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Sample records for postoperative wound complications

  1. [Immunoprophylaxis of postoperative inflammatory complications in thoracic and abdominal wounds].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Abakumov, M M; Danielian, Sh N; Nikulina, V P; Khvatov, V B

    2002-01-01

    Immune system (IS) was studied in 228 wounded with penetrating knife and shotgun wounds of the thorax and abdomen complicated by hemorrhage more than 1000 ml. Six variants of IS reaction to trauma, hemorrhage, surgical stress and intensive therapy 1-2 days after surgery were registered. Comparative analysis of laboratory and clinical efficacy of prophylactic use of leukinferon in 99 patients (test group) was carried out. Control group consisted of 129 patients matched by gender, age, type of wound, hemorrhage volume and fluid therapy. High immunoprophylactic efficacy of leukinferon was demonstrated. Period of immunorehabilitation (normalization of leukogram, correction of immune imbalance) in patients of the test group was shortened twice. Purulent complications rate reduced from 24.9 to 1.0%, hospital stay--from 41.7 +/- 3.6 to 16.3 +/- 1.1 days. PMID:12162084

  2. [Incidence of postoperative complications in geriatric gynecology].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S

    1984-01-01

    The results of a retrospective-study concerning postoperative complications after gynecologic geriatric surgery (506 patients, aged 60 years and over) at the Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the District Hospital Stralsund/GDR are presented. In 106 patients (10,94 per cent) we have registered post-operative complications, in particular anaemia, fever and wound-period (1967 to 1971 = 8,22%, 1977 to 1981 = 13,29%). Gynecologic surgery in the aged requires a carefully clinical management in preoperative diagnostic and an intensive postoperative care. PMID:6475112

  3. Preventing postoperative burn wound aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Levenson, C; Wohlford, P; Djou, J; Evans, S; Zawacki, B

    1991-01-01

    Between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 1988, 35 patients at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Burn Center had postoperative cultures from their burn wounds that grew Aspergillus species; clinical burn-wound aspergillosis occurred in 66% of these cases and death occurred in 53% of these cases. Beginning in November 1984, several modifications in the air-conditioning system and topical antimicrobial wound therapy were undertaken. Cleaning and 8Cu-quinolinolate treatment of air ducts every 2 months did not reliably clear Aspergillus species from the air in patient care areas. Several changes in topical therapeutic regimen failed to prevent both burn wound culture positivity and clinical aspergillosis. Finally, installation of high-efficiency particulate air filters, installation of new air ducts, and inception of wound irrigation with a solution of mafenide hydrochloride plus nystatin both during and after operation were associated with a reduction in wound culture positivity rate to one occurrence in 1988 (Poisson probability less than 0.01 versus the rate in 1984) and no occurrences during the 18 months after the false ceiling of the burn ward was sealed. PMID:2050719

  4. Maternal postoperative complications after nonobstetric antenatal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Brousseau, E. Christine; Dick, Madeline A.; Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Lockwood, Charles J.; Pettker, Christian M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our primary objective is to estimate the occurrence of major maternal 30 day postoperative complications after nonobstetric antenatal surgery. Methods We analyzed the 2005-2009 data files from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to assess outcomes for pregnant women undergoing nonobstetric antenatal surgery during any trimester of pregnancy as classified by CPT-4 codes. T-tests, ?2, logistic regression and other tests were used to calculate composite 30-day major postoperative complications and associations of preoperative predictors with 30 day postoperative morbidity. Results The most common non-obstetric antenatal surgical procedure among the 1,969 included women was appendectomy (44.0%). The prevalence of composite 30-day major postoperative complications was 5.8% (n=115). This included (not exclusive categories): return to the surgical operating room within 30 days of surgery 3.6%, infectious morbidity 2.0%, wound morbidity 1.4%, 30 day respiratory morbidity 2.0%, venous thromboembolic event morbidity 0.5%, postoperative blood transfusion 0.2%, and maternal mortality 0.25%. Conclusion Major maternal postoperative complications following nonobstetric antenatal surgery were low (5.8%). Maternal postoperative mortality was rare (0.25%). PMID:22735069

  5. Effects of early postoperative chemotherapy on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kolb, B A; Buller, R E; Connor, J P; DiSaia, P J; Berman, M L

    1992-06-01

    Wound complications were investigated in 100 patients undergoing chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer and compared with wound complications in patients with other gynecologic malignancy who did not receive chemotherapy but were operated on by the same gynecologic oncologists. The incidence of wound complications in the chemotherapy-treated population was 11%. Complications developed with equal frequency regardless of when postoperative chemotherapy was initiated. Thus, chemotherapy did not increase the risk of wound complications despite efforts to begin chemotherapy as soon as possible after cytoreductive surgery. Low postoperative albumin levels (P less than .01), postoperative hemoglobin of 10 g/dL or less (P less than .02), advanced stage of disease (P less than .004), and electrocautery use (P less than .05) were all risk factors for development of wound complications, whereas the frequency of bowel resection and type of fascial or skin closure did not adversely influence the risk. Patients who received chemotherapy and developed wound breakdown actually healed faster than our control population. They healed at the same rate as did obstetric and gynecologic patients from the literature. Because delays in administering chemotherapy postoperatively have been associated with decreased survival, we recommend that chemotherapy for advanced-stage epithelial cancer not be delayed solely because of concern for wound healing. PMID:1579328

  6. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Ple?ca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burl?nescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicol?escu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer. Abbreviations: PRS- Piver Rutledge-Smith, II- class II, III- class III PMID:24653760

  7. Common post-operative complications in children

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Dilip

    2012-01-01

    The exact incidence of common post-operative complications in children is not known. Most common one is post-operative nausea and vomiting followed by respiratory complications leading to hypoxia. Cardiac complications are less in children without associated congenital cardiac anomaly. Post-operative shivering, agitation and delirium are seen more often in children anaesthetised with newer inhalational agents like sevoflurane and desflurane. Urinary retention in the post-operative period could be influenced by anaesthetic drugs and regional blocks. The purpose of this article is to review the literature and present to the postgraduate students comprehensive information about the current understanding and practice pattern on various common complications in the post-operative period. Extensive literature was searched with key words of various complications from Pubmed, Google scholar and specific journal, namely paediatric anaesthesia. The relevant articles, review article meta-analysis and editorials were the primary source of information for this article. PMID:23293390

  8. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. [Postoperative complications of heart and pericardial injuries].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, Iu A; Abakumov, M M; Vladimirova, E S; Danielian, Sh N; Nikitina, O V; Belozerov, G E

    2013-01-01

    The 31-year experience of 839 cases of heart and pericardial injuries was analyzed. The complicated course was registered in 36%. Such factors as patient's age, blood loss, severity of injury and patient's condition on admission, defined the possibility of complications. No less important were the characteristics of postoperative treatment and early diagnostics of the injury. The thorough analysis of reasons of the complications' development allowed to work out some prophylactic measures and to decrease the frequency of postoperative lethality from 13.8 to 6.8%, whereas the complications rate was decreased from 43.8 to 32.3%. PMID:23715389

  10. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  11. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy—Patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61–87 years, median age 71 years) were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: “Managing postoperative complications,” “Being independent,” “Feeling safe,” and “Accepting the situation.” A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients’ lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery. PMID:26900139

  12. How to address wound healing complications.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2015-12-16

    The final article in this six-part series looks at wound complications. While most acute wounds will heal with the right treatment, some get stuck along the normal healing pathway and become chronic. The pathology of these wounds is complex, requiring nurses to determine and eliminate any underlying problems, such as poor circulation, while preventing colonisation to avoid infection. Through appropriate treatment and the correct dressing choice, nurses can help prevent a chronic wound from getting worse and put it back on the path to healing. Some wounds will never be able to heal; in such cases, nurses can help to relieve patient discomfort. PMID:26841484

  13. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and ?{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  14. [Intraoperative and postoperative complications of splenectomy].

    PubMed

    Petrovi?, M; Popovic, M; Knezevi?, S; Mati?, S; Goti?, M; Milovanovi?, A; Zuvela, M; Artiko, V; Dugali?, V; Rankovi?, V

    2002-01-01

    Spleen is being surgically removed because of trauma, in diagnostic and-or therapeutical purposes because of the benignant and malignant diseases. The percentage of morbidity during and after splenectomy is relatively low. During surgery might occur bleeding, trauma of the pancreatic tail, stomach, lineal flexure of the colon, left hemidiafragm, left suprarenal gland and upper pole of the left kidney, which must be correspondingly reclaimed during the same intervention. In the early postoperative period, postoperative bleeding, subfrenic abscess, pulmonal atelectasis, bronchopneumonia and left pleural extravasations might occur. Especially is important notification of these events in due time and adequate conservative and surgical treatment. After splenectomy, there is an increase of the number of trombocytes, which might lead to the tromboembolic complications. In the prevention of these complications in the postoperative period prolonged antiagregation therapy is suggested. Postsplenectomy sepsis is very late, general complication of splenectomy, which occurs because of the lower immunity in the child age. To prevent these complications, partial splenectomies, reimplantations of the spleen, prolonged application of the penicillin medicines after splenectomy and antipneumococcal vaccine are performed. PMID:12587454

  15. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  16. Reconstruction of open wounds as a complication of spinal surgery with flaps: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Lee Onn; Hubbard, Zachary; Salgado, Christopher J; Levi, Allan D; Chim, Harvey

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT A systematic review of the available evidence on the prophylactic and therapeutic use of flaps for the coverage of complex spinal soft-tissue defects was performed to determine if the use of flaps reduces postoperative complications and improves patient outcomes. METHODS A PubMed database search was performed to identify English-language articles published between 1990 and 2014 that contained the following phrases to describe postoperative wounds ("wound," "complex back wound," "postoperative wound," "spine surgery") and intervention ("flap closure," "flap coverage," "soft tissue reconstruction," "muscle flap"). RESULTS In total, 532 articles were reviewed with 17 articles meeting the inclusion criteria of this study. The risk factors from the pooled analysis of 262 patients for the development of postoperative complex back wounds that necessitated muscle flap coverage included the involvement of instrumentation (77.6%), a previous history of radiotherapy (33.2%), smoking (20.6%), and diabetes mellitus (17.2%). In patients with instrumentation, prophylactic coverage of the wound with a well-vascularized flap was shown to result in a lower incidence of wound complications. One study showed a statistically significant decrease in complications compared with patients where prophylactic coverage was not performed (20% vs 45%). The indications for flap coverage after onset of wound complications included hardware exposure, wound infection, dehiscence, seroma, and hematoma. Flap coverage was shown to decrease the number of surgical debridements needed and also salvage hardware, with the rate of hardware removal after flap coverage ranging from 0% to 41.9% in 4 studies. CONCLUSIONS Prophylactic coverage with flaps in high-risk patients undergoing spine surgery reduces complications, while therapeutic coverage following wound complications allows the salvage of hardware in the majority of patients. PMID:26424341

  17. Type of skin incision and wound complications in the obese parturient.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mamie; Hines, Rachel; Polinkovsky, Margaret; Stuebe, Alison; Thorp, John; Strauss, Robert

    2012-04-01

    We examined the relationship between type of skin incision at time of cesarean delivery and postoperative wound complications in the obese parturient. Women with a body mass index (BMI) of greater than 29 who had undergone cesarean delivery at The University of North Carolina were identified from the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition study. Inpatient and outpatient medical records were reviewed for maternal demographics as well as intrapartum and intraoperative characteristics. The exposure of interest was type of incision, classified as vertical or transverse. The primary outcome was wound complication, defined as partial or complete wound separation. Logistic regression analysis was used to create a final model of risk factors for wound complications while controlling for potentially confounding variables. From 1998 to 2005, 238 women with a BMI greater than 29 who underwent cesarean delivery were identified. Of these 238 women, a vertical skin incision was performed in 25 (11%) and a transverse skin incision in 213 (89%). The overall incidence of wound complications in this group was 13%. BMI was associated with wound complications (p < 0.01). After controlling for confounding factors, no difference in wound complication based on type of skin incision was apparent. The type of skin incision does not appear to be associated with wound complications in the obese parturient; however, larger studies would be needed to confirm this finding. Increased BMI is associated with a higher rate of wound complications. PMID:22105439

  18. Wound complications of adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ormsby, M.V.; Hilaris, B.S.; Nori, D.; Brennan, M.F.

    1989-07-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy by the brachytherapy technique has been suggested by us to diminish local recurrence following resection of extremity and superficial truncal soft-tissue sarcoma. However, loading of the catheters with radioactive sources on the first through the fifth postoperative days results in a 48% significant wound-complication rate. Our previous animal experiments would suggest that delay of application of radiation to one week after wounding is accompanied by significant improvement in wound-breaking strength, new H3 hydroxyproline accumulation, and improved force-tension curves. As part of our ongoing prospective randomized trial of the effects of brachytherapy on local control, one change was made: the catheters were loaded five or more days after operation. Wound complications were then reviewed in 50 patients following this single change in brachytherapy delivery. Of the 21 patients receiving brachytherapy, 14% had significant wound complications; 10% of the 29 patients who did not receive radiation had wound complications of similar severity. This decrease in wound complications represents a major improvement over our prior experience and suggests that the timing of radioactive source loading in the postoperative period is a major factor in radiation-induced wound-healing delay.

  19. [Pre-, peri- and postoperative prevention of wound infections].

    PubMed

    Gottrup, Finn; Jrgensen, Peter Holmberg; Bekhj, Laura

    2007-11-26

    Many factors related to the patient, surgical techniques and perioperative hygiene are decisive for the development of postoperative wound infections. The present paper describes some of the most important factors and tries on basis of the present literature to evaluate the evidence of these factors. PMID:18211780

  20. Effect of postoperative use of nasal oxygen catheter supplementation in wound healing following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; Angelini, Fábio Janson; Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Healing is an event that is fundamental to the success of total knee arthroplasty. The aims of the present study were to compare the rates of complications related to wound healing between two groups of volunteers submitted to total knee arthroplasty and to evaluate the effects of postoperative oxygen supplementation by means of a nasal catheter. METHOD: A total of 109 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were randomized into two groups, namely, groups that did and did not receive postoperative oxygen supplementation via a nasal catheter. The surgical wound was monitored every day during the hospital stay and on the 7th, 14th, 21st, 30th and 42nd postoperative days. Characteristics related to healing were observed, including hyperemia, dehiscence, necrosis, phlyctenules and deep and superficial infection. RESULTS: There were no cases of deep infection. Hyperemia was statistically correlated with the total number of complications in the groups, with oxygen demonstrated to be a protective factor against hyperemia. Approximately 30% of the patients who exhibited hyperemia had other complications, independent of oxygen supplementation. CONCLUSION: Oxygen supplementation following total knee arthroplasty was shown to be effective in diminishing hyperemia around the operative wound. The development of hyperemia was a precursor to other complications, irrespective of whether oxygen supplementation was used. PMID:25518030

  1. Incidence of postoperative wound infections after open tendo Achilles repairs

    PubMed Central

    Marican, Mohd Mizan; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung; Rikhraj, Inderjeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Tendo Achilles (TA), which is the confluence of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, is one of the most commonly injured tendons. The surgical repair of TA ruptures is associated with a significant risk of infection. This study examined several factors (i.e. gender, age, body mass index, history of diabetes mellitus, steroid use, acute or chronic TA injuries, type of surgical incision and type of sutures used) that may be associated with postoperative wound infection after open TA repair. METHODS This was a retrospective study involving 60 patients who underwent open TA repair over an 18-month period. Patients who had prior TA surgery or open TA injuries, or who needed soft tissues flaps were excluded. RESULTS Among the patients, 7 (11.7%) developed superficial wound infections that were successfully treated with oral antibiotics, while 3 (5.0%) developed deep wound infections that required at least one debridement procedure. No significant association was found between the risk of postoperative wound infection and gender, age, the presence of diabetes mellitus, acute or chronic ruptures, site of surgical incision and type of deep or superficial sutures used. CONCLUSION While diabetes mellitus and age did not appear to be associated with postoperative wound infections after open TA repair, obese patients were found to be two times more likely to develop a wound infection than normal-weight patients. The incidence of superficial wound infections in this study was similar to previously published results (11.7% vs. 8.2%14.6%), but the incidence of deep infections was higher (5% vs. 1%2%). PMID:26512146

  2. Abductor digiti minimi muscle flap transfer to prevent wound healing complications after ORIF of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Liang; Huang, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Sheng; Zhu, Tao; Lin, Chu; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the transfer of abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle flaps as a method for preventing wound healing complications in cases of closed calcaneal fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Method: Design: Retrospective review. Patients: Twenty-six cases of acute closed calcaneal fracture in patients at risk for serious wound complications or with serious fractures. Intervention: During the ORIF surgery, an ADM muscle flap was removed and used to cover the plate, filling the gap between the plate and skin. Main Outcome Measures: Wound healing rates, postoperative complications, and time to heal. Results: All wounds healed uneventfully, except for one case of minor superficial epithelial necrosis during the early postoperative period, which was treated conservatively. All patients regained ambulatory status with regular foot apparel. At last follow-up, the patients presented no clinical, laboratory, or radiological signs of complications. Conclusions: This ADM muscle flap transfer technique appeared to successfully prevent wound healing complications among patients undergoing ORIF for closed calcaneal fractures. This method offers a promising treatment option for calcaneal fractures in patients at high risk for serious wound complications, and future studies with greater numbers of cases are needed to further investigate its clinical application. PMID:26550221

  3. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

  4. Partial closure of skin wounds after kidney transplantation decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections.

    PubMed

    Siskind, Eric; Huntoon, Kristin; Shah, Kavin; Villa, Manuel; Blood, A J; Lumerman, Leandro; Fishbane, Lara; Goncharuk, Edwin; Oropallo, Alisha; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sachdeva, Mala; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Calderon, Kellie; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto P

    2012-06-01

    Wound infections are a major cause of morbidity after kidney transplantation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate an improved technique of wound closure. Data corresponding to 104 consecutive live donor kidney recipients were prospectively collected and analyzed. Our routine standard technique involved closure of the abdominal wall muscle and fascia in one layer with interrupted nonabsorbable full thickness sutures. No drains were used. The skin was closed with interrupted 2-0 nylon sutures 4 to 5 cm apart, leaving the skin and subcutaneous tissue in between partially open. Patients were allowed to shower starting on the first postoperative day. Examination of the wounds was continued for at least 1?month postoperatively, and then routinely as needed. All patients were thoroughly informed preoperatively of our technique. There were no immediate postoperative wound infections. There were no instances of dehiscence, evisceration, or need for revision. All patients were able to continue with their routine daily activities. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in all cases. We did not experience any patient complaints with respect to our technique. Patient satisfaction scores conducted by Press Ganey and Associates ranked in the 99 percentile with respect to peers undergoing kidney transplantation. Three patients returned six months postoperatively with suture granulomas which were treated nonoperatively. Partial closure of the skin wound with no associated drains is an effective and cosmetically desirable way to decrease the incidence of postoperative infections in kidney transplantation. PMID:23730135

  5. Partial Closure of Skin Wounds after Kidney Transplantation Decreases the Incidence of Postoperative Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Eric; Huntoon, Kristin; Shah, Kavin; Villa, Manuel; Blood, A.J.; Lumerman, Leandro; Fishbane, Lara; Goncharuk, Edwin; Oropallo, Alisha; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sachdeva, Mala; Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Calderon, Kellie; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto P.

    2012-01-01

    Wound infections are a major cause of morbidity after kidney transplantation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate an improved technique of wound closure. Data corresponding to 104 consecutive live donor kidney recipients were prospectively collected and analyzed. Our routine standard technique involved closure of the abdominal wall muscle and fascia in one layer with interrupted nonabsorbable full thickness sutures. No drains were used. The skin was closed with interrupted 20 nylon sutures 4 to 5 cm apart, leaving the skin and subcutaneous tissue in between partially open. Patients were allowed to shower starting on the first postoperative day. Examination of the wounds was continued for at least 1?month postoperatively, and then routinely as needed. All patients were thoroughly informed preoperatively of our technique. There were no immediate postoperative wound infections. There were no instances of dehiscence, evisceration, or need for revision. All patients were able to continue with their routine daily activities. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in all cases. We did not experience any patient complaints with respect to our technique. Patient satisfaction scores conducted by Press Ganey and Associates ranked in the 99 percentile with respect to peers undergoing kidney transplantation. Three patients returned six months postoperatively with suture granulomas which were treated nonoperatively. Partial closure of the skin wound with no associated drains is an effective and cosmetically desirable way to decrease the incidence of postoperative infections in kidney transplantation. PMID:23730135

  6. Porcine xenograft biosynthetic wound dressings for the management of postoperative Mohs wounds.

    PubMed

    Raimer, David W; Group, Ashley R; Petitt, Matthew S; Nosrati, Neda; Yamazaki, Mika L; Davis, Nathan A; Kelly, Brent C; Gibson, Bernard R; Montilla, Richard D; Wagner, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Cadaveric allografts and a large variety of other biologic dressings have been reported as being useful for the postoperative management of Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) wounds. Although the use of porcine xenografts for the immediate postoperative management of these wounds is known, their use has not been detailed in the dermatology literature. A case series of 15 consecutive Mohs micrographic surgery patients (mean age = 74.9 years, range = 49 to 89 years) with wounds initially managed with porcine xenografts is described. Porcine xenografts were useful in a variety of clinical settings following MMS. These included: (1) wound management when tumor margins were indeterminate pending additional dermatopathology studies and (2) wound management when there are issues such as through and through nasal defects involving the mucosa, large wound depth, exposed cartilage and or bone, or patient medical comorbidities that delay or prevent plans for immediate wound reconstruction. Future controlled studies of biologic dressings are needed to determine which options are best for micrographic surgery wounds. Comparisons should also include the traditional option of second intention healing without biologic dressings. PMID:21971266

  7. Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Erdem, ?evki; Mermerkaya, Musa U?ur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections. Materials and methods The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation) was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females) out of 317 (209 females; 108 males) were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 919) and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections. Results The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89%) patients (females) out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males) at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 38) irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 1216) months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks. Conclusion The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections. PMID:25565903

  8. Complications of equine wound management and dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R Reid

    2008-12-01

    Complications of wounds and cosmetic surgery can be accurately managed with a combination of timely surgical and medical intervention to ensure the best possible outcome. The lack of soft tissue protection and a large quantity of susceptible synovial, tendon, ligament, and neurovascular structures make early and meticulous evaluation of limb wounds critical. Skin grafting is usually used following a period of open wound management and after healthy granulation tissue formation. Penetrating wounds of the abdomen or thorax have a guarded prognosis resulting from the ensuing potential for infection and pneumothorax. Gunshot wounds limited to the skeletal muscles have a good prognosis, whereas injuries that involve vital organs decreased survivability. PMID:19203707

  9. High Rates of Postoperative Wound Infection Following Elective Implant Removal

    PubMed Central

    Backes, M; Schep, N.W.L; Luitse, J.S.K; Goslings, J.C; Schepers, T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Metal implants placed during fracture surgery are often removed for various reasons (i.e. pain, prominent material, patients request). The removal of implants is considered a ‘clean’ procedure and as low risk surgery. The incidence of wound infections following implant removal has received little attention in the literature. The aim of the current study was to assess the incidence and risk factors of postoperative wound infections (POWIs) following implant removal. Material and Methods : All consecutive adult patients in a Level 1 and Level 2 Trauma Center who had their implants removed during a 6.5 years period were included. Exclusion criteria were removal of implants because of an ongoing infection or fistula and removal followed by placement of new implants. Primary outcome measure was a POWI as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patient characteristics and peri-operative characteristics were collected from the medical charts. Results : A total of 452 patients were included (512 procedures). The overall POWI rate was 11.6% (10% superficial, 1.6% deep). A total of 403 procedures (78.7%) comprised of implant removal below the knee joint with a 12.2% POWI rate. A POWI following initial fracture treatment was associated with a higher rate of POWI following implant removal (p=0.012). A POWI occurred more often in younger patients (median age 36 versus 43 years; p=0.004). Conclusion : The overall incidence of postoperative wound infection was 11.6% with 10% superficial and 1.6% of deep infections in patients with elective implant removal. A risk factor for POWI following implant removal was a previous wound infection. PMID:26401166

  10. Postoperative wound care after dermatologic procedures: a comparison of 2 commonly used petrolatum-based ointments.

    PubMed

    Morales-Burgos, Adisbeth; Loosemore, Michael P; Goldberg, Leonard H

    2013-02-01

    An appropriate selection of topical agents for wound care is important to promote uncomplicated healing. Petrolatum-based ointments, such as Aquaphor Healing Ointment (AHO) and white petroleum jelly, are commonly employed to keep wounds moist postoperatively. While they have beneficial properties for wound healing, they also may cause wound redness and swelling. We decided to evaluate for wound reactivity postoperatively for these 2 commonly used petrolatum-based ointments. We found that surgical wounds treated with AHO had a higher incidence of wound redness (52%) than those treated with plain white petrolatum (12%). PMID:23377388

  11. [Total rhegmatogenous retinal detachment - late postoperative complication].

    PubMed

    Stefaniu, I; Ionic?, N; Ni??, N; Ni?ulescu, C; Chiril?, D; Zamfir, C

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a pacient operated for organized hemoftalmus after central retinal vein thrombosis (total vitrectomy) and whom five days after surgery a macular hole was observed and internal indendation with gas was performed. Postoperative evolution was good. Two months after surgery the pacient returns with cvasitotal regmatogen retinal detachment. The possible causes in bringing about of the retinal detachment in this case will be discussed as well as the factors that condition the success in posterior pole surgery. PMID:11392836

  12. [Use of leukinferon for prophylaxis of pyogenic complications in victims with thoracic wounds].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Abakumov, M M; Druzenko, O A; Markova, O A; Pogodina, A N; Khvatov, V B

    1999-01-01

    The results of treatment of 131 victims with penetrating wounds of the thorax complicated by profuse bleeding, are presented. 36 of them after surgery to prevent pyogenous complications received 5 injections of leukinferon (test group); 95 patients who were not treated by leukinferon made up control group comparable with the test group by sex, age and character of wounds. Comparative analysis of the results showed that treatment with leukinferon has resulted in decrease of postoperative complications. In the test group the number of complications made up 47.2%, in control group--61%. Al the same time in the former group there was only one pyogenous complication (2.9%), while in control group--10 (10.6%). After the course of leukinferon leucocytic formula of the blood has become normal, the number of patients with immunodeficiency and imbalance of proteins markers of the acuteness of inflammatory process has decreased. PMID:10459185

  13. Increased postoperative complications after protective ileostomy closure delay: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Perez, Ines; Leon, Miguel; Pastor, Daniel; Diaz Dominguez, Joaquin; Cantero, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the morbidity and complications associated to ileostomy reversal in colorectal surgery patients, and if these are related to the time of closure. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 93 patients, who had undergone elective ileostomy closure between 2009 and 2013 was performed. Demographic, clinical and surgical variables were reviewed for analysis. All complications were recorded, and classified according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification. Statistical univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, setting a P value of 0.05 for significance. RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of 60.3 years, 58% male. The main procedure for ileostomy creation was rectal cancer (56%), and 37% had received preoperative chemo-radiotherapy. The average delay from creation to closure of the ileostomy was 10.3 mo. Postoperative complications occurred in 40% of the patients, with 1% mortality. The most frequent were ileus (13%) and wound infection (13%). Pseudomembranous colitis appeared in 4%. Increased postoperative complications were associated with delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.041). Male patients had more complications (P = 0.042), mainly wound infections (P = 0.007). Pseudomembranous colitis was also associated with the delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.003). End-to-end intestinal anastomosis without resection was significantly associated with postoperative ileus (P = 0.037). CONCLUSION: Although closure of a protective ileostomy is a fairly common surgical procedure, it has a high rate of complications, and this must be taken into account when the indication is made. The delay in stoma closure can increase the rate of complications in general, and specifically wound infections and colitis. PMID:25276286

  14. Postoperative Complications in Craniomaxillofacial Reconstruction With Medpor.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Ferreira, Ana Carulina Rezende; Muoz, Xiomara Mnica Johanna Palacio; Okamoto, Roberta; Pellizer, Eduardo Piza; Garcia, Idelmo Rangel

    2016-03-01

    Bone reconstruction in craniofacial surgery is a challenge for surgeons, who most commonly adopt the autogenous bone grafting and alloplastic implants in such procedures. Among the alloplastic materials, the high-density porous polyethylene is highlighted-Medpor (Medpor, Porex Surgical Inc, Newman, GA), considered to be pure polyethylene, with only 1 manufacturing process and standard pore size. The purpose of the current study has been to present through a review of literature and the types of complications derived from the use of Medpor in craniomaxillofacial bone surgery. A specific and sensitive database was initially created via PubMed, focusing on studies published in English peer-reviewed journals between 2004 and 2014, including case reports, experimental studies in humans, and prospective and retrospective studies. Forty articles were found at PubMed database. After analyzing their abstracts, 19 were selected, totaling 1453 patients and 121 complications, being the most commonly reported diplopia with 56 patients and infection with 6 patients. Most of the complications reported in the articles used for the development of the current review are not directly related to the use of the Medpor implant. The only complications directly related to the use of this biomaterial were cases of infection. PMID:26963299

  15. Pancreaticoduodenectomy: expected post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, L P; Hoare, S M; O'Neill, A C; Awan, F N; Malone, D E; Ryan, E R; McCann, J W; Heffernan, E J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is a complex, high-risk surgical procedure performed for tumours of the pancreatic head and other periampullary structures. The rate of perioperative mortality has decreased in the past number of years but perioperative morbidity remains high. This pictorial review illustrates expected findings in early and late post-operative periods, including mimickers of pathology. It aims to familiarize radiologists with the imaging appearances of common and unusual post-operative complications. These are classified into early non-vascular complications such as delayed gastric emptying, post-operative collections, pancreatic fistulae and bilomas; late non-vascular complications, for example, biliary strictures and hepatic abscesses; and vascular complications including haemorrhage and ischaemia. Options for minimally invasive image-guided management of vascular and non-vascular complications are discussed. Familiarity with normal anatomic findings is essential in order to distinguish expected post-operative change from surgical complications or recurrent disease. This review summarizes the normal and abnormal radiological findings following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25026968

  16. Wound healing complications in brain tumor patients on Bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark R; Mandel, Jacob; O-Brien, Barbara; Conrad, Charles; Fields, Margaret; Hanna, Teresa; Loch, Carolyn; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-09-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is commonly used for treating recurrent glioblastoma (GBM), and wound healing is a well-established adverse event. Retrospective analysis of GBM patients with and without wound healing complications while on BEV treatment is reported. 287 patients identified, majority were males (60%) with median age of 52.5years. 14 cases identified with wound healing problems, related to either craniotomy (n=8) or other soft tissue wounds (n=6). Median duration of BEV treatment to complication was 62days (range 6-559). Majority received 10mg/kg (n=11) and nine (64.3%) were on corticosteroids, with median daily dose of 6mg (range 1-16mg) for median of 473days before starting BEV. For dehisced craniotomy wounds, median time for starting BEV from last surgery was 29days (range 27-345). Median time from starting BEV to developing wound complication was 47days (range 16-173). Seven (87.5%) had infected wounds requiring antibiotics, hospitalization. Four (50%) required plastic surgery. BEV stopped and safely resumed in 6 (75%) patients; median delay was 70days (range 34-346). Soft tissue wounds included decubitus ulcer, dehisced striae, herpes simplex, trauma to hand and back, and abscess. Median time from starting BEV to wound issues was 72days (range 6-559). Five (83.3%) were infected, requiring antibiotics. While three (50%) required hospitalization, none required plastic surgery. Treatment stopped in five (83.3%) and restarted in two (median delay 48days, range 26-69). Wound healing complications are uncommon but associated with significant morbidity. Identifying those at risk and contributing factors warrants further investigation. PMID:26298437

  17. Effects of immediate postoperative enteral nutrition on body composition, muscle function, and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, D; Gillanders, L; Mahr, K; Hill, G L

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-two patients undergoing bowel resection were randomized to receive either immediate postoperative nasojejunal feeding with full strength Osmolite solution for 56 hours (n = 16) or routine postoperative hypocaloric fluids and gradual reintroduction of diet (n = 16). Body composition changes were measured at 14 days after operation with in vivo neutron activation analysis, the wound healing response by subcutaneous implantation of Gortex tubes, and muscle function by grip strength, maximum ventilatory volume, and stimulation of the ulnar nerve at the wrist. Postoperative fatigue up to 3 months after operation was assessed using a 10-point analogue. Successful immediate enteral nutrition was established in 12 of the 16 patients. Enterally fed patients had a mean daily caloric intake of 1179 +/- 388 kcal/d (mean +/- SD) over the first 4 postoperative days compared with 382 +/- 71 kcal/d for the controls (p less than 0.0001). The amount of hydroxyproline accumulating in the Gortex tubes was also significantly greater (2.5 +/- 1.1 nmol/g tube vs 1.5 +/- 0.8 nmol/g tube; p less than 0.02). However, the amount and composition of the weight lost was not significantly different. Muscle function was not preserved, and postoperative fatigue occurred to an equal extent in both groups. Complications were similar in both groups, except for a preponderance of bowel obstructions in the controls. The time to passage of first flatus and first bowel motion, although shorter in the fed group, did not reach significance (p = 0.07). We conclude that immediate enteral nutrition is feasible and results in an improved wound healing response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1910100

  18. [Application of Opsite at donor sites, burns and postoperative wounds (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cavlak, Y

    1980-12-01

    The article reports on the Opsite foil and its properties. This is a film consisting of polyurethane which is permeable to gas and water vapour. Prolonged skin contact does not produce an allergic reaction. The wound becomes rapidly covered with an epithelium. Opsite is an extremely successful dressing for covering donor areas and wounds from burns, as well as postoperative wounds. PMID:6116406

  19. Risk factors for postoperative complications following oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; OHTA, Kouji; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to clarify significant risk factors for postoperative complications in the oral cavity in patients who underwent oral surgery, excluding those with oral cancer. Material and Methods This study reviewed the records of 324 patients who underwent mildly to moderately invasive oral surgery (e.g., impacted tooth extraction, cyst excision, fixation of mandibular and maxillary fractures, osteotomy, resection of a benign tumor, sinus lifting, bone grafting, removal of a sialolith, among others) under general anesthesia or intravenous sedation from 2012 to 2014 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Hiroshima University Hospital. Results Univariate analysis showed a statistical relationship between postoperative complications (i.e., surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) and diabetes (p=0.033), preoperative serum albumin level (p=0.009), and operation duration (p=0.0093). Furthermore, preoperative serum albumin level (<4.0 g/dL) and operation time (?120 minutes) were found to be independent factors affecting postoperative complications in multiple logistic regression analysis results (odds ratio 3.82, p=0.0074; odds ratio 2.83, p=0.0086, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicate that a low level of albumin in serum and prolonged operation duration are important risk factors for postoperative complications occurring in the oral cavity following oral surgery. PMID:26398515

  20. [Fibrin adhesion and postoperative anti-fibrinolytic care of conjunctival wounds].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, W; Stemberger, A; Blmel, G; Leydhecker, W

    1984-03-01

    The closure of conjunctival wounds by means of the fibrin adhesive technique has been reported by several authors; however, the clinical results were only partially satisfactory. Premature clot lysis resulted in disturbances of wound healing. These observations were corroborated by our the present authors' findings. Investigations of the proteolytic and fibrinolytic activity of aqueous humor and the lacrimal fluid revealed no activity in the aqueous humor, but significant activity in the lacrimal fluid. These findings indicated that proteolytic activity is responsible for the rapid dissolution of the fibrin clot after contact with tears. Stimulated by these findings, the present authors developed a topically applicable antifibrinolytic postoperative treatment based on eye drops containing Aprotinin (Trasylol). This technique has been applied in 3 patients so far and has resulted in stabilization of the fibrin clot until the wound has healed sufficiently. This cure is recommended for closure of conjunctival fistulas following glaucoma surgery, as well as for conjunctival wounds and partially dehiscent corneoscleral sections. It is noted that suturing of the latter is often complicated by scars or atrophy of the tissue. PMID:6202928

  1. Association between postoperative thromboembolism prophylaxis and complications following urological surgery

    PubMed Central

    CERRUTO, MARIA ANGELA; D'ELIA, CAROLINA; PICCOLI, MARCO; CACCIAMANI, GIOVANNI; DE MARCHI, DAVIDE; CORSI, PAOLO; DE MARCO, VINCENZO; CAVALLERI, STEFANO; ARTIBANI, WALTER

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolism represents the most significant complication and cause of non-surgical mortality in major urological surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the type of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis and the postoperative complication rate in a cohort of patients undergoing major urological surgery. All consecutive patients treated with major urological surgery between December 2011 and March 2013 were evaluated. For each patient, clinical and demographic data, as well as information on the post-surgical complications and the type of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis, were collected. In total, 453 patients (mean age, 63.3612.05 years) were recruited (43.5% for prostate surgery, 33.1% for renal surgery, 12.1% for bladder surgery and 11.3% for other surgery). Postoperative blood transfusions were required in 50 cases (11.0%). A total of 32 patients (7.1%) underwent re-intervention due to the occurrence of grade ?3 complications, with a readmission rate of 2.0%. According to the Clavien-Dindo Classification, the complications were grade 1 in 36.0% of the cases, grade 2 in 19.4%, grade 3 in 6.0%, grade 4 in 2.0% and grade 5 (mortality) in 0.7%. Only 1 case of deep venous thrombosis not associated with pulmonary thromboembolism was observed. Univariate analyses showed a significant negative association (higher risk of complications) between the use of >4,000 IU enoxaparin as the thromboembolism prophylaxis and postoperative blood transfusion rate (P=0.045), re-intervention rate (P=0.001) and the occurrence of grade ?3 complications (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between the use of >4,000 IU enoxaparin and both re-intervention rate (P=0.013) and occurrence of grade ?3 complications (P=0.002). High doses of enoxaparin (>4,000 IU) may lead to an increased risk of re-intervention and severe postoperative complications following major urological surgery. Randomised, controlled trials comparing the effect of different types of pharmacological thromboembolism prophylaxis on postoperative complications following major urological surgery are required. PMID:26889233

  2. [Postoperative hemoglobin course and septic complications following stomach resection].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, K; Holtz, J; Horch, R; Schobert, M

    1987-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin curves were studied in male patients, following two-third gastrectomy. A group with early septic complications was compared to one without. The groups were comparable for age distribution and pathological patterns (ulcer/gastric stenosis and carcinoma). Preoperative haemoglobin mean values were a the lower normal limit and dropped to 10.8 g/dl in the group with complications on the fifth day from surgery, but stayed constant at 12 g/dl in the control group, as of the second postoperative day. Haemoglobin dropped to mean values around 11 g/dl immediately after surgery in patients with severe complications, such as suture dehiscence. All groups deviated clearly from normal Hb. PMID:3591049

  3. Complications associated with bacitracin powder in surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Joshua M; Amankwah, Ernest K; Tetreault, Lisa L; Perlman, Sharon A; Tuite, Gerald F

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There has been renewed interest in the application of concentrated antibiotic powder to surgical wounds as a method to decrease infection rates. While there is substantial medical literature describing the effectiveness and complications associated with vancomycin and gentamycin powders, very little has been reported regarding the safety and effectiveness of bacitracin powder in surgical wounds. In this paper the authors report their detailed analysis of potential bacitracin powder-related complications in a population of pediatric patients who underwent shunt surgery. METHODS A detailed retrospective analysis was completed of all CSF shunt surgeries performed by the corresponding author at a large children's hospital between 2001 and 2013. This cohort consisted of many patients who were the subject of a previous report that showed the use of bacitracin powder in shunt wounds potentially decreased infection rates. Data were collected regarding the most common known complications of bacitracin, i.e., anaphylaxis, wound healing difficulties, and renal dysfunction. Data were stratified by typical demographic, medical, and surgical variables, including whether bacitracin powder was applied to wounds prior to closure. RESULTS A total of 597 patients were reviewed in the analysis: 389 underwent surgery without bacitracin powder and 208 had concentrated bacitracin powder applied to the wounds prior to closure. The application of bacitracin powder was not associated with anaphylaxis (n = 0 both groups) or with an increase in wound breakdown (n = 5 in the control group, n = 0 in the bacitracin powder group) or renal dysfunction (creatinine/estimated glomerular filtration rate) using both comparative and multivariate analyses between the 2 groups. The sample size evaluating renal function was significantly lower (range 6-320) than that of anaphylaxis and wound breakdown analysis because only clinical values acquired during the routine care of these patients were available for analysis. The only significant difference in demographics was the more frequent use of intrathecal vancomycin and gentamycin in patients who received bacitracin powder (n = 1 for controls, n = 21 for bacitracin powder). In the multivariate analysis, only 1 factor, surgery performed on a premature infant within the first 3 months of life, was independently associated with a change in creatinine at 3 months (creatinine decreased by 0.18) compared with the level before surgery (p < 0.0001). Bacitracin powder was not a significant factor. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to systematically analyze the potential complications of concentrated bacitracin powder applied to surgical wounds. The use of topical bacitracin powder in CSF shunt wounds was not associated with anaphylaxis, wound breakdown, or renal dysfunction. Further study using standardized protocols is necessary before widespread use can be recommended. PMID:26382180

  4. Postoperative metabolic and nutritional complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Koch, Timothy R; Finelli, Frederick C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly important method for management of medically complicated obesity. In patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, up to 87% with type 2 diabetes mellitus develop improvement or resolution of their disease postoperatively. Bariatric surgery can reduce the number of absorbed calories through performance of either a restrictive or a malabsorptive procedure. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery require indefinite, regular follow-up care by physicians who need to follow laboratory parameters of macronutrient as well as micronutrient malnutrition. Physicians who care for patients after bariatric surgery need to be familiar with common postoperative syndromes that result from specific nutrient deficiencies. PMID:20202584

  5. Postoperative wound dealing and superficial surgical site infection in open radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Fukashi; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamashita, Mauso; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soishi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-09-01

    The number of open radical prostatectomy (RP) surgeries has been decreasing owing to the spread of laparoscopic and robotic surgery, which has implications for postoperative wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate and document the current status of postoperative wound healing and superficial surgical site infection (SSI) in open RPs. One hundred and seventy-five antegrade RPs with the same or similar kinds of prophylactic antibiotic administration were divided into two groups: (i) 'no intervention' (wound covering group) and (ii) 'washing', using a washing solution from the second postoperative day to the day of skin staple removal (wound washing group). We compared these groups for the occurrence of superficial SSI. The wound covering group had three (303%) cases of superficial SSI, with one case caused by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). The wound washing group had nine (118%) cases of superficial SSI, with three cases caused by MSSA, two cases caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and one by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The wound covering group showed a significantly lower ratio of superficial SSI (P?=?00472). In conclusion, the postoperative wound status data in this study suggests that no wound intervention after RP resulted in a comparatively lower ratio of superficial SSI than in the wound washing group. PMID:25186077

  6. Imaging of bariatric surgery: normal anatomy and postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Carucci, Laura R

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions in the United States and around the world. During the past 2 decades, bariatric surgery has become an increasingly popular form of treatment for morbid obesity. The most common bariatric procedures performed include laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal examinations and abdominal computed tomography (CT) are the major imaging tests used to evaluate patients after these various forms of bariatric surgery. The purpose of this article is to present the surgical anatomy and normal imaging findings and postoperative complications for these bariatric procedures at fluoroscopic examinations and CT. Complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass include anastomotic leaks and strictures, marginal ulcers, jejunal ischemia, small bowel obstruction, internal hernias, intussusception, and recurrent weight gain. Complications after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding include stomal stenosis, malpositioned bands, pouch dilation, band slippage, perforation, gastric volvulus, intraluminal band erosion, and port- and band-related problems. Finally, complications after sleeve gastrectomy include postoperative leaks and strictures, gastric dilation, and gastroesophageal reflux. The imaging features of these various complications of bariatric surgery are discussed and illustrated. PMID:24471382

