64 males, 46 females) consecutive patients with a neuromuscular disorder who underwent correction of the scoliosis at a mean age of 14 years (7 to 19) and had a minimum two-year follow-up. We recorded demographic and peri-operative data, including complications and re-operations. There were 60 patients with cerebral palsy (54.5%) and 26 with DMD (23.6%). The overall complication rate was 22% (24 patients), the most common of which were deep wound infection (9, 8.1%), gastrointestinal complications (5, 4.5%) and hepatotoxicity (4, 3.6%). The complication rate was higher in patients with DMD (10/26, 38.5%) than in those with other neuromuscular conditions (14/84, 16.7% (p = 0.019). All hepatotoxicity occurred in patients with DMD (p = 0.003), who also had an increased rate of deep wound infection (19% vs 5%) (p = 0.033). In the DMD group, no peri-operative factors were significantly associated with the rate of overall complications or deep wound infection. Increased intra-operative blood loss was associated with hepatotoxicity (p = 0.036). In our series, correction of a neuromuscular scoliosis had an acceptable rate of complications: patients with DMD had an increased overall rate compared with those with other neuromuscular conditions. These included deep wound infection and hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was unique to DMD patients, and we recommend peri-operative vigilance after correction of a scoliosis in this group. PMID:24986949

  7. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki, E-mail: isohashi@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mabuchi, Seiji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Maruoka, Shintaroh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Tadashi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

  8. Medical-technical fundamentals for ozone\\/NO-ultrasonic method in postoperative complication treatment of larynx cancer carriers and their rehabilitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Naboka; V. V. Pedder; V. N. Mironenko; V. K. Kosenok; S. P. Popov; E. V. Khrustaleva; O. N. Osinkina; S. V. Dmitrienko; I. V. Surgutskova

    2009-01-01

    The summary form only given. Designing and introduction in clinical practice the new high effective method in postoperative complication treatment of larynx cancer carriers is validated. Method uses the ultrasonic and ozone\\/NO generating devices which is resolved for clinical application and provides the possibility for treatment of cancer carriers by the way of complex application of low frequency ultrasound and

  9. Maternal consequences of caesarean section. A retrospective study of intra-operative and postoperative maternal complications of caesarean section during a 10-year period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maaike A. P. C. van Ham; Pieter W. J. van Dongen; Jan Mulder

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to assess the intra-operative surgical complications and postoperative maternal morbidity rate of caesarean section. Study design: A total of 2647 women, delivered by caesarean section in our department between 1983 and 1992, were studied retrospectively. Three caesarean section groups were formed: (1) primary elective, (2) primary acute, without any effort to deliver vaginally, and (3)

  10. Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity. While once thought to function primarily as a pro-

    E-print Network

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    Abstract Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized, including fibronectin. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound of diabetic mouse wounds at higher levels. Subsequently, we observed that GzmB induced detachment of mouse

  11. Postoperative infections after oesophageal resections: the role of blood transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Rovera, Francesca; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Imperatori, Andrea; Tabacchi, Alessandra; Carcano, Giulio; Diurni, Mario; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Background Perioperative blood transfusion carries numerous potential risks concerning the transmission of infective diseases and immunodepression that can facilitate the occurrence of postoperative infectious complications. Explanation of connections between perioperative blood transfusion and postoperative septic complication worldwide is not well documented. Many studies have described a correlation between perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative infections. On the contrary, other studies indicate that factors influencing the need for blood transfusions during surgery have a greater bearing than blood transfusion per se on the occurrence of postoperative complications. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted in our Department on 110 consecutive patients undergoing oesophageal resection for primary cancer, in order to evaluate the incidence of postoperative infections related to perioperative allogenic blood transfusions. For each patient we preoperatively recorded in a computerized data-base several known risk-factors for postoperative infections; in detail we registered the administration of allogenic perioperative blood transfusions (period of administration, number of packages administered). Results Among the enrolled 110 patients, 53 (48%) received perioperative blood transfusions: in this group postoperative infections (overall infective complications) occurred in 27 patients. After a multivariate analysis we observed that perioperative blood transfusions significantly affected as an independent variable the development of wound infections (p = 0.02). Conclusion Blood transfusions independently affected the incidence of wound infections in patients who underwent oesophageal resection for primary cancer. PMID:17118175

  12. Preoperative inspiratory muscle training to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal resection is associated with a high incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Respiratory complications account for almost half of the readmissions to the critical care unit. Postoperative complications can result in prolonged hospital stay and consequently increase healthcare costs. In cardiac surgery a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program has shown to prevent postoperative pneumonia and reduce length of hospital stay. While in some surgical centers inspiratory muscle training is already used in the preoperative phase in patients undergoing esophageal resection, the added value of this intervention on the reduction of pulmonary complications has not yet been investigated in large surgical populations other than cardiac surgery in a randomized and controlled study design. Methods/Design The effect of a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program on the incidence of postoperative pneumonia in patients undergoing esophageal resection will be studied in a single blind multicenter randomized controlled trial (the PREPARE study). In total 248 patients (age >18 years) undergoing esophageal resection for esophageal cancer will be included in this study. They are randomized to either usual care or usual care with an additional inspiratory muscle training intervention according to a high-intensity protocol which is performed with a tapered flow resistive inspiratory loading device. Patients have to complete 30 dynamic inspiratory efforts twice daily for 7 days a week until surgery with a minimum of 2 weeks. The starting training load will be aimed to be 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure and will be increased based on the rate of perceived exertion. The main study endpoint is the incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Secondary objectives are to evaluate the effect of preoperative inspiratory muscle training on length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, incidence of other postoperative (pulmonary) complications, quality of life, and on postoperative respiratory muscle function and lung function. Discussion The PREPARE study is the first multicenter randomized controlled trial to evaluate the hypothesis that preoperative inspiratory muscle training leads to decreased pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection. Trial registration NCT01893008. PMID:24767575

  13. A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

  14. POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Vannucci, Andrea; Avidan, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is an unfortunately common complication seen during the postoperative course. Because of its significant association with physical and cognitive morbidity, clinicians should be aware of evidence-based practices relating to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of postoperative delirium. Here, we review selected recent literature pertaining to the epidemiology and impact of the condition, perioperative risk factors for its development and/or exacerbation, and strategies for management of delirium, with additional attention to the intensive care unit population. PMID:21483389

  15. Multivariate analysis of risk factors for postoperative complications in benign goiter surgery: prospective multicenter study in Germany.

    PubMed

    Thomusch, O; Machens, A; Sekulla, C; Ukkat, J; Lippert, H; Gastinger, I; Dralle, H

    2000-11-01

    Risk factors for postoperative complications of benign goiter surgery have not been investigated systematically. To this end, a prospective multicenter study (January 1 through December 31, 1998) was conducted involving 7266 patients with surgery for benign goiter from 45 East German hospitals. High-volume providers (>150 operations per year) performed 69% (5042/7266), intermediate-volume providers 27% (50-150), and low-volume providers 4% (258/7266) of operations. Among the hospital groups, the pattern of thyroid disease did not vary significantly, but there was a trend that small-volume providers tended to perform more operations for uninodular goiter and high-volume providers treated more patients with Graves' disease and recurrent goiter. Extent of resection (p < 0.0001) and remnant size (multinodular goiter and recurrent goiter, p < 0.001), differed significantly, with total thyroidectomy being performed more often in hospitals with more than 150 operations compared to hospitals with an operative volume of less than 150 procedures per year. Despite the larger extent of resection and smaller remnant size, rates of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy or hypoparathyroidism were not increased. When the logistic regression analyses were fitted to evaluate the impact of risk factors on transient and permanent RLN palsy and hypoparathyroidism, larger extent of resection [relative risk (RR) 1.5-2.1] and recurrent goiter (RR 1.8-3.4) consistently evolved as independent risk factors. With hypoparathyroidism, additional significant factors included patient gender (RR 2.1-2.4), hospital operative volume (RR 0.8-1.5), and Graves' disease (RR 2.8). Unlike parathyroid gland identification during hypoparathyroidism, RLN identification (RR 1.6) significantly (p = 0.01) reduced permanent RLN palsy rates. The multivariate analyses clearly confirmed the pivotal role of routine RLN identification, independent of the extent of the thyroid resection. These findings might help hospitals with lower operative volumes to identify patients at increased risk whom they might consider for specialist care. PMID:11038203

  16. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below.

  17. Genetic variation in the TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase signaling pathway as markers for postoperative pulmonary complications in lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Roth, Jack A.; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Correa, Arlene M.; Kim, Jae Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications are the most common morbidity associated with lung resection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase pathway is activated by stress stimuli and inflammatory signals. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms within this pathway may contribute to risk of complications. In this case-only study, we genotyped 173 germline genetic variants in a discovery population of 264 NSCLC patients who underwent a lobectomy followed by genotyping of the top variants in a replication population of 264 patients. Complications data was obtained from a prospective database at MD Anderson. MAP2K4:rs12452497 was significantly associated with a decreased risk in both phases, resulting in a 40% reduction in the pooled population (95% CI:0.43–0.83, P?=?0.0018). In total, seven variants were significant for risk in the pooled analysis. Gene-based analysis supported the involvement of TRAF2, MAP2K4, and MAP3K5 as mediating complications risk and a highly significant trend was identified between the number of risk genotypes and complications risk (P?=?1.63?×?10?8). An inverse relationship was observed between association with clinical outcomes and complications for two variants. These results implicate the TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase pathway in modulating risk of pulmonary complications following lobectomy and may be useful biomarkers to identify patients at high risk. PMID:26165383

  18. Genetic variation in the TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase signaling pathway as markers for postoperative pulmonary complications in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Roth, Jack A; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Correa, Arlene M; Kim, Jae Y; Swisher, Stephen G; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications are the most common morbidity associated with lung resection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase pathway is activated by stress stimuli and inflammatory signals. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms within this pathway may contribute to risk of complications. In this case-only study, we genotyped 173 germline genetic variants in a discovery population of 264 NSCLC patients who underwent a lobectomy followed by genotyping of the top variants in a replication population of 264 patients. Complications data was obtained from a prospective database at MD Anderson. MAP2K4:rs12452497 was significantly associated with a decreased risk in both phases, resulting in a 40% reduction in the pooled population (95% CI:0.43-0.83, P?=?0.0018). In total, seven variants were significant for risk in the pooled analysis. Gene-based analysis supported the involvement of TRAF2, MAP2K4, and MAP3K5 as mediating complications risk and a highly significant trend was identified between the number of risk genotypes and complications risk (P?=?1.63?×?10(-8)). An inverse relationship was observed between association with clinical outcomes and complications for two variants. These results implicate the TNF/TRAF2/ASK1/p38 kinase pathway in modulating risk of pulmonary complications following lobectomy and may be useful biomarkers to identify patients at high risk. PMID:26165383

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL KIRBY

    2010-01-01

    D iabetic foot disease is a major global burden. Foot ulcers frequently develop complications and become chronic, representing a considerable challenge as these are typically very difficult to treat. New therapies are needed to address these wounds and there is an increasing focus on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). This technique has been shown to accelerate wound healing and although

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Kirby

    2007-01-01

    iabetic foot disease is a major global burden. Foot ulcers frequently develop complications and become chronic, representing a considerable challenge as these are typically very difficult to treat. New therapies are needed to address these wounds and there is an increasing focus on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). This technique has been shown to accelerate wound healing and although its

  1. 2-Octyl-cyanoacrylate for wound closure in cervical and lumbar spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brückel, Anja; Stein, Marco; Oertel, Matthias F.; Christophis, Petros; Böker, Dieter-Karsten

    2010-01-01

    It is claimed that wound closure with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate has the advantages that band-aids are not needed in the postoperative period, that the wound can get in contact with water and that removal of stitches is not required. This would substantially enhance patient comfort, especially in times of reduced in-hospital stays. Postoperative wound infection is a well-known complication in spinal surgery. The reported infection rates range between 0% and 12.7%. The question arises if the advantages of wound closure with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in spinal surgery are not surpassed by an increase in infection rate. This study has been conducted to identify the infection rate of spinal surgery if wound closure was done with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. A total of 235 patients with one- or two-level surgery at the cervical or lumbar spine were included in this prospective study. Their pre- and postoperative course was evaluated. Analysis included age, sex, body mass index, duration and level of operation, blood examinations, 6-week follow-up and analysis of preoperative risk factors. The data were compared to infection rates of similar surgeries found in a literature research and to a historical group of 503 patients who underwent wound closure with standard skin sutures after spine surgery. With the use of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate, only one patient suffered from postoperative wound infection which accounts for a total infection rate of 0.43%. In the literature addressing infection rate after spine surgery, an average rate of 3.2% is reported. Infection rate was 2.2% in the historical control group. No risk factor could be identified which limited the usage of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. 2-Octyl-cyanoacrylate provides sufficient wound closure in spinal surgery and is associated with a low risk of postoperative wound infection. PMID:20440558

  2. Colorectal liver metastasis surgery: analysis of risk factors predicting postoperative complications in relation to the extent of resection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf Konopke; Stephan Kersting; Alfred Bunk; Janine Dietrich; Axel Denz; Jörg Gastmeier; Hans-Detlev Saeger

    2009-01-01

    Background\\/aims  Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, the rate of complications after resection for colorectal liver metastases remains\\u000a high. An awareness of risk factors is essential for the rates of morbidity and mortality to fall to optimal levels.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Of the 240 patients who underwent resection for the first manifestation of colorectal liver metastases, 49 patients with lobectomy\\u000a or extended

  3. Incisional negative pressure wound therapy for high-risk wounds.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E

    2015-04-01

    With an ageing population and a growing number of people with obesity and/or undergoing advanced cancer therapies, there is an increasing risk of surgical site complications including surgical site infections (SSIs). Postoperative shifting of large mobilised tissue flaps, such as in abdominoplasties, remains a dreaded complication, particularly following massive weight loss. Besides negative implications for the patient, surgical site complications result in an economic burden due to prolonged and repeated wound treatments. Preventative tools to reduce SSIs are needed. In selected patients at high risk of SSI and/or wound breakdown, use of incisional NPWT has been shown to actively manage clean, closed surgical incisions. This article contains a review of scientific and clinical research relevant to incisional NPWT use over surgical incisions, with particular emphasis on the common problem of wound breakdown and SSI following body-contouring surgery in post-bariatric patients. Although there are a growing number of studies describing use of incisional NPWT in a variety of applications, including vascular, cardiac and orthopaedic, a literature search revealed few studies regarding incisional NPWT use post body-contouring surgery. In a clinical study of seroma formation, less seroma and haematoma formation was reported in post-bariatric patients who received incisional NPWT, versus the control, following body-contouring surgery. In another study of widely applied external NPWT wound dressings over the ventral and lateral trunk following post-bariatric abdominal dermolipectomy, results showed a significant reduction in exudate formation, earlier drain removal, and decreased length of hospitalisation, compared with conventional treatment. Additional controlled studies are needed to validate the clinical impact of incisional NPWT following body-contouring surgery, and to determine proper recommendations for its use. PMID:25853645

  4. A Meta-Analysis for Postoperative Complications in Tibial Plafond Fracture: Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Versus Limited Internal Fixation Combined With External Fixator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Xiang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Zhu, Qing-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of tibial plafond fractures is challenging to foot and ankle surgeons. Open reduction and internal fixation and limited internal fixation combined with an external fixator are 2 of the most commonly used methods of tibial plafond fracture repair. However, conclusions regarding the superior choice remain controversial. The present meta-analysis aimed to quantitatively compare the postoperative complications between open reduction and internal fixation and limited internal fixation combined with an external fixator for tibial plafond fractures. Nine studies with 498 fractures in 494 patients were included in the present study. The meta-analysis found no significant differences in bone healing complications (risk ratio [RR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68 to 2.01, p = .58], nonunion (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.36, p = .82), malunion or delayed union (RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.57 to 2.69, p = .59), superficial (RR 1.56, 95% CI 0.43 to 5.61, p = .50) and deep (RR 1.89, 95% CI 0.62 to 5.80) infections, arthritis symptoms (RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.58, p = .18), or chronic osteomyelitis (RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.05 to 1.84, p = .20) between the 2 groups. PMID:25128304

  5. Alcoholic Chlorhexidine or Alcoholic Iodine Skin Antisepsis (ACAISA): protocol for cluster randomised controlled trial of surgical skin preparation for the prevention of superficial wound complications in prosthetic hip and knee replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Peel, T N; Cheng, A C; Buising, K L; Dowsey, M M; Choong, P F M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wound complications following arthroplasty are associated with significant impact on the patient and healthcare system. Skin cleansing prior to surgical incision is a simple and effective method to prevent wound complications however, the question of which agent is superior for surgical skin antisepsis is unresolved. Methods and analysis This cluster randomised controlled trial aims to compare the incidence of superficial wound complications in patients undergoing elective prosthetic hip or knee replacement surgery receiving surgical skin antisepsis with either: 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone in 70% alcohol. The trial will be conducted at an Australian tertiary, university affiliated hospital over a 3-year period involving 750 participants. Participants will be drawn from the surgical waiting list. Consent for this study will be ‘opt-out’ consent. On a given day, all eligible participants will have skin preparation either with 0.5% chlorhexidine in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone iodine in 70% alcohol. The primary outcome is superficial wound complications (comprised of superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSI) and/or prolonged wound ooze) in the first 30?days following prosthetic joint replacement surgery. Secondary outcomes will include the incidence of wound complications according to the joint replaced, assessment of the causative agents of SSI and cost-effectiveness analysis. The primary analysis is an intention-to-treat analysis including all participants who undergo randomisation and will be performed at the individual level taking into account the clustering effect. Ethics and dissemination The study design and protocol was reviewed and approved by the St Vincent's Hospital Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC-A 016/14 10/3/2014). Study findings will be disseminated in the printed media, and learned forums. A written lay summary will be available to study participants on request. Trial registration number The trial has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000177651. PMID:24833699

  6. Justification for Application of Recombinant Superoxide Dismutase in the Ozone\\/NOUltrasound Technology for Wound Treatment in Oncological Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valery V. Pedder; Maxim V. Naboka; Irina V. Churilova; Viktor K. Kosenok; Darya V. Egorova

    2010-01-01

    This paper justifies application of the recombinant superoxide dismutase product “Rexod” as one of the active components used in implementation of the ozone\\/NO-ultrasound technologies for treatment of complicated postoperative wounds in oncological patients. The theoretical research has shown that it is necessary to take into account biochemical reaction kinetics with involvement of oxygen active forms, oxygen radicals and nitric oxides

  7. Wound infections after transplant nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kohlberg, W I; Tellis, V A; Bhat, D J; Driscoll, B; Veith, F J

    1980-05-01

    Wound infections after transplant nephrectomy were analyzed retrospectively. When prophylactic antibiotics were not used, 20% of the closed nephrectomy wounds became infected. Eighty-one percent of the infections were due to staphylococcal organisms. Wounds containing a preexisting focus of infection or those reoperated on more than once within a month prior to nephrectomy are at such high risk for infection that these wounds should be left open for secondary healing. With the use of prophylactic cefazolin sodium, in the immediate preoperative and postoperative period, no wound infections have occurred in 18 closed transplant nephrectomy wounds. PMID:6990895

  8. An experimental model to determine the effects of adjuvant therapy on the incidence of postoperative wound infection: II. Evaluating preoperative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ariyan, S; Kraft, R L; Goldberg, N H

    1980-03-01

    A study was performed in 110 rats to investigate the effect of an LD50 dose of MTX, rescued with leucovorin treatment in 24 hours, on the ability of surgical wounds to tolerate bacterial contamination. The results of this study would indicate that the optimal time to ensure normal wound healing would be an interval of 10 to 14 days following the administration of large doses of this drug. This information would suggest that the use of methotrexate as a preoperative adjuvant, and radiation therapy following the surgical removal of the tumor, might be a reasonable approach to the adjuvant treatment of head and neck cancer without increasing the risk of wound infections. PMID:6766559

  9. A comparison of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing in the prediction of postoperative cardiac complications in patients requiring arterial reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    McPhail, N.V.; Ruddy, T.D.; Calvin, J.E.; Davies, R.A.; Barber, G.G.

    1989-07-01

    The individual and combined predictive values of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing were compared in a prospective study of 70 patients who had abdominal aortic aneurysms or aortoiliac occlusive disease that required surgical repair. All patients were evaluated clinically by the same cardiologist and had exercise stress testing and dipyridamole-thallium imaging before admission for surgery. Ten patients were excluded from the study because they had evidence of severe ischemia when tested (ST segment depression greater than 2 mm on exercise testing, severe multivessel disease on thallium imaging). The remaining 60 patients were operated on (abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, 40; aortobifemoral repair, 17; femorofemoral graft, 3). The test results were withheld from the surgeon, anesthetist, and cardiologist before surgery. A total of 22 patients experienced major cardiac complications postoperatively (acute pulmonary edema, 17; acute myocardial infarction, 5; cardiac death, 2). Thallium imaging showed myocardial ischemia in 31/60 patients. Exercise testing was positive (greater than or equal to 1 mm ST segment depression) in 10/60 patients. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging with a high sensitivity and reasonable specificity is the initial test of choice. Exercise testing is a poor screening test because of its low sensitivity. The combination of the two tests gives the highest positive predictive value and the greatest likelihood ratio. Thus patients assessed initially and found to have positive thallium scan results may be further stratified by exercise testing.

  10. A Single Dose of Amoxicillin and Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Complications in Third Molar Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Capella, Diogo Lenzi; Barbieri, Tharzon; Pagliarini, Micheli; Cavalieri, Talita; Manfro, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a single prophylactic dose of amoxicillin and/or dexamethasone in preventing postoperative complications (PC) after a surgical removal of a single mandibular third molar (M3). Methods This study is a randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial. Four groups were included: Group 1 (G1) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of dexamethasone; Group 2 (G2) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of placebo; Group 3 (G3) included a prophylactic dose of 8 mg of dexamethasone and 2 g of placebo and; Group 4 (G4) placebo. Results Fifty patients were included. It was observed one case of alveolar infection (2%) and two of alveolar osteitis (4%) resulting in three PC (6%). No statistical differences were observed between therapeutic groups for development of PC, trismus, pain and edema. The use of antibiotics showed an absolute risk reduction (ARR) for PC development of 3.52% and the number needed to treat (NNT) was 29. Conclusion Prophylactic antibiotics and corticoid in a single dose regimen did not bring any benefit on M3 surgeries. PMID:23390473

  11. Wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting is accelerated with the use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent applied to silver nylon wound contact dressings.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Roger; Flick, A Bart; Mikkelson, Debbie; Lowe, Cindy; Finley, Phillip J

    2007-01-01

    Wound healing after graft closure of excised burn wounds is a critical factor in the recovery process after thermal injury. Processes that speed time to stable wound closure should lead to improved outcomes, shorter lengths of hospital stays, and decreased complications. A randomized clinical trial to test the ability of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application to silver nylon wound contact dressings was designed. Time for wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting was observed. Thirty patients with full-thickness thermal burns were randomized into two groups. The control group received postoperative dressing care using moistened silver nylon fabric covered with gauze after tangential burn wound excision and split-thickness skin grafting. The study group received an identical protocol with the addition of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application. Time to 95% wound closure was measured using digital photography. The digital photographs were evaluated by a burn surgeon blinded to the patient's randomization. An independent t-test was used to analyze the data. The study group experienced a 36% reduction in time to wound closure (mean of 4.6 days) as compared to the control group (mean of 7.2 days). This was statistically significant at a P value of <.05. The use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent decreased time to wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting. PMID:17667128

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction complicated by pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Bagouri, E; Smith, Jon; Geutjens, G

    2012-11-01

    We report a case of pyoderma gangrenosum as a complication of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease, which was misdiagnosed initially as a post-operative wound infection. An early dermatology opinion and skin biopsy should be considered in cases of suspected infection where thorough surgical debridement and antimicrobial therapy has failed to improve the clinical picture. PMID:23131219

  13. [Complications associated with inguinal orchiectomy and scrotal orchiectomy].

    PubMed

    Anheuser, P; Kranz, J; Will, J; Dieckmann, K P

    2014-05-01

    Inguinal excision of testis is technically an elementary surgical procedure. According to the indication (e.g., malignant tumors, infarction, inflammation), an inguinal or alternatively a transcrotal approach is possible. Despite its straightforwardness, surgery of the scrotum includes remarkable risks and complications such as postoperative hemorrhage, hematoma formation, infections, and disturbances of wound healing followed by insufficient unfavorable cosmetic results. Nerve injury may be accompanied by temporary or persistent paresthesias which have been documented in our patients undergoing orchiectomy. PMID:24744108

  14. Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications in Patients With and Without an Obstruction Who Had Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer and Underwent a Single-Stage Operation After Mechanical Bowel Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare postoperative complications for single-stage surgery after mechanical bowel preparation in patients who experienced obstruction and those who did not. Methods From 2000 to 2011, 1,224 patients underwent a single-stage operation for left colorectal cancer after bowel preparation. Nonobstruction (NOB) and obstruction (OB) colorectal cancer patients were 1,053 (86.0%) and 171 (14.0%), respectively. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were compared between groups. Results The OB group had poor preoperative conditions (age, white blood cell, hemoglobin, albumin level, and advanced tumor stage) compared with the NOB group (P < 0.05). Mean on-table lavage time for the OB group was 17.5 minutes (range, 14-60 minutes). Mean operation time for the OB group was statistically longer than that of the NOB group (OB: 210 minutes; range, 120-480 minutes vs. NOB: 180 minutes; range, 60-420 minutes; P < 0.001). Overall morbidity was similar between groups (NOB: 19.7% vs. OB: 23.4%, P = 0.259). Major morbidity was more common in the OB group than in the NOB group, but the difference was without significance (OB: 11.7% vs. NOB: 7.6%, P = 0.070). Postoperative death occurred in 16 patients (1.3%), and death in the OB group (n = 7) was significantly higher than it was in the NOB group (n = 9) (4.1% vs. 0.9%, P = 0.001). Twelve patients had surgical complications, which were the leading cause of postoperative death: postoperative bleeding in five patients and leakage in seven patients. Conclusion Postoperative morbidity for a single-stage operation for obstructive left colorectal cancer is comparable to that for NOB, regardless of poor conditions of the patient. PMID:25580411

  15. Medical hypnosis and orthopedic hand surgery: Pain perception, post-operative recovery, and adherence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magaly Hettinga Mauer

    1994-01-01

    Orthopedic hand-surgery patients experience severe pain post-operatively, yet they must engage in painful exercises and wound-care shortly after surgery; poor involvement results in complications that may lead to loss of function and\\/or disfigurement. This study tested a cognitive-behavioral intervention including relaxation, imagery, and therapeutic suggestions (hypnosis) designed to reduce pain perception, enhance post-surgical recovery, and facilitate rehabilitation.Sixty hand-surgery patients at

  16. Prevention of post-operative infections in spine surgery by wound irrigation with a solution of povidone–iodine and hydrogen peroxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone Ulivieri; Stefano Toninelli; Carlo Petrini; Antonio Giorgio; Giuseppe Oliveri

    Introduction  Starting from January 2009, we systematically irrigated the surgical wounds of patients undergoing spine surgery with a solution\\u000a of povidone–iodine (PVP–I) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  We prospectively recorded the clinical data of patients who underwent spine surgery during 2009 and we compared the results\\u000a with retrospectively reviewed clinical records of patients operated during 2008. Patients were analyzed for preoperative risk

  17. [Principles of wound treatment].

    PubMed

    Bruhin, A; Metzger, J

    2007-09-01

    New techniques and devices have revolutionized the treatment of wounds during the last years. For the treatment of wounds we have nowadays a great variety of new gadgets, tools and methods. Complex wounds require specific skills, given the fact that a great number of different promising methods are on the market to enable an optimal wound management. Well educated "wound experts" are required to overcome the problems of very complicated and chronic wound problems. The importance of an interdisciplinary team increases while facing the problems of special wound disorders such as a diabetic food, food ulcers or the problems of open abdomen in case of severe peritonitis. In this overview the main principles of modern wound treatment are outlined. The aim of this article is to present a good summary of wound judgement and treatment for the practioner. Increasingly important is it to point out the situation of complexe wounds which should be judgded and treated with the help of a "wound expert". PMID:18075140

  18. Effect of the knee position during wound closure after total knee arthroplasty on early knee function recovery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effect of the knee position during wound closure on early knee function recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This study included 80 primary total knee arthroplasties due to osteoarthritis. The patients were randomized according to the type of wound closure: extension group for full extension and flexion group for 90° flexion. The incision of articular capsule was marked for precise wound alignment. In the flexion group, the knee was kept in high flexion for 1 to 2 min after wound closure. The two groups were treated with the same postoperative rehabilitation exercises. The range of motion (ROM), visual analogue scale (VAS) score of anterior knee pain, Knee Society Score (KSS) and postoperative complications were assessed at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months, postoperatively. Results At 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively, the ROM in flexion group was 98.95?±?10.33° and 110.05?±?4.93° respectively, with 87.62?±?8.92° and 95.62?±?6.51° in extension group, respectively; The VAS score of anterior knee pain in flexion group was 2.02?±?1.38 and 2.21?±?0.87, respectively, with 2.57?±?1.07 and 2.87?±?0.83 in extension group, respectively. The ROM and VAS pain score of the two groups were significantly different at these two time points, with no significant difference at 6 months postoperatively. The two groups were not significantly different in KSS, and no apparent complication was observed at three time points. Conclusion Marking the articular capsule incision, wound closure in flexion and high flexion after wound closure can effectively decrease anterior knee pain after TKA and promote the early recovery of ROM. PMID:25149657

  19. Management of chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia with life-threatening complications under negative pressure wound therapy and isolation of Helcococcus kunzii.

    PubMed

    Stanger, Katrin M; Albert, Frauke; Kneser, Ulrich; Bogdan, Christian; Horch, Raymund E

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of an 86-year-old man with severe wound infection originating from a chronic crural ulcer of the lower limb, which under negative pressure wound therapy led to excessive tissue necrosis and perforation of the anterior tibial artery. A swab taken 10 and 7 days preoperatively was positive for Helcococcus kunzii. H. kunzii has been described as a potentially pathogenic organism. The questions whether the negative pressure wound therapy itself caused the bleeding or the negative pressure wound therapy, which generates an anaerobic atmosphere, has triggered the growth and invasion of the facultative anaerobic bacterium H. kunzii and owing to the infection the artery perforated or whether the bacteria has no influence at all remain currently unanswered. After surgical debridement the signs of infection were completely eliminated, and a free musculocutaneous flap led to rapid healing of the wound. Following which H. kunzii was no longer detectable. PMID:23855685

  20. Risk factors for complications after bowel surgery in Korean patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Song Soo; Yoon, Yong Sik; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the incidence and factors predictive of early postoperative complications in Korean patients who undergo surgery for Crohn's disease (CD). Methods We retrospectively assessed 350 patients (246 males, 104 females; mean age, 30 ± 9 years) who underwent surgery for primary or recurrent CD at Asan Medical Center between January 1991 and May 2010. The incidence and predictive factors of early postoperative complications were analyzed by both univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the 350 patients, 81 patients (23.1%) developed postoperative complications, the most common being septic complications (54 patients), including 19 cases of wound infection. Thirty patients (8.6%) required re-operations, and only one patient died. Multivariate analysis showed that four factors were independently associated with a high risk of early postoperative complications; preoperative moderate to severe anemia (hematocrit concentration <30%; odds ratio [OR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6 to 5.9), hypoalbuminemia (serum albumin level <3.0 g/dL; OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.7), emergency surgery (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.5 to 10.6), and covering stoma (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.4). Correction of preoperative moderate to severe anemia and hypoalbuminemia decreased the incidence of postoperative complications. Mean hospital stay was significantly longer in patients with than without postoperative complications (31.3 ± 27.2 days vs. 10.3 ± 3.8 days, P < 0.001). Conclusion Preoperative anemia, low albumin level, emergency surgery, and covering stoma significantly increased the risk of early postoperative complications in patients with CD. Correcting preoperatively deficient nutritional factors may reduce postoperative morbidities. PMID:22977760

  1. [Use of Permacol in complicated incisional hernia].

    PubMed

    Armellino, Mariano Fortunato; De Stefano, Guglielmo; Scardi, Francesco; Forner, Anna Lucia; Ambrosino, Francesco; Bellotti, Roberto; Robustelli, Umberto; De Stefano, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Polypropylene mesh repair is the gold standard for primary inguinal hernia and incisional hernia. Wound infection and small bowel fistulas are contraindications to polypropylene mesh repair. In addition, synthetic meshes are known to cause severe peritoneal adhesions and enteric fistulas if located close to the bowel. Porcine intestinal submucosa has been used successfully in experimental studies in dogs and rats to repair large abdominal wall defects. A new porcine dermal collagen graft has been used in man for groin hernia repair, incisional hernia repair and other surgical procedures without complications. We describe 6 cases of complicated incisional hernia operated in emergency using porcine dermal collagen grafts. In one woman the incisional hernia was associated with an enterovaginal fistula. Three cases presented severe wound infections, two of which related to a previous polypropylene mesh repair, while another had an irreducible recurrent incisional hernia and one woman presented complete evisceration. None of the patients had postoperative or porcine-graft-related complications. Over a follow-up period of 3-24 months we have had no recurrence or wound infection. The results of these few cases confirm the safety and efficacy of the porcine dermal collagen mesh also in incisional hernia repair. PMID:17069192

  2. Intravitreal Fluorinated Gas Preference and Occurrence of Rare Ischemic Postoperative Complications after Pars Plana Vitrectomy: A Survey of the American Society of Retina Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Sigler, Eric J.; Randolph, John C.; Charles, Steve; Calzada, Jorge I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To perform a survey of the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) regarding the use of vitreous cavity fluorinated gas as an adjunct to pars plana vitrectomy for retinal detachment or macular hole repair. Methods. A multiple-choice online questionnaire was administered to members of ASRS. Physician experience, gas preference for vitrectomy, and categorical estimate of observation of blinding postoperative ischemic events were recorded. Results. 282 questionnaires were completed. Mean years in vitreoretinal practice were 15 ± 10. A decrease in yearly vitrectomy volume was associated with increased number of years in practice (P = 0.011). Greater than 95% of respondents preferred fluorinated gas to air alone for both retinal detachment and macular hole repair. 38% of respondents reported at least one observation of a blinding ischemic postoperative event. Overall estimated incidence of blinding postoperative ischemic event was 0.06 events/year in practice. Conclusions. Currently, C3F8 and SF6 are the postoperative gas preference for ASRS respondents, in contrast to previous North American surveys. The occurrence of blinding ischemic events appears unrelated to number of years in practice, was reported by less than half of those surveyed, and has occurred at an infrequent rate of approximately once for every ten years of practice for those observing the phenomena. PMID:22997567

  3. Successful treatment of an infected wound in infants by a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and arginine supplementation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kouji Masumoto; Kouji Nagata; Yoichiro Oka; Hiroki Kai; Sadako Yamaguchi; Mika Wada; Tsuyoshi Kusuda; Toshiro Hara; Shin-ichi Hirose; Akinori Iwasaki; Tomoaki Taguchi

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveWound dehiscence caused by surgical site infection (SSI) presents a complicated problem. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was developed to treat wound dehiscence. Nutritional treatment using arginine has also been recently shown to be effective for the treatment of pressure ulcers. Therefore, wound complications due to SSI were treated using NPWT combined with nutritional therapy with an arginine-rich supplement (ARS).

  4. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  5. The enhanced healing of a high-risk, clean, sutured surgical incision by prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™: cosmetic and therapeutic results.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Calamita, Roberto; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Pierangeli, Marina; Grassetti, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    According to the literature, incisional closure complications may range from postoperative surgical site infections, representing 17-22% of health care-associated infections, surgical wound dehiscence and formation of haematomas or seromas, and can lead to delayed or impaired incision healing. These kinds of situations are more common when wounds are closed under tension or in specific patient morbidities. Obesity, in particular, is associated with an impaired blood flow to tissues, predisposing the patient to increased risk of wound complications by various mechanisms. Incisional complications can become relevant economic burdens for health care systems because of an increase in the average length of hospital stay and readmissions, and additional medical and surgical procedures. Thus, a preventive therapy may have a critical role in the management of healing. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) technology as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™ (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) has recently been the focus of a new investigation, as a prophylactic measure to prevent complications via immediate postoperative application in high-risk, clean, closed surgical incisions. The authors present a 62-year-old class II obese female, who underwent bilateral inguinal dermolipectomy. Prophylactic NPWT as delivered by Prevena™ was performed successfully over surgical incisions. Cosmetic and therapeutic results are shown. PMID:25234139

  6. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  7. [Case of successful prevention of multiple organ dysfunctions in 74 years old patient with sepsis after Crawford surgery complicated with pleural empyema, chest wall tissues infection and osteomyelitis of ribs].

    PubMed

    Babaev, M A; Eremenko, A A; Charchian, É R; Kononets, P V; Bazarov, D V; Ziuliaeva, T P; Oreshkina, T D; Bogopol'skaia, O M; Kim, S Iu; Titova, I V; Fedorov, D S

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with a clinical case demonstrating that patient's elderly age is not an absolute contraindication for complex surgery in spite of high risk of postoperative complications. Early diagnostics, target treatment of the infection cite with vacuum-assisted therapy for wounds and the treatment of infectious complications based on individual characteristics of elderly patient with sepsis as an outcome of prosthetic thoracoabdominal aortic repair allowed avoiding multiple organ dysfunctions in the patient. PMID:24749312

  8. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  9. Postoperative Cervical Cord Compression Induced by Hydrogel Dural Sealant (DuraSeal®)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Gu; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a potential complication of cranial and spinal surgery. Postoperative CSF leakage can induce delayed healing, wound infection and meningitis. DuraSeal® (Covidien, Waltham, MA, USA) is a synthetic product which has been increasingly used to facilitate watertight repair of dural defects after cranial and spinal surgery. Despite some advantages of Duraseal®, the authors report a patient who developed cord compression following the use of DuraSeal® in cervical spine surgery in which the expansion of the DuraSeal® was believed to be the causative factor. PMID:24757459

  10. Open versus Laparoscopic Appendectomy in Children: A Comparison of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Mitra; Rauhofer, Ursula; Felberbauer, Franz Xaver; Rebhandl, Winfried; Horcher, Ernst

    2000-01-01

    Although between 4% and 20% of all appendectomies in adults are performed laparoscopically, this procedure is rarely done in the pediatric age group because of the substantially more difficult technique, the expected risks and suspected higher rate of complications. In a prospective study of 500 consecutive appendectomies, we tried to assess the actual rate of complications of each operative approach. We included 362 conventional and 138 laparoscopic appendectomies, the median age of the patients was 10.8 years. The mortality was 0 in both groups. We observed 89 minor and 11 major complications. All major complications (wound infections needing re-operation under general anesthesia, intra-abdominal abscesses, ileus due to adhesions and a case of renal insufficiency because of glomerulonephritis) occurred in the conventional group (n=11, ie, 3% of 362 open appendectomies). Seventy-two minor complications were seen in the same group (20%). In the laparoscopic group, there were 17 (13%) minor complications and no severe complications. This difference was statistically significant. We conclude that in children laparoscopic appendectomy does not carry a greater risk of intra- or postoperative complications and can therefore safely be established as a standard procedure. PMID:10917118

  11. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-29

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  12. Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two methods of securing skin grafts using negative pressure wound therapy: vacuum-assisted closure and gauze suction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Q; Franczyk, Mieczyslawa; Lee, Justine C; Greives, Matthew R; O'Connor, Annemarie; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionized the management of complicated wounds and has contributed an additional modality for securing split thickness skin grafts (STSG). The standard for NPWT is the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device. The authors' institution has accumulated experience using standard gauze sealed with an occlusive dressing and wall suction (GSUC) as their primary mode for NPWT. The authors report a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of the GSUC vs the VAC in securing STSG. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in 157 wounds in 104 patients requiring STSG from August 2009 to July 2012. All wounds were randomized to VAC or GSUC treatment and assessed for skin graft adherence/take. At postoperative day 4 or 5, NPWT was discontinued, and the size of the graft and any nonadherent areas were measured and recorded. Concomitant comorbidities, wound location, etiology, study failures, and reoperative rates were also reviewed. In all, 77 and 80 wounds were randomized to the GSUC and VAC study arms. Patient demographics were similar between both groups in terms of age, sex, comorbidities, etiology, and wound location. In all, 64 of 80 wounds in the GSUC group and 60 of 77 wounds in the VAC group had full take of the skin graft by postoperative day 4 or 5 (P = .80). The mean percent take in the GSUC group was 96.12% vs 96.21% in the VAC arm (P = .98). The use of NPWT in securing STSG is a useful method to promote adherence and healing. This study demonstrates that a low-cost, readily accessible system utilizing gauze dressings and wall suction (GSUC) results in comparable skin graft take in comparison to the VAC device. PMID:25162948

  13. Continuous intravenous insulin infusion reduces the incidence of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients after cardiac surgical procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony P Furnary; Kathryn J Zerr; Gary L Grunkemeier; Albert Starr

    1999-01-01

    Background. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for deep sternal wound infection after open heart surgical procedures. We previously showed that elevated postoperative blood glucose levels are a predictor of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that aggressive intravenous pharmacologic control of postoperative blood glucose levels would reduce the incidence of deep sternal wound infection.Methods. In

  14. [Pneumonia in wounded].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Iu V; Kharitonov, M A; Sadykov, R R; Shelukhin, V A; Ga?duk, S V; Bogomolov, A B; Ivanov, V V; Dobrovol'skaia, L M

    2015-02-01

    Pneumonia is one of the common complications of wounds of any localization. Therapists are involved into the treatment of lung lesions in wounded in the ICU, in the surgical and if the patient arrives "on follow-up care,"--in the medical ward. The article analyzes the main statistical indicators reflecting the prevalence and clinical and pathogenetic characteristics of lung pathology in wounded during the Great Patriotic War, during the fighting Soviet troops in the Republic of Afghanistan, the 1st and 2nd Chechen campaign. Pneumonia as a manifestation of traumatic disease can occur in two ways. Primary pneumonia is in close connection with the pathogenetic traumatic injury. Secondary lung lesions complicate the injury at a later date and are due to the introduction of a nosocomial infection process flora. We describe the clinical picture of pneumonia in the affected, the basic pathogenesis, principles of therapy. Successful treatment of lung pathology in wounded depends on the performance of a complex of activities involving a wide range of doctors of various specialties. PMID:25920173

  15. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  16. Necrotizing postsurgical infection complicating midurethral sling procedure with unrecognized cystotomy.

    PubMed

    Mahal, Amandeep Singh; Bradley, Catherine S

    2012-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with stress urinary incontinence underwent a retropubic midurethral sling procedure. On postoperative day 1, she presented with persistent abdominal pain and fever. A computed tomographic scan showed subcutaneous lower abdominal wall edema and gas above the fascia suggesting a necrotizing soft tissue infection. She was surgically debrided twice, which included removal of the mesh sling on postoperative day 4. Cystoscopy suggested unrecognized bladder perforation had occurred during the initial procedure, and record rerevealed untreated bacteriuria before sling placement. The patient required wound vacuum therapy and a later secondary wound closure procedure. Six months after the initial surgery, she was reevaluated for stress urinary incontinence and underwent a transobturator midurethral sling procedure with resolution of these symptoms. Necrotizing postsurgical infection is a rarely described complication of midurethral slings. Treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication includes aggressive surgical debridement, administration of broad-spectrum antibiotic, removal of infected implants, and supportive therapy. Unrecognized bladder injury and preoperative bacteriuria are discussed as potential risk factors for postsling necrotizing infection. PMID:22543774

  17. [Postoperative anaerobic sepsis].