  7. Use of intraoperative indocyanin-green angiography to minimize wound healing complications in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Bhanot, Parag; Franklin, Brenton; Albino, Frank; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2013-12-01

    Complication rates following abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) remain high. Early complications are related to skin necrosis and delayed healing, whereas late complications are related to recurrence. When concomitant body contouring procedures are performed, complication rates can be further increased. It is hypothesised that fluorescent angiography using indocyanin green (ICG) can identify poorly perfused tissues and thus reduce the incidence of delayed healing. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent AWR with concomitant panniculectomy from 2007-2012. Intraoperative ICG angiography with the SPY system (LifeCell Corp.) was used to determine the amount of resection for body contouring in patients who underwent reconstruction in a cohort of patients. SPY-Q was used to assess relative perfusion of analysed areas. Preoperative, postoperative, and operative details were analyzed. Seventeen patients met inclusion criteria, 12 patients were included in the non-ICG cohort, while five patients were included in the ICG cohorts. Wound-healing complications occurred in 5/12 (42%) patients in the non-ICG cohort vs 1/5 (20%) of the ICG cohorts. A description of the sole patient with complications in the ICG cohort is illustrated. Operative debridement and wound infection development occurred more frequently in the non-ICG cohort compared with the ICG cohort (17%, 17% vs 0%, 0%, respectively). Average time to wound healing was 41.1 days. Intraoperative ICG angiography can accurately detect perfusion abnormalities and can decrease wound healing related complications in complex hernia repair with concomitant panniculectomy. Assessing and ensuring skin viability can decrease the need for operative debridement. PMID:23596988

  8. The chain of postoperative complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Mehmet; Gnen, Murat; Al??, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct injuries are among the most dreadful complications of cholecystectomy. As laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become increasingly popular, the incidence of this complication increased and has remained unchanged in spite the learning curve being completed. A 50-year-old female underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstone disease. A complicated bile duct injury occurred during the procedure. As the injury was immediately recognized, it was treated with concomitant hepaticojejunostomy. In the postoperative period, biliary fistula, which was assumed to be the result of an anastomotic leak, was encountered. Diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was considered. It revealed that the anastomosis was intact and the source of biliary leak was an aberrant right posterior sectorial branch. A severe bleeding through the biliary catheter occurred due to transmigration of the catheter into the portal vein. Bleeding was controlled with embolization by the interventional radiologist. The patient thereafter was re-operated, and the leakage was sealed by ligation of the aberrant right posterior sectorial branch. The postoperative period was uneventful. As long as cholecystectomy is performed, bile duct injuries will always exist. Therefore, every abdominal surgeon should be aware of possible consequences of complications related to this procedure. PMID:25931907

  9. Convergent validity of three methods for measuring postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley A; Escallier, Krisztina E; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Oberhaus, Jordan; Becker, Jennifer; Geczi, Kristin; McKinnon, Sherry; Helsten, Dan L; Sharma, Anshuman; Wildes, Troy S; Avidan, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background Anesthesiologists need tools to accurately track postoperative outcomes. The accuracy of patient report in identifying a wide variety of postoperative complications following diverse surgical procedures has not previously been investigated. Methods In this cohort study, 1578 adult surgical patients completed a survey at least 30 days after their procedure asking if they had experienced any of 18 complications while in the hospital after surgery. Patient responses were compared to the results of an automated electronic chart review and (for a random subset of 750 patients) to a manual chart review. Results from automated chart review were also compared to those from manual chart review. Forty-two randomly selected patients were contacted by telephone to explore reasons for discrepancies between patient report and manual chart review. Results Comparisons between patient report, automated chart review, and manual chart review demonstrated poor-to-moderate positive agreement (range 0% to 58%) and excellent negative agreement (range 82% to 100%). Discordance between patient report and manual chart review were was frequently explicable by patients reporting events that happened outside the time period of interest. Conclusions Patient report can provide information about subjective experiences or events that happen after hospital discharge, but often yields different results from chart review for specific in-hospital complications. Effective in-hospital communication with patients and thoughtful survey design may increase the quality of patient-reported complication data. This is a substudy of the SATISFY-SOS surgical outcomes registry (NCT02032030). PMID:17992699

  10. Non-Activated Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma for the Prevention of Inguinal Wound-Related Complications After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Saratzis, Nikolaos; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) usually involves the surgical exposure and catheterization of the femoral arteries. Several inguinal surgical wound-related complications have been reported postoperatively. The aim of this report was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intraoperative application of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the prevention of wound-related complications in AAA EVAR. The authors conducted a patient- and assessor-blinded controlled trial involving 100 subjects undergoing EVAR of an AAA. PRP was produced using an autologous platelet separator and was applied, without prior thrombin activation, in 50 patients eligible for inclusion. The results were compared with a control group of 50 patients who underwent AAA EVAR within the same time period. The primary outcome was the difference in postoperative hospital stay. Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of wound healing and wound-related complications. Age, sex, and other comorbidities related to wound healing were not significantly different between cases and controls. One patient treated with PRP developed a unilateral wound infection with lymphorrhea, and two patients developed a bi-lateral superficial infection. Twelve patients within the control group developed a wound-related complication. The postoperative hospitalization was significantly lower in the PRP group. The overall surgical wound-related complications rate was also significantly lower in the PRP group. Application of non-thrombin-activated PRP seems to prevent major postoperative wound-related complications (p = .026) and shorten postoperative hospital stay duration after femoral artery exposure and catheterization for AAA EVAR (mean, 4.48 0.48 vs. 6.14 0.39 days). PMID:18389665

  11. Pyoderma Gangrenosum in Two Successive Pregnancies Complicating Caesarean Wound

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sapna Vinit; Bajapai, Neha; Pai, Ashwini; Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare ulcerative cutaneous disorder with tendency to recur in the injured area. Though most of the time is associated with chronic systemic conditions, it can occur in isolation and can be a diagnostic dilemma. The aetiology is poorly understood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and excluding other causes of skin ulcers, as it does not have characteristic histopathology or laboratory findings. Lesions can develop after surgery, after trauma or de novo. We are reporting a 32-year-old pregnant lady with two previous instances of pyoderma gangrenosum in the previous pregnancy, who in postoperative period following caesarean section developed the same condition for the third time. She responded well to local wound care, oral Prednisolone, and Dapsone and made a good recovery. Pregnancy being an immunologically altered status can play a role in development of pyoderma gangrenosum and one should always rule out its possibility when there is a delayed wound healing. PMID:24707419

  12. Pyoderma gangrenosum in two successive pregnancies complicating caesarean wound.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sapna Vinit; Bajapai, Neha; Pai, Ashwini; Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare ulcerative cutaneous disorder with tendency to recur in the injured area. Though most of the time is associated with chronic systemic conditions, it can occur in isolation and can be a diagnostic dilemma. The aetiology is poorly understood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and excluding other causes of skin ulcers, as it does not have characteristic histopathology or laboratory findings. Lesions can develop after surgery, after trauma or de novo. We are reporting a 32-year-old pregnant lady with two previous instances of pyoderma gangrenosum in the previous pregnancy, who in postoperative period following caesarean section developed the same condition for the third time. She responded well to local wound care, oral Prednisolone, and Dapsone and made a good recovery. Pregnancy being an immunologically altered status can play a role in development of pyoderma gangrenosum and one should always rule out its possibility when there is a delayed wound healing. PMID:24707419

  13. Retropubic Versus Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeman; Kwon, Taekmin; Kyung, Yoon Soo; Hong, Sungwoo; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) with those of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) performed by a single surgeon for the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The postoperative complications of 341 patients who underwent RRP and 524 patients who underwent RALP for prostate cancer at the Asan Medical Center between July 2007 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and compared. Complications were classified according to the modified Clavien classification system. Results RALP was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay (mean, 7.9 days vs. 10.1 days, p<0.001) and duration of urethral catheterization (6.2 days vs. 7.5 days, p<0.001) than RRP. Major complications (Clavien grade III-IV) were less common in the RALP group than in the RRP group (3.4% vs. 7.6%, p=0.006). There were no significant differences in medical complications between procedures. Considering surgical complications, urinary retention (7.0% vs. 2.7%, p=0.002) and wound repair (4.1% vs. 0.2%, p<0.001) were more common after RRP than after RALP. Extravasation of contrast medium during cystography was more common in the RRP group than in the RALP group (10.0% vs. 2.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions RALP is associated with a lower complication rate than RRP. PMID:24255757

  14. Exploring the Frontier of Electronic Health Record Surveillance: The Case of Post-Operative Complications

    PubMed Central

    FitzHenry, Fern; Murff, Harvey J.; Matheny, Michael E.; Gentry, Nancy; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Brown, Steven H; Reeves, Ruth M; Aronsky, Dominik; Elkin, Peter L.; Messina, Vincent P.; Speroff, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to build electronic algorithms using a combination of structured data and natural language processing (NLP) of text notes for potential safety surveillance of nine post-operative complications. Methods Post-operative complications from six medical centers in the Southeastern United States were obtained from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) registry. Development and test datasets were constructed using stratification by facility and date of procedure for patients with and without complication. Algorithms were developed from VASQIP outcome definitions using NLP coded concepts, regular expressions, and structured data. The VASQIP nurse reviewer served as the reference standard for evaluating sensitivity and specificity. The algorithms were designed in the development and evaluated in the test dataset. Results Sensitivity and specificity in the test set were 85% and 92% for acute renal failure, 80% and 93% for sepsis, 56% and 94% for deep vein thrombosis, 80% and 97% for pulmonary embolism, 88% and 89% for acute myocardial infarction, 88% and 92% for cardiac arrest, 80% and 90% for pneumonia, 95% and 80% for urinary tract infection, and 80% and 93% for wound infection, respectively. A third of the complications occurred outside of the hospital setting. Conclusions Computer algorithms on data extracted from the electronic health record produced respectable sensitivity and specificity across a large sample of patients seen in six different medical centers. This study demonstrates the utility of combining natural language processing with structured data for mining the information contained within the electronic health record. PMID:23673394

  15. Body mass index as a predictor of postoperative complications in loop ileostomy closure after rectal resection in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasufumi; Takakura, Yuji; Hinoi, Takao; Egi, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Ohdan, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    Loop ileostomy is widely employed after low rectal anastomosis to prevent pelvic sepsis from anastomotic leakage. However, stoma closure carries a risk of morbidity and even mortality in some cases. It is important to assess complications after stoma closure for maximizing the benefit of making loop ileostomy. The aim of this study was to review and examine the possible risk factors associated with complications after closure of loop ileostomies. A retrospective analysis, which focused on risk factors for complications after surgery, was performed for 82 consecutive patients who underwent elective closure of loop ileostomy from 2005-2012 at Hiroshima University Hospital. Postoperative complications developed in 22 patients (26.8%): 12 (14.6%) had an ileus, 8 (9.8%) had a wound infection, 2 (2.4%) had an intraperitoneal abscess and 1 had pseudomembranous enterocolitis. There was no postoperative mortality. In univariate analysis, gender and higher body mass index (BMI) were identified as significant risk factors for postoperative complications. After multivariate analysis, a BMI of 24 kg/m2 was identified as the cut-off value, above which significantly higher incidences of postoperative complications were observed. Furthermore, patients who succeeded in reducing their weight (BMI < 24 kg/m2) between the first and second surgeries had less morbidity than patients who remained obese (BMI > 24 kg/m2). Our study showed that the majority of complications associated with ileostomy closure are ileus. A BMI > 24 kg/m2 is an independent risk factor for postoperative complications. Weight loss programs before stoma closure might reduce postoperative complications. PMID:25707091

  16. Modified Mandibulotomy Technique to Reduce Postoperative Complications: 5-Year Results

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hye-Young; Choi, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hyung Jun; Cha, In-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To review the 5-year outcomes of our modified mandibulotomy technique. Retrospective review of a tertiary level oral cancer center. Materials and Methods During a 5-year period, 30 patients who had a uniform surgical technique consisting of a lower lip-splitting, modified stair-step osteotomy with thin saw blade and osteotome after plate-precontouring and combination fixation with monocortical osteosynthesis (miniplate) and bicortical osteosynthesis (maxiplate and bicortical screws), with at least 14 months postoperative follow-up, were selected and reviewed retrospectively. Results There were 8 women and 22 men with an average age of 56.5 years. All the patients involved malignancies were squamous cell carcinoma. The main primary sites of the those who underwent a mandibulotomy were the tonsil, the base of tongue, the oral tongue, the retromolar pad area, and others. Others included buccal cheek, floor of mouth, and soft palate. 23 patients received postoperative radiation therapy, and among whom 8 patients also received chemotherapy. Total four (13%) mandibulotomy-related complications occurred, only two (6.7%) requiring additional operation under general anesthesia. Conclusion Our modified mandibulotomy meets the criteria for an ideal mandibulotomy technique relatively well because it requires no intermaxillary fixation, can precise preserve the occlusion in a precise way, allows early function, requires no secondary procedures, and has few complications. PMID:23918577

  17. Post-operative abdominal complications in Crohn’s disease in the biological era: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waterland, Peter; Athanasiou, Thanos; Patel, Heena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on post-operative complications after surgery for Crohn’s disease (CD) comparing biological with no therapy. METHODS: PubMed, Medline and Embase databases were searched to identify studies comparing post-operative outcomes in CD patients receiving biological therapy and those who did not. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for each outcome measure of interest. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies were included for meta-analysis, comprising a total of 5425 patients with CD 1024 (biological treatment, 4401 control group). After biological therapy there was an increased risk of total infectious complications (OR = 1.52; 95%CI: 1.14-2.03, 8 studies) and wound infection (OR = 1.73; 95%CI: 1.12-2.67; P = 0.01, 7 studies). There was no increased risk for other complications including anastomotic leak (OR = 1.19; 95%CI: 0.82-1.71; P = 0.26), abdominal sepsis (OR = 1.22; 95%CI: 0.87-1.72; P = 0.25) and re-operation (OR = 1.12; 95%CI: 0.81-1.54; P = 0.46) in patients receiving biological therapy. CONCLUSION: Pre-operative use of anti-TNF-α therapy may increase risk of post-operative infectious complications after surgery for CD and in particular wound related infections.

  18. Risk factors for postoperative complication after spinal fusion and instrumentation in degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively few studies have focused on the major medical complications that are more common in older adults. Furthermore, these studies have generally not reported how accurately a risk factor, or combination of risk factors, can distinguish between those who will have a complication and those who will not. Methods A total of 236 consecutive patients who had undergone surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar scoliosis between June 2008 and June 2012 were included retrospectively in this study. The demographic distribution, medical history, and clinical data were collected to investigate the predictive factors of postoperative complications by logistic regression. Results Among 236 eligible patients, major medical complications occurred in 7.2% of cases and wound complications occurred in 1.7% of cases. Ninety-day mortality rate was 0.4%. Postoperative complications were strongly associated with history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (P = 0.031), dyspnea with minimal exertion (P = 0.041), being at least partially dependent (P = 0.041), smoking within the past year (P = 0.044), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of more than 2 (P = 0.000), diabetes treated with insulin (P = 0.003), and steroid use for chronic condition (P = 0.003). In logistic regressions, operation time (odds ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11–4.78), ASA class (class 3 or 4 vs. class 1 or 2: odds ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.22–3.45), insulin-dependent diabetes (odds ratio 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.18–2.43), and steroid use for chronic condition (odds ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.32) may be reasonable predictors for an individual's likelihood of surgical complications. Conclusions The occurrence of postoperative complications is most likely multifactorial and is related to operation time, ASA class, insulin-dependent diabetes and steroid use for chronic condition. PMID:24606963

  19. Post-operative pulmonary complications after non-cardiothoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) occur in 510% of patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery and in 22% of high risk patients. PPCs are broadly defined as conditions affecting the respiratory tract that can adversely influence clinical course of the patient after surgery. Prior risk stratification, risk reduction strategies, performing short duration and/or minimally invasive surgery and use of anaesthetic technique of combined regional with general anaesthesia can reduce the incidence of PPCs. Atelectasis is the main cause of PPCs. Atelectasis can be prevented or treated by adequate analgesia, incentive spirometry (IS), deep breathing exercises, continuous positive airway pressure, mobilisation of secretions and early ambulation. Pre-operative treatment of IS is more effective. The main reason for post-operative pneumonia is aspiration along the channels formed by longitudinal folds in the high volume, low pressure polyvinyl chloride cuffs of the endotracheal tubes. Use of tapered cuff, polyurethane cuffs and selective rather than the routine use of nasogastric tube can decrease chances of aspiration. Acute lung injury is the most serious PPC which may prove fatal. PMID:26556919

  20. Fournier's Gangrene as a Postoperative Complication of Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Sozen, Isa; Yildiz, Baris Dogu; Coskun, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Fournier's gangrene is the necrotizing fasciitis of perianal, genitourinary, and perineal regions. Herein, we present a case of scrotal Fournier's gangrene as a postoperative complication of inguinal hernia repair. A 51-year-old male with giant indirect hernia is presented. Patient underwent inguinal hernia repair, and after an unproblematic recovery period, he was discharged. He applied to our outpatient clinic on the fifth day with swollen and painful scrotum and it turned out to be Fournier's gangrene. Polypropylene mesh was not infected. Patient recovered and was discharged after repeated debridements. Basic principles in treatment of Fournier's gangrene are comprised of initial resuscitation, broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy, and early aggressive debridement. In the management of presented case, aggressive debridement was made right after diagnosis and broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to the hemodynamically stable patient. In these circumstances, the important question is whether we could prevent occurrence of Fournier's gangrene. PMID:25506030

  1. Fournier's Gangrene as a Postoperative Complication of Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Sozen, Isa; Yildiz, Baris Dogu; Coskun, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Fournier's gangrene is the necrotizing fasciitis of perianal, genitourinary, and perineal regions. Herein, we present a case of scrotal Fournier's gangrene as a postoperative complication of inguinal hernia repair. A 51-year-old male with giant indirect hernia is presented. Patient underwent inguinal hernia repair, and after an unproblematic recovery period, he was discharged. He applied to our outpatient clinic on the fifth day with swollen and painful scrotum and it turned out to be Fournier's gangrene. Polypropylene mesh was not infected. Patient recovered and was discharged after repeated debridements. Basic principles in treatment of Fournier's gangrene are comprised of initial resuscitation, broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy, and early aggressive debridement. In the management of presented case, aggressive debridement was made right after diagnosis and broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to the hemodynamically stable patient. In these circumstances, the important question is whether we could prevent occurrence of Fournier's gangrene. PMID:25506030

  2. EXPERIMENTAL-MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF EXPEDIENCY TO USE THE SKIN GLUE "DERMABOND" FOR POSTOPERATIVE WOUND CLOSURE.

    PubMed

    Avetikov, D; Loza, K; Starchenko, I; Loza, E; Marushchak, M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the morphological features of healing of postoperative wounds in the early stages of reparative process in the experiment, depending on the used type of the wound closure. It is proved that the nature and type of the scar depends on the processes that occur in the wound at the early postoperative stage, which in turn greatly affects the form of suture material used. The experiment included 20 male rats, weighing 180-200 g. All rats were anesthetized by a single intraperitoneal injection of sodium thiopental. After the shaving operative field, 2 cm full-thickness incision wound was made on the anterior surface of the abdomen in the longitudinal direction. As suture material for wound closure in the 1st experimental group (10 rats) we used surgical filament "Polyamide 4-0. In the 2nd experimental group (10 rats) wounds were closured by using skin glue "Dermabond". According from our experiment, the usage of skin glue creates better conditions for wound healing. Thus, to achieve a more aesthetic scar, we recommend applying skin glue instead of using nodal joints. PMID:26177141

  3. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patients tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  4. Management of complicated postoperative air-leak - a new indication for the Asherman chest seal.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, Sridhar; Steyn, Richard S

    2007-12-01

    Postoperative air-leak is a problem which is frequently encountered in thoracic surgery. We describe the utility of the Asherman chest seal, a device used in primary trauma care in the successful management of a complicated postoperative air-leak. The Asherman Chest Seal is a sterile occlusive dressing with a one-way Heimlich valve for treating open pneumothorax in acute settings. We used the Asherman chest seal in six patients from July 2001-June 2006 for management of persistent air-leak following thoracic surgical procedures. It was used in three decortication and three pleurectomy patients. There was an equal sex distribution with an age range of 24-67 years. The chest seal was used when drains fell out in the presence of air-leak or wound infection resulting in pneumothorax. All six patients had satisfactory expansion of the lungs with cessation of the air-leak. This was achieved without the pain and morbidity of a chest drain and inpatient stay. The Asherman chest seal is a simple but very useful device that has a role in management of complex air-leaks. PMID:17848400

  5. Topical autologous serum promotes enucleation wound healing in retinoblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Madeline K; Yam, Jason C S; Yu, Christopher B O; Lau, Flora H S

    2015-08-01

    Two retinoblastoma patients underwent uneventful enucleations while undergoing perioperative chemotherapy. In both cases the postoperative course was complicated by poor conjunctival wound healing. Administration of topical autologous serum was associated with wound healing and conjunctivalization of these wounds. PMID:26210027

  6. Incisional Hernia Classification Predicts Wound Complications Two Years after Repair.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ousley, Jenny M; Oyefule, Omobolanle O; Stewart, Melissa K; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2015-07-01

    Classification of ventral hernias (VHs) into categories that impact surgical outcome is not well defined. The European Hernia Society (EHS) classification divides ventral incisional hernias by midline or lateral location. This study aimed to determine whether EHS classification is associated with wound complications after VH repair, indicated by surgical site occurrences (SSOs). A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent VH repair at a tertiary referral center between July 1, 2005 and May 30, 2012, was performed. EHS classification, comorbidities, and operative details were determined. Primary outcome was SSO within two years, defined as an infection, wound dehiscence, seroma, or enterocutaneous fistula. There were 538 patients included, and 51.5 per cent were female, with a mean age of 54.2 12.4 years and a mean body mass index of 32.4 8.6 kg/m(2). Most patients had midline hernias (87.0%, n = 468). There were 47 patients (8.7%) who had a lateral hernia, and 23 patients (4.3%) whose repair included both midline and lateral components. Overall rate of SSO was 39 per cent (n = 211) within two years. The rate of SSO by VH location was: 39 per cent (n = 183) for midline, 23 per cent (n = 11) for lateral, and 74 per cent (n = 17) for VHs with midline and lateral components (P = <0.001). Patients whose midline hernia spanned more than one EHS category also had a higher rate of SSOs (P = 0.001). VHs are often described by transverse dimension alone, but a more descriptive classification system offers a richness that correlates with outcomes. PMID:26140887

  7. Postoperative discal cyst: An unusual complication after microendoscopic discectomy in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Jha, Subash C; Tonogai, Ichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Various complications after microendoscopic discectomy (MED) are well known, but postoperative discal cyst is a unique and relatively unknown complication. Here, we report on two teenage patients who presented with postoperative discal cyst after MED for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP), which resolved after conservative treatment. The patients were diagnosed with HNP at L4-5 and L5-S1 based on MRI and then treated by MED. Postoperative discal cyst was diagnosed on MRI after recurrence of symptoms. Both patients were managed conservatively. T2-weighted MRI demonstrated hyperintense collections adjacent to the operated intervertebral disc level, which were communicating with the corresponding disc annulus. Because the clinical symptoms were relatively mild, the patients were managed conservatively; both made a complete clinical recovery with radiological evidence of improvement. Postoperative discal cyst is a relatively unknown complication after MED for HNP. Surgeons should be aware of this postoperative complication when operating on young individuals with HNP. PMID:26781537

  8. Postoperative Morbidity by Procedure and Patient Factors Influencing Major Complications Within 30 Days Following Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Edward; Iannuzzi, James C.; Thorsness, Robert; Noyes, Katia; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little data are available to prioritize quality improvement initiatives in shoulder surgery. Purpose: To stratify the risk for 30-day postoperative morbidity in commonly performed surgical procedures about the shoulder completed in a hospital setting and to determine patient factors associated with major complications. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This retrospective study utilized the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from the years 2005 to 2010. Using Current Procedural Terminology codes, the database was queried for shoulder cases that were divided into 7 groups: arthroscopy without repair; arthroscopy with repair; arthroplasty; clavicle/acromioclavicular joint (AC) open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF)/repair; ORIF of proximal humeral fracture; open tendon release/repair; and open shoulder stabilization. The primary end point was any major complication, with secondary end points of incisional infection, return to the operating room, and venothromboembolism (VTE), all within 30 days of surgery. Results: Overall, 11,086 cases were analyzed. The overall major complication rate was 2.1% (n = 234). Factors associated with major complications on multivariate analysis included: procedure performed (P < .001), emergency case (P < .001), pulmonary comorbidity (P < .001), preoperative blood transfusion (P = .033), transfer from an outside institution (P = .03), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .006), wound class (P < .001), dependent functional status (P = .027), and age older than 60 years (P = .01). After risk adjustment, open shoulder stabilization was associated with the greatest risk of major complications relative to arthroscopy without repair (odds ratio [OR], 5.56; P = .001), followed by ORIF of proximal humerus fracture (OR, 4.90; P < .001) and arthroplasty (OR, 4.40; P < .001). These 3 groups generated over 60% of all major complications. Open shoulder stabilization had the highest odds of reoperation (OR, 8.34; P < .001), while ORIF of proximal humerus fracture had the highest risk for VTE (OR, 6.47; P = .001) compared with the reference group of arthroscopy without repair. Conclusion: Multivariable analysis of the NSQIP database suggests that open shoulder stabilization, ORIF for proximal humerus fractures, and shoulder arthroplasty are associated with the highest risk of major complications within 30 days after shoulder surgery in a hospital setting. Age, functional status, ASA score, pulmonary comorbidity, emergency case, preoperative blood transfusion, and transfer from an outside institution are patient variables that significantly influence complication risk. PMID:26535274

  9. Wound Complications in Elective Orthopaedics: Are Current British National Data Relevant?

    PubMed Central

    Cloke, DJ; Partington, PF

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The UK Nosocomial Infection National Surveillance Service (NINSS) collects data on surgical wound infection in a variety of procedures, including arthroplasty, to allow comparison between institutions. PATIENTS AND METHODS We have compared the results of a 6-month data collection by NINSS within our department with our own grading system of wound complications in elective arthroplasty surgery. RESULTS In this period, NINSS has reported one wound infection in our patients. However, we have recorded five patients who were returned to theatre for wound debridement, and yielded positive cultures from multiple specimens. Seven patients received antibiotic therapy alone for wound problems. CONCLUSIONS We present our wound grading system as suitable for the collection of data on wound complications in elective orthopaedic surgery. PMID:17316519

  10. Open-label clinical trial comparing the clinical and economic effectiveness of using a polyurethane film surgical dressing with gauze surgical dressings in the care of post-operative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Ana Abejón; Casanova, Pabló López; Soriano, José Verdú; Torra I Bou, Joan-Enric

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common postoperative complication and can cause avoidable morbidity and excessive costs for the health service. Novel dressings, designed specifically for postoperative wounds, can help to reduce the risk of SSI and other complications such as blistering. This study compared the use of a new polyurethane film surgical dressing (Opsite Post-Op Visible, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) with gauze and tape in the management of postoperative wounds. The results show that the polyurethane film dressing results in a significant reduction in SSI (1·4% versus 6·6%, P = 0·006) as well as a reduction in other postoperative wound complications (e.g. blistering and erythema). Economic analysis conducted alongside the study suggests that these improved outcomes can be achieved at a lower treatment cost than gauze and tape dressings. The modest incremental cost of the polyurethane film surgical dressing is easily offset by the reduction in the costs related to treating SSI and other wound complications associated with gauze and tape dressings. PMID:23742125

  11. Predictors of postoperative respiratory complications in premature infants after inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Gollin, G; Bell, C; Dubose, R; Touloukian, R J; Seashore, J H; Hughes, C W; Oh, T H; Fleming, J; O'Connor, T

    1993-02-01

    There is a significant incidence of inguinal hernia in premature infants and the optimal timing of repair is controversial. A high rate of postoperative respiratory complications has been reported in this group. In this study, the records of 47 premature infants (mean gestational age, 30.3 weeks) who underwent herniorrhaphy while still in the neonatal intensive care unit were reviewed in an effort to define those conditions that are independent risk factors for complications. Forty-three percent of infants had complications, including postoperative assisted ventilation (34%), episodes of apnea and/or bradycardia (23%), emesis and cyanosis with first feeding (6%), and requirement for postoperative reintubation (4%). Although low gestational age and postconceptual age at operation, low birth weight for gestational age, and preoperative ventilatory assistance were significantly associated with postoperative complications, only a history of respiratory distress syndrome/bronchopulmonary dysplasia (odds ratio 2.3), a history of patent ductus arteriosus (odds ratio 2.5), and low absolute weight at operation (odds ratio 3.5 for 1,000-g decrease) were independent risk factors for postoperative complication. Despite previous reports citing postconceptual age as the factor having the greatest impact on postoperative complications, these results indicate that a history of respiratory dysfunction and size at operation may be more important predictors of postoperative respiratory dysfunction in preterm infants. PMID:8437090

  12. Obesity and the challenges of caesarean delivery: prevention and management of wound complications.

    PubMed

    Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo

    2015-04-01

    Caesarean section in obese patients is associated with an increased risk of surgical wound complications, including haematoma, seroma, abscess and dehiscence. This review focusses on the available strategies to decrease wound complications in this population, and on the clinical management of these situations. Appropriate dose of prophylactic antibiotics, closure of the subcutaneous tissue, and avoidance of subcutaneous drains reduce the incidence of wound complications associated with caesarean section in obese patients. For treatment of superficial wound infection associated with dehiscence, there are data from general surgery patients to suggest that the use of vacuum-assisted devices leads to faster healing and that surgical reclosure is preferable to healing by secondary intention, when there are no signs of ongoing infection. There is a need for stronger evidence regarding the prevention and management of wound complications for caesarean section in obese women. PMID:25457856

  13. Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Esther, Robert J.; Erfanian, Kamil; Green, Rebecca; Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell; Tepper, Joel E.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

  14. [Dehiscence of laparotomy after hysterectomy - wound management].

    PubMed

    Karasov, D; Hako, M; Ziakov, K; Zbor, P; Mikolaj?k, A

    2012-12-01

    Authors of the paper present prospective case report about nursing process and healing of extensive dehiscence of middle lower laparotomy wound in patient after surgical procedure for endometrial carcinoma. The aim of the paper is to describe, analyse and evaluate the process of complicated postoperative wound healing using negative pressure and moist therapy. They emphasize importance of cooperation between particular departments in complicated postoperative wound therapy management. They point out using new and easily available techniques and methods, risk factors elimination and maintenance of the factors that have a positive influence on wound healing.Key words: postoperative wound dehiscence, negative pressure wound therapy, moist therapy, case report. PMID:23521188

  15. Correlation of fluid balance and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xuezhong; Wang, Haijun; Qu, Shining; Huang, Chulin; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Sun, Kelin

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between fluid balance and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer in a high volume cancer center. Methods Data of patients who admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) after esophagectomy at Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) between September 2008 and October 2010 were retrospectively collected and reviewed. Results There were 85 males and 15 females. Among them, 39 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications and hospital death was observed in 3 patients (3.0%). Univariable analysis showed that patients who developed postoperative pulmonary complications had more cumulative fluid balance in day 1 to 2 (2,6691,315 vs. 3,8151,353 mL, P<0.001; and 4,3071,627 vs. 5,3972,040 mL, P=0.014, respectively) compared with patients who did not have postoperative pulmonary complications. Multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that only more cumulative fluid balance in day 1 (P=0.008; OR =1.001; 95% CI, 1.000-1.002) was independent risk factor for postoperative pulmonary complications. Conclusions Positive fluid balance in postoperative day 1 is predictive of pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer. PMID:26716037

  16. The utility of midtrimester ultrasound assessment of the subcutaneous space in predicting cesarean wound complications

    PubMed Central

    Shainker, Scott A.; Raghuraman, Nandini; Modest, Anna M.; Schnettler, William T.; Hacker, Michele R.; Ralston, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between cesarean wound complications and thickness of the subcutaneous space within the anterior abdomen at the midtrimester fetal anatomical survey. Methods In this case-control study, cases were identified using an ICD9 code for wound complications of cesarean delivery. For each case, we identified the woman with the next consecutive midtrimester ultrasound who had a cesarean delivery without a wound complication, matched on age and race, as the control. A blinded investigator measured subcutaneous space at three distinct suprapubic levels in the midsagital plane. Results Of 7228 women with a cesarean delivery, 123 (1.7%) had a wound complication. Seventy-nine cases were eligible. Midline suprapubic subcutaneous thickness did not differ between cases and controls at the superior, middle or inferior locations (p ? 0.35). Body mass index was moderately correlated with ultrasound-derived measurements (r? 0.63; p<0.001). The incidence of vertical skin incision, stapled skin closure and classical hysterotomy differed between groups (p? 0.046). There was no significant increase in wound complication risk with increasing subcutaneous space thickness, even after adjustment (p? 0.34). Conclusion Prenatal ultrasound can quantify the subcutaneous space. Vertical skin incision, stapled wound closure, and a classical hysterotomy were associated with cesarean wound complication, but midtrimester subcutaneous thickness was not. PMID:25302863

  17. The incidence of post-operative wound infection in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, K S; Kok, C S

    1995-09-01

    With the increase in the number of orthopaedic surgeons and the aggressive marketing by manufacturing companies, high technology orthopaedic surgery is being more frequently carried out in Malaysia. Post-operative sepsis complicating this type of surgery can have disastrous consequences. No data is available in this country on the incidence of post-operative infection in Orthopaedic Surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of post-operative infection. A retrospective survey of 703 patients undergoing elective Orthopaedic Surgery in the year 1991 was carried out. We found an overall post-operative infection rate of 6.8% and a deep infection rate of 3.3%. This figure of 3.3% is higher than the internationally accepted figure of less than 2%. A need for ongoing surveillance and concerned effort to reduce the infection rate is stressed. PMID:8926901

  18. Silicone oil removal. II. Operative and postoperative complications.

    PubMed Central

    Casswell, A G; Gregor, Z J

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective study of the effects of silicone oil removal was carried out on 85 patients who had undergone pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil exchange for giant retinal tears or proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Silicone oil was removed either as part of the treatment of anterior segment complications such as glaucoma and keratopathy (25 patients) or in order to prevent these complications (60 patients). The major complications of the removal of silicone oil were retinal redetachment (25%), hypotony (16%), and expulsive haemorrhage (1%). The length of time that the oil remained in the eye and the presence of anterior segment complications did not appear to have an effect on the rate of retinal redetachment or hypotony. PMID:3426995

  19. Isolated sacral injuries: Postoperative length of stay, complications, and readmission

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Shi, Hanyuan; Thakore, Rachel V; Lee, Young M; Joyce, David; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate inpatient length of stay (LOS), complication rates, and readmission rates for sacral fracture patients based on operative approach. METHODS: All patients who presented to a large tertiary care center with isolated sacral fractures in an 11-year period were included in a retrospective chart review. Operative approach (open reduction internal fixation vs percutaneous) was noted, as well as age, gender, race, and American Society of Anesthesiologists’ score. Complications included infection, nonunion and malunion, deep venous thrombosis, and hardware problems; 90-d readmissions were broken down into infection, surgical revision of the sacral fracture, and medical complications. LOS was collected for the initial admission and readmission visits if applicable. Fisher’s exact and non-parametric t-tests (Mann-Whitney U tests) were employed to compare LOS, complications, and readmissions between open and percutaneous approaches. RESULTS: Ninety-four patients with isolated sacral fractures were identified: 31 (30.4%) who underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) vs 63 (67.0%) who underwent percutaneous fixation. There was a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach: 9.1 d for ORIF patients vs 6.1 d for percutaneous patients (P = 0.043), amounting to a difference in cost of $13590. Ten patients in the study developed complications, with no significant difference in complication rates or reasons for complications between the two groups (19.4% for ORIF patients vs 6.3% for percutaneous patients). Eight patients were readmitted, with no significant difference in readmission rates or reasons for readmission between the two groups (9.5% percutaneous vs 6.5% ORIF). CONCLUSION: There is a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach for sacral fracture patients. Given similar complications and readmission rates, we recommend a percutaneous approach. PMID:26396939

  20. Veterans Administration Cooperative Study on Bowel Preparation for Elective Colorectal Operations: impact of oral antibiotic regimen on colonic flora, wound irrigation cultures and bacteriology of septic complications.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J G; Condon, R E; Gorbach, S L; Clarke, J S; Nichols, R L; Ochi, S

    1978-01-01

    A ten hospital cooperative study comparing prophylactic oral neomycin and erythromycin base versus placebo demonstrated clinical efficacy of the antibiotics in preventing septic complications following elective colon operations. The present report concerns microbiological studies accomplished during this trial. Cultures of colon contents during surgery showed the antibiotic prep reduced concentrations of both aerobes and anaerobes by approximately 10(5) bacteria/ml. Virtually all major bacterial components of the normal flora were affected. Wound irrigation specimens at the time of closure failed to predict subsequent wound infection, but significantly fewer antibiotic recipients had positive irrigation cultures. Postoperative stool specimens showed that the oral antibiotics did not cause an emergence in resistant forms. Bacteriological studies of postoperative infections indicated that most postoperative infections involved a mixed aerobic-anaerobic flora, and that Bacteroides fragilis accounted for six of eight episodes of bacteremia. PMID:686893

  1. Colorectal resection in deep pelvic endometriosis: Surgical technique and post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Marco; Vignali, Andrea; Milone, Francesco; Pignata, Giusto; Elmore, Ugo; Musella, Mario; De Placido, Giuseppe; Mollo, Antonio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Coretti, Guido; Bracale, Umberto; Rosati, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of different surgical techniques on post-operative complications after colorectal resection for endometriosis. METHODS: A multicenter case-controlled study using the prospectively collected data of 90 women (22 with and 68 without post-operative complications) who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for endometriosis was designed to evaluate any risk factors of post-operative complications. The prospectively collected data included: gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists risk class, endometriosis localization (from anal verge), operative time, conversion, intraoperative complications, and post-operative surgical complications such as anastomotic dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and bowel dysfunction. RESULTS: A similar number of complicated cases have been registered for the different surgical techniques evaluated (laparoscopy, single access, flexure mobilization, mesenteric artery ligation, and transvaginal specimen extraction). A multivariate regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical, demographic, and surgical characteristics, complicated cases were only associated with endometriosis localization from the anal verge (OR = 0.8, 95%CI: 0.74-0.98, P = 0.03). After analyzing the association of post-operative complications and each different surgical technique, we found that only bowel dysfunction after surgery was associated with mesenteric artery ligation (11 out of 44 dysfunctions in the mesenteric artery ligation group vs 2 out of 36 cases in the no mesenteric artery ligation group; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Although further randomized clinical trials are needed to give a definitive conclusion, laparoscopic colorectal resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis appears to be both feasible and safe. Surgical technique cannot be considered a risk factor of post-operative complications. PMID:26715819

  2. Effect of Pre-Designed Instructions for Mothers of Children with Hypospadias on Reducing Postoperative Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Sanaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital anomaly with a prevalence estimated to be as high as 1 in 125 live male births. Complications after surgical procedures are possible. The incidence of complications can be reduced by meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. So the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of…

  3. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  4. Postoperative Complications in the Tube Versus Trabeculectomy (TVT) Study During Five Years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Gedde, Steven J.; Herndon, Leon W.; Brandt, James D.; Budenz, Donald L.; Feuer, William J.; Schiffman, Joyce C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe postoperative complications encountered in the Tube Versus Trabeculectomy (TVT) Study during 5 years of follow-up. Design Multicenter randomized clinical trial. Methods Settings Seventeen clinical centers. Study Population Patients 18 to 85 years of age who had previous trabeculectomy and/or cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation and uncontrolled glaucoma with intraocular pressure (IOP) ?18 mm Hg and ?40 mm Hg on maximum tolerated medical therapy. Interventions Tube shunt (350-mm2 Baerveldt glaucoma implant) or trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (MMC 0.4 mg/mL for 4 minutes). Main Outcome Measures Surgical complications, reoperations for complications, visual acuity, and cataract progression. Results Early postoperative complications occurred in 22 patients (21%) in the tube group and 39 patients (37%) in the trabeculectomy group (P = .012). Late postoperative complications developed in 36 patients (34%) in the tube group and 38 patients (36%) in the trabeculectomy group during 5 years of follow-up (P = .81). The rate of reoperation for complications was 22% in the tube group and 18% in the trabeculectomy group (P = .29). Cataract extraction was performed in 13 phakic eyes (54%) in the tube group and 9 phakic eyes (43%) in the trabeculectomy group (P = .43). Conclusions A large number of surgical complications were observed in the TVT Study, but most were transient and self-limited. The incidence of early postoperative complications was higher following trabeculectomy with MMC than tube shunt surgery. The rates of late postoperative complications, reoperation for complications, and cataract extraction were similar with both surgical procedures after 5 years of follow-up. PMID:22244522

  5. Patient-reporting improves estimates of postoperative complication rates: a prospective cohort study in gynaecological oncology

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, R; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Nordin, A; Liston, R; Burnell, M; Das, N; Desai, R; Gornall, R; Beardmore-Gray, A; Hillaby, K; Leeson, S; Linder, A; Lopes, A; Meechan, D; Mould, T; Nevin, J; Olaitan, A; Rufford, B; Ryan, A; Shanbhag, S; Thackeray, A; Wood, N; Reynolds, K; Menon, U

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most studies use hospital data to calculate postoperative complication rates (PCRs). We report on improving PCR estimates through use of patient-reporting. Methods: A prospective cohort study of major surgery performed at 10 UK gynaecological cancer centres was undertaken. Hospitals entered the data contemporaneously into an online database. Patients were sent follow-up letters to capture postoperative complications. Grade IIV (ClavienDindo classification) patient-reported postoperative complications were verified from hospital records. Postoperative complication rate was defined as the proportion of surgeries with a Grade IIV postoperative complication. Results: Patient replies were received for 1462 (68%) of 2152 surgeries undertaken between April 2010 and February 2012. Overall, 452 Grade IIV (402 II, 50 IIIV) complications were reported in 379 of the 1462 surgeries. This included 172 surgeries with 200 hospital-reported complications and 231 with 280 patient-reported complications. All (100% concordance) 36 Grade IIIV and 158 of 280 (56.4% concordance) Grade II patient-reported complications were verified on hospital case-note review. The PCR using hospital-reported data was 11.8% (172 out of 1462; 95% CI 1114), patient-reported was 15.8% (231 out of 1462; 95% CI 1417.8), hospital and verified patient-reported was 19.4% (283 out of 1462; 95% CI 17.421.4) and all data were 25.9% (379 out of 1462; 95% CI 2428). After excluding Grade II complications, the hospital and patient verified Grade IIIV PCR was 3.3% (48 out of 1462; 95% CI 2.54.3). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study of postoperative complications we are aware of in gynaecological oncology to include the patient-reported data. Patient-reporting is invaluable for obtaining complete information on postoperative complications. Primary care case-note review is likely to improve verification rates of patient-reported Grade II complications. PMID:23846170

  6. Tissue Responses to Postoperative Laser Therapy in Diabetic Rats Submitted to Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    de Loura Santana, Cristiano; de Fátima Teixeira Silva, Daniela; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; Souza, Amanda Pires; Gomes, Mariana Teixeira; de Azevedo Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi; Shibuya, Josiane Ferraretto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study about low-level laser therapy biomodulation on a full-thickness burn model we showed that single and fractionated dose regimens increased wound healing and leukocyte influx similarly when compared with untreated control. In order to verify if this finding would be similar in an impaired wound model, we investigated the effect of single and multiple irradiations on wound closure rate, type of inflammatory infiltrate, myofibroblasts, collagen deposition, and optical retardation of collagen in diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats in the same estrous cycle had diabetes induced with streptozotocin and an 8-mm excisional wound performed with a punch. The experimental groups were: control group – untreated ulcer; single-dose group – ulcer submitted to single dose of diode laser therapy (λ = 660 ± 2 nm; P = 30 mW; energy density: 4 J/cm2) and fractionated-dose group – ulcer submitted to 1 J/cm2 laser therapy on Days 1, 3, 8, and 10. The ulcers were photographed on the experimental days and after euthanasia tissue samples were routinely processed for histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Independently of the energy density, laser therapy accelerated wound closure by approximately 40% in the first three days in comparison to the control group. Laser therapy increased acute inflammatory infiltrate until Day 3. Both laser groups exhibited more myofibroblasts and better collagen organization than the control group. The findings demonstrate that low-level laser therapy in the immediate postoperative period can enhance the tissue repair process in a diabetes model. Similar effects were achieved with laser therapy applied a single time with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 and applied four times with an energy density of 1 J/cm2. The application of laser therapy in the inflammatory phase was the most important factor to the enhancement of the tissue repair process. PMID:25909480

  7. Postoperative complications and survival of elderly breast cancer patients: a FOCUS study analysis.

    PubMed

    de Glas, N A; Kiderlen, M; Bastiaannet, E; de Craen, A J M; van de Water, W; van de Velde, C J H; Liefers, G J

    2013-04-01

    Old age is associated with comorbidity and decreased functioning which influences treatment decisions in elderly breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for complications after breast cancer surgery in elderly patients, and to assess mortality in patients with postoperative complications. The FOCUS cohort is a detailed retrospective cohort of all breast cancer patients aged 65years and older who were diagnosed between 1997 and 2004 in the South-West of the Netherlands. Risk factors for postoperative complications were assessed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. One-year survival and overall survival were calculated using univariable and multivariable Cox Regression models, and relative survival was calculated according to the Ederer II method. 3179 patients received surgery, of whom 19% (n=618) developed 1 or more postoperative complication(s). The odds ratio of having postoperative complications increased with age [OR 1.85 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.50, p=0.001) in patients >85years] and number of concomitant diseases [OR 1.71 (95% CI 1.30-2.24, p?0.001) for 4 or more concomitant diseases]. One-year overall survival, overall survival, and relative survival were worse in patients with postoperative complications [multivariable HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.05-2.11), p=0.025. HR 1.21, (95% CI 1.07-1.36), p=0.002 and RER 1.19 (95% CI 1.05-1.34), p=0.006 respectively]. Stratified for comorbidity, relative survival was lower in patients without comorbidity only. Increasing number of concomitant disease increased the risk of postoperative complications. Although elderly patients with comorbidity did have a higher risk of postoperative complications, relative mortality was not higher in this group. This suggests that postoperative complications in itself did not lead to higher relative mortality, but that the high relative mortality was most likely due to geriatric parameters such as comorbidity or poor physical function. PMID:23446810

  8. Role of wound instillation with bupivacaine through surgical drains for postoperative analgesia in modified radical mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jonnavithula, Nirmala; Khandelia, Harsh; Durga, Padmaja; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM) is the commonly used surgical procedure for operable breast cancer, which involves extensive tissue dissection. Therefore, wound instillation with local anaesthetic may provide better postoperative analgesia than infiltration along the line of incision. We hypothesised that instillation of bupivacaine through chest and axillary drains into the wound may provide postoperative analgesia. Methods: In this prospective randomised controlled study 60 patients aged 45–60 years were divided into three groups. All patients were administered general anaesthesia. At the end of the surgical procedure, axillary and chest wall drains were placed before closure. Group C was the control with no instillation; Group S received 40 ml normal saline, 20 ml through each drain; and Group B received 40 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and the drains were clamped for 10 min. After extubation, pain score for both static and dynamic pain was evaluated using visual analog scale and then 4th hourly till 24 h. Rescue analgesia was injection tramadol, if the pain score exceeds 4. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13. Results: There was a significant difference in the cumulative analgesic requirement and the number of analgesic demands between the groups (P: 0.000). The mean duration of analgesia in the bupivacaine group was 14.6 h, 10.3 in the saline group and 4.3 h in the control group. Conclusion: Wound instillation with local anaesthetics is a simple and effective means of providing good analgesia without any major side-effects. PMID:25684808

  9. Impact of postoperative complications on clinical and economic consequences in pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jon, Bohumil; ?ermkov, Eva; ubrt, Zden?k; Ferko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients who develop complications consume a disproportionately large share of available resources in surgery; therefore the attention of healthcare funders focuses on the economic impact of complications. The main objective of this work was to assess the clinical and economic impact of postoperative complications in pancreatic surgery, and furthermore to assess risk factors for increased costs. Methods In all, 161 consecutive patients underwent pancreatic resection. The costs of the treatment were determined and analyzed. Results The overall morbidity rate was 53.4%, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 3.7%. The median of costs for all patients without complication was 3,963 Euro, whereas the median of costs for patients with at least one complication was significantly increased at 10,670 Euro (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis American Society of Anesthesiologists ? 3 (P = 0.006), multivisceral resection (P < 0.001) and any complication (P < 0.001) were independently associated with increased costs. Conclusion Postoperative complications are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs. The treatment costs increase with the severity of the postoperative complications. Those factors that are known to increase the treatment costs in pancreatic resection should be considered when planning patients for surgery. PMID:26793689

  10. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  11. Postoperative Respiratory Complications of Laryngeal Mask Airway and Tracheal Tube in Ear, Nose and Throat Operations

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Reza; Hassani, Valiollah; Movasaghi, Gholamreza; Alimian, Mahzad; Faiz, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Supraglottic devices could be used to reduce postoperative respiratory complications, but there are few studies focused on their use in more prolonged surgeries. Objectives: In this study, we compared postoperative respiratory complications in patients with prolonged ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeries, whose airways were controlled with tracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Materials and Methods: In a randomized control trial (RCT), 171 candidates of prolonged ENT surgeries were randomly assigned into two groups. In group one (n = 85) LMA and in group two (n = 86) endotracheal tube were used for airway control. The incidences of four postoperative respiratory complications including sore throat, hoarseness, cough and shortness of breath in immediate postoperative period were measured and compared among patients of each group. Results: Sore throat was recorded in 32.9% of patients with LMA and 44.2% of intubated patients, but it was not statistically significant (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.158). Hoarseness was recorded in 3.5% of patients with LMA and 24.4% of intubated patients (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.000). In 1.2% of patients with LMA cough was recorded; it was also seen in 7% of the intubated patients (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.005). Shortness of breath was mentioned by two intubated patients (2.3%) and in patient with LMA we did not record this complication. Conclusions: LMA in prolonged ENT surgeries was associated with reduced respiratory complications. PMID:26473104

  12. Anti-Angiogenic Drugs: Involvement in Cutaneous Side Effects and Wound-Healing Complication

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The uses of anti-angiogenic drugs have not only made an impact on the battle to eliminate cancer but are also responsible for a number of medical complications. The long-term use of these drugs has increased the spectrum and incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the overall impact that these drugs have on patient care. Recent Advances: This review highlights the role of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in angiogenesis and wound healing and looks at how angiogenic inhibitors promote wound-healing complications. Critical Issues: With an increased use of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of various cancers and ocular diseases, there is an increased need for clinicians to define the risks and to optimize the usage of these drugs to reduce the incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. In addition, awareness is needed when treating patients on anti-angiogenic drugs so as not to exacerbate potential wound-healing complications when performing surgical procedures. Future Directions: Clinicians and surgeons will need to develop management guidelines to optimize patient care to reduce the risk of morbidity. When performing a surgical procedure, the impact of adverse effects from the use of anti-angiogenic drugs should be considered to ensure the welfare of the patient. In addition, the development of more specific inhibitors is necessary to reduce target effects to reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. PMID:25302138

  13. The Impact of Postoperative Complications on Survivals After Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Booka, Eisuke; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Nishi, Tomohiko; Matsuda, Satoru; Kaburagi, Takuji; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Omori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of postoperative complications after esophagectomy on long-term outcome.The treatment of esophageal cancer has recently been improved; however, esophagectomy with thoracotomy and laparotomy carries considerable postoperative morbidity and mortality. The real impact of postoperative complications on overall survival is still under evaluation.A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy with thoracotomy and laparotomy, with R0 or R1 resection between January 1997 and December 2012. Of 402 patients, we analyzed the following parameters 284 patients who could be followed up for over 5 years: stage of disease, neoadjuvant therapies, surgical approaches, surgical complications, postoperative medical complications, and overall and relapse-free survivals using medical records.Of the 284 patients, 64 (22.5%) had pneumonia, 55 (19.4%) had anastomotic leakage, and 45 (15.8%) had recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP). Pneumonia had a significant negative impact on overall survival (P?=?0.035); however, anastomotic leakage and RLNP did not affect overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of pneumonia was predictive of poorer overall survival; the multivariate hazard ratio was 1.456 (95% confidence interval 1.020-2.079, P?=?0.039).Pneumonia has a negative impact on overall survival after esophagectomy. Strategies to prevent pneumonia after esophagectomy should improve outcomes in this operation. PMID:26287423

  14. The Impact of Postoperative Complications on Survivals After Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Booka, Eisuke; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Nishi, Tomohiko; Matsuda, Satoru; Kaburagi, Takuji; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Omori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the impact of postoperative complications after esophagectomy on long-term outcome. The treatment of esophageal cancer has recently been improved; however, esophagectomy with thoracotomy and laparotomy carries considerable postoperative morbidity and mortality. The real impact of postoperative complications on overall survival is still under evaluation. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy with thoracotomy and laparotomy, with R0 or R1 resection between January 1997 and December 2012. Of 402 patients, we analyzed the following parameters 284 patients who could be followed up for over 5 years: stage of disease, neoadjuvant therapies, surgical approaches, surgical complications, postoperative medical complications, and overall and relapse-free survivals using medical records. Of the 284 patients, 64 (22.5%) had pneumonia, 55 (19.4%) had anastomotic leakage, and 45 (15.8%) had recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP). Pneumonia had a significant negative impact on overall survival (P = 0.035); however, anastomotic leakage and RLNP did not affect overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of pneumonia was predictive of poorer overall survival; the multivariate hazard ratio was 1.456 (95% confidence interval 1.020–2.079, P = 0.039). Pneumonia has a negative impact on overall survival after esophagectomy. Strategies to prevent pneumonia after esophagectomy should improve outcomes in this operation. PMID:26287423

  15. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  16. Wound Bioburden and Infection-Related Complications in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Sue E.; Frantz, Rita A.

    2013-01-01

    The identification and diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) infections remains a complex problem. Because inflammatory responses to microbial invasion may be diminished in persons with diabetes, clinical signs of infection are often absent in persons with DFUs when infection is limited to localized tissue. In the absence of these clinical signs, microbial load is believed to be the best indicator of infection. Some researchers, however, believe microbial load to be insignificant and type of organism growing in the ulcer to be most important. Previous studies on the microbiology of DFUs have not provided enough evidence to determine the microbiological parameters of importance. Infection-related complications of DFUs include wound deterioration, osteomyelitis, and amputation. Risk factors for amputation include age, peripheral vascular disease, low transcutaneous oxygen, smoking, and poor glycemic control. These risk factors are best measured directly with physiological measures of arterial perfusion, glycemic control, sensory neuropathy, plantar pressures, and activity level and by controlling off-loading. DFU bioburden has not been examined as a risk factor for infection-related complications. To address the relationship between wound bioburden and the development of infection-related complications in DFUs, tightly controlled prospective studies based on clearly defined, valid measures of wound bioburden and wound outcomes are needed. This article reviews the literature and proposes a model of hypothesized relationships between wound bioburden—including microbial load, microbial diversity, and pathogenicity of organisms—and the development of infection-related complications. PMID:18647759

  17. Post-Operative Complications in Living Liver Donors: A Single-Center Experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songfeng; Chen, Jihao; Wang, Jingqiao; Yang, Cheng; Jin, Mengmeng; Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Mangli; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the growing demand for available organs and the cadaveric organs facilitates the adoption of living donor liver transplantation. We retrospectively identified and evaluated the post-operative complications as per the modified Clavien classification system in 152 living liver donors at at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University between December, 2006 and June, 2014. Post-operative complications were observed in 61 patients (40.1%) in the present study, but no mortality was reported. Complications developed in 58 (40.0%) right, 1 (33.3%) left, and 2 (66.7%) lateral left hepatectomy donors. The prevalence of re-operation was 1.3%. Grade I and II complications were observed in 38 (25.0%) and 11 (7.2%) donors, respectively. Grade IIIa complications developed in 9 (5.9%) donors and only 3 (2.0%) patients reported grade IIIb complications. The most common complication was pleural effusion that occurred in 31 (20.4%) donors. No significant prognostic baseline factor was identified in this study. In conclusion, living donors experienced various complications, which were usually mild and had a good prognosis. PMID:26270475

  18. Perioperative synbiotics decrease postoperative complications in periampullary neoplasms: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sommacal, Heloisa Martins; Bersch, Vivian Pierri; Vitola, Santo Pascoal; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch

    2015-01-01

    Periampullary neoplasms are rapidly progressive tumors with a poor prognosis and high morbidity and mortality rates, which have a negative influence on patient outcomes. Some probiotics and prebiotics have the ability to protect the intestinal barrier and prevent bacterial translocation, infection, and postoperative complications. We evaluated the use of synbiotics in a prospective, double-blind study of patients undergoing surgery for periampullary neoplasms (PNs) and assessed the effect of these agents on nutritional status, postoperative complications, antibiotic use, length of hospital stay, and mortality. Patients were randomized to receive probiotics and prebiotics-synbiotics--group S [Lactobacillus acidophilus 10, 1 10(9)CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HS 111, 1 10(9) CFU, Lactobacillus casei 10, 1 10(9) CFU, Bifidobacterium bifidum, 1 10(9)CFU, and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) 100 mg]--or placebo-controls--group C, twice daily, for a total of 14 days. Risk, clinical status, and postoperative complication rates were assessed. Twenty-three patients were allocated to each group. The incidence of postoperative infection was significantly lower in group S (6 of 23 patients, 26.1%) than in group C (16 of 23 patients, 69.6%) (P = 0.00). Duration of antibiotic therapy was also shorter in group S (mean = 9 days vs. 15 days in group C; P = 0.01). Noninfectious complications were less common in group S (6 of 23 vs. 14 of 23 patients in group C; P = 0.03). Mean length of hospital stay was 12 5 days in group S vs. 23 14 days in group C (P = 0.00). No deaths occurred in group S, whereas 6 deaths occurred in group C (P = 0.02). Perioperative administration of synbiotics reduces postoperative mortality and complication rates in patients undergoing surgery for PNs. PMID:25803626

  19. The dynamic of nasogastric decompression after esophagectomy and its predictive value of postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Guo, Jie; You, Bin; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the regularity and the influence factors of nasogastric decompression volume after esophagectomy, and explore whether the volume of nasogastric decompression can be employed as a predictor for postoperative complications of esophageal carcinoma. Methods Consecutive 247 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy were retrospectively evaluated. The volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression was recorded and the regularity based on it was described. The single and multiple factors regression analysis were used to find out relative factors of the nasogastric decompression volume among the patients without postoperative complication. Gender, age, height, weight, tobacco or alcohol exposure, location of the tumor, histological type, pathological staging, operation time, surgical procedures, anastomotic position and gastric conduit reconstruction were considered as the independent variable. Then, verify the former regression models using the data of patients with postoperative complications. Results In trend analysis, the curve estimation revealed a quadratic trend in the relationship between nasogastric decompression volume and postoperative days (R2 =0.890, P=0.004). The volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression was described by daily drainage (mL) =82.215 + 69.620 × days − 6.604 × days2. The results of multiple linear stepwise regression analysis showed that gastric conduit reconstruction (β=0.410, P=0.000), smoking (β=−0.231, P=0.000), age (β=−0.193, P=0.001) and histological type of the tumor (β=−0.169, P=0.006) were significantly related to the volume of nasogastric decompression. The average drainage in 5 days after surgery =262.287 + 132.873 × X1 − 72.160 × X2 − 27.904 × X3 − 36.368 × X4 (X1, gastric conduit reconstruction; X2, smoking; X3, histological type; X4, age). The nasogastric decompression of the patients with delayed gastric emptying, and lung infection statistically differ from their predictive values respectively according to the former equation (P<0.01), but the data of anastomotic leakage cases had no significance difference (P=0.344). Conclusions It is found that the volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression presents a quadratic trend based on the days after esophagectomy. Gastric conduit reconstruction, smoking history, age and histological type were independent factors affecting on the volume of postoperative nasogastric decompression. Also, the volume of nasogastric decompression has validity and application value for predicting postoperative complications. PMID:26941977

  20. Wounds of the distal limb complicated by involvement of deep structures.

    PubMed

    Jann, Henry; Pasquini, Chris

    2005-04-01

    The authors describe the clinically relevant structures of the distal limb and the current diagnostic and treatment modalities. Specific problems include tendon laceration, septic tenosynovitis, and sep-tic arthritis of the distal joints. A detailed description of tendon repair, tendon sheath lavage, and postoperative convalescent methodology is provided. This article makes available to the reader information necessary to appropriately diagnose and treat wounds of the distal equine limb involving deep structures. Information on the overall prognosis is also provided. PMID:15691605

  1. Neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in a wound of the postoperative maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in a wound of the postoperative maxillary sinus that was difficult to distinguish from a postoperative maxillary cyst. The patient was a 65-year-old Japanese woman who complained of left exophthalmos with cheek swelling and eye movement disorders. In past history, she had, 40 years previously undergone operation on the bilateral maxillary sinus by Caldwell-Luc's method. In a preoperative computed tomography, a mass occupied the left maxillary sinus showing irregular densities with destruction of the posterior bone walls and invasion into the left orbital. Both TI and T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed low intensities and unevenness in the mass. We performed a biopsy of the maxillary tumor according to Caldwell-Luc's method. Histological examination diagnosed neuroendocrine carcinoma. Radiation therapy (total 66Gy) resulted in partial response for this tumor. However, sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinoma has been identified as highly aggressive, with a high probability of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24765415

  2. The temporary use of allograft for complicated wounds in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Moerman, E; Middelkoop, E; Mackie, D; Groenevelt, F

    2002-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on the use of glycerol-preserved allografts (GPA) in the preparation of complicated wounds for secondary wound closure. All files from the plastic surgery department in the period 1992-1998 were screened. Thirty-three patients within a total 85 GPA treatments were selected and screened for indication of use of GPA, frequency of GPA changes, duration of treatment and whether or not subsequent autografting was possible. GPA was used as a biological cover for the following indications: problematic wound healing, 13 cases; non-healing burns, 12 cases; carcinoma, 4 cases; unstable scar, 2 cases; shortage of skin, 2 cases. The average frequency of GPA application was 2.6 times, with a mean duration of 5 days per application. In 84 cases (32 patients) the wound was successfully covered with autograft. In conclusion, GPA was used with good results as a temporary cover for complicated wounds. We postulate that angiogenic effects of this biological dressing may have contributed to the improved healing conditions and successful secondary wound closure. PMID:12237058

  3. Transversus abdominis plane block versus local anaesthetic wound infiltration for postoperative analgesia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingduo; Li, Rui; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Yali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and local anaesthetic wound infiltration can provide effective pain relief at the wound site after surgery. However, the relative efficacy of two techniques for postoperative analgesia remains controversial. Methods: We searched PUBMED, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TAP block with wound infiltration for pain relief after surgery. The primary outcomes were pain scores at rest and on movement at 1, 8 and 24 hours postoperatively and cumulative morphine consumption over 24 hours. The secondary outcomes were time to first rescue analgesic, number of rescue analgesic use and opioids-related side-effects. Results: Nine RCTs with a total of 500 participants were included. TAP block was associated with significant lower rest and dynamic pain scores at 8 hour [MD = -1.08, 95% CI (-1.89-0.26), P = 0.009] and 24 hour [MD = -0.83, 95% CI (-1.60, -0.06), P = 0.03] postoperatively than wound infiltration, but no significant difference was found at 1 hour [MD = -0.94, 95% CI (-1.97, 0.09), P = 0.08] postoperatively. In adults, TAP block significantly reduced 24-hour overall morphine consumption by 3.85 mg [MD = -3.85, 95% CI (-7.47, -0.22), P = 0.04] compared with wound infiltration. Subgroup analysis showed that adults received TAP block appeared to have lower rest pain scores at 24 hour than children (P = 0.008). Conclusion: TAP block provides superior analgesia compared with wound infiltration in the setting of a multimodal analgesic regimen. Subgroup analysis indicated that adults may have benefits additional to the analgesic effect than children. PMID:26770326

  4. Postoperative complications following TECA-LBO in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Rebecca E; Elkins, A Derrell; Moore, George E; Lantz, Gary C

    2013-01-01

    The medical records for 133 total ear canal ablations combined with lateral bulla osteotomies (TECA-LBOs) performed on 82 dogs (121 ears) and 11 cats (12 ears) between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed to determine if the duration of preoperative clinical signs was associated with the incidence of postoperative facial nerve injury and Horner's syndrome. Other perioperative complications, such as a head tilt, nystagmus, incisional drainage, draining tracts, hearing loss, as well as bacterial culture results, were noted. Postoperative facial nerve paresis occurred in 36 of 133 ears (27.1%), and paralysis occurred in 29 of 133 ears (21.8%), with no significant difference between species. Thus, postoperative facial nerve deficits occurred in 48.9% of ears. The median duration of clinically evident temporary facial nerve deficits was 2 wk for dogs and 4 wk for cats. Dogs had a significantly longer duration of preoperative clinical signs and were less likely than cats to have a mass in the ear canal. Dogs were less likely to have residual (> 1 yr) postoperative facial nerve deficits. The incidence of postoperative Horner's syndrome was significantly higher in cats than dogs. The duration of preoperative clinical signs of ear disease was not associated with postoperative facial nerve deficits. PMID:23535749

  5. Diagnosis and management of the postoperative surgical and medical complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Montravers, Philippe; Augustin, Pascal; Zappella, Nathalie; Dufour, Guillaume; Arapis, Konstantinos; Chosidow, Denis; Fournier, Pierre; Ribeiro-Parienti, Lara; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Desmard, Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Perioperative complications following bariatric surgery (BS) have been poorly analysed and their management is not clearly assessed. The associated frequency of ICU admission is difficult to estimate. Among surgical complications, digestive perforations are the most frequent. The most common postoperative complications of sleeve gastrectomy are fistulas, but bleeding on the stapling line is also commonly reported. Complication rates are higher after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, mainly due to anastomotic leaks. Medical complications are mainly thromboembolic or respiratory complications. All these surgical and medical complications are not easily detected; clinical signs can be atypical or insidious, often resulting in delayed management. Respiratory signs can be predominant and lead erroneously to pulmonary or thromboembolic diseases. Diagnostic criteria are based on minor clinical signs, tachycardia being probably the most frequent one. Lately, complications are revealed by haemodynamic instability, respiratory failure or renal dysfunction and radiographic findings. Management decision according to these abnormal signs is based on a combined multidisciplanary approach including surgical and/or endoscopic procedures and medical care, depending on the nature and severity of the surgical complication. Medical management is based on supportive ICU care of organ dysfunctions, curative anticoagulation if required, nutritional support, and appropriate anti-infective therapy. Pharmacological data are limited in morbidly obese patients and the appropriate doses are debated, especially for anti-infective agents. Complicated BS cases have a poor outcome, probably largely related to delayed diagnosis and reoperation. PMID:25829315

  6. Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with postoperative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Do, H S; Lim, J H; Jang, H S; Rim, J S; Kwon, J J; Lee, E S

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the correlation among antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications in the removal of lower 3rd molars. A total of 1222 such extractions in 890 patients between January 2010 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. The difficulty of extraction measured by Pederson's index, antibiotic prophylaxis with cefditoren, and postoperative complications were recorded. The difficulty of extraction was significantly associated with postoperative complications (p=0.03). There were no significant associations between antibiotic prophylaxis and postoperative complications in groups of equal difficulty ("easy" group (class I) p=1.00; "moderate" group (class II) p=1.00; and "difficult" group (class III) p=0.65). There was a small but insignificant increase in the number of dry sockets and infections in class III cases. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative inflammatory complications is unnecessary for extraction of 3rd molars. PMID:24029441

  7. Development and characterization of cefazolin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles composite gelatin nanofiber mats for postoperative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Rath, Goutam; Hussain, Taqadus; Chauhan, Gaurav; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Systemic antibiotic therapy in post-operative wound care remain controversial leading to escalation in levels of multi-resistant bacteria with unwanted morbidity and mortality. Recently zinc (Zn) because of multiple biophysiological functions, gain considerable interest for wound care. Based on our current understanding, the present study was designed with an intent to produce improve therapeutic approaches for post-operative wound management using composite multi-functional antibiotic carrier. The study involved the fabrication, characterization and pre-clinical evaluation of cefazolin nanofiber mats loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) and comparing co-formulated mats with individual component, enable a side by side comparison of the benefits of our intervention. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug, ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) and drug-ZnONP mixture against Staphylococcus aureus was determined using micro dilution assay. The fabricated nanofibers were then evaluated for in-vitro antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of inhibition was predicted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further these nanofiber mats were evaluated in-vivo for wound healing efficacy in Wistar rats. Study revealed that the average diameter of the nanofibers is around 200-900 nm with high entrapment efficiency and display sustained drug release behavior. The combination of ZnO and cefazolin in 1:1 weight ratio showed higher anti-bacterial activity of 1.9 ± 0.2 μg/ml. Transmission electron microscopy of bacterial cells taken from the zone of inhibition revealed the phenomenon of cell lysis in tested combination related to cell wall disruption. Further composite medicated nanofiber mats showed an accelerated wound healing as compared to plain cefazolin and ZnONP loaded mats. Macroscopical and histological evaluations demonstrated that ZnONP hybrid cefazolin nanofiber showed enhanced cell adhesion, epithelial migration, leading to faster and more efficient collagen synthesis. Hence the fabricated composite nanofiber mats have the potential to be used as a postoperative antimicrobial wound dressings. PMID:26478308

  8. Patients' satisfaction and wound-site complications after radial artery harvesting for coronary artery bypass

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Sara C.; Halbersma, Wouter B.; Grandjean, Jan G.; Mariani, Massimo A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish patients' satisfaction and the incidence of wound-site complications after radial artery (RA) harvesting for bypass surgery. A telephonic quality of life questionnaire was performed in 306 consecutive patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting with the use of RA with the open technique. A psychometric Likert scale was used to define the degree of patients' satisfaction. The questionnaire concerned arm pain, cosmesis and mobility, sensory and neurological complications, and patients' general health state. The median values and the modal scores achieved the maximal value of satisfaction for all site-related complications and the mean scores were >4 out of 5. The median patients' general health state was 4. Cosmetic result of the wound was considered at least acceptable by 98% of patients. The incidence of impairing peripheral neurological complications was 16.7%. The degree of patients' satisfaction after RA harvesting was more than satisfactory and the incidence of wound-site complications was acceptable. The incidence of neurological injuries was lower than previously described. PMID:22159263

  9. The Preoperative CT-Scan Can Help to Predict Postoperative Complications after Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Femke F.; de Graaff, Feike; Bouman, Donald E.; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Slump, Kees H.; Klaase, Joost M.

    2015-01-01

    After pancreatoduodenectomy, complication rates are up to 40%. To predict the risk of developing postoperative pancreatic fistula or severe complications, various factors were evaluated. 110 consecutive patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy at our institute between January 2012 and September 2014 with complete CT scan were retrospectively identified. Pre-, per-, and postoperative patients and pathological information were gathered. The CT-scans were analysed for the diameter of the pancreatic duct, attenuation of the pancreas, and the visceral fat area. All data was statistically analysed for predicting POPF and severe complications by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The POPF rate was 18%. The VFA measured at umbilicus (OR 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00–1.02; P = 0.011) was an independent predictor for POPF. The severe complications rate was 33%. Independent predictors were BMI (OR 1.24; 95% CI = 1.10–1.42; P = 0.001), ASA class III (OR 17.10; 95% CI = 1.60–182.88; P = 0.019), and mean HU (OR 0.98; 95% CI = 0.96–1.00; P = 0.024). In conclusion, VFA measured at the umbilicus seems to be the best predictor for POPF. BMI, ASA III, and the mean HU of the pancreatic body are independent predictors for severe complications following PD. PMID:26605340

  10. Staged Concept for Treatment of Severe Postsaphenectomy Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Thomas; Subramanian, Sreekumar; Borger, Michael A.; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2011-01-01

    The saphenous vein remains the most commonly used conduit in coronary artery bypass surgery. Vein harvest is a critical component with significant morbidity associated with leg wounds from open technique. Occurring complications are hematoma, postoperative pain, skin changes, neuropathy, and septic or nonseptic wound complications. Within the context of a recent case, we present our approach to postsaphenectomy wound management. PMID:21876703

  11. Predictors of postoperative complications of Ilizarov external ring fixators in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lee C; Bevilacqua, Nicholas J; Frykberg, Robert G; Armstrong, David G

    2007-01-01

    Our objective was to determine factors associated with complications of Ilizarov external ring fixator surgery for foot and ankle disorders in persons with diabetes mellitus. We reviewed the records of patients who underwent Charcot foot reconstruction or soft tissue offloading surgery over 1 year at a single institution. We compared the association of serious pin tract infection, pin fracture, and surgical wound dehiscence with the patient age, weight, duration device was used, preoperative glucose, preoperative hemoglobin, tourniquet time, and total operating time. Fifteen patients (16 limbs) underwent reconstructive surgery. Younger age, elevated preoperative glucose, and lengthy tourniquet times were associated with complications (P = .03). These data demonstrate that 2 modifiable factors (preoperative hyperglycemia and tourniquet time) predict complications and should be mitigated to lower risk. PMID:17761322

  12. Effectiveness and safety of continuous wound infiltration for postoperative pain management after open gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xing; Feng, Xu; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively evaluate the effectiveness and safety of continuous wound infiltration (CWI) for pain management after open gastrectomy. METHODS: Seventy-five adult patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System (ASA) grade 1-3 undergoing open gastrectomy were randomized to three groups. Group 1 patients received CWI with 0.3% ropivacaine (group CWI). Group 2 patients received 0.5 mg/mL morphine intravenously by a patient-controlled analgesia pump (PCIA) (group PCIA). Group 3 patients received epidural analgesia (EA) with 0.12% ropivacaine and 20 µg/mL morphine with an infusion at 6-8 mL/h for 48 h (group EA). A standard general anesthetic technique was used for all three groups. Rescue analgesia (2 mg bolus of morphine, intravenous) was given when the visual analogue scale (VAS) score was ≥ 4. The outcomes measured over 48 h after the operation were VAS scores both at rest and during mobilization, total morphine consumption, relative side effects, and basic vital signs. Further results including time to extubation, recovery of bowel function, surgical wound healing, mean length of hospitalization after surgery, and the patient’s satisfaction were also recorded. RESULTS: All three groups had similar VAS scores during the first 48 h after surgery. Group CWI and group EA, compared with group PCIA, had lower morphine consumption (P < 0.001), less postoperative nausea and vomiting (1.20 ± 0.41 vs 1.96 ± 0.67, 1.32 ± 0.56 vs 1.96 ± 0.67, respectively, P < 0.001), earlier extubation (16.56 ± 5.24 min vs 19.76 ± 5.75 min, P < 0.05, 15.48 ± 4.59 min vs 19.76 ± 5.75 min, P < 0.01), and earlier recovery of bowel function (2.96 ± 1.17 d vs 3.60 ± 1.04 d, 2.80 ± 1.38 d vs 3.60 ± 1.04 d, respectively, P < 0.05). The mean length of hospitalization after surgery was reduced in groups CWI (8.20 ± 2.58 d vs 10.08 ± 3.15 d, P < 0.05) and EA (7.96 ± 2.30 d vs 10.08 ± 3.15 d, P < 0.01) compared with group PCIA. All three groups had similar patient satisfaction and wound healing, but group PCIA was prone to higher sedation scores when compared with groups CWI and EA, especially during the first 12 h after surgery. Group EA had a lower mean arterial pressure within the first postoperative 12 h compared with the other two groups. CONCLUSION: CWI with ropivacaine yields a satisfactory analgesic effect within the first 48 h after open gastrectomy, with lower morphine consumption and accelerated recovery. PMID:26855550

  13. Effect of perioperative glucocorticoid administration on postoperative complications following esophagectomy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Mok, Hsiao-Pei; Wang, Wen-Ping; Xiao-Feizuo; Chen, Long-Qi

    2014-02-01

    Perioperative corticosteroid administration is a controversial therapy for improving the short-term prognosis following surgery. The objective of the current meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of the perioperative use of corticosteroids during esophagectomy for esophageal carcinoma. A comprehensive study was performed using references selected from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE (Ovid databases), EMBASE and three Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals). Eligible studies were restricted to randomized clinical trials that reported data from patients undergoing esophagectomy. In addition, treated groups of patients received perioperative corticosteroid administration and control groups received a placebo infusion, such as saline water. The studies evaluated the incidence of postoperative complications and the variation of inflammatory mediators. All extracted data underwent meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.1 software. Only six studies were eligible for selection. The following parameters were found to be reduced following the use of methylprednisolone: Interleukin (IL)-6 immediately following surgery and on postoperative days (PODs) 1 and 3; IL-8 immediately following surgery; and PaO2/FiO2 on POD 3. Moreover, organ failure, cardiovascular complications and pulmonary morbidity were all reduced in patients with corticosteroid usage. Certain factors showed no significant differences between the treated and control groups, including IL-8 on POD 1, IL-6 prior to surgery and on POD 5, PaO2/FiO2 following surgery, mortality, anastomotic leakage, severe infection and renal and hepatic failure. Prophylactic administration of methylprednisolone during the perioperative period may reduce the incidence of specific types of postoperative complications and inhibit the postoperative inflammatory reaction. Additional randomized controlled trials must be performed. PMID:24396446

  14. Postoperative pulmonary complication after neurosurgery: A case of unilateral lung collapse

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary complications, especially postoperative pulmonary complications, are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in neurosurgical patients. Hypoxemia due to mucus plug causing lung collapse is a rare event. We report a case of a 40-year-old female with right cerebellopontine angle space occupying lesion, scheduled for elective craniotomy and tumor excision. The patient underwent surgery uneventfully and was shifted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) for monitoring. Eight hours after extubation, she developed hypoxemia due to mucus plug resulting in left lung collapse. She was intubated, and mucus plug was aspirated through sterile endobronchial tube suction which resulted in reexpansion of the collapsed lung. The patient was managed with postural drainage, chest physiotherapy, and antibiotics and extubated after 24 h. This type of pulmonary complication may have a catastrophic course, especially in neurosurgical patients, if not diagnosed and managed in time.

  15. Total mechanical stapled oesophagogastric anastomosis on the neck in oesophageal cancer prevention of postoperative mediastinal complications

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Rados?aw; Irga-Jaworska, Ninela; Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Ja?kiewicz, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Oesophagogastric anastomosis after oesophagus resection is commonly performed on the neck. Even though a few different techniques of oesophagogastric anastomosis have been previously detailed, both manual and mechanical procedures have been burdened with leakages and strictures. Our simple technique of oesophagogastric anastomosis is a modification of mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler in order to prevent postoperative leak and concomitant mediastinal complications. Since 2008, we have performed nine oesophagogastric anastomoses following oesophagus resection. The mean age of the operated patients was 54 years. There was no mortality among the operated patients in the early post-operative period. The mean follow-up period for the patients operated on in our department was 17 months until the time of the analysis. None of the patients showed any leakage or stricture, and no mediastinal complications were reported in the group. Following our own experience, mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler seems to decrease the time of the operation as well as significantly reducing the incidence of leakages from the anastomosis. This type of anastomosis may decrease the number of postoperative strictures and the most dangerous mediastinal infections. PMID:26855647

  16. A phase II trial of a surgical protocol to decrease the incidence of wound complications in obese gynecologic oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    Novetsky, Akiva P.; Zighelboim, Israel; Guntupalli, Saketh R.; Ioffe, Yevgeniya J.M.; Kizer, Nora T.; Hagemann, Andrea R.; Powell, Matthew A.; Thaker, Premal H.; Mutch, David G.; Massad, L. Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obese women have a high incidence of wound separation after gynecologic surgery. We explored the effect of a prospective care pathway on the incidence of wound complications. Methods Women with a body mass index (BMI)?30kg/m2 undergoing a gynecologic procedure by a gynecologic oncologist via a vertical abdominal incision were eligible. The surgical protocol required: skin and subcutaneous tissues to be incised using a scalpel or cutting electrocautery, fascial closure using #1 polydioxanone suture, placement of a 7mm Jackson-Pratt drain below Campers fascia, closure of Campers fascia with 3-0 plain catgut suture and skin closure with staples. Wound complication was defined as the presence of either a wound infection or any separation. Demographic and perioperative data were analyzed using contingency tables. Univariable and multivariable regression models were used to identify predictors of wound complications. Patients were compared using a multivariable model to a historical group of obese patients to assess the efficacy of the care pathway. Results 105 women were enrolled with a median BMI of 38.1. Overall, 39 (37%) had a wound complication. Women with a BMI of 3039.9 kg/m2 had a significantly lower risk of wound complication as compared to those with a BMI >40 kg/m2 (23% vs 59%, p<0.001). After controlling for factors associated with wound complications the prospective care pathway was associated with a significantly decreased wound complication rate in women with BMI<40kg/m2 (OR 0.40, 95% C.I.: 0.180.89). Conclusion This surgical protocol lead to a decreased rate of wound complications among women with BMI 3039.9 kg/m2. PMID:24952366

  17. Wound complications after modified radical mastectomy compared with tylectomy with axillary lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Vinton, A L; Traverso, L W; Jolly, P C

    1991-05-01

    Tylectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and radiotherapy (TAD) has become an accepted treatment for early breast cancer and has been shown to result in equal 5- and 8-year survival when compared with modified radical mastectomy (MRM). In order to determine the safety of TAD with respect to wound complications and to identify potential risk factors, we reviewed the charts of 560 patients undergoing MRM (n = 387) and TAD (n = 173) at Virginia Mason Medical Center from 1983 through 1989. The incidence of infection, seroma, hematoma, and epidermolysis were compared, and obesity, age 60 years or older, smoking, antibiotics, and wound drainage were examined as possible risk factors. There were more wound complications in the MRM group versus the TAD group (49% versus 35%; p less than 0.01), specifically more seromas (29% versus 18%; p less than 0.01) and epidermolysis (18% versus 0%). In the MRM group, age 60 years or older was associated with seroma (p less than 0.01) and smoking was associated with epidermolysis (p less than 0.01). In the TAD group, obesity was associated with infection. In both groups, volume of drainage from closed suction wound drains greater than 30 mL in the 24 hours prior to removal of the last drain was associated with seroma (p less than 0.05). PMID:2031542

  18. Immediate Postoperative Complications in Patients Undergoing CABG; Investigating the Role of Prior Coronary Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Negargar, Sohrab; Anvari, Shahriar; Abbasi, Kyomars; Enamzadeh, Elgar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately 15 to 30% of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) will require repeated revascularization. There is an ongoing debate concerning the impact of prior PCI on subsequent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. This study sought to compare immediate post-CABG complications between patients with and without previous coronary stenting. Methods: A total of 556 CABG candidates including 73 patients with previous coronary stenting and 483 patients without prior stenting were enrolled in this retrospective-prospective study. Demographic information, cardiac markers (CK-MB, Troponin T), and postoperative data including inotrope administration, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) use, bleeding, pathological electrocardiography (ECG) changes, and overall complications were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean age of the patients in stented group was significantly higher than that in unstented group (63.497.71 vs. 61.379.80 years, p=0.05). The mean serum level of Troponin T 12 h postoperation was significantly higher in the same group (323.2633.16 vs. 243.3011.52 ng/dL; p=0.03). Comparing the stented and unstented groups, the rates of inotrope use (17.8% vs. 7.2%; p=0.003), significant bleeding (15.1% vs. 4.3%; p=0.001), and overall complications (32.9% vs. 11.6%; odds ratio: 3.74 with 95% confidence interval of 2.13-6.55, p<0.001) were significantly higher in the former group. The association between overall complications and prior stenting was independent (odd ratio: 3.06). No significant connections were found between postoperative complications and stent number or type. Conclusion: A positive history of previous coronary stenting significantly increases the risk of immediate post-CABG complications. PMID:25610554

  19. [Quality assurance in surgery--more than documentation of postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, R T

    1996-01-01

    This review discusses several aspects of surgical quality assurance: 1. The surgical audit to collect data and analyze postoperative complications. 2. Quality assurance by measurement of patients' postoperative long-term outcome. 3. The elaboration of therapeutical guidelines. 4. Measurement of costs and benefit of the surgical intervention including patients' postoperative quality of life. 5. Quality assurance of clinical trials and medical publications. It is demonstrated that the regular documentation of postoperative complications and an internal data analysis improve the results, dependent on the quality of the data which is best guaranteed by a neutral observer. The late results after operation are mainly influenced by the quality of the surgeon, as prove recurrence rates after hernia repair ranging between 0 and 10% using identical operation techniques, or locoregional recurrences of 30-60% after abdominal perineal resection of the rectum. The elaboration of therapeutical guidelines may be helpful for the evaluation of the benefit of the intervention and for the prevention of unnecessary operations as has been demonstrated for the treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenoses. Qualified clinical studies performed according to the GCP rules with biometrical planning, clear cut definition of the purpose of the study and listing of inclusion and exclusion criteria are the prerequisites of substantiated therapeutical guidelines. Under increasing economic pressure not only the benefit, but also the costs of treatment are of major importance, the evaluation of the cost effectiveness ratio by measuring the cost per quality adjusted year of life saved will become essential for future therapeutical recommendations. PMID:8867341

  20. Does the use of carbon dioxide field flooding during heart valve surgery prevent postoperative cerebrovascular complications?

    PubMed

    Giordano, Salvatore; Biancari, Fausto

    2009-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is any benefit with the use of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) field flooding techniques in heart valve surgery, in order to reduce postoperative neurological complications. Altogether 202 articles were found using the reported search, and six of them were used to answer the clinical question. All but one trial, were prospective, randomised. Four studies reported a significantly lower intracardiac bubble count in the CO(2) group. A significant reduction of p300 peak latencies in the CO(2) group was observed in one study. Otherwise, neurocognitive test batteries did not reveal any advantages of CO(2) field flooding in two studies. Three studies reported on postoperative cerebrovascular complications and the overall rate of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) or prolonged reversible ischemic neurological deficit was 1.2% in the CO(2) group and 2.5% in the control group (P=ns). Although the use of CO(2) field flooding has been observed to be associated with a significantly lower count of intracardiac air bubbles, and improved survival in two small studies, so far there is no evidence of a sustained reduction of cerebrovascular complications with the use of this method. PMID:19447802

  1. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  2. Imaging in bariatric surgery: service set-up, post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S; Shah, V; Ahmed, A R; Blunt, D M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent and costly problem faced by the healthcare system. The role of bariatric surgery in managing obesity has also increased with evidence showing a reduction in long-term morbidity and mortality. There are unique challenges faced by the radiology department in providing an imaging service for this population of patients, from technical and staffing requirements through to the interpretation of challenging post-surgical images. We describe these challenges and provide an overview of the most frequently performed procedures, normal post-operative imaging findings and the appearance of common complications. PMID:21045066

  3. Postoperative Ascites of Unknown Origin following Laparoscopic Appendicectomy: An Unusual Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feretis, M.; Boyd-Carson, H.; Karim, A.