    PubMed

    Fichev, G; Poromanski, I; Marina, M

    1997-01-01

    As shown by clinical practice, postoperative anaerobic sepsis is a complication more common than usually thought of or microbiologically verified. The exceptionally difficult microbiological verification, regardless of the fact that original registered transport media are employed, is the underlying cause of obligate non-spore forming microorganisms from hemoculture being demonstrated in four patients only. In all of them Bacteroides fragilis is isolated and identified. Also, in all patients a fully developed clinical picture of sepsis is present along with the characteristic laboratory septic syndrome constellation as well. After pointing out the difficulties in diagnosing "post-operative anaerobic sepsis", and more particularly its verification, emphasis is laid on the clinical and laboratory symptoms presented by the patients, and on the important role played by the SIRS system, contributing greatly to an adequately oriented clinical thinking. PMID:9739848

  18. The role of postoperative prophylactic antibiotics in the treatment of facial fractures: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical study. Part 3: Le Fort and zygomatic fractures in 94 patients.

    PubMed

    Soong, Poh Luon; Schaller, Benoit; Zix, Jürgen; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Mottini, Matthias; Lieger, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference between the effect of a 5-day and a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotics on the incidence of infection after midfacial fractures. A total of 98 patients with displaced Le Fort or zygomatic fractures that required operation were randomly assigned into 2 groups, both of which were given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1.2g intravenously every 8h from the time of admission until 24h postoperatively. The 5-day group was then given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 625 mg orally 8-hourly for another 4 days. The 1-day group was given placebo orally at the same time points. Patients were followed up 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks, and 6 months, postoperatively. The development of an infection of the wound was the primary end point. Ninety-four of the 98 patients completed the study. Two of the 45 patients in the 5-day group (4%) and 2/49 in the 1-day group (4%) developed postoperative wound infections. One in each group had a purulent infection, while the others had only wound breakdown. Two patients of the 5-day group and one in the 1-day group developed rashes on the trunk. There were no significant differences in the incidence of infection or side effects between the groups. In midfacial fractures a 1-day course of antibiotics postoperatively is as effective in preventing infective complications as a 5-day regimen. PMID:24602602

  19. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery. In this study we investigated the incidence of DSWI and effect of re-exploration for bleeding on DSWI mortality. Methods We reviewed 73,700 cases registered in the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD) during the period from 2004 to 2009 and divided them into five groups: 26,597 of isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) cases, 23,136 valvular surgery cases, 17,441 thoracic aortic surgery cases, 4,726 valvular surgery plus CABG cases, and 1,800 thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG cases. We calculated the overall incidence of postoperative DSWI, incidence of postoperative DSWI according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI cases according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI according to whether re-exploration for bleeding, and the intervals between the operation and deaths according to whether re-exploration for bleeding were investigated. Operative mortality is defined as in-hospital or 30-day mortality. Risk factors for DSWI were also examined. Results The overall incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8%. The incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8% after isolated CABG, 1.3% after valve surgery, 2.8% after valve surgery plus CABG, 1.9% after thoracic aortic surgery, and 3.4% after thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG. The 30-day and operative mortality in patients with DSWI was higher after more complicated operative procedures. The incidence of re-exploration for bleeding in DSWI cases was 11.1%. The overall 30-day/operative mortality after DSWI with re-exploration for bleeding was 23.0%/48.0%, and it was significantly higher than in the absence of re-exploration for bleeding (8.1%/22.0%). The difference between the intervals between the operation and death according to whether re-exploration for bleeding had been performed was not significant. Age and cardiogenic shock were significant risk factors related to re-exploration for bleeding, and diabetes control was a significant risk factor related to DSWI for all surgical groups. Previous CABG was a significant risk factor related to both re-exploration for bleeding and DSWI for all surgical groups. Conclusions The incidence of DSWI after cardiac surgery according to the data entered in the JACVSD registry during the period from 2004 to 2009 was 1.8%, and more complicated procedures were followed by higher incidence and mortality. When re-exploration for bleeding was performed, mortality was significantly higher than when it was not performed. Prevention of DSWI and establishment of an effective appropriate treatment for DSWI may improve the outcome of cardiac surgery. PMID:23688324

  20. Complications of groin hernia repair: their prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Gaines, R D

    1978-03-01

    An estimated overall complication rate of approximately ten percent is found in the half million patients who annually undergo groin hernia repair in the United States. Certain features in the operative technique are emphasized which should prevent many of these complications.Intraoperative complications during the groin hernia repair are primarily hemorrhage and injury to the vas deferens, the three nerves in the area, the vascular supply of the testis, and the abdominal and pelvic viscera. Miscellaneous intraoperative complications relate to problems associated with the repair of massive hernias, missed hernia, and the loss of strangulated bowel into the abdominal cavity.Early postoperative complications may be either systemic or local with cardiac and respiratory conditions comprising the former group. The early local complications are primarily wound problems of infection, hematoma formation, and scrotal swelling involving the skin and testis. High ligation in excision of the sac in all hernias, repair of the defect in the plane of its occurrence, and suture of fascia to fascia in the same plane without tension are the basic tenets of inguinal hernia repair which should result in a low incidence of recurrence.The most effective prophylactic measures necessary for the prevention of complications considered are a thorough knowledge of inguinofemoral anatomy, mature surgical judgment, and meticulous surgical technique. PMID:691083

  1. Complications associated with equine arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Laurie R; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2008-12-01

    Arthroscopic complications are infrequent but when they occur can cause significant morbidity in the equine patient. This article reviews intraoperative and postoperative complications along with ways to avoid them. Additionally, therapeutic methods of managing these complications also are discussed. PMID:19203702

  2. Systematic review of high-volume multimodal wound infiltration in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Purnajyoti; Rogers, Benedict A

    2014-06-01

    Pain relief following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is challenging because early mobilization and rehabilitation are essential for a successful outcome. Postoperative pain can limit recovery, leading to reduced mobility and prolonged hospitalization. There are potential benefits of infiltrating high volumes of local anesthetics around the soft tissues of replaced hip and knee joints. The risk of systemic toxicity is minimized with diluted local anesthetic solution, which also allows a high volume to be used. One of the principal advantages is that analgesia agents are administered intraoperatively by the surgeon, thereby minimizing the need for additional invasive procedures. The authors conducted a systematic review to evaluate whether high-volume multimodal wound infiltration reduces pain and opiate intake while enhancing early rehabilitation and discharge when used in patients undergoing TKA. Only randomized controlled studies were included. Although better pain relief in the immediate postoperative period with wound infiltration is gained after TKA, there is no definite evidence that this leads to a reduction in opiate consumption, the achievement of early milestones, or a reduction in hospital stay. The roles of individual agents in achieving pain relief and the use of percutaneous wound catheter for postoperative doses are also unclear. There are few reports of complications, including falls and delayed mobilization, when femoral nerve blocks are used. Wound infiltration analgesia should be used at the preference of the surgeon and anesthetist provided regular review of their practice is undertaken to identify any untoward side effects. Further randomized trials with sufficient sample size comparing each outcome, including pain scores, opiate consumption, and length of hospital stay, should be undertaken. PMID:24972430

  3. Contemporary demographics and complications of patients treated for open ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Madanat, Rami; Honkamaa, Maija; Mäkinen, Tatu J

    2015-08-01

    Open ankle fractures are rare injuries with a high likelihood of wound complications and subsequent infections. There is limited information about the complications and outcomes of these injuries in different age groups. The aim of this study was to assess the contemporary demographics and complications related to this injury. We performed a chart review of all the 3030 patients treated for ankle fractures at a Level 1 trauma centre from 2006 to 2011. 137 (4.5%) patients had an open ankle fracture. The demographic data, injury mechanism, comorbidities, and fracture type were collected. Treatment, complications, length of stay and number of outpatient visits were also recorded. The mean age of the patients was 60 years and 56% were women. Most fractures were Weber type B with a medial sided wound (93%). Only 20% of the fractures were the result of high-energy trauma, and 31% were Gustilo grade III injuries. Immediate internal fixation was performed in 82% of patients, and the wound was primarily closed in most cases (80%). The incidence of postoperative wound necrosis and deep infection was 18% and 17%, respectively. There were more deep infections if pulsatile lavage was used during the wound debridement (p=0.029). About 14 (10%) patients required a flap reconstruction to cover the soft-tissue defect. Every other patient (54%) had a complication, and 21 patients (15%) suffered a long-term disability related to the injury. The number complications did not differ for nighttime and daytime operations (p=0.083). High-energy injuries were more common in younger patients (p<0.001) and these patients also had more lateral sided open wounds than older patients (p=0.002). Interestingly, younger patients also had significantly more complications (p=0.024), suffered more often from chronic pain (p=0.003), and required more flap reconstructions (p=0.026), reoperations (p=0.026), and outpatient clinic visits (p=0.006). Open ankle fractures have a high complication rate and often require multiple surgical procedures. In young patients these injuries are more likely to be the consequence of high-energy trauma leading to more complications and subsequently increased healthcare resource utilisation. PMID:25935358

  4. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

  5. Prophylactic Antibiotics and Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elbur, Abubaker Ibrahim; M.A., Yousif; El-Sayed, Ahmed S.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infections account for 14%-25% of all nosocomial infections. The main aims of this study were to audit the use of prophylactic antibiotic, to quantify the rate of post-operative wound infection, and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in general surgery. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the General Surgery Department in Khartoum Teaching Hospital– Sudan. All Adult patients (age ?18 years) admitted during March 1st to 31st October 2010 were recruited. Multivariable logistic analysis was done to identify wound infection risk factors. Prescriptions were audited against predetermined criteria. Results: A total of 540 patients were recruited; (females73.7% of total ). The performed surgical procedures were 547. The rate of wound infection was 10.9%. Multivariable logistic analysis showed that; ASA score ? 3; (p= <0.001), wound class (p= 0.001), and laparoscopic surgical technique; (p= 0.002) were significantly associated with prevalence of wound infection. Surgical prophylaxis was unnecessarily given to 311 (97.5%) of 319 patients for whom it was not recommended. Prophylaxis was recommended for 221 patients; of them 218 (98.6 %) were given preoperative dose in the operating rooms. Evaluation of prescriptions for those patients showed that; spectrum of antibiotic was adequate for 160 (73.4%) patients, 143 (65.6%) were given accurate doses, only 4 (1.8%) had the first preoperative dose/s in proper time window, and for 186 (85.3%) of them prophylaxis was extended post-operatively. Only 36 (6.7%) prescriptions were found to be complying with the stated criteria. Conclusion: The rate of wound infection was high and prophylactic antibiotics were irrationally used. Multiple interventions are needed to correct the situation. PMID:24551629

  6. A case of nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap for below-knee amputation stump wound: treatment option for compartment syndrome after fibular free flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Kwang Seog; Lee, Sam Yong

    2014-02-01

    Despite the frequent use of the fibular free flap, there have been no reports of severe compartment syndrome of the donor leg that necessitated limb amputation. A 66-yr-old man had a fibular osseous free flap transfer from the left leg to the mandible that was complicated by postoperative compartment syndrome. An extensive chronic leg wound resulted, which was treated with multiple debridements and finally with below-knee amputation. Successful coverage of the below-knee amputation stump was accomplished with a nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap. Various foot fillet flaps may be used acutely as a free or an island pedicled flap, but dissection of the vascular pedicle may be difficult in a chronically inflamed wound because of inflammation and adhesions to surrounding tissue. The nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap may be considered as a useful option for treatment of a chronically inflamed stump wound after below-knee amputation. PMID:24550664

  7. Abdominal gunshot wounds. An urban trauma center's experience with 300 consecutive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, D V; Burch, J M; Spjut-Patrinely, V; Mattox, K L; Jordan, G L

    1988-01-01

    From July 1983 through December 1987, 300 consecutive patients with penetrating gunshot wounds of the abdomen causing visceral or vascular injuries were treated. Resuscitative thoracotomy was required in 20 patients (6.6%), and only two survived. The most commonly injured organs were the small bowel (60%), colon (41.6%), liver (29.3%), vascular structures (24.6%), stomach (17.3%), and kidney (17.0%). The overall survival rate for the series was 88.3%; however, if only the 226 patients without vascular injuries are considered, the survival rate was 97.3%. In the 35 patients who died, the blood pressure on admission was 51 mmHg, 18 required a resuscitative thoracotomy, four visceral or vascular injuries were present, and the median blood replacement was 18 units. The cause of death was perioperative shock in 30 patients (85.7%), whereas five patients (14.3%) died of sepsis and multiple organ failure. The most common postoperative complication in survivors and patients who died later in the study was an intra-abdominal abscess (3.0%). Rapid conservative operative techniques for civilian gunshot wounds leads to few postoperative complications and an excellent survival rate, especially if vascular injuries are not present. PMID:3421760

  8. Treatment Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Ketamine on Postoperative Analgesia after Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kayyal, Talal A.; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Capehart, Samantha J.; Monson, Laura A.; Buchanan, Edward P.; Glover, Chris D.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cleft palate repair may result in significant pain in the immediate postoperative period, which can lead to vigorous crying resulting in wound dehiscence and pulmonary complications. Effective pain control with opioids is the mainstay but administration on the floor has to be countered with the complications associated with their use, chiefly respiratory depression and sedation. We retrospectively examined the efficacies of intraoperative administration of intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine (DEX) and ketamine (KET) to prevent early postoperative pain in children undergoing primary cleft palate repair and compared the results against relevant literature. The Texas Children's Hospital anesthesia database was queried to identify children undergoing a palatal surgery from December 2011 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria permitted completed primary palatal surgery without major complications and intraoperative administration of DEX or KET. The control group (CTRL) received no additional drug. A comprehensive literature review was performed. A total of 71 pediatric patients underwent palatal surgery during the study period with 46 patients qualifying for analysis. Although results were not significant, consistent trends were observed with regards to lower opioid requirements during the first 24 hours for both medications compared with the CTRL. KET also had shorter time to discharge. The literature review resulted in several studies supporting decreased postoperative pain end points for both DEX and KET. In our sample, DEX and KET reduced postoperative opioid requirements. KET seems to have the added benefit of a shorter hospital stay. These finding are supported in the literature. With further investigation, the addition of these drugs may serve to provide improved pain relief without over sedation in patients undergoing cleft palate repair. PMID:25045418

  9. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  10. Does a continuous local anaesthetic pain treatment after immediate tissue expander reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients more efficiently reduce acute postoperative pain - a prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate breast reconstruction with an expander is a reasonable option for properly selected patients. After reconstruction, patients have severe postoperative pain, which responds poorly to opioids. Our aim was to evaluate if continuous wound infusion of a local anaesthetic into the surgical wound reduces postoperative pain, consumption of opioids and incidence of chronic pain compared to standard intravenous piritramide after primary breast reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients. Methods Altogether, 60 patients were enrolled in our study; one half in the group with wound infusion of a local anaesthetic, and the other half in the standard (piritramide) group. Parameters measured included: pain intensity (visual analogue scale), drug requirements, alertness, hospitalisation, side-effects and late complications. A p-value of?wound infusion of a local anaesthetic significantly reduces acute pain and enables reduced opioid consumption, resulting in less postoperative sedation and reduced need for antiemetic drugs. Wound infusion of a local anaesthetic reduces chronic pain. PMID:24433317

  11. Microcurrent skin patches for postoperative pain control in total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, T; El-Kawy, S; Shalaby, H; El-Sebai, M

    2007-04-01

    Pain control following painful orthopaedic procedures such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an ongoing challenge, as current pain management techniques often result in under-medication and/or complications. In a study designed to test the effect of the micro-current skin patch (MCT) on pain relief in patients following TKA, we followed 24 patients, randomly divided into two groups, one group receiving MCT plus tramadol hydrochloride (tramadol) for pain relief and a control group receiving only tramadol, for 10 days postoperatively. Tramadol was given intramuscularly in increment doses of 100 mg, as needed, for the duration of the study period. Pain was assessed daily using a visual analogue score (VAS). Other parameters, including the effect of MCT on the dose of tramadol needed for pain relief, the degree of wound healing measured at the end of the follow-up period, category of the wound 10 days postoperatively (1, 2 or 3) and total drain fluid volume, were also assessed. During the 10-day postoperative period there was a progressive decrease in pain in patients of both groups, however the patients of the MCT group showed a consistently lower VAS throughout the observation period, most markedly on those follow-up days with the highest pain scores in patients of the control group. This effect was monitored on the basis of the average dose of tramadol administered per day: 200.0+/-7.0 mg/day in the control group and 63.3+/-15.8 mg/day in the MCT group. Wound healing was better with the application of the MCT patch: grade 1 wounds were observed in 50% of the patients of the MCT group as compared to 8.3% in control group. The total drain volume was lower in patients of the MCT group compared to the controls (1020.8+/-211.6 and 1170.8+/-243.5 ml, respectively). None of the patients indicated that they wished to discontinue MCT therapy. This pilot study shows that MCT therapy led to better pain control with a markedly lower need for tramadol as compared to the control group. This better pain control was accompanied by a better healing of the wound and a lower drain volume. PMID:16896874

  12. Monitoring the healing of combat wounds using Raman spectroscopic mapping.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nicole J; Brown, Trevor S; Evans, Korboi N; Hawksworth, Jason S; Hussey, Sean; Tadaki, Doug K; Elster, Eric A

    2010-01-01

    Soldiers wounded in modern warfare present with extensive and complicated acute wounds, confounded by an overwhelming inflammatory response. The pathophysiology of acute wounds is unknown and timing of wound closure remains subjective. Collagen gene expression profiles are presented for 24 patients. Impaired healing wounds showed a twofold decrease in the up-regulation of COL1A1 and COL3A1 genes in the beginning of the wound healing process, compared with normal healing wounds. By the final debridement, however, collagen gene expression profiles for normal and impaired healing wounds were similar for COL1A1 and COL3A1. In addition, Raman spectroscopic maps were collected of biopsy tissue sections, from the first and last debridements of 10 wounds collected from nine patients. Tissue components obtained for the debridement biopsies were compared to elucidate whether or not a wound healed normally. Raman spectroscopy showed a loss of collagen in five patients, indicated by a negative percent difference in the 1,665/1,445 cm(-1) band area ratios. Four healed patients showed an increased or unchanged collagen content. Here, we demonstrate the potential of Raman spectroscopic analysis of wound biopsies for classification of wounds as normal or impaired healing. Raman spectroscopy has the potential to noninvasively monitor collagen deposition in the wound bed, during surgical wound debridements, to help determine the optimal time for wound closure. PMID:20546554

  13. Complications following hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications. PMID:25444470

  14. Perioperative Complications in Abdominal Sacrocolpopexy, Sacrospinous Ligament Fixation and Prolift Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Fuat; Demirci, Oya; Dolgun, Zehra Nihal; Karakoç, Birgül; Demirci, Elif; Somunk?ran, Asl?; ?yibozkurt, Cem; Karaalp, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse is an important problem for women. To overcome this issue, different operational technics are in use, such as abdominal sacrocolpopexy, sacrospinous fixation, and the total Prolift procedure. Aims: This study assessed perioperative complications in abdominal sacrocolpopexy, sacrospinous fixation, and the total Prolift procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Perioperative complications were defined as any complication occurring during surgery or the first 6 weeks postoperatively. Forty-five patients underwent abdominal procedures, 60 patients underwent sacrospinous fixation, and 43 patients underwent the total Prolift procedure. Results: In the abdominal group, one bladder injury, four hemorrhages, and three wound dehiscences occurred. In the sacrospinous group, one rectal injury and one postoperative vault infection occurred. In the Prolift group, one bladder injury and one hemorrhage occurred. Minor complications were more frequent in the abdominal group than the others. The operating time and hospital stay of the abdominal group were significantly longer than the others. The Pro-lift procedure had less operating time and hospital stay than other procedures. Conclusion: The total Prolift may be a novel alternative for apical prolapse with low perioperative morbidities and complications. PMID:25207189

  15. Enhanced susceptibility to infections in a diabetic wound healing model

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Tobias; Spielmann, Malte; Zuhaili, Baraa; Koehler, Till; Fossum, Magdalena; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Yao, Feng; Steinstraesser, Lars; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Eriksson, Elof

    2008-01-01

    Background Wound infection is a common complication in diabetic patients. The progressive spread of infections and development of drug-resistant strains underline the need for further insights into bacterial behavior in the host in order to develop new therapeutic strategies. The aim of our study was to develop a large animal model suitable for monitoring the development and effect of bacterial infections in diabetic wounds. Methods Fourteen excisional wounds were created on the dorsum of diabetic and non-diabetic Yorkshire pigs and sealed with polyurethane chambers. Wounds were either inoculated with 2 × 108 Colony-Forming Units (CFU) of Staphylococcus aureus or injected with 0.9% sterile saline. Blood glucose was monitored daily, and wound fluid was collected for bacterial quantification and measurement of glucose concentration. Tissue biopsies for microbiological and histological analysis were performed at days 4, 8, and 12. Wounds were assessed for reepithelialization and wound contraction. Results Diabetic wounds showed a sustained significant infection (>105 CFU/g tissue) compared to non-diabetic wounds (p < 0.05) over the whole time course of the experiment. S. aureus-inoculated diabetic wounds showed tissue infection with up to 8 × 107 CFU/g wound tissue. Non-diabetic wounds showed high bacterial counts at day 4 followed by a decrease and no apparent infection at day 12. Epidermal healing in S. aureus-inoculated diabetic wounds showed a significant delay compared with non-inoculated diabetic wounds (59% versus 84%; p < 0.05) and were highly significant compared with healing in non-diabetic wounds (97%; p < 0.001). Conclusion Diabetic wounds developed significantly more sustained infection than non-diabetic wounds. S. aureus inoculation leads to invasive infection and significant wound healing delay and promotes invasive co-infection with endogenous bacteria. This novel wound healing model provides the opportunity to closely assess infections during diabetic wound healing and to monitor the effect of therapeutical agents in vivo. PMID:18312623

  16. Maxillofacial gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Olga; de Régloix, Stanislas; Dubourdieu, Stéphane; Lefort, Hugues; Boizat, Stéphane; Houze, Benoit; Culoma, Jennifer; Burlaton, Guillaume; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The majority of maxillofacial gunshot wounds are caused by suicide attempts. Young men are affected most often. When the lower one-third of the face is involved, airway patency (1.6% of the cases) and hemorrhage control (1.9% of the cases) are the two most urgent complications to monitor and prevent. Spinal fractures are observed with 10% of maxillary injuries and in 20% of orbital injuries. Actions to treat the facial gunshot victim need to be performed, keeping in mind spine immobilization until radiographic imaging is complete and any required spinal stabilization accomplished. Patients should be transported to a trauma center equipped to deal with maxillofacial and neurosurgery because 40% require emergency surgery. The mortality rate of maxillofacial injuries shortly after arrival at a hospital varies from 2.8% to 11.0%. Complications such as hemiparesis or cranial nerve paralysis occur in 20% of survivors. This case has been reported on a victim of four gunshot injuries. One of the gunshots was to the left mandibular ramus and became lodged in the C4 vertebral bone. Maurin O , de Régloix S , Dubourdieu S , Lefort H , Boizat S , Houze B , Culoma J , Burlaton G , Tourtier JP . Maxillofacial gunshot wounds. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2015;30(3):1 4. PMID:25868553

  17. [Management of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K; Sekulla, C; Kern, J; Dralle, H

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery stands at 1%-2?%. This low incidence contrasts with the significant potential complications of postoperative hemorrhage. Influencing factors and measures mentioned in the literature and own studies are discussed. Although an improvement in the postoperative hemorrhage rate was to be expected indirectly due to the increasing use of coagulation-relevant medication, there has been neither an increase in incidence nor a reduction in resultant complications, including primarily recurrent vocal cord paresis, tracheotomy and mortality. Factors that influence surgical success include a meticulous technique and caution, as well as ensuring intensive and qualified postoperative monitoring for a minimum of 4-6 h, thereby permitting immediate revision surgery at any time. PMID:25532753

  18. High incidence and spontaneous resolution of mastoid effusion after craniotomy on early postoperative magnetic resonance images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Watanabe; N. Saito; N. Sato; A. Takahashi; H. Fujimaki; M. Tosaka; T. Sasaki

    2003-01-01

    Mastoid effusion is a poorly understood complication after craniotomy. The incidence and severity of postoperative mastoid effusion were retrospectively examined on postoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to assess any association with craniotomy procedures, time course, and neuro-otological complications. We evaluated the early postoperative MR images (within 4 days of craniotomy) and medical records of 74 patients who underwent 77 operations for

  19. [New approach to postoperative delirium treatment].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, I N; Makhla?, A V; Tepliakova, A N; Guba?dullin, R R; Sal'nikov, P S; Borisov, A Iu; Berezenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of different drugs for sedation was studied in 51 patients after large abdominal operations complicated by postoperative delirium. Diagnosis of postoperative delirium was established according to CAM-ICU criteria. Dexmedetomidine has demonstrated significantly decreased duration of delirium and hospital stay in intensive care unit in comparison with haloperidol. Besides, patients which received dexmedetomidine preserved opportunity for verbal contact. Also these patients interacted better with department's stuff. PMID:26031955

  20. Acute Heart Failure in the Postoperative Period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd A. Watson; Lee A. Fleisher

    In the perioperative period, heart failure is one of the most common conditions requiring evaluation and treatment. Furthermore,\\u000a heart failure is the most frequently encountered postoperative cardiac complication of noncardiac surgery (1, 2). Postoperatively, acute heart failure (AHF), defined as the rapid onset of symptoms and signs secondary to abnormal cardiac\\u000a function, often presents in patients with underlying chronic heart

  1. Surgical wound care - closed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wound. Do not use soaps, lotions, powders, cosmetics, or any other skin care products on your ... around the incision: More redness More pain Swelling Bleeding The wound is larger or deeper The wound ...

  2. Intensified neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for rectal cancer enhances surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy has proven superior to adjuvant treatment in reducing the rate of local recurrence without impairing cancer related survival or the incidence of distant metastases. The present study aimed at addressing the effects of an intensified protocol of neoadjuvant treatment on the development of postoperative complications. Methods A total of 387 patients underwent oncological resection for rectal cancer in our institution between January 2000 and December 2009. 106 patients received an intensified radiochemotherapy. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were analyzed retrospectively with special attention on complication rates after intensified radio-chemotherapy. Therefore, for each patient subjected to neoadjuvant treatment a patient without neoadjuvant treatment was matched in the following order for tumor height, discontinuous resection/exstirpation, T-category of the TNM-system, dividing stoma and UICC stage. Results Of all patients operated for rectal cancer, 27.4% received an intensified neoadjuvant treatment. Tumor location in the matched patients were in the lower third (55.2%), middle third (41.0%) and upper third (3.8%) of the rectum. Postoperatively, surgical morbidity was higher after intensified neoadjuvant treatment. In the subgroup with low anterior resection (LAR) the anastomosis leakage rate was higher (26.6% vs. 9.7%) and in the subgroup of patients with rectal exstirpations the perineal wound infection rate was increased (42.2% vs. 18.8%) after intensified radiochemotherapy. Conclusions In rectal cancer the decision for an intensified neoadjuvant treatment comes along with an increase of anastomotic leakage and perineal wound infection. Quality of life is often reduced considerably and has to be balanced against the potential benefit of intensifying neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. PMID:24073705

  3. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  4. A Repot of Surgical Complications in a Series of 262 Consecutive Pediatric Cochlear Implantations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajallouyean, Mohammad; Amirsalari, Susan; Yousefi, Jaleh; Raeesi, Mohammad-Ali; Radfar, Shokofeh; Hassanalifard, Mahdieh

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implantations have become a routinely performed and successful surgical intervention in both adults and children. The current article reports the complications encountered in various age groups of consecutive children who underwent implantation in our center. Methods We performed a prospective analysis of all profoundly deaf children who underwent cochlear implantation from March 2006 to July 2009 at Baqhiyatallah Cochlear Implantation Center. All patients were younger than 5 years old at the time of implantation. Findings The minor complications occurred in 49 (18.7%) cases, The most common postoperative complications were temporary facial weakness detected in 15 cases (5.7%) all of which were reversible. Magnet wound was observed in 14 (5.3%) patients, keloid formation in 10 (3.8%), wound infection in 2 (0.8%), otitis media in 5 (2%), and electrode movement, meningitis, vertigo, Laryngospasm each in 1 (0.4%) case was detected among our patients. Conclusion Cochlear implantation in children continues to be reliable and safe in experienced hands, with a low percentage of severe complications as long as the patient is monitored closely. PMID:23056831

  5. O efeito do índice de massa corporal sobre as complicações no pós-operatório de cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio em idosos The effect of the body mass index on postoperative complications of coronary artery bypass grafting in elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cíntia REIS; Sandra Mari BARBIERO; Luciane RIBAS

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of BMI (body mass index) in the postoperative period of elderly patients undergoing CABG. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective study, carried out in academic hospital, with all patients (n=290), aged or above 60 years, undergone CABG, from August 2006 to July 2007. The patients were divided into tertiles of BMI (<22, 22-27,> 27kg \\/m²). The variables included

  6. Muscle Flaps and Thoracomyoplasty as a Re-redo Procedure for Postoperative Empyema.

    PubMed

    Botianu, Petre Vlah-Horea; Botianu, Alexandru Mihail; Bacarea, Vladimir Constantin

    2014-09-10

    Background?The role of muscle flaps and thoracomyoplasty in the treatment of postoperative empyema is controversial. The major difficulty is given by the sectioning of the muscular masses during the previous thoracotomy/thoracotomies, resulting in a limitation of the volume and mobility of the available neighborhood flaps. Materials and Methods?Between January 1, 2004, and January 1, 2012, we used muscle flaps and thoracomyoplasty as a re-redo procedure in seven patients having a history of at least two major procedures performed through thoracotomy (without considering tube thoracostomy and open thoracic window). In all the cases, the indication for thoracomyoplasty was the presence of an empyema which could not be controlled by the previous procedures. The principle of our procedure was to perform a complete obliteration of the cavity, closure reinforcement of the bronchial fistulae using muscle flaps (in four cases), drainage, and primary closure of the new operative wound. Results?We encountered no mortality, one bronchopneumonia requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment, and one intermuscular seroma; there was no need for prolonged mechanical ventilation or major inotropic support. In all the patients, we achieved complete obliteration of the cavity and per primam wound healing, with postoperative hospitalizations ranging between 30 and 51 days. At late follow-up (1-8 years), we encountered no recurrence and no major functional sequelae. Conclusions?Thoracomyoplasty may be a definitive solution in cases with recurrent postoperative complications. A careful analysis of the local anatomy allows the use of muscle flaps even after more procedures involving opening of the chest. PMID:25207489

  7. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. PMID:22998924

  8. Postoperative acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, S; Ricci, Z

    2015-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents 18-47% of all causes of hospital-acquired AKI and it is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality especially in patients requiring dialysis. Only recently, with the application of new AKI classifications and guidelines (RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO), a more accurate evaluation of the real incidence of kidney dysfunction in patients undergoing surgery has been detailed. In patients undergoing non-cardiac, non-vascular and non-thoracic surgery several independent preoperative and intraoperative predictors of AKI have been identified. Nonetheless, no measure for AKI prevention reached a high level of recommendation, although hemodynamic monitoring and goal-directed fluid management may limit perioperative AKI. Cardiac surgery-related AKI and cardiopulmonary bypass-related AKI have been extensively evaluated and several preventive and treatment strategies have been developed. Open and endovascular surgery-related AKI have been compared and hydration is currently the only preventive strategy with a substantial level of efficacy. In addition, AKI in thoracic surgery, overlooked in the past, has been evaluated, showing that it frequently complicates postoperative course of patients undergoing elective lung cancer resection. Multi-hit mechanisms (ischemia, inflammation, toxins) co-act on patients' predisposition (susceptibility). A multi-step approach is probably necessary to limit the incidence and the severity of postsurgery AKI patients, such as careful risk stratification, adoption of preventive measures and goal directed intraoperative algorithms. The present review will summarize the current literature about the epidemiology of postoperative AKI focusing on patient-related and technical-related risk factors, outcome and prevention strategies in different groups of surgeries. PMID:25057935

  9. Effectiveness of pre-peritoneal continuous wound infusion with lidocaine for pain control following ovariohysterectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Morgaz, Juan; Muñoz-Rascón, Pilar; Serrano-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Navarrete, Rocío; Domínguez, Juan Manuel; Fernández-Sarmiento, José Andrés; Gómez-Villamandos, Rafael J; Serrano, Juan Manuel; Granados, María Del Mar

    2014-12-01

    This study compared the post-operative analgesic efficacy of continuous lidocaine administration with that of intramuscular (IM) methadone in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Thirty-eight dogs were divided randomly into two groups. Following surgery, the lidocaine group (L) received a continuous lidocaine infusion (2?mg/kg/h) through a wound catheter inserted in the pre-peritoneal space; the control group (C) received methadone (0.2?mg/kg IM). A dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS), the Scale-Form Glasgow Composite Measure Scale (CMPS-SF), mechanical wound thresholds, heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were assessed pre-operatively and 2, 4, 6, 18, and 24?h after surgery. The presence of the wound catheter prevented the evaluator from remaining blinded to group allocations. Plasma lidocaine and cortisol levels were measured 2, 6, 18, and 24?h after surgery. There were no intergroup differences in any pain assessment scale scores at any time point. Stable intravenous lidocaine levels were observed. Four animals in the control group but none in the lidocaine group required rescue analgesia. There were no differences in complication rates between groups. Continuous locoregional lidocaine delivered via a wound catheter between the parietal peritoneum and abdominal muscle offers effective analgesia in dogs during ovariohysterectomy and appears to be a promising analgesic option in veterinary surgery. PMID:25257353

  10. Postoperative cerebral venous infarction

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Naik, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative cerebral venous infarction (POCVI) is not an uncommon complication in cranial surgeries. However, literature is sparse on the epidemiology and management of postoperative venous infarcts. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to study the incidence and clinico-radiological course of POCVI in patients in a tertiary level neurosurgical unit and compare the outcome between pediatric and adult patients following POCVI. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study carried out over an 8 month period, consecutive patients undergoing elective major cranial surgeries were monitored neurologically and with serial computed tomography (CT) of the head for POCVI in the postoperative period. All patients had at least one CT head done within 24 hours of surgery. Diagnosis of hemorrhagic POCVI was based on the presence of subcortical, multifocal hyperdensities with irregular margins and or low density areas in the perioperative fields. Nonhemorrhagic POCVI was diagnosed if CT showed a localized hypodensity poorly demarcated in the subcortical white matter with/without mass effect, along with the presence of fresh neurological deficits. Observations and Results: A total of 376 patients were enrolled in the study period. Of these, 26 (7%) developed POCVI. The male: female ratio was 1.2:1 and age ranged from 6 to 68 years with 12 (46%) being under the age of 18 years. Sixteen (61%) patients developed hemorrhagic POCVI and 10 (39%) patients developed nonhemorrhagic POCVI. The mean time to POCVI detection was 72 hours (range 24–144 hours). Seventeen (66%) patients were managed conservatively, and nine (34%) patients underwent decompressive craniectomy as an additional procedure for management of POCVI. In five patients (all with hemorrhagic POCVI), the infarction was an incidental finding. Of the 21 patients with symptomatic POCVI, 13 (61.9%) patients improved neurologically and were discharged with residual deficits. Two (9.5%) showed no neurological improvement till discharge, and 6 (28.5%) died during the hospital stay following POCVI. Conclusions: Children constitute a significant population (46% in our study) of the patients who develop POCVI with poor outcome similar to that seen in adult patients. PMID:25878733

  11. [Complications of liposuction].

    PubMed

    Sattler, G; Eichner, S

    2013-03-01

    Liposuction is the most frequent aesthetic procedure worldwide for adipose tissue reduction and treatment of lipedema. It is being employed with increasing frequency. In 2010, in the USA more than 200.000 liposuctions were performed. Apart from aesthetic indications, liposuction also is suitable for treatment of benign adipose tissue diseases. This intervention is not a simple procedure but requires extensive knowledge and experience to prevent irreversible medical or aesthetic complications. Severe complications including necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, hemorrhage, perforation of inner organs und pulmonary embolism - some even with lethal outcome - occasionally have been reported. These complications were mostly due to inadequate hygiene measures, inappropriate patient selection, use of excessive local anesthesia during mega-liposuction (tumescent technique) and inadequate post-operative surveillance. The complication rate usually reflects a lack of medical experience as well as technical inadequacies. PMID:23494094

  12. Corneal injection track: an unusual complication of intraocular lens implantation and review

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Julie Y.C.; Young, Alvin L.

    2015-01-01

    Phacoemulsification is the main gold standard for cataract operation in the developed world together with foldable intraocular lens (IOL) implantation by injection, allowing for stable wound construction and less postoperative astigmatism. It is a safe procedure with high success rate with the advancement in machines, improvement of IOL injection systems and further maturation of surgeons' techniques. Despite the large number of operations performed every day, foldable IOL injection leading to an intra-stromal corneal track is a very rare complication. We report a case of this unusual finding in a 70-year-old gentleman who has undergone cataract operation in November 2011 in our hospital and will review on the complications related to foldable IOL injection.

  13. Topical antimicrobial toolkit for wound infection.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Alam, Tarik; Marin, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Increased bacterial burden and formation of biofilm has been recognized as one of the key factors contributing to delayed wound healing. There is a toolbox of topical antimicrobial wound dressings that incorporate silver, iodine, polyhexamethylene biguanide, methylene blue/gentian violet, and honey. This article reviews a diverse range of evidence to discuss the advantages and disadvantage of topical antimicrobial dressings. Discussion will provide guidance on when and how to use topical antimicrobial dressings to achieve optimal outcomes and cost-effective wound care. Chronic wounds do not follow a predictable and expected healing trajectory, and they may persist for months or years due to underlying disease processes, recurrent injury, and comorbidities.1 With an aging population and increased prevalence of chronic diseases, the majority of wounds are refractory to healing, placing a significant burden on the health system and individual patients. Bacterial burden and biofilm have been recognized as key factors contributing to persistent inflammation, tissue destruction, delayed wound healing, and other serious complications (especially in individuals who are frail and immune-compromised).2 It has been demonstrated that when bacterial growth reaches a critical threshold of 105 bacteria per gram of tissue, bacterial toxins can cause tissue damage in the superficial wound compartment, delaying healing.2 In the literature, this phenomenon is referred to as critical colonization, increased bacterial burden, superficial infection, or localized infection. According to a recent review, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized infection.3. PMID:25433174

  14. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  15. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  16. Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin and Postoperative Bleeding in Rhytidectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Durnig; Walther Jungwirth

    2006-01-01

    Background: Postoperative bleeding and hematoma are unwanted complica- tions, especially for face lifts, where the rate of hematoma is reported to be high. The authors investigated the rate of complications. As expected, the major adverse event was postoperative bleeding, requiring surgical evacuation of he- matoma in 5.6 percent of cases. Plastic surgeons in Europe are currently under pressure to use

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Obesity is a Risk Factor for Developing Postoperative

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    -known postoperative complication after axillary node dissection (ALND). Although, sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND of developing LE after axillary lymph node dissec- tion (ALND) is considerable (10). Gallagher and AlgORIGINAL ARTICLE Obesity is a Risk Factor for Developing Postoperative Lymphedema in Breast Cancer

  18. [Neurosonographic monitoring in the postoperative period in patients with a severe cranio-cerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Onys'ko, O V

    2009-01-01

    The method of neurosonography was used in 61 patients. Neurosonographic monitoring allowed diagnosing intracerebral postoperative complications and performance of the necessary medical procedures. PMID:19514393

  19. Prévention des complications respiratoires après chirurgie abdominale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Rezaiguia; C Jayr

    1996-01-01

    Abdominal surgery, especially upper abdominal surgical procedures are known to adversely affect pulmonary function. Pulmonary complications are the most frequent cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This review article aimed to analyse the incidence and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary morbidity and their prevention. The most important means for preoperative assessment is the clinical examination; pulmonary function tests (spirometry) are

  20. Reconstruction of soft tissue after complicated calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Koski, E Antti; Kuokkanen, Hannu O M; Koskinen, Seppo K; Tukiainen, Erkki J

    2004-01-01

    A total of 35 flap reconstructions were done to cover exposed calcaneal bones in 31 patients. All patients had calcaneal fractures, 19 of which were primarily open. Soft tissue reconstruction for the closed fractures was indicated by a postoperative wound complication. A microvascular flap was used for reconstruction in 21 operations (gracilis, n = 11; anterolateral thigh, n = 5; rectus abdominis, n = 3; and latissimus dorsi, n = 2). A suralis neurocutaneous flap was used in eight, local muscle flaps in three, and local skin flaps in three cases. The mean follow-up time was 14 months (range 3 months-4 years). One suralis flap failed and was replaced by a latissimus dorsi flap. Necrosis of the edges that required revision affected three flaps. Deep infection developed in two patients and delayed wound healing in another four. During the follow-up the soft tissues healed in all patients and there were no signs of calcaneal osteitis. Flaps were considered too bulky in five patients. Soft tissues heal most rapidly with microvascular flaps. In the long term, gracilis muscle covered with free skin grafts gives a good contour to the foot. The suralis flap is reliable and gives a good final aesthetic outcome. Local muscles can be transposed for reconstruction in small defects. PMID:15513600

  1. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  2. The Role of Wound Healing and Its Everyday Application in Plastic Surgery: A Practical Perspective and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ireton, Jordan E.; Unger, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After surgery it is often recommended that patients should refrain from strenuous physical activity for 4–6 weeks. This recommendation is based on the time course of wound healing. Here, we present an overview of incisional wound healing with a focus on 2 principles that guide our postoperative recommendations: the gain of tensile strength of a wound over time and the effect of mechanical stress on wound healing. Methods: A systematic search of the English literature was conducted using OVID, Cochrane databases, and PubMed. Inclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing the dynamics of incisional wound healing, and exclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing nonincisional wounds. Results: Experiments as early as 1929 laid the groundwork for our postoperative activity recommendations. Research using animal models has shown that the gain in tensile strength of a surgical wound is sigmoidal in trajectory, reaching maximal strength approximately 6 weeks postoperatively. Although human and clinical data are limited, the principles gained from laboratory investigation have provided important insights into the relationship among mechanical stress, collagen dynamics, and the time course of wound healing. Conclusion: Our postoperative activity recommendations are based on a series of animal studies. Clinical research supporting these recommendations is minimal, with the most relevant clinical data stemming from early motion protocols in the orthopedic literature. We must seek to establish clinical data to support our postoperative activity recommendations so that we can maximize the physiologic relationships between wound healing and mechanical stress. PMID:25289204

  3. Non-equilibrium Air Plasma for Wound Bleeding Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Lin, Chuan-Shun; Chiang, Shu-Hsing

    A low temperature non-equilibrium air plasma spray is tested as a blood coagulator. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma effluent indicates that it carries abundant reactive atomic oxygen (RAO), which can activate erythrocyte - platelet interactions to enhance blood coagulation for plug formation. Tests of the device for wound bleeding control were performed on pigs. Four types of wounds, straight cut and cross cut in the ham area, a hole in an ear saphenous vein, and a cut to an ear artery, were examined. The results showed that this plasma spray could effectively stop the bleeding and reduced the bleeding time considerably. Post-Operative observation of straight cut and cross cut wound healing was carried out. It was found that the plasma treatment had a positive impact on wound healing, in particular, of the cross cut wound; its healing time was shortened by a half.