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative ascites is a very rare complication of laparoscopic surgery. Significant iatrogenic injuries to the bowel, the urinary tract, and the lymphatic system should be excluded promptly to avoid devastating results for the patient. In some cases, in spite of investigating patients extensively, no definitive causative factor for the accumulation of fluid can be identified. In such cases, idiopathic allergic or inflammatory reaction of the peritoneum may be responsible for the development of ascites. We present a case of ascites of an unknown origin in a young female patient following a laparoscopic appendicectomy. PMID:24822146

  4. Effect of body mass index on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shohab, Durre; Ayub, Ramsha; Alam, Muhammad Umar; Butt, Amna; Sheikh, Sanam; Assad, Salman; Akhter, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of body mass index (BMI) on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) by comparing three BMI groups. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of 129 patients who underwent PCNL from January 2010 to August 2013. All the patients underwent PCNL by a standard technique. The patients were divided into three groups: patients having a BMI ≤24 kg/m2 were included in the normal group, those having a BMI of 24.1–30.0 kg/m2 were included in the overweight group, and those having a BMI >30 kg/m2 were included in the obese group. Three groups were compared for operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement. Results A total of 129 patients including 44 females and 85 males were included with a mean age of 45.00±1.44 years. The mean age in the normal group was 43.29±1.69 years, 47.08±1.29 years in the overweight group, and 43.61±1.25 years in the obese group. The mean stone size in the normal group was 25.46±8.92 mm, 28.01±8.40 mm in the overweight group, and 26.84±7.41 mm in the obese group. Our results showed no statistically significant difference with respect to mean operative time, mean hospital stay, and stone clearance in the normal, obese, and overweight patients undergoing PCNL. Postoperative complications and analgesia requirement were also similar in all the three groups. Conclusion There was no effect of BMI on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing PCNL. PCNL is a safe and effective procedure for the removal of renal stones in obese patients. PMID:26623145

  5. Postoperative Complications After Prophylactic Thyroidectomy for Very Young Patients With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Kluijfhout, Wouter P.; van Beek, Dirk-Jan; Verrijn Stuart, Annemarie A.; Lodewijk, Lutske; Valk, Gerlof D.; van der Zee, David C.; Vriens, Menno R.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether younger age at surgery is associated with the increased incidence of postoperative complications after prophylactic thyroidectomy in pediatric patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2. The shift toward earlier thyroidectomy has resulted in significantly less medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC)-related morbidity and mortality. However, very young pediatric patients might have a higher morbidity rate compared with older patients. Hardly any literature exists on complications in the very young. A retrospective single-center analysis was performed on the outcomes of MEN2 patients undergoing a prophylactic total thyroidectomy at the age of 17 or younger. Forty-one MEN2A and 3 MEN2B patients with thyroidectomy after January 1993 and at least 6 months of follow-up were included, subdivided in 9 patients younger than 3 years, 15 patients 3 to 6 years, and 20 patients older than 6 years. Postoperative hypocalcemia and other complications were registered. Twelve (27%) patients developed transient hypocalcemia and 9 (20%) patients suffered from permanent hypocalcemia, with a nonsignificant trend toward higher incidence with decreasing age. Three (7%) patients had other complications, of whom 2 were younger than 3 years. For patients younger than 3 years, the average length of stay (LOS) was 6.7 days, versus 1.7 and 3.5 days, respectively, for the older patient groups (P?complications had a longer LOS compared with patients without (5.0 vs 2.0, P?complications, causing a significant increased LOS. Irrespective age of surgery, MTC did not recur in any patient. In planning optimal timing of surgery, clinicians should take the risk of complications into account. We advise not to perform total thyroidectomy before the age of 3 for patients defined high risk by the American Thyroid Association guideline. PMID:26200612

  6. Comparative analyses of postoperative complications and prognosis of different surgical procedures in stage II endometrial carcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongmei; Gui, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of surgical resection extent on the postoperative complications and the prognosis in patients with stage II endometrial cancer. Methods A total of 54 patients were retrospectively reviewed, 35 patients underwent subradical hysterectomy and 19 patients received radical hysterectomy, both with simultaneous bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy. Results Comparing the surgical outcomes in subradical hysterectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, there were no significant differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay. After surgery, 37.1% vs 36.8% patients received postoperative radiotherapy in the subradical hysterectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, without statistically significant difference. As for postoperative complications, the early postoperative complication rate in patients who underwent subradical hysterectomy was 14.3%, significantly lower than that in patients submitted to radical hysterectomy (14.3% vs 42.1%), with P=0.043. However, there was no significant difference in late postoperative complication rate between the two surgical procedures. Regarding the clinical prognosis, patients receiving the subradical hysterectomy showed similar survival to their counterparts undergoing the radical procedures. The relapse rate was 5.71% vs 5.26%, respectively, without significant difference. There were no deaths in both surgical groups. Conclusion For stage II endometrial carcinoma, subradical hysterectomy presented with less early postoperative complications and similar survival duration and recurrence compared with radical hysterectomy and should be advocated in clinical treatment. PMID:26937200

  7. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    PubMed

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-09-28

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients' outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  8. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  9. [The pathogenesis of postoperative abdominal wound dehiscence. Part I: Clinical investigations to determine patient groups at risk (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schmidtler, F; Schildberg, F W; Schramm, W; Gleisner, C

    1977-05-20

    Between 1955 and 1974 a total of 27 404 patients were laparotomied at the University Surgical Clinic in Munich. Abdominal wound dehiscence occurred during the postoperative phase in 324 patients. In comparison with the clinical findings of undisturbed healing in the total number of patients, some predisposing factors could be established which were statistically confirmed for the first time: age over 60, males, malignant primary disease, long operation time, low preoperative hemoglobin concentration, high blood loss and bigger blood transfusions. With the help of these risk criteria, endangered patients can be detected pre-or intra-operatively. PMID:141616

  10. Analysis of the relationship between postoperative ophthalmic complications and dialysis time of pre-kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Lei; Qi, Fan; Xie, Jin-Liang; Qi, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Zhu, Xiang-Rong; Ding, Xiang; Yang, Bo; Jin, Peng

    2012-01-01

    AIM To determine the influence of the dialysis time before kidney transplantation on postoperative ophthalmic complications. METHODS One hundred and eighty three patients who were given the follow-up after kidney transplantation were selected, including 124 males and 59 females. The dialysis time before kidney transplantation was (2.92.1) years. Among them, there were 93 cases having cadaveric renal transplantation and 90 cases having living relative renal transplantation. The conditions of ophthalmic complications in all the patients after kidney transplantation were investigated and the incidence rate on ophthalmic complications having different dialysis time before kidney transplantation was given Chi-square test and Chi-square linear trend test. RESULTS Among 183 patients with kidney transplantation, 95 patients (51.9%) had at least one ophthalmic complication and the rest 88 patients (48.1%) had no significant abnormality at the eye region. The most common ophthalmic complications were pinguecula/conjunctival degeneration (31 cases), the following was caligo lentis (24 cases). The main manifestations were grayish white granule and plaque turbidity occurred in posterior capsule at the posterior pole of crystaline lens. The angulus iridocornealis of 5 patients (5.3%) with cataract and glaucoma were all open-angle through the detection by gonioscope. Through visual field examination, there were 2 patients with paracentral scotoma, 2 patients with arcuate scotoma and one case with nasal step. CONCLUSION The experiments verify that the incidence of glaucomawas relates to the dialysis time before kidney transplantation, and the incidence rate might be higher if the dialysis time is longer. PMID:22773990

  11. Is the rate of postoperative complications following laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy higher in elderly patients than in younger patients?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With an increase in life expectancy, very elderly patients are presenting with gastric cancer more commonly than ever. The present study retrospectively analyzed the surgical outcomes of laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy for gastric cancer in the young, elderly, and very elderly age groups. Methods The study group consisted of 1,055 patients who underwent laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy between February 2002 and December 2012. We divided these patients into three groups; group 1 (young age, <65years), group 2 (elderly age, 6574 years), and group 3 (very elderly age, ?75years). Results There were statistical differences in the rates of postoperative complications among the three groups (P?=?0.008). However, when assessed according to the severity of postoperative complications based on the Clavien-Dindo classification, there was no statistical difference among the three groups (P?=?0.562). Conclusions Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy for gastric cancer can be performed in very elderly patients. In analyzing studies of elderly patients with postoperative complications following the procedure, not only should the rate of postoperative complications be taken into consideration, but also the severity of any postoperative complications. PMID:24736010

  12. [Fibronectin content in wound secretions as a criterion of the course of wound healing].

    PubMed

    Kotschnew, O S; Ismailow, S G; Litwinow, R I; Ermolin, G A; Efremow, E E; Zubairow, D M

    1991-01-01

    The content of soluble immunoreactive fibronectin in wound exudate in 104 patients after appendectomy, laparotomy and thermal injuries was studied both in non-complicated and purulent postoperative wounds. It was shown that in the case of non-complicated wound healing fibronectin reached maximum level at the 2nd and 3rd postoperative days. At the following days the fibronectin content decreased and returned at the 4th-5th days to the first day level. In the purulent wound the amount of fibronectin in the exudate remains low in the hydratation phase rising significantly in the phase of dehydration. The described changes correlate well with the clinical signs of wound healing. The data suggest that the fibronectin content in wound exudate can be used in evaluation of wound healing, prediction of possible complications as well as in control of treatment efficiency. PMID:1746177

  13. Use of Electrocautery for Coagulation and Wound Complications in Caesarean Sections

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Cristiane M.; Amaral, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety of electrocautery for coagulation during Caesarean sections. Study Design. A randomized, controlled, clinical pilot study was performed at a university maternity hospital. After admission for delivery and decision to perform a C-section, volunteers were randomized to either the intervention group (use of electrocautery for coagulation) or nonintervention group. The women were examined at the time of postpartum discharge (day 3), at days 7 to 10, and again at days 30 to 40 for signs of infection, hematoma, seroma, or dehiscence. Data were analyzed using an intention-to-treat analysis, and risk ratios were calculated. Results. No significant differences were found between the two groups. Only 2.8% of patients in the intervention group developed surgical wound complications during hospitalization. However, 7 to 10 days following discharge, these rates reached 23.0% and 15.4% in the intervention and nonintervention groups, respectively (RR = 1.50, 95% CI = 0.842.60). Conclusion. Further studies should confirm whether the use of electrocautery for coagulation does not increase the risk of surgical wound complications in patients undergoing Caesarean sections. PMID:25143985

  14. Study of two techniques for midline laparotomy fascial wound closure.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Vipul; Halvadia, B M; Bharaney, R P; Ajwani, Vicky; Shah, S M; Rai, Samir; Trivedi, Mitesh

    2014-04-01

    To study the results of two techniques, simple interrupted closure and continuous with intermittent Aberdeen knot technique for midline laparotomy fascial wound closure. A random selection of 200 midline laparotomy cases was done. In one group (group A) of 100 cases, midline fascial wound closure was done with continuous sutures with intermittent Aberdeen knot technique using Prolene No. 1 suture material. In the other group (group B) of 100 cases, closure was done with the technique of simple interrupted sutures with Prolene No.1 suture material. Comparison of both the techniques regarding preoperative status and postoperative complication such as incisional hernia, wound dehiscence, suture sinus formation, stitch granuloma, and chronic wound pain was done according to clinical examination and recorded in the pro forma prepared. In group A, postoperative complications were incisional hernia 3%, wound dehiscence 4%, and suture sinus formation 1%. In group B, postoperative complication were incisional hernia 5%, wound dehiscence 4%, and suture sinus formation 1%. All these complications were statistically insignificant, in both group comparisons. While the complication such as stitch granuloma 3%, chronic wound pain 3%, and wound infection 4% in group A was significantly less than in group B where the complication of stitch granuloma was 12%, chronic wound pain 13%, and wound infection 13% (P value 0.03, P value 0.018, and P value 0.048, respectively). Both the techniques, simple interrupted suture closure and continuous with intermittent Aberdeen knot closure for midline laparotomy fascial wounds, show a similar rate of postoperative complication such as incisional hernia, wound dehiscence, and suture sinus formation. But the continuous suturing with intermittent Aberdeen knot technique is a better option to prevent complications such as stitch granuloma, chronic wound pain, and wound infection, which are higher in the simple interrupted fascial wound closure technique. PMID:24891770

  15. The association of socioeconomic disadvantage with postoperative complications after major elective cardiovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Agabiti, N; Cesaroni, G; Picciotto, S; Bisanti, L; Caranci, N; Costa, G; Forastiere, F; Marinacci, C; Pandolfi, P; Russo, A; Perucci, C A

    2008-01-01

    Background: Understanding the mechanism by which both patient- and hospital level factors act in generating disparities has important implications for clinicians and policy-makers. Objective: To measure the association between socioeconomic position (SEP) and postoperative complications after major elective cardiovascular procedures. Design: Multicity hospital-based study. Subjects: Using Hospital Discharge Registries (ICD-9-CM codes), 19 310 patients were identified undergoing five cardiovascular operations (coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valve replacement, carotid endarterectomy, major vascular bypass, repair of unruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA repair)) in four Italian cities, 1997–2000. Measures: For each patient, a five-level median income index by census block of residence was calculated. In-hospital 30-day mortality, cardiovascular complications (CCs) and non-cardiovascular complications (NCCs) were the outcomes. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multilevel logistic regression adjusting for city of residence, gender, age and comorbidities taking into account hospital and individual dependencies. Main results: In-hospital 30-day mortality varied by type of surgery (CABG 3.7%, valve replacement 5.7%, carotid endarterectomy 0.9%, major vascular bypass 8.8%, AAA repair 4.0%). Disadvantaged people were more likely to die after CABG (lowest vs highest income OR 1.93, p trend 0.023). For other surgeries, the relationship between SEP and mortality was less clear. For cardiac surgery, SEP differences in mortality were higher for publicly funded patients in low-volume hospitals (lowest vs highest income OR 3.90, p trend 0.039) than for privately funded patients (OR 1.46, p trend 0.444); however, the difference in the SEP gradients was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Disadvantaged people seem particularly vulnerable to mortality after cardiovascular surgery. Efforts are needed to identify structural factors that may enlarge SEP disparities within hospitals. PMID:18791046

  16. Determining Surgical Complications in the Overweight (DISCOVER): a multicentre observational cohort study to evaluate the role of obesity as a risk factor for postoperative complications in general surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nepogodiev, Dmitri; Chapman, Stephen J; Glasbey, James; Kelly, Michael; Khatri, Chetan; Drake, Thomas M; Kong, Chia Yew; Mitchell, Harriet; Harrison, Ewen M; Fitzgerald, J Edward; Bhangu, Aneel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is increasingly prevalent among patients undergoing surgery. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the impact of obesity on postoperative complications. This multicentre study aims to determine whether obesity is associated with increased postoperative complications following general surgery. Methods and analysis This prospective, multicentre cohort study will be performed utilising a collaborative methodology. Consecutive adults undergoing open or laparoscopic, elective or emergency, gastrointestinal, bariatric or hepatobiliary surgery will be included. Day case patients will be excluded. The primary end point will be the overall 30-day major complication rate (Clavien-Dindo grade III–V complications). Data will be collected to risk-adjust outcomes for potential confounding factors, such as preoperative cardiac risk. This study will be disseminated through structured medical student networks using established collaborative methodology. The study will be powered to detect a two-percentage point increase in the major postoperative complication rate in obese versus non-obese patients. Ethics and dissemination Following appropriate assessment, an exemption from full ethics committee review has been received, and the study will be registered as a clinical audit or service evaluation at each participating hospital. Dissemination will take place through national and local research collaborative networks. PMID:26195471

  17. Intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis using two types of Moria microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Karabela, Yunus; Muftuoglu, Orkun; Gulkilik, Ibrahim Gokhan; Kocabora, Mehmet Selim; Ozsutcu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, management, and visual outcomes of intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery using two types of Moria M2 microkeratomes. This retrospective analysis was performed on 806 primary LASIK cases. The intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications were identified and categorized according to type of Moria microkeratome. There were 52 intraoperative and early postoperative complications--one case of partial flap (0.124 %), one case of free flap (0.124 %), one case of small flap (0.124 %), 13 cases of epithelial defect (1.61 %), 12 cases of flap striae (1.49 %), 10 cases of diffuse lamellar keratitis (1.24 %), 10 cases of interface debris (1.24 %), three cases of epithelial ingrowth (0.37 %), and one case of microbial infection (0.124 %). The overall incidence of flap complications was 6.45 %. There were 27 right eye (6.73 %) and 25 left eye (6.17 %) complications. The incidence of complications with the Moria automated metallic head 130 microkeratome was 4.22 % and with the Moria single-use head 90 microkeratome was 2.23 %. We observed one culture-negative interface abscess which was cured with surgical cleaning and intensive medical treatment. The most common complication encountered was epithelial defects, followed by flap striae. Our study showed that LASIK with a microkeratome has a relatively low incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative flap complications. The authors have no financial interest in any of the issues contained in this article and have no proprietary interest in the development of marketing of or materials used in this study. PMID:24531872

  18. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN DIABETIC PATIENTS BEFORE GASTRIC BYPASS AS A POSSIBLE MARKER FOR POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    LINS, Daniel C.; CAMPOS, Josemberg M.; de PAULA, Patrícia S.; GALVÃO-NETO, Manoel; PACHU, Eduardo; CAVALCANTI, Ney; FERRAZ, Álvaro A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background : Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated to inflammatory state, which can be set off by the adipose tissue, once it is a metabolically active organ that can cause a chronic mild inflammatory state. Aim : To evaluate the correlation between preoperative C-reactive protein and postoperative complications risk in obese patients (grades II and III) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods : Between 2008 and 2013 were analysed 209 patients (107 with diabetes), presenting body mass index >40 kg/m2or >35 kg/m2with comorbidities. During the postoperative period, two groups were evaluated: with and without complications. Preoperative ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein was measured by immunonephelometry method. Results : Complications occurred in seven patients (pulmonary thromboembolism, fistula, two cases of suture leak, pancreatitis, evisceration and upper digestive hemorrhage). No statistical significance was found regarding lipid profile and C-reactive protein between patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus. When compared to each other, both groups (with and without complications) presented with statistical significance regarding C-reactive protein level (7,2 mg/dl vs 3,7 mg/dl, p=0,016) and had similar weight loss percentage after 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Conclusions : Preoperative C-reactive protein serum level was higher in the group which presented complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass when compared to the group without postoperative complications. PMID:26537265

  19. Elevated serum lactoferrin and neopterin are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Gang; Wei, Chengshou; Gu, Song; Tang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that lactoferrin (LF) and neopterin (NT) are correlated with infection. The aim of this study is to determine whether serum levels of LF and NT are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Material and methods A total of 268 patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury who underwent spinal surgery were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of LF, NT, and C-reactive protein (CRP), in addition to white blood cell count (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), were measured preoperatively and 24 h postoperatively. Results In total, 22 of 268 patients (8.2%) developed postoperative infectious complications. The levels of serum LF, NT, and CRP were significantly higher in the infected patients than in the non-infected patients. No significant differences were observed in postoperative WBC count and ESR between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that LF (OR: 1.004 (1.002–1.007)), NT (OR: 1.137 (1.054–1.227)), and CRP (OR: 1.023 (1.002–1.044)) were significantly associated with the presence of postoperative infectious complications. The area under receiver operating characteristic curves for LF, NT, and CRP was 0.709, 0.779, and 0.629, respectively. Conclusions Elevated serum concentrations of LF and NT are associated with early infection after surgery. Compared to CRP, elevated levels of LF and NT are better indicators for predicting postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:24273571

  20. Illegal tattoos complicated by Staphylococcus infections: a north Carolina wound care and medical center experience.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Alan C

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a major source of morbidity in Hamlet, NC; in 2011, there were 58 emergency room visits resulting from MRSA infections, leading to 31 admissions to Sandhills Regional Medical Center (Hamlet, NC). The situation is complicated by illegal tattoo artists offering less-expensive artwork, as their bargain prices often involve stinting on sterile technique. Three patients with infected tattoos were seen at Sandhills Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine (Hamlet, NC) with a range of tissue damage requiring different treatment plans. Closer scrutiny of tattoo ink and use of preservatives could prevent accidental or deliberate contamination, and reduce the risk of tattoo infection. ?. PMID:25876168

  1. Characteristics of abdominal cavity drainage fluid in Chinese patients without postoperative complications after surgery for gastrointestinal or retroperitoneal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Pi, Hongying; Zheng, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal cavity drainage fluid can be used as an early diagnostic tool of postoperative complications, and observing its characteristics can help us to judge and handle postoperative complications. There is no accurate standard reference range on its characteristics after surgeries for gastrointestinal or retroperitoneal tumors. This research attempted to analyze its characteristics in Chinese patients without postoperative complications after surgery for gastrointestinal or retroperitoneal tumors, and to offer an experimental basis for establishing a reliable standard reference range for abdominal cavity drainage fluid used to detect postoperative complications. Methods This study enrolled 262 Chinese patients without postoperative complications after surgery for gastrointestinal or retroperitoneal tumors. Results All patients had a median age (range) of 55 (1972) years, and 150 (57.3%) were men. There were 93 (35.5%), 115 (43.9%), and 54 (20.6%) patients who underwent surgery for upper gastrointestinal tumors, lower gastrointestinal tumors, and retroperitoneal tumors, respectively. The total amount, density, and pH of the abdominal cavity drainage fluid were 204 (06,195) mL, 1.032 (1.0111.047) kg/m3, and pH 7.0 (5.07.5), respectively. The total numbers of cells and white blood cells were 1.31011 (5.51086.21012)/L and 3.7109 (1.01075.01011)/L, respectively. The levels of sugar and protein were 3 (037) mmol/L and 39 (1272) g/L. The total amount of abdominal cavity drainage fluid, the total number of cells, the total number of white blood cells, the number of multinucleated cells, the number of monocytes, and the levels of sugar were statistically significantly different between the three groups (P<0.05 for all). Conclusion This study described the characteristics of abdominal cavity drainage fluid in Chinese patients without postoperative complications after surgery for gastrointestinal or retroperitoneal tumors, and provided an experimental basis for establishing a reliable standard reference range for abdominal cavity drainage fluid for screening for postoperative complications. PMID:25670893

  2. Effects of Surgical Wound Infiltration with Bupivacaine on Postoperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Bilateral Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    YILMAZ, zge Turna; TOYDEMIR, T. Seval Fatma; KIR?AN, ?smail; DOKUZEYLUL, Banu; GUNAY, Zeynep; KARACAM, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a numerical rating scale for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  3. Effects of surgical wound infiltration with bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Özge Turna; Toydemir, T Seval Fatma; Kirşan, İsmail; Dokuzeylul, Banu; Gunay, Zeynep; Karacam, Esra

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners' anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a "numerical rating scale" for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  4. Postoperative Complications After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have shown that patients with COPD have a higher risk of mortality than those without COPD after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, most of the previous studies were small, single-center studies with limited case numbers (or their only focus was mortality). The aim of our study was to focus on readmission, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute respiratory failure (ARF), cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism rates after CABG in an Asian COPD population. We conducted a nationwide case–control study in Taiwan using the claims database of hospitalization between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Patients with COPD before CABG were defined as the case groups. Each case was propensity score-matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease, with 2 controls selected from CABG patients without COPD. The outcomes of interest were mortality, wound infection, and the readmission rate over 30 days for the following diseases: AMI, pneumonia, ARF, cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism. There were 14,858 patients without COPD and 758 patients with COPD who underwent CABG. After propensity score matching, the 30-day mortality and 30-day readmission rates and AMI were higher in the non-COPD group. The incidences of pneumonia and ARF after CABG were higher in the COPD group. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease does not necessarily lead to mortality, readmission, or AMI after CABG, and the major respiratory complications associated with CABG in patients with COPD were pneumonia and ARF. PMID:26937939

  5. An analysis of limb-threatening lower extremity wound complications after 1090 consecutive coronary artery bypass procedures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T A; Taylor, S M; Crane, M M; Cornett, W R; Langan, E M; Snyder, B A; Cull, D L

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and characterize limb-threatening lower extremity wound or soft tissue complications after coronary artery bypass (CABG) and determine risk factors for their cause. While minor wound problems of the leg after CABG are not uncommon, serious limb-threatening complications, though less frequent, do occur and are often de-emphasized in the surgical literature. A review of 1090 consecutive CABG procedures performed from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995 was instituted, which screened for limb-threatening lower extremity wound or soft tissue complications defined as wounds that: required additional surgery for treatment; prolonged the length of stay; or which required lengthy home health nursing for treatment. Minor lymph leaks, leg swelling, infections or wound problems treated as an outpatient were excluded. Of 1090 patients, 54 (5.0%) experienced a limb-threatening lower extremity complication. Complications were categorized as vein harvest incision non-healing (n = 36, 66.7%), decubitus ulceration (n = 11, 20.4%), forefoot ischemia/embolization (n = 10, 18.5%), groin hematoma/abscess (n = 6, 11.1%), severe cellulitis (n = 3, 5.6%), or a combination (n = 12, 22.2%). Statistically significant risk factors by univariate and bivariate analysis for a complication included older age (68 years vs 62 years, p = 0.007), female sex (57% vs 28%, p < 0.001), diabetes (57% vs 33%, p = 0.005) and longer pump time (129 min vs 114 min, p = 0.009). These complications necessitated five major lower extremity amputations and nine revascularization procedures. Chronic lower extremity ischemia from peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was a major contributing factor for the development of wounds in at least 23 (42.6%) of these patients, though suspected in only 10 (43.5%) preoperatively. A non-healing vein harvest incision below the knee of a patient retrospectively found to have inadequate distal circulation for healing occurred in 17 (31.5%) of the total 54 cases. It was concluded that non-healing vein incisions, decubitus ulcers and forefoot ischemic lesions frequently occurring in older diabetic females with undetected pre-existing PVD, comprise the majority of limb-threatening leg complications after CABG. Nearly one-third of the complications may have been avoided had the vein harvest incision not been made at the ankle of a patient with unappreciated PVD. PMID:10406454

  6. Transcutaenous electrical nerve stimulation to manage a lower extremity wound complicated by peripheral arterial disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yarboro, Douglas D; Smith, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is used to alleviate muscle pain, and there is some evidence it may affect healing in chronic wounds. An 80-year-old male patient with a chronic left lower extremity wound and a history of peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer presented for treatment. Previous protocols of care, mainly consisting of sharp debridement and daily dressing changes, had not resulted in a decrease in wound size. The patient had right and left iliac artery stenosis - not amenable to surgical intervention - and an ankle brachial index (ABI) of 0.63 on the left and 0.59 on the right lower extremities. On presentation, the wound measured 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm with a depth of 0.3 cm and a 0.5-cm tract at the 5 o'clock position. Treatment was changed to application of an ionic silver-containing Hydrofiber dressing and low-frequency TENS. Electrodes were applied 2 cm superior and inferior to the wound margin at a frequency of 2 Hz with a pulse width of 250 microseconds and amplitude of 33 mA. Treatment time was 45 minutes, twice daily, for 3 months, performed at home by the patient and his caregiver. After 4 weeks, wound dimensions decreased by 1.51% per day, and the wound was completely healed (100% epithelialized) after 12 weeks. At that time, the ABI of the left (treated) leg had increased to 0.71. Research is needed to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of low-frequency TENS to help clinicians provide evidenced-based treatment for wounds complicated by decreased blood flow. PMID:25019248

  7. Impact of Perioperative Blood Transfusion on Postoperative Complications and Prognosis of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients with Different Preoperative Hemoglobin Value

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Lian; Wei-Han, Zhang; Yang, Kun; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of perioperative blood transfusion on the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma patients is still controversial. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative complications and prognosis of patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma with different levels of preoperative hemoglobin value (POHb). Method. From 2003 to 2011, 1199 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were retrospectively enrolled and followed up to December 2014. Clinicopathological features and survival outcomes were compared between transfused and nontransfused patients. Results. In this study, transfused patients had more postoperative complications than nontransfused ones (P = 0.002). In survival analysis, the difference was not significant between transfused and nontransfused patients with POHb between 70 and 100?g/L (P = 0.191). However, in patients with POHb >100?g/L, transfused patients had significantly worse prognosis (P < 0.001), especially in TNM III stage patients (P = 0.002). And intraoperative blood transfusion predicted poor prognosis (P = 0.001). Conclusion. Perioperative blood transfusion might lead to poor survival in gastric adenocarcinoma patients with POHb >100?g/L and transfused patients had more postoperative complications; thus it is better to refrain from unnecessary perioperative blood transfusion especially intraoperative transfusion. PMID:26819609

  8. The comparative risk of developing postoperative complications in patients with distal radius fractures following different treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Jun; Li, Yi-Fan; Ji, Yun-Han; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Xian-Zhong; Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a network meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of seven most common surgical procedures to fix DRF, including bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Published studies were retrieved through PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. The database search terms used were the following keywords and MeSH terms: DRF, bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. The network meta-analysis was performed to rank the probabilities of postoperative complication risks for the seven surgical modalities in DRF patients. This network meta-analysis included data obtained from a total of 19 RCTs. Our results revealed that compared to DRF patients treated with bridging external fixation, marked differences in pin-track infection (PTI) rate were found in patients treated with plaster fixation, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Cluster analysis showed that plaster fixation is associated with the lowest probability of postoperative complication in DRF patients. Plaster fixation is associated with the lowest risk for postoperative complications in DRF patients, when compared to six other common DRF surgical methods examined. PMID:26549312

  9. Intermediate acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during general anesthesia increases the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Prospective, propensity score matched cohort study. Setting General teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 2006-10. Participants 18?579 surgical patients who received intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during surgery were matched by propensity score to 18?579 reference patients who did not receive such agents. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were oxygen desaturation after extubation (hemoglobin oxygen saturation <90% with a decrease in oxygen saturation after extubation of >3%) and reintubations requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit within seven days of surgery. We also evaluated effects on these outcome variables of qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission (train-of-four ratio) and reversal of neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade. Results The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents was associated with an increased risk of postoperative desaturation less than 90% after extubation (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.51) and reintubation requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit (1.40, 1.09 to 1.80). Qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission did not decrease this risk and neostigmine reversal increased the risk of postoperative desaturation to values less than 90% (1.32, 1.20 to 1.46) and reintubation (1.76, 1.38 to 2.26). Conclusion The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during anesthesia was associated with an increased risk of clinically meaningful respiratory complications. Our data suggest that the strategies used in our trial to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade should be revisited. PMID:23077290

  10. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications. PMID:12760580

  11. Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation for prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications: a comprehensive review of the role of tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure, and lung recruitment maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Güldner, Andreas; Kiss, Thomas; Serpa Neto, Ary; Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Canet, Jaume; Spieth, Peter M; Rocco, Patricia R M; Schultz, Marcus J; Pelosi, Paolo; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are associated with increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and mortality after major surgery. Intraoperative lung-protective mechanical ventilation has the potential to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. This review discusses the relevant literature on definition and methods to predict the occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complication, the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury with emphasis on the noninjured lung, and protective ventilation strategies, including the respective roles of tidal volumes, positive end-expiratory pressure, and recruitment maneuvers. The authors propose an algorithm for protective intraoperative mechanical ventilation based on evidence from recent randomized controlled trials. PMID:26120769

  12. [Transrectal magnetotherapy of the prostate from Intramag device in prophylaxis of postoperative complications of transurethral resection of prostatic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Ne?mark, A I; Snegirev, I V; Ne?mark, B A

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyse preoperative preparation of 91 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Two groups of patients received conventional preparation (group 1) and magnetotherapy (group 2) before TUR of the prostate. The examination covered immune system, bacteriological indices of urine and prostatic tissue. Infection of the urinary tract is a main risk factor of complications after TUR. Conventional preoperative preparation fails to correct immunity, to change bacterial urine flora, to improve hemodynamics in the prostate. Transrectal magnetotherapy with running magnetic field eliminates deficiency of T- and B-cell immunity, raises functional activity of B-lymphocytes and phagocytic ability of neutrophils, reduces endogenic intoxication, tissue edema, bacterial contamination, number of thrombohemorrhagic complications. This leads to a decrease in the number of postoperative complications. PMID:16708596

  13. Evaluation of the role of antibiotics in preventing postoperative complication after routine periodontal surgery: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rosh Radhika; Doraswamy, Dwarakanath Chinni; Hussain, Ahad M.; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Jayaprakash, Deepika

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Aim of this randomly controlled clinical study was to evaluate the role of antibiotics to prevent postoperative complications after routine periodontal surgery and also to determine whether their administration improved the surgical outcome. Materials and Methods: Forty-five systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis requiring flap surgery were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, and control groups. Surgical procedures were carried out with complete asepsis as per the protocol. Postoperative assessment of patient variables like swelling, pain, temperature, infection, ulceration, necrosis, and trismus was performed at intervals of 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 3 months. Changes in clinical parameters such as gingival index, plaque index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were also recorded. Results: There was no incidence of postoperative infection in any of the patients. Patient variables were comparable in all the three groups. Though there was significant improvement in the periodontal parameters in all the groups, no statistically significant result was observed for any group over the others. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that when periodontal surgical procedures were performed following strict asepsis, the incidence of clinical infection was not significant among all the three groups, and also that antibiotic administration did not influence the outcome of surgery. Therefore, prophylactic antibiotics for patients who are otherwise healthy administered following routine periodontal surgery to prevent postoperative infection are unnecessary and have no demonstrable additional benefits. PMID:24872630

  14. Comparison of postoperative complications in advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery versus surgery alone

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Poonam; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar; Noronha, Vanita; Chaturvedi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer is the third most common cancer in India with 60% presenting in advanced stages. There is the emerging role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in the management of these advanced cancers. There is a general perception that complication rates are higher with the use of NACT. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospectively collected data of head and neck cancer patients operated at our hospital from March 2013 to September 2014. A total of 205 patients were included in the study. These patients were studied in two groups. Group 1 included 153 patients who underwent surgery alone, and Group 2 included 52 patients who received 2-3 cycles of NACT followed by surgery. Results: The mean age of the population was 51 years in the Group 1 and 45 years in Group 2. The hospital stay and readmissions in postoperative period were similar in the two groups. In this study, the complication rate was 37.9% in the surgery patients and 30.8% in the NACT patients (P = 0.424). Conclusion: The postoperative complication rates in patients who received NACT followed by surgery were not significantly different from those who underwent surgery. PMID:26811595

  15. Morphine Spinal Block Anesthesia in Patients Who Undergo an Open Hemorrhoidectomy: A Prospective Analysis of Pain Control and Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Jos PT; Isaac, Raniere R; Alves-Neto, Onofre; Moreira, Thiago AC; Vieira, Tiago HM; Brasil, Andressa MS

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the use of adding morphine to bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia for pain control in patients who underwent an open hemorrhoidectomy. Methods Forty patients were prospectively selected for an open hemorrhoidectomy at the same institution and were randomized into two groups of 20 patients each: group 1 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with 80 g of morphine (0.2 mg/mL). Group 2 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with distilled water, achieving the same volume of spinal infusion as that of group 1. Both groups were prescribed the same pain control medicine during the postoperative period. Pain scores were evaluated at the anesthetic recovery room and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Postoperative complications, including pruritus, nausea, headaches, and urinary retention, were also recorded. Results There were no anthropometric statistical differences between the two groups. Pain in the anesthetic recovery room and 3 hours after surgery was similar for both groups. However, pain was better controlled in group 1 at 6 and 12 hours after surgery. Although pain was better controlled for group 1 after 24 hours of surgery, the difference between the groups didn't achieved statistical significance. Complications were more common in group 1. Six patients (6/20) presented coetaneous pruritus and 3 with (3/20) urinary retention. Conclusion A hemorrhoidectomy under a spinal with morphine provides better pain control between 6 and 12 hours after surgery. However, postoperative complications, including cutaneous pruritus (30%) and urinary retention (15%), should be considered as a negative side of this procedure. PMID:24999465

  16. Simple adaptations of surgical technique to critically reduce the risk of postoperative sternal complications in patients receiving bilateral internal thoracic arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sakic, Adel; Chevtchik, Orest; Kilo, Juliane; Schistek, Roland; Mueller, Ludwig C.; Ulmer, Hanno; Grimm, Michael; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Limited blood supply to the thoracic chest wall is a known risk factor for sternal wound complications after CABG. Therefore, bilateral internal thoracic arteries are still rarely utilized despite their proven superior graft patency. The aim of our study was to analyse whether modification of the surgical technique is able to limit the risk of sternal wound complications in patients receiving bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting. METHODS All 418 non-emergent CABG patients receiving bilateral internal thoracic artery CABG procedures (BITA) from January 2001 to January 2012 were analysed for sternal wound complications. Surgical technique together with known risk factors and relevant comorbidity were analysed for their effect on the occurrence of sternal wound complications by means of multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Sternal wound complications occurred in 25 patients (5.9%), with a sternal dehiscence rate of 2.4% (10 patients). In multivariate analysis, diabetes (odds ratio [OR]: 4.8, 95% CI: 1.911.7, P = 0.001), but not obesity (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 0.74.2, P = 0.28) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 0.875.6, P = 0.1) was a relevant comorbid condition for sternal complications. Skeletonization of ITA grafts (OR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.060.5, P = 0.001) and the augmented use of sternal wires (OR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.060.95, P = 0.04) were highly effective in preventing sternal complications. The use of platelet-enriched-fibrin glue (PRF) sealant, however, was associated with more superficial sternal infections (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.310.5, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Adjusted for common risk factors, skeletonization of BITA grafts together with augmented sternal wires is effective in preventing sternal complications. The use of PRF sealant, however, increased the risk for superficial wound complications. PMID:23681126

  17. Evidence-Based Strategies to Reduce Postoperative Complications in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Bridget; Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructive plastic surgery is vital in assisting patients with reintegration into society after events such as tumor extirpation, trauma, or infection have left them with a deficit of normal tissue. Apart from performing a technically sound operation, the plastic surgeon must stack the odds in the favor of the patient by optimizing them before and after surgery. The surgeon must look beyond the wound, at the entire patient, and apply fundamental principles of patient optimization. This article reviews the evidence behind the principles of patient optimization that are commonly used in reconstructive surgery patients. PMID:26371388

  18. Postoperative mesenteric venous thrombosis: Potential complication related to minimal access surgery in a patient with undiagnosed hypercoagulability

    PubMed Central

    Sucandy, Iswanto; Gabrielsen, Jon D; Petrick, Anthony T

    2010-01-01

    Context: Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially fatal complication associated with laparoscopy which has now become common practice and gold standard for many procedures in general surgery. There are only few scattered case reports in the literature describing this postoperative thrombotic event. Case Report: In the present study, we describe a patient presenting with severe abdominal pain at 25 days following an uneventful laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair and nissen fundoplication. Exploratory laparotomy revealed an extensive small bowel ischemia requiring bowel resection followed by a second look laparotomy. Retrospectively performed hematologic workup revealed a genetic mutation associated with hyperhomocysteinemia in addition to her hyperfibrinogenemia. Previously published data were collected and discussed. Conclusions: Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially serious complication after laparoscopic surgery especially in patients with underlying hypercoagulability. High index of suspicion is important in early diagnosis and subsequent treatment. PMID:22558583

  19. Dilemmas surrounding the diagnosis of deep brain stimulation electrode infection without associated wound complications: A series of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background: When wounds are benign, diagnosis of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode infection and associated intraparenchymal infection can be challenging. Only a couple, such cases exist in literature. Since infections of the central nervous system can be life-threatening, prompt diagnosis is necessary to prevent neurological injury. Employed within the appropriate context, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, as well as laboratory data and clinical presentation, may help guide diagnosis. Case Descriptions: Case 1 - A 55-year-old male with bilateral DBS electrodes and generators (49 days from last procedure), who presented with confusion and fever. Pertinent positive laboratory was white blood cell 20.5K. MRI of the brain showed edema with enhancement along the right DBS electrode. Wound exploration revealed gross purulence in the subgaleal space. The entire system was removed; cultures from subgaleal space revealed Propionibacterium acnes; cultures from electrode were negative. The patient was sent home on antibiotics. Case 2 - A 68-year-old male with a right DBS electrode (11 days from placement), who presented after an unwitnessed fall, followed by confusion and amnesia. Pertinent laboratory examinations were negative. MRI of the brain showed edema with enhancement along the DBS electrode. Wound exploration revealed no infection. The DBS system was left in place; final cultures were negative; no antibiotics were prescribed. Repeat MRI showed resolving fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal and contrast enhancement. Conclusions: Contrast enhancement, T2 FLAIR, and diffusion weighted imaging are influenced by postoperative changes. Caution is stressed regarding dependence on these features for acute diagnosis of infection and indication for electrode removal. Timing of the imaging after surgery must be considered. Other factors, such as systemic signs and abnormal laboratory data, should be evaluated. Based on these guidelines, retrospectively, the patient in Case 2 should not have been rushed for a wound exploration; close observation with serial imaging and laboratory data may have prevented an unnecessary procedure. PMID:26958428

  20. Health-related quality of life after cardiac surgery – the effects of age, preoperative conditions and postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Factors influencing the postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after cardiac surgery have not been well described yet, mainly in the older people. The study’s aim was to explore differences in clinical conditions and HRQOL of patients before and after cardiac surgery taking into account the influence of age and to describe factors influencing changes of HRQOL in the postoperative period. Methods This was a prospective consecutive observational study with two measurements using the SF-36 questionnaire before surgery and 1 year after surgery. It considered main clinical characteristics of participants prior to surgery as well as postoperative complications. Results At baseline assessment the study considered 310 patients, predominantly male (69%). Mean age was 65 (SD 10.4) years and 101 patients (33%), who were older than 70, constituted the older group. This older group showed greater comorbidity, higher cardiac operative risk and lower HRQOL in the preoperative period as well as a higher prevalence of postoperative complications than the younger group. Thirty-day mortality was 1.4% in the younger group and 6.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). One year mortality was 3.3% in the younger group and 10.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). There was a significant improvement in all 8 health domains of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.001) in the overall sample. There was no significant difference in change in a majority of HRQOL domains between the younger and the older group (p > 0.05). Logistic multivariate analysis identified a higher values of preoperative PCS (Physical component summary) scores (OR 1.03, CI 1.00 – 1.05, p = 0.0187) and MCS (Mental component summary) scores (OR 1.02, CI 0.997 – 1.00, p = 0.0846) as the only risk factors for potential non-improvement of HRQOL after cardiac surgery after correction for age, gender and type of surgery. Conclusions Older patients with higher operative risk have lower preoperative HRQOL but show a similar improvement in a majority of HRQOL domains after cardiac surgery as compared with younger patients. The multivariate analysis has shown the higher preoperative HRQOL status as a only significant factor of potential non-improvement of postoperative HRQOL. PMID:24618329

  1. Postoperative complications of microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm: lessons from experience of 2040 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ho; Jee, Tae Keun; Lee, Jeong Ah; Park, Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is an effective and safe treatment option that offers the prospect of definitive cure for hemifacial spasm (HFS). However, there are potential risks of complications for MVD associated with retromastoid suboccipital craniectomy (RmSOC) and cranial nerves in particular. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical characteristics of possible complications after MVD for HFS and to establish appropriate management concept of these complications. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 2040 patients who underwent RmSOC with MVD for HFS at Samsung medical center between January 1998 and March 2013. Of 2040 patients, 2027 were followed (99.4 %). Of the 2027 patients, 1841 (90.8 %) exhibited complete relief or minimal symptoms, and 113 (5.6 %) reported improved spasm but had mild remnant symptoms. After operation, the most frequently developed complications were facial nerve palsy (8.19 %), followed by middle ear effusion (4.90 %) and hearing loss (3.63 %). There were two cases of supratentorial subdural hemorrhage, three cases of infarction. MVD was found to be safe and effective treatment for HFS, in consistent with previous reports. Some of the complications such as facial nerve palsy, middle ear effusion, and hearing loss are relatively common. However, they have mild clinical courses that are usually transient. PMID:26382646

  2. Vitamin A Deficiency after Gastric Bypass Surgery: An Underreported Postoperative Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C.; Miller, Wendy M.; Franklin, Barry; Mudugal, Dharani; Rao Buragadda, Avdesh; Boura, Judith; Nori-Janosz, Katherine; Chengelis, David L.; Krause, Kevin R.; McCullough, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Few data are available on vitamin A deficiency in the gastric bypass population. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of gastric bypass patients (n = 69, 74% female). The relationship between serum vitamin A concentration and markers of protein metabolism at 6-weeks and 1-year post-operative were assessed. Results. The average weight loss at 6-weeks and 1-year following surgery was 20.1 9.1?kg and 44.1 17.1?kg, respectively. At 6 weeks and 1?year after surgery, 35% and 18% of patients were vitamin A deficient, (<325?mcg/L). Similarly, 34% and 19% had low pre-albumin levels (<18?mg/dL), at these time intervals. Vitamin A directly correlated with pre-albumin levels at 6 weeks (r = 0.67, P < 0.001) and 1-year (r = 0.67,??P < 0.0001). There was no correlation between the roux limb length measurement and pre-albumin or vitamin A serum concentrations at these post-operative follow-ups. Vitamin A levels and markers of liver function testing were also unrelated. Conclusion. Vitamin A deficiency is common after bariatric surgery and is associated with a low serum concentration of pre-albumin. This fat-soluble vitamin should be measured in patients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery and deficiency should be suspected in those with evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition. PMID:20871833

  3. [A case of primary lung cancer complicated with post-operative intractable pulmonary fistula].