  4. Postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Lovich-Sapola, Jessica; Smith, Charles E; Brandt, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Prevention and control of postoperative pain are essential. Inadequate treatment of postoperative pain continues to be a major problem after many surgeries and leads to worse outcomes, including chronic postsurgical pain. Optimal management of postoperative pain requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, methods available to reduce pain, invasiveness of the procedure, and patient factors associated with increased pain, such as anxiety, depression, catastrophizing, and neuroticism. Use of a procedure-specific, multimodal perioperative pain management provides a rational basis for enhanced postoperative pain control, optimization of analgesia, decrease in adverse effects, and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:25814108

  5. Effects of steroids on wound healing: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goforth, P; Gudas, C J

    1980-01-01

    Since some podiatric surgeons are using glucocorticosteroids to minimize postoperative edema and pain associated with traumatic procedures, the effects on wound healing should be understood as much as possible so that maximum results can be achieved with minimal risk to the patient. Considerable animal and human research has been done on the potential wound-healing effects of glucocorticosteroids. Current studies indicate a detrimental wound-healing effect with the use of glucocorticosteroids. Increased infection will also be discussed. PMID:7016965

  6. Laparoscopic appendicectomy is a favorable alternative for complicated appendicitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, J.; Agarwal, Prakash; Bagdi, R. K.; Balagopal, S.; Madhu, R.; Balamourougane, P.; Khanday, Zaffer Saleem

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of laparoscopy in complicated appendicitis in children. Materials and Methods: A total of 119 children were operated for appendicitis between October 2005 and May 2008 at SRMC, Chennai. Forty-one patients underwent open appendicectomy (OA), and 71 patients underwent laparoscopic appendicectomy (LA). Twenty-six cases among the LA group and 16 among the OA group had complicated appendicitis. Twenty-six cases were completed laparoscopically, and 2 needed conversion to OA. Results: Out of 26 patients in the LA group, 23 made an uneventful recovery without any complications. One had minor port site infection, and 2 had prolonged loose stools. Out of 16 in the OA group, 7 had complications. Three had wound infection, 2 had loose stools, 1 had fecal fistula and another required subsequent surgeries. Operative duration in LA was 86.7 min (range: 75 to 120 min) and 90.3 min (range: 70 to 150 min) in OA. Oral feed resumption in LA was done at average of 2.7 days and in OA at 4.3 days. IV antibiotics were administered for an average of 3.6 days in LA and 4.8 days in OA, parenteral analgesic for 2.7 days in LA and 4.2 days in OA. The length of hospital stay was 5.4 days in LA and 7.3 days in OA. Conclusion: LA is a favorable alternative in children with complicated appendicitis in view of less postoperative pain, fewer postoperative complications and quicker return to normal activity. PMID:20011482

  7. Surgery-Related Complications and Sequelae in Management of Tuberculosis of Spine

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Moon, Young-Wan; Moon, Hanlim; Kim, Sung-Sim

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Medical record-based survey. Purpose To survey the overall incidence of the intra- and postoperative complications and sequelae, and to propose the preventive measures to reduce complications in the spinal tuberculosis surgery. Overview of Literature There is no study focused on the surgery-related complications and sequelae, with some touching lightly on the clinical problems. Methods There were 901 patients in this study, including 92 paraplegics. One hundred eighty-six patients had no visible deformity, while those of 715 patients were visible. Six hundred fifty-nine patients had slight to moderate non-rigid kyphosis, and 56 had severe rigid kyphosis. Sixty-seven out of 92 paraplegics had slight to moderate non-rigid kyphosis, and 25 had severe kyphosis. There were 134 cervical and cervicodorsal lesions, 518 thoracic and thoracolumbar lesions, and 249 lumbar and lumbosacral lesions. Seven hundred sixty-four patients had primarily anterior surgeries, and 137 had posterior surgeries. Instrumentation surgery was combined in 174 patients. Results There were intra- and postoperative complications: direct large vessel and neurological injuries (cord, roots, nerves), late thrombophlebitis, various thoracic cavity problems, esophagus and ureter injuries, peritoneum perforation, ileus, wound infections, stabilization failure, increase of deformity and late adjacent joint and bone problems. Thrombophlebitis and sympatheticolysis symptoms and signs in the lower limbs were the most common complications related with anterior lumbar and lumbosacral surgeries. Kyphosis increased in 31.5% of the non-instrumented anterior surgery cases (42% in children and 21% in adults). Conclusions The safe, effective and most familiar surgical procedure should be adopted to minimize complications and sequelae. Cosmetic spinal surgery should be withheld if functional improvement could not be expected. PMID:25187860

  8. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  9. Emphysematous cystitis: an unreported complication after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Dumitrascu, T; Preda, Emi; Ionescu, M

    2015-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy was associated with an increased morbidity, and septic complications are the primary cause of death in these patients. However, severe sepsis, caused by a postoperative urinary tract infection, is uncommon. It is presented the case of a 72 years old man, with a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy for an ampullary adenocarcinoma. Postoperatively, the patient developed a chyle leak, and a severe urinary tract infection (i.e., emphysematous cystitis), with septic shock. The diagnosis, management and outcome are discussed. In conclusion, emphysematous cystitis is a potentially life-threatening complication, which may occur due to the postoperative immunodepression after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25970961

  10. Wound care centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... multiple types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy Depending on the type of wound, your doctor may recommend hyperbaric oxygen therapy . Oxygen is important for healing. During this treatment, ...

  11. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gastrointestinal system, or respiratory system — fluids and other contaminants could get into the wound and cause infection. ... sure there are no remaining bacteria or other contaminants, they will stitch or close the wound. Sometimes, ...

  12. Gunshot wounds - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

  13. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or a brace, specialized castings, or use a wheelchair or crutches. These devices will reduce the pressure ... location, pressure on the wound from walking or standing, swelling, circulation, blood glucose levels, wound care, and ...

  14. G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Aleah L.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation following Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (3–4 month) and aged (18–20 month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal, subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 ?l/injection) or saline control (50 ?l/injection) 30 minutes after wound infection. Mice were sacrificed at days 3 and 7 post wound infection and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no affect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of post-operative wound infection or chronic, non-healing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

  15. Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: timothy.wagner@amedd.army.mil; Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Suit, Herman D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S. [Orthopaedic Oncology, Department of Orthopaedics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yoon, Sam S. [Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Gebhardt, Marc C. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Mankin, Henry J. [Orthopaedic Oncology, Department of Orthopaedics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

  16. Post-operative delirium in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, B; Elango, P; Ganessan, R

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a common, but an often underdiagnosed complication in the elderly following major surgery. Recognising delirium in early stages and diagnosing the condition based on established criteria can improve the outcome and management. Managing delirium with environmental, supportive and pharmacological interventions will possibly reduce the incidence and side-effects associated with post-operative delirium. The purpose of this article is to provide an over view of the current knowledge about the disease, diagnosis, pathogenesis, preventive strategies, and treatment of post-operative delirium. PMID:25024465

  17. Postoperative Ventilatory Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie A. Price; Norman W. Rizk

    Immediate postoperative evaluation of the patient remains a crucial role of the intensivist. Postoperative patients can be divided into the otherwise healthy, chronically ill, and acutely ill for strategizing about care. For chronically ill and acutely ill patients who require ongoing ventilation, ventilator management continues to evolve toward modes that are more interactive with patient needs. Newer modes of ventilation

  18. Minimally invasive vein harvesting significantly reduces pain and wound morbidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward A. Black; R. N. Karen Campbell; Keith M. Channon; Chandi Ratnatunga; Ravi Pillai

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Minimally invasive saphenous vein harvesting is advocated to reduce wound morbidity. Our early experience with minimally invasive techniques, however, suggested that increased tissue traction and trauma might follow. We aimed to test the hypothesis that minimally invasive harvesting reduces post-operative pain and inflammation. A secondary objective was to determine if minimally invasive harvesting could be performed efficiently. Methods: Forty

  19. Minimally invasive vein harvesting significantly reduces pain and wound morbidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward A Black; R. N Karen Campbell; Keith M Channon; Chandi Ratnatunga; Ravi Pillai

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Minimally invasive saphenous vein harvesting is advocated to reduce wound morbidity. Our early experience with minimally invasive techniques, however, suggested that increased tissue traction and trauma might follow. We aimed to test the hypothesis that minimally invasive harvesting reduces post-operative pain and inflammation. A secondary objective was to determine if minimally invasive harvesting could be performed efficiently. Methods: Forty

  20. Nasal tip complications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Richard E

    2012-06-01

    As cosmetic nasal surgery becomes increasingly more popular worldwide, postoperative nasal tip deformities have also become far more prevalent. Owing to the cosmetic prominence of the nose and to the functional importance of the nasal airway, postsurgical nasal tip deformities often result in debilitating emotional and physiological consequences. However, contemporary principles of cosmetic and functional nasal surgery, when applied expertly, will typically prevent such complications and will simultaneously permit a natural, attractive, and well-functioning nose. This article explores the mechanisms leading to common iatrogenic deformities of the nasal tip and provides alternative techniques for the safe and effective modification of nasal tip contour. PMID:22723230

  1. Biofilm in wound care.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial. PMID:25757387

  2. [Experimental stab wound].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Miroslav; Vorel, František; Zelený, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Stab wounds caused by knives and daggers are usually of different appearances. The knife wound has one edge sharp while the second one is blunt. The wound caused by blow of dagger has both edges sharp. The forensic expert must very often decide whether the knife or dagger was used. The aim of this experimental work was to show how a single-edged knife penetrates the skin and causes the wound typical for the double-edged dagger. The fact was verified. The wound typical for dagger can be found if the knife is used only according to the scheme. The forensic expert can say that a one cutting edge knife was used if the one edge of wound is squared and the other one is sharp. If the both of them are sharp, forensic expert must be very careful in his decision.Key words: stab wounds - knife - dagger - forensic expertise. PMID:25671417

  3. Complications of Breast-cancer Radiotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Senkus-Konefka; J. Jassem

    2006-01-01

    Although the beneficial effect of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer is well documented, this treatment may be related to a number of complications, which may affect patient quality of life and possibly survival. Among significant long-term irradiation sequelae are cardiac and lung damage, lymphoedema, brachial plexopathy, impaired shoulder mobility and second malignancies. The risk of these complications, particularly high with

  4. Do progressive tension sutures really decrease complications in abdominoplasty?

    PubMed

    Khan, Sami; Teotia, Sumeet S; Mullis, William F; Jacobs, William E; Beasley, Michael E; Smith, Kevin L; Eaves, Felmont F; Finical, Stephan J; Watterson, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of progressive tension sutures (PTS) in preventing or reducing seroma formation and local wound complications in patients undergoing abdominoplasty. Forty-nine patients who underwent abdominoplasty procedures with the use of PTS were retrospectively compared with a historical control group of 54 patients who underwent standard abdominoplasty. Primary outcomes measured were seroma formation and local wound complications, including hypertrophic scar formation, umbilical distortion, and wound necrosis. Secondary outcomes were all other complications and time to drain removal. Overall complication rates and local wound complication rates were significantly reduced with the addition of PTS to abdominoplasty. Seroma formation and the time to drain removal were reduced in the PTS group, but the findings were not statistically significant. PMID:16374089

  5. Reconstruction option of abdominal wounds with large tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal wall defects result from trauma, abdominal wall tumors, necrotizing infections or complications of previous abdominal surgeries. Apart from cosmetics, abdominal wall defects have strong negative functional impact on the patients. Many different techniques exist for abdominal wall repair. Most problematic and troublesome are defects, where major part of abdominal wall had to be resected and tissue for transfer or reconstruction is absent. Case presentation Authors of the article present operative technique, in which reconstruction of abdominal wall was managed by composite polypropylene mesh with absorbable collagen film, creation of granulation tissue with use of NPWT (negative pressure wound therapy), and subsequent split skin grafting. Three patients with massive abdominal wall defect were successfully managed and abdominal wall reconstruction was performed by mentioned technique. Functional and cosmetic effect is acceptable and patients have good postoperative quality of life. Conclusions Patients with giant abdominal defects can benefit from described technique. It serves as the only option, with which abdominal wall is fully reconstructed without need for the secondary intervention. PMID:25103782

  6. [Pathophysiology and mechanisms of postoperative cognitive dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Uchino, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Fumiaki; Nishiyama, Ryota; Ishida, Yuhsuke; Saiki, Iwao; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi

    2014-11-01

    Postoperative cognitive impairment is a recognized clinical phenomenon. Previously, such clinical findings were called "adverse cerebral effects of anesthesia on old people". POCD is transient disturbance that can affect patients of any age but is more common in elderly people. Its relevance with the immediate post-operative phase was made clear. The aging of the population and new developments in medicine both lead to the increasing number of elderly patietnts undergoing extensive surgery. Mechanism of POCD is considered to be due to the inflammatory response and Ca2+ dysregulation of the brain. For the diagnosis of POCD, pscychometric tests are applied. Risk factors for POCD are aging, extensive invasive operations, intra and postoperative complications, and anesthetics. To reduce POCD, it is necessary to provide preoperative screening and cognitive training, minimally invasive surgery, the use of short-acting agents, meticulous anesthetic technique to prevent perioperative disturbances of homeostasis and organ ischemia, tight volume balance, and EEG monitoring. PMID:25731051

  7. [Postoperative respiratory insufficiency and its treatment].

    PubMed

    Kösek, V; Wiebe, K

    2015-05-01

    The development of a postoperative respiratory insufficiency is typically caused by several factors and include patient-related risks, the extent of the procedure and postoperative complications. Morbidity and mortality rates in acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are high. It is important to have consistent strategies for prevention and preoperative conditioning is essential primarily for high-risk patients. Treatment of established postoperative lung failure requires early tracheotomy, protective ventilation (tidal volume 6 ml/kg body weight), elevated positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP, 10-20 mmH2O), recurrent bronchoscopy and early patient mobilization. In critical cases an extracorporeal lung assist is considered to be beneficial as a bridge to recovery and for realizing a protective ventilation protocol. Different systems with separate indications are available. The temporary application of a lung assist allows thoracic surgery to be performed safely in patients presenting with insufficient respiratory function. PMID:25801596

  8. Surgical site infection complicating breast cancer surgery in kuwait.

    PubMed

    Omar, Abeer A; Al-Mousa, Haifaa H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common postoperative complication associated with breast cancer surgery. The present investigation aimed to determine the SSI rate after breast cancer surgeries and the causative microorganisms. Patients and Methods. All patients who underwent breast surgery in Kuwait Cancer Control Center as a treatment for breast cancer from January 2009-December 2010 were prospectively followed for the development of SSI. Indirect detection was used to identify SSIs through medical record to review and discussion with the treating surgeons. Results. The number of operations was 438. Females represented 434 (99.1%) cases while males constituted only 4 (0.9%) cases. SSIs were diagnosed after 10 operations, all for female cases. Most of the SSIs (8 cases; 80%) were detected after patients were discharged, during outpatient followup. Out of those 5/8; (62.5%) were readmitted for management of SSI. Nine patients (90%) received systemic antibiotic therapy for management of their wound infection. The SSI rate was 2.3%. The main causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) which was responsible for 40% of infections. Gram negative bacteria were isolated from 40% of the cases. Conclusion. SSI is an important complication following breast cancer surgery. Microbiological diagnosis is an essential tool for proper management of such patients. PMID:24967132

  9. Designing Hydrogel Adhesives for Corneal Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Today, corneal wounds are repaired using nylon sutures. Yet there are a number of complications associated with suturing the cornea, and thus there is interest in an adhesive to replace or supplement sutures in the repair of corneal wounds. We are designing and evaluating corneal adhesives prepared from dendrimers – single molecular weight, highly branched polymers. We have explored two strategies to form these ocular adhesives. The first involves a photocrosslinking reaction and the second uses a peptide ligation reactions to couple the individual dendrimers together to from the adhesive. These adhesives were successfully used to repair corneal perforations, close the flap produced in a LASIK procedure, and secure a corneal transplant. PMID:17889330

  10. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  11. Diagnosis, prevention and management of postoperative pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Sj Singh; Kulshrestha, A

    2012-07-01

    Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for prevention of this postoperative complication so as to decrease morbidity and mortality. The various search engines for preparation of this manuscript were used which included Entrez (including Pubmed and Pubmed Central), NIH.gov, Medknow.com, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, Scopus, Science Direct, MedHelp.org, yahoo.com and google.com. Manual search was carried out and various text books and journals of anesthesia and critical care medicine were also searched. From the information gathered, it was observed that postoperative cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients with serious cardiovascular diseases is most common followed by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema which can be due to fluid overload in the postoperative period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post-extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure. NPPE carries a good prognosis if promptly diagnosed and appropriately treated with or without mechanical ventilation. PMID:23439791

  12. Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, SJ Singh; Kulshrestha, A

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for prevention of this postoperative complication so as to decrease morbidity and mortality. The various search engines for preparation of this manuscript were used which included Entrez (including Pubmed and Pubmed Central), NIH.gov, Medknow.com, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, Scopus, Science Direct, MedHelp.org, yahoo.com and google.com. Manual search was carried out and various text books and journals of anesthesia and critical care medicine were also searched. From the information gathered, it was observed that postoperative cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients with serious cardiovascular diseases is most common followed by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema which can be due to fluid overload in the postoperative period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post-extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure. NPPE carries a good prognosis if promptly diagnosed and appropriately treated with or without mechanical ventilation. PMID:23439791

  13. Infected ptosis surgery – a rare complication from a multidrug-resistant organism

    PubMed Central

    Jan-Bond, Chan; Norazah, Abdul-Rahman; Sree-Kumar, Palani; Zunaina, Embong; Fazilawati, Qamarruddin

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy had a case of congenital ptosis of the right eye and has undergone frontalis sling surgery using Gore-tex material. There was no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication. However, the patient defaulted his follow-up and presented with right eye preseptal abscess secondary to infected surgical wound 1 month after surgery. He was treated with multiple antibiotics and underwent repeated incision and drainage procedures. However, there was still no resolution of the right eye preseptal abscess. The patient’s condition subsequently improved after removal of the Gore-tex material and treatment with an antibiotic combination of ceftazidime and amikacin. Microbiological analysis finally isolated the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species. At 6 months follow-up, his right upper eyelid was healed with scarring, but without ptosis. PMID:25945032

  14. Serum cholesterol levels and postoperative atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-operative atrial fibrillation is an important complication after coronary bypass surgery. As inflammation and oxidative stress were makedly encountered in the etiology, high cholesterol was also defined to provoke atrial fibrillation. In this present study, the relationship between postoperative atrial fibrillation and preoperative serum lipid levels were evaluated. Methods A total of 100 patients, who were operated at the department of Cardiovascular Surgery of our hospital were included to the study analysis. Patients, who had preoperative atrial fibrillation, thyroid dysfunction, or left atrial dilatation (above 4.5 cm) were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into two groups with postoperative atrial fibrillation development (Group I n?=?36), and without atrial fibrillation development (Group II n?=?64). Preoperative routine blood analyses, ECG, echocardiography were evaluated. Patients were followed for atrial fibrillation development for one month starting from the intensive care unit at the postoperative period. Serum lipid profiles and thyroid function were measured. For homogenization of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress, treatments other than statins, betablockers, calcium channel blockers, aspirin, ACE inhibitors, and ARB were stopped for 10 days. Atrial fibrillation for at least ?5 minutes in the intensive care unit was accepted as postoperative atrial fibrillation. Results Demographic data were similiar between groups (p?>?0.05). There was no difference in TC levels between groups, whereas LDL-C levels were statistically lower in patients developing post-operative atrial fibrillation (106.67?±?28.36 vs 118.75?±?27.75; P?postoperative atrial fibrillation development. High levels of LDL-C in the preoperative period could be predictor of atrial fibrillation development in the post operative period. PMID:24712763

  15. Complications in periocular rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Mack, William P

    2010-08-01

    Thorough preoperative evaluation with meticulous surgical planning to achieve facial aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface is imperative to avoid or decrease potential functional and/or cosmetic complications in cosmetic periocular surgery. Before performing surgery, the physician should be aware of the patient's history of dry eyes, previous facial trauma, previous injection of Botox Cosmetic, history of previous laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and past facial surgery. A full evaluation should be performed on the upper eyelid/brow region to assess for the presence of brow ptosis, brow/eyelid asymmetry, dermatochalasis/pseudodermatochalasis, eyelid ptosis, and deep superior sulcus. On the lower eyelid/cheek examination, special attention should be directed to the diagnosis of underlying negative vector, dry eyes, prominent eyes, lower lid retraction, ectropion, lateral canthal dystopia, lower eyelid laxity, scleral show, and lagophthalmos, with a rejuvenation goal that focuses on obtaining a youthful fullness through repositioning and reinforcing efforts to avoid the negative effects of hollowness. Intraoperative and postoperative medical and surgical management of cosmetic periocular surgery complications focus on decreasing the risk of postoperative ptosis, lagophthalmos, lid retraction, and lid asymmetry, with special attention to limiting the risk of visual loss secondary to orbital hemorrhage. PMID:20659676

  16. Negative pressure wound therapy to prevent seromas and treat surgical incisions after total hip arthroplasty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milena Pachowsky; Johannes Gusinde; Andrea Klein; Siegfried Lehrl; Stefan Schulz-Drost; Philipp Schlechtweg; Johannes Pauser; Kolja Gelse; Matthias H. Brem

    Purpose  The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) to improve wound healing after\\u000a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and its influence on the development of postoperative seromas in the wound area.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials  The study is a prospective randomised evaluation of NPWT in patients with large surgical wounds after THA, randomising patients\\u000a to either a

  17. Optimizing postoperative sexual function after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tutolo, Manuela; Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno; Gallina, Andrea; Abdollah, Firas; Capitanio, Umberto; Bianchi, Marco; Passoni, Niccolò; Nini, Alessandro; Fossati, Nicola; Rigatti, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the complications associated with pelvic surgery. The significance of ED as a complication following pelvic surgery, especially radical prostatectomy (RP), lies in the negative impact that it has on patients’ sexual and overall life. In the literature, rates of ED following RP range from 25% to 100%. Such variety is associated with pelvic dissection and conservation of neurovascular structures. Another important factor impacting on postoperative ED is the preoperative erectile function of the patient. Advances in the knowledge of pelvic anatomy and pathological mechanisms led to a refinement of pelvic surgical techniques, with attention to the main structures that if damaged compromise erectile function. These improvements resulted in lower postoperative ED rates and better erectile recovery, especially in patients undergoing RP. Furthermore, surgery alone is not sufficient to prevent this complication, and thus, several medical strategies have been tested with the aim of maximizing erectile function recovery. Indeed it seems that prevention of postoperative ED must be addressed by a multimodal approach. The aim of this review is to give a picture of recent knowledge, novel techniques and therapeutic approaches in order to reach the best combination of treatments to reduce the rate of ED after pelvic surgery. PMID:23205061

  18. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  19. Chryseobacterium in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Kienzle, N; Muller, M; Pegg, S

    2001-03-01

    Chryseobacteria are gram negative organisms, formerly known as Flavobacteria, which rarely cause infections of burn wounds. This article documents three cases of Chryseobacterium infection in burn wounds and adds to the other two cases that have been reported in English literature. Two patients died, with one of the deaths linked to a Chryseobacteria bacteraemia. In two patients, there was an associated history of first aid treatment with untreated water. Patients whose burn wounds are suspected to be infected with Chryseobacterium require wound excision and coverage in combination with antibiotic therapy such as ciprofloxacin, vancomycin and rifampicin. PMID:11226658

  20. Telemedicine for wound management

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi K.

    2012-01-01

    The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process. PMID:23162242

  1. Reconstructive perineoplasty in the management of non-healing wounds after anorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, C; Pescatori, M

    2001-04-01

    Non-healing wounds (NHW) following anorectal surgery cause great distress to the patient and may be followed by a retracting scar causing anal deformity and incontinence. The management of NHW is controversial. The aim of this study was to review our experience with reconstructive perineoplasty in the treatment of such condition. From January 1992 to June 2000, we treated 12 patients affected by NHW (4 men and 8 women, mean age 47 years), not responding to conservative treatment. None had Crohn's disease or HIV infection. Pre- and postoperative anal manometry and ultrasound were carried out in 8 patients. All had microspinal anesthesia, mechanical preparation of the intestine, and perineal wound cleansing. Reconstructive perineoplasty was performed by means of local flaps (i. e. cutaneous, fasciocutaneous, myocutaneous). Median follow-up was 13 months (range, 1 to 70). Postoperative complications were as follows: 5 perineal suture dehiscences (1 total, 4 partial), the flap being resutured in one case under local anesthesia; one patient required dilatations for mild anal stricture. No case of gross fecal incontinence, retracting scar or perineal ulcer was observed. Among those patients who had disordered anal continence prior to surgery, all but one improved continence score following perineoplasty from 2.8+/-2.2 to 1.8+/-1.2 (mean +/- sdm, not significant). Following reconstructive perineoplasty, no significant change was observed in functional and morphologic patterns of the anal sphincters either at manometry or by ultrasound. Reconstructive perineoplasty resulted in a good functional and clinical outcome in most cases and, therefore, may be considered an effective procedure in the management of NHW. PMID:11793257

  2. Anesthesia, Microcirculation and Wound Repair in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bentov, Itay; Reed, May J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related changes in skin contribute to impaired wound healing after surgical procedures. Changes in skin with age include decline in thickness and composition, a decrease in the number of most cell types and diminished microcirculation. The microcirculation provides tissue perfusion, fluid homeostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause further disruption of the microvasculature of aged skin. Perioperative management can be modified to minimize insults to aged tissues. Judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control and increased tissue oxygen tension are examples of adjustable variables that support the microcirculation. Anesthetic agents influence the microcirculation from a combination of effects on cardiac output, arterial pressure and local micro-vascular changes. We examine the role of anesthetic management in optimizing the microcirculation and potentially improving post-operative wound repair in older persons. PMID:24195972

  3. Postoperative analgesia in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Elisabeth; Hoffmann, Clément; Keita, Hawa

    2013-02-01

    Elderly people represent the fastest-growing segment of our society and undergo surgery more frequently than other age groups. Effective postoperative analgesia is essential in these patients because inadequate pain control after surgery is associated with adverse outcomes in elderly patients. However, management of postoperative pain in older patients may be complicated by a number of factors, including a higher risk of age- and disease-related changes in physiology and disease-drug and drug-drug interactions. Physiological changes related to aging need to be carefully considered because aging is individualized and progressive. Assessment of pain management needs to include chronological age, biological age with regard to renal, liver and cardiac functions, and the individual profile of pathology and prescribed medications. In addition, ways in which pain should be assessed, particularly in patients with cognitive impairment, must be considered. Cognitively intact older patients can use most commonly used unidimensional pain scales such as the visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), numeric rating scale (NRS) and facial pain scale (FPS). VRS and NRS are the most appropriate pain scales for the elderly. In older patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment, the VRS is a better tool. For severe cognitively impaired older patients, behavioural scales validated in the postoperative context, such as Doloplus-2 or Algoplus, are appropriate. For postoperative pain treatment, most drugs (e.g. paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nefopam, tramadol, codeine, morphine, local anaesthetics), techniques (e.g. intravenous morphine titration, subcutaneous morphine, intravenous or epidural patient-controlled analgesia, intrathecal morphine, peripheral nerve block) and strategies (e.g. anticipated intraoperative analgesia or multimodal analgesia) used for acute pain management can be used in older patients. However, in view of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes in older persons, the higher incidence of co-morbidities and concurrent use of other drugs, each must be carefully adjusted to suit each patient. Evaluation of treatment efficacy and incidence and severity of adverse events should be monitored closely, and the concept of 'start low and go slow' should be adopted for most analgesic strategies. PMID:23288604

  4. Prognostic Significance of Complications after Laparoscopic Colectomy for Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiang; Wu, Weidong; Zhang, Kundong; Cen, Gang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Huang, Kejian; Huang, Chen; Qiu, Zhengjun

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study sought to evaluate the prognostic significance of postoperative complications for colon cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Methods From May 2006 to May 2009, a total 224 patients who underwent laparoscopic curative resection (R0) for colon cancer were included in our retrospective study. Postoperative complications were evaluated according to a standardized grading system. The main outcome measurements of our study were overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS), which were then compared between the no complication and complication groups. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the correlation between complications and prognosis. Results Fifty-nine postoperative complications occurred in 43 patients. The overall morbidity rate was 26.3%. The 5-year OS in the complication group was 41.4% compared with 78.5% in the no complication group (P<0.001). The cumulative incidence of relapse was also more aggressive in patients with complications (5-year RFS: complication group 40.9% vs. no complication group 82.1%, P<0.001). Multivariate analysis identified complications as a significant factor increasing the risk for both OS (RR 2.737; 95% CI 1.512–4.952; P?=?0.001) and RFS (RR 4.247; 95% CI 2.291–7.876; P<0.001). Conclusion Postoperative complications could pose a significant adverse impact not only on OS but also on RFS in patients with colon cancer even when laparoscopic R0 resection is available. PMID:25299478

  5. Treatment of postoperative voiding dysfunction following incontinence surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danielle D. Sweeney; Wendy W. Leng

    2007-01-01

    Persistent postoperative voiding dysfunction is a known complication following female stress incontinence surgery. Although\\u000a many variations on surgical technique exist, the most common cause remains attributable to hypersuspension of the urethra.\\u000a The diagnosis of postoperative voiding dysfunction in this setting can be challenging due to the lack of standardized criteria\\u000a and varied clinical presentation. Furthermore, patients can present with a

  6. Treatment of postoperative voiding dysfunction following incontinence surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danielle D. Sweeney; Wendy W. Leng

    2005-01-01

    Persistent postoperative voiding dysfunction is a known complication following female stress incontinence surgery. Although\\u000a many variations on surgical technique exist, the most common cause remains attributable to hypersuspension of the urethra.\\u000a The diagnosis of postoperative voiding dysfunction in this setting can be challenging due to the lack of standardized criteria\\u000a and varied clinical presentation. Furthermore, patients can present with a

  7. [Hemangioma: complications].

    PubMed

    Casanova, D; Norat, F; Bardot, J; Magalon, G

    2006-01-01

    Hemangioma (HMG) is a benign tumour of the child generally evolving to spontaneous regression. Sometimes this evolution can become complicated in a more or less serious way according to its localization or of its importance. If local complications are, in the most of cases, without gravity, complications of a general nature like thrombopenia or cardiac failure may compromise the vital prognosis. There are in addition serious forms where, according to its localization or its importance, the HMG can compromise the aesthetic, or functional even vital outcome. PMID:16997443

  8. Biomechanics and Wound Healing in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Dupps, William J.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    The biomechanical and wound healing properties of the cornea undermine the predictability and stability of refractive surgery and contribute to discrepancies between attempted and achieved visual outcomes after LASIK, surface ablation and other keratorefractive procedures. Furthermore, patients predisposed to biomechanical failure or abnormal wound healing can experience serious complications such as keratectasia or clinically significant corneal haze, and more effective means for the identification of such patients prior to surgery are needed. In this review, we describe the cornea as a complex structural composite material with pronounced anisotropy and heterogeneity, summarize current understanding of major biomechanical and reparative pathways that contribute to the corneal response to laser vision correction, and review the role of these processes in ectasia, intraocular pressure measurement artifact, diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and corneal haze. The current understanding of differences in the corneal response after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), LASIK and femtosecond-assisted LASIK are reviewed. Surgical and disease models that integrate corneal geometric data, substructural anatomy, elastic and viscoelastic material properties and wound healing behavior have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and minimize complications but depend on the identification of preoperative predictors of biomechanical and wound healing responses in individual patients. PMID:16720023

  9. Wound problems in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vince, Kelly G; Abdeen, Ayesha

    2006-11-01

    Wound problems can often be prevented with careful planning. When transverse incisions are used for knee surgery many years prior to any anticipated knee arthroplasty, no major problems are typically encountered with a conventional, anterior longitudinal incision. We recommend lateral incisions (eg, after a previous lateral tibial plateau fracture) be reused for TKA. When confronted with multiple previous incisions, surgeons would best use the most recently healed or the most lateral. We prefer soft tissue reconstruction with expanders or a gastrocnemius flap if there are multiple incisions, if the skin and scar tissue are adherent to underlying tissue, or if wound healing seems questionable. Deep infection must be determined by aspiration. When present, we believe treatment must include irrigation, débridement, polyethylene exchange if acute, and resection arthroplasty if chronic. Poor wound healing is a potentially devastating complication that may result in multiple reconstructive procedures and even amputation. Early recognition followed by expeditious débridement and soft tissue reconstruction should be used for managing wound complications after TKA. PMID:17079990

  10. Angiogenesis in Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcia G. Tonnesen; Xiaodong Feng; Richard A. F. Clark

    2000-01-01

    During wound healing, angiogenic capillary sprouts invade the fibrin\\/fibronectin-rich wound clot and within a few days organize into a microvascular network throughout the granulation tissue. As collagen accumulates in the granulation tissue to produce scar, the density of blood vessels diminishes. A dynamic interaction occurs among endothelial cells, angiogenic cytokines, such as FGF, VEGF, TGF-?, angiopoietin, and mast cell tryptase,

  11. Wound-Periderm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Idit Ginzberg

    Herbivores, and particularly chewing insects, cause substantial damage to the plant. In addition to lost tissue, there are great concerns of pathogen invasion and water loss at the site of the attack. One of the plant’s defense strategies is the formation of wound periderm at the boundaries of the invaded or damaged region to isolate it from non-wounded healthy tissue.

  12. Postoperative radiographs after ACL reconstruction are not cost-effective.

    PubMed

    Stucken, Charlton; Flato, Russell; O'Hagan, Thomas; O'Brien, Daniel; Ruiz, Devin; Cohen, Steven B; Dodson, Christopher; Ciccotti, Michael G; Tjoumakaris, Fotios

    2015-04-01

    Postoperative radiographs have become standard after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, even though few findings in the literature substantiate their efficacy. The goal of this study was to determine whether routine postoperative radiographs were cost-effective in patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. In addition, the authors sought to determine whether these radiographs provided meaningful clinical information that changed postoperative management. Between January and December 2010, the authors retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent ACL reconstruction at their institution. The clinical course of all patients was reviewed to determine whether the results of the radiograph at the time of interpretation changed the plan of care. All radiographs were then scrutinized for abnormal findings that could have changed the plan of care if noted at the time of follow-up. Of 624 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction, 340 (54.4%) had a postoperative radiograph within 30 days. No radiograph showed a complication as interpreted by the surgeon at the time the radiograph was obtained, and no changes were made in routine postoperative care. On final review of each radiograph, none showed findings that would have changed management. The cost of performing and interpreting radiographs was $42.62 per patient, with a combined cost of $14,490.80. The findings of the study showed that postoperative radiographs after ACL reconstruction should not be considered "routine" practice. In addition, because these studies provided little clinical information, they are recommended only when symptoms suggest a mechanical complication and in cases of unforeseen postoperative trauma. PMID:25901629

  13. [Prevention of respiratory complications after abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Rezaiguia, S; Jayr, C

    1996-01-01

    Abdominal surgery, especially upper abdominal surgical procedures are known to adversely affect pulmonary function. Pulmonary complications are the most frequent cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This review article aimed to analyse the incidence and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary morbidity and their prevention. The most important means for preoperative assessment is the clinical examination; pulmonary function tests (spirometry) are not reliably predictive for postoperative pulmonary complications. Age, type of surgical procedure, smoking and nutritional state have all been identified as potential predictors for postoperative complications. However, usually there is not enough preoperative time available to obtain beneficial effects of stopping smoking and improvement of nutritional state. In patients with COPD, a preoperative multidisciplinary evaluation including the primary care physician, pulmonologist/intensivist, anesthesiologist and surgeon is required. Consensus as to preoperative physiologic state, therapeutic preparation, and postoperative management is essential. Simple spirometry and arterial blood gas analysis are indicated in patients exhibiting symptoms of obstructive airway disease. There are no values that contra-indicate an essential surgical procedure. Smoking should stop at least 8 weeks preoperatively. Preoperative therapy for elective surgery with antibiotics, beta2-agonist, or anticholinergic bronchodilator aerosols, as well as training in cough and lung expansion techniques should begin at least 24 to 48 hours preoperatively. Postoperative therapy should be continued for 3 to 5 days. Usually, anaesthesia is responsible for early complications, whereas surgical procedures are often associated with delayed morbidity. Laparoscopic procedures are recommended, as postoperative morbidity and hospital stay seem reduced in patients without COPD. Regional anaesthesia is given as having less adverse effects on pulmonary function than general anaesthesia. However, for unknown reasons these benefits are not associated with a decrease in postoperative respiratory complications. Moreover, the quality or the type of postoperative analgesia does not influence postoperative respiratory morbidity. Postoperatively, oxygen administration increases SaO2, but cannot abolish desaturation due to obstructive apnea. The various techniques of physiotherapy (chest physiotherapy, incentive spirometry, continuous positive airway pressure breathing) seem to be equivalent in efficacy; but intermittent positive pressure breathing has no advantages, compared with the other treatments and could even be deleterious. Chest physiotherapy and incentive spirometry are the most practical methods available for decreasing secretion contents of airways, whereas continuous positive airway pressure breathing is efficient on atelectasis. In stage II or III COPD patients, admission in a intensive therapy unit and prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required. PMID:9033757

  14. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    Home > Pregnancy > You're pregnant: Now what? Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en español ) Pregnancy complications Health problems before pregnancy Pregnancy related problems Infections during pregnancy When to call the doctor ...

  15. Vaginal Evisceration: An Unexpected Complication of Conization

    PubMed Central

    Ghassani, Ali; Andre, Benoit; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Tanguy le Gac, Yann; Martinez, Alejandra; Vidal, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Background. Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) is routinely performed for the management of high grade intracervical neoplasia (CIN). Several uncommon complications have been described, including postoperative peritonitis, pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery, and bowel fistula. We report a unique case of postoperative vaginal evisceration and the subsequent management. Case. A 73-years-old woman underwent LLETZ for high grade CIN. On postoperative day 3, she was admitted for small bowel evisceration through the vagina. Surgical management was based on combined laparoscopic and transvaginal approach and consisted in bowel inspection and reinstatement, peritoneal washing, and dehiscence repair. Conclusions. Vaginal evisceration is a rare but potentially serious complication of pelvic surgery. This case report is to make clinicians aware of such complication following LLETZ and its management. PMID:25506010

  16. Closing fasciotomy wounds using plastic bands: an alternative simple and cheap method.

    PubMed

    Suliman, M Taifour; Aizaz, S

    2008-09-01

    Fasciotomy incisions are essential to relieve pressure on the neurovascular structures in the limbs. However, closing such wounds often becomes a challenge to the surgeon. The aim of this study is to describe a simple and cheap method of closing these wounds. Plastic bands were used to gradually close fasciotomy wounds in five patients. All fasciotomy wounds in the five patients closed successfully within 4-12 days. Only two patients developed minimal complications in the form of minor wound infection and a hypertrophic scar. We conclude that the plastic band method used here is cheaper and simpler in comparison to similar techniques using the same device. PMID:18761225

  17. POTENCY, CONTINENCE AND COMPLICATION RATES IN 1,870 CONSECUTIVE RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM J. CATALONA; GUSTAVO F. CARVALHAL; DOUGLAS E. MAGER; DEBORAH S. SMITH

    1999-01-01

    PurposeWe update results in a series of consecutive patients treated with anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy regarding recovery of erections, urinary continence and postoperative complications.

  18. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, Mira; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030g/cm(2) at an EBI dose of 30kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. PMID:26117742

  19. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. This suggests that preoperative biliary drainage should be avoided whenever possible in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Such a change in current preoperative management may improve patient outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:10450725

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy as an adjunct in healing of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Langer, Vijay; Bhandari, Prem S; Rajagopalan, Satyamoorthy; Mukherjee, Mrinal K

    2015-08-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has emerged as a cutting-edge technology and provides an alternative solution to the problem of wounds. This study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of this technique in the treatment of chronic wounds. A prospective clinical study was used to evaluate our experience in use of NPWT in the healing of pressure ulcers and chronic wounds over 2 years. The primary end point of the study group was the time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue and full reepithelialisation without drainage. All patients with sepsis were excluded from the study. The statistical analysis of the data was carried out. Of the 60 patients studied, 41 had associated comorbidities including diabetes mellitus. The commonest site of occurrence was the lower limb. Coverage in the form of a flap was required at presentation in 63·33% of patients. However, after initiation of NPWT, none of them required the procedure and they healed spontaneously either by secondary intention or by skin grafting. The time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue was 14·36 ± 4·24 days. Complete healing of wounds occurred by 33·1 ± 10·22 days. There was a statistically significant difference in the volume of the wounds before and after the intervention (P = 0·000). Complications resulting from NPWT were minimal. This technique is an excellent adjunct to surgical debridement. PMID:23855645

  1. Prevalence of Immune Disease in Patients with Wounds Presenting to a Tertiary Wound Healing Center

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Schilling, Amber; Germinario, Anthony; Mete, Mihyre; Kim, Paul; Steinberg, John; Attinger, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and account for considerable healthcare and socioeconomic costs. Leg ulcers are a recognized complication of immune disease, and the purpose of this study was to establish the prevalence of immune disease in a cohort of patients with chronic wounds, and to compare wound outcomes in the subjects with and without immune disease. Retrospective chart review was completed on consecutive patients scheduled with the plastic surgeon in the Georgetown University Center for Wound Healing between January 1 and March 31, 2009. Of the 520 patients scheduled for appointments, 340 were eligible for inclusion. The prevalence of immune disease was higher than expected with 78 of 340 patients (23%) having associated immune disease. At presentation, wounds in patients with immune disease had a significantly larger mean surface area (33.4cm2 (69.05) compared to 22.5 cm2 (63.65), p=0.02). Split thickness skin graft (STSG) and bioengineered alternative tissue (BAT) graft data was available on 177 grafts from 55 subjects. There was a significantly lower response rate to STSG in subjects with immune disease (50% compared to 97%, p=0.0002), but response rates to BAT were not different. The association between immune diseases and chronic wounds may provide unique insights into pathways of wound healing, and warrants further study. PMID:22168783

  2. The role of postoperative prophylactic antibiotics in the treatment of facial fractures: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical study. Part 2: Mandibular fractures in 59 patients.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Benoit; Soong, Poh Luon; Zix, Jürgen; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Lieger, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference between a 5-day and a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotic on the incidence of infection after mandibular fractures involving the alveolus. Sixty-two patients with fractures of the mandible involving the dentoalveolar region were randomly assigned to 2 groups, both of which were given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1.2 g intravenously every 8 h from admission until 24 h postoperatively. The 5-day group were then given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 625 mg orally every 8 h for another 4 days. The 1-day group was given an oral placebo at the same intervals. Follow-up appointments were 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Development of an infection was the primary end point. Fifty-nine of the 62 patients completed this study. Six of the 30 patients in the 5-day group (20%) and 6 out of the 29 in the 1-day group (21%) developed local wound infections. Three of the 6 in the 1-day group developed purulent discharge and swelling. One patient in the 5-day group developed a rash on the trunk. There were no significant differences in the incidence of infection or side effects between the groups. In fractures of the mandible involving the alveolus, a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotic is as effective in preventing infective complications as a 5-day regimen. PMID:24012053

  3. [Treatment of purulent wounds by using of negative pressure].

    PubMed

    Riabov, A L; Skalozub, O I; Lapin, R V

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of wounds treatment complicated by surgical infection. An apparatus for creating negative pressure VivanoTec/S042 was used for this in 74 patients. Types of surgical interventions depended on phase of inflammatory process and severity of clinical manifestations. It was done 153 operations. Surgical management of infected wounds, necrectomy were performed. As the relief of inflammatory process repeated surgical management with plasty by using of local tissue was done. Short-term good anatomical results were achieved in 97% of patients. Good functional result was marked in all patients. Wound healing occurred at the optimum time. PMID:25042193

  4. Integrins in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Regulation of cell adhesions during tissue repair is fundamentally important for cell migration, proliferation, and protein production. All cells interact with extracellular matrix proteins with cell surface integrin receptors that convey signals from the environment into the nucleus, regulating gene expression and cell behavior. Integrins also interact with a variety of other proteins, such as growth factors, their receptors, and proteolytic enzymes. Re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation are crucially dependent on the temporospatial function of multiple integrins. This review explains how integrins function in wound repair. Recent Advances: Certain integrins can activate latent transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-?1) that modulates wound inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Dysregulation of TGF-?1 function is associated with scarring and fibrotic disorders. Therefore, these integrins represent targets for therapeutic intervention in fibrosis. Critical Issues: Integrins have multifaceted functions and extensive crosstalk with other cell surface receptors and molecules. Moreover, in aberrant healing, integrins may assume different functions, further increasing the complexity of their functionality. Discovering and understanding the role that integrins play in wound healing provides an opportunity to identify the mechanisms for medical conditions, such as excessive scarring, chronic wounds, and even cancer. Future Directions: Integrin functions in acute and chronic wounds should be further addressed in models better mimicking human wounds. Application of any products in acute or chronic wounds will potentially alter integrin functions that need to be carefully considered in the design. PMID:25493210

  5. Effect of the suture technique on postoperative pain, swelling and trismus after removal of lower third molars: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Santos, Laila; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Herráez-Vilas, José-María

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the intensity of pain, swelling and trismus after the removal of impacted lower third molars comparing two different suture techniques of the triangular flap: the complete suture of the distal incision and relieving incision and the partial suture with only one suture knot for closure of the corner of the flap and the closure of the distal incision, without suturing the relieving incision. Material and Methods A prospective, randomized, crossover clinical trial was conducted in 40 patients aged from 18 to 45 years who underwent surgical extraction of impacted lower third molars at the Department of Oral Surgery in the Odontological Hospital of the University of Barcelona during the year 2011. Patients were randomly divided in 2 groups. Two different techniques (hermetical closure and partial closure of the wound) were performed separated by a one month washout period in each patient. Postoperative pain, swelling and trismus were evaluated prior to the surgical procedure and also at 2 and 7 days post operatively. Results No statistically significant differences were observed for pain (p<0.06), trismus (p<0.71) and swelling (p<0.05) between the test and the control group. However, the values of the three parameters related to the test group were lower than those for the control group. Conclusions Partial closure of the flap without suturing the relieving incision after surgical extraction of lower third molars reduces operating time and it does not produce any postoperative complications compared with complete closure of the wound. Key words: Third molar, surgical flaps, suture techniques, postoperative pain, swelling, trismus. PMID:25662551

  6. Emergency Open Incarcerated Hernia Repair with a Biological Mesh in a Patient with Colorectal Liver Metastasis Receiving Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab Uncomplicated Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Morrison, Dawn; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), often used in combinational chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastases. However adverse events have been attributed to the use of bevacizumab including gastrointestinal perforations, thrombotic events, hypertension, bleeding, and wound healing complications. 53-year-old male, with a history of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis, receiving a combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy (FOLFIRI, irinotecan with fluorouracil and folinic acid) with bevacizumab presented as an emergency with an incarcerated incisional hernia. The last administration of chemotherapy and bevacizumab had taken place 2 weeks prior to this presentation. As the risk of strangulation of the bowel was increased, a decision was made to take the patient to theatre, although the hazard with respect to wound healing, haemorrhage, and infection risk was high due to the recent administration of chemotherapy with bevacizumab. The patient underwent an open repair of the incarcerated recurrent incisional hernia with placement of a biological mesh, and the postoperative recovery was uncomplicated with no wound healing or bleeding problems. PMID:25614840

  7. Cardiovascular and respiratory complications after major head and neck surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dirk R. Buitelaar; Alfons J. M. Balm; Ninja Antonini; Harm van Tinteren; Johannes M. Huitink

    2006-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to gain insight into the incidence rates for, distribution of, and risk factors of postoperative cardiovascular and respiratory complications in major head and neck surgery. Methods. We performed a retrospective review of 469 patients who had undergone primary major head and neck surgery. Outcome measures were incidence rates, risk factors, and distribution over time for postoperative

  8. Delayed Postoperative Extradural Hematoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Ramnarayan; N. R. Sreehari; G. K. Ninan; K. M. John

    2007-01-01

    Postcraniotomy complications include various types of intracranial hematomas and systemic complications like cardiac and renal failure. This is a report of a patient who underwent a reexploration of a previous craniotomy and then went into status epilepticus, which was controlled, but the patient developed acute renal failure and then a delayed extradural hematoma.

  9. Postoperative Vision Loss after Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Scadden, John

    2014-01-01

    We report a case which highlights the rare but devastating complication of postoperative vision loss (POVL) in orthopaedic surgery. Though documented previously, it has not been reported in shoulder arthroplasty surgery of which we present the first case. The aetiology of POVL is difficult to elucidate due to its elusive nature. We explain the risks associated with regional blocks used for such surgery and how this may be related to POVL. We must be vigilant of the possible causes of POVL as curative treatment is often not possible and hence must take preventative measures which we have recommended. Fortunately, the patient fully recovered at 10 months postoperatively with excellent function of her reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:25610682

  10. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Houreld, Nicolette N.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing. PMID:24511283

  11. generalization complicated

    E-print Network

    Hinton, Geoffrey E.

    on big datasets . If we have a big data set that needs a complicated model, the full Bayesian framework generalization. Is preprocessing cheating? . Its cheating if we use a carefully designed set of task­ specific. One set is sufficient. . For planes in 3­D, h=4 even though 4 co­planar points cannot be shattered

  12. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-03-01

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  13. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-01-16

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  14. Surgical Wound Case Studies With the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penny E. Campbell; Phyllis A. Bonham

    2006-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy consists of a wound dressing, a drainage tube inserted into the dressing, an occlusive trans- parent film, and a connection to a vacuum source that supplies the negative pressure. A new product called the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System (BlueSky Medical, La Costa, Calif) is available for negative pressure wound therapy. This article de- scribes the

  15. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  16. Self-Management of Injection-Related Wounds Among Injecting Drug Users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Roose; A. Seiji Hayashi; Chinazo O. Cunningham

    2009-01-01

    Injection-related wounds are an important complication of injection drug use. This study describes behaviors related to self-management of injection-related wounds and identifies factors associated with behaviors that may increase the potential for harm. We conducted interviews with 101 injecting drug users in Washington, DC. A total of 82 (81.2%) injecting drug users reported ever having an injection-related wound, and of

  17. [Complications of surgical treatment of hypospadia].

    PubMed

    Romanov, D V; Korol'kova, I A

    2004-01-01

    127 new cases of hypospadia were treated in 1980-2002. A total of 348 operations including urethroplasty by Duplay and Cecil were made. 78 of the operations were followed by complications out of which 26 were corrected in the postoperative period and had no effect on the treatment results. The first stage of surgical correction of hypospadia (89 operations) brought complications in 13.48% cases. Recurrent distortion of the cavernous bodies was most typical complication at this stage. In most cases development of scarry deformation was due to inflammatory changes early after surgery. Derivatives of prednisolone proved effective in the treatment of hypertrophic scars. This complication correlated with skin plastic repair (longitudinal suturing or creation of oncoming triangular flaps) to correct the defect. The second stage of hypospadia surgery was urethroplasty made in 196 cases. It was accompanied with complications in 13.25 patients. Fistulas of newly-created urethra (11.73%) were the most typical and frequent complication. The number of postoperative complications varied greatly depending on the disease form and method of urethral reconstruction. Cecil urethroplasty brought complications in 7.94% cases. Efficacy of neurourethra creation by Duplay varied greatly depending on the length of the created neourethral portion and the number of local skin resources (8-33-83.33% complications). PMID:15199814

  18. Complications in pediatric cochlear implant surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H.-G. Kempf; K. Johann; T. Lenarz

    1999-01-01

    In a retrospective analysis we evaluated the intra- and postoperative complications in children who underwent cochlear implantation\\u000a between 1984 and 1993 at the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover. The data and records of 366 children were collected and analyzed.\\u000a Relevant parameters were major complications such as significant infection, intraoperative bleeding, facial nerve injury,\\u000a implant loss and device failure, as well as lesser

  19. Sutures versus staples for wound closure in orthopaedic surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the spectrum of surgical decision-making, wound closure material is often an afterthought. However, the findings of a recent meta-analysis suggest that the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) is increased by using staples to close surgical wounds. Less clear is the effect of closure material on the incidence of non-infectious wound complications. The aim of this study was to compare sutures and staples in terms of: incidence of wound complications to determine the sample size for a definitive trial comparing wound closure methods. Methods Eligible adult orthopaedic patients were randomized to have wounds closed with sutures or staples. Time for skin closure was recorded. Wounds were assessed for complications for six weeks. The incidence of complications was compared using Fisher’s exact test. Time to close and pain with removal of closure material were compared using a Student’s t-test. Results The total number of patients reporting a wound complication was 59 of 148 patients completing six-week followup (41%), with no differennce between sutures and staples (RR = 0.77, CI = 0.52–1.14). The time to close wounds was shorter in the staple group (mean=4.8 min, CI = 2.6–7.1) than the suture group (mean=12 min, CI = 7.9–16). Patients in the staple group (mean=3.7, CI =2.8–4.6) reported more pain with removal than suture group (mean=2.5, CI =1.6–3.4). Conclusions This study suggests that 42% of patients report a wound complication with no difference between sutures and staples. It was demonstrated that suturing skin requires more time and staples are more painful to remove. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01146236 (registered June 14, 2010) PMID:23394586

  20. Bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts after orthognathic surgery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hye; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative maxillary cysts are locally aggressive lesions, usually developing as delayed complications many years after radical antral surgery. This report describes a case of bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts following orthognathic surgery performed approximately 21 years previously. The patient complained of stinging pain on her right cheek. Radiographic examination revealed low-attenuation lesions on both maxillary sinuses with discontinuously corticated margins without distinct expansion or bone destruction. The cysts were enucleated with the removal of metal plates and screws for pain relief. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of postoperative maxillary cysts lined by ciliated, pseudostratified columnar cells. The patient has remained asymptomatic thus far, and there was no evidence of local recurrence at 21 months of postoperative follow-up. PMID:25473641

  1. [The development of postoperative nausea and vomiting care].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Chen; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne

    2011-08-01

    Nausea and vomiting is a common post-operative complication that exacerbates patient discomfort and puts tension on suture lines, which may cause hematomas beneath surgical flaps and place patient at risk of aspiration pneumonia. Nausea and vomiting decreases patient comfort and satisfaction and increases hospital stay length and costs. Postoperative nausea and vomiting are common occurrences. Nurses typically give medicine in accordance with doctors' orders without understanding patient symptoms. Such results in less than optimal holistic care management. This situation encouraged the author to collect references on current international trends related to postoperative nausea and vomiting treatment in the clinical setting. The author further worked to recommend a care management protocol based on findings. This paper describes risk factors of postoperative nausea and vomiting and the related drugs, prevention procedures, and treatment recommendations. Finally, the author developed a simple care flow chart suited for use in internal clinical situations that may provide a valuable reference for medical professionals. PMID:21809289

  2. Can avoidance of complications lead to biased healthcare decisions?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Amsterlaw; Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher; Angela Fagerlin; Peter A. Ubel

    2006-01-01

    Imagine that you have just received a colon cancer diagnosis and need to choose between two different surgical treatments. One surgery, the ``complicated surgery,'' has a lower mortality rate (16\\\\% vs.\\\\ 20\\\\%) but compared to the other surgery, the ``uncomplicated surgery,'' also carries an additional 1\\\\% risk of each of four serious complications: colostomy, chronic diarrhea, wound infection, or an

  3. Platelet-rich plasma inside the sternotomy wound reduces the incidence of sternal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Serraino, Giuseppe F; Dominijanni, Andrea; Jiritano, Federica; Rossi, Michele; Cuda, Aldo; Caroleo, Santo; Brescia, Adalgisa; Renzulli, Attilio

    2015-06-01

    Despite the large choice of wide-spectrum antibiotic therapy, deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) following cardiac surgery is a life-threatening complication worldwide. This study evaluated that the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) applied inside the sternotomy wound would reduce the effect of sternal wound infections, both superficial and deep. Between January 2007 and January 2012, 1093 consecutive patients underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. Patients were divided into two groups. Group B, the study group, included those who received the PRP applied inside the sternotomy wound before closure. Group A, the control group, included patients who received a median sternotomy but without the application of PRP. Antibiotic prophylaxis remained unchanged across the study and between the two groups. Occurrence of DSWI was significantly higher in group A than in group B [10 of 671 (1·5%) versus 1 of 422 (0·20%), P = 0·043]. Also, superficial sternal wound infections (SSWIs) were significantly higher in group A than in group B [19 of 671 (2·8%) versus 2 of 422 (0·5%), P = 0·006]. The use of PRP can significantly reduce the occurrence of DSWI and SSWI in cardiac surgery. PMID:23692143

  4. Postoperative mediastinitis: a comparison of two electrocautery techniques on presternal soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Grooters, R K; Merkley, D F; Thieman, K C; Soltanzadeh, H

    1990-06-01

    Postoperative mediastinitis remains a serious surgical problem, complicating 0.4% to 5% of all cases. In an experiment designed to address this problem, 36 mongrel dogs underwent a median sternotomy incision. In group I (n = 18) all layers to the sternum were opened by a scalpel, and electrocautery was used only for pinpoint hemostasis. In group II (n = 18) the skin was opened by a scalpel and the remaining layers to the sternum were opened by electrocautery. Total kilojoules of electrical energy delivered to the tissues was 9.4 +/- 5.7 for group I and 44.1 +/- 7.0 for group II (p less than 0.001). Each group was randomly divided into three subgroups (n = 6): Ia and IIa were noninoculated controls; Ib and IIb were inoculated just before skin closure; Ic and IIc were inoculated and given one preoperative dose of cefonicid. The inoculum contained Staphylococcus intermedius in a 0.5 ml suspension of 10(8) organisms. Each animal was observed and the wounds were scored daily until death or until all survivors were put to death on the eighth postoperative day. Pleural fluid was cultured at autopsy. Ten dogs died of mediastinitis (four in IIa and six in IIb), but none from group I (p less than 0.01). Positive cultures from pleural fluid in matching subgroups (n = 6) occurred as follows: one in Ia and five in IIa (p less than 0.05); one in Ib and six in IIb (p less than 0.01); zero in Ic and two in IIc. We conclude that pinpoint hemostasis on the soft tissues of the sternotomy incision significantly reduces the severity and frequency of penetrating mediastinitis. PMID:2359337

  5. ASA classification and perioperative variables as predictors of postoperative outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. WOLTERS; T. WOLF; H. STÜTZER; T. SCHRÖDER

    1996-01-01

    In a prospective study of 6301 surgical patients in a university hospital, we examined the strength of association between ASA physical status classi- fication and perioperative risk factors, and post- operative outcome, using both univariate analysis and calculation of the odds ratio of the risk of developing a postoperative complication by means of a logistic regression model. Univariate analysis showed

  6. Postoperative perforation of the Schneiderian membrane in maxillary sinus augmentation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jo, Kyu-Hong; Yoon, Kyu-Ho; Cheong, Jeong-Kwon; Jeon, In-Seong

    2014-07-01

    Perforation of the Schneiderian membrane constitutes a major intraoperative complication of maxillary sinus floor elevation with graft materials, but postoperative perforation of the sinus membrane is very rare. This case report demonstrates that conservative treatment involving drainage and the administration of systemic antibiotics can be used to successfully treat postoperative sinus membrane perforation with infection of the graft material. PMID:25020219

  7. Predictive factors for complications in elderly patients who underwent head and neck oncologic surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvaro Sanabria; André L. Carvalho; Rosana L. Melo; José Magrin; Mauro K. Ikeda; José G. Vartanian; Luiz P. Kowalski

    2008-01-01

    Background. Postoperative complications are rele- vant outcomes in patients with head and neck tumor who have undergone surgery. Few trials have assessed predictive factors in older patients. We assessed the predictive effect of preopera- tive clinical factors on postoperative complications. Methods. We conducted a cohort study with 242 patients older than 70 years with head and neck cancer who underwent

  8. Postoperative circadian disturbances.

    PubMed

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-12-01

    An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attention has also been directed towards the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms in relation to surgery. The attention has been directed to the question whether the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms can affect postoperative recovery, morbidity and mortality. Based on the lack of studies where these endogenous rhythms have been investigated in relation to surgery we performed a series of studies exploring different endogenous rhythms and factors affecting these rhythms. We also wanted to examine whether the disturbances in the postoperative circadian rhythms could be correlated to postoperative recovery parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of melatonin (AMT6s) in urine the first night after both minor and major surgery. This delay after major surgery was correlated to the duration of surgery. The amplitude in the melatonin rhythm was unchanged the first night but increased in the second night after major surgery. The amplitude in AMT6s was reduced the first night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively. There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The circadian activity rhythm was also disturbed after both minor and major surgery. The daytime AMT6s excretion in urine after major surgery was increased on the fourth day after surgery and the total excretion of AMT6s in urine was correlated to sleep efficiency and wake time after sleep onset, but was not correlated to the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. We could only prove an effect of melatonin substitution in patients with lower than median pain levels for a three days period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the series of studies included in this thesis we have systematically shown that circadian disturbances are found in the secretion of hormones, the sleep-wake cycle, core body temperature rhythm, autonomic nervous system tone, myocardial ischaemia and activity rhythm after surgery. Correlation exists between circadian rhythm parameters and measures of postoperative sleep quality and recovery. However, oral melatonin treatment in the first three nights after surgery, cannot yet be generally recommended for improvement of sleep quality or other recovery parameters based on the available results. It may be indicated in subgroups or if other perioperative treatment algorithms were used, but this has to be investigated in future trials. PMID:21122464

  9. Risk analysis and outcome of mediastinal wound and deep mediastinal wound infections with specific emphasis to omental transposition

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To report our experience, with Deep mediastinal wound infections (DMWI). Emphasis was given to the management of deep infections with omental flaps Methods From February 2000 to October 2007, out of 3896 cardiac surgery patients (prospective data collection) 120 pts (3.02%) developed sternal wound infections. There were 104 males & 16 females; (73.7%) CABG, (13.5%) Valves & (9.32%) CABG and Valve. Results Superficial sternal wound infection detected in 68 patients (1.75%) and fifty-two patients (1.34%) developed DMWI. The incremental risk factors for development of DMWI were: Diabetes (OR = 3.62, CI = 1.2-10.98), Pre Op Creatinine > 200 ?mol/l (OR = 3.33, CI = 1.14-9.7) and Prolong ventilation (OR = 4.16, CI = 1.73-9.98). Overall mortality for the DMWI was 9.3% and the specific mortality of the omental flap group was 8.3%. 19% of the "DMWI group", developed complications: hematoma 6%, partial flap loss 3.0%, wound dehiscence 5.3%. Mean Hospital Stay: 59 ± 21.5 days. Conclusion Post cardiac surgery sternal wound complications remain challenging. The role of multidisciplinary approach is fundamental, as is the importance of an aggressive early wound exploration especially for deep sternal infections. PMID:21923951

  10. Complications in colorectal surgery: risk factors and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backround Open or laparoscopic colorectal surgery comprises of many different types of procedures for various diseases. Depending upon the operation and modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors the intra- and postoperative morbidity and mortality rate vary. In general, surgical complications can be divided into intraoperative and postoperative complications and usually occur while the patient is still in the hospital. Methods A literature search (1980-2009) was carried out, using MEDLINE, PubMed and the Cochrane library. Results This review provides an overview how to identify and minimize intra- and postoperative complications. The improvement of different treatment strategies and technical inventions in the recent decade has been enormous. This is mainly attributable to the increase in the laparoscopic approach, which is now well accepted for many procedures. Training of the surgeon, hospital volume and learning curves are becoming increasingly more important to maximize patient safety, surgeon expertise and cost effectiveness. In addition, standardization of perioperative care is essential to minimize postoperative complications. Conclusion This review summarizes the main perioperative complications of colorectal surgery and influencable and non-influencable risk factors which are important to the general surgeon and the relevant specialist as well. In order to minimize or even avoid complications it is crucial to know these risk factors and strategies to prevent, treat or reduce intra- and postoperative complications. PMID:20338045

  11. Hyperspectral characterization of an in vitro wound model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Hegstad, Janne-Lise; Paluchowski, Lukasz; Milani?, Matija; Pukstad, Brita S.

    2014-03-01

    Wound healing is a complex process not fully understood. There is a need of better methods to evaluate the different stages of healing, and optical characterization is a promising tool in this respect. In this study hyperspectral imaging was employed to characterize an in vitro wound model. The wound model was established by first cutting circular patches of human abdominal skin using an 8mm punch biopsy tool, and then creating dermal wounds in the center of the skin patches using a 5mm tool. The wounds were incubated in medium with 10% serum and antibiotics. Hyperspectral images were collected every three days using a push broom hyper spectral camera (Hyspex VNIR1600). The camera had a spectral resolution of 3.7 nm and was fitted with a close up lens giving a FOV of 2.5 cm and a spatial resolution of 29 micrometer. Samples for histology were collected throughout the measurement period, which was 21 days in total. Data were processed in ENVI and Matlab. A successful classification based on hyperspectral imaging of the implemented model is presented. It was not possible to see the healing zone in the in vitro model with the naked eye without dying. The hyperspectral results showed that newly formed epithelium could be imaged without any additional contrast agents or dyes. It was also possible to detect non-viable tissue. In vitro wound models and hyperspectral imaging can thus be employed to gain further insight in the complicated process of healing in different kinds of wounds.

  12. Patient Factors as a Major Determinant of Wound Outcome and Infection After Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. W. Hopf

    \\u000a Despite major advances in the management of patients undergoing surgery-including aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics,\\u000a and advances in surgical approaches such as laparoscopic surgery-surgical wound infection remains among the most common complications\\u000a of surgery [1]. Wound complications are associated with prolonged hospitalization and increased resource consumption. More than 300,000\\u000a surgical site infections occur each year in the United States at an

  13. Facilitating residual wound closure after partial graft loss with vacuum assisted closure therapy.

    PubMed

    Poulakidas, Stathis; Kowal-Vern, Areta

    2008-01-01

    Third degree burns require skin grafting. In most instances, if the graft becomes infected, it requires debridement of the site and re-grafting. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the successful healing of a skin graft using negative pressure wound therapy with silver impregnated foam and soft silicone wound contact layer in a 4% total body surface area burn of a lower extremity skin graft infected with Pseudomonas aerugenosa without regrafting. A 27-year-old Hispanic male sustained a gasoline flame burn and presented 72 hours postincident with right lower extremity cellulitis. After intravenous antibiotics, the area was grafted with a partial thickness sheet graft. At 9 days postoperatively, the patient developed a wound infection, with an eventual 40% graft loss and was started on a course of antibiotics. With continued graft loss, on the 22nd postoperative day, negative pressure wound therapy V.A.C. (Vacuum Assisted Closure-KCI, San Antonio, TX) with silver impregnated foam and soft silicone wound contact layer (Mepitel, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) were applied. The wound was completely re-epithelialized by 9 days. In combination with antibiotics, it was possible to treat a residual open wound and prevent the need for regrafting. PMID:18535475

  14. Solutions to intraoperative wound classification miscoding in a subset of American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program patients.

    PubMed

    Turrentine, Florence E; Giballa, Sarah B; Shah, Puja M; Jones, David R; Hedrick, Traci L; Friel, Charles M

    2015-02-01

    Intraoperative wound classification is a predictor of postoperative infection. Therefore, accurately assigning the correct classification to a surgical wound is of particular importance. Our institution participates in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP), a national outcomes database that collects wound classification for all qualifying operative procedures, and we noted discrepancies when comparing ACS NSQIP wound classification coding with perioperative coding in our electronic medical record. We tested the effectiveness of an intervention that included staff educational sessions, informational posters, and postoperative debriefings on improving the accuracy of documented intraoperative wound classification. The ?(2) test was used to compare proportions of wound classification miscodings before and after educational sessions and debriefings commenced. Baseline data revealed misclassification of wounds occurred 21 per cent (30 of 141) of the time in predominately colorectal procedures performed by two surgeons from April through August 2012. Errors decreased to 9 per cent (13 of 147) from August to December 2012, after our intervention of education sessions with operating room staff and the surgeons incorporating a statement confirming the wound classification at the end of the case debriefing. The ?(2) statistic was 8.7589. The P value was significant at 0.003. Ensuring concordance of classification between the surgeon and nurse during a postprocedure debriefing as well as education of perioperative nursing staff through posters and seminars significantly improved the accuracy of intraoperative wound classification coding. PMID:25642884

  15. A Randomized Clinical Trial on the Effect of Oral Metronidazole on Wound Healing and Pain after Anal Sphincterotomy and Fissurectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seyed Vahid Hosseini; Babak Sabet; Mohamoud Nouri; Shahram Bolandparvaz

    Chronic anal fissure is one of the most common causes of anal pain and surgical therapy is the treatment of choice. There is scarce information regarding the prophylactic effects of oral metronidazole on postoperative complications of anal fissure. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of metronidazole as a prophylactic measure for postoperative anal fissure complications. In

  16. Postoperative irradiation in carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Pilepich, M.V.; Walz, B.J.; Baglan, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-eight patients received postoperative radiotherapy with curative intent following either radical prostatectomy (18 patients) or enucleative prostatectomy (10 patients). In patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, the indications for postoperative radiotherapy included positive margins in 13, close margins in 2, and seminal vesicle involvement in 3 patients. The majority of patients (82%) received total dose to the prostatic bed in excess of 6500 rad. In over 80% of the patients, the pelvic lymphatics are also treated (to a total dose of 4000-5000 rad). All of the patients irradiated after radical prostatectomy clinically remained disease-free locally. Approximately one-half of the patients in both the enucleation and radial prostatectomy groups developed evidence of distant metastases. The complications of treatment have been comparable to those in patients treated with radiotherapy only. The continence status has not been affected significantly. All patients with incontinence following completion of radiotherapy had documented impairment of continence prior to radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy administered following either radical or enucleative prostatectomy was tolerated well and resulted in excellent local control.

  17. Survey and management of anaesthesia related complications in PACU

    PubMed Central

    Faraj, Jafar H.; Vegesna, A.R.R.; Mudali, I.N.; Khairay, M.A.; Nissar, Shaikh; Alfarhan, Muna; Sabir, Kareema; El-imam, Fawkia; Anto, Lucy; Go, Teofila

    2012-01-01

    It is the first prospective study about anaesthesia related postoperative complications conducted in Hamad General Hospital. Total 1128 adult patients admitted to the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) during a period of three months were surveyed for anaesthesia related complications. Documented complications were found in 48 patients i.e. 4.25% of patients' population. The types of complications were related to the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nausea/vomiting and body temperature in this descending order. Most of the complications happened to healthy ASA I and II patients. Factors that play major role in determining the immediate postoperative complications were the ASA status, the level of anaesthesia seniority attending the patient, the urgency and the nature of procedure. We tried to find other factors that may influence complications in addition, discussed below. PMID:25003043

  18. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of infected abdominal wounds containing mesh: an analysis of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene; Gabriel, Allen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) in the adjunctive management of abdominal wounds with exposed and known infected synthetic mesh. A non randomised, retrospective review of medical records for 21 consecutive patients with infected abdominal wounds treated with NPWT was conducted. All abdominal wounds contained exposed synthetic mesh [composite, polypropylene (PP), or knitted polyglactin 910 (PG) mesh]. Demographic and bacteriological data, wound history, pre-NPWT and comparative post-NPWT, operative procedures and complications, hospital length of stay (LOS) and wound healing outcomes were all analysed. Primary endpoints measured were (1) hospital LOS prior to initiation of NPWT, (2) total time on NPWT, (3) hospital LOS from NPWT initiation to discharge and (4) wound closure status at discharge. A total of 21 patients with abdominal wounds with exposed, infected mesh were treated with NPWT. Aetiology of the wounds was ventral hernia repair (n = 11) and acute abdominal wall defect (n = 10). Prior to NPWT initiation, the mean hospital LOS for the composite, PP and PG meshes were 76 days (range: 21-171 days), 51 days (range: 32-62 days) and 19 days (range: 12-39 days), respectively. The mean hospital LOS following initiation of NPWT for wounds with exposed composite, PP and PG mesh were 28, 31 and 32 days, respectively. Eighteen of the 21 wounds (86%) reached full closure after a mean time of 26 days of NPWT and a mean hospital LOS of 30 days postinitiation of NPWT. Three wounds, all with composite mesh left in situ, did not reach full closure, although all exhibited decreased wound dimensions, granulating beds and decreased surface area exposure of mesh. During NPWT/ROCF, one hypoalbuminemic patient with exposed PP mesh developed an enterocutaneous fistula over a prior enterotomy site. This patient subsequently underwent total mesh extraction, takedown of the fistula and PP mesh replacement followed by reinstitution of NPWT and flap closure. In addition to appropriate systemic antibiotics and nutritional optimisation, the adjunctive use of NPWT resulted in successful closure of 86% of infected abdominal wounds with exposed prosthetic mesh. Patient hospital LOS (except those with PG mesh), operative procedures and readmissions were decreased during NPWT compared with treatment prior to NPWT. Future multi-site prospective, controlled studies would provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions could be made in the management of these challenging and costly cases. PMID:21176107

  19. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds. PMID:23162236

  20. Removal of adhesive wound dressing and its effects on the stratum corneum of the skin: comparison of eight different adhesive wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Imai, Ryutaro; Ahmatjan, Niyaz; Ida, Yukiko; Gondo, Masahide; Shibata, Dai; Wanatabe, Katsueki

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, adhesive wound dressings have been increasingly applied postoperatively because of their ease of use as they can be kept in place without having to cut and apply surgical tapes and they can cover a wound securely. However, if a wound dressing strongly adheres to the wound, a large amount of stratum corneum is removed from the newly formed epithelium or healthy periwound skin. Various types of adhesives are used on adhesive wound dressings and the extent of skin damage depends on how much an adhesive sticks to the wound or skin surface. We quantitatively determined and compared the amount of stratum corneum removed by eight different wound dressings including polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive, silicone-based adhesive dressing, composite hydrocolloid and self-adhesive polyurethane foam in healthy volunteers. The results showed that wound dressings with silicone adhesive and self-adhesive polyurethane foam removed less stratum corneum, whereas composite hydrocolloid and polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive removed more stratum corneum. PMID:22883604

  1. Lasers and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, A J

    1993-10-01

    The advances in laser surgery over the past decade have been remarkable and have significantly altered the management of a host of dermatologic disorders. This article focuses on the CO2 laser as a cutting and vaporization tool and reviews the features that distinguish CO2 laser-induced wounds from those created by a scalpel. Tissue welding, wound management after skin treatment with the visible light lasers based on the principle of selective photothermolysis, as well as the controversial field of low-energy laser therapy (biostimulation) are also addressed. PMID:8222362

  2. A novel primate model of delayed wound healing in diabetes: dysregulation of connective tissue growth factor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Thomson; S. V. McLennan; A. Hennessy; P. Boughton; J. Bonner; H. Zoellner; D. K. Yue; S. M. Twigg

    2010-01-01

    Aims\\/hypothesis  Chronic non-healing wounds are a common complication of diabetes. Prolonged inflammation and decreased matrix accumulation\\u000a may contribute. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is induced during normal wound healing, but its regulation in diabetic\\u000a wounds is unknown. We developed a primate model for the study of in vivo wound healing in baboons with long diabetes duration.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Drum implants were placed subcutaneously

  3. Macrophage phagocytosis of wound neutrophils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriana J. Meszaros; Jonathan S. Reichner; Jorge E. Albina

    Abstract: Resolution of acute inflammation is thought to require the recognition and phagocyto- sis of apoptotic neutrophils (PMN) through receptor- ligand interactions with macrophages,(Mf). This hypothesis was tested in rat wounds by quantifying apoptosis in freshly harvested and aged-in-culture PMN taken from wounds 1?3 days after injury and by using these wound PMN as phagocytic targets for wound, immune-activated peritoneal,

  4. Pharmacological management of postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Farhad; Stulberg, Jonah J; Delaney, Conor P

    2009-04-01

    The duration of postoperative ileus following abdominal surgery is quite variable, and prolonged postoperative ileus is an iatrogenic phenomenon with important influence on patient morbidity, hospital costs and length of stay in hospital. Adequate treatment for prolonged postoperative ileus is important to improve patient morbidity and clinical efficiency. Both clinical and pharmacological management strategies have improved rapidly over the last decade, and appropriate and timely management using multimodal techniques should be used for optimal care. In this review, we define postoperative ileus, describe the pathogenesis and briefly discuss clinical management before detailing potential pharmacologic management options. PMID:19399212

  5. Wound healing and antibacterial properties of methanolic extract of Pupalia lappacea Juss in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound healing is a natural process that enables tissue repair after an injury. To shorten its duration and minimize associated complications, wounds are treated with medications. Currently there is a growing interest in the use of alternative wound dressing agents such as plant extracts. One plant used traditionally in wound treatment is Pupalia lappacea. In view of its use in wound care, we investigated the wound healing activities of 80% methanolic leave extract of Pupalia lappacea using excision, incision and dead space wound models. Also its effects on three common wound contaminants were investigated. Methods Excision wounds were created, contaminated with microbes and treated with ointments (10% and 20% w/w) prepared from Pupalia lappacea. Incision and dead space wounds were also created in rats which were subsequently dosed orally with the extract. The wound healing activities of Pupalia lappacea ointment on excision wound was assessed by rates of wound contraction and epithelialization as well as its antibacterial effects. The effects of Pupalia lappacea on incision and dead-space wounds were determined by the wound breaking strengths and weights of the granuloma tissues formed, respectively. Results Pupalia. lappacea ointments significantly (p?wound healing with 20% ointment having the highest percentage wound contraction and rate of epithelialization. At 4, 7 and 14 days post treatment, mean total viable bacterial count of excision wounds of the extract treated groups were significantly (p?Wound breaking strengths and weights of granuloma tissues formed in the extract treated groups were significantly (p?wound healing and antibacterial activities. These findings validate the use of this plant in traditional medicine for treatment of wounds. PMID:24886368

  6. Risks of complication following thyroidectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark R. Burge; Tanja-Maria Zeise; Michael W. Johnsen; Martin J. Conway; Clifford R. Qualls

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because hypoparathyroidism is a serious complication of thyroidectomy, we attempted to elucidate factors determining the\\u000a risk of this postoperative outcome.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Four tertiary care hospitals in Albuquerque, New Mexico.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PATIENTS: A retrospective study of 142 patients who underwent total or subtotal thyroidectomy between 1988 and 1995.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Permanent hypoparathyroidism was defined as hypocalcemic symptoms plus a

  7. [Useful wound management at home].

    PubMed

    Mizuhara, Akihiro; Taguchi, Akemi; Sato, Mikako; Shindo, Kazuko

    2014-12-01

    In wound care, close observation of the quantity and nature of exudate from a wound, and selection of appropriate dressing and/or medication are crucial. Care should be taken to prevent wounds with excessive exudate from becoming too moist. Furthermore, wound care at home must be easy, which is achievable through the use of readily available materials and medications. 1 ) A wound with little to moderate exudate should be treated using wrap therapy with perforated polyethylene sheets. This therapy can be used to treat pressure ulcers, wounds, wounds with slough, and burns. 2 ) An 18-gauge needle can be used to perforate wounds with little exudate, such as mild pressure ulcers or wounds with slough, and polyurethane film can then be applied. 3 ) Polyurethane film should be applied to blisters, pressure ulcers, or similar skin injuries with little exudate. 4 ) A hydrocolloid dressing should be used on wounds with light exudate. 5 ) An ointment containing steroids should be applied to critically colonized wounds. 6 ) Melolin dressings, Moiskin Pads, or a disposable diaper should be used to manage wounds with heavy exudate. PMID:25595088

  8. The effect of whole body disinfection on intraoperative wound contamination.

    PubMed

    Byrne, D J; Phillips, G; Napier, A; Cuschieri, A

    1991-06-01

    As part of a large whole body disinfection (WBD) trial two small sub-groups of patients who showered preoperatively with either a 4% chlorhexidine (CHX: N = 29) or placebo (N =27) detergent were studied to assess intraoperative wound contamination. The groups were well matched for age, sex and length of surgery. A membrane filter contact technique was used for bacterial recovery from the wounds after the initial skin incision and before wound closure. The membrane filters were incubated aerobically on blood agar plates with a CHX neutralizer for 48 h at 37 degrees C and colonies were counted. The results show a significant difference, between the bacterial counts at the start and end of surgery in the CHX and placebo groups. There was no difference in bacterial counts at the start of surgery between the CHX and placebo groups. There was a significant difference in the bacterial counts at the end of surgery between the CHX and placebo groups. These results indicate that preoperative WBD with CHX reduces intraoperative wound contamination but the effect of this on postoperative wound sepsis rates awaits the results of a large WBD trial. PMID:1678760

  9. Wound Repair and Regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Reinke; H. Sorg

    2012-01-01

    The skin is the biggest organ of the human being and has many functions. Therefore, the healing of a skin wound displays an extraordinary mechanism of cascading cellular functions which is unique in nature. As healing and regeneration processes take place in all parts of the human body, this review focuses on the healing processes of the skin and highlights

  10. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  11. Rifampin-bonded vascular grafts and postoperative infections.

    PubMed

    Goëau-Brissonnière, Olivier; Javerliat, Isabelle; Koskas, Fabien; Coggia, Marc; Pechère, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative wound and graft infections remain a major challenge for vascular surgeons. The bonding of antimicrobial substances on the graft material has been considered for many years, but the demonstration of safety and efficacy of these techniques is far from evident. Among the different proposed options, bonding of rifampin to the grafts has been the most evaluated technique, both experimentally and clinically. The objective of this review was to present and analyze the available data on rifampin-bonding and the possible evolutions of this technique to improve the resistance of vascular prostheses. PMID:21172589

  12. Postoperative nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a long-standing issue, not a new concept in anesthesiology. Despite many studies over the last several decades, PONV remains a significant problem due to its complex mechanism. This review presents a summary of the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PONV, focusing on preventive treatment, particularly the use of new drugs. In addition, we discuss the latest meta-analysis results regarding correct clinical use of classic drugs. I also summarize the latest trends of postdischarge nausea and vomiting and the pharmacogenetics, which is attracting a great deal of attention from other medical fields in PONV-related studies. Finally, we discuss the drawbacks of existing studies on PONV and suggest a focus for future investigations. PMID:25302092

  13. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy and Laparoscopic Omentoplasty for Deep Sternal Wound Infections after Median Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    De Brabandere, Kristof; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Czapla, Jens; La Meir, Mark; Delvaux, Georges; Wellens, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Deep sternal wound infection remains one of the most serious complications in patients who undergo median sternotomy for coronary artery bypass surgery. We describe our experience in treating 6 consecutive patients with our treatment protocol that combines aggressive débridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics, negative-pressure wound therapy, omentoplasty with laparoscopically harvested omentum, and the use of bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flaps. The number of débridements needed in order to attain clinically clean wounds and negative cultures varied between 1 and 10, with a median of 5. The length of stay after omentoplasty and bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flap placement varied between 11 and 22 days. One of the 6 patients developed a small wound dehiscence that was treated conservatively. No bleeding related to vacuum-assisted closure therapy was identified. Three patients had pneumonia. Two of the 3 patients had an episode of acute renal failure. The 30-day mortality rate was zero, although 1 patient died in the hospital 43 days after the reconstructive surgery, of multiple-organ failure due to pneumonia that was induced by end-stage pulmonary fibrosis. No patient died between hospital discharge and the most recent follow-up date (4–12 mo). Late local follow-up results, both functional and aesthetic, were good. We conclude that negative-pressure wound therapy—in combination with omentoplasty using laparoscopically harvested omentum and with the use of bilateral pectoral advancement flaps—is a valuable technique in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection because it produces good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:22719146

  14. Gunshot Wound Contamination with Squirrel Tissue: Wound Care Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Porter W.; Falgiani, Tricia B.; Hoelle, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    While report of animal bites contaminating wounds is reported commonly, direct wound contamination with squirrel flesh has never been reported in the literature. The patient suffered an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound that drove squirrel flesh and buck shot deep within his right buttock. This case outlines his hospital course and wound treatment. The patient was treated with ten days of broad spectrum antibiotics, extensive debridement of the wound in the operating room, and further treatment of the wound with a vacuum dressing system. While squirrel tissue and buckshot had to be removed from the wound on day six of the hospital stay, the patient remained afebrile without signs or symptoms of systemic illness. PMID:24851187

  15. Postoperative Care of Patients Undergoing Same-Day Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Patricia; Kautz, Donald D

    2015-07-01

    Elective laparoscopic cholecystectomies are common outpatient surgical procedures. After briefly discussing cholecystectomy and its indications, best practices in phase I, phase II, and phase III recovery are discussed. Typical pharmaceutical regimens for controlling pain and postoperative nausea and vomiting are summarized. By implementing best practices, nurses can prevent and recognize complications. The criteria for discharge, extended recovery, and inpatient admission are discussed, along with the required patient discharge teaching using the teach-back technique, as well as patient and family teaching needs in the immediate postoperative period. Nurses can optimize the patient's surgical experience and promote safety by implementing best practices in all phases of recovery from laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:26119606

  16. Non-invasive ventilation in postoperative patients: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Chiumello; G. Chevallard; C. Gregoretti

    2011-01-01

    Background  Postoperative pulmonary complications, generally defined as any pulmonary abnormality occurring in the postoperative period,\\u000a are still a significant issue in clinical practice increasing hospital length of stay, morbidity and mortality. Non-invasive\\u000a ventilation (NIV), primarily applied in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, decompensated COPD and hypoxemic pulmonary failure, is\\u000a nowadays also used in perioperative settings.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  Investigate the application and results of preventive and

  17. Postoperative nutritional support using needle catheter feeding jejunostomy.

    PubMed Central

    Delany, H M; Carnevale, N; Garvey, J W; Moss, G M

    1977-01-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy was used as an adjunctive surgical procedure in 110 patients. In 19 patients (or 17%) the jejunostomy was of value for the administration of post-operative nutritional support using an elemental diet and it may serve as an alternative route for the administration of supplementing fluids and electrolytes if intestinal function is intact. The clinical experience with the catheter jejunostomy establishes it as a satisfactory technique for postoperative nutritional support in patients requiring esophageal and proximal gastric resection and repair, and gastric surgery in the elderly and debilitated. It is also useful in patients undergoing complicated biliary, pancreatic, and duodenal surgery in whom anastomotic difficulties are anticipated. PMID:407853

  18. [Complicated umbilical hernia in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Concept for risk reduction of repair].