    PubMed

    Morio, A; Miyamoto, H; Yamazaki, A; Anami, Y; Oh, S; Izumi, H; Hosoda, Y; Fukuchi, Y

    2000-12-01

    The case was a 76-year-old male. After thoracoscopic left upper lobectomy against primary lung cancer with poor risks such as complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pulmonary emphysema, oral steroid treatment, heavy smoker, decreased renal function, the patient was complicated with intractable pulmonary fistula and MRSA pyothorax. Intracavitary administration of albumin preparation and fibrin glue (Beriplast P) was effective against pulmonary fistula though it was not helpful in the pleurodesis which was conducted 7 times. Teicoplanin (Targosid) was effective against MRSA pyothorax and maintained the renal function. PMID:11127565

  4. Postoperative complications and functional results after total glossectomy with microvascular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Y; Uchiyama, K; Ebihara, S; Saikawa, M; Hayashi, R; Haneda, T; Ohyma, W; Kishimoto, S; Asai, M; Nakatsuka, T; Harii, K

    2000-10-01

    Microsurgical reconstruction after total glossectomy can greatly improve quality of life; however, postoperative functional results are often unstable, and the effectiveness of total glossectomy remains questionable. To determine the problems of reconstruction after total glossectomy with laryngeal preservation and to examine the functional results of swallowing and speech, 30 patients who had undergone total glossectomy and reconstruction with free flaps were reviewed for this study. The patients ranged in age from 20 to 73 years, and 23 of the 30 had undergone reconstruction with a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Wider and thicker flaps were designed and transferred and were sutured to suspend the larynx. To maintain physiologic swallowing function after surgery, the extent of laryngeal suspension and cricopharyngeal myotomy was limited. Of the 30 patients, 21 (70 percent) could be decannulated with laryngeal preservation; 20 of these 21 could tolerate a normal/soft/pureed diet, and 1 was limited to a fluid diet. Speech was intelligible in 16 of the 19 patients evaluated. In 9 of the 30 patients, laryngeal function could not be preserved. In four of these nine patients, additional resection combined with total glossectomy caused severe aspiration and recurrent pneumonia. Two patients with preoperative cerebral dysfunction were also poor candidates for laryngeal preservation. Additionally, the transferred flap's lack of bulk in the oral cavity and the advanced age (73 years) of one patient and the poor motivation of another may have contributed to postoperative aspiration. Aspiration occurred in one patient because of local recurrence of a tumor. The presence of preoperative cerebral dysfunction (p = 0.025), resection of the epiglottis (p = 0.005), and postoperative orocutaneous fistulas (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with the failure of laryngeal preservation. However, because of the difficulty of enrolling a sufficient number of patients in the study and the inherent limitations of retrospective studies, multivariate analysis in this study showed that no factors, such as patient age, flap volume, and the type of neck dissection, were significant predictors of laryngeal preservation. Although prospective studies are necessary, the function of individual patients must be assessed so that the study experiences discussed here can be applied to subsequent patients. PMID:11039374

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Postoperative Complications in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A Need for Preventive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Amra, Babak; Niknam, Nasim; Sadeghi, Mohsen Mir Mohammad; Rabbani, Majid; Fietze, Ingo; Penzel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is very frequent and often unrecognized in surgical patients. OSA is associated with perioperative complications. We evaluated the effects of OSA on postoperative complications and hospital outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: Candidates of elective CABG were evaluated by the Berlin questionnaire for OSA. After surgery, patients were assessed for postoperative complications, re-admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), duration of intubation, re-intubation, days spent in the ICU and the hospital. Results: We studied 61 patients who underwent CABG from which 25 (40.9%) patients had OSA. Patients with OSA had higher body mass index (29.5 3.9 vs. 26.0 3.7 kg/m2, P = 0.003) and higher frequency of hypertension (68.0% vs. 30.5%, P = 0.003), dyslipidemia (36.0% vs. 5.5%, P = 0.004), and pulmonary disease (16.0 vs. 2.7%, P = 0.08). Regarding the surgical outcomes, OSA patients had longer intubation duration (0.75 0.60 vs. 0.41 0.56 days, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea is frequent, but unrecognized among patients undergoing CABG. In these patients, OSA is associated with prolonged intubation duration. Preventing these problems may be possible by early diagnosis and management of OSA in cardiac surgery patients. Further studies with larger sample of patients and longer follow-ups are required in this regard. PMID:25538841

  6. Impact of preoperative patient education on prevention of postoperative complications after major visceral surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (PEDUCAT trial)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In line with the growing number of surgical procedures being performed worldwide, postoperative complications are also increasing proportionately. Prevention of these postoperative complications is a high medical priority. Preoperative education of patients, including provision of preparatory information about the correct behavior after surgery, could improve the postoperative outcome, but the evidence for this is inconclusive. The aim of the PEDUCAT trial is to evaluate the feasibility and the impact of preoperative patient education on postoperative morbidity, mortality and quality of life in patients scheduled for elective major visceral surgery. Methods/design PEDUCAT is designed as a cluster-randomized controlled pilot study. The experimental group will visit a standardized preoperative seminar to learn how best to behave after surgery in addition to being given a standard information brochure, whereas the control group will only receive the information brochure. Outcome measures such as postoperative morbidity, postoperative pain, postoperative anxiety and depression, patient satisfaction, quality of life, length of hospital stay and postoperative mortality will be evaluated. Statistical analysis will be based on the intention-to-treat population. Analysis of covariance will be applied for the intervention group comparison, adjusting for age, center and quality of life before surgery. This is a pilot study to show the feasibility of the concept. Nevertheless, the planned sample size of n = 204 is large enough to show an effect with power of 90% and a significance level of 5%. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Register number: DRKS00004226. PMID:23978275

  7. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit. PMID:25861890

  8. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is a risk factor for the elevation of high mobility group box-1, leading to an increase in postoperative severe pulmonary complications.

    PubMed

    Takahata, R; Ono, S; Tsujimoto, H; Hiraki, S; Aosasa, S; Yamamoto, J; Hase, K

    2016-01-01

    We herein clarified the time course of changes in the serum high mobility group box chromosomal protein-1 (HMGB-1) concentrations in esophageal cancer patients after esophagectomy, and investigated whether the perioperative serum HMGB-1 levels correlate with the administration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NACRT) and the postoperative clinical course, especially the occurrence of pulmonary complications, in such patients. Sixty patients who underwent right transthoracic esophagectomy for esophageal cancer were enrolled in this study. The relationship between the perioperative serum HMGB-1 levels and NACRT, and the postoperative severe pulmonary complications were evaluated. Patients with severe pulmonary complications (n = 44) tended to have undergone NACRT more often than those without severe pulmonary complications (n = 16). The preoperative and postoperative day 7 serum HMGB-1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients with severe pulmonary complications than those in patients without severe pulmonary complications. In the univariate and multivariate analyses, the use of NACRT and the preoperative elevations in the serum HMGB-1 levels (>4.2?ng/mL) were found to be significantly associated with pulmonary dysfunction. Furthermore, the response to NACRT was found to be significantly associated with the preoperative serum HMGB-1 levels. The use of NACRT contributes to preoperative serum HMGB-1 elevation, and these were risk factors for the occurrence of severe postoperative pulmonary complications in patients with esophageal cancer after thoracic esophagectomy. PMID:25139532

  9. Gallbladder perforation: a rare complication of postoperative chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanlai; Song, Wentao; Hou, Qingsheng; Li, Jianning; Guo, Hongliang

    2015-01-01

    A middle-aged man presented 1 day after being discharged from hospital with completing the first course of postoperative chemotherapy. He suffered a sudden persistent high fever and chills. It was noted that he had a history of a total gastrectomy (with D2 lymphadenectomy) 1 month ago. His admission bloods revealed total bilirubin was 142.2 umol/L, indirect bilirubin of 107.6 umol/L and white cell count of 20.05×10(9)/L. A color doppler ultrasound scan confirmed fluid and gas around liver and hilus lienis while the gallbladder cannot be detected. During Computed Tomography (CT) guided puncture positioning technology and setting a three-channel tube, about 400 ml of foul smell hazel turbid liquid was drained out. He was diagnosed as gallbladder perforation and he was underwent conservative treatment consist of drainage, banning diet, total parenteral nutrition and intravenous antibiotics. Then he recovered well within the subsequent 10 days and was discharged. PMID:26271278

  10. Post-operative stress fractures complicating surgery for painful forefoot conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Max R; Jack, Christopher; Jones, Gareth G; Singh, Samrendu K

    2010-01-01

    A stress fracture is caused by repetitive or unusual loading of a bone leading to mechanical failure. Fatigue type stress fractures occur in normal bone exposed to abnormally high repetitive loads, whereas insufficiency type stress fractures occur in abnormal bone exposed to normal loads. We describe three cases of insufficiency stress fractures that have complicated surgery for painful forefoot conditions. The diagnosis and management of these cases are discussed. Stress fractures should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient who continues or develops pain after surgery to the forefoot. PMID:20418092

  11. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of immunomodulators in the treatment of patients with postoperative suppurative-septic complications].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Nikulina, V P

    1996-01-01

    The influence of immunoactive medicines on the cell immunity have been studied. There were differences in reaction to T-activin and Thymalin between various patients with septic postoperative complications. Thymalin stimulated T-cells while acting with immunoglobulins or immune plasmas only. T-activin led to the increase in the number of T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes independently of it's cooperation with the vaccines. The stimulating effect of myelopid demonstrated itself by increase in the number of B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins M and G after 14 days of treatment. The positive clinical effect was more impressive when immunomodulators were used in combinations with the vaccines; still it did not correlate completely with the dynamics of the cell immunity parameters. PMID:8754918

  12. A retrospective study of deep sternal wound infections: clinical and microbiological characteristics, treatment, and risk factors for complications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Monica; Yusuf, Erlangga; Giulieri, Stefano; Perrottet, Nancy; Von Segesser, Ludwig; Borens, Olivier; Trampuz, Andrej

    2016-03-01

    Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a feared complication following cardiac surgery. This study describes clinical, microbiological, and treatment outcomes of DSWI and determines risk factors for complications. Of 55 patients with DSWI, 66% were male and mean age was 68.2years. Initial sternotomy was for coronary artery bypass graft in 49% of patients. Sternal debridement at mean 25.4±18.3days showed monomicrobial (94%), mainly Gram-positive infection. Secondary sternal wound infection (SSWI) occurred in 31% of patients, was mostly polymicrobial (71%), and was predominantly due to Gram-negative bacilli. Risk factors for SSWI were at least 1 revision surgery (odds ratio [OR] 4.8 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.0-22.4], P=0.047), sternal closure by muscle flap (OR 4.6 [1.3-16.8], P=0.02), delayed sternal closure (mean 27 versus 14days, P=0.03), and use of vacuum-assisted closure device (100% versus 58%, P=0.008). Hospital stay was significantly longer in patients with SSWI (69days versus 48days, P=0.04). PMID:26707065

  13. Aorta-Left Renal Vein Fistula Complicating an Aortic Aneurysm: Preoperative and Postoperative Multislice CT Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Barrier, Pierre Otal, Philippe; Garcia, Olivier; Vahdat, Olivier; Domenech, Brice; Lannareix, Valerie; Joffre, Francis; Rousseau, Herve

    2007-06-15

    Fistulas complicating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are rare, and fistulas involving the left renal vein are particularly uncommon. We highlight here a fistula between an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a retroaortic left renal vein, revealed by left flank pain associated with hematuria and acute renal failure. The multislice CT angiography performed in this 68-year-old patient revealed communication and equal enhancement between the aorta and the left gonadic vein, suggesting the presence of a fistula. The three-dimensional VRT reconstructions presented in this case were of great value in the preoperative planning, enabling immediate visualization of this unusual feature. Alternative diagnoses to consider when encountering this clinical presentation are reviewed.

  14. Management of gunshot wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  15. Non-injection-site necrotic skin lesions complicating postoperative heparin thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tassava, Twylla; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2015-08-01

    The patient case we present is a definite case of HIT from both clinical and serological perspectives. The 4Ts score was eventually 8/8 (maximum) based upon thrombocytopenia (88% platelet count fall to nadir of 58 109/L), appropriate timing (onset on Day 5 post-intraoperative UFH exposure), thrombosis (right lower limb DVTs, skin necrosis, anaphylactoid reaction to IV heparin, right hallux ischemic necrosis), and no plausible alternative explanation for thrombocytopenia. In addition, the patient had a strong positive SRA and PF4-dependent ELISA. Although necrotizing skin lesions distant from heparin injection sites are not a common consequence of HIT, their occurrence in this patientalong with previous supportive literature [11-13]indicate that these lesions should be considered rare manifestations of HIT. Moreover, the distinct localization of the unusual necrotic skin rash to the right limb suggests that a low flow state due to the arterial obstruction or perhaps even as a result of an underlying venous thrombus, both of which were present in our patient, could play a key pathophysiological role in predisposing to this unusual complication of HIT. PMID:25808584

  16. Use of custom made porous hydroxyapatite implants for cranioplasty: postoperative analysis of complications in 1549 patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefini, Roberto; Esposito, Giacomo; Zanotti, Bruno; Iaccarino, Corrado; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Servadei, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cranioplasty is a surgical intervention aimed at reestablishing the integrity of skull defects, and should be considered the conclusion of a surgical act that began with bone flap removal. Autologous bone is still considered the treatment of choice for cranioplasty. An alternative choice is bioceramic porous hydroxyapatite (HA) as it is one of the materials that meets and comes closest to the biomimetic characteristics of bone. Methods: The authors analyzed the clinical charts, compiled by the neurosurgeon, of all patients treated with custom-made porous HA devices (Custom Bone Service Fin-Ceramica, Faenza) from which epidemiological and pathological data as well as material-related complications were extrapolated. Results: From November 1997 to December 2010, 1549 patients underwent cranioplasty with the implantation of 1608 custom-made porous HA devices. HA was used in 53.8% of patients for decompressive craniectomy after trauma or intracranial hemorrhage, while the remaining cases were for treated for comminuted fracture, cutaneous or osseous resection, cranial malformation, autologous bone reabsorption or infection or rejection of previously implanted material. The incidence of adverse events in patients treated for cranioplasty, as first line treatment was 4.78% (56 events/1171 patients), and 5.02%, (19 events/378 patients) at second line. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that HA is a safe and effective material, is well tolerated in both adult and pediatric patients, and meets the requirements necessary to repair craniolacunia. PMID:23493459

  17. Incidence and risk factors for post-operative complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy : a comparison with other neuromuscular conditions.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, A D; Mitchell, M J; Tsirikos, A I

    2014-07-01

    We report the incidence of and risk factors for complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and compare them with those of other neuromuscular conditions. We identified 110 (64 males, 46 females) consecutive patients with a neuromuscular disorder who underwent correction of the scoliosis at a mean age of 14 years (7 to 19) and had a minimum two-year follow-up. We recorded demographic and peri-operative data, including complications and re-operations. There were 60 patients with cerebral palsy (54.5%) and 26 with DMD (23.6%). The overall complication rate was 22% (24 patients), the most common of which were deep wound infection (9, 8.1%), gastrointestinal complications (5, 4.5%) and hepatotoxicity (4, 3.6%). The complication rate was higher in patients with DMD (10/26, 38.5%) than in those with other neuromuscular conditions (14/84, 16.7% (p = 0.019). All hepatotoxicity occurred in patients with DMD (p = 0.003), who also had an increased rate of deep wound infection (19% vs 5%) (p = 0.033). In the DMD group, no peri-operative factors were significantly associated with the rate of overall complications or deep wound infection. Increased intra-operative blood loss was associated with hepatotoxicity (p = 0.036). In our series, correction of a neuromuscular scoliosis had an acceptable rate of complications: patients with DMD had an increased overall rate compared with those with other neuromuscular conditions. These included deep wound infection and hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was unique to DMD patients, and we recommend peri-operative vigilance after correction of a scoliosis in this group. PMID:24986949

  18. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5 values, and absolute and relative V5 values in male vs. female patients. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine correlations between dosimetric factors. Results: Eighteen (16.4%) of the 110 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications. Two of these died of progressive pneumonia. Hospitalizations were significantly longer for patients with postoperative pulmonary complications than for those without (median, 15 days vs. 11 days, p = 0.003). On univariate analysis, female gender (p = 0.017), higher mean lung dose (p = 0.036), higher relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy (V5) (p = 0.023), and smaller volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5-35 Gy (VS5-VS35) (p < 0.05) were all significantly associated with an increased incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. No other clinical factors were significantly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort. On multivariate analysis, the volume of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5) was the only significant independent factor associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Dosimetric factors but not clinical factors were found to be strongly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation plus surgery. The volume of the lung spared from doses of {>=}5 Gy was the only independent dosimetric factor in multivariate analysis. This suggests that ensuring an adequate volume of lung unexposed to radiation might reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications.

  19. Vacuum-assisted closure for open perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In colorectal cancer surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication, and especially, perineal wound complications after abdominoperineal resection (APR) remain to be serious clinical problems. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was first reported in another surgical field in 1997, and it is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. VAC therapy has been recently used for open abdominal wounds. We introduced VAC for treating open perineal wound of APR and report the usefulness of it. Presentation of case We treated four patients. Firstly, in cases 1 and 2, we introduced VAC therapy to the management of SSI of the perineal wound after APR, and it was useful to control postoperative perineal wound infection. And also, in cases 3 and 4, we introduced VAC therapy to prevent perineal wound infection. Perineal wound infection did not happen. Discussion A vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been reported to decrease perineal wound complications including pelvic abscess and open perineal wound; however it results in significant operative blood loss, increased operative time, and additional surgical complications. In our cases, there were no complications relating to VAC therapy and it promoted rapid wound healing. Our results suggested that it is an effective treatment for APR in a high-risk case of an open perineal wound. Conclusion VAC therapy is a less invasive method and a useful treatment for open perineal wound of APR. PMID:25942750

  20. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka ; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

  1. Preoperative and postoperative care in cosmetic laser resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Adam T.; Becker, Daniel G.

    2001-05-01

    Advances in laser technology have allowed the application of lasers to cosmetic facial skin resurfacing. While this application has been extremely advantageous to patients, the development of pre- and postoperative therapeutic regimens was necessary to mitigate potential complications associated with laser resurfacing. Potential complications of laser resurfacing include prolonged postoperative erythema, hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, herpetic, bacterial or candidal infection, and other concerns including scarring and abnormal wound healing. In this report we review the state of the art of preoperative and postoperative care for cosmetic laser resurfacing.

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications.

  3. Treatment of Sternal Wound Infection Using a Free Myocutaneous Flap.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-han; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Wang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-11-01

    Deep sternal wound infections are potentially life-threatening complications after cardiac operations because they can spread into the mediastinum and cause postoperative morbidity and mortality. We present a 65-year-old man with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting. A large sternal defect was left after debridement. After brief vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), a free myocutaneous flap of the anterolateral thigh (ALT) was used to fill the dead space. At the 9-month follow-up, the wound had healed completely without tissue loss or complications, and the patient returned to normal life. This was a successful treatment of a deep sternal wound with free flap coverage. PMID:26522542

  4. Postoperative infections after oesophageal resections: the role of blood transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Rovera, Francesca; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Imperatori, Andrea; Tabacchi, Alessandra; Carcano, Giulio; Diurni, Mario; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Background Perioperative blood transfusion carries numerous potential risks concerning the transmission of infective diseases and immunodepression that can facilitate the occurrence of postoperative infectious complications. Explanation of connections between perioperative blood transfusion and postoperative septic complication worldwide is not well documented. Many studies have described a correlation between perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative infections. On the contrary, other studies indicate that factors influencing the need for blood transfusions during surgery have a greater bearing than blood transfusion per se on the occurrence of postoperative complications. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted in our Department on 110 consecutive patients undergoing oesophageal resection for primary cancer, in order to evaluate the incidence of postoperative infections related to perioperative allogenic blood transfusions. For each patient we preoperatively recorded in a computerized data-base several known risk-factors for postoperative infections; in detail we registered the administration of allogenic perioperative blood transfusions (period of administration, number of packages administered). Results Among the enrolled 110 patients, 53 (48%) received perioperative blood transfusions: in this group postoperative infections (overall infective complications) occurred in 27 patients. After a multivariate analysis we observed that perioperative blood transfusions significantly affected as an independent variable the development of wound infections (p = 0.02). Conclusion Blood transfusions independently affected the incidence of wound infections in patients who underwent oesophageal resection for primary cancer. PMID:17118175

  5. Preoperative inspiratory muscle training to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal resection is associated with a high incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Respiratory complications account for almost half of the readmissions to the critical care unit. Postoperative complications can result in prolonged hospital stay and consequently increase healthcare costs. In cardiac surgery a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program has shown to prevent postoperative pneumonia and reduce length of hospital stay. While in some surgical centers inspiratory muscle training is already used in the preoperative phase in patients undergoing esophageal resection, the added value of this intervention on the reduction of pulmonary complications has not yet been investigated in large surgical populations other than cardiac surgery in a randomized and controlled study design. Methods/Design The effect of a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program on the incidence of postoperative pneumonia in patients undergoing esophageal resection will be studied in a single blind multicenter randomized controlled trial (the PREPARE study). In total 248 patients (age >18years) undergoing esophageal resection for esophageal cancer will be included in this study. They are randomized to either usual care or usual care with an additional inspiratory muscle training intervention according to a high-intensity protocol which is performed with a tapered flow resistive inspiratory loading device. Patients have to complete 30 dynamic inspiratory efforts twice daily for 7days a week until surgery with a minimum of 2weeks. The starting training load will be aimed to be 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure and will be increased based on the rate of perceived exertion. The main study endpoint is the incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Secondary objectives are to evaluate the effect of preoperative inspiratory muscle training on length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, incidence of other postoperative (pulmonary) complications, quality of life, and on postoperative respiratory muscle function and lung function. Discussion The PREPARE study is the first multicenter randomized controlled trial to evaluate the hypothesis that preoperative inspiratory muscle training leads to decreased pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection. Trial registration NCT01893008. PMID:24767575

  6. Postoperative Infectious Complications in Our Early Experience With Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazushi; Haraguchi, Takahiro; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Muramaki, Mototsugu; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate postoperative infectious complications (PICs) in our early experience with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) followed by mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of the clinical data for 90 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between February 2008 and March 2011. All patients were evaluated for the emergence of PICs, including prophylactic antibiotic administration (PAA) and the influence of the kind or duration of PAA on PIC. The details of cases with PICs were also examined. Results The patients' mean age was 71 years (range, 50 to 95 years), and their mean prostate volume was 60 mL (range, 2 to 250 mL). There were 7 cases (7.78%) with PICs; in detail, 3 patients were diagnosed with prostatitis, 2 with pyelonephritis, and 2 with epididymitis. Three patients had positive urine cultures: 1 had Serratia marcescens/Proteus mirabilis, 1 had S. marcescens, and 1 had Klebsiella pneumonia; only one case had urological sepsis. Our statistical data showed no significant differences between 2 or fewer days and 3 or more days of PAA and PIC occurrence. There was also no significant effect on PIC occurrence of sulbactam/ampicillin compared with other antibiotics. Conclusions The results of this retrospective study showed that PIC occurrence did not depend on the duration or the kind of PAA. Further prospective study is necessary for the evaluation and establishment of prophylactic measures for PICs. PMID:23526729

  7. Evaluation of procalcitonin as a biomarker of diagnosis, severity and postoperative complications in adult patients with acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Mohammad; Ehsanipour, Fahimeh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Tamannaie, Zeinab; Taghavi, Roohollah; Pishgahroudsari, Mohaddese; Jesmi, Fatemeh; Chaichian, Shahla

    2014-01-01

    Background: Delay in diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis (AA) results in an increased rate of perforation, postoperative morbidity, mortality and hospital length of stay. Several biochemical parameters including white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL6) and Procalcitonin (PCT) have been used to further improve the clinical diagnosis of AA. The aim of this study was to assess the value of procalcitonin as a predictor of diagnosis and severity of appendicitis in order to improve the clinical decision making, since other studies have been unable to demonstrate a diagnostic value for PCT elevation in acute appendicitis. Methods: One-hundred patients who underwent open appendectomy, including 75 men and 25 women with a mean age of 28 years were included in this study. Procalcitonin values were measured by an immunofluorescent method). Serum PCT>0.5 ng/ml was considered positive. The PCT serum values were measured in four different categories, including ?0.5ng/ml, 0.5-2 ng/ml, 2-10ng/ml and more than 10ng/ml. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of PCT level measurement for acute appendicitis diagnosis were 44% and 100% respectively. The value of PCT increased with the severity of appendicitis and also with the presence of peritonitis and infection, at the site of surgery. Conclusions: Procalcitonin measurement cannot be used as a diagnostic test for adult patients with acute appendicitis and its routine use in such patients is not cost effective and conclusive. Procalcitonin values can be used as a prognostic marker and predictor of infectious complications following surgery and it can help to carry out timely surgical intervention which is highly recommended in patients with PCT values more than 0.5ng/ml. PMID:25405116

  8. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea risk on postoperative respiratory complications: protocol for a hospital-based registry study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Christina H; Zaremba, Sebastian; Devine, Scott; Nikolov, Milcho; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with significant immediate and long-term morbidity, including fragmented sleep and impaired daytime functioning, as well as more severe consequences, such as hypertension, impaired cognitive function and reduced quality of life. Perioperatively, OSA occurs frequently as a consequence of pre-existing vulnerability, surgery and drug effects. The impact of OSA on postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) needs to be better characterised. As OSA is associated with significant comorbidities, such as obesity, pulmonary hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke, it is unclear whether OSA or its comorbidities are the mechanism of PRCs. This project aims to (1) develop a novel prediction score identifying surgical patients at high risk of OSA, (2) evaluate the association of OSA risk on PRCs and (3) evaluate if pharmacological agents used during surgery modify this association. Methods Retrospective cohort study using hospital-based electronic patient data and perioperative data on medications administered and vital signs. We will use data from Partners Healthcare clinical databases, Boston, Massachusetts. First, a prediction model for OSA will be developed using OSA diagnostic codes and polysomnography procedural codes as the reference standard, and will be validated by medical record review. Results of the prediction model will be used to classify patients in the database as high, medium or low risk of OSA, and we will investigate the effect of OSA on risk of PRCs. Finally, we will test whether the effect of OSA on PRCs is modified by the use of intraoperative pharmacological agents known to increase upper airway instability, including neuromuscular blockade, neostigmine, opioids, anaesthetics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination The Partners Human Research Committee approved this study (protocol number: 2014P000218). Study results will be made available in the form of manuscripts for publication and presentations at national and international meetings. PMID:26769778

  9. Comparison of laparoscopic versus conventional open cryptorchidectomies on intraoperative and postoperative complications and duration of surgery, anesthesia, and hospital stay in horses.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Nicola C; Koenig, Judith; Sorge, Ulrike

    2015-04-15

    Objective-To compare surgical preparation time, surgery and anesthesia times, hospitalization duration, and intra- and postoperative complications between laparoscopic and conventional open cryptorchidectomy in horses. Design-Retrospective cohort study. Animals-60 horses that underwent cryptorchidectomy. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed to identify horses that had undergone cryptorchidectomy from 1991 to 2012. Thirty horses that underwent laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy (case horses) were matched with 30 control horses that had undergone open cryptorchidectomy (ie, inguinal and parainguinal surgical approaches). Horses were matched according to history of previous surgery, testicle location, and type of closure following removal of an undescended unilateral testicle. Duration of surgery, surgical preparation and anesthesia times, hospitalization duration, and number of intra- and postoperative complications were compared between horses that underwent laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy versus open cryptorchidectomy. Comparisons were also made between horses in terms of whether there was a history of previous failed cryptorchidectomy or unknown location of testicle prior to surgery. Results-Horses that underwent laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy had significantly longer surgery and anesthesia times overall, compared with horses that underwent open cryptorchidectomy. No difference in surgery time was found between case and control horses that had a previous surgical attempt to remove an undescended testicle or in which the testicle location was unknown prior to surgery. Overall, horses undergoing laparoscopy had a nonsignificant increase in intraoperative complications, compared with control horses, and had significantly more postoperative complications. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Horses undergoing laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy had increased surgical preparation time, increased surgery and anesthesia times, and more postoperative complications, compared with horses undergoing open cryptorchictomy. Laparoscopy may be advantageous for a second attempt at cryptorchidectomy or if the testicle location is unknown prior to surgery. PMID:25835173

  10. Stan Scheller: The Forerunner of Clinical Studies on Using Propolis for Poor and Chronic Nonhealing Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzewski, M.; Kubacka, S.; Urbanek, T.; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K.; Morawiec, T.

    2013-01-01

    For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds. PMID:23710220

  11. Postoperative Complications, In-Hospital Mortality and 5-Year Survival After Surgical Resection for Patients with a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jilesen, Anneke P J; van Eijck, Casper H J; In't Hof, K H; van Dieren, S; Gouma, Dirk J; Nieveen van Dijkum, Els J M

    2016-03-01

    Studies on postoperative complications and survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are sparse and randomized controlled trials are not available. We reviewed all studies on postoperative complications and survival after resection of pNET. A systematic search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE from 2000-2013. Inclusion criteria were studies of resected pNET, which described postoperative complications separately for each surgical procedure and/or 5-year survival after resection. Prospective and retrospective studies were pooled separately and overall pooled if heterogeneity was below 75 %. The random-effect model was used. Overall, 2643 studies were identified and after full-text analysis 62 studies were included. Pancreatic fistula (PF) rate of the prospective studies after tumor enucleation was 45 %; PF-rates after distal pancreatectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, or central pancreatectomy were, respectively, 14-14-58 %. Delayed gastric emptying rates were, respectively, 5-5-18-16 %. Postoperative hemorrhage rates were, respectively, 6-1-7-4 %. In-hospital mortality rates were, respectively, 3-4-6-4 %. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) of resected pNET without synchronous resected liver metastases were, respectively, 85-93 %. Heterogeneity between included studies on 5-year OS in patients with synchronous resected liver metastases was too high to pool all studies. The 5-year DSS in patients with liver metastases was 80 %. Morbidity after pancreatic resection for pNET was mainly caused by PF. Liver resection in patients with liver metastases seems to have a positive effect on DSS. To reduce heterogeneity, ISGPS criteria and uniform patient groups should be used in the analysis of postoperative outcome and survival. PMID:26661846

  12. Lack of association between arterial oxygen tensions in horses during exploratory coeliotomy and post-operative incisional complications: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Robson, Katherine; Cripps, Peter; Bardell, David

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if there was an association between the lowest arterial blood oxygen tensions (PaO2) measured during anaesthesia and post-operative incisional complications in horses. Clinical records of 278 horses undergoing ventral midline coeliotomy from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2013 were examined. The frequency of incisional complications was 32.0% (n = 89). In a multivariable model, intra-operative arterial blood oxygen tensions (PaO2) were not significantly associated with development of an incisional complication (P = 0.351). Using hypertonic (7.2%) saline (P = 0.028, OR 3.167, 95% CI 1.132-8.861), increasing total plasma protein concentration (TP) (P = 0.002, OR 1.061 per g/L, 95% CI 1.021-1.102), an intestinal resection (P <0.001, OR 4.056, 95% CI 2.231-9.323), increasing body mass (P = 0.004, OR 1.004 per kg, 95% CI 1.001-1.006) and the use of penicillin alone compared with penicillin and gentamicin pre-operatively (P = 0.009, OR 4.145, 95% CI 1.568-10.958) increased the risk of incisional complications. The study was unable to demonstrate a link between low intra-operative PaO2 and increased risk of post-operative incisional complications. PMID:26975449

  13. Influence of two different surgical techniques on the difficulty of impacted lower third molar extraction and their post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Ohanyan, Ani; Kechagias, Nikos; Tsekos, Antonis; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative complications of various degrees of severity are commonly observed in third molar impaction surgery. For this reason, a surgical procedure that decreases the trauma of bone and soft tissues should be a priority for surgeons. In the present study, we compare the efficacy and the post-operative complications of patients to whom two different surgical techniques were applied for impacted lower third molar extraction. Material and Methods Patients of the first group underwent the classical bur technique, while patients of the second group underwent another technique, in which an elevator was placed on the buccal surface of the impacted molar in order to luxate the alveolar socket more easily. Results Comparing the two techniques, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the duration of the procedure and in the need for tooth sectioning when applying the second surgical technique, while the post-operative complications were similar in the two groups. We also found a statistically significant lower incidence of lingual nerve lesions and only a slightly higher frequency of sharp mandibular bone irregularities in the second group, which however was not statistically significant. Conclusions The results of our study indicate that the surgical technique using an elevator on the buccal surface of the tooth seems to be a reliable method to extract impacted third molars safely, easily, quickly and with the minimum trauma to the surrounding tissues. Key words:Mandibular third molar, impacted, surgical technique, extraction, elevator. PMID:26116843

  14. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below. PMID:26157306

  15. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below. PMID:26157306

  16. Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. . E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Wang, Shulian; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

  17. Effects of Adding Midazolam and Sufentanil to Intrathecal Bupivacaine on Analgesia Quality and Postoperative Complications in Elective Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahpour, Abolfazl; Azadi, Raheleh; Bandari, Razieh; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intrathecal adjutants can be used for regional anesthesia (RA) in cesarean section to improve its quality in terms of time and complications. Some previous studies focused on the effects of adding sufentanil and/or midazolam to bupivacaine and compared each with using bupivacaine alone. However, there has been no study to assess the effects of using sufentanil and midazolam in combination with bupivacaine. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare properties (time of achievement/recovery of sensory/motor blocks; and time to request opium), complications (nausea, vomiting, shivering and hypotension), and neonatal first minute Apgar score with and without the addition of midazolam (M) or sufentanil (S) to bupivacaine (B) through intrathecal injection for spinal anesthesia, after the cesarean section. Patients and Methods: In this double blind randomized clinical trial participants were randomly allocated to three equal groups: Group B (2.5 cc of bupivacaine 0.5% + 1 cc normal saline 0.9%), Group BM (2.5 cc of bupivacaine + 0.02 mg/kg midazolam) and Group BS (2.5 cc of bupivacaine 0.5% + 0.7 cc normal saline 0.9% + 1.5 g of sufentanil, 0.3 cc). We used analysis of variance (ANOVA), post hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment, and chi-square test for statistical analysis; the analyses were performed using the SPSS-16 software. Given a significant level of 0.05, overall and pair-wise comparisons were made. Results: Seventy-five females participated in the study with no significant age difference (mean standard deviation (SD): 28.60 6.06, 28.12 5.29 and 28.76 3.97 year; P = 0.9). Except for time to motor block recovery (P = 0.057), the overall differences among the three groups was significant in terms of time to sensory/motor block (P < 0.001), time to sensory block recovery (P < 0.001), and time to request opium (P < 0.001). In all pair-wise comparisons there was no significant difference between the BM and BS group, except for time to request opium, which was longer in the BS group (P < 0.001). The occurrence of nausea (P = 0.02), postoperative shivering (P = 0.01) and hypotension (P < 0.001) were significantly different between the groups, unlike vomiting, where the difference was not significant (P = 0.2). All neonates had an Apgar score of nine. Conclusions: The findings showed that adding sufentanil or midazolam to bupivacaine shortens the onset of spinal anesthesia and increases the time duration of anesthesia; however it does not change the motor block recovery time. Adding sufentanil delays the first request for narcotic analgesics while adding midazolam leads to a decrease in nausea and hypotension. Adding sufentanil or midazolam does not have any deleterious effect on infants Apgar scores. However, increases shivering in patients. PMID:26473100

  18. Local Anaesthetic Infiltration and Indwelling Postoperative Wound Catheters for Patients with Hip Fracture Reduce Death Rates and Length of Stay.

    PubMed

    Harrison, William D; Lees, Deborah; A'Court, Jamie; Ankers, Thomas; Harper, Ian; Inman, Dominic; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background. An analgesic enhanced recovery (ER) protocol for patients with a hip fracture was introduced. It was hypothesised that the ER would reduce pain, length of stay and improve clinical outcomes. The protocol used intraoperative infiltration of levobupivacaine followed by ongoing wound infusions. Methods. Consecutive patients admitted to two hospitals were eligible for the ER protocol. Numerical Reporting Scale pain scores (0-10) were recorded alongside opiate requirements. 434 patients in the ER group (316 full ER, 90 partial ER, and 28 no ER) were compared to a control group (CG) of 100 consecutive patients managed with traditional opiate analgesia. Results. Mean opiate requirement was 49.2?mg (CG) versus 32.5?mg (ER). Pain scores were significantly reduced in the full ER group, p < 0.0001. Direct discharge home and mean acute inpatient stay were significantly reduced (p = 0.0031 and p < 0.0001, resp.). 30-day mortality was 15% (CG) versus 5.5% (ER), p = 0.0024. Conclusions. This analgesic ER protocol for patients with a hip fracture was safe and effective and was associated with reduced inpatient stay and mortality. PMID:26649330

  19. Local Anaesthetic Infiltration and Indwelling Postoperative Wound Catheters for Patients with Hip Fracture Reduce Death Rates and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Lees, Deborah; A'Court, Jamie; Ankers, Thomas; Harper, Ian; Inman, Dominic; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An analgesic enhanced recovery (ER) protocol for patients with a hip fracture was introduced. It was hypothesised that the ER would reduce pain, length of stay and improve clinical outcomes. The protocol used intraoperative infiltration of levobupivacaine followed by ongoing wound infusions. Methods. Consecutive patients admitted to two hospitals were eligible for the ER protocol. Numerical Reporting Scale pain scores (0–10) were recorded alongside opiate requirements. 434 patients in the ER group (316 full ER, 90 partial ER, and 28 no ER) were compared to a control group (CG) of 100 consecutive patients managed with traditional opiate analgesia. Results. Mean opiate requirement was 49.2 mg (CG) versus 32.5 mg (ER). Pain scores were significantly reduced in the full ER group, p < 0.0001. Direct discharge home and mean acute inpatient stay were significantly reduced (p = 0.0031 and p < 0.0001, resp.). 30-day mortality was 15% (CG) versus 5.5% (ER), p = 0.0024. Conclusions. This analgesic ER protocol for patients with a hip fracture was safe and effective and was associated with reduced inpatient stay and mortality. PMID:26649330

  20. Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT. PMID:24106562

  1. Early Postoperative Results and Complications of using the EX-PRESS Shunt in uncontrolled Uveitic Glaucoma: A Case Series of Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jonathan CH; Qing, Li; Lai, Jimmy SM

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this case series is to describe the efficacy of the EX-PRESS shunt in uveitic glaucoma. Methods: This prospective case series sequentially recruited uveitic glaucoma subjects with intraocular pressure (IOP) > 21 mm Hg despite maximal topical antiglaucoma medications from July 2012 to July 2013 in Hong Kong. All subjects received a trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (MMC) and EX-PRESS shunt implantation. The primary outcome measures included preope-rative IOP and postoperative IOP on day 1, 1 week, 1 month, and every 3 months thereafter. The secondary outcome measures included postoperative complications and follow-up procedures, pre- and postoperative Snellen best corrected visual acuity and cup-disc ratio, as well as the number of antiglaucoma medication required. Results: In a case series of five subjects with uncontrolled uveitic glaucoma, two had inactive anterior uveitis, and three had active panuveitis. The mean preoperative IOP was 35.4 ± 12.6 mm Hg on 3.8 ± 0.5 antiglaucoma eye drops. The mean day 1, 1 week and 1 month IOP's were 6.6 ± 3.7 mm Hg, 7.2 ± 3.2 mm Hg, and 12.6 ± 8.2 mm Hg, respectively. One case required subconjunctival MMC injections postoperatively; two required conjunctival resuture for leakage; and two had early postoperative hypotony that resolved after oral prednisolone. At 6 months, the mean IOP was 13.2 ± 4.6 mm Hg. Four out of five subjects had IOP < 21 mm Hg without medication, and all had IOP < 21 mm Hg with antiglaucoma medication. Conclusion: The EX-PRESS shunt demonstrates good IOP control with a propensity for hypotony in the early postoperative period in this small uveitic glaucoma series. How to cite this article: Lee JWY, Chan JCH, Qing L, Lai JSM. Early Postoperative Results and Complications of using the EXPRESS Shunt in uncontrolled Uveitic Glaucoma: A Case Series of Preliminary Results. J Current Glau Prac 2014;8(1):20-24.