    PubMed

    Koscielny, A; Hirner, A; Kaminski, M

    2010-03-01

    Umbilical hernia repair is often accompanied by complications in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. In recent years we have been using the following concept for treating umbilical hernias in such patients: repair of the hernia by direct sutures and concomitant implantation of two large bore Robinson drainage tubes until the wound healing was completed within the next postoperative 10-14 days. During this time the reconstruction of the abdominal wall is in our opinion as robust that the ascites no longer represents a risk. Preconditions to perform this procedure were the best medicamentous treatment of ascites as ever possible and the perioperative administration of prophylactic antibiotics like gyrase inhibitors to avoid spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Over a period of 10 years (01.01.1997-31.12.2006) we operated on 22 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis and ascites because of a complicated umbilical hernia (incarceration, irreponibility, skin ulceration, leackage of ascites). One group of patients (n=10) was treated by umbilical hernia repair with the concomitant implantation of two drainage tubes and the other group (n=12) by umbilical hernia repair without draining off the ascites. Morbidity and mortality were compared in both groups in a retrospective analysis. The postoperative morbidity could be reduced from 25% to 10% by using the drainage tubes as well as the rate of recurrent hernias in the drainage group. Due to these experiences we use the concept as standard in such patients and would like to recommend it further. However, we would like to initiate a prospective, randomized, at best multicenter trial for further validation. PMID:19812906

  19. Retained glass foreign bodies in wounds: Predictive value of wound characteristics, patient perception, and wound exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark T Steele; Luan V Tran; William A Watson; Robert L Muelleman

    1998-01-01

    A convenience sample of 164 adult patients with 185 glass-caused wounds who presented to an emergency department (ED) and consented to a radiograph was prospectively studied. The purpose was to determine the characteristics of wounds at high risk for foreign body (FB) and the predictive value of patient FB sensation and probing wound exploration for FB retention. Retained glass was

  20. Complications of splenic tissue reimplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Tzoracoleftherakis, E.; Alivizatos, V.; Kalfarentzos, F.; Androulakis, J.

    1991-01-01

    Splenic tissue reimplantation employing the omental implantation technique was applied in 23 patients undergoing splenectomy for traumatic or iatrogenic splenic injury. Four complications were encountered after autotransplantation (17.4%). Two of these consisted of small bowel obstruction due to postoperative adhesions and were successfully managed by lysis of the adhesions. The other two complications were aseptic necrosis of the splenic transplants and were treated with ablation of the autolysed transplants. A case of abnormal splenic tissue reimplantation in a male patient with unsuspected myelofibrosis is also discussed. He underwent an emergency laparotomy for rupture of a subcapsular splenic haematoma. It is concluded that splenic tissue implantation in the greater omentum is associated with important early morbidity and this should be taken into account whenever application of the method is considered. Images Figure 1 PMID:2018325

  1. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome. PMID:14653765

  2. Serpina3n accelerates tissue repair in a diabetic mouse model of delayed wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, I; Parkinson, L G; Shen, Y; Toro, A; Brown, T; Zhao, H; Bleackley, R C; Granville, D J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity. Although once thought to function primarily as a pro-apoptotic serine protease, granzyme B (GzmB) can also accumulate in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during chronic inflammation and cleave ECM proteins that are essential for proper wound healing, including fibronectin. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound healing through excessive ECM degradation. In the present study, the murine serine protease inhibitor, serpina3n (SA3N), was administered to excisional wounds created on the dorsum of genetically induced type-II diabetic mice. Wound closure was monitored and skin wound samples were collected for analyses. Wound closure, including both re-epithelialization and contraction, were significantly increased in SA3N-treated wounds. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of SA3N-treated wounds revealed a more mature, proliferative granulation tissue phenotype as indicated by increased cell proliferation, vascularization, fibroblast maturation and differentiation, and collagen deposition. Skin homogenates from SA3N-treated wounds also exhibited greater levels of full-length intact fibronectin compared with that of vehicle wounds. In addition, GzmB-induced detachment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts correlated with a rounded and clustered phenotype that was prevented by SA3N. In summary, topical administration of SA3N accelerated wound healing. Our findings suggest that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic wound healing through the proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin that is essential for normal wound closure, and that SA3N promotes granulation tissue maturation and collagen deposition. PMID:25299783

  3. Mild analgesics in postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Tammisto, T.; Tigerstedt, I.

    1980-01-01

    1 The intensity of postoperative pain is influenced by many factors, for example, individual variation, site of incision and type of operation, anaesthetic technique, and the interval from the end of operation to the appearance of pain. 2 These factors affect the efficacy of analgesics. 3 Mild analgesics provide adequate pain relief in half of our patients in the immediate postoperative phase when the pain is slight to moderate. 4 The maximum effect of mild analgesics corresponds to that produced by morphine 6-10 mg. Adequate analgesia may not therefore be provided for the treatment of severe postoperative pain unless narcotic analgesics have been used peroperatively. 5 When mild analgesics are combined with narcotics synergism is achieved. 6 As postoperative pain decreases with time, mild analgesics usually provide adequate pain relief on the first and following postoperative days. PMID:7437275

  4. [Lipedema complicated with lymphedema and chyloderma].

    PubMed

    Ignjatovi?, M; Jevti?, M; Cerovi?, S

    2000-01-01

    Lipedema never reveals clinical picture of extreme lymphedema-elephantiasis, and skin signs and complications have not been observed. Aim of this paper is to present a case of lipedema with the initial lymphedema in which, after one episode of lymphangiitis and cellulitis, came to the rapid development of lymphedema followed by chyloderma. During the local treatment of extreme chyloderma with excessive exudation, semiocclusive synthetic dressings have been used for moist wound healing. The treatment was completed after 20 weeks with total epithelizsation, without maceration and irritation, without additional spreading of the chyloderma field, without wound infections, with fast and full relief of the pain. Lipedem with extreme lymphedema can be followed by skin complications of lymphedema like chylodermia. PMID:11039316

  5. Identifying wound prevalence using the Mobile Wound Care program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Judi; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Mitchell, Eleanor; Steers, Nicole; Khalil, Hanan

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the prevalence of wounds within health care systems is a challenging and complex undertaking. This is often compounded by the clinicians' training, the availability of the required data to collect, incomplete documentation and lack of reporting of this type of data across the various health care settings. To date, there is little published data on wound prevalence across regions or states. This study aims to identify the number and types of wounds treated in the Gippsland area using the Mobile Wound Care (MWC™) program. The MWC program has enabled clinicians in Gippsland to collect data on wounds managed by district nurses from four health services. The main outcomes measured were patient characteristics, wound characteristics and treatment characteristics of wounds in Gippsland. These data create several clinical and research opportunities. The identification of predominant wound aetiologies in Gippsland provides a basis on which to determine a regional wound prospective and the impact of the regional epidemiology. Training that incorporates best practice guidelines can be tailored to the most prevalent wound types. Clinical pathways that encompass the Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers can be introduced and the clinical and economical outcomes can be quantitatively measured. The MWC allows healing times (days) to be benchmarked both regionally and against established literature, for example, venous leg ulcers. PMID:23848943

  6. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  7. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.® - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.®) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which may occur during negative-pressure therapy but not necessarily due to it, are often attributed to a single factor and reported as such. However, despite the wealth of clinical experience internationally available, information regarding certain simple considerations is still lacking. Garnering information on all the factors that could possibly influence the outcome has become more difficult due to a (fortunate) decrease in the incidence of deep sternal wound infection. If more insight is to be gained from fewer clinical cases, then various potentially confounding factors should be fully disclosed before complications can be attributed to the technique itself or improvements to negative-pressure wound therapy for deep sternal wound infection can be accepted as evidence-based and the guidelines for its use adapted. The authors propose the adoption of a simple checklist in such cases. PMID:21955731

  8. Manganese superoxide dismutase expression in endothelial progenitor cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Marrotte, Eric J.; Chen, Dan-Dan; Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Alex F.

    2010-01-01

    Amputation as a result of impaired wound healing is a serious complication of diabetes. Inadequate angiogenesis contributes to poor wound healing in diabetic patients. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) normally augment angiogenesis and wound repair but are functionally impaired in diabetics. Here we report that decreased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in EPCs contributes to impaired would healing in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. A decreased frequency of circulating EPCs was detected in type 2 diabetic (db/db) mice, and when isolated, these cells exhibited decreased expression and activity of MnSOD. Wound healing and angiogenesis were markedly delayed in diabetic mice compared with normal controls. For cell therapy, topical transplantation of EPCs onto excisional wounds in diabetic mice demonstrated that diabetic EPCs were less effective than normal EPCs at accelerating wound closure. Transplantation of diabetic EPCs after MnSOD gene therapy restored their ability to mediate angiogenesis and wound repair. Conversely, siRNA-mediated knockdown of MnSOD in normal EPCs reduced their activity in diabetic wound healing assays. Increasing the number of transplanted diabetic EPCs also improved the rate of wound closure. Our findings demonstrate that cell therapy using diabetic EPCs after ex vivo MnSOD gene transfer accelerates their ability to heal wounds in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. PMID:21060152

  9. [Thoracic and abdominal and limb wounds by gun shot].

    PubMed

    Naomi, Akira; Oyamatsu, Yoshinori; Narita, Kunio; Nakayama, Masato

    2015-02-01

    In Japan, we are permitted to own fire arms only for hunting and clay pigeon shooting, but gunshot wound victims have neen rarely seen due to the strict laws against owing guns, and the lack of related crimes. Therefore, surgeons should be familiar with ballistics, practical gunshot wound management, and the possibility of delayed lead poisoning ssociated with bullet residue. A 69-year-old man was brought to our hospital because he was accidentally shot by his companion's shotgun during hunting. On admission, although he had stable vital sign and multiple gunshot wounds on his right forearm and femur, chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) revealed a few of bullets and its flagments on his back, into spleen and pericardium. Following local debridment after removal of the bullets in his right forearm and femur at an emergency room, broken heart muscle and diaphragm were repaired and hematoma in the anterior mediastinum was removed at the operating room. The patient was discharged on the 25th post-operative day and his post-operative course was uneventful. In case of gunshot injuries, in addition to prompt diagnosis and evaluation of organ injuries, careful follow up for possible delayed lead poisoning is important. PMID:25743351

  10. Pervasive Body Sensor Network: An Approach to Monitoring the Post-operative Surgical Patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omer Aziz; Benny P. L. Lo; Guang-zhong Yang; Rachel King; Ara Darzi

    2006-01-01

    Patients recovering from abdominal surgery are at risk of complications due to reduced mobility as a result of post-operative pain. The ability to pervasively monitor the recovery of this group of patients and identify those at risk of developing complications is therefore clinically desirable, which may result in an early intervention to prevent adverse outcomes. This paper describes the development

  11. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  12. Our Wounded Braves 

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, E. [author

    2012-03-05

    returned to pasture. Dehiscence occurred in one or both ulnar incisions of all foals from 2 to 5 days after surgery. All wounds healed within 2 weeks with stall rest, daily cleansing, and systemic antibiotics (procaine penicillin G, 22, 000 U/kg BID... of the distal aspect of the semilunar notch healed with the best results (70% sound), and olecranon fractures affecting the proximal aspect of the semilunar notch healed with the poorest results (0% sound). Reasons for euthanasia were 1 musculoskeletal...

  13. A new method to prevent wound infection: a controlled clinical trial in patients with combined liver and bile duct resection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Hiramatsu; M. Nagino; J. Kamiya; S. Kondo; M. Kanai; M. Miyachi; K. Uesaka; S. Mizuno; Y. Nimura

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: Despite advances in antibiotic prophylaxis, postoperative wound infection remains a major source of morbidity after digestive\\u000a surgery. Its prevention is a challenging problem, especially in high-risk patients. The authors introduced a new method to\\u000a prevent surgical wound infections and evaluated its efficacy in a prospective, randomized trial in markedly high-risk patients.\\u000a Methods: Patients with biliary tract carcinoma who were

  14. Betadine irrigation and post-craniotomy wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunal S.; Goldenberg, Brandon; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of betadine irrigation in preventing postoperative wound infection in cranial neurosurgical procedures. Methods A total of 473 consecutive cranial neurosurgical procedures, including craniotomies and burr hole procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had either antibiotic irrigation or dilute betadine plus antibiotic irrigation prior to skin closure. Infection was determined by purulence noted on reoperation and confirmed with bacterial growth culture. One and three month postoperative infection rates were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared tests. Results This study included 404 patients. Betadine was used in 117 (29.0%). At 1 month after surgery, there was no difference in the rate of wound infection between the two groups (1.7% each). However, at 90 days, the betadine group had a 2.6% infection rate compared with 3.8% in the antibiotic group, indicating a 33% decrease in infection rates with the addition of betadine (p=.527). The small sample size of the study produced a low power and high beta error. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, betadine decreased postoperative infection rates compared with antibiotic prophylaxis alone at 90 days but not 30 days. This was not statistically significant, but a larger sample size would lower the beta error and decrease confounding bias associated with group heterogeneity. The potential for betadine, a cheap, low toxicity antimicrobial, to decrease infection rates and reoperations for infection warrants a larger multicenter trial. PMID:24529229

  15. Effect of Hominis Placenta on cutaneous wound healing in normal and diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Yeun; Lee, Jiyoung; Jeong, Minsu; Min, Seorim; Kim, Song-Yi; Lee, Hyejung; Lim, Yunsook

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The number of diabetic patients has recently shown a rapid increase, and delayed wound healing is a major clinical complication in diabetes. In this study, the wound healing effect of Hominis placenta (HP) treatment was investigated in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. MATERIALS/METHODS Four full thickness wounds were created using a 4 mm biopsy punch on the dorsum. HP was injected subcutaneously at the middle region of the upper and lower wounds. Wounds were digitally photographed and wound size was measured every other day until the 14th day. Wound closure rate was analyzed using CANVAS 7SE software. Wound tissues were collected on days 2, 6, and 14 after wounding for H/E, immunohistochemistry for FGF2, and Masson's trichrome staining for collagen study. RESULTS Significantly faster wound closure rates were observed in the HP treated group than in normal and diabetes control mice on days 6 and 8. Treatment with HP resulted in reduced localization of inflammatory cells in wounded skin at day 6 in normal mice and at day 14 in diabetic mice (P < 0.01). Expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 showed a significant increase in the HP treated group on day 14 in both normal (P < 0.01) and diabetic mice (P < 0.05). In addition, HP treated groups showed a thicker collagen layer than no treatment groups, which was remarkable on the last day, day 14, in both normal and diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, HP treatment has a beneficial effect on acceleration of cutaneous wound healing via regulation of the entire wound healing process, including inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. PMID:25110560

  16. Fluid Lavage of Open Wounds (FLOW): design and rationale for a large, multicenter collaborative 2 × 3 factorial trial of irrigating pressures and solutions in patients with open fractures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Open fractures frequently result in serious complications for patients, including infections, wound healing problems, and failure of fracture healing, many of which necessitate subsequent operations. One of the most important steps in the initial management of open fractures is a thorough wound irrigation and debridement to remove any contaminants. There is, however, currently no consensus regarding the optimal approach to irrigating open fracture wounds during the initial operative procedure. The selection of both the type of irrigating fluid and the pressure of fluid delivery remain controversial. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of irrigation solutions (soap vs. normal saline) and pressure (low vs. high; gravity flow vs. high; low vs. gravity flow) on re-operation within one year among patients with open fractures. Methods/Design The FLOW study is a multi-center, randomized controlled trial using a 2 × 3 factorial design. Surgeons at clinical sites in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit 2 280 patients who will be centrally randomized into one of the 6 treatment arms (soap + low pressure; soap + gravity flow pressure; soap + high pressure; saline + low pressure; saline + gravity flow pressure; saline + high pressure). The primary outcome of the study is re-operation to promote wound or bone healing, or to treat an infection. This composite endpoint of re-operation includes a narrow spectrum of patient-important procedures: irrigation and debridement for infected wound, revision and closure for wound dehiscence, wound coverage procedures for infected or necrotic wound, bone grafts or implant exchange procedures for established nonunion in patients with postoperative fracture gaps less than 1 cm, intramedullary nail dynamizations in the operating room, and fasciotomies for compartment syndrome. Patients, outcome adjudicators, and data analysts will be blinded. We will compare rates of re-operation at 12 months across soap vs. saline, low pressure vs. high pressure, gravity flow pressure vs. high pressure, and low pressure vs. gravity flow pressure. We will measure function and quality of life with the Short Form-12 (SF-12) and the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) at baseline, 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months after initial surgical management, and measure patients' illness beliefs with the Somatic Pre-Occupation and Coping (SPOC) questionnaire at 1 and 6 weeks. We will also compare non-operatively managed infections, wound healing, and fracture healing problems at 12 months after initial surgery. Discussion This study represents a major international effort to identify a simple and easily applicable strategy for emergency wound management. The importance of the question and the potential to identify a low cost treatment strategy argues strongly for global participation, especially in low and middle income countries such as India and China where disability from traumatic injuries is substantial. Trial Registration This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00788398). PMID:20459600

  17. Advanced glycation end products delay corneal epithelial wound healing through reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Long; Chen, Hongmei; Yu, Xiaoming; Wu, Xinyi

    2013-11-01

    Delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds is a serious complication in diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are intimately associated with the diabetic complications and are deleterious to the wound healing process. However, the effect of AGEs on corneal epithelial wound healing has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) on corneal epithelial wound healing and its underlying mechanisms. Our data showed that AGE-BSA significantly increased the generation of intracellular ROS in telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells. However, the generation of intracellular ROS was completely inhibited by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), anti-receptor of AGEs (RAGE) antibodies, or the inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Moreover, AGE-BSA increased NADPH oxidase activity and protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, p22phox and Nox4, but anti-RAGE antibodies eliminated these effects. Furthermore, prevention of intracellular ROS generation using NAC or anti-RAGE antibodies rescued AGE-BSA-delayed epithelial wound healing in porcine corneal organ culture. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AGE-BSA impaired corneal epithelial wound healing ex vivo. AGE-BSA increased intracellular ROS generation through NADPH oxidase activation, which accounted for the delayed corneal epithelial wound healing. These results may provide better insights for understanding the mechanism of delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds in diabetes. PMID:23955437

  18. It's not just a wound...

    PubMed

    Russell, Barbara J

    2005-04-01

    An ongoing challenge in wound management is a belief that wounds are temporary, routine, and merely physical. However, wounds can be very complex ethically which, in turn, necessitates careful and sensitive attention by practitioners. Five clinical cases are analyzed in terms of their ethical and legal implications. More specifically, concepts such as informed consent, surrogate decision-making, compliance, intimacy, embodiment, stigma, and bodily memory are examined. Following the conceptual analyses are recommendations for responsive clinical practice. PMID:16089062

  19. Use of Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Median Sternal Incisions after Cardiothoracic Surgery: Clinical Evidence and Consensus Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M.; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors’ own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  20. Use of incisional negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery: clinical evidence and consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Pascal M; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors' own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  1. Honey: A Biologic Wound Dressing.

    PubMed

    Molan, Peter; Rhodes, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    Honey has been used as a wound dressing for thousands of years, but only in more recent times has a scientific explanation become available for its effectiveness. It is now realized that honey is a biologic wound dressing with multiple bioactivities that work in concert to expedite the healing process. The physical properties of honey also expedite the healing process: its acidity increases the release of oxygen from hemoglobin thereby making the wound environment less favorable for the activity of destructive proteases, and the high osmolarity of honey draws fluid out of the wound bed to create an outflow of lymph as occurs with negative pressure wound therapy. Honey has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, but there is much variation in potency between different honeys. There are 2 types of antibacterial activity. In most honeys the activity is due to hydrogen peroxide, but much of this is inactivated by the enzyme catalase that is present in blood, serum, and wound tissues. In manuka honey, the activity is due to methylglyoxal which is not inactivated. The manuka honey used in wound-care products can withstand dilution with substantial amounts of wound exudate and still maintain enough activity to inhibit the growth of bacteria. There is good evidence for honey also having bioactivities that stimulate the immune response (thus promoting the growth of tissues for wound repair), suppress inflammation, and bring about rapid autolytic debridement. There is clinical evidence for these actions, and research is providing scientific explanations for them. PMID:26061489

  2. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  3. Postoperative “Chimney” for Unintentional Renal Artery Occlusion after EVAR

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Federico; Piacentino, Filippo; Tozzi, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Renal artery obstruction during endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm using standard device is a rare but life-threatening complication and should be recognized and repaired rapidly in order to maintain renal function. Both conventional surgery and endovascular stenting have been reported. We report a case of late postoperative bilateral “chimney” to resolve a bilateral thrombosis of the renal artery following an uncomplicated endovascular aortic repair. PMID:25478283

  4. Epidemiology and outcome of major postoperative infections following cardiac surgery: Risk factors and impact of pathogen type

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luke F.; Arduino, Jean Marie; Sheng, Shubin; Muhlbaier, Lawrence H.; Kanafani, Zeina A.; Harris, Anthony D.; Fraser, Thomas G.; Allen, Keith; Corey, G. Ralph; Fowler, Vance G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Major postoperative infections (MPIs) are poorly understood complications of cardiac surgery. We examined the epidemiology, microbiology, and outcome of MPIs occurring after cardiac surgery. Methods The study cohort was drawn from the Society of Thoracic Surgeon National Cardiac Database and comprised adults who underwent cardiac surgery at 5 tertiary hospitals between 2000 and 2004. We studied the incidence, microbiology, and risk factors of MPI (bloodstream or chest wound infections within 30 days after surgery), as well as 30-day mortality. We used multivariate regression analyses to evaluate the risk of MPI and mortality. Results MPI was identified in 341 of 10,522 patients (3.2%). Staphylococci were found in 52.5% of these patients, gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in 24.3%, and other pathogens in 23.2%. High body mass index, previous coronary bypass surgery, emergency surgery, renal impairment, immunosuppression, cardiac failure, and peripheral/cerebrovascular disease were associated with the development of MPI. Median postoperative duration of hospitalization (15 days vs 6 days) and mortality (8.5% vs 2.2%) were higher in patients with MPIs. Compared with uninfected individuals, odds of mortality were higher in patients with S aureus MPIs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.7) and GNB MPIs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.0). Conclusions Staphylococci accounted for the majority of MPIs after cardiac surgery. Mortality was higher in patients with Staphylococcus aureus- and GNB-related MPIs than in patients with MPIs caused by other pathogens and uninfected patients. Preventive strategies should target likely pathogens and high-risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:22609237

  5. Postoperative assessment of the patient after transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, John C; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Freda, Pamela U

    2008-01-01

    While most transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is accomplished without complication, monitoring is required postoperatively for a set of disorders that are specific to this surgery. Postoperative assessments are tailored to the early and later postoperative periods. In the early period, which spans the first few weeks after surgery, both monitoring of anterior and posterior pituitary function and managing neurosurgical issues are the focus of care. Potential disruption of pituitary-adrenal function is covered with perioperative glucocorticoids. Various strategies exist for ensuring the integrity of this axis, but typically this is done by measuring a morning cortisol on the 2nd or 3rd postoperative days. Patients with levels <10 microg/l should continue therapy with reassessment in the later postoperative period. Monitoring for water imbalances, which are due to deficiency or excess of ADH (DI or SIADH, respectively), is accomplished by continuous accounting of fluid intake, urine output and specific gravities coupled with daily serum electrolyte measurements. DI is characterized by excess volumes of inappropriately dilute urine, which can lead to hypernatremia. Most patients maintain adequate fluid intake and euvolemia, but desmopressin therapy is required for some. SIADH, which peaks in incidence on 7th postoperative day, presents with hyponatremia that can be severe and symptomatic. Management consists of fluid restriction. Neurosurgical monitoring is primarily for disturbances in vision or neurological function, and although uncommon, for CSF leak and infections such as meningitis. In the later postoperative period, the adrenal, thyroid and gonadal axes are assessed. New persistent hypopituitarism is rare when transsphenoidal surgery is performed by an experienced surgeon. Various strategies are available for assessing each axis and for providing replacement therapy in patients with deficiencies. Long term monitoring with assessments of visual, neurological and pituitary function coupled with pituitary imaging is necessary for all patients who have undergone surgery, irrespective of the hormone status of their tumors. PMID:18320327

  6. Burn wound healing and treatment: review and advancements.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew P; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Elster, Eric A; Burmeister, David M; Rose, Lloyd F; Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Chan, Rodney K; Christy, Robert J; Chung, Kevin K

    2015-01-01

    Burns are a prevalent and burdensome critical care problem. The priorities of specialized facilities focus on stabilizing the patient, preventing infection, and optimizing functional recovery. Research on burns has generated sustained interest over the past few decades, and several important advancements have resulted in more effective patient stabilization and decreased mortality, especially among young patients and those with burns of intermediate extent. However, for the intensivist, challenges often exist that complicate patient support and stabilization. Furthermore, burn wounds are complex and can present unique difficulties that require late intervention or life-long rehabilitation. In addition to improvements in patient stabilization and care, research in burn wound care has yielded advancements that will continue to improve functional recovery. This article reviews recent advancements in the care of burn patients with a focus on the pathophysiology and treatment of burn wounds. PMID:26067660

  7. Complications of Medium Depth and Deep Chemical Peels

    PubMed Central

    Nikalji, Nanma; Godse, Kiran; Sakhiya, Jagdish; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin

    2012-01-01

    Superficial and medium depth peels are dynamic tools when used as part of office procedures for treatment of acne, pigmentation disorders, and photo-aging. Results and complications are generally related to the depth of wounding, with deeper peels providing more marked results and higher incidence of complications. Complications are also more likely with darker skin types, certain peeling agents, and sun exposure. They can range from minor irritations, uneven pigmentation to permanent scarring. In very rare cases, complications can be life-threatening. PMID:23378707

  8. A study on postoperative vasectomy cases.

    PubMed

    Mridha, S N; Ganguly, M M; Jana, B R

    1979-12-16

    A followup study of a sample of 160 of the 2500 men, who had vasectomies at the R.G. Kar Medical College and Hospital in Calcutta from 1972-1975, was conducted in order to assess the characteristics of acceptors, the frequency of postoperative complications, and the impact of vasectomy on sexual feelings. 53.1% of the men were between the ages of 35-44. Average marriage duration was 13.1 years and the men had an average of 3.75 children. 96.8% of the men were literate. 60.6% had incomes below Rs.200, 35.6% had incomes between Rs.201-500, and 3.8% had incomes above Rs.501. 159 of the men were Hindu. 50% of the men reported that they experience contraceptive failure prior to vasectomy. Post operative complications were experienced by 70.62% of the men. 32.5% of the 160 men experienced early complications within 10 days after the operation and 83.1% experienced late complications, 10 or more days following the procedure. In reference to early complications, out of the total 160 patients, 11.2% had local pain or swelling; 14.4% had stitch abscess, 4.4% had bleeding or hematoma, 1.9% had fever, and 0.6% had hemorrhagic diathesis. In reference to late complications, out of the total 160 patients, 13.1% had cord related problems, 10.6% had swelling of the epididymis, 10.6% had swelling of the testis, and 3.8% experienced a general deterioration in health. Sexual feelings after the vasectomy remained the same for 62.5% of the patients, decreased for 31.25%, and improved for 6.25%. Among those patients who had decreased sexual feeling, 55.6% were between the ages of 45-54, 31.8% were between the ages of 35-40, and 25.5% were between the ages of 25-34. A decrease in sexual feeling was significantly related to post operative late complications. Among the 123 men who had a semen analysis 90 days following vasectomy, 18 had positive readings and 105 had negative readings. 6 of the 123 men reported that their wives conceived after vasectomy and of these 6, only 4 had positive readings. The study findings were presented in tabular form. PMID:546987

  9. Anterior ankle arthroscopy: indications, pitfalls, and complications.

    PubMed

    Epstein, David M; Black, Brandee S; Sherman, Seth L

    2015-03-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy is a useful, minimally invasive technique for diagnosing and treating ankle conditions. Arthroscopic treatment offers the benefit of decreased surgical morbidity, less postoperative pain, and earlier return to activities. Indications for anterior ankle arthroscopy continue to expand, including ankle instability, impingement, management of osteochondritis dissecans, synovectomy, and loose body removal. Anterior ankle arthroscopy has its own set of inherent risks and complications. Surgeons can decrease the risk of complications through mastery of ankle anatomy and biomechanics, and by careful preoperative planning and meticulous surgical technique. PMID:25726482

  10. CICATRIZATION OF WOUNDS : VI. BACTERIOLOGICAL ASEPSIS OF A WOUND.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A

    1917-07-01

    Of twenty infected cases treated with Dakin's solution or chloramine paste, seven were bacteriologically sterile. This proves that, in general, 35 per cent of the cases thus treated become bacteriologically aseptic. This degree of asepsis is not necessary in order to suture the wound, the absence of bacteria in films being sufficient. Complete sterilization of wounds, can, therefore, now be accomplished. PMID:19868138

  11. Prevention, early detection, and management of complications after 328 consecutive extrapleural pneumonectomies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Sugarbaker; Michael T. Jaklitsch; Raphael Bueno; William Richards; Jeanne Lukanich; Steven J. Mentzer; Yolonda Colson; Phillip Linden; Michael Chang; Leah Capalbo; Elizabeth Oldread; Siyamek Neragi-Miandoab; Scott J. Swanson; Lambros S. Zellos

    2004-01-01

    ObjectiveExtrapleural pneumonectomy for therapy of mesothelioma has been associated with significant perioperative mortality and morbidity. Postoperative complications of this procedure require a unique management approach. We developed treatment algorithms for most of the common complications of extrapleural pneumonectomy resulting in reduced mortality and hospital stay. Complications after extrapleural pneumonectomy were further analyzed to elucidate means of prevention, early detection, and

  12. Substance p promotes wound healing in diabetes by modulating inflammation and macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Leal, Ermelindo C; Carvalho, Eugénia; Tellechea, Ana; Kafanas, Antonios; Tecilazich, Francesco; Kearney, Cathal; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Auster, Michael E; Kokkotou, Efi; Mooney, David J; LoGerfo, Frank W; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Veves, Aristidis

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes. Substance P (SP) is involved in wound healing, but its effect in diabetic skin wounds is unclear. We examined the effect of exogenous SP delivery on diabetic mouse and rabbit wounds. We also studied the impact of deficiency in SP or its receptor, neurokinin-1 receptor, on wound healing in mouse models. SP treatment improved wound healing in mice and rabbits, whereas the absence of SP or its receptor impaired wound progression in mice. Moreover, SP bioavailability in diabetic skin was reduced as SP gene expression was decreased, whereas the gene expression and protein levels of the enzyme that degrades SP, neutral endopeptidase, were increased. Diabetes and SP deficiency were associated with absence of an acute inflammatory response important for wound healing progression and instead revealed a persistent inflammation throughout the healing process. SP treatment induced an acute inflammatory response, which enabled the progression to the proliferative phase and modulated macrophage activation toward the M2 phenotype that promotes wound healing. In conclusion, SP treatment reverses the chronic proinflammatory state in diabetic skin and promotes healing of diabetic wounds. PMID:25871534

  13. Antimicrobial effect of continuous lidocaine infusion in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced wound infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chiu, Kuan-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Continuous infusion of local anesthetics in surgical wounds has been shown to be an effective technique for postoperative analgesia. To investigate the potential antimicrobial effect of continuous local anesthetic infusion, we adapted a mouse model of surgical wound infection to examine effects on antibacterial response. Forty male BALB/c mice were randomized into 2 groups. An incision wound was made over the dorsal flank and instilled with Staphylococcus aureus. An osmotic pump was then implanted to deliver either 0.9% NaCl or 2% lidocaine continuously. Each wound was cultured postoperatively at 2 days, and the colony count of S. aureus was determined. Results showed that the number of colony-forming units of S. aureus measured in wounds treated with lidocaine displayed a nearly 10-fold reduction compared to the wounds in the saline group (P=0.009). The demonstrated antibacterial activity indicates that local anesthetic infusion may play a role in prophylaxis for surgical wound infections. PMID:25310128

  14. Clinical Biofilms: A Challenging Frontier in Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Hurlow, Jennifer; Couch, Kara; Laforet, Karen; Bolton, Laura; Metcalf, Daniel; Bowler, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Biofilms have been implicated in a variety of wound complications. Recent Advances: Research has confirmed that biofilms form in wounds of patients experiencing delayed healing and may be a precursor to infection. Critical Issues: Research into the strength of this association is still in its infancy. Is biofilm formation a cause of these complications, a step toward them, or a signal that unresolved factors injuring tissue or delaying healing are setting the stage for biofilm formation, infection, and healing delay? To qualify biofilms for use in informing clinical practice decisions, biofilm characteristics supporting those decisions need standardized definitions and valid evidence that they predict or diagnose healing or infection outcomes. Literature searches of relevant terms reviewed biofilm definitions and validation of their role in predicting and diagnosing delayed wound healing or infection. Future Directions: Further research is needed to provide a rapid accurate technique to identify and characterize biofilms in ways that optimize their validity in diagnosing or screening patient risk of infection or delayed healing and to inform clinical decisions. This research will help validate biofilm's capacity to support wound care clinical practice decisions and establish their importance in guiding clinical practice. PMID:26005595

  15. [Stimulation of the healing of aseptic wounds using laser irradiation].

    PubMed

    Tolstykh, P I; Gertsen, A V; Eliseenko, V I; Sarasek, Iu K

    1991-07-01

    On the basis of experimental studies conducted on 535 albino Wistar rats and clinical observations over 125 patients, and from complex appraisal of morphological, biochemical, and tensiometric data the conclusion is drawn that optimal operative cutting of tissues is achieved by means of far infrared carbon dioxide laser beam with a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Comparison of these characteristics showed the strength of the postoperative scar to be much less in intraoperative tissue cutting with a steel scalpel or high-energy beam of an AIG laser with a wavelength of 1.06 microns. Low-intensity laser radiation increased the strength of the postoperative scar in the early periods in all groups. Tissue cutting with a high-energy carbon dioxide laser beam with a wavelength of 10.6 microns in combination with pre- and postoperative exposure of the zone of the incision to low-intensity 0.89 micron wavelength laser beam considerably increases the strength of the postoperative scar and is the method of choice in the treatment of aseptic wounds. PMID:1921196

  16. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Everett, Newton B.; Tyler, Ruth

    1970-01-01

    Healing skin wounds were studied in a series of parabiotic rats. The femurs of one parabiont of each pair were shielded whilst both animals were given 800 r from a Co60 source. The animals were wounded 3 days after irradiation. Each animal with partially shielded marrow was then given tritiated thymidine intraperitoneally daily while the cross-circulation was arrested by clamping. After the thymidine-3H had cleared the blood, the clamp was released. Animals were sacrificed, and wounds were prepared for radioautography 1, 2, and 6 days after wounding. In the wounds of the shielded animals thymidine-3H was observed in epidermis, endothelium, leukocytes, fibroblasts, and mast cells. Only neutrophilic leukocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes were labeled, as determined by light and electron microscope radioautography, in the wounds of each nonshielded parabiont. None of the many fibroblasts present were found to contain label in the wounds of the nonshielded parabionts through the 6 day period. These observations provide further evidence that wound fibroblasts do not arise from hematogenous precursors and, therefore, must arise from adjacent connective tissue cells. PMID:5415241

  17. Skin Substitutes and Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Auger; D. Lacroix; L. Germain

    2009-01-01

    Medical science has vastly improved on the means and methods available for the treatment of wounds in the clinic. The production and use of various types of skin substitutes has led to dramatic improvements in the odds of survival for severely burned patients, but they have also shown promise for many other applications, including cases involving chronic wounds that are

  18. Hemoglobin A1c is a Predictor of Healing Rate In Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Andrea L.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Margolis, David J.; Lazarus, Gerald S.; Garza, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity wounds are a major complication of diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) reflects glycemia over 2–3 months and is the standard measure used to monitor glycemia in diabetic patients, but results from studies have not shown a consistent association of HbA1c with wound healing. We hypothesized that elevated HbA1c would be most associated with poor wound healing. To test this hypothesis we conducted a retrospective cohort study of 183 diabetic individuals treated at the Johns Hopkins Wound Center. Our primary outcome was wound-area healing rate (cm2/day). Calibrated tracings of digital images were used to measure wound area. We estimated coefficients for healing rate using a multiple linear regression model controlling for clustering of wounds within individuals and other common clinic variables. The study population was 45% female and 41% black with mean age of 61 years. Mean HbA1c was 8.0% and there were 2.3 wounds per individual (310 wounds total). Of all measures assessed, only HbA1c was significantly associated with wound-area healing rate. Specifically, for each 1.0% point increase in HbA1c, the daily wound-area healing rate decreased by 0.028 cm2/day (95% CI: 0.003, 0.0054, p=0.027). Our results suggest that glycemia, as assessed by HbA1c, may be an important biomarker in predicting wound healing rate in diabetic patients. PMID:21697890

  19. Wounds of the hand contaminated by human or animal saliva.

    PubMed

    Peeples, E; Boswick, J A; Scott, F A

    1980-05-01

    A prospective and retrospective evaluation of 75 patients with hand wounds contaminated by human saliva (35) or animal saliva (40) demonstrates that a program of outpatient management can be sufficient for optimal care in many patients. This series challenges the proposition that hospitalization, radiographs, and surgical debridement are necessary for most such wounds. Sixty-seven per cent did not have surgical intervention and no complications resulted. Ninety-two per cent received antibiotics. Radiographs were obtained only when bony injury or entry into a joint was suspected. Delay in seeking treatment until obvious signs of infection or pain are present is common. Literature review details the anatomic factors important in the natural history and control of these infections, and the changes with respect to modes of treatment for these potentially dangerous wounds. The injury is caused by bites with the hand extended or, in fight-bite wounds, with the metacarpal-phalangeal and interphalangeal joints flexed, allowing deeper penetration and then sealing of the wound when the first is opened. Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are the organisms most frequently found in human bites, and in animal bites; Pasteurella multocida should be considered in dog and cat bites. PMID:7365851

  20. Access to wound dressings for patients living with epidermolysis bullosa - an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Louise J

    2014-10-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a rare genetic skin disorder characterised by fragility and blistering of skin and mucous membranes. Skin can blister and shear away from minimal friction, trauma and every day activities. The disease causes a wide range of complications but wound care is the major challenge to severe EB, and good wound care is an essential part of wound management. The goal of wound care was to choose a product that protects the fragile skin, limits friction, decreases pain and promotes healing. However, access to wound dressings for those people living with EB is challenging. This article discusses the availability of EB dressings in a number of countries around the world and also describes an innovative National Epidermolysis Bullosa Dressings Scheme (NEBDS) in Australia, which aims to improve the quality of life of people with EB, by reducing the financial burden associated with the provision of dressings accordingly. PMID:23174001

  1. Management of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshitaka Fujii

    2011-01-01

    The common and distressing complications of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are the main concern of 40–70% of patients\\u000a undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). The first step in preventing PONV after LC is to reduce the risk factors involving\\u000a patient characteristics, surgical procedure, anesthetic technique, and postoperative care. Particularly, the use of propofol-based\\u000a anesthesia can reduce the incidence of PONV after

  2. Postoperative osteomyelitis following implant arthroplasty of the foot: diagnosis with indium-111 white blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, R.H.; Kanat, I.O.

    1987-11-01

    Many complications can occur following insertion of silicone elastomer implants into the foot. Postoperative infection may be difficult to distinguish from other conditions such as dislodgment, fracture, ectopic and heterotopic new bone formation, synovitis, and bursitis. White blood cell scintigraphy, in conjunction with the clinical scenario, may prove to be an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of postoperative osteomyelitis, subsequent to implant arthroplasties. 32 references.

  3. Pregnancy Complications: Chlamydia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the community. Home > Pregnancy > Pregnancy Complications > Chlamydia Pregnancy complications Pregnancy complications may need special medical care. ... younger than 25. Can chlamydia cause problems during pregnancy? Yes. If you get it before or during ...

  4. Wound Repair By Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard F.; Glassberg, Edward; Saperia, David; White, Rodney A.; Lask, Gary; Dwyer, Richard M.; Uitto, Jouni

    1986-08-01

    In this study, we have developed a concept of wound closure by laser welding and studied the wound healing process. In the first set of experiments, six-millimeter long, full-thickness incisions were made in the skin on the back of hairless mice. Control wounds were closed with interrupted 5-0 prolene suture. The experimental wounds were approximated and closed by laser welding using a Nd:YAG (1.06 ?m) laser. Selected wounds were excised for histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, tensile strength determination and assay of type I collagen specific messenger-RNA. The laser welded wounds demonstrated rapid healing with good cosmetic results. The tensile strength was identical both for laser welded and sutured wounds at 7, 16, and 21 days. A significant increase of type I collagen specific mRNA was noted in both specimens at 4, 10 and 16 days, but a higher level was recorded in the sutured specimens at day 16 (2652 vs. 911 U/pg total RNA). We further initiated a comparative study to identify the laser which would be most suitable for skin welding. For this purpose argon, Nd:YAG (1.06 ?m and 1.32 ?m) and CO2 lasers were used to weld skin. Wound healing, tensile strength and collagen analyses were performed. The results indicated that both argon and Nd:YAG (1.32 ?m) lasers achieved the most effective closure. These results suggest that laser welding provides an efficient method for closing skin wounds. The laser welding has clear advantages over conventional suturing techniques, being sterile, non-tactile, not requiring introduction of foreign materials into the wound, and providing improved cosmetic results.

  5. Wound care in venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, G

    2013-03-01

    Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain. In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds. Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage. In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power. Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred. When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective. In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge. Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time. Negative wound pressure treatment creating a negative pressure on ulcer bed is able to favour granulation tissue and shorten healing time. In case of hard-to-heal leg ulcers such as large, deep, infected and long-lasting venous ulcers, sharp debridement and skin grafting may favour and shorten ulcer healing. PMID:23482540

  6. Immediate postoperative enteral feeding results in impaired respiratory mechanics and decreased mobility.

    PubMed Central

    Watters, J M; Kirkpatrick, S M; Norris, S B; Shamji, F M; Wells, G A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors set out to determine whether immediate enteral feeding minimizes early postoperative decreases in handgrip and respiratory muscle strength. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Muscle strength decreases considerably after major surgical procedures. Enteral feeding has been shown to restore strength rapidly in other clinical settings. METHODS: A randomized, controlled, nonblinded clinical trial was conducted in patients undergoing esophagectomy or pancreatoduodenectomy who received immediate postoperative enteral feeding via jejunostomy (fed, n = 13), or no enteral feeding during the first 6 postoperative days (unfed, n = 15). Handgrip strength, vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) were measured before surgery and on postoperative days 2, 4, and 6. Fatigue and vigor were evaluated before surgery and on postoperative day 6. Mobility was assessed daily after surgery using a standardized descriptive scale. Postoperative urine biochemistry was evaluated in daily 24-hour collections. RESULTS: Postoperative vital capacity (p < 0.05) and FEV1 (p = 0.07) were consistently lower (18%-29%) in the fed group than in the unfed group, whereas grip strength and maximal inspiratory pressure were not significantly different. Postoperative mobility also was lower in the fed patients (p < 0.05) and tended to recover less rapidly (p = 0.07). Fatigue increased and vigor decreased after surgery (both p < or = 0.001), but changes were similar in the fed and unfed groups. Intensive care unit and postoperative hospital stay did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate postoperative jejunal feeding was associated with impaired respiratory mechanics and postoperative mobility and did not influence the loss of muscle strength or the increase in fatigue, which occurred after major surgery. Immediate postoperative enteral feeding should not be routine in well-nourished patients at low risk of nutrition-related complications. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9339943

  7. Simplified Analysis of Residual Stresses in In-Situ Cured Hoop-Wound Rings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Gabrys; C. E. Bakis

    1998-01-01

    A simple theoretical\\/empirical hybrid method for the prediction of residual stresses in in-situ cured, thick, hoop-wound, thermosetting composite rings is presented. The method avoids the need for complicated characterizations of resin and fiber properties that affect residual stress development during the manufacturing process. New results from a series of experiments with in-situ cured hoop-wound glass and carbon reinforced epoxy composites

  8. Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described. PMID:23285333

  9. Wound bed preparation: ultrasonic-assisted debridement.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Gillian; Pinnuck, Loreto

    Wound bed preparation is essential for the healing of wounds. The TIME framework (tissue, infection/inflammation, moisture balance, edge of wound) for wound bed preparation shows the importance of debridement in the treatment of chronic wounds. Debridement involves the removal of devitalised tissue from the wound bed. It also facilitates the removal of biofilms-complex microbial communities that are known to contribute to delayed wound healing and chronicity of wounds. Ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement (UAWD) is a lesser known debridement method that uses low-frequency ultrasound waves. There is evidence to show that the three clinical effects of atraumatic selective tissue debridement, wound stimulatory effects and antibacterial activity facilitate early healing of wounds, reducing the cost to the healthcare system and improving the patient's quality of life. PMID:23587975

  10. Necrotising fasciitis in a domestic shorthair cat--negative pressure wound therapy assisted debridement and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nolff, M C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2015-04-01

    A 10-year-old, domestic shorthair cat was presented for acute lameness of the left forelimb accompanied by severe pain, swelling, skin necrosis, malodorous discharge and pyrexia. Following a presumptive diagnosis of necrotising fasciitis aggressive surgical debridement of the affected soft tissues of the antebrachium and negative pressure wound treatment of the open defect were performed. Surgical findings supported the tentative diagnosis of necrotising fasciitis and Streptococcus canis was isolated from the wound. A free skin graft was performed 29 days after admission, and augmented by 3 days of negative pressure wound therapy to facilitate graft incorporation. Healing was achieved without complications and no functional or aesthetic abnormalities remained. PMID:25323110

  11. Early laparotomy wound failure as the mechanism for incisional hernia formation

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Liyu; Culbertson, Eric J.; Wen, Yuan; Franz, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia is the most common complication of abdominal surgery leading to reoperation. In the United States, 200,000 incisional hernia repairs are performed annually, often with significant morbidity. Obesity is increasing the risk of laparotomy wound failure. Methods We used a validated animal model of incisional hernia formation. We intentionally induced laparotomy wound failure in otherwise normal adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Radio-opaque, metal surgical clips served as markers for the use of x-ray images to follow the progress of laparotomy wound failure. We confirmed radiographic findings of the time course for mechanical laparotomy wound failure by necropsy. Results Noninvasive radiographic imaging predicts early laparotomy wound failure and incisional hernia formation. We confirmed both transverse and craniocaudad migration of radio-opaque markers at necropsy after 28 d that was uniformly associated with the clinical development of incisional hernias. Conclusions Early laparotomy wound failure is a primary mechanism for incisional hernia formation. A noninvasive radiographic method for studying laparotomy wound healing may help design clinical trials to prevent and treat this common general surgical complication. PMID:23036516

  12. Complications and untoward effects of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mickey M. Karram; Jeffery L. Segal; Brett J. Vassallo; Steven D. Kleeman

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo report our experience with our first 350 cases of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT), specifically assessing intraoperative complications, postoperative morbidity, and untoward effects of the procedure.

  13. Pectus excavatum with delayed diagnosis of implant tear on MRI apparently causing recurrent postoperative seromas: A case report.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Arti R; Powell, Daniel K; Irish, Robert D; Math, Kevin R

    2015-08-01

    Seroma formation is the most common early postoperative complication after pectus excavatum repair, but later seromas are rare. While many seromas eventually resorb or decrease in size after aspiration, our case demonstrates recurrent seroma formation as a late complication of pectus excavatum repair in a patient with an implant tear. Postoperative seromas can result in prolonged chest wall pain, large chest wall masses, and increased mass effect on the heart with potential risk for resultant right ventricular outflow obstruction. This case report illustrates a solid silicone implant tear. Though rare, early recognition may help to decrease the likelihood of recurrent postoperative seromas. PMID:25452151

  14. Early vascular complications after endovascular repair of aortoiliac aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Aljabri, B; Obrand, D I; Montreuil, B; MacKenzie, K S; Steinmetz, O K

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of and review the treatment options for intraoperative endograft access-related vascular complications and early postoperative vascular complications of endovascular repair for aortoiliac aneuryms (EVAR). Between February 1998 and April 2000, 53 patients (46 males, 7 females) with aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (AAA) and iliac arteries were treated with endovascular grafts (48 AAA, and 5 iliac aneurysms). All procedures were performed using open exposure of the femoral arteries. One patient with an AAA was converted to open repair (primary technical success, 98.1%). We recorded the need for adjunctive vascular procedures or intervention to the access arteries (iliofemoral) or the endograft because of thrombosis or distal embolization. Events were classified as either intraoperative, early postoperative (< 30 postoperative days), or late postoperative. Their etiology and treatment were recorded. The results were compared to those from other series reported in the literature and to published registry data. From our results we concluded that the need for adjunctive vascular procedures to the iliofemoral arteries at the time of EVAR is significant. These procedures are necessary to either repair damage to the access arteries from the delivery system or provide a conduit for graft delivery in cases where the access arteries are inadequate. Early postoperative vascular complications are due to technical factors resulting in residual graft limb stenoses. Both intraoperative and early postoperative vascular complications after EVAR are more common in female patients. These complications can be effectively treated with a variety of open surgical and transfemoral endovascular techniques. PMID:11769140

  15. Pooled Analysis of Non-Union, Re-Operation, Infection, and Approach Related Complications after Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Nai-Feng; Hu, Xu-Qi; Wu, Li-Jun; Wu, Xin-Lei; Wu, Yao-Sen; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chi, Yong-Long; Mao, Fang-Min

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior odontoid screw fixation (AOSF) has been one of the most popular treatments for odontoid fractures. However, the true efficacy of AOSF remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to provide the pooled rates of non-union, reoperation, infection, and approach related complications after AOSF for odontoid fractures. Methods We searched studies that discussed complications after AOSF for type II or type III odontoid fractures. A proportion meta-analysis was done and potential sources of heterogeneity were explored by meta-regression analysis. Results Of 972 references initially identified, 63 were eligible for inclusion. 54 studies provided data regarding non-union. The pooled non-union rate was 10% (95% CI: 7%–3%). 48 citations provided re-operation information with a pooled proportion of 5% (95% CI: 3%–7%). Infection was described in 20 studies with an overall rate of 0.2% (95% CI: 0%–1.2%). The main approach related complication is postoperative dysphagia with a pooled rate of 10% (95% CI: 4%–17%). Proportions for the other approach related complications such as postoperative hoarseness (1.2%, 95% CI: 0%–3.7%), esophageal/retropharyngeal injury (0%, 95% CI: 0%–1.1%), wound hematomas (0.2%, 95% CI: 0%–1.8%), and spinal cord injury (0%, 95% CI: 0%–0.2%) were very low. Significant heterogeneities were detected when we combined the rates of non-union, re-operation, and dysphagia. Multivariate meta-regression analysis showed that old age was significantly predictive of non-union. Subgroup comparisons showed significant higher non-union rates in age ?70 than that in age ?40 and in age 40 to <50. Meta-regression analysis did not reveal any examined variables influencing the re-operation rate. Meta-regression analysis showed age had a significant effect on the dysphagia rate. Conclusions/Significances This study summarized the rates of non-union, reoperation, infection, and approach related complications after AOSF for odontoid factures. Elderly patients were more likely to experience non-union and dysphagia. PMID:25058011

  16. Outcomes of WHO Grade I Meningiomas Receiving Definitive or Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzler, Emily; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Mendenhall, William M., E-mail: mendwm@shands.ufl.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We analyzed long-term local control and complications in patients with either pathologically confirmed or clinical World Health Organization Grade I meningiomas treated with definitive or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Methods: Between 1984 and 2006, 146 patients were treated with definitive (n = 88) or postoperative RT after subtotal resection (n = 57) or gross total resection (n = 1). Patients were treated with conventional (n = 41), stereotactic (n = 103), or intensity-modulated RT (n = 2) to a median dose of 52.7 Gy and followed for a median of 7.3 years (range, 0.6-22.0 years) Results: The local control rates at 5 and 10 years were as follows: definitive RT, 99% and 99%; postoperative RT, 96% and 93%; and overall, 97% and 96%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were as follows: definitive RT 94% and 94%, postoperative RT, 100% and 96%; and overall, 96% and 95%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were as follows: definitive RT, 81% and 75%; postoperative RT, 96% and 85%; and overall, 87% and 79%, respectively. Severe RT complications occurred in 6.8% of patients; severe surgery-related complications occurred in 10 (17%) of 58 patients treated surgically. Conclusions: The likelihood of cure after definitive RT or following subtotal resection is excellent. However, a small population of patients experience severe complications, even at the moderate dose used for this disease.

  17. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  18. Detection of gentamicin emission from bone cement in the early postoperative period following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Lehel; Koós, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor; Szabó, György

    2006-05-01

    This article describes the characteristics of gentamicin emission from the bone cement-antibiotic complex in the early postoperative period following total hip arthroplasty. Gentamicin levels of the drain fluid taken at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively were measured with a fluorescent polarization immunoassay method. Mean gentamicin concentrations were 2.6, 1.2, and 0.6 mcg/mL, respectively. Age, sex, and body mass index had no significant influence on the outcome. Results showed that the amount of gentamicin in the wound fluid is inversely proportional to the total amount excreted. Twenty-four hours postoperatively, the average gentamicin concentrations in the drain fluid taken from around the endoprosthesis implanted with Palacos-R bone cement (Zimmer Warsaw, Ind), diminished, yet remained above the minimal inhibitory concentration level. PMID:16729744

  19. [Modern aspects of classification of the complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Aliaev, Iu G; Rapoport, L M; Rudenko, V I

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) develops due to inadequate assessment of the clinical course of urolithiasis, incorrectly defined indications for treatment, lack of adequate preoperative preparation and ESWL technology. Based on the analysis of the results of treatment of 4500 patients with urolithiasis in the Clinic of Urology of the First MSMU n.a. I.M. Sechenov, taking into account the Clavien-Dindo classification of postoperative complications, we proposed a classification of complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, which allows to estimate the degree of complications and determine the sequence of the provision of special medical care. PMID:25799729

  20. Intensive insulin treatment increases donor site wound protein synthesis in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chinkes, David L.; Aarsland, Asle; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the treatment of burns, patients’ own skin is the preferred material to cover burn wounds, resulting in the need to create a donor site wound. Enhancement of healing of the donor site wound would be beneficial in burn patients. Insulin, an anabolic agent, is routinely used to treat hyperglycemia after injury. We investigated whether intensive insulin treatment (INS) increases fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of the donor site wound protein and decreases the length of hospitalization normalized for total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA). Methods FSR of the donor site wound protein was measured in pediatric patients randomized to control (CNT) (n = 13) and INS (n = 10) treatments. Depending on the postoperative day when the tracer study was done studies were divided into “Early” (days < 5) and “Late” (days >=5) periods. Results FSR of the donor site wound protein was greater in the INS group at the “Early” period of wound healing (CNT vs. INS, 8.2±3.8 vs. 13.1±6.9 %/day, p: < 0.05); but not at the “Late” (CNT vs. INS, 19.7±4.6 vs. 16.6±4.0 %/day, p > 0.05). Despite these differences LOS/TBSA was not decreased in the INS group. Correlation analyses demonstrated that independently of the treatment regimen FSR positively correlated (p < 0.05) with time post creation of the donor site and negatively correlated (p < 0.05) with LOS/TBSA. Conclusions Insulin treatment increased FSR of the donor site wound protein in the early period of wound healing; FSR correlated with LOS/TBSA independently of the treatment regimen. PMID:21236451

  1. Postoperative Instructions Following Facial Surgery

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Postoperative Instructions Following Facial Surgery 1. Your surgery will be performed in the Surgery Center on the 4th floor of the Center for Health and Healing (CHH) at Oregon Health & Sciences University. The procedure is done under anesthesia administered by an anesthesiologist. After surgery, you

  2. The holistic management of chronic wound pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claire Acton

    Pain is a frequent symptom of patients with chronic wounds and contributes to suffering and reduced quality of life. Wound care professionals need to understand the potential causes and mechanisms of pain that are experienced by a patient with a chronic wound and provide the most appropriate interventions. A previous article published in Wounds UK considered the deleterious effect on

  3. Vacuum Assisted Closure Therapy versus Standard Wound Therapy for Open Musculoskeletal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Kushagra; Chauhan, Vijendra D.; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Chauhan, Neena; Rajan, Manu; Agrawal, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study was performed to evaluate the results of vacuum assisted wound therapy in patients with open musculoskeletal injuries. Study Design and Setting. Prospective, randomized, and interventional at tertiary care hospital, from 2011 to 2012. Materials and Methods. 30 patients of open musculoskeletal injuries underwent randomized trial of vacuum assisted closure therapy versus standard wound therapy around the upper limb and lower limb. Mean patient age was 39 ± 18 years (range, 18 to 76 years). Necrotic tissues were debrided before applying VAC therapy. Dressings were changed every 3 or 4 days. For standard wound therapy, debridement followed by daily dressings was done. Data Management and Statistical Analysis. The results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis. Results. The size of soft tissue defects reduced more than 5?mm to 25?mm after VAC (mean decrease of 26.66%), whereas in standard wound therapy, reduction in wound size was less than 5?mm. A free flap was needed to cover exposed bone and tendon in one case in standard wound therapy group. No major complication occurred that was directly attributable to treatment. Conclusion. Vacuum assisted wound therapy was found to facilitate the rapid formation of healthy granulation tissue on open wounds in the upper limb and lower limb, thus to shorten healing time and minimize secondary soft tissue defect coverage procedures. PMID:23878741

  4. Using negative pressure wound therapy following surgery for complex pilonidal disease: a case series.

    PubMed

    Bendewald, Frank P; Cima, Robert R; Metcalf, Dan R; Hassan, Imran

    2007-05-01

    Complex pilonidal disease, an uncommon manifestation of an anorectal condition, is characterized by chronic or recurrent abscesses with extensive, branching sinus tracts. Definitive treatment requires wide excision of all involved tissue followed by secondary intention healing or reconstructive surgery. All treatment options have unique advantages and disadvantages. Following recent reports that negative pressure wound therapy after surgery for complex pilonidal disease may be a useful alternative to moist saline dressing treatments, five patients (three men and two women, median age 21 years [range: 16 to 63 years]) with complex pilonidal disease (symptom duration range 6 months to 30 years) were treated on an outpatient basis. Following wide excision under general anesthesia, a portable negative pressure wound therapy device was applied. Mean wound defect size after excision was 11 cm x 4 cm x 5 cm, or 205 cm(3) (range 90 cm(3) to 410 cm(3)). Negative pressure wound therapy was used for an average of 6 weeks (range 4 to 9 weeks) and mean time to complete epithelialization was 12 weeks (range 9 to 22 weeks), including use of moist saline dressings post negative pressure wound therapy. Treatment was discontinued in one patient due to skin irritation. No other complications were observed. Long-term follow-up is required to assess the risk of recurrent pilonidal disease or wound failure following negative pressure wound therapy. Additional studies of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of pilonidal disease are warranted. PMID:17551174

  5. A Minimally Invasive Approach for Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Shintaro [Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Ohyaguchi kamimachi, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8610, Third Department of Surgery (Japan)], E-mail: yamazaki-nmed@umin.ac.jp; Kuramoto, Kenmei [National Hospital Tokyo, Disaster Medical Center, Tokyo, Department of Radiology (Japan); Itoh, Yutaka [National Hospital Tokyo, Disaster Medical Center, Tokyo, Department of Surgery (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshika [Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Ohyaguchi kamimachi, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8610, Third Department of Surgery (Japan); Ueda, Toshisada [National Hospital Tokyo, Disaster Medical Center, Tokyo, Department of Surgery (Japan)

    2003-11-15

    Pancreas fistula is a well-known and severe complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy. It is difficult to control with conservative therapy, inducing further complications and severe morbidity. Until now, re-operation has been the only way to resolve pancreatic fistula causing complete dehiscence of the pancreatic-enteric anastomosis (complete pancreatic fistula). Percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage is one of the treatments for pancreatic fistula. This procedure allows both pancreas juice drainage and anastomosis re-construction at the same time. This is effective and minimally invasive but difficult to adapt to a long or complicated fistula. In particular, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct is indispensable. This paper reports the successful resolution of a postoperative pancreatic fistula by a two-way-approach percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage procedure. Using a snare catheter from the fistula and a flexible guidewire from the transgastric puncture needle, it can be performed either with or without main pancreatic duct dilatation.

  6. Intraperitoneal infusion as a complication of needle catheter feeding jejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Blebea, J; King, T A

    1985-01-01

    The needle catheter feeding jejunostomy is being increasingly utilized for postoperative nutritional support. We report a case of catheter dislodgement with intraperitoneal infusion of an elemental diet with subsequent peritonitis and death. A review of the literature reveals this complication to occur in 1.5% of patients, even when the serosa of the small bowel has been attached to the anterior abdominal wall. Recommendations are made regarding the prevention and management of such complications. PMID:4068198

  7. WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery with the goal of defining recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. PMID:24289453

  8. Use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Wounds: A Review of Recent Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evan T. Excell

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is used extensively in the acute and chronic wound care arena of health care. It has become a standard of care for many types of wounds from non-healing diabetic foot ulcers and burns to traumatic and surgical wounds. Recently attention has been paid to using this system for the treatment of catastrophic abdominal wounds.

  9. Postoperative Residual Neuromuscular Paralysis at an Australian Tertiary Children's Hospital

    PubMed Central

    O'Dea, Brendan; Meyerkort, Luke; Hegarty, Mary; von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Residual neuromuscular blockade (RNMB) is known to be a significant but frequently overlooked complication after the use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). Aim of this prospective audit was to investigate the incidence and severity of RNMB at our Australian tertiary pediatric center. Methods. All children receiving NMBA during anesthesia were included over a 5-week period at the end of 2011 (Mondays to Fridays; 8?a.m.–6?p.m.). At the end of surgery, directly prior to tracheal extubation, the train-of-four (TOF) ratio was assessed quantitatively. Data related to patient postoperative outcome was collected in the postoperative acute care unit. Results. Data of 64 patients were analyzed. Neostigmine was given in 34 cases and sugammadex in 1 patient. The incidence of RNMB was 28.1% overall (without reversal: 19.4%; after neostigmine: 37.5%; n.s.). Severe RNMB (TOF ratio < 0.7) was found in 6.5% after both no reversal and neostigmine, respectively. Complications in the postoperative acute care unit were infrequent, with no differences between reversal and no reversal groups. Conclusions. In this audit, RNMB was frequently observed, particularly in cases where patients were reversed with neostigmine. These findings underline the well-known problems associated with the use of NMBA that are not fully reversed.

  10. Preoperative versus postoperative initiation of dalteparin thromboprophylaxis in THA.

    PubMed

    Borgen, Pål O; Dahl, Ola E; Reikeras, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Chemical thromboprophylaxis in total hip arthroplasty (THA) may increase surgical site bleeding. The drug dose and timing of such therapy is therefore important. We studied two cohorts of 298 and 301 patients undergoing THA. The first group received their first dose of dalteparin sodium 5000 IU subcutaneously the evening before surgery and the second group a half dose six hours postoperatively, followed by 5000 units daily in both groups. Blood loss was reduced by 146 ml from 1230 ml to 1084 ml (p<0.001) with postoperative prophylaxis alone. The number of patients receiving blood transfusion decreased from 53% to 35% (p=0.001), and the use of transfused packed red blood cells was reduced from 1.25 to 0.83 units per patient (p=0.001). The overall rates of non-vascular complications 6 months after surgery were 12% and 11%, bleeding related events 6.0% and 4.0%, and thromboembolic related events were 2.0% and 2.3% in the preoperative and the postoperative cohorts. Two patients died in the preoperative group and one in the postoperative group due to venous and arterial thromboembolism. This study show that 2500 IU dose of dalteparin started 6 hours after surgery significantly reduced blood loss and transfusions compared to 5000 IU dalteparin injected 12 hours before surgery. Few thromboembolic events occurred, and these were equally distributed. PMID:20640994

  11. Prevena™, negative pressure wound therapy applied to closed Pfannenstiel incisions at time of caesarean section in patients deemed at high risk for wound infection.

    PubMed

    Anglim, B; O'Connor, H; Daly, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our retrospective study is to report on our experience using the Prevena™ wound system in obese patients undergoing caesarean section delivery. A total of 26 cases were identified from July 2012 to October 2013. The median BMI of these women was 45.3 kg/m(2). Elective caesarean sections were performed in 20 women (77%). There were four cases (15%) of superficial dehiscence. Factors associated with wound breakdown were wound infection (p = 0.03), increasing BMI (p < 0.001) and emergency LSCS (p = 0.04). In a logistic regression model the presence of infection was the only factor which remained associated with wound breakdown. Wound disruption is a major cause of morbidity following caesarean section in morbidly obese patients. The wound complication rate in our experience was low with the Prevena™ dressing with no cases of sheath dehiscence, and no patient required a second operation. The presence of infection is the most important factor in wound breakdown and should be the focus for management protocols. PMID:25383909

  12. Management of post-hepatectomy complications

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Fu, Quan; Wuyun, Gerile; Wuyun, Tu

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic resection had an impressive growth over time. It has been widely performed for the treatment of various liver diseases, such as malignant tumors, benign tumors, calculi in the intrahepatic ducts, hydatid disease, and abscesses. Management of hepatic resection is challenging. Despite technical advances and high experience of liver resection of specialized centers, it is still burdened by relatively high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Especially, complex resections are being increasingly performed in high risk and older patient population. Operation on the liver is especially challenging because of its unique anatomic architecture and because of its vital functions. Common post-hepatectomy complications include venous catheter-related infection, pleural effusion, incisional infection, pulmonary atelectasis or infection, ascites, subphrenic infection, urinary tract infection, intraperitoneal hemorrhage, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, biliary tract hemorrhage, coagulation disorders, bile leakage, and liver failure. These problems are closely related to surgical manipulations, anesthesia, preoperative evaluation and preparation, and postoperative observation and management. The safety profile of hepatectomy probably can be improved if the surgeons and medical staff involved have comprehensive knowledge of the expected complications and expertise in their management. This review article focuses on the major postoperative issues after hepatic resection and presents the current management. PMID:24307791

  13. Sternum wound contraction and distension during negative pressure wound therapy when using a rigid disc to prevent heart and lung rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra Lindstedt; Richard Ingemansson; Malin Malmsjö

    2011-01-01

    Background  There are increasing reports of deaths and serious complications associated with the use of negative pressure wound therapy\\u000a (NPWT), of which right ventricular heart rupture is the most devastating. The use of a rigid barrier has been suggested to\\u000a offer protection against this lethal complication by preventing the heart from being drawn up against the sharp edges of the\\u000a sternum.

  14. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) in acute and chronic wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA), as a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and a low thermal load to the skin surface, can improve the healing of acute and chronic wounds both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. wIRA increases tissue temperature (+2.7°C at a tissue depth of 2 cm), tissue oxygen partial pressure (+32% at a tissue depth of 2 cm) and tissue perfusion. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient supply of tissue with energy and oxygen and consequently also for wound healing and infection defense. wIRA can considerably alleviate pain (without any exception during 230 irradiations) with substantially less need for analgesics (52–69% less in the groups with wIRA compared to the control groups). It also diminishes exudation and inflammation and can show positive immunomodulatory effects. The overall evaluation of the effect of irradiation as well as the wound healing and the cosmetic result (assessed on visual analogue scales) were markedly better in the group with wIRA compared to the control group. wIRA can advance wound healing (median reduction of wound size of 90% in severely burned children already after 9 days in the group with wIRA compared to 13 days in the control group; on average 18 versus 42 days until complete wound closure in chronic venous stasis ulcers) or improve an impaired wound healing (reaching wound closure and normalization of the thermographic image in otherwise recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers) both in acute and in chronic wounds including infected wounds. After major abdominal surgery there was a trend in favor of the wIRA group to a lower rate of total wound infections (7% versus 15%) including late infections following discharge from hospital (0% versus 8%) and a trend towards a shorter postoperative hospital stay (9 versus 11 days). Even the normal wound healing process can be improved. The mentioned effects have been proven in six prospective studies, with most of the effects having an evidence level of Ia/Ib. wIRA represents a valuable therapy option and can generally be recommended for use in the treatment of acute as well as of chronic wounds. PMID:20204090

  15. We count but should we scrutinize? An unreported complication in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dabis, John; Abdul-Jabar, Hani B.; Smith, Matthew; Kotrba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Complications following spinal surgery can range from simple wound infection to complete paralysis. Intraoperative checks have been introduced to account for all the instruments and materials used and help minimize surgeon-related complications. We report a case of a broken osteotome tip within the spinal canal following a routine posterior decompression of the lumbar spine.

  16. Postoperative discomfort of dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Yildirim, Mustafa Denizhan; Delikan, Ebru; Çetin, Seçil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find out postoperative discomfort in children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia (DRGA). Methods: This study involved 78 (4 to 10 year-old) healthy patients who were scheduled for DRGA and were needed extensive dental treatment because of severe caries, and showed high dental fear and/or behavioral management problems. The children had to be fit for DRGA administration by fulfilling the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II and no associated mental health or communication problems. Data were collected by structured interview either face to face (immediately post operation) or using a telephone (post operation after discharge). One of the study’s investigators recorded all data related to the immediate postoperative period during the child’s stay in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). The questionnaire consisted of questions related to postoperative problems experienced by the patient in the period after their day-stay attendance. The questionnaire, consisting of questions regarding and generally related to the child’s activities. In addition, pain was assessed using the face, legs, activity, cry, consolability (FLACC) scale. Results: The prevalence of postoperative problems was 46 out of 78 (59%). The mean FLACC score was 1.8 (SD=2.1). Some of the patients having more than one reported problem. Forty-one percent of the children showed nasal discomfort (P<0.01). Thirty-three percent and 43% of the children experienced throat or mouth discomfort. The most common experienced postoperative symptom after DRGA was bleeding. Nasal bleeding, however, was an uncommon complication and did not cause serious morbidity or mortality in children intubated nasotracheally. In addition, postoperative discomfort was related to number of the extractions. Children who had 4 or more extractions were more likely to experience pain. Findings associated with other bodily functions were assessed. Nausea and vomiting were reported in 20.5% of children. Twenty-six children (18%) had a fever. Thirty-nine (50.0%) parents reported that their children had problems eating. Conclusion: Post-operative discomfort was more with 4 or more extraction done under DRGA and that nasal bleeding was noted a uncommon post-operative symptom. PMID:25097517

  17. Elevated body mass index and risk of postoperative CSF leak following transsphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dlouhy, Brian J.; Madhavan, Karthik; Clinger, John D.; Reddy, Ambur; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; O’Brien, Erin K.; Chang, Eugene; Graham, Scott M.; Greenlee, Jeremy D. W.

    2012-01-01

    Object Postoperative CSF leakage can be a serious complication after a transsphenoidal surgical approach. An elevated body mass index (BMI) is a significant risk factor for spontaneous CSF leaks. However, there is no evidence correlating BMI with postoperative CSF leak after transsphenoidal surgery. The authors hypothesized that patients with elevated BMI would have a higher incidence of CSF leakage complications following transsphenoidal surgery. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of 121 patients who, between August 2005 and March 2010, underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgeries for resection of primarily sellar masses. Patients requiring extended transsphenoidal approaches were excluded. A multivariate statistical analysis was performed to investigate the association of BMI and other risk factors with postoperative CSF leakage. Results In 92 patients, 96 endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries were performed that met inclusion criteria. Thirteen postoperative leaks occurred and required subsequent treatment, including lumbar drainage and/or reoperation. The average BMI of patients with a postoperative CSF leak was significantly greater than that in patients with no postoperative CSF leak (39.2 vs 32.9 kg/m2, p = 0.006). Multivariate analyses indicate that for every 5-kg/m2 increase in BMI, patients undergoing a transsphenoidal approach for a primarily sellar mass have 1.61 times the odds (95% CI 1.10–2.29, p = 0.016, by multivariate logistic regression) of having a postoperative CSF leak. Conclusions Elevated BMI is an independent predictor of postoperative CSF leak after an endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach. The authors recommend that patients with BMI greater than 30 kg/m2 have meticulous sellar reconstruction at surgery and close monitoring postoperatively. PMID:22443502

  18. Wound dressings and topical agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, K R; Ashry, H R

    1995-01-01

    Topical treatment of wounds is an important aspect of wound care, although secondary to surgical and systemic care. Dressing materials come in many forms to suit wound types and preferences. No hard evidence exists to place any one approach above another. All wounds deserve individualized attention and care plans. Likewise, a plethora of solutions exist to augment dressing materials in cleansing, antibiosis, and débridement. Traditional agents, including hydrogen peroxide, Dakin's solution, and povidone-iodine, are more tissue toxic than their common usage would indicate. We prefer frequent dressing changes with natural fiber gauze and nontoxic solutions such as saline. The scalpel, curette, and rongeur are, in our experience, much preferred to enzymatic agents when débridement is needed. We encourage scrutiny of commercial products based on clinical merit and effectiveness as documented in the medical literature. Platelet derived growth factors are an effective adjunct to wound healing and are primarily indicated when the condition of patients and their wounds has otherwise been optimized. PMID:7720031

  19. Wound disinfection with ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G J; Bannister, G C; Leeming, J P

    1995-06-01

    Bacteria were counted concurrently in the air and wounds during the first 20 min of total joint arthroplasty procedures in two theatres: a conventional plenum ventilated theatre with ultraviolet C (UVC) tubes installed and a filtered vertical laminar flow theatre. Four theatre environments were tested: conventional theatre and clothing; conventional theatre with UVC protective clothing, with UVC set to produce 100 or 300 microW cm-2 s-1 irradiation; and filtered vertical laminar flow air with staff wearing cuffed cotton/polyester clothing. When used, the UVC was activated 10 min after starting an operation to assess the effect of UVC clothing alone, and of UVC radiation on bacteria already present in the wound. Compared with conventional theatres, UVC clothing reduced air counts by 38%, UVC at 100 microW cm-2 s-1 by 81%, at 300 microW cm-2 s-1 by 91%, and laminar flow by 92%. Wounds counts fell correspondingly by 66% with UVC clothing, 87% with UVC at 100 microW cm-2 s-1 and 92% both with UVC at 300 microW cm-2 s-1 and laminar flow. In conventional and laminar flow theatres air and wound counts correlated closely but in UVC theatres wound counts were lower than levels expected from prevailing air counts suggesting that UVC kills bacteria in wounds as well as in air. PMID:7673693

  20. Retropericardial hematoma complicating off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshihiro Fukui; Shigefumi Suehiro; Toshihiko Shibata; Koji Hattori; Hidekazu Hirai

    2002-01-01

    We report the case of a retropericardial hematoma after triple-vessel off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated a retropericardial hematoma that compressed the left atrium anteriorly and suppressed cardiac function. Injury to the pulmonary vein during placement of deep pericardial sutures and postoperative infusion of heparin were the likely causes of this rare but potentially fatal complication of an

  1. Effect of CO 2 laser irradiation on wound healing of exposed rat pulp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaya Suzuki; Takahito Ogisu; Chikage Kato; Koichi Shinkai; Yoshiroh Katoh

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of direct pulp capping treatment using super-pulsed CO2 laser preirradiation on the wound healing process of exposed rat pulp on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 postoperatively. Group\\u000a 1 was irradiated with a CO2 laser and directly capped with a self-etching adhesive system. The laser was operated in super-pulse mode (pulse duration,\\u000a 200 ?s;

  2. Complicated Gallstones after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sioka, Eleni; Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Zachari, Eleni; Katsogridaki, Georgia; Tzovaras, George

    2014-01-01

    Background. The natural history of gallstone formation after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), the incidence of symptomatic gallstones, and timing of cholecystectomy are not well established. Methods. A retrospective review of prospectively collected database of 150 patients that underwent LSG was reviewed. Results. Preoperatively, gallbladder disease was identified in 32 of the patients (23.2%). Postoperatively, eight of 138 patients (5.8%) became symptomatic. Namely, three of 23 patients (13%) who had evident cholelithiasis preoperatively developed complicated cholelithiasis. From the cohort of patients without preoperative cholelithiasis, five of 106 patients (4.7%) experienced complicated gallstones after LSG. Total cumulative incidence of complicated gallstones was 4.7% (95% CI: 1.3–8.1%). The gallbladder disease-free survival rate was 92.2% at 2 years. No patient underwent cholecystectomy earlier than 9 months or later than 23 months indicating the post-LSG effect. Conclusion. A significant proportion of bariatric patients compared to the general population became symptomatic and soon developed complications after LSG, thus early cholecystectomy is warranted. Routine concomitant cholecystectomy could be considered because the proportion of patients who developed complications especially those with potentially significant morbidities is high and the time to develop complications is short and because of the real technical difficulties during subsequent cholecystectomy. PMID:25105023

  3. Sympathetic mechanisms in post-operative pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Postoperative pain after major surgery is often inadequately treated with opiates alone. The paper by De Kock, Pichon and Scholtes, in this issue, is a good example of a well-designed prospective study of the role of the sympathetic nervous system in postoperative pain. Clonidine, an alpha 2 adrenoceptor agonist effectively reduced the postoperative PCA morphine requirements in their patients after

  4. Postoperative Care of the Facial Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Medel, Nicholas; Panchal, Neeraj; Ellis, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine factors involved in the postoperative care of traumatic lacerations. An evidence-based comprehensive literature review was conducted. There are a limited number of scientifically proven studies that guide surgeons and emergency room physicians on postoperative care. Randomized controlled trials must be conducted to further standardize the postoperative protocol for simple facial lacerations. PMID:22132257

  5. Acute post-operative rhinosinusitis following endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Shams, P N; Selva, D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the incidence and risk factors for acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) following endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EnDCR). Methods Retrospective single-surgeon interventional case series, including 196 consecutive patients undergoing 203 endonasal DCR, with clinical and radiological evidence of nasolacrimal duct or common canalicular obstruction. Pre-operative lacrimal and sinonasal clinical assessment and imaging, intraoperative endoscopic video recording, and post-operative clinical and endoscopic findings were analysed for cases of ARS occurring within the first 4 weeks following DCR among patients with and without a past history of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Surgical complications and outcomes at 12 months and management of ARS are reported. Results Three patients (1.5%) developed ARS within the first 5 post-operative days, none of which had experienced peri-operative complications and all had a past history of CRS. The rate of CRS in this cohort of 196 patients was 10.2% (n=20), of which 15% (n=3) developed ARS, although none had symptoms of CRS at the time of surgery; one had undergone previous sinus surgery. Presenting symptoms of ARS included facial pain, tenderness over the affected sinus, and nasal discharge; all patients responded to oral antibiotic therapy. Discussion The rate of ARS following EnDCR was 1.5%. In those with a prior history of CRS, it was 15% (P=0.009). ARS developed within the first post-operative week among patients with a past history of CRS, who were asymptomatic at the time of surgery, and responded to oral antibiotics. CRS may be a risk factor for the development of post-operative ARS. PMID:23846379

  6. Postoperative Pain Experience: Results from a National Survey Suggest Postoperative Pain Continues to Be Undermanaged

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey L. Apfelbaum; Connie Chen; Shilpa S. Mehta; Tong J. Gan

    2003-01-01

    Postoperative pain can have a significant effect on pa- tient recovery. An understanding of patient attitudes and concerns about postoperative pain is important for identifying ways health care professionals can improve postoperative care. To assess patients' postoperative pain experience and the status of acute pain manage- ment, we conducted a national study by using tele- phone questionnaires. A random sample

  7. Influence of postoperative enteral nutrition on postsurgical infections.

    PubMed Central

    Beier-Holgersen, R; Boesby, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that early enteral nutrition might reduce the incidence of serious complications after major abdominal surgery. METHODS: In a randomised double blind prospective trial 30 patients received Nutri-drink and 30 patients received placebo through a nasoduodenal feeding tube. On the day of operation the patients were given median 600 ml of either nutrition or placebo, 60 ml per hour. On the first postoperative day the patients received either 1000 ml (median) of nutrition or placebo, on day 2 1200 ml (median) nutrition, 1400 ml placebo, on day 3 1000 ml (median) nutrition, 1150 ml placebo, and on day 4 1000 ml (median) nutrition, 800 ml placebo. All patients were followed up for 30 days by the same investigator. RESULTS: The two groups were similar with regard to nutritional status and type of operation. The rate of postoperative infectious complications was significantly lower in the nutrition group, two of 30 compared with 14 of 30 in the placebo group (p = 0.0009). CONCLUSION: Early enteral nutrition given to patients after major abdominal surgery results in an important reduction in infectious complications. PMID:9038665

  8. Excellent local control with IOERT and postoperative EBRT in high grade extremity sarcoma: results from a subgroup analysis of a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To report the results of a subgroup analysis of a prospective phase II trial focussing on radiation therapy and outcome in patients with extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods Between 2005 and 2010, 50 patients (pts) with high risk STS (size???5 cm, deep/extracompartimental location, grade II-III (FNCLCC)) were enrolled. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with EIA (etoposide, ifosfamide and doxorubicin), definitive surgery with IOERT, postoperative EBRT and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. 34 pts, who suffered from extremity tumors and received radiation therapy after limb-sparing surgery, formed the basis of this subgroup analysis. Results Median follow-up from inclusion was 48 months in survivors. Margin status was R0 in 30 pts (88%) and R1 in 4 pts (12%). IOERT was performed as planned in 31 pts (91%) with a median dose of 15 Gy, a median electron energy of 6 MeV and a median cone size of 9 cm. All patients received postoperative EBRT with a median dose of 46 Gy after IOERT or 60 Gy without IOERT. Median time from surgery to EBRT and median EBRT duration was 36 days, respectively. One patient developed a local recurrence while 11 patients showed nodal or distant failures. The estimated 5-year rates of local control, distant control and overall survival were 97%, 66% and 79%, respectively. Postoperative wound complications were found in 7 pts (20%), resulting in delayed EBRT (>60 day interval) in 3 pts. Acute radiation toxicity mainly consisted of radiation dermatitis (grade II: 24%, no grade III reactions). 4 pts developed grade I/II radiation recall dermatitis during adjuvant chemotherapy, which resolved during the following cycles. Severe late toxicity was observed in 6 pts (18%). Long-term limb preservation was achieved in 32 pts (94%) with good functional outcome in 81%. Conclusion Multimodal therapy including IOERT and postoperative EBRT resulted in excellent local control and good overall survival in patients with high risk STS of the extremities with acceptable acute and late radiation side effects. Limb preservation with good functional outcome was achieved in the majority of patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01382030, EudraCT 2004-002501-72, 17.06.2011 PMID:24885755

  9. Latissimus dorsi flap closure of the irradiated clavicular wound.

    PubMed

    Hartzell, Tristan L; Hornicek, Francis J; Austen, William G

    2008-01-01

    Partial or total resection of a previously irradiated clavicle and surrounding soft tissues is a difficult clinical problem. Attempts to close the defect with local tissue often result in wound breakdown and exposure of any remaining clavicle. Furthermore, the most appealing local muscle flap, the pectoralis major, is often unsuitable for reconstruction because of previous resection or radiation damage. Over a 3-year period, 8 patients had resection of a previously irradiated clavicle and surrounding soft tissues. Four underwent excision for sarcoma and four for osteoradionecrosis complicated by chronic wounds. All defects were reconstructed with a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap. No patient had a flap failure, and all had closed wounds at a minimum 18-month follow-up. Our series demonstrates the success of latissimus dorsi flap coverage for post-claviculectomy defects in an irradiated field. To our knowledge, this is the first described series of such patients. The latissimus dorsi muscle flap should be considered for all difficult wounds involving the clavicle and surrounding soft tissues. PMID:18760634

  10. Sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors according to clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Lemaignen, A; Birgand, G; Ghodhbane, W; Alkhoder, S; Lolom, I; Belorgey, S; Lescure, F-X; Armand-Lefevre, L; Raffoul, R; Dilly, M-P; Nataf, P; Lucet, J C

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery depends on the definition used. A distinction is generally made between mediastinitis, as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and superficial SSI. Our objective was to decipher these entities in terms of presentation and risk factors. We performed a 7-year single centre analysis of prospective surveillance of patients with cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. SSI was defined as the need for reoperation due to infection. Among 7170 patients, 292 (4.1%) developed SSI, including 145 CDC-defined mediastinitis (CDC-positive SSI, 2.0%) and 147 superficial SSI without associated bloodstream infection (CDC-negative SSI, 2.1%). Median time to reoperation for CDC-negative SSI was 18 days (interquartile range, 14-26) and 16 (interquartile range, 11-24) for CDC-positive SSI (p 0.02). Microorganisms associated with CDC-negative SSI were mainly skin commensals (62/147, 41%) or originated in the digestive tract (62/147, 42%); only six were due to Staphylococcus aureus (4%), while CDC-positive SSI were mostly due to S. aureus (52/145, 36%) and germs from the digestive tract (52/145, 36%). Risk factors for SSI were older age, obesity, chronic obstructive bronchopneumonia, diabetes mellitus, critical preoperative state, postoperative vasopressive support, transfusion or prolonged ventilation and coronary artery bypass grafting, especially if using both internal thoracic arteries in female patients. The number of internal thoracic arteries used and factors affecting wound healing were primarily associated with CDC-negative SSI, whereas comorbidities and perioperative complications were mainly associated with CDC-positive SSI. These 2 entities differed in time to revision surgery, bacteriology and risk factors, suggesting a differing pathophysiology. PMID:25882356

  11. Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

  12. Complications of Tumor Ablation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence Cheung; Tito Livraghi; Luigi Solbiati; Gerald D. Dodd; Eric vanSonnenberg

    Percutaneous and surgical ablation procedures are flourishing, in large part because of the relative paucity and the acceptability\\u000a of complications. However, serious and fatal complications have occurred, albeit rarely, with ablation. This chapter identifies\\u000a those complications, describes their underlying cause, and, when possible, discusses strategies to avoid them.