  2. A multivariate analysis to assess the effect of packed red cell transfusion and the unit age of transfused red cells on postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Hegde, Vikas; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Arora, Bhavna; Rosamma, N.L; Thakur, Uday Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transfusion of blood components and age of transfused packed red cells (PRCs) are independent risk factors for morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgeries. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined data of patients undergoing cardiac surgery at our institute from January 1, 2012 to September 30, 2012. Details of transfusion (autologous and allogenic), postoperative length of stay (PLOS), postoperative complications were recorded along with other relevant details. The analysis was done in two stages, in the first both transfused and nontransfused individuals and in the second only transfused individuals were considered. Age of transfused red cells as a cause of morbidity was analyzed only in the second stage. Results: Of the 762 patients included in the study, 613 (80.4%) were males and 149 (19.6%) were females. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors like the number and age of transfused PRCs and age of the patient had significant bearing upon the morbidity. Morbidity was significantly higher in the patients transfused with allogenic PRCs when compared with the patients not receiving any transfusion irrespective of the age of transfused PRCs. Transfusion of PRC of over 21 days was associated with higher postoperative complications, but not with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, allogenic blood transfusion increases morbidity. The age of PRCs transfused has a significant bearing on morbidity, but not on in-hospital mortality. Blood transfusion services will therefore have to weigh the risks and benefits of providing blood older than 21 days in cardiac surgeries. PMID:25722566

  3. Tracheal tube cuff inflation guided by pressure volume loop closure associated with lower postoperative cuff-related complications: Prospective, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Almarakbi, Waleed A.; Kaki, Abdullah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main function of an endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff is to prevent aspiration. High cuff pressure is usually associated with postoperative complications. We tried to compare cuff inflation guided by pressure volume loop closure (PV-L) with those by just to seal technique (JS) and assess the postoperative incidence of sore throat, cough and hoarseness. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, 100 patients’ tracheas were intubated. In the first group (n = 50), ETT cuff inflation was guided by PV-L, while in the second group (n. = 50) the ETT cuff was inflated using the JS technique. Intracuff pressures and volumes were measured. The incidence of postoperative cuff-related complications was reported. Results: Demographic data and durations of intubation were comparable between the groups. The use of PV-L was associated with a lesser amount of intracuff air [4.05 (3.7-4.5) vs 5 (4.8-5.5), P < 0.001] and lower cuff pressure than those in the JS group [18.25 (18-19) vs 33 (32-35), P ≤ 0.001]. The incidence of postextubation cuff-related complications was significantly less frequent among the PV-L group patients as compared with the JS group patients (P ≤ 0.009), except for hoarseness of voice, which was less frequent among the PV-L group, but not statistically significant (P ≤ 0.065). Multiple regression models for prediction of intra-cuff pressure after intubation and before extubation revealed a statistically significant association with the technique used for cuff inflation (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The study confirms that PV-L-guided ETT cuff inflation is an effective way to seal the airway and associates with a lower ETT cuff pressure and lower incidence of cuff-related complications. PMID:25191181

  4. Prospective Study of Postoperative Complications After Total Thyroidectomy for Multinodular Goiters by Surgeons With Experience in Endocrine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zambudio, Antonio Ros; Rodrguez, Jos; Riquelme, Juan; Soria, Teresa; Canteras, Manuel; Parrilla, Pascual

    2004-01-01

    Objetives: (1) To show that total thyroidectomy (TT) can be performed in multinodular goiter (MG) by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery with a definitive complication rate of 1% or less; and (2) to analyze the risk factors for complications in these patients. Summary Background Data: There is current controversy over the role of TT in the treatment of MG; although there are potential benefits, high rates of complications are not acceptable in surgery for a benign pathology. Patients and Method: A prospective study was conducted on 301 MGs meeting the following criteria: (1) bilateral MG; (2) no prior cervical surgery; (3) operation by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery; (4) no associated parathyroid pathology; (5) no initial thoracic approach; and (6) minimum follow-up of 1 year. Age, sex, time of evolution, symptoms, cervical goiter grade, intrathoracic component, thyroid weight, and presence of associated carcinoma were analyzed as risk factors for complications. The ?2 test and a logistic regression analysis were applied. Results: Complications were presented by 62 patients (21%), corresponding to 29 hypoparathyroidisms, 26 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries, 4 lesions of the superior laryngeal nerve, 3 cervical hematomas, and 1 infection of the cervicotomy. The variables associated with the presence of these complications were hyperthyroidism (P = 0.0033), compressive symptoms (P = 0.0455), intrathoracic component (P = 0.0366), goiter grade (P = 0.0195), and weight of excised specimen (P = 0.0302); hyperthyroidism (relative risk [RR] 2.5) and intrathoracic component (RR 1.5) persisted as independent risk factors. Definitive complications appeared in 3 patients (1%), corresponding to 2 hypoparathyroidisms and 1 recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Two cases corresponded to a toxic goiter, and the third to an intrathoracic goiter with compressive symptoms. Conclusion: In endocrine surgery units, TT can be performed for MG with a definitive complication rate of around 1%; the main independent risk factors for the development of complications are hyperthyroidism and goiter size. PMID:15213613

  5. A Cochrane Systematic Review finds no significant difference in outcome or risk of postoperative complications between day care and in-patient cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Fedorowicz, Zbigniew; Lawrence, David J; Gutierrez, Peter

    2006-09-01

    This review was conducted to determine reliable evidence regarding the safety, feasibility, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of cataract extraction performed as a day care versus in-patient procedure. The search to identify randomized controlled trials comparing day care and in-patient surgery for age-related cataract included the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences. Assessment of methodological quality was based on criteria defined by the Cochrane Collaboration. The primary outcome was the achievement of a satisfactory visual acuity 6 weeks after operation. Two trials, involving a total of 1284 people, are included. One trial reported statistically significant differences in early postoperative complication rates in the day care group, which had no clinical relevance to visual outcomes 4 months postoperatively. Mean change in visual acuity Snellen lines of the operated eye 4 months postoperatively was 4.1 standard deviation SD 2.3 for the day care group and 4.1 SD 2.2 for the in-patient group. Costs were 20% more for the in-patient group attributable to higher costs for overnight stay. PMID:16951761

  6. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  7. In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

    2012-01-01

    Objective To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Methods Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. Results With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. Conclusions It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated. PMID:23569962

  8. Postoperative vascular complications in unrecognised Obstructive Sleep apnoea (POSA) study protocol: an observational cohort study in moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Matthew T V; Wang, Chew-Yin; Seet, Edwin; Tam, Stanley; Lai, Hou-Yee; Walker, Stuart; Short, Timothy G; Halliwell, Richard; Chung, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emerging epidemiological data suggest that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general surgical population. Unfortunately, the majority of these patients are unrecognised and untreated at the time of surgery. There is substantial biological rationale to indicate that patients with unrecognised OSA are at a higher risk of postoperative vascular events. However, the extent of this morbidity is currently unknown. We have initated the postoperative vascular complications in the unrecognised obstructive sleep apnoea (POSA) study to determine the associations between OSA, nocturnal hypoxia and major postoperative vascular events in 1200 moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis The POSA study is an international prospective observational cohort study. Using a type 3 portable sleep monitoring device and ambulatory oximetry, we will quantify the severity of OSA. The primary outcome is a composite of vascular death, myocardial infarction; non-fatal cardiac arrest; stroke; pulmonary embolism; congestive heart failure and new arrhythmia within 30?days of surgery. As of November 2013, we have recruited over 700 patients from nine centres in six countries. The mean age is 68?years, the mean body mass index is 27?kg/m2 and 55% of patients are men. 27.9% of patients have known coronary artery disease, over 76% have diabetes. The majority of patients underwent orthopaedic surgery (28%) and colorectal resection (18.5%). Ethics and dissemination The POSA study has received ethics approval from all study sites before patient recruitment. Informed consent will be obtained from all patients. The POSA study will determine the risk of unrecognised OSA in major non-cardiac surgery. We will publish these findings in peer-reviewed journals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01494181 PMID:24413351

  9. [Use of immunochemical studies to predict the course of fibrous cavernous tuberculosis of lung and postoperative complications in patients on chemo and laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, L V; Dobkin, V G; Baenski, A V; Kulikovskaia, N V; Litvinov, V I

    1997-01-01

    A total of 103 patients with fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lung were examined. They all received chemotherapy, including 3 - 4 antituberculous agents. Laser therapy was performed with a UZOR-2K low-energy semiconductor laser. In patients with profound changes in the serum level of protein, with high antigenemia and antibody production, the course of the disease was found to be poor; X-ray positive changes were achieved to a lesser extent, bacterial expellation stopped less frequently and more slowly. The decreases in the serum content of the proteins tested, in the level of antigenemia and antibody production which occur with drug and laser therapies are also an important factor of preoperative preparation, which is highly effective in preventing postoperative complications. PMID:9333810

  10. Acute Pulmonary Oedema: A Post-Operative Complication Due to Neostigmine and Post Obstructive Pulmonary Oedema in a Case of Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Durve, Shubhada R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema has been described in relation to perioperative period. The aetiology may be multifactorial and its management poses a challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Its occurrence in a normal healthy person with no other medical history makes the diagnosis difficult. The causes of pulmonary oedema are cardiac failure, fluid overload, airway obstruction, acid aspiration, gas embolism, anaesthetic drugs, sepsis, anaphylactic reaction and reaction to blood & blood products. Early detection, prompt management by an anaesthesiologist will help to prevent further postoperative complications. We report a case of 9-year-old male child, posted for tonsillectomy under general anaesthesia, who developed acute pulmonary oedema following extubation after reversal with neostigmine and how we managed it successfully. PMID:26266194

  11. Acute Pulmonary Oedema: A Post-Operative Complication Due to Neostigmine and Post Obstructive Pulmonary Oedema in a Case of Tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    More, Preeti G; Durve, Shubhada R

    2015-06-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema has been described in relation to perioperative period. The aetiology may be multifactorial and its management poses a challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Its occurrence in a normal healthy person with no other medical history makes the diagnosis difficult. The causes of pulmonary oedema are cardiac failure, fluid overload, airway obstruction, acid aspiration, gas embolism, anaesthetic drugs, sepsis, anaphylactic reaction and reaction to blood & blood products. Early detection, prompt management by an anaesthesiologist will help to prevent further postoperative complications. We report a case of 9-year-old male child, posted for tonsillectomy under general anaesthesia, who developed acute pulmonary oedema following extubation after reversal with neostigmine and how we managed it successfully. PMID:26266194

  12. A randomized, prospective study of total hip wound closure with resorbable subcuticular staples.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David A; Bengero, Lowell L; Clapp, Brenda C; Burgess, Mary

    2010-09-01

    Resorbable subcuticular staples are a new way to close surgical wounds and have not been reported in the orthopedic literature. This randomized, controlled study compared a resorbable subcuticular staple system with stainless steel wound stapling in patients undergoing unilateral primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent was obtained for all patients. Sixty patients (30 each group) were randomized to receive either resorbable subcuticular staples or stainless steel staples after primary THA. Incision length, number of staples used, and any staple insertion problems were recorded. Subjective reports of pain levels or incision complaints were solicited, and wound photographs were obtained on days 1 and 14 and 6 weeks postoperatively. The presence of wound drainage, erythema, wound separation, or echymosis was recorded at each visit, as well as all postoperative complications. The average incision length in the resorbable group was 13.2 cm and required 16 staples for closure, compared to 15 cm and 20 staples for the metal staple group. No infections occurred in either group, although the incidence of erythema and wound drainage at 2 weeks was higher for patients in the stainless steel group. One patient with metal staples had a postoperative hematoma requiring secondary irrigation and debridement. Patient satisfaction was higher with the resorbable staples. A resorbable subcuticular staple system can provide comparable wound closure to stainless steel staples following THA and may do so with less local discomfort, wound drainage, or erythematous reaction. PMID:20839703

  13. Incisional negative pressure wound therapy for high-risk wounds.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E

    2015-04-01

    With an ageing population and a growing number of people with obesity and/or undergoing advanced cancer therapies, there is an increasing risk of surgical site complications including surgical site infections (SSIs). Postoperative shifting of large mobilised tissue flaps, such as in abdominoplasties, remains a dreaded complication, particularly following massive weight loss. Besides negative implications for the patient, surgical site complications result in an economic burden due to prolonged and repeated wound treatments. Preventative tools to reduce SSIs are needed. In selected patients at high risk of SSI and/or wound breakdown, use of incisional NPWT has been shown to actively manage clean, closed surgical incisions. This article contains a review of scientific and clinical research relevant to incisional NPWT use over surgical incisions, with particular emphasis on the common problem of wound breakdown and SSI following body-contouring surgery in post-bariatric patients. Although there are a growing number of studies describing use of incisional NPWT in a variety of applications, including vascular, cardiac and orthopaedic, a literature search revealed few studies regarding incisional NPWT use post body-contouring surgery. In a clinical study of seroma formation, less seroma and haematoma formation was reported in post-bariatric patients who received incisional NPWT, versus the control, following body-contouring surgery. In another study of widely applied external NPWT wound dressings over the ventral and lateral trunk following post-bariatric abdominal dermolipectomy, results showed a significant reduction in exudate formation, earlier drain removal, and decreased length of hospitalisation, compared with conventional treatment. Additional controlled studies are needed to validate the clinical impact of incisional NPWT following body-contouring surgery, and to determine proper recommendations for its use. PMID:25853645

  14. Association Between Endoscopic vs. Open Vein Harvesting and Mortality, Wound Complications, and Cardiovascular Events in Patient Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Judson B.; Peterson, Eric D.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Sedrakyan, Art; Tavris, Dale; Alexander, John H.; Lopes, Renato D.; Dokholyan, Rachel S.; Zhao, Yue; OBrien, Sean M.; Michler, Robert E.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Edwards, Fred H.; Duggirala, Hesha; Gross, Thomas; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Smith, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    Context The safety and durability of endoscopic vein harvest (EVH) in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) has recently been called into question. Objective To compare the long-term outcomes of endoscopic versus open vein graft harvesting for Medicare patients undergoing CABG surgery in the United States of America. Design, Setting, and Patients This is an observational study of 235,394 Medicare patients undergoing isolated CABG from 2003 to 2008 at 934 surgical centers participating in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) national database. STS records were linked to Medicare files to allow longitudinal assessment (median follow-up 3 years) through December 2009. Main Outcome Measure Primary: death; Secondary: wound complications and the composite of myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularization. Results Based on Medicare Part B coding, 52% of patients received EVH during CABG, less often in females than males (but <2% difference). After propensity score adjustment for clinical characteristics, there were no significant differences between long-term mortality (12,429/122,899 [13.2%] vs. 13,096/112,495 [13.4%]) and the composite of death, MI and revascularization (18,419/122,899 [19.5%] vs. 19,232/112,495 [19.7%])for those receiving EVH vs. open, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97, 1.04) for mortality and 1.0 (95% CI 0.98, 1.05) for the composite outcome. EVH was associated with lower harvest site wound complications relative to open procedure (3,654/122,899 [2.97%] vs. 4,047/112,495 [3.6%]), adjusted HR 0.83 (95 % CI 0.77, 0.89; p<0.0001). Conclusions Among patients undergoing CABG, the use of endoscopic vein-graft harvest compared with open vein graft harvest was not associated with increased mortality. PMID:22851114

  15. [Postoperative disease].

    PubMed

    Germain, A

    1976-01-01

    Post-operative disease, which is well known clinically, is characterised in the laboratory and metabolically by a succession of two stages=an initial short stage, lasting a few days, marked by intensive catabolism and, after a change, there is a second phase, much longer, lasting several weeks, anabolic in nature, during which are reconstituted the reserves lost during the first phase. The mechanism of post-operative disease enters into the general field of post-aggressive reaction bringing into play an adrenocorticoid process. But a whole series of factors, included in the agression without neuro-endocrine background, cause diffuse metabolic disturbances in the organism with their own appearance of severity. Occurring at the same time as the operation, they may also occur in the pre and postoperative periods. In order to minimise and shorten the post-operative disease, it is important to combat as far as possible, these different specific factors by good preparation, correct anesthetic and surgical techniques and the prevention and treatment of complications. One should also pay attention to nutritional problems. When, before operation, patients are particularly under-nourished, or when, after operation, muscle wasting lasts abnormally owing to the temporary incapacity of the digestive tract to fulfil its role, or when catabolism takes on a dangerous appearance owing to the magnitude of the surgical aggression, or the onset of a complication, such as suppuration, it is essential to administer a high calory diet, either by venous catheter in a large vein, or, by continuous administration through a gastric catheter and using the nutripump. PMID:134395

  16. Anal cushion lifting method is a novel radical management strategy for hemorrhoids that does not involve excision or cause postoperative anal complications

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Gentaro; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ishiyama, Yuji; Nishio, Akihiko; Tarumi, Ken; Kawamura, Maiko; Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Fujimiya, Mineko; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the anal cushion lifting (ACL) method with preliminary clinical results. METHODS: Between January to September 2007, 127 patients who received ACL method for hemorrhoid was investigated with informed consent. In this study, three surgeons who specialized in anorectal surgery performed the procedures. Patients with grade two or more severe hemorrhoids according to Golighers classification were considered to be indicated for surgery. The patients were given the choice to undergo either the ACL method or the ligation and excision method. ACL method is an original technique for managing hemorrhoids without excision. After dissecting the anal cushion from the internal sphincter muscle, the anal cushion was lifted to oral side and ligated at the proper position. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients were recorded including complications after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 127 patients were enrolled. Their median age was 42 (19-84) years, and 74.8% were female. In addition, more than 99% of the patients had grade 3 or worse hemorrhoids. The median follow-up period was 26 (0-88) mo, and the median operative time was 15 (4-30) min. After surgery, analgesics were used for a median period of three days (0-21). Pain control was achieved using extra-oral analgesic drugs, although some patients required intravenous injections of analgesic drugs. The median duration of the patients postoperative hospital stay was 7 (2-13) d. A total of 10 complications (7.9%) occurred. Bleeding was observed in one patient and was successfully controlled with manual compression. Urinary retention occurred in 6 patients, but it disappeared spontaneously in all cases. Recurrent hemorrhoids developed in 3 patients after 36, 47, and 61 mo, respectively. No anal stenosis or persistent anal pain occurred. CONCLUSION: We consider that the ACL method might be better than all other current methods for managing hemorrhoids. PMID:26525139

  17. A comparison of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing in the prediction of postoperative cardiac complications in patients requiring arterial reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    McPhail, N.V.; Ruddy, T.D.; Calvin, J.E.; Davies, R.A.; Barber, G.G.

    1989-07-01

    The individual and combined predictive values of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing were compared in a prospective study of 70 patients who had abdominal aortic aneurysms or aortoiliac occlusive disease that required surgical repair. All patients were evaluated clinically by the same cardiologist and had exercise stress testing and dipyridamole-thallium imaging before admission for surgery. Ten patients were excluded from the study because they had evidence of severe ischemia when tested (ST segment depression greater than 2 mm on exercise testing, severe multivessel disease on thallium imaging). The remaining 60 patients were operated on (abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, 40; aortobifemoral repair, 17; femorofemoral graft, 3). The test results were withheld from the surgeon, anesthetist, and cardiologist before surgery. A total of 22 patients experienced major cardiac complications postoperatively (acute pulmonary edema, 17; acute myocardial infarction, 5; cardiac death, 2). Thallium imaging showed myocardial ischemia in 31/60 patients. Exercise testing was positive (greater than or equal to 1 mm ST segment depression) in 10/60 patients. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging with a high sensitivity and reasonable specificity is the initial test of choice. Exercise testing is a poor screening test because of its low sensitivity. The combination of the two tests gives the highest positive predictive value and the greatest likelihood ratio. Thus patients assessed initially and found to have positive thallium scan results may be further stratified by exercise testing.

  18. Conservative Management of Wound Dehiscence Following Pediatric Cavus Foot Surgery: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cavus foot surgeries are relatively common procedures in pediatric orthopedics. Following surgery, the tensile forces exerted on the wound by the newly corrected foot may hinder soft tissue healing and lead to wound dehiscence. Treatments including skin grafting and other plastic surgery procedures have been described in order to manage this complication. However, the effectiveness of conservative treatment regimens in cases of large dehiscence of these wounds has not yet been reported. Methods: The charts of 7 patients between the ages of 7 and 19 who had surgical correction of severe cavus deformity and who developed wound dehiscence postoperatively were reviewed. All patients were treated conservatively with regular cleaning with chlorhexedine and application of different ointments and dressings along with surgical debridements. Three patients also received antibiotics. The primary outcome was wound healing as documented by clinical notes and photographs. Results: The treatment was successful in producing the desired outcome in all cases with no other systemic or wound complications developing. Complete wound healing was obtained within a median time of 6 months and 5 days of treatment without the need for skin grafting or other plastic surgery procedures. Conclusions: In pediatric patients with wound dehiscence postcavus foot surgery, conservative management with minimal surgical debridement and regular cleaning and dressing of the wound is a viable treatment option that has been shown to be effective in 7 cases. It should be considered in such patients before proceeding to more invasive surgical treatment. PMID:26894015

  19. Analysis of Complications in Postbariatric Abdominoplasty: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grieco, Michele; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Simonacci, Francesco; Raposio, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominoplasty is one of the most popular body-contouring procedures. It is associated with a significant number of complications: the most common ones are seroma, hematoma, infection, wound-healing problems, and skin flap necrosis. From January 2012 to December 2014, 25 patients (18 women and 7 men) (mean age: 51 years) underwent abdominoplastic surgery at the Plastic Surgery Section, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Italy. All patients reported a weight loss between 15?kg and 47?kg. All of the of 25 patients were included in the study; minor and major complications were seen in 17 (68%) and 8 (32%) patients, respectively. The percentage of complications in our patients was as follows: 9 patients with seroma (36%); 4 patients with wound dehiscence with delayed wound healing (16%); 3 cases with hematoma (12%); 2 patients with postoperative bleeding (8%); 1 patient (4%) with an umbilical necrosis; 1 patient (4%) with a deep vein thrombosis; 3 patients with infected seroma (12%); and 2 patients with wound infection (8%). There were no cases of postoperative mortality. The aim of this study is to analyze our complications in postbariatric abdominoplasty. PMID:26236501

  20. Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications in Patients With and Without an Obstruction Who Had Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer and Underwent a Single-Stage Operation After Mechanical Bowel Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare postoperative complications for single-stage surgery after mechanical bowel preparation in patients who experienced obstruction and those who did not. Methods From 2000 to 2011, 1,224 patients underwent a single-stage operation for left colorectal cancer after bowel preparation. Nonobstruction (NOB) and obstruction (OB) colorectal cancer patients were 1,053 (86.0%) and 171 (14.0%), respectively. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were compared between groups. Results The OB group had poor preoperative conditions (age, white blood cell, hemoglobin, albumin level, and advanced tumor stage) compared with the NOB group (P < 0.05). Mean on-table lavage time for the OB group was 17.5 minutes (range, 14-60 minutes). Mean operation time for the OB group was statistically longer than that of the NOB group (OB: 210 minutes; range, 120-480 minutes vs. NOB: 180 minutes; range, 60-420 minutes; P < 0.001). Overall morbidity was similar between groups (NOB: 19.7% vs. OB: 23.4%, P = 0.259). Major morbidity was more common in the OB group than in the NOB group, but the difference was without significance (OB: 11.7% vs. NOB: 7.6%, P = 0.070). Postoperative death occurred in 16 patients (1.3%), and death in the OB group (n = 7) was significantly higher than it was in the NOB group (n = 9) (4.1% vs. 0.9%, P = 0.001). Twelve patients had surgical complications, which were the leading cause of postoperative death: postoperative bleeding in five patients and leakage in seven patients. Conclusion Postoperative morbidity for a single-stage operation for obstructive left colorectal cancer is comparable to that for NOB, regardless of poor conditions of the patient. PMID:25580411

  1. The postoperative stomach.

    PubMed

    Woodfield, Courtney A; Levine, Marc S

    2005-03-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients. PMID:15741008

  2. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis and facial palsy as serial complications in orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Seok; Oh, Eui Sun; Hong, Jong Won; Roh, Tai Suk; Rah, Dong Kyun; Paik, Hyo Chae

    2011-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery is one of the most commonly performed cosmetic surgical procedures. Hemorrhage, infection, and facial palsy have been reported as complications of the surgery, but the occurrence is low. Our patient presented with facial palsy, postoperative bleeding, wound dehiscence, and descending necrotizing mediastinitis in a sequence. This is the first report of descending necrotizing mediastinitis after orthognathic surgery. Although these are very rare complications, awareness of the clinical presentation and the management of these conditions are important. PMID:21403562

  3. Impact of GOLD groups of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Choi, Sun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased postoperative complications. Recently, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classified COPD patients into four groups based on spirometry results and the severity of symptoms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of GOLD groups on postoperative complications. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of COPD patients who underwent preoperative spirometry between April and August 2013 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. We divided the patients into GOLD groups according to the results of spirometry and self-administered questionnaires that assessed the symptom severity and exacerbation history. GOLD groups, demographic characteristics, and operative conditions were analyzed. Results Among a total of 405 COPD patients, 70 (17.3%) patients experienced various postoperative complications, including infection, wound, or pulmonary complications. Thoracic surgery, upper abdominal surgery, general anesthesia, large estimated blood loss during surgery, and longer anesthesia time were significant risk factors for postoperative complications. Patients in high-risk group (GOLD groups C or D) had an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those in low-risk group (GOLD groups A or B). Conclusion COPD patients in GOLD groups representing a high exacerbation risk have an increased risk of postoperative complications compared to those with low risk. PMID:26929613

  4. Complications Following Anorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, Hiroko; Poylin, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Anorectal surgery is well tolerated. Rates of minor complications are relatively high, but major postoperative complications are uncommon. Prompt identification of postoperative complications is necessary to avoid significant patient morbidity. The most common acute complications include bleeding, infection, and urinary retention. Pelvic sepsis, while may result in dramatic morbidity and even mortality, is relatively rare. The most feared long-term complications include fecal incontinence, anal stenosis, and chronic pelvic pain. PMID:26929747

  5. Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from 120 to 1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = 13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

  6. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage with Postoperative Morbidity after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Lu, Jian-Wen; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background. The advantages or disadvantages of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) prior to pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) remain unclear. Methods. A prospectively maintained database was queried for 335 consecutive patients undergoing standard PD surgery between 2009 and 2013. Clinical data and postoperative complications of the 47 patients receiving PBD and 288 patients with early surgery were compared. A matching analysis was also performed between patients receiving or not receiving PBD (no-PBD). Results. The indication for PBD was severe obstructive jaundice (81%) and cholangitis (26%) at the time of PBD. 47?PBD patients had higher bilirubin level than 288 no-PBD patients preoperatively (363.2??mol/L versus 136.0??mol/L, p < 0.001). Although no significant difference of any complications could be observed between the two groups, positive intraoperative bile culture and wound infection seemed to be moderately increased in PBD compared to no-PBD patients (p = 0.084 and 0.183, resp.). In the matched-pair comparison, the incidence of wound infection was three times higher in PBD than no-PBD patients (14.9% versus 4.3%, p = 0.080). Conclusions. PBD seems to moderately increase the risk of postoperative wound and bile duct infection. Therefore, PBD should be selectively performed prior to PD. PMID:26798333

  7. Airway Compromise Due to Wound Hematoma Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Mark A; Aidlen, Jessica Pelow; Daniels, Alan H; Thakur, Nikhil A; Caiati, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    One of the most serious adverse events associated with anterior cervical spine surgery is wound hematoma resulting in airway compromise. The reported incidence of this postoperative complication has varied from 0.2% to 1.9%. Obstruction of the airway secondary to bleeding presents a challenging clinical scenario given the rapidity of onset, distorted anatomy of the upper respiratory tract, urgent need to act and potential for catastrophic consequences. This high-risk, life-threatening clinical scenario requires specialized knowledge and a well-designed treatment protocol to achieve a positive outcome. In this review, we report a case of airway compromise secondary to wound hematoma following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, followed by a review of relevant literature, anatomy, etiologic factors and diagnostic considerations. We also propose guidelines for the prevention and management of postoperative airway obstruction due to wound hematoma. PMID:22431955

  8. Vacuum-assisted closure of necrotic and infected cranial wound with loss of dura mater: A technical note

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osama; Storey, Christopher M.; Zhang, Shihao; Chelly, Marjorie R.; Yeoh, Melvin S.; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complex cranial wounds can be a problematic occurrence for surgeons. Vacuum-assisted closure devices have a wide variety of applications and have recently been used in neurosurgical cases involving complex cranial wounds. There is only one report regarding the use of a vacuum-assisted closure device with loss of dura mater. We report a complicated case of a necrotic cranial wound with loss of dura mater. Case Description: A 68-year-old female underwent an evacuation of a subdural hematoma. Postoperatively, the patient developed a wound infection that required removal of the bone flap. The wound developed a wedge-shaped necrosis of the scalp with exposure of brain tissue due to loss of dura mater from previous surgeries. She underwent debridement and excision of the necrotic tissue with placement of a synthetic dural graft (Durepair, Medtronic, Inc.) and placement of a wound vac. The patient underwent a latissismus dorsi muscle flap reconstruction that subsequently failed. After the wound vac was replaced, the synthetic dural graft was replaced with a fascia lata graft and an anterolateral thigh free flap reconstruction. We describe the technical nuances of this complicated case, how the obstacles were handled, and the literature that discusses the utility. Conclusion: We describe a case of a complex cranial wound and technical nuances on how to utilize a wound-vac with loss of dura mater. PMID:25657864

  9. Wound care in horses.

    PubMed

    Caston, Stephanie S

    2012-04-01

    Care of equine wounds in the field can be a challenging endeavor. Many times, wound care is complicated by chronicity or by prior inappropriate care in addition to the great degree of tissue trauma that occurred when the horse was wounded. Recognizing involvement of synovial structures, loss of skin, and damage to bone are critical in the initial examination of wounds and will guide future care. Education of clients is also important in that preparing them for possible outcomes during healing may help improve compliance and proper treatment of wound. Owners and trainers often perform much of the daily care and monitoring of equine wounds and thus can greatly assist or impede the progress. Bandaging is important to management of equine wounds-especially on the limbs-and is sometimes overlooked because of its labor-intensive nature and the desire for a spray, ointment, or salve that will heal the wound. The practitioner that improves and utilizes his or her understanding of the wound-healing process in concert with his or her knowledge of local anatomy will be the one who is best equipped to care for wounds in ambulatory practice. PMID:22640581

  10. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development. PMID:26611234

  11. Obesity and Surgical Wound Healing: A Current Review

    PubMed Central

    Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Dinh, Trish Phuong; Salas, R. Emerick; Johnson, Erika L.; Wright, Terry G.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The correlation between obesity and deficient wound healing has long been established. This review examines the current literature on the mechanisms involved in obesity-related perioperative morbidity. Methods. A literature search was performed using Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Internet searches. Keywords used include obesity, wound healing, adipose healing, and bariatric and surgical complications. Results. Substantial evidence exists demonstrating that obesity is associated with a number of postoperative complications. Specifically in relation to wound healing, explanations include inherent anatomic features of adipose tissue, vascular insufficiencies, cellular and composition modifications, oxidative stress, alterations in immune mediators, and nutritional deficiencies. Most recently, advances made in the field of gene array have allowed researchers to determine a few plausible alterations and deficiencies in obese individuals that contribute to their increased risk of morbidity and mortality, especially wound complications. Conclusion. While the literature discusses how obesity may negatively affect health on various of medical fronts, there is yet to be a comprehensive study detailing all the mechanisms involved in obesity-related morbidities in their entirety. Improved knowledge and understanding of obesity-induced physiological, cellular, molecular, and chemical changes will facilitate better assessments of surgical risks and outcomes and create efficient treatment protocols for improved patient care of the obese patient population. PMID:24701367

  12. [State of the immune system in patients with penetrating thoracic and abdominal injuries complicated by massive hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Abakumov, M M; Khvatov, V B

    2001-01-01

    Results of immune status examination on day 1-2 and 4-8 after operation in 217 patients with penetrating gunshot and stab-incised wounds of thorax and abdomen were analyzed. Correlation between immunogram and volume of acute hemorrhage was studied. Types of immunograms characteristic of good and complicated postoperative period were determined, their frequency was estimated, that permits to perform substantiated and timely special correction for acceleration of immunorehabilitation and prevention of infectious complications. PMID:11490494

  13. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of events, beginning with tissue injury, mediated by inflammation, and ending long after reepithelialization is complete. Research and controlled clinical experience have provided a better understanding so that clinicians can influence the events of healing to decrease pain, control bleeding, infection, and cosmetic result as well as speed the time for complete healing. The following is a summary of guidelines for the management of wound healing: (1) wound creation; wounds should be created with minimal necrosis of tissue in order to prevent delays in healing. Electrosurgical, cryosurgical, and laser surgical wounds heal more slowly than wounds created by scalpel excision or curettage. Electro-coagulation should be used sparingly in sutured wounds. Large lesions are best treated in a single stage rather than in divided treatments since the rate of wound healing is not proportional to the area but instead to the logarithm of the area. Thus, the total healing time is much shorter if done in a single treatment session. (2) use of drugs; corticosteroids given before or within three days of wounding in dose of prednisone 40 mg or greater will inhibit wound healing. Vitamin A topically or systemically may reverse this inhibition. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are more important for their effects on platelet function and bleeding than on wound healing. (3) wound dressings; the use of occlusive dressings to promote moist wound healing is the most significant advance in wound management. Occlusive dressings shorten the time for healing, decrease pain, reduce wound contamination, and improve the cosmetic result. (4) control of wound contraction and scar formation; at the time of wound formation, guiding sutures may be helpful in wound healing by secondary intention in order to control the direction of wound contraction and prevent distortion. Intralesional steroids may be useful for hypertrophic scars and keloids. (5) identification of complications; early identification of certain complications can prevent the delays in healing. These include infection, remembering infrequently cultured organisms such as yeast, malnourishment with protein and mineral deficiency, and the knowledge that adhesive-backed wound dressings can cause rewounding of otherwise normally healing wounds. (6) predicting the cosmetic result; wounds healed by secondary intention may provide a cosmetic result superior to surgical repair. Wounds in concave areas usually heal with a better result than wounds managed by flaps or grafts although wounds on convex surfaces usually look best if a skillful primary closure can be performed without distortion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3079257

  14. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. PMID:22147959

  15. Laparoscopy in trauma: An overview of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kindel, Tammy; Latchana, Nicholas; Swaroop, Mamta; Chaudhry, Umer I; Noria, Sabrena F; Choron, Rachel L; Seamon, Mark J; Lin, Maggie J; Mao, Melissa; Cipolla, James; El Chaar, Maher; Scantling, Dane; Martin, Niels D; Evans, David C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of laparoscopy has provided trauma surgeons with a valuable diagnostic and, at times, therapeutic option. The minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic surgery, combined with potentially quicker postoperative recovery, simplified wound care, as well as a growing number of viable intraoperative therapeutic modalities, presents an attractive alternative for many traumatologists when managing hemodynamically stable patients with selected penetrating and blunt traumatic abdominal injuries. At the same time, laparoscopy has its own unique complication profile. This article provides an overview of potential complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in trauma, focusing on practical aspects of identification and management of laparoscopy-related adverse events. PMID:26557490

  16. A single-center experience of hemofiltration treatment for acute aortic dissection (Stanford type A) complicated with postoperative acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Peng; Zhang, Xi-Quan; Pang, Xin-Yan; Cao, Guang-Qing; Fang, Chang-Cun; Wu, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for aortic dissection patients with acute renal failure after surgery in retrospective manner. Methods: A total of thirty-seven aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure accepted CVVH therapy. The effect of CVVH was evaluated by analyzing clinical condition changes and laboratory examination results. Results: After treatment of CVVH, renal function and clinical symptoms were significantly improved in thirty patients. Eight of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within two weeks after CVVH therapy; and twenty-two of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within four weeks after CVVH therapy. Nevertheless, seven patients got no benefit from CVVH therapy with poor prognosis. Conclusion: CVVH is an effective treatment to most aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure. The effect of CVVH was correlated with original renal function, early CVVH therapy, and continuous intensive care. PMID:26550312

  17. Computed tomography of the postoperative abdominal aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, S.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.; Bosniak, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen was performed on 46 patients who had undergone graft replacement of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twelve post-operative complications were found in nine patients. They included hemorrhage, infection, anastomotic pseudoaneurysms, major vessel occlusion, postoperative pancreatitis, and others. The varied apperance of the normal postoperative graft is also presented. It is concluded that CT is a rapid, sensitive, and noninvasive method for detecting or excluding postoperative complications of abdominal aortic surgery.

  18. The accelerating effect of negative pressure wound therapy with Prevena on the healing of a closed wound with persistent serous secretion.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Burak; Biber, Roland; Brem, Matthias H

    2015-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy has been lately used on closed incisions in the immediate postoperative period to accelerate wound healing. However, there are no data in the literature regarding the use of this type of therapy for wounds with persistent secretion in the early postoperative care. We present the first report of persistent postoperative serous wound secretion in a patient after femoral nailing treated successfully with Prevena (KCI), a closed incision negative pressure management system (CINPWT). PMID:24393137

  19. Wound modulation after filtration surgery.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Leonard K; Sherwood, Mark B; Kahook, Malik Y

    2012-11-01

    Filtration surgery is the standard invasive procedure for the management of intraocular pressure in advanced glaucoma. The key to a successful outcome is to modulate the normal wound healing cascade that leads to closure of the newly created aqueous outflow pathway. Antifibrotic agents such as mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil have been increasingly used to modulate the wound healing process and increase surgical success. Although these agents have proven efficacy, they also increase the risk of complications. Efforts have centered on the identification of novel agents and techniques that can influence wound modulation without these complications. We detail new agents and methods under investigation to control wound healing after filtration surgery. PMID:23068975

  20. Study of factors that affect complications after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Jess-Gmez, G; Santiago-Delpn, E A; Gonzlez-Caraballo, Z; Morales-Otero, L

    2006-04-01

    There are no multifactorial studies of complications after renal transplant in the Hispanic population. The objective of this study was to identify which factors are associated with the development of complications after renal transplantation. This retrospective study was performed on all patients transplanted in the Puerto Rico Transplant Program during 2002. Independent variables included preoperative albumin, white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin, creatinine, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), type of dialysis, time on dialysis, and urine production after transplant. Dependent parameters included posttransplant diuresis, wound infection, wound dehiscence, lymphoceles, acute tubular necrosis, length of stay, postoperative weight, graft survival, and patient survival. Data were analyzed with parametric and nonparametric techniques using STAT 200 software. Sixty-four patients were included in the study: 37 male, 27 female. No significant differences in complication rate or length of stay were found with age, preoperative albumin, WBC count, hemoglobin, creatinine, weight, height, dialysis modality, and donor type. Significant factors included type of dialysis, time on dialysis, and BMI. Preoperative albumin if > 3 was not a prognostic indicator for the development of surgical complications following renal transplantation. Only preoperative weight, BMI, and dialysis duration were significant factors in the development of postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay in this sample Hispanic transplant population. These data are important in formulating selection, education, and transplant management policy. PMID:16647507

  1. Wound dressings for primary and revision total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing post-surgical complications after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is of great importance, and application of an appropriate wound dressing is necessary. Since no dressing encompasses all the parameters required for ideal wound healing, a comparison of the available dressing types can assist the surgeon to choose the best dressing after TJA. Methods Studies evaluating postoperative wound dressings after TJA were reviewed in order to assess the outcomes, complications and costs associated with dressing types. Results Traditional cotton dressings have a high ability to absorb exudate. However, they dry out sooner and there is a risk of pain and additional trauma during dressing changes. Although vapor permeable dressings allow transmission of moisture, but they have low absorptive capacity and require frequent changes even with moderately exudating wounds. On the other hand, hydrofiber and hydrocolloid dressings have high absorptive capacity and permeability, and can cope with exudate production. They are changed less often and have low blistering rates, which may reduce surgical site infection (SSI). Although the unit cost associated with advanced dressings is much higher than the traditional dressings, the decreased rate of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) and the cost associated with treating PJI more than compensate for it. Conclusions Choice of dressing type after TJA should depend upon permeability, absorptive capacity, documented rate of SSI and cost effectiveness with its use, apart from a surgeons past clinical experience and familiarity. PMID:26605314

  2. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  3. [Wounds and dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Bulić, Suzana Ozanić; Kotrulja, Lena; Sjerobabski-Masnec, Ines

    2012-10-01

    Wounds are a hallmark of various skin diseases. Most patients with wounds suffer from chronic venous insufficiency or other vascular diseases. Autoimmune, infective, metabolic, malignant, some psychiatric and diseases caused by environmental factors like radiation, present with skin and mucosal erosions and ulcerations. Lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Kaposi sarcoma, genodermatoses like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease belong to different dermatological entities, they have different etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation, but at some stage ulcerations and erosions dominate through the disease course as a result of complications of untreated disease or as part of a complex clinical presentation. Wounds demand a different multidisciplinary therapeutic approach, sometimes even in intensive care unit, where special care is available. Most patients are followed-up to avoid fatal complications like sepsis, as well as a potential malignant transformation of cells in the environment of chronic inflammation. Wounds are found in female genital lichen planus and lichen sclerosus. Oral lichen planus has a potential for malignant transformation and is considered a precancerous disease. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a life threatening disease similar to burns. Wounds cover most of the body surface as well as mucosa. The high mortality rate is due to complications like sepsis, loss of thermoregulation, electrolyte and fluid disbalance and shock. Chronic wounds are also a hallmark of skin tumors and other skin malignancies like Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The primary treatment goal in genodermatoses like epidermolysis bullosa is wound care, and to a less extent in other inherited skin diseases like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease wound healing is important for sustaining a good quality of life in affected individuals. PMID:23193818

  4. Postoperative Spinal Wound Infections and Postprocedural Diskitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Vives, Michael J; Basra, Sushil K; Reiter, Mitchell F

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Postprocedural infections are a significant cause of morbidity after spinal interventions. Methods: Literature review. An extensive literature review was conducted on postprocedural spinal infections. Relevant articles were reviewed in detail and additional case images were included. Results: Clinical findings, laboratory markers, and imaging modalities play important roles in the detection of postprocedural spinal infections. Treatment may range from biopsy and antibiotics to multiple operations with complex strategies for soft tissue management. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postprocedural spinal infections and limiting their long-term sequelae. PMID:18092559

  5. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  6. Puncture Wounds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... wound, and monitor your progress. In some cases, x-rays may be ordered to determine whether something remains in the wound or if bone damage has occurred. Antibiotics may be prescribed if necessary. ...

  7. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  8. Management of complications and compromised free flaps following major head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Durmus, Kasim; Uysal, Ismail O; Old, Matthew; Agrawal, Amit; Arshad, Hassan; Teknos, Theodoros N; Ozer, Enver

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are preferred for most major head and neck reconstruction surgeries because of better functional outcomes, improved esthetics, and generally higher success rates. Numerous studies have investigated measures to prevent flap loss, but few have evaluated the optimal treatment for free flap complications. This study aimed to determine the complication rate after free flap reconstructions and discusses our management strategies. Medical records of 260 consecutive patients who underwent free flap reconstructions for head and neck defects between July 2006 and June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed for patient and surgical characteristics and postoperative complications. The results revealed that microvascular free flaps were extremely reliable, with a 3.5% incidence of flap failure. There were 78 surgical site complications. The most common complication was neck wound infection, followed by dehiscence, vascular congestion, abscess, flap necrosis, hematoma, osteoradionecrosis, and brisk bleeding. Twenty patients with poor wound healing received hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which was ineffective in three patients who eventually experienced complete flap loss. Eleven patients with vascular congestion underwent medicinal leech therapy, which was effective. Among the 78 patients with complications, 44 required repeat surgery, which was performed for postoperative brisk bleeding in three. Eventually, ten patients experienced partial flap loss and nine experienced complete flap loss, with the latter requiring subsequent pectoralis major flap reconstruction. Microvascular free flap reconstruction represents an essential and reliable technique for head and neck defects and allows surgeons to perform radical resection with satisfactory functional results and acceptable complication rates. PMID:25575841

  9. Current concepts in negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Howe, Lisa M

    2015-05-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming recognized in veterinary medicine as a viable option for the management of complex wounds. NPWT has many advantages over traditional wound care and results in quicker and improved wound healing in many instances. This article discusses the art and science of NPWT, as well as the many current indications, complications, advantages and disadvantages, and future directions of NPWT in small animal veterinary medicine. This therapy will likely have a growing role in veterinary medical practice for complicated wound management and other usages in coming years. PMID:25744142

  10. Effect of oral factor Xa inhibitor and low-molecular-weight heparin on surgical complications following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Moon, Young-Wan; Lim, Seung-Jae; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Youn-Soo

    2016-02-29

    This prospective study was conducted to report the effect of oral factor Xa inhibitor and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) on surgical complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA). The patients with an age postoperatively and continued for two weeks after surgery. Primary measure outcome was major surgical wound complications defined as haematoma requiring any intervention, superficial wound infection, deep periprosthetic infection, and increased wound bleeding. Secondary measured outcome included minor surgical complications (swelling, drainage, erythema, and oozing), organ bleeding, and venous thromboembolic (VTE) events. A total of 184 patients aged complications associated with thromboprophylaxis was 6.5?% (58/886). There were no significant differences in the rate of major surgical complications among all the three groups of the patients aged wound oozing continued significantly longer in the pharmacological group than in the placebo group, but wound infection did not occur in any case. The VTE events were similar in all the groups. PMID:26790579

  11. Comparison of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) &conventional wound dressings in the open fracture wounds

    PubMed Central

    Arti, Hamidreza; Khorami, Mohsen; Ebrahimi-Nejad, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Successful closure is a primary step of treatment in open fracture wounds. Delayed healing or complications can lead to increased treatment duration, costs and disability rates. The aim of this study was to compare Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) and conventional wound dressings in patients with open fracture wounds. Methods: In a prospective randomized clinical trial study, 90 patients with open fractures that were referred for treatment were enrolled between February 2013 to March 2015. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I underwent NPWT and group II underwent conventional wound dressing. Then patients were followed up for one month. Within the one month, the number of dressing change varied based on the extent of the wound. Duration of wound healing, presence of infection and the number of hospitalization days in these patients were recorded and compared at the end of the study between the two groups. Questionnaires and check lists were used to collect data. Analysis was done with SPSS 20, paired sample T-test, and chi-square tests. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the rate of wound healing in the group one or NPWT group and group II (conventional wound dressings) P<0.05. There was no significant difference between two groups in incidence of infection (P=0.6). Conclusion: Using NPWT expedites the healing process of extremity wounds. It is more economical and can be considered as a substitute for the treatment of extremity wounds.