  13. Gestational vascular complications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnon Samueloff

    2003-01-01

    Severe pregnancy complications, primarily severe pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) occur in about 1–5% of gestations. This rate is even higher in special medical situations. These pregnancy complications have been shown to increase maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality considerably. Severe pregnancy complications have also been shown to be associated with deficient uteroplacental

  14. A brief history of wound care.

    PubMed

    Broughton, George; Janis, Jeffrey E; Attinger, Christopher E

    2006-06-01

    Since the caveman, man has been tending to his wounds. Wound care evolved from magical incantations, potions, and ointments, to a systematic text of wound care and surgery from Hippocrates and Celsus. These advances were lost after the fall of the Roman Empire. In Europe, the Middle Ages were a regression of wound care back to potions and charms. It was'nt until the time of large armies using muskets and cannons that surgical wound care emerged again. This article will briefly highlight major milestones in wound care. PMID:16799371

  15. A clinical algorithm for wound biofilm identification.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, D G; Bowler, P G; Hurlow, J

    2014-03-01

    Recognition of the existence of biofilm in chronic wounds is increasing among wound care practitioners, and a growing body of evidence indicates that biofilm contributes significantly to wound recalcitrance. While clinical guidelines regarding the involvement of biofilm in human bacterial infections have been proposed, there remains uncertainty and lack of guidance towards biofilm presence in wounds. The intention of this report is to collate knowledge and evidence of the visual and indirect clinical indicators of wound biofilm, and propose an algorithm designed to facilitate clinical recognition of biofilm and subsequent wound management practices. PMID:24633059

  16. Quantitative bacterial analysis of comparative wound irrigations.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, M L; Robson, M C; Krizek, T J; Southwick, W O

    1975-01-01

    It is a biologic fact that all open wounds contain bacteria and remain contaminated with varying levels of bacteria until successful wound closure has been accomplished. The sine qua non in the management of the contaminated wound has been and remains adequate sharp debridement. In a standardized experimental model, three methods of irrigation were compared employing quantitative bacteriology of tissue to evaluate their effectiveness at decreasing bacterial levels and reducing wound infection. The pulsating jet lavate was found to be significantly better than gravity flow irrigation or wound irrigation with a bulb syringe. These data on tissue biopsies support previous reports using surface and wound exudate cultures. PMID:1094969

  17. Radiography after orthognathic surgery. Part II. Surgical complications.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, P A; Tu, H K; Koment, M A; Ruskin, J D; Bennion, J

    1988-04-01

    In a retrospective review of the radiographs from 100 patients who had undergone orthognathic surgery, the authors found that 10% of radiographs had evidence of surgical complications. These complications were fractures, temporomandibular joint dislocations, transected tooth roots, retained surgical devices, avascular necrosis, malunion or nonunion of osteotomy fragments, and osteomyelitis. Some of these complications are of little significance, while others require immediate intervention. Opacified maxillary sinuses and lucencies around tooth roots are frequent findings that may be confused with abnormalities; however, they represent postoperative blood in the sinuses and resorption of bone due to stress from orthodontic appliances, respectively. PMID:3347722

  18. Thoracic epidural infusion with chloroprocaine for postoperative analgesia following epicardial pacemaker placement in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Mineto; Corridore, Marco; Tobias, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    In critically ill neonates and infants, major interventions, including thoracotomy, may result in significant postoperative respiratory insufficiency and pain leading to the need for postoperative mechanical ventilation. Although there are many potential options for providing postoperative analgesia, there continues to be expanding use of regional anesthesia in this population. One of the many reported advantages is the provision of postoperative analgesia while avoiding the deleterious effects on respiratory function that may be seen with systemic opioids. We report the use of thoracic epidural anesthesia using a continuous infusion of chloroprocaine to provide analgesia following thoracotomy and epicardial pacemaker placement in an infant. The perioperative plan was complicated by comorbid conditions including congenital complete heart block, recent rhinovirus infection with residual respiratory involvement, and prematurity. PMID:25364272

  19. Surgical Outcomes and Complications after Occipito-Cervical Fusion Using the Screw-Rod System in Craniocervical Instability

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Ho; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung; Yoo, Chan Jong; Son, Seong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although there is no consensus on the ideal treatment of the craniocervical instability, biomechanical stabilization and bone fusion can be induced through occipito-cervical fusion (OCF). The authors conducted this study to evaluate efficacy of OCF, as well as to explore methods in reducing complications. Methods A total of 16 cases with craniocervical instability underwent OCF since the year 2002. The mean age of the patients was 51.5 years with a mean follow-up period of 34.9 months. The subjects were compared using lateral X-ray taken before the operation, after the operation, and during last follow-up. The Nurick score was used to assess neurological function pre and postoperatively. Results All patients showed improvements in myelopathic symptoms after the operation. The mean preoperative Nurick score was 3.1. At the end of follow-up after surgery, the mean Nurick score was 2.0. After surgery, most patients' posterior occipito-cervical angle entered the normal range as the pre operation angle decresed from 121 to 114 degree. There were three cases with complications, such as, vertebral artery injury, occipital screw failure and wound infection. In two cases with cerebral palsy, occipital screw failures occurred. But, reoperation was performed in one case. Conclusion OCF is an effective method in treating craniocervical instability. However, the complication rate can be quite high when performing OCF in patients with cerebral palsy, rheumatoid arthritis. Much precaution should be taken when performing this procedure on high risk patients. PMID:23826478

  20. Management of Inflammatory Complications of Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bergermann, Michael; Donald, Paul J.; àWengen, Daniel F.

    1993-01-01

    Because the contents of the intracranial cavity are exposed to the upper airway, inflammatory complications are the most frequent in skull base surgery. If dura has to be resected and reconstructed with a graft, the risk of inflammatory complications increases. An evaluation of 93 patients with skull base tumors who were operated on at the University of California, Davis Medical Center between July 1982 and March 1992 and had resection and reconstruction of dura is presented. Inflammatory complications developed in 33 (35%) patients. Local wound infection, cerebrospinal fluid leak, and meningitis are by far the most frequent complications. Patients with middle and combined fossae approaches have the highest incidence. Cause, treatment, and prophylaxis of inflammatory complications are discussed. PMID:17170883

  1. The association of intraoperative factors with the development of postoperative delirium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward R Marcantonio; Lee Goldman; E. John Orav; E. Francis Cook; Thomas H Lee

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the association of intraoperative factors, including route of anesthesia, hemodynamic complications, and blood loss, with the development of postoperative delirium.PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 1,341 patients 50 years of age and older admitted for major elective noncardiac surgery at an academic medical center. Data on route of anesthesia, intraoperative hypotension, bradycardia and tachycardia, blood loss, number of

  2. Postoperative morbidity and mortality following resection of the colon and rectum for cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. L. Bokey; P. H. Chapuis; C. Fung; W. J. Hughes; S. G. Koorey; D. Brewer; R. C. Newland; Yanek S. Y. Chiu

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of postoperative complications and mortality of patients with colorectal cancer when treated by conventional surgery. METHODS: Morbidity and mortality following open resection for colorectal cancer were analyzed in 1,846 patients whose clinical, operative, and pathology data were prospectively documented over a 20-year period. RESULTS: Mortality following elective resection of

  3. An autopsy case of a decomposed body with keyhole gunshot wound and secondary skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Kuroda, Ryohei; Nakajima, Makoto; Takizawa, Ayako; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The decomposed body of a 53 or 57-year-old male was found with a gun in a locked car parked in a coin-operated parking lot. During autopsy, the entrance wound in the frontal bone showed a characteristic keyhole defect with internal and external beveling. There was no exit wound. The fragmented bullet traveled downward within the calvarium and struck the right orbital plate. Two independent linear fractures were observed away from the entrance. These were believed to be secondary fractures resulting neither from internal ricochet of the bullet nor from direct blunt force to the head. Although decomposition complicated the evaluation of the gunshot wound characteristics, microscopic examination confirmed large quantities of soot along the wound tract, supporting our conclusion that the range of fire was contact. PMID:22633563

  4. Postoperative liver failure after major hepatic resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in the modern era with special reference to remnant liver volume

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Shirabe; Mitsuo Shimada; Tomonobu Gion; Hirofumi Hasegawa; Kenji Takenaka; Tohru Utsunomiya; Keizo Sugimachi

    1999-01-01

    Background: Postoperative liver failure is a life-threatening complication after hepatic resection. Because of recent advances in liver surgery technique and a more stringent patient selection, mortality after hepatic resection has steadily decreased, but its incidence still ranges from 10% to 20%. The factors linked to postoperative liver failure in major hepatic resection in the modern era should be reevaluated.Study Design:

  5. Effects of ketoprofen for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Iwata, Hideki; Morikawa, Akihiro; Imori, Satoko; Waki, Sayaka; Tamura, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Fumimoto; Eguchi, Satoru; Kumagai, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common geriatric complication that may be associated with increased mortality. Here, we investigated the effects of postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen on cognitive functions in aged animals and compared its effectiveness to morphine. Rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups: isoflurane anesthesia without surgery (group C), isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy (group IL), and isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy plus postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen or morphine. There was no difference in postoperative locomotor activity among groups. In group IL, postoperative pain levels assessed by the Rat Grimace Scale significantly increased until 8 h after surgery, which was similarly inhibited by both ketoprofen and morphine. Cognitive function was assessed using radial arm maze testing for 12 consecutive days from postoperative day 3. Results showed that the number of memory errors in group IL were significantly higher than those in goup C. However, both ketoprofen and morphine could attenuate the increase in memory errors following surgery to a similar degree. Conversely, ketoprofen showed no effect on cognitive function in the nonsurgical rats that did not experience pain. Our findings suggest that postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen can prevent the development of surgery-associated memory deficits via its pain-relieving effects. PMID:24676769

  6. Efficacy of papain-based wound cleanser in promoting wound regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ajlia, S A S H; Majid, F A A; Suvik, A; Effendy, M A W; Nouri, H Serati

    2010-06-15

    A new invention, papain-based wound cleanser is formulated by incorporating papain, a proteolytic enzyme extracted from Carica papaya into the formulation. This cleanser is invented to simplify the methods in wound management by combining wound cleansing and wound debridement using a single formulation. This study describes the preparation and preclinical study of papain-based wound cleanser in accelerating wound healing. In this study, papain-based wound cleanser was used to treat wound incision on Sprague-Dawley rats while distilled water and Betadine were used as negative and positive control. Twenty-seven clinically healthy white rats were randomly divided into three groups and treated accordingly until the 21st day post-incision. Wound reduction rates and histological analysis were obtained to asses the healing pattern. Rats treated with papain-based wound cleanser showed a progressive wound healing based on the wound reduction rates and histological analysis when compared with rats treated with distilled water and Betadine. Better collagen deposition and presence of skin organelles in rats treated with papain-based wound cleanser demonstrated its efficacy in promoting wound healing. In addition to its wound healing effect, papain-based wound cleanser is also integrated with antibacterial properties which make it a complete package for wound management. However, further studies should be carried out to ensure its safety for human usage. PMID:21061910

  7. Effects of a low level laser on the acceleration of wound healing in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Adel J.; Alfars, Abdalbari A.; Falih, Mohsin A. J.; Hassan, Al-Nawar A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tissue healing is a complex process that involves local and systemic responses. The use of low level laser therapy for wound healing has been shown to be effective in modulating both local and systemic response. Aim: The aim of this study was to accelerate and facilitate wound healing and reduce scar formation and wound contraction of an open wound by a low level laser. Materials & Methods: Twenty adult male rabbits, lepus cuniculus demostica, were brought from a Basrah local market and raised under proper management conditions in Basrah Veterinary Medicine College. The age of these rabbits ranged between 8-10 months and their body weight was 1.5-2 Kg. The rabbits were divided into two groups, group I (Control) and group II (Treated). General anesthesia was provided by a mixture of Xylazine and Ketamine at a ratio of 1:0.5m intramuscularly. Selected sites were shaved, cleaned and disinfected. A wound of 4-cm length and 3-cm depth was made on the gluteal region; six hours later, the wound was treated with gallium aluminum and an arsenide diode laser with a power output of 10m at a wavelength of 890nm in pulsed nods, with a frequency of 20 KLTZ. The wound exposure to the laser was once a day at 890 nm wavelength for 5 minutes over a 7-day period. Histopathological study was obtained regarding the wound depth and edge of the skin on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days. Results: The histopathological finding of group I at three days postoperative showed hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration, mainly neutrophils as well as congested blood vessels in the gap. At seven days, the gap contained necrotized neutrophils together with hemolysis and granulation tissue under the dermis tissue. Hemolysis was seen between the muscle fibers. At 14 days, there was irregular fibrous connective tissue proliferation with congested blood vessels seen in the gap with mononuclear cell infiltration. In group II at three days postoperative, severe inflammatory cell infiltration was observed, mainly neutrophils with proliferation of fibroblasts from a few fibrous connective tissues. On the 7th day, the main lesion was characterized by severe granulation tissue that consisted of proliferation of fibrous connective tissue and congested blood vessels in the gap of the incision with mononuclear cell infiltration. Conclusions: The study found that low level laser therapy (II) was effective in open wounds, which showed better regeneration and faster restoration of structural and functional integrity as compared to the control group. PMID:22540090

  8. Wound ballistics: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Ordog, G J; Wasserberger, J; Balasubramanium, S

    1984-12-01

    Ballistics is the study of the natural laws governing projectile missiles and their predictable performances, and wound ballistics is the study of a missile's effect on living tissue. A knowledge of these topics is essential to determine the extent and type of injury from a missile. The type of missile can often be determined by radiography. The caliber can be measured directly if the bullet is close to the x-ray plate and the x-ray tube is at least six feet from the film. Changing these distances can result in a maximum magnification of the bullet image of 20%, and the exact amount can be calculated using a formula provided. Definitions of ballistic and wound ballistic terms are provided, as are examples of wound ballistics in application. PMID:6507972

  9. [Ultrasonic cavitation and ozonization in treatment of patients with pyo-necrotic complications of diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zubarev, P N; Risman, B V

    2011-01-01

    The main group consisted of 130 patients with pyo-necrotic complications of diabetic foot syndrome, in who after operations within the foot limits, there were ultrasonic cavitation and ozonization of the wound surface. The control group consisted of 90 patients who underwent operative treatment as well as a standard local treatment using the preparations with reference to the phase of the wound process. The use of low-frequency ultrasound allows in short-terms ablation of necrotized tissues within the limits of healthy tissues, decrease of microbial contamination of the wounds and preparing to closing. Ozonization of the wounds facilitates growth of the granulating tissues and prolongs the effect of decontamination of the wound surface. The application of physical methods in treatment of patients with pyo-necrotic complications of diabetic foot syndrome decreases the number of disabling operations. PMID:21506355

  10. Impact of Preoperative Anaemia and Blood Transfusion on Postoperative Outcomes in Gynaecological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Toby; Musallam, Khaled M.; Nassif, Joseph; Ghazeeri, Ghina; Seoud, Muhieddine; Gurusamy, Kurinchi S.; Jamali, Faek R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of preoperative anaemia and blood transfusion on 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing gynecological surgery. Study Design Data were analyzed from 12,836 women undergoing operation in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Outcomes measured were; 30-day postoperative mortality, composite and specific morbidities (cardiac, respiratory, central nervous system, renal, wound, sepsis, venous thrombosis, or major bleeding). Multivariate logistic regression models were performed using adjusted odds ratios (ORadj) to assess the independent effects of preoperative anaemia (hematocrit <36.0%) on outcomes, effect estimates were performed before and after adjustment for perioperative transfusion requirement. Results The prevalence of preoperative anaemia was 23.9% (95%CI: 23.2–24.7). Adjusted for confounders by multivariate logistic regression; preoperative anaemia was independently and significantly associated with increased odds of 30-day mortality (OR: 2.40, 95%CI: 1.06–5.44) and composite morbidity (OR: 1.80, 95%CI: 1.45–2.24). This was reflected by significantly higher adjusted odds of almost all specific morbidities including; respiratory, central nervous system, renal, wound, sepsis, and venous thrombosis. Blood Transfusion increased the effect of preoperative anaemia on outcomes (61% of the effect on mortality and 16% of the composite morbidity). Conclusions Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse post-operative outcomes in women undergoing gynecological surgery. This risk associated with preoperative anaemia did not appear to be corrected by use of perioperative transfusion. PMID:26147954

  11. Use of Postoperative Palatal Obturator After Total Palatal Reconstruction With Radial Forearm Fasciocutaneous Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Euicheol C; Jung, Young Ho; Shin, Jin-Yong

    2015-07-01

    A 67-year-old-male patient visited our hospital for a mass on the soft palate of approximately 5.0 × 6.0?cm in size. He was diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma and reconstruction after total palate resection was planned. After ablative surgery, a radial forearm free flap procedure was successfully performed to cover the hard and soft palates. However, wound disruption occurred twice during the postoperative period.When a palate defect is reconstructed using a soft tissue free flap, flap drooping by gravitation and the flap itself can generate irregularity in the lower contour of the palate and, in the long-term, insufficiencies of velopharyngeal function, speech, and mastication. To complement such functional and aesthetic problems caused by flap drooping, conventional prosthetics and new operative techniques have been discussed. However, overcoming wound disruption caused by flap drooping in the acute postoperative period has not been discussed.In this case, the temporary use of a palatal obturator during the postoperative period was beneficial after soft tissue reconstruction of the palate. PMID:26114541

  12. Ixora coccinea Enhances Cutaneous Wound Healing by Upregulating the Expression of Collagen and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Aadesh; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Goyary, Danswrang; Mitra Mazumder, Papiya; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Background. Ixora coccinea L. (Rubiaceae) has been documented for traditional use in hypertension, menstrual irregularities, sprain, chronic ulcer, and skin diseases. In the present study, I. coccinea was subjected to in vitro and in vivo wound healing investigation. Methods. Petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol, and water sequential I. coccinea leaves extracts were evaluated for in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and fibroblast proliferation activities. The promising I. coccinea methanol extract (IxME) was screened for in vivo wound healing activity in Wistar rat using circular excision model. Wound contraction measurement, hydroxyproline quantification, and western blot for collagen type III (COL3A1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and Smad-2, -3, -4, and -7 was performed with 7-day postoperative wound granulation tissue. Gentamicin sulfate (0.01% w/w) hydrogel was used as reference standard. Results. IxME showed the potent antimicrobial, antioxidant activities, with significant fibroblast proliferation inducing activity, as compared to all other extracts. In vivo study confirmed the wound healing accelerating potential of IxME, as evidenced by faster wound contraction, higher hydroxyproline content, and improved histopathology of granulation tissue. Western blot analysis revealed that the topical application of I. coccinea methanol extract stimulates the fibroblast growth factor and Smad mediated collagen production in wound tissue. PMID:24624303

  13. Effects of an orabase formulation with ethanolic extract of Malva sylvestris L. in oral wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Kovalik, Ana Cristina; Bisetto, Paula; Pochapski, Márcia Thaís; Campagnoli, Eduardo Baulm; Pilatti, Gibson Luiz; Santos, Fábio André

    2014-05-01

    Malva sylvestris L. is widely used in medicine for treatment of inflammatory processes. The plant has anti-inflammatory properties due to substances such as mucilage, flavonoids, and tannins. A mouthwash with leaves from the plant can be used for the treatment of wounds in the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to assess the wound healing effect of Malva sylvestris L. on a palate mucosa wound in rats. After intraperitoneal anesthesia, a 4-mm-diameter excisional wound was made in the center of the palatal mucosa of 136 rats, using a punch-out biopsy tool. Eight animals were used as baseline wound. The remaining rats were divided into four groups: CO, control; OB, orabase vehicle; CX, 2% chlorhexidine; and MA, 20% Malva in orabase. At 24?h postoperatively, the animals were immobilized without anesthetic to apply 25?mg of each substance twice a day, totaling 50?mg daily. The wound areas were measured photographically and the reepithelialization rates were determined histologically (%) after 0, 3, 7, 15, and 21 days. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. Similar healing pattern was observed among the groups (P>.05; ANOVA). According to the methodology, Malva sylvestris L. extract had no effect on wound healing in the palatal mucosa of rats. PMID:24476217

  14. Ixora coccinea Enhances Cutaneous Wound Healing by Upregulating the Expression of Collagen and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Aadesh; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Goyary, Danswrang; Mitra Mazumder, Papiya; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Background. Ixora coccinea L. (Rubiaceae) has been documented for traditional use in hypertension, menstrual irregularities, sprain, chronic ulcer, and skin diseases. In the present study, I. coccinea was subjected to in vitro and in vivo wound healing investigation. Methods. Petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol, and water sequential I. coccinea leaves extracts were evaluated for in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and fibroblast proliferation activities. The promising I. coccinea methanol extract (IxME) was screened for in vivo wound healing activity in Wistar rat using circular excision model. Wound contraction measurement, hydroxyproline quantification, and western blot for collagen type III (COL3A1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and Smad-2, -3, -4, and -7 was performed with 7-day postoperative wound granulation tissue. Gentamicin sulfate (0.01% w/w) hydrogel was used as reference standard. Results. IxME showed the potent antimicrobial, antioxidant activities, with significant fibroblast proliferation inducing activity, as compared to all other extracts. In vivo study confirmed the wound healing accelerating potential of IxME, as evidenced by faster wound contraction, higher hydroxyproline content, and improved histopathology of granulation tissue. Western blot analysis revealed that the topical application of I. coccinea methanol extract stimulates the fibroblast growth factor and Smad mediated collagen production in wound tissue. PMID:24624303

  15. Recurrent sternal infection following treatment with negative pressure wound therapy and titanium transverse plate fixation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geneviève Gaudreau; Victor Costache; Chanel Houde; Daniel Cloutier; Livia Montalin; Pierre Voisine; Richard Baillot

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a definition for recurrent sternal infection (RSI), analyse the risk factors and describe the management of this complication following treatment of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) with horizontal titanium sternal osteosynthesis and coverage with pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps. Methods: Between 2002 and 2007, 10665 patients were submitted to open-heart surgery (OHS) in our institution, of whom 149

  16. Animal models of external traumatic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

  17. Methylene blue prevents surgery-induced peritoneal adhesions but impairs the early phase of anastomotic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Soykan; Ozaslan, Cihangir; Kuru, Bekir; Karaca, Sefa; Ustun, Huseyin; Alagol, Haluk; Renda, Nurten; Oz, Murat

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Adhesion formation continues to be an important problem in gastrointestinal surgery. In recent years, methylene blue (MB) has been reported to be an effective agent for preventing peritoneal adhesions. However, its effects on the wound healing process are unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MB on the early and late phases of anastomotic wound healing and on adhesion formation. Methods We randomly categorized 92 rats into 2 groups in bursting pressure measurements and 50 rats into 3 groups in the adhesion model. We divided the animals into saline-treated (n = 46) or MB-treated (n = 46) groups. Bursting pressures of the anastomoses were measured on postoperative days 3 and 7. In biochemical studies, tissue hydroxyproline levels, total nitrite/nitrate levels and nitric oxide synthase activity were measured on postoperative days 3 and 7. In the adhesion model, we randomly categorized rats into sham (n = 10), saline-treated (n = 20) and MB-treated (n = 20) groups, and the formation of intraperitoneal adhesions was scored on postoperative day 14. We compared the measurement of bursting pressure and biochemical measurements of tissue hydroxyproline levels, total nitrite/nitrate levels and nitric oxide synthase activity. Histopathological findings of specimens were presented. Results During the early phase of wound healing (postoperative day 3), bursting pressures, tissue hydroxyproline, total nitrite/nitrate levels and nitric oxide synthase activity in the MB-treated group were significantly lower than those of the saline-treated group. On postoperative day 7, there was no significant difference in these parameters between MB and saline-treated groups. In the adhesion model, MB caused a significant reduction in the formation of peritoneal adhesions. Conclusion MB prevents peritoneal adhesions but causes a significant impairment of anastomotic bursting pressure during the early phase of the wound healing process by its transient inhibitory effect on the nitric oxide pathway. PMID:17152569

  18. First Evidence of Sternal Wound Biofilm following Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elgharably, Haytham; Mann, Ethan; Awad, Hamdy; Ganesh, Kasturi; Ghatak, Piya Das; Gordillo, Gayle; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Roy, Sashwati; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2013-01-01

    Management of deep sternal wound infection (SWI), a serious complication after cardiac surgery with high morbidity and mortality incidence, requires invasive procedures such as, debridement with primary closure or myocutaneous flap reconstruction along with use of broad spectrum antibiotics. The purpose of this clinical series is to investigate the presence of biofilm in patients with deep SWI. A biofilm is a complex microbial community in which bacteria attach to a biological or non-biological surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substance. Biofilm related infections represent a major clinical challenge due to their resistance to both host immune defenses and standard antimicrobial therapies. Candidates for this clinical series were patients scheduled for a debridement procedure of an infected sternal wound after a cardiac surgery. Six patients with SWI were recruited in the study. All cases had marked dehiscence of all layers of the wound down to the sternum with no signs of healing after receiving broad spectrum antibiotics post-surgery. After consenting patients, tissue and/or extracted stainless steel wires were collected during the debridement procedure. Debrided tissues examined by Gram stain showed large aggregations of Gram positive cocci. Immuno-fluorescent staining of the debrided tissues using a specific antibody against staphylococci demonstrated the presence of thick clumps of staphylococci colonizing the wound bed. Evaluation of tissue samples with scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed three-dimensional aggregates of these cocci attached to the wound surface. More interestingly, SEM imaging of the extracted wires showed attachment of cocci aggregations to the wire metal surface. These observations along with the clinical presentation of the patients provide the first evidence that supports the presence of biofilm in such cases. Clinical introduction of the biofilm infection concept in deep SWI may advance the current management strategies from standard antimicrobial therapy to anti-biofilm strategy. PMID:23936415

  19. Application methods of local anaesthetic infiltrations for postoperative pain relief in tonsillectomy: a prospective, randomised, double-blind, clinical trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klaus Stelter; John Martin Hempel; Alexander Berghaus; Michaela Andratschke; Christian W. Luebbers; Hjalmar Hagedorn

    2009-01-01

    Perioperative local anaesthetics are often used to reduce the postoperative pain in tonsillectomy. There exist three different\\u000a ways of applying local anaesthetics: (1) pre-incisional peritonsillar; (2) post-tonsillectomy wound infiltration; (3) post-tonsillectomy\\u000a packing with soaked gauze. The objective of the study is the evaluation of differences of pain reduction comparing the three\\u000a different techniques of application. The study design mainly includes

  20. Pancreatic fistula and postoperative pancreatitis after pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudis, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The most serious complication after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is pancreatic fistula (PF) type C, either as a consequence or independently from postoperative pancreatitis (PP). Differentiating between these two types of complications is often very difficult, if not impossible. The most significant factor in early diagnosis of PP after PD is an abrupt change in clinical status. In our retrospective study we also observed significantly higher levels of serum concentrations of CRP and AMS comparing to PF without PP. Based on our findings, CT scan is not beneficial in the early diagnosis of PP. Meantime PF type C is indication to operative revision with mostly drainage procedure which is obviously not much technically demanding, there are no definite guidelines on how to proceed in PP. Therefore the surgeon’s experience determines not only whether PP will be diagnosed early enough and will be differentiated from PF without PP, but also whether a completion pancreatectomy will be performed in indicated cases. PMID:25392838

  1. The Effect of Channa striatus (Haruan) Extract on Pain and Wound Healing of Post-Lower Segment Caesarean Section Women

    PubMed Central

    Ab Wahab, Siti Zubaidah; Abdul Kadir, Azidah; Nik Hussain, Nik Hazlina; Yunus, Rohaizan; Baie, Saringat; Hassan, Intan Idiana; Wan Mahmood, Wan Haslindawani; Abd Razak, Asrenee; Wan Yusoff, Wan Zahanim

    2015-01-01

    Channa striatus has been consumed for decades as a remedy to promote wound healing by women during postpartum period. The objectives of this study were to compare postoperative pain, wound healing based on wound evaluation scale (WES), wound cosmetic appearance based on visual analogue scale (VAS) scores and patient satisfaction score (PSS), and safety profiles between C. striatus group and placebo group after six weeks of lower segment caesarean section (LSCS) delivery. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted. Subjects were randomised in a ratio of 1?:?1 into either the C. striatus group (500?mg daily) or placebo group (500?mg of maltodextrin daily). 76 subjects were successfully randomised, with 38 in the C. striatus group and 35 in the placebo group. There were no significant differences in postoperative pain (p = 0.814) and WES (p = 0.160) between the C. striatus and placebo groups. However, VAS and PSS in the C. striatus group were significantly better compared with the placebo group (p = 0.014 and p < 0.001, resp.). The safety profiles showed no significant differences between the groups. In conclusion, six-week supplementation of 500?mg of C. striatus extract showed marked differences in wound cosmetic appearance and patient's satisfaction and is safe for human consumption.

  2. Chylothorax complicating closure of the ductus arteriosus: the second case.

    PubMed

    Ennazk, L; Echouka, O; El Houati, R; Mouaffak, Y; El Adib, G; Boumzebra, D; Younous, S

    2013-01-01

    Chylothorax is a possible complication of intrathoracic surgery. The diagnosis of postoperative chylothorax is easy; however, the treatment can cause problems of management because of the lack of consensus. In children, the most common causes of postoperative chylothorax are the cures for congenital heart diseases. We report the case of a two-year-old child, presenting with a chylothorax following surgery of the ductus arteriosus. Our case illustrates the treatment that must first include medical measures without delaying the surgery. The risk is the installation of nutritional and immune deficiency. PMID:23844310

  3. [Acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period following pneumonectomy].

    PubMed

    López Alvarez, S; Bonome González, C; Izquierdo Villarroya, B; Barbeito Vilariño, M J; Etxainz Alvarez, A; Alvarez Refojo, F

    2002-11-01

    A 72-year-old man, smoker, with insuline-dependent diabetes and dislipemia underwent left pneumonectomy. Several episodes of intraoperative hemodynamic instability associated with electrocardiographic ST segment alterations were attributed to surgical manipulation; ischemia was not suspected. Cardiorespiratory failure, related to extensive anterior infarction, developed a few minutes after admission to the postoperative intensive care unit (PICU). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and mechanical ventilation were required. The patient responded to treatment with beta blockers, platelet antiaggregants and statins. Tube was removed a few hours later and the patient was discharged from the PICU on the fifth day. Pneumonectomy has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, with complications mainly arising in the lung and heart. Risk from anesthesia is considered to be great in this procedure, and for that reason it is essential to identify intraoperative myocardial ischemia so that it can be treated aggressively. In patients at high cardiovascular risk who undergo lung resection, intraoperative episodes of myocardial ischemia are associated with a high incidence of postoperative miocardial infarction. Therefore, careful postoperative monitoring is needed and measures should be taken to prevent angina. Early extubation should be avoided. PMID:12516493

  4. Comparison of silver nylon wound dressing and silver sulfadiazine in partial burn wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Fereydoon; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Yavari, Akram; Hosseini, Vahid; Mousavi, Sarah

    2013-10-01

    The study aims to perform a comparative assessment of two types of burn wound treatment. To do the assessment, patients with partial thickness burn wounds with total body surface area <40% were simple randomised to treat with nanocrystalline silver nylon wound dressing or silver sulfadiazine cream. Efficacy of treatment, use of analgesics, number of wound dressing change, wound infection and final hospitalisation cost were evaluated. The study showed silver nylon wound dressing significantly reduced length of hospital stay, analgesic use, wound infection and inflammation compared with silver sulfadiazine. PMID:22734483

  5. The impact of fluid intervention on complications and length of hospital stay after pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the impact on perioperative fluid intervention on complications and length of hospital stay following pancreaticoduodenectomy. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis of fluid intervention in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy at a university teaching hospital to test the hypothesis that a restrictive intravenous fluid regime and/or a neutral or negative cumulative fluid balance, would impact on perioperative complications and length of hospital stay. Methods We retrospectively obtained demographic, operative details, detailed fluid prescription, complications and outcomes data for 150 consecutive patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy in a university teaching hospital. Prognostic predictors for length of hospital stay and complications were determined. Results One hundred and fifty consecutive patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy were evaluated between 2006 and 2012. The majority of patients were, middle-aged, overweight and ASA class III. Postoperative complications were frequent and occurred in 86 patients (57%). The majority of complications were graded as Clavien-Dindo Class 2 and 3. Postoperative pancreatic fistula occurred in 13 patients (9%), and delayed gastric emptying occurred in 25 patients (17%). Other postoperative surgical complications included sepsis (22%), bile leak (4%), and postoperative bleeding (2%). Serious medical complications included pulmonary edema (6%), myocardial infarction (8%), cardiac arrhythmias (13%), respiratory failure (8%), and renal failure (7%). Patients with complications received a higher median volume of intravenous therapy and had higher cumulative positive fluid balances. Postoperative length of stay was significantly longer in patients with complications (median 25 days vs. 10 days; p?postoperative day 1 and surgeon caseloads were associated with the development of complications. Conclusions In the context of pancreaticoduodenectomy, restrictive perioperative fluid intervention and negative cumulative fluid balance were associated with fewer complications and shorter length of hospital stay. These findings provide good opportunities to evaluate strategies aimed at improving perioperative care. PMID:24839398

  6. TU Delft researchers have invented a wound

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    and efficiency of wound diagnostics. A portable device using this method is capable of defining all important wound characterisaton device is very versatile, as it can be used in case of (multiple) skin (single or multi- layered) wound characteristics simultaneously and in real time outside a diagnostic

  7. Polyhexamethylene biguanide dressings in wound management.

    PubMed

    Fumarola, Sian

    This article describes wound management using polyhexamethylene biguanide dressings in two patients experiencing multiple comorbidities. Wound bed debridement and bioburden management were important factors in achieving positive results in terms of promoting wound healing and reducing infection and malodour. PMID:21894678

  8. Epithelial stem cells, wound healing and cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther N. Arwert; Esther Hoste; Fiona M. Watt

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that tissue repair depends on stem cells and that chronic wounds predispose to tumour formation. However, the association between stem cells, wound healing and cancer is poorly understood. Lineage tracing has now shown how stem cells are mobilized to repair skin wounds and how they contribute to skin tumour development. The signalling pathways, including WNT and

  9. Repithel®: Removing the Barriers to Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Mueller; P. M. Vogt; H.-U. Steinau; B. Bosse; M. Hopp; W. Fleischer; K. Reimer

    2006-01-01

    Background: Various standardized and\\/or validated models exist to test wound healing products. This article discusses their usefulness in clinical practice. Objectives: Major barriers to wound healing have been identified after intense interaction of research and practitioners. Although extensively tested, wound healing products are still associated with trial and error due to the high variability and complexity associated with the treatment

  10. Jasmonates as Signals in the Wound Response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregg A. Howe

    2004-01-01

    Plant responses to wounding and herbivore attack are orchestrated by complex signaling pathways that link the production of chemical and physical signals at the wound site to activation of gene expression and other cellular processes. The systemic nature of many wound-induced responses provides an attractive opportunity to study intercellular signaling pathways that operate over long distances within the plant. Genetic

  11. The evolution of negative pressure wound therapy: negative pressure wound therapy with instillation.

    PubMed

    Wolvos, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Complex wounds pose a considerable burden to patients and the health-care system. The development of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionised the treatment of these wounds. NPWT helps create a favourable wound healing environment by removing infectious material, decreasing oedema and promoting perfusion and granulation tissue formation. Additionally, NPWT has been reported to help reduce time to wound closure and length of hospital stay. Modifications of this foundation of wound care have added intermittent instillation with a dwell time to NPWT (NPWTi-d). This new system offers more comprehensive wound care through automated wound irrigation, allowing more control over the wound environment and the opportunity to deliver topical wound solutions directly to the affected tissues. A comparison between the two therapies, NPWT and NPWTi-d, is described, and two real-world applications of NPWTi-d are presented. PMID:25853644

  12. Procrastination of Wound Drainage and Malnutrition Affect the Outcome of Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi, Fereidoon M.; Parvizi, Javad; Haytmanek, C. Thomas; Joshi, Ashish

    2008-01-01

    The association between wound drainage and subsequent periprosthetic infection is well known. However, the most appropriate treatment of wound drainage is not well understood. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 10,325 patients (11,785 procedures), among whom 300 patients (2.9%) developed persistent (greater than 48 hours postoperatively) wound drainage. Wound drainage stopped spontaneously between 2 and 4 days in 217 patients treated with local wound care and oral antibiotics. The remaining 83 patients (28%) underwent further surgery. A single débridement resulted in cessation of drainage without subsequent infection in 63 of 83 patients (76%), whereas 20 (24%) patients continued to drain and underwent additional treatment (repeat débridement, resection arthroplasty, or long-term antibiotics). Timing of surgery and the presence of malnutrition predicted failure of the first débridement. There were no differences between the success and failure groups with regard to all other examined parameters, including demographic or surgical factors. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18404297

  13. Hyperspectral imaging of ischemic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Surya C.; Elgharably, Haytham; Melvin, James; Huang, Kun; Bergdall, Valerie; Allen, David W.; Hwang, Jeeseong; Litorja, Maritoni; Shirley, Eric; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Optical imaging has the potential to achieve high spatial resolution and high functional sensitivity in wound assessment. However, clinical acceptance of many optical imaging devices is hampered by poor reproducibility, low accuracy, and lack of biological interpretation. We developed an in vivo model of ischemic flap for non-contact assessment of wound tissue functional parameters and spectral characteristics. The model was created by elevating the bipedicle skin flaps of a domestic pig from the underlying vascular bed and inhibiting graft bed reperfusion by a silastic sheet. Hyperspectral imaging was carried out on the ischemic flap model and compared with transcutaneous oxygen tension and perfusion measurements at different positions of the wound. Hyperspectral images have also been captured continuously during a post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) procedure. Tissue spectral characteristics obtained by hyperspectral imaging correlated well with cutaneous tissue oxygen tension, blood perfusion, and microscopic changes of tissue morphology. Our experiments not only demonstrated the technical feasibility for quantitative assessment of chronic wound but also provided a potential digital phantom platform for quantitative characterization and calibration of medical optical devices.

  14. Wound disinfection with ultraviolet radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. S. Taylor; G. C. Bannister; J. P. Leeming

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria were counted concurrently in the air and wounds during the first 20 min of total joint arthroplasty procedures in two theatres: a conventional plenum ventilated theatre with ultraviolet C (UVC) tubes installed and a filtered vertical laminar flow theatre. Four theatre environments were tested: conventional theatre and clothing; conventional theatre with UVC protective clothing, with UVC set to produce

  15. Recent Developments in Topical Wound Therapy: Impact of Antimicrobiological Changes and Rebalancing the Wound Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Erfurt-Berge, Cornelia; Renner, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Wound therapy improves every year by developing new wound treatment options or by advancing already existing wound materials, for example, adding self-releasing analgesic drugs or growth factors to wound dressings, or by binding and inactivating excessive proteases. Also new dressing materials based on silk fibers and enhanced methods to reduce bacterial burden, for example, cold argon plasma, might help to fasten wound healing. PMID:24829919

  16. Treatment of diabetic wounds with fetal murine mesenchymal stromal cells enhances wound closure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea T. Badillo; Robert A. Redden; Liping Zhang; Edward J. Doolin; Kenneth W. Liechty

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes impairs multiple aspects of the wound-healing response. Delayed wound healing continues to be a significant healthcare\\u000a problem for which effective therapies are lacking. We have hypothesized that local delivery of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC)\\u000a at a wound might correct many of the wound-healing impairments seen in diabetic lesions. We treated excisional wounds of genetically\\u000a diabetic (Db-\\/Db-) mice and heterozygous

  17. [Complications of body piercing].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, L; Madrid, C; Odman-Jaques, M; Yersin, B; Carnon, P N

    2014-03-19

    The trend of body piercing has grown in popularity in the past decade within the general population and especially among young adults. Complications of body piercing include local inflammation and infections, but severe complications are also possible and largely underestimated. People are usually not aware of the risks before making a piercing, and their medical history, medication and comorbidities are largely neglected by the people who realise the piercing. This article presents a review of the complications that a primary care physician may observe, for a patient who wishes to make a piercing, or presents complications due to the implementation of such a device. PMID:24734366

  18. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kidney dialysis or transplantation may be required. Drug toxicity This is occasionally responsible for kidney complications, although toxicity issues generally resolve when the drug in question ...

  19. Complications in periorbital surgery.

    PubMed

    Terella, Adam M; Wang, Tom D; Kim, Michael M

    2013-02-01

    Comprehensive rejuvenation of the periorbital region commonly involves management of the brow, as well as the upper and lower eyelids. Browlifting, upper and lower blepharoplasty, fat transfer, and neuromodulators are frequently utilized with excellent results. However, surgery in this region can be fraught with potential complications ranging from a poor cosmetic outcome to orbital hematoma and vision loss. Although avoidance of complications is preferred, it is incumbent on the surgeon to have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these complications. The authors examine the more common complications of periorbital surgery. PMID:23426754

  20. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  1. [Chronic wounds as a public health problem].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Koli?, Maja; Redzepi, Gzim; Antoli?, Slavko

    2014-10-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals and the entire health care system. Regarding the healing process, wounds can be classified as acute or chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if healing does not occur within the expected period according to the wound etiology and localization. Chronic wounds can be classified as typical and atypical. The majority of wounds (95 percent) are typical ones, which include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic ulcers and two separate entities: diabetic foot and decubital ulcers. Eighty percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the rest are mostly neuropathic ulcers. Chronic wounds significantly decrease the quality of life of patients by requiring continuous topical treatment, causing immobility and pain in a high percentage of patients. Chronic wounds affect elderly population. Chronic leg ulcers affect 0.6-3 percent of those aged over 60, increasing to over 5 percent of those aged over 80. Emergence of chronic wounds is a substantial socioeconomic problem as 1-2 percent of western population will suffer from it. This estimate is expected to rise due to the increasing proportion of elderly population along with the diabetic and obesity epidemic. It has been proved that chronic wounds account for the large proportion of costs in the health care system, even in rich societies. Socioeconomically, the management of chronic wounds reaches a total of 2-4 percent of the health budget in western countries. Treatment costs for some other diseases are not irrelevant, nor are the method and materials used for treating these wounds. Considering etiologic factors, a chronic wound demands a multidisciplinary approach with great efforts of health care professionals to treat it more efficiently, more simply and more painlessly for the patient, as well as more inexpensively for health care funds. PMID:25326983

  2. THE LINEAR EXCISIONAL WOUND: AN IMPROVED MODEL FOR HUMAN EX-VIVO WOUND EPITHELIALIZATION STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Amilcar Ezequiel; Beckett, Laurel A.; Baier, Brian S.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose Wound healing is a complex process that involves multiple intercellular and intracellular processes and extracellular interactions. Explanted human skin has been used as a model for the re-epithelialization phase of human wound healing. The currently used standard technique employs a circular punch biopsy tool to make the initial wound. Despite its wide use, the geometry of round wounds makes them difficult to measure reliably. Methods Our group has designed a linear wounding tool, and compared the variability in ex vivo human linear and circular wounds. Results An F test for differences in variances demonstrated that the linear wounds provided a population of wound size measurements that was fifty percent less variable than that obtained from a group of matched circular wounds. This reduction in variability would provide substantial advantages for the linear wound technique over the circular wound punch technique, by reducing the sample sizes required for comparative studies of factors that alter healing. Conclusion This linear wounding tool thus provides method for wounding that is standardized, provides minimal error in wound gap measurements, and is easily reproducible. We demonstrate its utility in an ex vivo model for the controlled investigation of human skin wounds. PMID:21605167

  3. Does Intraoperative Ulinastatin Improve Postoperative Clinical Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiu-Lan; Zhong, Fei; Wei, Ming; Liu, Wei-Feng; Li, Mei-Na; Li, Qiao-Bo; Huang, Wen-Qi; Sun, Lai-Bao; Shu, Hai-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The systematic meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated the effects of intraoperative ulinastatin on early-postoperative recovery in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods. RCTs comparing intraoperative ulinastatin with placebo in cardiac surgery were searched through PubMed, Cochrane databases, Medline, SinoMed, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1966 to May 20th, 2013). The primary endpoints included hospital mortality, postoperative complication rate, length of stay in intensive care unit, and extubation time. The physiological and biochemical parameters illustrating postoperative cardiac and pulmonary function as well as inflammation response were considered as secondary endpoints. Results. Fifteen RCTs (509 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Ulinastatin did not affect hospital mortality, postoperative complication rate, or ICU length of stay but reduced extubation time. Ulinastatin also increased the oxygenation index on postoperative day 1 and reduced the plasma level of cardiac troponin-I. Additionally, ulinastatin inhibited the increased level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8 associated with cardiac surgery. Conclusion. Ulinastatin may be of value for the inhibition of postoperative increased inflammatory agents and most likely provided pulmonary protective effects in cardiac surgery. However, larger adequately powered RCTs are required to define the clinical effect of ulinastatin on postoperative outcomes in cardiac surgery. PMID:24734237

  4. Complications of Hair Restoration Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Eswari; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Gorur, Divya; Suresh, Deepak Hurkudli; Siddaraju, Maheshwari Nallur; Narasimhan, Revathi Thimmanhalli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hair restoration surgery (HRS) is a very promising and sought after aesthetic procedure with very few complications. Complications may occur in the donor or the recipient area, and it may be due to surgical or idiopathic causes. Aim: The aim was to analyze the complications in male patients who underwent HRS for androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of male patients who underwent HRS for AGA from December 2010 to August 2014. Data were collected from the registers, telephonic enquiry and electronic mails. All complications during and after surgery, and their subjective feeling about hair growth was recorded. Results: Seventy-three patients were included in the analysis. A total of 65 patients had undergone follicular unit transplant, 7 patients underwent FUE, and one patient had body hair transplantation. Postoperative edema was found in 42.47% of patients, followed by sterile folliculitis in 23.29% of patients, wide donor scar in 15.07% of patients, bacterial folliculitis and numbness/paresthesia in 10.96% of patients. Other complications such as raised scar, hiccups, pruritus, excessive bleeding were found in isolated cases. Conclusion: Thorough preoperative evaluation, skillful surgical techniques, good communication and postoperative follow-up go a long way in giving satisfactory outcome with fewer complications in HRS. PMID:25368473

  5. Physics of Wound Healing I: Energy Considerations

    E-print Network

    Apell, S Peter; Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many components and interrelated processes on a microscopic level. This paper addresses a macroscopic view on wound healing based on an energy conservation argument coupled with a general scaling of the metabolic rate with body mass M as M^{\\gamma} where 0 wound healing rate peaks at a value determined by {\\gamma} alone, suggesting a concept of wound acceleration to monitor the status of a wound. 2) We find that the time-scale for wound healing is a factor 1/(1 -{\\gamma}) longer than the average internal timescale for producing new material filling the wound cavity in corresondence with that it usually takes weeks rather than days to heal a wound. 3) The model gives a prediction for the maximum wound mass which can be generated in terms of measurable quantities related to wound status. We compare our model predictions to experimental results for a range of different wound conditions (healthy, lean, diabetic and obses...