  12. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group. PMID:26310621

  13. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, D L; Plopper, C; Terra, R M

    1999-06-01

    Surgical trauma induces complex physiologic changes that lead to catabolism and loss of body cell mass. This reaction is usually mild but can be exacerbated by previous malnutrition and postoperative complications. To avoid severe metabolic distress, nutritional therapy may be prescribed, using the enteral route whenever possible. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is indicated for patients already receiving TPN preoperatively, those severely malnourished prior to major surgery, those unable to eat satisfactorily for 7 days, or patients presenting with severe complications. Postoperative TPN should last for at least 7 days. The total energy requirements are between 30 and 35 kcal/kg/day. About 50% to 70% should be provided in the form of carbohydrates, and 20% to 30% in the form of lipids. The optimal input rates for glucose and lipids are 4 to 5 g/kg/day and 80 mg/kg/hr, respectively. The ideal nitrogen administration is 250 to 300 mg/kg/day, and the optimal calorie/nitrogen ratio is 150 to 200. Some specific amino acids can be added as intravenous dipeptides. An adequate follow-up must include clinical and biochemical parameters. Several trials evaluated the impact of TPN in postoperative patients, but further well designed, controlled clinical trials are still necessary to address a great number of unanswered questions. PMID:10227924

  14. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  15. Gastric partitioning complicated by peripheral neuropathy with lumbosacral plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Harwood, S C; Chodoroff, G; Ellenberg, M R

    1987-05-01

    Gastric bypass and partitioning are the two surgical procedures most commonly used in the treatment of morbid obesity. They are, however, not without their postoperative complications. These include acute and chronic problems such as wound infection, gastric leak, obstruction, embolism, and neurologic sequelae. Many studies have mentioned the frequent occurrence of polyneuropathy in the postgastrectomy state. This report describes a 38-year-old patient who developed an asymmetric peripheral neuropathy with lumbosacral plexus involvement following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. PMID:3034193

  16. Gastrointestinal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, Peter H.; Murdoch, J. Lamont; Votteler, Theodore

    1969-01-01

    The gastrointestinal abnormalities encountered in 125 patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have been described. Spontaneous perforation of the intestine and massive gastrointestinal haemorrhage are uncommon but potentially lethal complications of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Less dangerous abnormalities, such `as external hernia, hiatus hernia, eventration of the diaphragm, intestinal diverticula, and rectal prolapse were all encountered in patients in the series. Abdominal surgery in affected patients may be made difficult by fragility of tissues and a bleeding tendency. In the postoperative period, tearing out of sutures and wound dehiscence may occur. PMID:5308459

  17. The enhanced healing of a high-risk, clean, sutured surgical incision by prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by Prevena Customizable: cosmetic and therapeutic results.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Calamita, Roberto; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Pierangeli, Marina; Grassetti, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    According to the literature, incisional closure complications may range from postoperative surgical site infections, representing 17-22% of health care-associated infections, surgical wound dehiscence and formation of haematomas or seromas, and can lead to delayed or impaired incision healing. These kinds of situations are more common when wounds are closed under tension or in specific patient morbidities. Obesity, in particular, is associated with an impaired blood flow to tissues, predisposing the patient to increased risk of wound complications by various mechanisms. Incisional complications can become relevant economic burdens for health care systems because of an increase in the average length of hospital stay and readmissions, and additional medical and surgical procedures. Thus, a preventive therapy may have a critical role in the management of healing. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) technology as delivered by Prevena Customizable (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) has recently been the focus of a new investigation, as a prophylactic measure to prevent complications via immediate postoperative application in high-risk, clean, closed surgical incisions. The authors present a 62-year-old class II obese female, who underwent bilateral inguinal dermolipectomy. Prophylactic NPWT as delivered by Prevena was performed successfully over surgical incisions. Cosmetic and therapeutic results are shown. PMID:25234139

  18. Etiology, treatment, and complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Munante-Cardenas, Jose Luis; Facchina Nunes, Paulo Henrique; Passeri, Luis Augusto

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate some epidemiological characteristics, surgical treatment methods, and complications of cases involving mandibular fractures. Records from 119 patients treated for mandibular fractures between January 2006 and December 2011 were analyzed. We find mandibular fractures mostly affect Caucasian (72.2%) men (80.7%). The mean age of the patients was 28.1 years. Road traffic accidents (RTA) caused the most fractures (49.5%), followed by physical violence, including gunshot wounds (21%). Motorcycle accidents were the most common cause of RTA (76.2%). The most affected mandibular regions were the parasymphysis (26.9%) and the mandible angle (25.1%). Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments were applied (90.4% and 9.6%, respectively). The most common surgical approach was the intraoral (64.9%), using the 2.0-mm fixation system (88.0%). Complications such as postoperative infections, malocclusion, and paresthesia occurred in 36 patients (30.2%). This research revealed interesting features about the etiology of mandibular fractures that were mostly associated with RTA. Severity of the trauma and noncompliance of the patients were factors that contributed to the development of postoperative complications. PMID:25643329

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:27684. PMID:24352756

  20. Infection in conflict wounded.

    PubMed

    Eardley, W G P; Brown, K V; Bonner, T J; Green, A D; Clasper, J C

    2011-01-27

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  1. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  2. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as traditional or conventional therapy in the literature, although they typically are not the first line of treatment in Ontario. Modern moist interactive dressings are foams, calcium alginates, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, and films. Topical antibacterial agents—antiseptics, topical antibiotics, and newer antimicrobial dressings—are used to treat infection. The Technology Being Reviewed Negative pressure wound therapy is not a new concept in wound therapy. It is also called subatmospheric pressure therapy, vacuum sealing, vacuum pack therapy, and sealing aspirative therapy. The aim of the procedure is to use negative pressure to create suction, which drains the wound of exudate (i.e., fluid, cells, and cellular waste that has escaped from blood vessels and seeped into tissue) and influences the shape and growth of the surface tissues in a way that helps healing. During the procedure, a piece of foam is placed over the wound, and a drain tube is placed over the foam. A large piece of transparent tape is placed over the whole area, including the healthy tissue, to secure the foam and drain the wound. The tube is connected to a vacuum source, and fluid is drawn from the wound through the foam into a disposable canister. Thus, the entire wound area is subjected to negative pressure. The device can be programmed to provide varying degrees of pressure either continuously or intermittently. It has an alarm to alert the provider or patient if the pressure seal breaks or the canister is full. Negative pressure wound therapy may be used for patients with chronic and acute wounds; subacute wounds (dehisced incisions); chronic, diabetic wounds or pressure ulcers; meshed grafts (before and after); or flaps. It should not be used for patients with fistulae to organs/body cavities, necrotic tissue that has not been debrided, untreated osteomyelitis, wound malignancy, wounds that require hemostasis, or for patients who are taking anticoagulants. Review Strategy The inclusion criteria were as follows: Randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a sample size of 20 or more Human study Published in English Summary of Findings Seven international health technology assessments on NPWT were identified. Included in this list of health technology assessments is the original health technology review on NPWT by the Medical Advisory Secretariat from 2004. The Medical Advisory Secretariat found that the health technology assessments consistently reported that NPWT may be useful for healing various types of wounds, but that its effectiveness could not be empirically quantified because the studies were poorly done, the patient populations and outcome measures could not be compared, and the sample sizes were small. Six RCTs were identified that compared NPWT to standard care. Five of the 6 studies were of low or very low quality according to Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. The low and very low quality RCTs were flawed owing to small sample sizes, inconsistent reporting of results, and patients lost to follow-up. The highest quality study, which forms the basis of this health technology policy assessment, found that: There was not a statistically significant difference (≥ 20%) between NPWT and standard care in the rate of complete wound closure in patients who had complete wound closure but did not undergo surgical wound closure (P = .15). The authors of this study did not report the length of time to complete wound closure between NPWT and standard care in patients who had complete wound closure but who did not undergo surgical wound closure There was no statistically significant difference (≥ 20%) in the rate of secondary amputations between the patients that received NPWT and those that had standard care (P = .06) There may be an increased risk of wound infection in patients that receive NPWT compared with those that receive standard care. Conclusion Based on the evidence to date, the clinical effectiveness of NPWT to heal wounds is unclear. Furthermore, saline dressings are not standard practice in Ontario, thereby rendering the literature base irrelevant in an Ontario context. Nonetheless, despite the lack of methodologically sound studies, NPWT has diffused across Ontario. Discussions with Ontario clinical experts have highlighted some deficiencies in the current approach to wound management, especially in the community. Because NPWT is readily available, easy to administer, and may save costs, compared with multiple daily conventional dressing changes, it may be used inappropriately. The discussion group highlighted the need to put in place a coordinated, multidisciplinary strategy for wound care in Ontario to ensure the best, continuous care of patients. PMID:23074484

  3. INFLUENCE OF SURGICAL TECHNIQUE IN THE PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS SURGICAL WOUND IMPLANT: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Roberto Maranho; CAIADO, Rafael Coelho; REIS, Paulo Roberto de Melo; LACERDA, Elisngela de Paula Silveira; SUGITA, Denis Masashi; MRU, Ftima

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of malignancies increased alarmingly. Surgery constitutes one of the most efficient therapeutic modalities for the treatment of solid tumors. The neoplastic implant in surgical wound is a complication whose percentage of occurrence reported in the literature is variable, but sets with high morbidity and therapeutic difficulties. Protecting the wound is one of the recommended principles of oncologic surgery. Aim To evaluate the influence of wound protection in the development of tumor implantation. Methods Sarcoma 180 tumor cells were used, with intraperitoneal inoculation in Swiss mice. After the establishment of neoplastic ascites, animals were randomized into two groups of 10, each group consisting of five males and five females. In both groups, laparotomy and manipulation of intra-abdominal organs was performed. In a group laparotomy was performed using the protection of the abdominal wound and the other group without it. On the 9th postoperative day macroscopic evaluation of the operative scar was performed, which was later removed for microscopic evaluation. Results There was microscopic infiltration of tumor cells in the wound of all animals. However, the group that held the protection, infiltration was less intense when compared to the group without it. The infiltration was also more severe in females than in males of the same group. Conclusion Tumor infiltration into the wound was more intense in the group in which the protection of the surgical site was not performed, and in females when compared to males of the same group. PMID:25861061

  4. Avoidance and management of perioperative complications of endoscopic third ventriculostomy: the Dhaka experience.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, Khandkar A; Haque, Mohammod R; Chowdhury, Forhad H

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Although endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a minimally invasive procedure, serious perioperative complications may occur due to the unique surgical maneuvers involved. In this paper the authors report the complications of elective and emergency ETV and their surgical management in 412 patients from July 2006 to October 2012 at Dhaka Medical College Hospital (a government hospital) and other private hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The authors attempted some previously undescribed simple maneuvers that may help to overcome the difficulties of managing complications. METHODS The complication rate was determined by recording intraoperative changes in pulse and blood pressure, bleeding episodes, serum electrolyte abnormalities, CSF leakage, and neurological deterioration in the immediate postoperative period. RESULTS Intraoperative complications included hemodynamic alterations in the form of tachycardia, bradycardia, and hypertension. Bleeding was categorized as major in 2 cases and minor in 68 cases. Delayed recovery from anesthesia occurred in 14 cases, CSF leakage from the wound in 11 cases, and electrolyte imbalance in 5 cases. Postoperatively, 2 patients suffered convulsions and 1 had evidence of third cranial nerve injury. Three patients died as a result of complications. CONCLUSIONS Complications during endoscopy can lead to serious consequences that may sometimes be very difficult to manage. The authors have identified and managed a large number of complications in this series, although the rate of complications is consistent with that in other reported series. These complications should be kept in mind perioperatively by both surgeons and anesthesiologists, as prompt detection and action can help minimize the risks associated with neuroendoscopic procedures. PMID:26024001

  5. Skin substitutes based on allogenic fibroblasts or keratinocytes for chronic wounds not responding to conventional therapy: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Rapisarda, Vicenzo; Somalvico, Francesco; Scotti, Andrea; Russo, Giulia Lo; Ciancio, Francesco; Sgr, Arturo; Nebuloni, Manuela; Allevi, Raffaele; Torre, Maria L; Trabucchi, Emilio; Marazzi, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Chronic wounds are an expression of underlying complex pathologies and have a high incidence. Skin substitutes may represent an alternative approach to treat chronic ulcers. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to evaluate the wound reduction using skin substitutes based on allogenic fibroblasts or keratinocytes in 30 patients not responding to conventional therapy. Wound bed was prepared, then keratinocytes on Laserskin() to treat superficial wounds or fibroblasts on Hyalograft 3D(R) to treat deep leg ulcers were applied, and finally wounds were treated with a secondary dressing composed of nanocrystalline silver. Once a week constructs were removed and new bioengineered products were applied, as well as nanocrystalline silver medication. In none of the cases under examination did any complications arise relating to the treatment. We also achieved a reduction in wound dimension and exudates, and an increase in wound bed score. Postoperative assessment shows a degree of healing that is statistically higher in the group treated with keratinocytes as compared with the fibroblast group. This retrospective study improves our understanding and defines the clinical indications for the various uses of the two types of skin substitutes. PMID:24517418

  6. Complications of Elbow Trauma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Emilie V; Sarkissian, Eric J

    2015-11-01

    The elbow is a highly congruent trochoginglymoid joint allowing motion in both flexion-extension and pronosupination across 3 articulations. Therefore, treatment of fractures of the elbow can be technically challenging to manage, even after initial surgery. The posttraumatic elbow is prone to complications such as stiffness associated with heterotopic ossification, instability or subluxation (posterolateral rotatory instability and varus posteromedial instability patterns), and wound complications. This article discusses the pathoanatomy, prevention, and treatment of these complications. PMID:26498555

  7. Autologous Platelet Gel Fails to Show Beneficial Effects on Wound Healing after Saphenectomy in CABG Patients

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, Dirk; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Haardt, Helmut; Laczkovics, Axel; Reber, Delawer

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Wound healing impairment in the leg after removal of the saphenous vein within the framework of a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation represents a clinically significant problem. Patients suffer from this complication, and treatment of the wounds is costly in terms of both time and money. No method is known to date that reliably prevents postoperative wound healing disturbances. The effect of autologous platelet gel to stimulate wound healing is known from various medical disciplines. Within a prospective randomized study, we wanted to determine whether intraoperative use of autologous platelet gel on the leg during a CABG operation could reduce the incidence of postoperative wound healing disturbances. The application group (AG) included 35 patients and was compared to a control group (CG) that also had 35 patients. The platelet gel, as well as the thrombin required to activate the platelets, was prepared from autologous patient blood during the operation. Validation of the platelet gel comprised measurement of the growth factors plateletderived growth factor AB (PDGF AB) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), as well as the thrombocyte and leukocyte counts. Wound healing was photographically documented after surgery, and the patients were contacted by telephone on day 50 after surgery to obtain information on wound healing status. After cell separation, the platelet count was 1616 845/?L, which is higher than in whole blood by a factor of 7.1 2.0, with a platelet yield of 47.0% 13.2%. The PDGF AB concentration after activation of the platelets was raised by a median factor of 158 and EGF by a median factor of 64 compared with whole blood. During the primary clinical stay, no statistically significant differences were recorded in the number of hematomas, postoperative leg swelling, or pain level. Large-area hematomas were less frequent in the application group (AG, 29.4% vs. CG, 60%, p = .007). In the follow-up 51 9 days after surgery, 17.6% (6/34) of the patients from the AG and 31.4% (11/35) of the patients from the CG showed leg wound healing disturbances (p = .184). Using the cell separation system, a biological product that contains high concentrations of platelets, leukocytes, and growth factors can be prepared reproducibly. Despite optimum application of the autologous platelet gel to the wound, no clinically relevant differences were found between the groups, either during the primary clinic stay or in the follow-up period. PMID:18853833

  8. Complication Rates of the 720 Video-Assisted Minilaparotomy Living Donor Nephrectomies: Supplementing Clavien Classification

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ha Bum; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Yang, Seung Choul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN) has been reported to be as safe and effective as open surgery. We systematically evaluated the safety of video-assisted minilaparotomy surgery-living donor nephrectomy (VAMS-LDN) with use of the modified Clavien classification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed complications in 720 cases of VAMS-LDN conducted in our institute from 2003 to 2010 by use of the modified Clavien classification of surgical complications. Results The mean age of the donors was 39.3 years (range, 16 to 66 years) and their mean body mass index was 23.3 kg/m2 (range, 15.8 to 36.4 kg/m2). A total of 67 complications occurred (9.3%). Based on the modified Clavien classification, grade 1, 2a, and 2b complications occurred in 49 (6.8%), 16 (2.2%), and 2 (0.3%) of the donors, respectively. Most grade 1 complications involved mild vascular injuries that were immediately repaired with polypropylene sutures during the surgery. These did not cause any postoperative problems. The other grade 1 complications were wound dehiscence, not requiring secondary closure, and wound site pain in 11 (1.5%) and 5 (0.7%) cases, respectively. Grade 2a complications occurred in 16 (2.2%) cases: 9 (1.3%) involved postoperative transfusions and 1 (0.1%) involved a renal fossa hematoma. One grade 2b complication occurred; it was a lymphocele that resolved with placement of a pigtail catheter. No complications classified as grade 2c or worse occurred. Conclusions According to the present analysis of complications, VAMS-LDN is a safe procedure with complication rates comparable to those of LLDN as evaluated in previous studies. PMID:22323976

  9. Postoperative Epidural Hematomas in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Arnold, Paul M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural hematomas are rare complications following lumbar spine surgery, but if they are not quickly identified and treated they can lead to permanent neurological deficits. Epidural hematomas occur in approximately 0.10%-0.24% of all spine surgeries, and despite the fact that multiple large studies have been performed attempting to identify risk factors for this complication, there is still significant debate about the effect of subfascial drains, postoperative anticoagulation, and antiplatelet medication on the incidence of postoperative hematoma. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of patients who develop a postoperative lumbar epidural hematoma. PMID:26484502

  10. Aloe vera dermal wound gel is associated with a delay in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J M; Greenspoon, J S

    1991-07-01

    We evaluated the time interval required for wound healing using a standard wound management protocol with and without aloe vera gel. Twenty-one women were studied who had wound complications requiring healing by second intention after cesarean delivery or laparotomy for gynecologic surgery. Wounds treated with standard management healed in a mean (+/- SD) time interval of 53 +/- 24 days, whereas those treated with aloe vera gel required 83 +/- 28 days (P = .003). The use of aloe vera dermal wound gel was associated with a significant delay in wound healing compared with treatment with an otherwise identical regimen that did not include aloe vera. PMID:2047051

  11. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  12. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-29

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  13. Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two methods of securing skin grafts using negative pressure wound therapy: vacuum-assisted closure and gauze suction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Q; Franczyk, Mieczyslawa; Lee, Justine C; Greives, Matthew R; O'Connor, Annemarie; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionized the management of complicated wounds and has contributed an additional modality for securing split thickness skin grafts (STSG). The standard for NPWT is the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device. The authors' institution has accumulated experience using standard gauze sealed with an occlusive dressing and wall suction (GSUC) as their primary mode for NPWT. The authors report a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of the GSUC vs the VAC in securing STSG. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in 157 wounds in 104 patients requiring STSG from August 2009 to July 2012. All wounds were randomized to VAC or GSUC treatment and assessed for skin graft adherence/take. At postoperative day 4 or 5, NPWT was discontinued, and the size of the graft and any nonadherent areas were measured and recorded. Concomitant comorbidities, wound location, etiology, study failures, and reoperative rates were also reviewed. In all, 77 and 80 wounds were randomized to the GSUC and VAC study arms. Patient demographics were similar between both groups in terms of age, sex, comorbidities, etiology, and wound location. In all, 64 of 80 wounds in the GSUC group and 60 of 77 wounds in the VAC group had full take of the skin graft by postoperative day 4 or 5 (P = .80). The mean percent take in the GSUC group was 96.12% vs 96.21% in the VAC arm (P = .98). The use of NPWT in securing STSG is a useful method to promote adherence and healing. This study demonstrates that a low-cost, readily accessible system utilizing gauze dressings and wall suction (GSUC) results in comparable skin graft take in comparison to the VAC device. PMID:25162948

  14. Conventional single-port laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis in children: Efficient and cost-effective

    PubMed Central

    Karaku?, Osman Zeki; Ulusoy, Oktay; Ate?, O?uz; Hakgder, Glce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgr, Feza Mira

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is gradually gaining popularity among paediatric surgeons for complicated appendicitis. A retrospective study was conducted to compare conventional single port LA, multiport LA and open appendectomy (OA) for complicated appendicitis in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1995 from December 2014, 1,408 patients (604 girls, 804 boys) underwent surgery for uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. The patient characteristics, operation times, duration of hospitalization, operative costs, and postoperative complications were recorded. A 10-mm 0 scope with a parallel eye piece and an integrated 6 mm working channel were inserted through an 11-mm conventional umbilical port for single port LA. RESULTS: A total of 314 patients with complicated appendicitis (128 girls, 186 boys) underwent appendectomy. Among these, 102 patients (32.4%) underwent single port LA, 17 patients (5.4%) underwent multiport LA and 195 patients (62.1%) underwent OA. The hospital stay of the single port LA group was significantly less (3.88 1.1) compared with multiport LA (5.41 1.2) and OA groups (6.14 1.1) (P < 0.001). Drain usage, wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates were significantly high in the OA group. There was no significant difference between the groups in postoperative intraabdominal abscess formation. Single-port LA performed for complicated appendicitis was cheaper compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has shown that single-port LA for complicated appendicitis can be conducted in a reasonable operative time; it shortens the hospitalization period, markedly reduces postoperative wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates and does not increase the operative cost. PMID:26917914

  15. Necrotizing postsurgical infection complicating midurethral sling procedure with unrecognized cystotomy.

    PubMed

    Mahal, Amandeep Singh; Bradley, Catherine S

    2012-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with stress urinary incontinence underwent a retropubic midurethral sling procedure. On postoperative day 1, she presented with persistent abdominal pain and fever. A computed tomographic scan showed subcutaneous lower abdominal wall edema and gas above the fascia suggesting a necrotizing soft tissue infection. She was surgically debrided twice, which included removal of the mesh sling on postoperative day 4. Cystoscopy suggested unrecognized bladder perforation had occurred during the initial procedure, and record rerevealed untreated bacteriuria before sling placement. The patient required wound vacuum therapy and a later secondary wound closure procedure. Six months after the initial surgery, she was reevaluated for stress urinary incontinence and underwent a transobturator midurethral sling procedure with resolution of these symptoms. Necrotizing postsurgical infection is a rarely described complication of midurethral slings. Treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication includes aggressive surgical debridement, administration of broad-spectrum antibiotic, removal of infected implants, and supportive therapy. Unrecognized bladder injury and preoperative bacteriuria are discussed as potential risk factors for postsling necrotizing infection. PMID:22543774

  16. Surgical wound infections. A 5-year prospective study of 20,193 wounds at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M; O'Connor, M; Schwartz, M L

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a 5-year prospective study of postoperative wound sepsis utilizing a careful program of wound surveillance. Surgical wounds following 20,193 operations on all surgical services were surveyed by a trained nurse epidemiologist. Daily examination of wounds, culture of all suspicious wounds, and 30-day outpatient clinic follow-up were performed. Results were disseminated at monthly intervals to all involved surgeons and operating room personnel. Prospective and ongoing analysis of results facilitated identification and rectification of specific problem areas. Wound infection rates demonstrated a steady decline over the course of the study, overall rates dropping from 4.2% to 1.9% (p less than 0.05). This reduction in incidence of postoperative wound sepsis of 55% is estimated to have saved 2740 inhospital days and nearly $750,000. PMID:6703787

  17. Barbed versus traditional sutures for wound closure in knee arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Deting; Yin, Houfa; Xie, Hui; Ma, Honghai; Chen, Erman; Hu, Dongcai; Pan, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Sutures are an increasing focus of research in knee arthroplasty (KA). Whether knotless barbed sutures (KBS) are safe and efficient in KA remains controversial. The objective of our study is to compare the clinical outcomes of KA according to wound closure method: KBS versus knotted traditional sutures (KTS). To clarify this, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nine articles involving 10 studies were included in this study. The dataset consisted of 1729 patients with 1754 KA. Among these, 814 patients’ wounds were closed with KBS and 915 with KTS. Our analysis indicates that KBS is preferable for KA wound closure given its shorter wound closure time and lower total cost; postoperative Knee Society scores and complication rates were similar to those of surgeries using KTS. The subgroup analysis revealed that closure of arthrotomy with KBS appears to be associated with a lower risk of complications. This meta-analysis indicates that use of KBS in KA reduces operative time and cost. KBS is the preferred option for wound closures, including arthrotomy and reattachment of subcutaneous and subcuticular tissues. Given the possible biases, adequately powered and better-designed studies with longer follow-up are required to reach a firmer conclusion. PMID:26805714

  18. The Outcome of Using Closed Suction Wound Drains in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Waly, Feras; Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Abduljabbar, Fahad H.; Landry, Tara; Ouellet, Jean; Moran, Kathryn; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective Determine whether closed suction wound drains decrease the incidence of postoperative complications compared with no drain use in patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched up through January 22, 2015, to identify studies comparing the use of closed suction wound drains with no drains in spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Outcomes assessed included the cumulative incidence of epidural hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, and postoperative blood transfusion. The overall strength of evidence across studies was based on precepts outlined by the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. Results Five heterogeneous studies, three randomized controlled trials, and two cohort studies form the evidence basis for this report. There was no difference in the incidence of hematoma, superficial wound infection, or deep infection in patients with compared with patients without closed suction wound drains after lumbar surgery. The upper bounds of the 95% confidence interval for hematoma ranged from 1.1 to 16.7%; for superficial infection, 1.0 to 7.3%; and for deep infection, 1.0 to 7.1%. One observational study reported a 3.5-fold increase in the risk of blood transfusion in patients with a drain. The overall strength of evidence for these findings is considered low or insufficient. Conclusions Conclusions from this systematic review are limited by the quality of included studies that assessed the use of closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgeries for degenerative conditions. We believe that spine surgeons should not routinely rely on closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgery until a higher level of evidence becomes available to support its use. PMID:26682098

  19. The association between gastrostomy tube placement, poor post-operative outcomes, and hospital re-admissions in head and neck cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ashley C.; Worley, Mitchell; Ackall, Feras; D'Agostino, Ralph; Waltonen, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Investigate the relationship of G-tube placement timing on post-operative outcomes. Participants 908 patients underwent resection of head and neck upper aerodigestive tract tumors between 2007 and 2013. Patient charts were retrospectively screened for patient demographics, pre-operative nutrition variables, co-morbid conditions, Tumor-Node-Metastasis staging, surgical treatment type, and timing of G-tube placement. Exclusionary criteria included death within the first three months of the resection and resections performed solely for nodal disease. Main Outcomes Post-surgical outcomes, including wound and medical complications, hospital re-admissions, length of inpatient hospital stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) time. Results 793 surgeries were included: 8% of patients had G-tubes pre-operatively and 25% had G-tubes placed post-operatively. Patients with G-tubes (pre-operative or post-operative) were more likely to have complications and prolonged hospital care as compared to those without G-tubes (p < 0.001). Patients with pre-operative G-tubes had shortened length of stay (p = 0.007), less weight loss (p = 0.03), and fewer wound care needs (p < 0.0001), when compared to those that received G-tubes post-operatively. Those with G-tubes placed post-operatively had worse outcomes in all categories, except pre-operative BMI. Conclusions Though having enteral access in the form of a G-tube at any point suggests a more high risk patient, having a G-tube placed in the pre-operative period may protect against poor post-operative outcomes. Post-operative outcomes can be predicted based on patient characteristics available to the physician in the pre-operative period. PMID:26321115

  20. Surgical complications and their impact on patients’ psychosocial well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Anna; Faiz, Omar; Davis, Rachel; Almoudaris, Alex; Vincent, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical complications may affect patients psychologically due to challenges such as prolonged recovery or long-lasting disability. Psychological distress could further delay patients’ recovery as stress delays wound healing and compromises immunity. This review investigates whether surgical complications adversely affect patients’ postoperative well-being and the duration of this impact. Methods The primary data sources were ‘PsychINFO’, ‘EMBASE’ and ‘MEDLINE’ through OvidSP (year 2000 to May 2012). The reference lists of eligible articles were also reviewed. Studies were eligible if they measured the association of complications after major surgery from 4 surgical specialties (ie, cardiac, thoracic, gastrointestinal and vascular) with adult patients’ postoperative psychosocial outcomes using validated tools or psychological assessment. 13 605 articles were identified. 2 researchers independently extracted information from the included articles on study aims, participants’ characteristics, study design, surgical procedures, surgical complications, psychosocial outcomes and findings. The studies were synthesised narratively (ie, using text). Supplementary meta-analyses of the impact of surgical complications on psychosocial outcomes were also conducted. Results 50 studies were included in the narrative synthesis. Two-thirds of the studies found that patients who suffered surgical complications had significantly worse postoperative psychosocial outcomes even after controlling for preoperative psychosocial outcomes, clinical and demographic factors. Half of the studies with significant findings reported significant adverse effects of complications on patient psychosocial outcomes at 12 months (or more) postsurgery. 3 supplementary meta-analyses were completed, 1 on anxiety (including 2 studies) and 2 on physical and mental quality of life (including 3 studies). The latter indicated statistically significantly lower physical and mental quality of life (p<0.001) for patients who suffered surgical complications. Conclusions Surgical complications appear to be a significant and often long-term predictor of patient postoperative psychosocial outcomes. The results highlight the importance of attending to patients’ psychological needs in the aftermath of surgical complications. PMID:26883234

  1. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  2. Fatal complications of tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Stemmer, E A; Oliver, C; Carey, J P; Connolly, J E

    1976-03-01

    Thirty-six of 403 deaths after tracheotomy were direct complications of that procedure. Arterial hemorrhage caused three deaths, venous bleeding, seven. Airway obstruction resulted in six fatalities. Tracheoesophageal fistula caused five deaths. Eight deaths were due to infection and sepsis. Tension pneumothorax developed in one patient and the remaining six deaths were due to cardiopulmonary collapse. Many of the complications of tracheotomy can be avoided with accurate knowledge of anatomic variations, ideal operating conditions, proper technic, careful arterial and venous hemostasis, routine postoperative chest x-ray films, sterile suction technic, proper use of soft cuffed tracheotomy tubes, adequate humidification, and careful postoperative blood gas monitoring. PMID:769582

  3. How to avoid specific complications of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Stamatis, Emmanouil D; Myerson, Mark S

    2002-12-01

    The design of the Agility total ankle replacement (DePuy, Warsaw, IN) has improved in an effort to address the biomechanic challenges of the ankle joint. Certainly further laboratory investigation and clinical trials with ankle replacement are needed to improve its position as the major alternative to ankle arthrodesis. As the science behind the ankle implants has evolved during the last 15 years, so has our experience and understanding of some crucial factors predisposing to an unsuccessful outcome. Complications such as postoperative stiffness, prosthesis subsidence, and residual deformity along with infection and wound healing problems jeopardize a successful outcome. Adequate knowledge of anatomy and biomechanics, careful preoperative evaluation and planning, and strict attention to operative details help minimize the incidence of these complications. PMID:12516733

  4. Necrotizing scleritis as a complication of cosmetic eye whitening procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report necrotizing scleritis as a serious complication of a cosmetic eye whitening procedure that involves the use of intraoperative and postoperative topical mitomycin C. Findings This is a single case report. A 59-year-old Caucasian male with a history of blepharitis status post uncomplicated LASIK refractive surgery reported chronic conjunctival hyperemia for 15 years prior to undergoing a cosmetic eye whitening procedure. He presented to our clinic 12 months after the cosmetic eye whitening procedure with progressive bilateral necrotizing scleritis and scleral calcification. Conclusions Chronic conjunctival hyperemia may prompt patients to seek surgical correction with cosmetic eye whitening procedures. However, conjunctival hyperemia secondary to tear deficiency and evaporative dry eye may predispose to poor wound healing. Serious complications including necrotizing scleritis may result from cosmetic eye whitening procedures and the use of topical mitomycin C. PMID:23514228

  5. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care.

    PubMed

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-04-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

  6. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

  7. An update on the evaluation and management of plantar puncture wounds and Pseudomonas osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A S; Zukin, D D; Perro, M

    1992-02-01

    The management of children who present to the ED with plantar puncture wounds is dependent upon the nature of the injury, the examination of the puncture site, and the potential risk of a retained foreign body. Not all patients will require wound enlargement and a search for a retained foreign body. Close follow-up of all children who are being treated as outpatients is of vital importance in detecting an early development of an infectious complication. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis should be suspected in all patients who present with foot pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to bear weight after sustaining a nail puncture through a sneaker. The current consensus favors open surgical dbridement followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. The exact duration of the postoperative antibiotic course is still being debated. PMID:1603689

  8. Wound drainages in total hip arthroplasty: to use or not to use? Review of the literature on current practice.

    PubMed

    Nanni, M; Perna, F; Calamelli, C; Donati, D; Ferrara, O; Parlato, A; D'Arienzo, M; Faldini, C

    2013-08-01

    Aim of this study is to analyze data reported in literature concerning the efficacy of using wound low-vacuum suction drainages in orthopedic surgery after total hip arthroplasty. We analyzed studies concerning the use of drainages in prosthetic hip replacement surgery, performing our research through Pubmed, Cochrane database and Google Scholar, and selecting the ones evaluating the following parameters: bleeding, the need for blood transfusions, number or reinforcement of post-operative medications, length of hospitalization, functional results, periprosthetic and surgical wound infection, post-operative hematoma. Our review did not show any demonstrated advantage from the use of wound drainages in total hip arthroplasty. Moreover, some studies enlighted a possible complication related to their employment, represented by the greater need for blood transfusions. Despite the absence of a statistically demonstrated positive influence on wound outcome using suction drains after total hip replacement, many orthopedic surgeons still recommend using drainages, just because there is no certified proof of a negative effect. PMID:23709186

  9. Effect of Preoperative Biliary Drainage on Complications Following Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinting; Ou, Guangsheng; Lian, Guoda; Luo, Hui; Huang, Kaihong; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) prior to pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is still controversial; therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of PBD on complications following PD. A meta-analysis was carried out for all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective and retrospective studies published from inception to March 2015 that compared PBD and non-PBD (immediate surgery) for the development of postoperative complications in PD patients. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using fixed-effect analyses, or random-effects analyses if there was statistically significant heterogeneity (P?complication (OR 1.52, CI 1.07 to 2.17; P?=?0.02), wound infection (OR 2.09, CI 1.39 to 3.13; P?=?0.0004), and delayed gastric emptying (DGE) (OR 1.37, CI 1.08 to 1.73; P?=?0.009). This meta-analysis suggests that biliary drainage before PD increased postoperative infectious complication, wound infection, and DGE. In light of the results of the study, PBD probably should not be routinely carried out in PD patients. PMID:26200634

  10. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  11. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided. PMID:25698564

  12. Antibiotics May Not Help After 'Complicated' Appendectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... traditional teaching is that all patients with complicated appendicitis receive post-operative antibiotics to reduce the risk ... may not be necessary following surgery for complicated appendicitis." He explained that "antibiotics are not without risks, ...

  13. A multicenter, retrospective study to evaluate the effect of preoperative stoma site marking on stomal and peristomal complications.

    PubMed

    Baykara, Zehra Gocmen; Demir, Sevil Guler; Karadag, Ayise; Harputlu, Deniz; Kahraman, Aysel; Karadag, Sercan; Hin, Aysel Oren; Togluk, Eylem; Altinsoy, Meral; Erdem, Sonca; Cihan, Rabia

    2014-05-01

    Even though preoperative marking of the stoma area is considered important for the prevention of postoperative complications, not all healthcare institutions have universally adopted this practice. A multicenter, retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to determine the effect of stoma site marking on stomal and peristomal complications. The 1-year study included 748 patients (408 [54.5%] male, mean age 56.60 16.73 years) from eight stomatherapy units in Turkey. Patient data, including age, gender, diagnosis, type of surgery, history of preoperative stoma site marking, person performing the marking, and postoperative complications, were obtained from patient records, abstracted, and analyzed. Cancer was the reason for the operation in 545 (72.9%) of the cases. In 287 patients (38.4%), the stoma and wound care nurse and/or surgeon marked the stoma area; this occurred 1 day before or on the day of surgery according to Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses Society and American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons recommendations. Stomal/ peristomal complications developed in 248 (33.2%) persons; the most frequently observed complications in patients were parastomal skin problems (136, 48.7%), mucocutaneous separation (52, 18.6%), and retraction (31, 11.1%). The rate of complications was higher among patients whose stoma site was not marked than among those whose stoma site was marked (22.9% and 46%, respectively; P <0.001). The results of this study confirm the stoma area should be marked preoperatively in all planned surgical interventions in order to reduce the risk of postoperative complications. Additional prospective and experimental studies on effectiveness of preoperative stoma site marking should be conducted with larger sample groups. PMID:24807019

  14. Surgical Adhesive Drape (IO-ban) as Postoperative Surgical Site Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Hasan R; Snyder, Rita; McGowan, Jason E; Jha, Ribhu T; Nair, Mani N

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective chart analysis. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the senior authors (MNN) experience applying a widely available surgical drape as a postoperative sterile surgical site dressing for both cranial and spinal procedures. Summary of Background Data: Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication ofspinesurgery that can result in significant morbidity. There is wide variation in wound care management in practice, including dressing type.Given the known bactericidal properties of the surgical drape, there may be a benefit of continuing its use immediately postoperatively. Methods: All of the senior authors cases from September 2014 through September 2015 were reviewed.These were contrasted to the previous year prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as a postoperative dressing. Results: Only one surgical case out of 157 operative interventions (35 cranial, 124 spinal) required operative debridement due to infection. From September 2013 to September 2014, prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as dressing, the author had five infections out of 143 operations (46 cranial, 97 spinal) requiring intervention. Conclusion: The implementation of a sterile surgical drape as a closed postoperative surgical site dressing has led to a decrease in surgical site infections.The technique is simple and widely available, and should be considered for use to diminish surgical site infections. PMID:26798570

  15. A case of nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap for below-knee amputation stump wound: treatment option for compartment syndrome after fibular free flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Kwang Seog; Lee, Sam Yong

    2014-02-01

    Despite the frequent use of the fibular free flap, there have been no reports of severe compartment syndrome of the donor leg that necessitated limb amputation. A 66-yr-old man had a fibular osseous free flap transfer from the left leg to the mandible that was complicated by postoperative compartment syndrome. An extensive chronic leg wound resulted, which was treated with multiple debridements and finally with below-knee amputation. Successful coverage of the below-knee amputation stump was accomplished with a nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap. Various foot fillet flaps may be used acutely as a free or an island pedicled flap, but dissection of the vascular pedicle may be difficult in a chronically inflamed wound because of inflammation and adhesions to surrounding tissue. The nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap may be considered as a useful option for treatment of a chronically inflamed stump wound after below-knee amputation. PMID:24550664

  16. Unusual auricular complications in cutaneous oncology.

    PubMed

    Leshin, B; Hess, S P; White, W L; Matthews, B L; Koufman, J A

    1991-11-01

    The anatomic complexity of the pinna predisposes that structure to a variety of unique, site specific postoperative complications following management of skin cancer. We describe four unusual auricular complications: 1) radiochondronecrosis; 2) autonecrosis of skin during second intention healing; 3) hearing loss secondary to tragal retraction over the external auditory canal; and 4) extension of tumor through fenestrated cartilage. Well-known postoperative auricular complications are reviewed and anticipation and recognition of these unusual complications are emphasized. PMID:1757651

  17. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  18. Prevention of wound infection after elective colorectal resection.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, S D; Ryan, J A

    1987-11-01

    Various operative wound handling techniques have been proposed to prevent wound infections after elective colorectal resection, including pelvic drains, wound wicks, topical antibiotics, and subcutaneous drains. Review of 243 consecutive elective colorectal resections performed between 1977 and 1983, in which 64 percent of the patients had significant underlying medical problems, 27 percent were over age 70, and 45 percent had concomitant abdominal procedures, revealed that consistent application of a uniform perioperative protocol emphasizing aseptic and antiseptic techniques minimizes wound and anastomotic infectious complications. Simple wound closure in this setting is sufficient to prevent incisional wound infections. PMID:3674295

  19. Postoperative protein sparing.

    PubMed

    Wilmore, D W

    1999-06-01

    Postoperative nitrogen sparing refers to a therapy that decreases net nitrogen loss from the body following an operation. Protein sparing has long been regarded as a surrogate marker for improved outcome, but a critical review of the evidence indicates that this relation is difficult to establish, especially in the short term. Thus, specific endpoints that evaluate outcome are needed to determine the efficacy of a specific therapy that spares protein. Cost effectiveness must also be considered. A variety of therapies were evaluated using protein-sparing, efficiency, and cost criteria. Evidence was reviewed for glucose, amino acids, parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, growth hormone, and glutamine administered during the perioperative period. Only three areas could be identified that spared nitrogen and provided efficacy: (1) preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 7 to 10 days before operation in a depleted patient (wound healing (especially in burns) and possibly to enhance muscle strength (particularly in the elderly); and (3) the use of glutamine-supplemented TPN in severely ill surgical patients to decrease mortality. The issue of early tube feeding in trauma patients is still confusing. This therapy must be evaluated by an appropriate study in trauma patients that compares a tube-fed group with an unfed control group. Only by demonstrating improved outcomes and enhanced cost saving with our protein-sparing therapy can we continue to enhance the care of our surgical patients. PMID:10227922

  20. Sutureless closure of scleral wounds in animal models by the use of laser welded biocompatible patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Menabuoni, Luca; Lenzetti, Ivo; Pini, Roberto

    2011-03-01

    The common procedures used to seal the scleral or conjunctival injuries are based on the traditional suturing techniques, that may induce foreign body reaction during the follow up, with subsequent inflammation and distress for the patient. In this work we present an experimental study on the laser welding of biocompatible patches onto ocular tissues, for the closure of surgical or trauma wounds. The study was performed ex vivo in animal models (porcine eyes). A penetrating perforation of the ocular tissue was performed with a surgical knife. The wound walls were approximated, and a biocompatible patch was put onto the outer surface of the tissue, in order to completely cover the wound as a plaster. The patches were prepared with a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, showing high mechanical strength, good elasticity, high permeability for vapour and gases and rather low biodegradation. During preparation, Indocyanine Green (ICG) was included in the biopolymeric matrix, so that the films presented high absorption at 810 nm. Effective adhesion of the membranes to the ocular tissues was obtained by using diode laser light emitted from an 810 nm diode laser and delivered by means of a 300 μm core diameter optical fiber, to produce spots of local film/tissue adhesion, due to the photothermal effect at the interface. The result is an immediate closure of the wound, thus reducing post-operative complications due to inflammation.