  6. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  7. Complications of rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Harsha, Brian C

    2009-02-01

    Rhinoplasty presents a unique set of challenges for the cosmetic surgeon. Complications may arise from inadequate diagnosis, errors in surgical technique, or variations in the patient's anatomy or healing response. Complications as a result of overly aggressive surgery may also have functional consequences and be harder to correct. PMID:19185797

  8. Anastomotic Complications after Esophagectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lerut; W. Coosemans; G. Decker; P. De Leyn; P. Nafteux; D. Van Raemdonck

    2002-01-01

    Anastomotic complications after esophagectomy continue to be a burden jeopardizing the quality of life and of swallowing. However, incidence, mortality and morbidity of anastomotic complications have substantially decreased in recent years. It seems that this is not so much related to the use of a particular conduit, approach or route for reconstruction, but rather related to refinement in anastomotic techniques

  9. Complications of endoscopic neurosurgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Teo; Salim Rahman; Frederick A. Boop; Bruce Cherny

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendoscopy is rapidly becoming an essential part of the neurosurgeon's repertoire. Currently, very few studies have identified the complications of this new technique, yet many have warned of the steep learning curve associated with its practice. We have reviewed the last 173 neuroendoscopic procedures performed by one surgeon and identified two distinct groups of complications: those that have clinically significant

  10. Management of Complications of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, M. Dror; Cotter, Shane E.; Gargollo, Patricio C.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Treatment of men with prostate cancer commonly involves surgical, radiation, or hormone therapy. Most men with prostate cancer live for many years after diagnosis and may never suffer morbidity or mortality attributable to prostate cancer. The short-term and long-term adverse consequences of therapy are, therefore, of great importance. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include immediate postoperative complications and long-term urinary and sexual complications. External beam or interstitial radiation therapy in men with localized prostate cancer may lead to urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual complications. Improvements in surgical and radiation techniques have reduced the incidence of many of these complications. Hormone treatment typically consists of androgen deprivation therapy, and consequences of such therapy may include vasomotor flushing, anemia, and bone density loss. Numerous clinical trials have studied the role of bone antiresorptive therapy for prevention of bone density loss and fractures. Other long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy may include adverse body composition changes and increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Ongoing and planned clinical trials will continue to address strategies to prevent treatment-related side effects and improve quality of life for men with prostate cancer. PMID:18502900

  11. [Intramedullary glioma. Postoperative MRI aspects].

    PubMed

    Borocco, A; Idir, A; Joubert, E; Lacroix, C; Hurth, M; Doyon, D

    1995-06-01

    MRI is the standard exploration of intramedullary tumours. Following up the patients is of prime importance to detect and treat possible recurrences at an early stage. The purpose of this paper is to specify the postoperative MRI semiology of intraspinal gliomas. During the 1986-1992 period, 47 patients operated upon in the Bicêtre hospital for primary intraspinal tumours were followed up with high-field MR (1.5 Tesla, Signa, G.E.). The retrospective visual study was carried out by two neuro-radiologists. The patients' group consisted of 24 women and 23 men aged from 15 to 67 years (mean 38 years). The tumours treated were 29 ependymomas and 18 astrocytomas. Eighty-five MRI examinations were analysed. Most of them comprised at least two planes in T1 and T2-weighted spin echo sequences with gadolinium injection, then only T1-weighted spin echo sequences after gadolinium injection (0.1 mmol/kg). The mean postoperative follow up period in the 47 patients was 32 months (range 7 to 84 months). Contrast enhancement of the spinal cord was observed in 20 cases. In the 6 patients with recurrence (5 astrocytomas, 1 malignant ependymoma) there was a segmental increase of spinal cord volume with contrast enhancement after gadolinium injection. In 3 out of these 6 patients clinical deterioration appeared later than MRI semiology. In clinically stable patients neither enhancement nor increase in spinal cord size was found in 27 cases, and enhancement alone was noted in 12 cases. There was no reliable criterion in the analysis of post gadolinium signal enhancement that could be used to differentiate recurrence from cicatricial contrast enhancement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7629570

  12. Simplified Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Pediatric Hand Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kasukurthi, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is commonly used as a bolster for skin grafts. The technique offers the benefit of negative pressure as well as reduced dressing changes. Skin grafting of the hand provides a unique challenge, and currently, the only commercially available NPWT hand dressings are adult-sized, precluding their use in small children. We present our custom NPWT “mitten” technique for use with skin grafts on the pediatric hand. PMID:19562417

  13. Simplified Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Pediatric Hand Wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rahul Kasukurthi; Gregory H. Borschel

    2010-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is commonly used as a bolster for skin grafts. The technique offers the benefit of\\u000a negative pressure as well as reduced dressing changes. Skin grafting of the hand provides a unique challenge, and currently,\\u000a the only commercially available NPWT hand dressings are adult-sized, precluding their use in small children. We present our\\u000a custom NPWT “mitten”

  14. [Postoperative analgesia of newborns using local anesthetic administered through wound irrigation catheter of permanent action].

    PubMed

    Zhirkova, Iu V; Stepanenko, S M; Kucherov, Iu I

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of publications is devoted to the application of skin conductance monitoring in anesthesiology and intensive care. Rates of skin conductance (baseline values, the amplitude and frequency of the waves) are closely linked with the state of the sympathic nervous system. According to their dynamics it is possible to judge on the pain and stress in patients with whom the contact is difficult: newborns, infants, patients of all age groups during general anesthesia and in critical condition. According to published data monitoring skin conductance showed itself as a sensitive and promising method to identify and determine the severity of pain in all age groups, approaching by its characteristics the theses of the pain assessment perfect tool. PMID:21513071

  15. Integrin Regulation of Epidermal Functions in Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Longmate, Whitney M.; DiPersio, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Integrins are bidirectional signaling receptors for extracellular matrix that regulate both inside-out signaling that controls keratinocyte-mediated changes to the wound microenvironment and outside-in signaling that controls keratinocyte responses to microenvironmental changes. As such, integrins represent attractive therapeutic targets for treatment of chronic wounds or general promotion of wound healing. Advances in wound management are particularly important as the elderly and diabetic populations within the United States continue to grow. Recent Advances: Although integrins are best known for mediating cell adhesion and migration, integrins in wound epidermis also control cell survival, proliferation, matrix remodeling, and paracrine crosstalk to other cellular compartments of the wound. Importantly, the concept of targeting integrins in the clinic has been established for treatment of certain cancers and other diseases, laying the groundwork for similar exploitation of integrins as targets to treat chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Despite their attractiveness as therapeutic targets, integrins have complex roles in wound healing that are impacted by both their own expression and a highly dynamic wound microenvironment that determines ligand availability. Therefore, identifying relevant integrin ligands in the wound and understanding both distinct and overlapping functions that different integrins play in the epidermis will be critical to determine their precise roles in wound healing. Future Directions: Future research should focus on gaining a thorough understanding of the highly coordinated functions of different integrins in wound epidermis, and on determining which of these functions go awry in pathological wounds. This focus should facilitate development of integrin-targeting therapeutics for treating chronic wounds. PMID:24669359

  16. Spirometric values and chest pain intensity three days post-operative coronary artery bypass graft surgery?

    PubMed Central

    AlOtaibi, Kholoud D.; El-Sobkey, Salwa B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is proved to have ventilatory complications and reduction in spirometric values. This study aimed to examine the hypothesis that reduction of post-operative chest pain intensity would be associated with improvement in the spirometric values for patient underwent CABG. Materials and method 26 cardiac patients recruited for this study. Their convenience to the study inclusion criteria decided their eligibility. Through 3 days after elective CABG their spirometric values were measured along with their perception to chest pain intensity using 0–10 numeric rating scale. Collected data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Results Chest pain intensity showed progressive significant (P = 0.0001) reduction through the 3 days post-operative. On the other hand spirometric values also showed progressive improvement through the 3 days post-operative. This improvement was significant for all measured spirometric values except for the ratio of forced expiratory volume in the 1st second to the forced vital capacity (P = 0.134). There was no significant relationship between the chest pain intensity and spirometric values. This was applied to all measured spirometric values and to the 3 days postoperative. Conclusion The current study findings rejected the examined hypothesis that reduction of post-operative chest pain intensity would be associated with improvement in the spirometric values for patient underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. There was no significant relationship between the chest pain intensity and any of the spirometric values at any of the 3 post-operative days.

  17. Safety of liposome extended-release bupivacaine for postoperative pain control

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Juan; Kamar, Nawal; Melibary, Somayah; Quevedo, Eduardo; Bergese, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ideal postoperative pain management requires a multidisciplinary approach in combination with a variety of dosage regimens. Approximately 21–30% of patients experience moderate to severe pain in the postoperative period, which may have a significant impact on recovery rate, standard of living, psychological health, and postoperative complications. Objective: Analysis of the incidence and characterization of reported adverse effects with DepoFoam bupivacaine compared to conventional bupivacaine or placebo. Methods: A systematic review of prospective studies on the use of DepoFoam versus bupivacaine or placebo was performed in order to answer the clinically relevant question: is DepoFoam a safer formulation in place of bupivacaine single injection or continuous local infusion techniques for postoperative pain management? Inclusion criteria required randomized, controlled, double-blind trials in patients 18 years old or older, single dose used for postoperative pain control, and a primary procedure performed. Results: Six studies fitted the inclusion criteria for analysis, DepoFoam bupivacaine used in therapeutic doses was well-tolerated, had a higher safety margin, and showed a favorable safety profile compared to bupivacaine and control groups. Conclusion: Extended drug delivery system DepoFoam bupivacaine is a promising drug formulation that may significantly improve postoperative care and pain control in surgical patients. PMID:24817851

  18. A miniaturised actuation system embedded in an instrumented knee implant for postoperative ligament imbalance correction.

    PubMed

    Collo, A; Poignet, P; Hamitouche, C; Almouahed, S; Stindel, E

    2014-01-01

    During Total Knee Arthroplasty surgery, the orthopaedic surgeon has to set up proper balance conditions for the two lateral ligaments of the knee. Such ligament tensioning procedure is performed manually and mainly depends on the surgeon's experience. Unfortunately, inaccuracies are unavoidable and may give rise to serious postoperative complications. In the worst-case scenario, the only solution to this problem is represented by revision surgery. In order to cope with this problem, this work proposes a novel instrumented tibial component able to detect knee imbalance conditions in the postoperative period. A miniaturised actuation system embedded in the tibial baseplate allows to restore optimal balance conditions without resorting to revision surgery. PMID:25571416

  19. Simultaneous irrigation and negative pressure wound therapy enhances wound healing and reduces wound bioburden in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathryn; Bills, Jessica; Barker, Jenny; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Infected foot wounds are one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and amputation among persons with diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate a new wound therapy system that employs negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with simultaneous irrigation therapy. For this study, we used a porcine model with full-thickness excisional wounds, inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Wounds were treated for 21 days of therapy with either NPWT, NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy using normal saline or polyhexanide biguanide (PHMB) at low or high flow rates, or control. Data show that NPWT with either irrigation condition improved wound healing rates over control-treated wounds, yet did not differ from NPWT alone. NPWT improved bioburden over control-treated wounds. NPWT with simultaneous irrigation further reduced bioburden over control and NPWT-treated wounds; however, flow rate did not affect these outcomes. Together, these data show that NPWT with simultaneous irrigation therapy with either normal saline or PHMB has a positive effect on bioburden in a porcine model, which may translate clinically to improved wound healing outcomes. PMID:24134060

  20. Suction-irrigation drainage: an underestimated therapeutic option for surgical treatment of deep sternal wound infections†

    PubMed Central

    Deschka, Heinz; Erler, Stefan; El-Ayoubi, Lemir; Vogel, Cordula; Vöhringer, Luise; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Deep sternal wound infections are significant and severe complications following cardiac surgery and substantially influence perioperative morbidity and mortality. We present the experience of our department using two different surgical treatments over a three-year period. METHODS Between January 2009 and December 2011, a total of 3274 cardiac procedures with complete median sternotomy were performed in our department. In 94 patients (3%), a deep sternal wound infection occurred, including sternal instability with consecutive surgical treatment. The patients either received wound debridement with sternum refixation and suction-irrigation drainage (SID; n = 72) or sternum refixation only (RF; n = 22) if there was sternal instability with limited signs of infection. SID was routinely installed for 7 days: the irrigation solution contained neomycin. In all cases, swabs were taken and analysed. The different methods were evaluated in respect of their clinical outcomes. RESULTS The success rate—defined as single, uncomplicated procedure—of the SID treatment was 74%, compared with 59% of the isolated sternum refixation. Complications included continuous infection, recurrence of sternal instability and wound necrosis. Eighty-eight percent of the swabs in the SID group were positive, compared with 32% in the sternal refixation only group. The dominating pathogenic germs were coagulase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus. Mortality was 10% for the SID group and 5% for the RF group. CONCLUSIONS Contrary to accepted opinion, the suction-irrigation drainage is an appropriate therapy for deep sternal wound infections. Nevertheless, deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery remain severe complications and are related to increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:23529753

  1. A Wireless Electroceutical Dressing Lowers Cost of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Piya Das; Schlanger, Richard; Ganesh, Kasturi; Lambert, Lynn; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Martinsek, Patsy; Roy, Sashwati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the use of a wireless electroceutical dressing (WED) (Procellera®) in conjunction with a 5-day negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) may reduce the number of dressing changes required per week with this therapy. Approach: At the Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, chronic wound patients (n=30) undergoing NPWT were randomized into two arms following consent as approved by the institutional review board. The control arm received standard of care NPWT, where the dressing change was performed thrice a week. The test arm received the same care except that the WED was added as an interface layer and dressing change was limited to twice a week. Results: A reduced cost of care was achieved using the WED in conjunction with NPWT. Despite fewer dressing changes in wounds dressed with the WED, closure outcomes were comparable with no overt signs of any wound complication, including infection. The cost of NPWT care during the week was significantly lower (from $2918 to $2346) in the WED-treated group compared with patients in the control arm. Innovation: This work introduces a novel technology platform involving a WED, which may be used in conjunction with NPWT. If used as such, NPWT is effective in decreasing the frequency of dressing change and lowering the cost of care. Conclusion: This work points toward the benefit of using the WED combined with NPWT. A larger clinical trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of WED in wound care is warranted. PMID:26005596

  2. Next-Generation Sequencing: A Review of Technologies and Tools for Wound Microbiome Research

    PubMed Central

    Hodkinson, Brendan P.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The colonization of wounds by specific microbes or communities of microbes may delay healing and/or lead to infection-related complication. Studies of wound-associated microbial communities (microbiomes) to date have primarily relied upon culture-based methods, which are known to have extreme biases and are not reliable for the characterization of microbiomes. Biofilms are very resistant to culture and are therefore especially difficult to study with techniques that remain standard in clinical settings. Recent Advances: Culture-independent approaches employing next-generation DNA sequencing have provided researchers and clinicians a window into wound-associated microbiomes that could not be achieved before and has begun to transform our view of wound-associated biodiversity. Within the past decade, many platforms have arisen for performing this type of sequencing, with various types of applications for microbiome research being possible on each. Critical Issues: Wound care incorporating knowledge of microbiomes gained from next-generation sequencing could guide clinical management and treatments. The purpose of this review is to outline the current platforms, their applications, and the steps necessary to undertake microbiome studies using next-generation sequencing. Future Directions: As DNA sequencing technology progresses, platforms will continue to produce longer reads and more reads per run at lower costs. A major future challenge is to implement these technologies in clinical settings for more precise and rapid identification of wound bioburden. PMID:25566414

  3. Surgical Sutures Filled with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Promote Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Reckhenrich, Ann Katharin; Kirsch, Bianca Manuela; Wahl, Elizabeth Ann; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Rezaeian, Farid; Harder, Yves; Foehr, Peter; Machens, Hans-Günther; Egaña, José Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Delayed wound healing and scar formation are among the most frequent complications after surgical interventions. Although biodegradable surgical sutures present an excellent drug delivery opportunity, their primary function is tissue fixation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) act as trophic mediators and are successful in activating biomaterials. Here biodegradable sutures were filled with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) to provide a pro-regenerative environment at the injured site. Results showed that after filling, ASCs attach to the suture material, distribute equally throughout the filaments, and remain viable in the suture. Among a broad panel of cytokines, cell-filled sutures constantly release vascular endothelial growth factor to supernatants. Such conditioned media was evaluated in an in vitro wound healing assay and showed a significant decrease in the open wound area compared to controls. After suturing in an ex vivo wound model, cells remained in the suture and maintained their metabolic activity. Furthermore, cell-filled sutures can be cryopreserved without losing their viability. This study presents an innovative approach to equip surgical sutures with pro-regenerative features and allows the treatment and fixation of wounds in one step, therefore representing a promising tool to promote wound healing after injury. PMID:24625821

  4. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  5. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-09-18

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, "ossified" knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as "is postoperative brace use really necessary?", "what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?", "to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?", "how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?", "should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?" be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  6. Postoperative thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura after aortofemoral bypass

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Naba R.; Aryal, Madan R.; Badal, Madan; Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Alweis, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is uncommon in the postoperative setting, even more so after vascular surgery. We present a case of thrombocytopenia after aortofemoral bypass, which highlights the importance of a high index of suspicion for postoperative TTP to avoid life-threatening consequences. PMID:23882385

  7. The Platelet Thrombin Receptor and Postoperative Bleeding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor A. Ferraris; Suellen P. Ferraris; Amandeep Singh; Wendy Fuhr; Darren Koppel; Daniel McKenna; Evelio Rodriguez; Herbert Reich

    1998-01-01

    Background. We hypothesized that small amounts of thrombin desensitize the platelet thrombin receptor during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), resulting in postoperative platelet dysfunction and bleeding.Methods. Seventy-nine patients were entered into a study designed to measure changes in platelet thrombin receptor function during CPB and to correlate them to postoperative bleeding. In addition to measurements of clinical blood loss, platelet function tests

  8. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  9. Community health nursing, wound care, and...ethics?

    PubMed

    Bell, Sue Ellen

    2003-09-01

    Because of changing demographics and other factors, patients receiving care for wounds, ostomies, or incontinence are being referred in increasing numbers to community health nursing organizations for initial or continued care. As home-based wound care becomes big business, little discussion is being focused on the moral and ethical issues likely to arise in the high-tech home setting. Progressively more complex and expensive home care relies on family members to take on complicated care regimens in the face of decreasing numbers of allowable skilled nursing home visits. A framework and a principle-based theory for reflection on the character and content of moral and ethical conflicts are provided to encourage informed and competent care of patients in the home. Common moral and ethical conflicts for WOC nurses in the United States are presented. These conflicts include issues of wound care supply procurement; use of documentation to maximize care or profit; problems of quality, care consistency, and caregiver consent; and dilemmas of tiered health care options. The advantages of a framework to address ethical conflicts are discussed. PMID:14560284

  10. Evaluation of an oxygen-diffusion dressing for accelerated healing of donor-site wounds.

    PubMed

    Lairet, Kimberly F; Baer, David; Leas, Michelle L; Renz, Evan M; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating the healing process and reducing pain during healing are beneficial for the following reasons: faster return to work, lower risk of wound infection, improved quality of life, and possibly reduced need for analgesia. This clinical study assessed the effectiveness of a new oxygen-diffusion dressing (OxyBand; Oxyband Technologies, St. Louis, MO) compared with standard Xeroform gauze dressings (Convidien, Mansfield, MA), in the care of skin-graft donor sites in burn patients. Time to healing was the primary endpoint, and pain scores and cosmetic outcome were also assessed. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled study of burn patients undergoing harvesting of two donor sites. Patients were followed at predetermined time points for 30 to 45 days to determine the time to reepithelialization, cosmetic appearance, and pain. Subjects were adult burn patients with less than 30% TBSA burns admitted to the burn center, who required excision and grafting. Twenty patients were enrolled, of whom 17 completed the study. Average age was 35 years. Average burn size was 9.2% TBSA. Patients underwent harvesting of split-thickness skin grafts with one donor wound dressed with OxyBand and the other dressed in Xeroform gauze. Wounds were inspected and photographed on postoperative days 4 and 8, and then every 2 days until the donor wounds were healed. Pain scores at each site were also collected at these visits (rated by patients on a scale from 0 to 10). Mean time to wound healing for OxyBand was 9.3 ± 1.7 days; for Xeroform, 12.4 ± 2.7 days (P < .001). Pain scores were lower (P < .01) at the OxyBand site compared with the Xeroform site at all time points during postoperative days 4 to 12. There was no difference in the cosmetic outcome of the wounds at 30 to 45 days postoperatively. This study revealed a decrease in the time to healing and in pain at donor sites dressed with an oxygen-diffusion dressing. PMID:23877142

  11. Hyperspectral imaging in diabetic foot wound care.

    PubMed

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-09-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes and afflicts as many as 15 to 25% of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients during their lifetime. If untreated, diabetic foot ulcers may become infected and require total or partial amputation of the affected limb. Early identification of tissue at risk of ulcerating could enable proper preventive care, thereby reducing the incidence of foot ulceration. Furthermore, noninvasive assessment of tissue viability around already formed ulcers could inform the diabetes caregiver about the severity of the wound and help assess the need for amputation. This article reviews how hyperspectral imaging between 450 and 700 nm can be used to assess the risk of diabetic foot ulcer development and to predict the likelihood of healing noninvasively. Two methods are described to analyze the in vivo hyperspectral measurements. The first method is based on the modified Beer-Lambert law and produces a map of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the dermis of the foot. The second is based on a two-layer optical model of skin and can retrieve not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations but also epidermal thickness and melanin concentration along with skin scattering properties. It can detect changes in the diabetic foot and help predict and understand ulceration mechanisms. PMID:20920429

  12. Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes and afflicts as many as 15 to 25% of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients during their lifetime. If untreated, diabetic foot ulcers may become infected and require total or partial amputation of the affected limb. Early identification of tissue at risk of ulcerating could enable proper preventive care, thereby reducing the incidence of foot ulceration. Furthermore, noninvasive assessment of tissue viability around already formed ulcers could inform the diabetes caregiver about the severity of the wound and help assess the need for amputation. This article reviews how hyperspectral imaging between 450 and 700 nm can be used to assess the risk of diabetic foot ulcer development and to predict the likelihood of healing noninvasively. Two methods are described to analyze the in vivo hyperspectral measurements. The first method is based on the modified Beer-Lambert law and produces a map of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the dermis of the foot. The second is based on a two-layer optical model of skin and can retrieve not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations but also epidermal thickness and melanin concentration along with skin scattering properties. It can detect changes in the diabetic foot and help predict and understand ulceration mechanisms. PMID:20920429

  13. Prevalence of and risk factors for persistent postoperative nonanginal pain after cardiac surgery: a 2-year prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Choinière, Manon; Watt-Watson, Judy; Victor, J. Charles; Baskett, Roger J.F.; Bussières, Jean S.; Carrier, Michel; Cogan, Jennifer; Costello, Judy; Feindel, Christopher; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Racine, Mélanie; Taillefer, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persistent postoperative pain continues to be an underrecognized complication. We examined the prevalence of and risk factors for this type of pain after cardiac surgery. Methods: We enrolled patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting or valve replacement, or both, from Feb. 8, 2005, to Sept. 1, 2009. Validated measures were used to assess (a) preoperative anxiety and depression, tendency to catastrophize in the face of pain, health-related quality of life and presence of persistent pain; (b) pain intensity and interference in the first postoperative week; and (c) presence and intensity of persistent postoperative pain at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. The primary outcome was the presence of persistent postoperative pain during 24 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 1247 patients completed the preoperative assessment. Follow-up retention rates at 3 and 24 months were 84% and 78%, respectively. The prevalence of persistent postoperative pain decreased significantly over time, from 40.1% at 3 months to 22.1% at 6 months, 16.5% at 12 months and 9.5% at 24 months; the pain was rated as moderate to severe in 3.6% at 24 months. Acute postoperative pain predicted both the presence and severity of persistent postoperative pain. The more intense the pain during the first week after surgery and the more it interfered with functioning, the more likely the patients were to report persistent postoperative pain. Pre-existing persistent pain and increased preoperative anxiety also predicted the presence of persistent postoperative pain. Interpretation: Persistent postoperative pain of nonanginal origin after cardiac surgery affected a substantial proportion of the study population. Future research is needed to determine whether interventions to modify certain risk factors, such as preoperative anxiety and the severity of pain before and immediately after surgery, may help to minimize or prevent persistent postoperative pain. PMID:24566643

  14. Influencing dressing choice and supporting wound management using remote 'tele-wound care'.

    PubMed

    King, Brenda

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a local involvement in a project to evaluate a remote system of wound management, incorporating the use of digital and mobile technology. It outlines how this involvement influenced the current system of 'tele wound care' (remote wound management) in a large community organisation. The system allows remote wound assessment, management advice and ongoing monitoring of wounds to ensure that the dressing choice remains appropriate and that timely wound care support can be provided to community nurses, practice nurses and GPs. PMID:24912832

  15. Complications encountered in the treatment of pilon fractures.

    PubMed

    McFerran, M A; Smith, S W; Boulas, H J; Schwartz, H S

    1992-01-01

    A total of 52 tibial plafond (pilon) fractures in 51 patients were retrospectively reviewed from the years 1985-1990 to define the rate of complications encountered during their management. All fractures were managed under faculty supervision at a level I trauma center and its two affiliated institutions. The follow-up period was scrutinized to determine whether or not a complicating event occurred. Major local complications, termed events, were defined as those requiring unplanned surgery due to infection, wound breakdown with subsequent flap coverage, and failure of fixation or fracture healing. Reduction accuracy and final clinical results were not specifically examined. There were 14 (27%) type I, 17 (33%) type II, and 21 (40%) type III Ruedi-Allgower fracture types. The majority (79%) of the fractures were closed and 89% were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. The overall local complication rate was 54%. A total of 21 (40%) pilon fractures (six type I, six type II, and nine type III) had major local complicating events requiring 77 additional operations. Patient follow-up time ranged from 1 week (the occurrence of a major local complication) to 200 weeks (no complication), with a mean of 67 weeks. Kaplan-Meier survivorship (K-M) analysis was utilized to statistically estimate the complication rate in this patient population accounting for the occurrence of censored events. The K-M-determined event rate was 42 +/- 7%. Ten (of 21) pilon fractures had events by 3 weeks, while only two occurred beyond 40 weeks. PMID:1602341

  16. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  17. The Evolution of Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Kelman Cohen

    Man’s struggle to heal wounds is as old as history itself. As life forms evolved from single cell life to amphibian and finally\\u000a mammal, the pristine ability to heal by regeneration was lost and thus repairs by inflammation and subsequent deposition of\\u000a matrix protein (scar) evolved as the method of mammalian healing. This evolutionary change leading to scar (the deposition

  18. Preventing Deep Wound Infection after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Charles S.; Yarbrough, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of deep wound infections before, during, and after coronary artery bypass grafting have prompted research to clarify risk factors and explore preventive measures to keep infection rates at an irreducible minimum. An analysis of 42 studies in which investigators used multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus and obesity are by far the chief preoperative risk factors. A 4-point preoperative scoring system based on a patient's body mass index and the presence or absence of diabetes is one practical way to determine the risk of mediastinitis, and other risk-estimate methods are being refined. Intraoperative risk factors include prolonged perfusion time, the use of one or more internal mammary arteries as grafts, blood transfusion, and mechanical circulatory assistance. The chief postoperative risk factor is reoperation, usually for bleeding. Unresolved issues include the optimal approach to Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization and the choice of a prophylactic antibiotic regimen. We recommend that cardiac surgery programs supplement their audit processes and ongoing vigilance for infections with periodic, multidisciplinary reviews of best-practice standards for preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative patient care. PMID:23678210

  19. Amniocentesis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Anandakumar, C; Wong, Y C; Annapoorna, V; Arulkumaran, S; Chia, D; Bongso, A; Ratnam, S S

    1992-05-01

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate whether the performance of an experienced operator had any significant influence in reducing the incidence of complications in amniocentesis; 1,459 women had amniocentesis performed under ultrasound guidance; 1,324 were performed by experienced operators and 135 cases by less experienced operators. Complications like fetal loss, blood-stained amniotic fluid, culture failure, multiple needle puncture, leaking liquor, fetal trauma and error in results were compared in the 2 groups. This study demonstrated that amniocentesis performed by an experienced operator decreased the various complications associated with amniocentesis. PMID:1520214

  20. [Wound signal transduction pathways in plants].

    PubMed

    Szczegielniak, Jadwiga

    2007-01-01

    A significant advancement in our knowledge and understanding of wound-signaling pathways in plants has been made recently. Essential role in the explanation of these processes came from the genetic screens and analysis of mutants which are defective in either jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis, JA perception or systemin function. Plants equally react to wound in the tissues directly damaged (local response) as well as in the non-wounded areas (systemic response). Jasmonides and in particular the most studied JA, produced by the octadecanoid pathway, are responsible for the systemic response. Jasmonides functioning as long-distance signal particles transmit the information about wound to distant, non-wounded tissues where defense response is invoked. Peptyd - systemin, identified in some Solanaceous species, acts locally to the wounded area to elicit the production of JA. Jasmonic acid-dependent and -independent wound signal transduction pathways have been identified and partially characterized. JA-dependent wound signaling pathways are responsible for the activation of systemic responses, whereas JA-independent wound signaling pathways, activated close to wound side, have a role in reparation of damaged tissue and in defense against pathogens. PMID:17969872

  1. Impaired Laparotomy Wound Healing in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Liyu; Culbertson, Eric J.; Wen, Yuan; Robson, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity increases the risk of laparotomy dehiscence and incisional hernia. The aim of this study was to measure the biological effect of obesity on laparotomy wound healing and the formation of incisional hernias. Methods Normal-weight Sprague–Dawley (SD) and obese Zucker rats were used in an established laparotomy wound healing and incisional ventral hernia model. Mechanical testing was performed on abdominal wall strips collected from laparotomy wounds. Hernia size was measured by digital imaging. Picrosirius staining for collagen isoforms was observed with polarized microscopy. Abdominal wall fibroblasts were cultured to measure collagen matrix remodeling and proliferation. Results Laparotomy wound healing was significantly impaired in obese rats. Mechanical strength was lower than in normal-weight rats. Yield load was reduced in the obese group at all time points. Picrosirius red staining showed increased immature type III collagen content and disorganized type I collagen fibers within laparotomy wounds of obese rats. Wound size was significantly larger in the obese group. Collagen matrix remodeling was impaired with fibroblasts from obese rats, but there was no difference in fibroblast proliferation between the obese and normal-weight groups. Conclusions We observed for the first time that laparotomy wound healing is impaired in obese rats. The recovery of laparotomy wound strength is delayed due to abnormal collagen maturation and remodeling, possibly due to a defect in fibroblast function. Strategies to improve outcomes for laparotomy wound healing in obese patients should include correcting the wound healing defect, possibly with growth factor or cell therapy. PMID:21347822

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam-adjunctive treatment in the management of traumatic wounds of the leg: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schlatterer, Daniel; Hirshorn, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, the application of and indications for negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) have grown tremendously. This is particularly true in orthopaedic trauma in the management of injuries to the leg, ankle, and foot. This article reviews the evidence-based medicine in terms of NPWT/ROCF, as a method of reducing bacterial counts in wounds, as a bridge until definitive bony coverage, for treating infections, and as an adjunct to wound bed preparation and for bolstering split-thickness skin grafts, dermal replacement grafts, and over muscle flaps. NPWT/ROCF has been shown to be an adjunct to the mainstays of wound management. No significant complications have been noted in the categories of NPWT/ROCF discussed in this review. In addition, evidence supports a decrease in complex soft tissue procedures in grade IIIB open fractures when NPWT/ROCF is employed. Although more research needs to be done, NPWT/ROCF appears to provide clinical benefit for the treatment of these complex lower extremity wounds. PMID:19034163

  3. Experimental missile wound to the brain.

    PubMed

    Carey, M E; Sarna, G S; Farrell, J B; Happel, L T

    1989-11-01

    Among civilians in the United States, 33,000 gunshot wound deaths occur each year; probably half of these involve the head. In combat, head wounds account for approximately half of the immediate mortality when death can be attributed to a single wound. No significant reduction in the neurosurgical mortality associated with these wounds has occurred between World War II and the Vietnam conflict, and very little research into missile wounds of the brain has been undertaken. An experimental model has been developed in the anesthetized cat whereby a ballistic injury to the brain may be painlessly reproduced in order that the pathophysiological effects of brain wounding may be studied and better treatments may be designed to lower the mortality and morbidity rates associated with gunshot wounds. Prominent among physiological effects observed in this model was respiratory arrest even though the missile did not injure the brain stem directly. The incidence of prolonged respiratory arrest increased with increasing missile energy, but arrest was often reversible provided respiratory support was given. It is possible that humans who receive a brain wound die from missile-induced apnea instead of brain damage per se. The mortality rate in humans with brain wounding might be reduced by prompt respiratory support. Brain wounding was associated with persistently increased intracranial pressure and reduced cerebral perfusion pressure not entirely attributable to intracranial bleeding. The magnitude of these derangements appeared to be missile energy-dependent and approached dangerous levels in higher-energy wounds. All wounded cats exhibited postwounding increases in blood glucose concentrations consistent with a generalized stress reaction. A transient rise in hematocrit also occurred immediately after wounding. Both of these phenomena could prove deleterious to optimal brain function after injury. PMID:2509646

  4. [Late complications of the intestine after radiotherapy of bladder carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sulmoni, A; Hollinger, A; Schmucki, O

    1976-03-01

    Immediate reactions of the intestines during or after radiotherapy of the pelvis are very common. Later complications requiring surgical intervention are seldom found. Out of 101 patients with bladder carcinomas, we observed 4 with severe irreversible intestinal changes. These had been operated and had received post-operative radiotherapy. On 3 patients a sigmoid stenosis had to be resected under the protection of a colostomy. On the fourth patient an ileovesical fistula was closed primary. PMID:1265937

  5. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Complications Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Symptoms Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  6. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... complete loss of smell (anosmia) may occur with sinusitis. Causes of decreased and/or loss of sense ... improvement. Mucocele A mucocele is a complication of sinusitis caused by obstruction of drainage of mucous from ...

  7. Complications of TMJ surgery.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David; Puig, Leann

    2015-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery can be divided into 3 types of surgery: Arthroscopy, arthroplasty, and total joint replacement. The complications associated with these procedures increase with complexity. They all include injury to adjacent structures, infections, and bleeding problems. PMID:25483447

  8. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  9. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD) are generally classified as either local ... is chronic (of long duration) LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF ULCERATIVE COLITIS PERFORATION (RUPTURE) OF THE BOWEL Intestinal perforation occurs ...

  10. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español ( ... Action Coalition's website (www.vaccineinformation.org). Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus ... Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  11. Complications of Otitis Media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Metin Önerci

    \\u000a The complications of acute or chronic middle ear diseases still carry a very high mortality rate if not treated properly,\\u000a although the incidence of complications has been decreasing significantly after the introduction of antibiotics. The infection\\u000a may spread to neighboring structures either by bone erosion or preformed pathways. Facial nerve paralysis due to chronic otitis\\u000a media with cholesteatoma requires urgent

  12. [Complications and peculiarities of anesthesia in abdominal delivery].

    PubMed

    Balich, E Ia

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the reasons responsible for complications of anesthesia in abdominal delivery has shown that such complications are most frequent before fetus extraction. They are: poorly corrected hypo- or hypertension and tachycardia; damages of major vessels, pleura and lungs upon central vein puncture; severe hypoxia in difficult or abortive intubations with mouth, larynx, pharynx, trachea and esophagus injuries; regurgitation and development of aspiration pneumonia (Mendelson syndrome); toxic and allergic reactions to psychopharmacological, narcotic and local anesthetic agents; signs of laryngobronchiolospasm; complications during suture of the uterus and abdominal cavity when main anesthesia is performed (hypotonic bleeding with the onset of ARDS, hemodynamic disturbances due to microembolism of the pulmonary artery branches upon active contractions of the uterus caused by uterotonics, side effects of myorelaxants); complications in the early postoperative period (prolonged apnea, the onset of acute cardiopulmonary and hepatic failure). PMID:7943866

  13. Rare complication post sleeve gastrectomy: Acute irreducible paraesophageal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sanea, Osamah; Al-garzaie, Ahmed; Dernaika, Mohamad; Haddad, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been accepted as a standalone effective bariatric procedure. With the increase in the number of cases done worldwide, we are witnessing the emergence of new unexpected complications. Presentation A seemingly straight forward sleeve gastrectomy was complicated by acute post-operative vomiting which was diagnosed as an acute intra thoracic migration of part of the new sleeve. Surgical repair was done, with reduction and fixation of the stomach. Patient was subsequently relieved of his symptoms and discharged. Discussion This is a rare complication of a relatively well studied operation. Faced with severe post operative repeated vomiting, clinical suspicion and correct use of all para-clinical tools should help delineate the cause. Conclusion We report this case hoping to expand the existing literature on the topic and to highlight the potential role of gastrophrenic membrane dissection in the occurrence of such complication. PMID:25644556

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Postoperative Infections after Sinus Elevation Surgery: Clinical Consensus and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Testori, Tiziano; Drago, Lorenzo; Wallace, Steven S.; Capelli, Matteo; Galli, Fabio; Zuffetti, Francesco; Parenti, Andrea; Deflorian, Matteo; Fumagalli, Luca; Weinstein, Roberto L.; Maiorana, Carlo; Di Stefano, Danilo; Valentini, Pascal; Giannì, Aldo B.; Chiapasco, Matteo; Vinci, Raffaele; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Mantovani, Mario; Torretta, Sara; Pipolo, Carlotta; Felisati, Giovanni; Padoan, Giovanni; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Mattina, Roberto; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Maxillary sinus surgery is a reliable and predictable treatment option for the prosthetic rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla. Nevertheless, these interventions are not riskless of postoperative complications with respect to implant positioning in pristine bone. Aim. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a clinical consensus of experts (periodontists, implantologists, maxillofacial surgeons, ENT, and microbiology specialists) on several clinical questions and to give clinical recommendations on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat postoperative infections. Materials and Methods. A panel of experts in different fields of dentistry and medicine, after having reviewed the available literature on the topic and taking into account their long-standing clinical experience, gave their response to a series of clinical questions and reached a consensus. Results and Conclusion. The incidence of postop infections is relatively low (2%–5.6%). A multidisciplinary approach is advisable. A list of clinical recommendation are given. PMID:22927851

  15. [Postoperative period pecularities in patients of 70 years and older with ischemic heart disease after myocardial revasculization].

    PubMed

    Ziuliaeva, T P; Babaev, M A; Eremenko, A A; Zhbanov, I V; Molochkov, A V

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of preoperative risk factors and postoperative period flow in patients older than 70 years (58 people) in comparison with control group aged 40-63 years (62 patients), undergoing myocardial revasculization was conducted. . Significantly higher rates of rhythm disturbances, arterial hypertension, lung diseases, chronic renal insufficiency, atherosclerotic carotid artery disease, lower limb atherosclerotic disease were found in patients older than 70 years preoperatively. It leads to postoperative complications and requires special preoperative correction. Complications incidence after CABG was higher by 1.7 times in patients older than 70 versus control group. The most frequent complications were: rhythm disturbances (in 5 times more often, than control group), respiratory failure (which in 70% of cases was caused by COPD), cerebral complications (in 2,5 times more often, than in control group). Myocardial revasculization surgery in elderly patients is effective treatment method and can be performed with good immediate results. PMID:24000657

  16. Use of a biological extracellular matrix wound therapy to heal complex, chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Rando, T

    2009-02-01

    This small case series involved four patients with vascular impairment and multiple comorbidities whose wounds had not responded to standard treatment. Use of this novel therapy help initiate wound healing and improve quality of life. PMID:19418784

  17. Advances in Wound Healing: A Review of Current Wound Healing Products

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick S.; Evans, Gregory R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Successful wound care involves optimizing patient local and systemic conditions in conjunction with an ideal wound healing environment. Many different products have been developed to influence this wound environment to provide a pathogen-free, protected, and moist area for healing to occur. Newer products are currently being used to replace or augment various substrates in the wound healing cascade. This review of the current state of the art in wound-healing products looks at the latest applications of silver in microbial prophylaxis and treatment, including issues involving resistance and side effects, the latest uses of negative pressure wound devices, advanced dressings and skin substitutes, biologic wound products including growth factor applications, and hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunct in wound healing. With the abundance of available products, the goal is to find the most appropriate modality or combination of modalities to optimize healing. PMID:22567251

  18. The influence of complications on the costs of complex cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Short, Marah N; Aloia, Thomas A; Ho, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is widely known that outcomes after cancer surgery vary widely, depending on interactions between patient, tumor, neoadjuvant therapy, and provider factors. Within this complex milieu, the influence of complications on the cost of surgical oncology care remains unknown. The authors examined rates of Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) occurrence for 6 cancer operations and their association with costs of care. METHODS The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) PSI definitions were used to identify patient safety-related complications in Medicare claims data. Hospital and inpatient physician claims for the years 2005 through 2009 were analyzed for 6 cancer resections: colectomy, rectal resection, pulmonary lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and pancreatic resection. Risk-adjusted regression analyses were used to measure the association between each PSI and hospitalization costs. RESULTS Overall PSI rates ranged from a low of 0.01% for postoperative hip fracture to a high of 2.58% for respiratory failure. Death among inpatients with serious treatable complications, postoperative respiratory failure, postoperative thromboembolism, and accidental puncture/laceration were >1% for all 6 cancer operations. Several PSIs—including decubitus ulcer, death among surgical inpatients with serious treatable complications, and postoperative thromboembolism—raised hospitalization costs by ?20% for most cancer surgery types. Postoperative respiratory failure resulted in a cost increase >50% for all cancer resections. CONCLUSIONS The consistently higher costs associated with cancer surgery PSIs indicate that substantial health care savings could be achieved by targeting these indicators for quality improvement. PMID:24382697

  19. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178

  20. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-04-18

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178