  1. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  2. [Coxibs for postoperative analgesia].

    PubMed

    Voloshin, A G; Nikoda, V V

    2013-01-01

    Coxibs can be regarded as an effective way of postoperative pain treatment with proven analgesic and opioid-saving effects. When comparing the opioid-saving effect after the large surgical interventions, COX-2 inhibitors are not inferior to NSAIDs and surpass paracetamol. The combination of coxibs and opiate receptors antagonists, as well as epidural analgesia is effective in the frames of multimodal analgesia. The reasonability of coxibs and paracetamol combination is questionable. In patients at risk of gastrointestinal complications development, but with none cardiovascular risk, COX-2 inhibitors are more safe, than the combination of NSAIDs and proton pump inhibitors. Due to no cross-reactivity with aspirin and NSAIDs, coxibs can be recommended to patients with aspirin asthma and related diseases. Specific COX-2 inhibitors prescription is able to inhibit comissure formation after laparotomy, suppressing blood vessels proliferation. It is assumed that the COX-2 inhibitors may inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor of the tumor and so inhibit angiogenesis of solitary tumors and metastases, without affecting the normal endothelium. Thus, today coxibs are not inferior in eficiency to certain opioid analgesics and have improved safety profile compared with traditional NSAIDs. These qualities allow to consider them as a group of non-opioid analgesics for postoperative analgesia. PMID:24000661

  3. Imaging of the postoperative hip.

    PubMed

    Carty, Fiona L; Cashman, James P; Parvizi, Javad; Zoga, Adam C; Morrison, William B

    2011-09-01

    A basic understanding of the surgical approach, technique, and potential complications in addition to the types of hardware used is essential in interpreting postoperative imaging of the hip. This article reviews the various surgical approaches to the hip and hardware components in total hip arthroplasty and hip preservation surgery and the potential complications that may arise. The various surgical treatments in the management of acetabular dysplasia and avascular necrosis and the imaging appearances of these on different imaging modalities are also discussed. PMID:21928159

  4. Technique and complications of reconstruction of the pelvic floor with polyglactin mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Sener, S.F.; Imperato, J.P.; Blum, M.D.; Ignatoff, J.M.; Soper, T.G.; Winchester, D.P.; Meiselman, M.

    1989-06-01

    A polyglactin mesh sling was used to reconstruct the pelvis in eight patients after colorectal or urologic resections in preparation for postoperative radiation therapy. There were three perioperative complications--a pelvic abscess requiring percutaneous drainage, a wound dehiscence and a herniation of the small intestine between the pelvic sidewall and mesh requiring small intestinal resection. There were two delayed complications, both partial small intestinal obstructions. One occurred just after the conclusion of radiation treatment and the other occurred five months after the conclusion of radiation therapy. Both obstructions responded to conservative management. None of the common acute radiation effects occurred during radiotherapy. One patient with delayed partial small intestinal obstruction had possible late radiation effects. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 12.5 months. Despite the complications described in this report, the use of a polyglactin mesh sling as an adjunct to resection of carcinoma of the pelvis has merit and should be studied further.

  5. The gracilis free flap revisited: a review of 25 cases of transfer to traumatic extremity wounds.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, M; Lord, J; Ash, K; Shouse, B; Getz, S; Robb, G

    1998-02-01

    Trauma to the extremities often results in a complex bony and soft-tissue injury requiring free flap reconstruction. Muscles from various body sites have been used in extremity reconstruction since the early 1970s. The gracilis muscle is usually not considered the first choice for free flap reconstruction of these defects. It is usually relegated to small defects or used to reanimate the face. Our purpose is to present our experience with the gracilis muscle as a first-choice flap in reconstruction of traumatic extremity defects. A retrospective review of all gracilis muscle free flap transfers for traumatic extremity wounds between 1988 and 1995 at the Naval Medical Center Portsmouth was performed. Twenty-five patients age 20 to 71 years (mean, 29.7 years) underwent 26 free flaps to the lower leg, ankle, foot, or forearm to cover traumatic wounds. Defects ranged in size from 3 x 3 cm (9 cm2) to 13 x 18 cm (234 cm2), with a mean of 75.5 cm2. There were no flap losses and all wounds healed. Nine patients experienced 11 complications, which consisted of minor wound separation (16%), wound infection (12%), partial or complete loss of split-thickness skin graft (8%), thrombosis of graft with successful revascularization (4%), and nonunion of an underlying fracture (4%). Our overall success rate for gracilis free flap reconstruction of traumatic wounds is 100%. The gracilis free muscle flap has become our first option for tissue coverage in traumatized extremities. It leaves minimal functional defect limited to the side of the primary injury and provides a good cosmetic result. It can cover large defects when the epimysium is cut, and allows an epidural block to be performed for sympathectomy effect and pain control in the affected extremity during the immediate postoperative period. PMID:9495461

  6. Prospective comparative study of single-layer versus double-layer closure of leg wounds after long saphenous vein harvest in coronary artery bypass graft operations

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Mohammad Salman; Al Sabti, Hilal; Mukaddirov, Mirdavron; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wound infection is one of the major complication post CABG that leads to prolonged length of stay and cost post surgery. Coronary artery bypass grafting is one of the most commonly performed operations in the world. The long saphenous vein harvested by traditional techniques is still widely used and caries a risk of wound infection. Objective The purpose of this study is to ascertain if a single-layer closure result in better wound healing and functional outcome as compared with the traditional two-layer closure after harvest of saphenous vein. Methods Sixty-seven consecutive patients undergoing CABG were prospectively randomized to have their leg wound closed by either a single-layer technique with a suction drain or double layers without suction drain. All wounds were assessed for the presence of serous discharge, inflammation, edema, purulent exudates, infection of the deep tissues, and pain postoperatively and two weeks after discharge. Results There were trends towards increased rates of wound related outcomes in patients in double layer group when compared with single layer group. Out of 77 patients in our study, 52 patients underwent single layer closure (males, n = 37; females, n= 15) and 25 patients underwent double layer closure (males, n = 21; females, n = 04). There was significant statistical difference between the treatment groups with single layer group having lower average scores (4.038) compared to double layer group (9.467), P- value 0.001. Patients whose legs were closed with the single layer technique had less post operative edema (23.07% vs 53.30) and pain (44.2 vs 73.33) compared with the double layer group. Conclusions Single-layer leg wound closure over a suction drain has shown a better wound outcome compared to traditional double-layer closure. A possible mechanism of better wound healing in the former technique might be through decreased tissue handling and a reduction in leg edema. PMID:22263084

  7. A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. Methods: A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 20072012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. Results: The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (p<0.0001). There were no substantial changes in the patient population risk factors over this time. As a result of the changes in incision management practice, a total of 92 cesarean post-operative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Conclusion: Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI. PMID:25826622

  8. Exploring Predictors of Complication in Older Surgical Patients: A Deficit Accumulation Index and the Braden Scale

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rachel-Rose; Lagoo-Deenadayalan, Sandhya A.; Heflin, Mitchell T.; Sloane, Richard; Eisen, Irvin; Thacker, Julie M.; Whitson, Heather E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether readily collected perioperative information might identify older surgical patients at higher risk for complication. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study SETTING Medical chart review at a single academic institution PARTICIPANTS 102 patients aged 65 years and older who underwent abdominal surgery between January 2007 and December 2009. MEASUREMENTS Primary predictor variables were the first postoperative Braden Scale score (within 24 hours of surgery) and a Deficit Accumulation Index (DAI) constructed based on 39 available preoperative variables. The primary outcome was presence or absence of complication within 30 days of surgery date. RESULTS Of 102 patients, 64 experienced at least one complication with wound infection being the most common complication. In models adjusted for age, race, sex, and open vs. laparoscopic surgery, lower Braden Scale scores were predictive of 30-day postoperative complication (OR 1.30 [CI 95%, 1.06, 1.60]), longer length of stay (â = 1.44 (0.25) days; pvalue = ≤ 0.0001) and discharge to institution rather than home (OR 1.23 [CI 95%, 1.02, 1.48]). The cut-off value for the Braden Score with the highest predictive value for complication was ≤ 18 (OR 3.63 [CI 95%, 1.43, 9.19]; c statistic of 0.744). The DAI and several traditional surgical risk factors were not significantly associated with 30-day postoperative complications in this cohort. CONCLUSION This is the first study to identify the perioperative score on the Braden Scale, a widely used risk-stratifier for pressure ulcers, as an independent predictor of other adverse outcomes in geriatric surgical patients. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding as well as investigate other utilizations for this tool, which correlates well to phenotypic models of frailty. PMID:22906222

  9. Hybrid technique for postoperative ventral hernias own experience

    PubMed Central

    Okni?ski, Tomasz; Pawlak, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are many techniques which may be involved in abdominal hernia repair, from classical to tension-free. Treatment of complicated hernias has undergone evolution. Many surgeons consider the laparoscopic method as a method of choice for incisional hernia repair. Sometimes miniinvasive repair of complicated hernia is not so easy to perform. We are convinced that selected patients may benefit from combined open and laparoscopic techniques. Aim To present the operating technique and early results of treatment of 15 patients operated on using the 3 hybrid technique. Material and methods Fifteen patients suffering from recurrent incisional hernias underwent the hybrid technique for their repair between June 2012 and April 2015. The hybrid technique was performed using synthetic meshes in 14 cases and a biological implant in 1 case. Results The early postoperative period was uncomplicated in all cases. Within a maximum follow-up period of 32 months, two deep wound infections were observed. Conclusions The hybrid technique may be used in patients with recurrent incisional hernias. PMID:26865889

  10. Outcome following deep wound contamination in cemented arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Byrne, A M; Morris, S; McCarthy, T; Quinlan, W; O'byrne, J M

    2007-02-01

    Infection remains a devastating complication of joint replacement surgery causing a significant burden to both patient and surgeon. However, despite exhaustive prophylactic measures, intraoperative contamination still occurs during cemented arthroplasty with current infection rates of 1-2%. A study was undertaken to determine the incidence of perioperative contamination in cemented arthroplasty patients, to identify contaminating organisms, to identify contaminated regions within the operative wound, to identify factors associated with increased contamination, and finally to assess the medium-term clinical outcome in patients with confirmed intraoperative wound contamination. Eighty consecutive patients undergoing hip and knee cemented arthroplasty were prospectively enrolled over a 6-month period. All scrubbed personnel wore total body exhaust isolation suits and procedures were carried out in ultra-clean air theatres. Of 441 samples, contamination was identified at 21 sites (4.8%) representing a cohort of 18 patients (22.5%). Longer duration of surgery predisposed to higher contamination rates while lower contamination rates were significantly related to fewer gowned personnel within the ultra-clean system, and fewer total personnel in theatre during the procedure. None of the patients developed clinical evidence of deep prosthetic infection at follow-up. We noted a high incidence of intraoperative contamination despite standard prophylaxis. However, this was not reflected by a similar rate of postoperative infection. This may be due to a small bacterial inoculum in each case or may be due to the therapeutic effect of perioperative intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:16586132

  11. Exceptional laceration of flexor digitorum tendons proximal to a severe palmar hand wound: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ennaciri, Badr; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Hand wounds are common, poor functional outcomes are marked because of sequelae inherent to posttraumatic and postoperative complications. Suitable surgery repair in emergency can ensure best results. Classically, tendon's injuries occur near the injured area and their repair depend on traumatized zone, sutures techniques, associated lesions and surgeon's abilities. We report a case of a farmer who has sustained of a severe hand wound due to blades of a combine harvester. Clinical examination showed exceptional laceration of 2nd and 3rd flexor digitorum tendons from musculo-tendinous junction, without any lesion in their palmar section. We proceeded; after extensive debridement, abundant lavage and removal of foreign body; to modified Kessler sutures using PDS 4.0 followed by dorsal splint for protecting tendons repair, and progressive rehabilitation program. Final result was interesting after 12 weeks. Thinking to tendon laceration is important, when manipulating machines with rotational movements.

  12. Four-fold benefit of wound closure under high magnification

    PubMed Central

    Kivelev, Juri; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Unaffected wound healing and good cosmetic result after a neurosurgical procedure are important factors measuring a level of care. The usefulness of high magnification of the operating microscope during closure of neurosurgical wounds is evaluated. Methods: During a one-year microneurosurgical fellowship, the first author (JK) performed wound closure under the microscope in 200 of 524 neurosurgical operations carried out by the senior author (JH) at the Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Supratentorial approaches were employed most frequently in 143 patients (72%). Surgeries for infratentorial lesions and the spinal canal comprised 48 (24%) and 9 procedures (4%), respectively. Mean duration of the surgery from skin to skin was 1.8 (range 0.5-6.2) hours. After intradural hemostasis was completed by the senior author, further steps including dural suturing, bone flap fixation, and wound closure were performed by the first author. Wound condition was assessed during the early and late postoperative period. Mean follow-up was 3.2 (range 1-10) months. Results: Early postoperative healing of the wound was uneventful in 180 patients (90%). No wound rupture or postoperative hematoma occurred. In five patients (2.5%), lumbar puncture or spinal drainage was necessary due to significant subcutaneous liquor collection. No wound revision was required. At follow-up, in 196 patients (98%) the postoperative scar was in perfect condition. Neither skin necrosis nor healing problems occurred. Conclusion: Based on our results, we found the high magnification of operating microscope to be beneficial when closing neurosurgical wounds; it allows (1) better hemostasis, (2) precise wound margin approximation, (3) atraumatic handling of the tissues, and (4) improvement of the manual dexterity of the neurosurgeon. PMID:24083051

  13. How wounds heal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How scrapes heal; How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... from germs. Not all wounds bleed. For example, burns, some puncture wounds, and pressure sores don't ...

  14. Is there a need for postoperative surveillance after day case groin surgery in children?

    PubMed

    Powell, S F; Brown, R A; Millar, A J W; De Wet, P M; Rode, H

    2002-08-01

    There is increasing awareness of the value of day case paediatric surgery in fulfilling the needs of the community. Is this cost effective, are there hidden complications and is there a need for routine follow-up? Seven hundred and thirty-one children attending the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital day surgery unit over a 32-month period, and undergoing 912 procedures confined to the inguinoscrotal region, were enrolled in the study. Surgical procedures performed included inguinal herniotomy, orchidopexy and circumcision. Of the 731 children, 159 consecutive children had their inguinal and perineal skin flora analysed preoperatively and in 59 of these children three skin swabs were taken from the groin area: before routine skin preparation for surgery, after the skin preparation and on completion of the operation. Staphylococcus epidermidis predominated as the normal skin flora (70%), followed by Escherichia coli (19%) and Proteus mirabilis (10%), while S. aureus was only found in 2.5% of cases. The efficacy of cleaning with 4% chlorhexidine and 2% povidone-iodine in 70% alcohol is shown by virtual complete eradication of the organisms isolated from the preoperative skin cultures. In only 2 cases (3.4%) were organisms (S. aureus and S. epidermidis respectively) isolated following skin preparation. Cultures taken at the end of operative procedures grew predominantly S. epidermidis (5 cases, 8.5%). Children were discharged from the day unit once they had taken fluids and had passed urine. The wounds were also checked for any evidence of bleeding. Follow-up was done 2 weeks later by means of a visit to the day unit where the same surgeon assessed wound healing according to the Southampton Wound Assessment Scale. Ninety-four per cent of the wounds had healed by primary intention; 4.5% had minor complications and 1.5% had septic complications. Our trial confirms that wound sepsis is an infrequent but significant complication of day case groin surgery. Routine follow-up by surgical day units of minor surgical cases is not warranted and will incur unnecessary cost. Only 1.5% of postoperative cases will require further medical attention and septic lesions in the lymphatic drainage area should be regarded as risk factors. PMID:12387217

  15. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  16. Postoperative Immunosuppression After Open and Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Assessment of Cellular Immune Function and Monocytic HLA-DR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Schmidt, Sven C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Major abdominal procedures are strongly associated with postoperative immunosuppression and subsequent increased patient morbidity. It is believed that laparoscopic surgery causes less depletion of the systemic immune function because of the reduced tissue trauma. Various cytokines and monocytic HLA-DR expression have been successfully implemented to assess postoperative immune function. The aim of our study was to show the difference in immunologic profiles after minimally invasive versus conventional liver resection. Methods: Ten animals underwent either laparoscopic or conventional open left lateral liver resection. Flow cytometric characteristics of HLA-DR expression on monocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cellular secretion of tumor necrosis factor ?, interferon ?, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were measured and analyzed in ex vivo whole blood samples. Intraoperative and postoperative clinical outcome parameters were also documented and evaluated. Results: All animals survived the procedures. Postoperative complications were fever (n = 3), wound infections (n = 2), and biloma (n = 1). Open surgery showed a morbidity rate of 80% compared with 40% after laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic liver resection showed no postoperative immunoparalysis. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression in this group was elevated, whereas the open surgery group showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class II expression on postoperative day 1. Postoperative secretion of tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin 6, and interferon ? was lower in the open surgery group. Elevated transaminase levels after laparoscopy might have resulted from an ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by the capnoperitoneum. Conclusion: Major immunoparalysis depression was not observed in either group. Laparoscopic surgery shows a tendency to improve immunologic recovery after liver resection. PMID:24398205

  17. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Schenning, Katie J; Deiner, Stacie G

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients older than 65years receive greater than one-third of the more than 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. PMID:26315635

  18. [New approach to postoperative delirium treatment].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, I N; Makhlaĭ, A V; Tepliakova, A N; Gubaĭdullin, R R; Sal'nikov, P S; Borisov, A Iu; Berezenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of different drugs for sedation was studied in 51 patients after large abdominal operations complicated by postoperative delirium. Diagnosis of postoperative delirium was established according to CAM-ICU criteria. Dexmedetomidine has demonstrated significantly decreased duration of delirium and hospital stay in intensive care unit in comparison with haloperidol. Besides, patients which received dexmedetomidine preserved opportunity for verbal contact. Also these patients interacted better with department's stuff. PMID:26031955

  19. Mind-body techniques in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Karen A

    2002-11-01

    Even the most skilled and resourceful wound care provider encounters stagnation of wound healing from time to time. Patients with chronic, nonhealing wounds often display negative thought patterns and behavioral tendencies that, in turn, hinder biological and emotional healing. An increasing body of research supports the negative effect of stress on wound healing. The impact of deeper, emotion-based "wounds" as complicating factors in conventional wound healing are being further explored. It is theorized that emotions such as lack of self worth, guilt, and anger are strongly correlated to the chronic, nonhealing wound. Mind-body techniques such as affirmations, creative visualization, relaxation, and conscious breathing are suggested for incorporation into the treatment program. These techniques seek to empower and engage the patient by promoting greater personal awareness and assertion in the healing process. Wound care providers are seen as facilitators of the innate healing potential inside each individual. Mind-body techniques are offered as a complement for a more comprehensive wound healing strategy. PMID:12426453

  20. Avoiding complications in the repair of orbital floor fractures.

    PubMed

    Harris, Gerald J

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of the orbital floor are commonly repaired by all specialists who manage facial trauma. Potential complications include incomplete correction of preoperative enophthalmos or diplopia, as well as induction of hypoglobus or hyperglobus, eyelid malposition, or optic nerve injury. To optimize functional and aesthetic results, a stepwise analysis of the surgical procedure is presented-from the election and timing of repair, through the incision and dissection path, release of herniated orbital tissue, implant material and placement, wound closure, and postoperative care. Key elements include the distinction of floor fracture subtypes, avoiding cicatricial contraction of the lower eyelid, complete release of herniated soft tissue, direct observation of all fracture margins, and proper contouring and positioning of the implant. PMID:24874836

  1. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  2. Recent advances in postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

    2010-03-01

    Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development. PMID:20351978

  3. Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development. PMID:20351978

  4. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life. PMID:16471044

  5. Open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plafond fractures. Variables contributing to poor results and complications.

    PubMed

    Teeny, S M; Wiss, D A

    1993-07-01

    In a retrospective study, 58 patients with 60 tibial plafond fractures were treated by internal fixation and reviewed over an average follow-up period of 2.5 years. There were three Reudi Type I, 27 Reudi Type II, and 30 Reudi Type III fractures. Twelve fractures were open, and 60% of the fractures were the result of high-energy trauma. Results were evaluated based on a subjective and objective rating system. There were 15 good and excellent (25%), 15 fair (25%), and 30 poor results (50%). The deep infection rate in Reudi Types I and II fractures was 0%, and in Type III fractures it was 37%. The deep infection rate statistically correlated with the presence of a postoperative wound dehiscence or skin slough but not with the presence of an open fracture. Overall clinical rating correlated with the Reudi classification, quality of reduction, and the presence of a postoperative wound infection. The ankle fusion rate for Reudi Types I and II fractures was 10%, whereas that in Reudi Type III fractures was 26%. The results of this study show that operative treatment of complex intraarticular fractures of the distal tibia remain fraught with difficulty and that the complication rates and need for further reconstructive surgery remains high. If anatomic reduction without soft-tissue complications cannot be predicted preoperatively, consideration should be given to alternative types of treatment. PMID:8519097

  6. Intensified neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for rectal cancer enhances surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy has proven superior to adjuvant treatment in reducing the rate of local recurrence without impairing cancer related survival or the incidence of distant metastases. The present study aimed at addressing the effects of an intensified protocol of neoadjuvant treatment on the development of postoperative complications. Methods A total of 387 patients underwent oncological resection for rectal cancer in our institution between January 2000 and December 2009. 106 patients received an intensified radiochemotherapy. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were analyzed retrospectively with special attention on complication rates after intensified radio-chemotherapy. Therefore, for each patient subjected to neoadjuvant treatment a patient without neoadjuvant treatment was matched in the following order for tumor height, discontinuous resection/exstirpation, T-category of the TNM-system, dividing stoma and UICC stage. Results Of all patients operated for rectal cancer, 27.4% received an intensified neoadjuvant treatment. Tumor location in the matched patients were in the lower third (55.2%), middle third (41.0%) and upper third (3.8%) of the rectum. Postoperatively, surgical morbidity was higher after intensified neoadjuvant treatment. In the subgroup with low anterior resection (LAR) the anastomosis leakage rate was higher (26.6% vs. 9.7%) and in the subgroup of patients with rectal exstirpations the perineal wound infection rate was increased (42.2% vs. 18.8%) after intensified radiochemotherapy. Conclusions In rectal cancer the decision for an intensified neoadjuvant treatment comes along with an increase of anastomotic leakage and perineal wound infection. Quality of life is often reduced considerably and has to be balanced against the potential benefit of intensifying neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. PMID:24073705

  7. Usefulness of lateral internal sphincterotomy in reducing postoperative pain after open hemorrhoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Kanellos, Ioannis; Zacharakis, Emmanouil; Christoforidis, Emmanouil; Angelopoulos, Stamatis; Kanellos, Dimitrios; Pramateftakis, Manousos Georgios; Betsis, Dimitrios

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of lateral internal sphincterotomy on pain after open hemorrhoidectomy. From 1998 to 2003, seventy-eight (78) patients with fourth-degree hemorrhoids were included in this prospective randomized trial. The patients were randomized into two equal groups of 39 patients. Patients from group I underwent Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy. Patients from group II, quite apart from Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy, underwent lateral internal sphincterotomy up to the dentate line, in the left hemorrhoidectomy wound. One surgeon from the Department, who did not know to which group the patients belonged, evaluated the postoperative course in all the patients. After the first bowel movement, there were three (7.7%) patients who did not experience any pain in the internal sphincterotomy group, while in the non-internal sphincterotomy group all patients experienced mild or moderate pain. There were also more patients who experienced excruciating pain in the non-internal sphincterotomy group than in the internal sphincterotomy group (25 vs. 18); these differences were statistically significant (p = 0.034). There was no significant difference in the Wexner Incontinence Scale between the groups (p = 0.228). The addition of lateral internal sphincterotomy to open hemorrhoidectomy seems to have a positive effect on reducing postoperative pain in a few patients, without affecting the postoperative complications rate. PMID:15770383

  8. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. PMID:22998924

  9. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  10. Surgical wound healing in bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E C

    2012-07-01

    Animal experiments have shown that a number of bleeding disorders may affect wound healing (WH), including haemophilia B, deficiency of factor XIII and abnormalities of fibrinogen. Therefore, normal healing requires adequate haemostatic function for the appropriate time frame (up to 4 weeks in the clean and uncontaminated wound). Many factors may affect WH, including impaired haemostasis, diabetes, poor nutrition, insufficient oxygenation, infection, smoking, alcoholism, old age, stress and obesity. The gold standard for the correct care of surgical wounds in patients with bleeding disorders includes wound dressing and comprehensive standard care (haemostasis, nutritional support, treatment of co-morbidities, offloading, reperfusion therapy and compression). Although complications of surgical wounds healing in patients with bleeding disorders are uncommon, a low level of the deficient factor for an insufficient period of time could cause WH complications such as haematomas, infection, and skin necrosis and dehiscence. Clinical experience and animal experiments appear to indicate that, to get a satisfactory healing of surgical wounds and avoid potential complications of WH, a good level of haemostasis is necessary for 2-3 weeks after surgery. However, many treaters would regard this recommendation at odds with (i.e. more aggressive than) current standards. Unfortunately no additional clinical evidence for this recommendation can be provided. PMID:22335628

  11. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus. PMID:25722363

  12. Current issues in postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Narinder

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pain has been poorly managed for decades. Recent surveys from USA and Europe do not show any major improvement. Persistent postoperative pain is common after most surgical procedures, and after thoracotomy and mastectomy, about 50% of patients may experience it. Opioids remain the mainstay of postoperative pain treatment in spite of strong evidence of their drawbacks. Multimodal analgesic techniques are widely used but new evidence is disappointing. Regional anaesthetic techniques are the most effective methods to treat postoperative pain. Current evidence suggests that epidural analgesia can no longer be considered the 'gold standard'. Perineural techniques are good alternatives for major orthopaedic surgery but remain underused. Infiltrative techniques with or without catheters are useful for almost all types of surgery. Simple surgeon-delivered local anaesthetic techniques such as wound infiltration, preperitoneal/intraperitoneal administration, transversus abdominis plane block and local infiltration analgesia can play a significant role in improvement of postoperative care, and the last of these has changed orthopaedic practice in many institutions. Current postoperative pain management guidelines are generally 'one size fits all'. It is well known that pain characteristics such as type, location, intensity and duration vary considerably after different surgical procedures. Procedure-specific postoperative pain management recommendations are evidence based, and also take into consideration the role of anaesthetic and surgical techniques, clinical routines and risk-benefit aspects. The role of acute pain services to improve pain management and outcome is well accepted but implementation seems challenging. The need for upgrading the role of surgical ward nurses and collaboration with surgeons to implement enhanced recovery after surgery protocols with regular audits to improve postoperative outcome cannot be overstated. PMID:26509324

  13. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. PMID:26589696

  14. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis – unusual management of unusual complication of Whipple procedure

    PubMed Central

    Huťan, Martin; Bartko, Christian; Slyško, Roman; Sekáč, Jaroslav; Prochotský, Augustín; Majeský, Ivan; Škultéty, Ján

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatoduodenectomy is an extensive procedure carrying risk of a number of postoperative complications. Of these the most common are surgical site infections (SSI), bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, and anastomotic leakage. However, the most serious complications are ones, that are rare, clinically hardly diagnosed, and if untreated, leading to the death of a patient. Among the latter complications is thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Its clinical signs are unspecific and diagnostics complicated. Treatment requires aggressive approach. If this is absent, intestinal necrosis with septic state, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) lead to a death of a patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE Authors present a case of a patient after pancreatoduodenectomy, complicated by the thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Patient was managed by resection of the necrotic bowel, venous decompression by venous bypass from superior mesenteric vein to the right ovarian vein, and open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Patient suffered severe abdominal sepsis with need for intensive organ support. Abdomen was definitely closed on fourth NPWT redress. Patient healed without any further complications, is well and was released to the ambulatory setting. DISCUSSION Superior mesenteric vein (VMS) thrombosis is a rare complication. It diagnosis requires high level of vigilance and once diagnosed, aggressive therapy is essential. Two goals of surgical treatment exist: resection of the necrotic bowel and facilitation of the blood outflow. CONCLUSION Mesenteroovarian anastomosis is one of the options in treatment of thrombosis of VMS if thrombectomy is not feasible. PMID:25255475

  15. [Complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lombardi, C P; Raffaelli, M; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Oragano, L; Sollazzi, L; Bellantone, R

    2007-10-01

    Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedure worldwide, even if the risks of lethal postoperative complications prevented its evolution and diffusion until the beginning of the XX century. At that time, T. Kocher described his meticulous technique, reporting excellent results in terms of mortality and morbidity. At present, mortality for this procedure approaches 0% and overall complication rate is less than 3%. Nonetheless, major complications of thyroidectomy (i.e. compressive hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy and hypoparathyroidism) are still fearful complications and account for a significant percentage of medico-legal claims. Patients volume and surgical skill play an important role in reducing the risk of complications. Accurate knowledge of anatomy and pathophysiology, complications incidence and pathogenesis and a careful surgical performance are essential. In this review, post-thyroidectomy complications basing on literature analysis and personal experience are described. The main anatomical, technical and pathophysiological factors that help preventing post-thyroidectomy complications are analyzed, taking into proper account new technologies and the minimally invasive surgical procedures that influenced thyroid surgery during the last decade. PMID:17947950

  16. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Materials Publications Related Links World Health Organization (WHO) Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) Diphtheria and the Alaskan Iditarod Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Complications from ...

  17. Complications of glioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christina; Westphal, Manfred; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Even with current advances in adjunctive therapies, including radiation, chemotherapy, and various clinical trials of gene therapy and immunotherapy, surgical resection remains one of the most effective treatment for intra-axial gliomas. Survival in these patients has been shown to be related to the extent of resection. In some cases, it can provide cures of long-term remission; in others, it can provide disease control when combined with the above adjunctive treatments. However, surgical resection carries its own risks and complications. These complications can be broadly divided into neurologic, regional, and systemic, including direct cortical and vascular injury, surgical wound complications, and postsurgical medical complications. Certain patient characteristics, including Karnofsky performance status score (KPS) and pathology of the tumor, have been shown to have an impact on the risk of postsurgical complications. Advancement in preoperative and intraoperative adjunct technology such as cortical mapping and navigation has improved the surgeon's ability to safely and maximally resect the tumors. It is therefore important to understand the perioperative complications after craniotomy and tumor resection and factors affecting morbidity and mortality in order for surgeons to optimally select and counsel patients who will benefit the most from surgical resection. This chapter will focus on the complications associated with craniotomy for intrinsic glioma and ways of avoiding these events. PMID:26948356

  18. Perioperative Surgical Complications and Learning Curve Associated with Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Single-Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Bin; Seok, Sang Ok; Jo, Byung Woo; Ha, Joong Won

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgical complications tend to occur more frequently in the beginning stages of a surgeon's career, knowledge of perioperative complications is important to perform a safe procedure, especially if the surgeon is a novice. We sought to identify and describe perioperative complications and their management in connection with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive TLIF. The primary outcome measure was adverse events during the perioperative period, including neurovascular injury, implant-related complications, and wound infection. Pseudarthroses and adjacent segment pathologies were not included in this review. Adverse events that were not specifically related to spinal surgery and did not affect recovery were also excluded. Results Perioperative complications occurred in 9% of patients (11/124); including three cases of temporary postoperative neuralgia, two deep wound infections, two pedicle screw misplacements, two cage migrations, one dural tear, and one grafted bone extrusion. No neurologic deficits were reported. Eight complications occurred in the first one-third of the series and only 3 complications occurred in the last two-thirds of the series. Additional surgeries were performed in 6% of patients (7/124); including four reoperations (two for cage migrations, one for a misplaced screw, and one for an extruded graft bone fragment) and three hardware removals (one for a misplaced screw and two for infected cages). Conclusions We found perioperative complications occurred more often in the early period of a surgeon's experience with minimally invasive TLIF. Implant-related complications were common and successfully managed by additional surgeries in this series. We suggest greater caution should be exercised to avoid the potential complications, especially when surgeon is a novice to this procedure. PMID:25729524

  19. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  20. Identification of complications that have a significant effect on length of stay after spine surgery and predictive value of 90-day readmission rate.

    PubMed

    Yadla, Sanjay; Ghobrial, George M; Campbell, Peter G; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Harrop, James S; Ratliff, John K; Sharan, Ashwini D

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Complications after spine surgery have an impact on overall outcome and health care expenditures. The increased cost of complications is due in part to associated prolonged hospital stays. The authors propose that certain complications have a greater impact on length of stay (LOS) than others and that those complications should be the focus of future targeted prevention efforts. They conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database to identify complications with the greatest impact on LOS as well as the predictive value of these complications with respect to 90-day readmission rates. METHODS Data on 249 patients undergoing spine surgery at Thomas Jefferson University from May to December 2008 were collected by a study auditor. Any complications occurring within 30 days of surgery were recorded as was overall LOS for each patient. Stepwise regression analysis was performed to determine whether specific complications had a statistically significant effect on LOS. For correlation, all readmissions within 90 days were recorded and organized by complication for comparison with those complications affecting LOS. RESULTS The mean LOS for patients without postoperative complications was 6.9 days. Patients who developed pulmonary complications had an associated increase in LOS of 11.1 days (p < 0.005). The development of a urinary tract infection (UTI) was associated with an increase in LOS of 3.4 days (p = 0.002). A new neurological deficit was associated with an increase in LOS of 8.2 days (p = 0.004). Complications requiring return to the operating room (OR) showed a trend toward an increase in LOS of 4.7 days (p = 0.09), as did deep wound infections (3.3 days, p = 0.08). The most common reason for readmission was for wound drainage (n = 21; surgical drainage was required in 10 [4.01%] of these 21 cases). The most common diagnoses for readmission, in decreasing order of incidence, were categorized as hardware malpositioning (n = 4), fever (n = 4), pulmonary (n = 2), UTI (n = 2), and neurological deficit (n = 1). Complications affecting LOS were not found to be predictive of readmission (p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS Postoperative complications in patients who have undergone spine surgery are not uncommon and are associated with prolonged hospital stays. In the current cohort, the occurrence of pulmonary complications, UTI, and new neurological deficit had the greatest effect on overall LOS. Further study is required to determine the causative factors affecting readmission. These specific complications may be high-yield targets for cost reduction and/or prevention efforts. PMID:26315951

  1. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  2. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  3. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Woo; Baek, Seung Ryeol; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Sang Ho; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo Yun; Moh, Ji Hong; Kondo, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Background Rosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice. Methods Sixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg) was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test. Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-β1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA. Conclusions Rose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing. PMID:26618114

  4. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy. PMID:22325312

  5. Maxillofacial gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Olga; de Régloix, Stanislas; Dubourdieu, Stéphane; Lefort, Hugues; Boizat, Stéphane; Houze, Benoit; Culoma, Jennifer; Burlaton, Guillaume; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The majority of maxillofacial gunshot wounds are caused by suicide attempts. Young men are affected most often. When the lower one-third of the face is involved, airway patency (1.6% of the cases) and hemorrhage control (1.9% of the cases) are the two most urgent complications to monitor and prevent. Spinal fractures are observed with 10% of maxillary injuries and in 20% of orbital injuries. Actions to treat the facial gunshot victim need to be performed, keeping in mind spine immobilization until radiographic imaging is complete and any required spinal stabilization accomplished. Patients should be transported to a trauma center equipped to deal with maxillofacial and neurosurgery because 40% require emergency surgery. The mortality rate of maxillofacial injuries shortly after arrival at a hospital varies from 2.8% to 11.0%. Complications such as hemiparesis or cranial nerve paralysis occur in 20% of survivors. This case has been reported on a victim of four gunshot injuries. One of the gunshots was to the left mandibular ramus and became lodged in the C4 vertebral bone. PMID:25868553

  6. The tip of the iceberg: Post caesarean wound dehiscence presenting as abdominal wound sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bharatam, Kaundinya Kiran; Sivaraja, P.K.; Abineshwar, N.J.; Thiagarajan, Vasundhara; Thiagarajan, D.A.; Bodduluri, Sudeep; Sriraman, K.B.; Vasantha Ragavan, A.; Priya, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Uterine scar dehiscence can complicate caesarean section with complications like post partum hemorrhage, endomyometritis, localized/generalized peritonitis, and sepsis. Presentation of case Our patient had abdominal wound infection after LSCS surgery and features of sepsis. The wound infection was actually the presentation of a uterine scar dehiscence and localized peritonitis. Discussion Incidence of uterine scar dehiscence is around 0.6%. Presentation can be post partum hemorrhage, endomyometritis, and generalized/localized peritonitis. Peritonitis caused by uterine incisional necrosis must be dealt surgically. A high index of suspicion with appropriate investigations can highlight such problems for early treatment and cure with least morbidity especially related to further pregnancies. Conclusion Uterine scar dehiscence with infection requires high index of suspicion as rare cause for post partum localized/generalized peritonitis with sepsis. Severe abdominal wound infection after caesarean section may be associated with uterine wound dehiscence, which poses a grave risk to the mother in a future pregnancy. PMID:25728672

  7. Acceleration of wound repair by curcumin in the excision wound of mice exposed to different doses of fractionated γ radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Rajanikant, Golgod Krishnamurthy

    2012-02-01

    Fractionated irradiation (IR) before or after surgery of malignant tumours causes a high frequency of wound healing complications. Our aim was to investigate the effect of curcumin (CUM) on the healing of deep excision wound of mice exposed to fractionated IR by mimicking clinical conditions. A full-thickness dermal excision wound was created on the shaved dorsum of mice that were orally administered or not with 100 mg of CUM per kilogram body weight before partial body exposure to 10, 20 or 40 Gy given as 2 Gy/day for 5, 10 or 20 days. The wound contraction was determined periodically by capturing video images of the wound from day 1 until complete healing of wounds. Fractionated IR caused a dose-dependent delay in the wound contraction and prolonged wound healing time, whereas CUM administration before fractionated IR caused a significant elevation in the wound contraction and reduced mean wound healing time. Fractionated IR reduced the synthesis of collagen, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and nitric oxide (NO) at different post-IR times and treatment of mice with CUM before IR elevated the synthesis of collagen, DNA and NO significantly. Histological examination showed a reduction in the collagen deposition, fibroblast and vascular densities after fractionated IR, whereas CUM pre-treatment inhibited this decline significantly. Our study shows that CUM pre-treatment accelerated healing of irradiated wound and could be a substantial therapeutic strategy in the management of irradiated wounds. PMID:21883936

  8. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Jzef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  9. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers-including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes-affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. PMID:26979353

  10. Management of gunshot wounds to the mandible.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Michael; Sawatari, Yoh

    2010-07-01

    The gunshot wound to the mandible is a unique traumatic injury. The resultant injury from the gunshot wound is diverse because of the variability of the projectile, motion, velocity, and tissue characteristics. When a high-velocity projectile strikes the mandible, often times the wound will consist of a severely comminuted mandible surrounded by nonvital soft tissues and the implantation of multiple foreign bodies. This represents a challenge for the treating surgeon. The anatomy and function of the mandible make it such that the care of the gunshot wound requires a combination of trauma and reconstructive surgeries. There are varying techniques advocated for the management of gunshot wound to the face. However, for the comminuted mandible fracture sustained from a gunshot wound, an approach involving the fabrication of an occlusal splint, intermaxillary fixation, aggressive debridement of hard and soft tissues, and immediate reconstruction with a titanium plate is a comprehensive approach that can restore the appropriate function and contour of the patient. At the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Miami, this approach to the comminuted mandible fracture secondary to the gunshot wound has led to the effective management of this specific subset of injury. The complication rate is comparable with the current literature and provides an advantage as a 1-stage management to restore appropriate function and cosmesis to the patient. PMID:20613603

  11. Non-healing wounds: the geriatric approach.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2009-01-01

    The most common types of non-healing wounds are four types: pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischemic ulcers and venous ulcers. Many of those wounds develop among the elderly, becoming non-healing to the extent that the patient may live with them all of his life, or even die because of them. Not enough attention is paid to the underlying contributing problems specific to the elderly patient. Those factors are physiologic (aging skin, immune state and atherosclerosis) and pathologic situation (diabetic disease, ischemia of leg). Therefore, the geriatric approach to a non-healing wound is comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Those including: patient's co-morbidities, functional state as measured by the activities of daily living (ADL) scale, nutritional status, social support, ethical beliefs and quality of life and not only the wound itself. Each discipline (the nursing staff, physician, dietitian, occupational, physical therapists and social worker) has its own task in preventing and treating such wounds. The ultimate goal therefore has been altered from healing of the wounds to symptom control, prevention of complications and to contribute to the patient's overall wellbeing. This review discusses all those items in a geriatric point of view, and how to deal with the non-healing wounds as a geriatric syndrome. PMID:18838182

  12. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gastrointestinal system, or respiratory system — fluids and other contaminants could get into the wound and cause infection. ... sure there are no remaining bacteria or other contaminants, they will stitch or close the wound. Sometimes, ...

  13. Sweet NETs, Bitter Wounds.

    PubMed

    Papayannopoulos, Venizelos

    2015-08-18

    What causes slow wound healing rates in diabetes is poorly understood. Wong et al. (2015) report that an increase in the deployment of neutrophil extracellular traps associated with hyperglycemia slows down wound healing. PMID:26287680

  14. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... wounds heal, you may have a wound VAC (Vacuum Assisted Closure) dressing. It increases blood flow in ... helps with healing. This is a negative pressure (vacuum) dressing. There is a vacuum pump, a foam ...

  15. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePLUS

    ... soap with antibacterial chemicals. These can damage the wound tissue and slow healing. Your doctor may also ask you to irrigate, or wash out, your wound: Fill a syringe with salt water or soapy ...

  16. Gunshot wounds - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

  17. The effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing in horses.

    PubMed

    Petersen, S L; Botes, C; Olivier, A; Guthrie, A J

    1999-05-01

    Laser therapy is used in many countries, including South Africa, for the treatment of skin wounds. Low level galium aluminium arsenide (GaAlAs) laser was administered to full thickness skin wounds (3 x 3 cm) induced surgically on the dorsal aspect of the metacarpophalangeal joints of 6 crossbred horses in a randomised, blind, controlled study. Treated wounds that received a daily laser dosage of 2 J/cm2 were compared with nontreated control wounds on the opposite leg. There were no wound complications. Both groups of wounds were cleaned daily using tap water. Wound contraction and epithelialisation were evaluated using photoplanimetry. There were no significant differences in wound contraction or epithelialisation between the laser treated and the control wounds. It was therefore concluded that laser therapy had no clinically significant effect on second intention wound healing in this study. PMID:10402136

  18. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease. PMID:26342531

  19. The Role of Wound Healing and Its Everyday Application in Plastic Surgery: A Practical Perspective and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ireton, Jordan E.; Unger, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After surgery it is often recommended that patients should refrain from strenuous physical activity for 46 weeks. This recommendation is based on the time course of wound healing. Here, we present an overview of incisional wound healing with a focus on 2 principles that guide our postoperative recommendations: the gain of tensile strength of a wound over time and the effect of mechanical stress on wound healing. Methods: A systematic search of the English literature was conducted using OVID, Cochrane databases, and PubMed. Inclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing the dynamics of incisional wound healing, and exclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing nonincisional wounds. Results: Experiments as early as 1929 laid the groundwork for our postoperative activity recommendations. Research using animal models has shown that the gain in tensile strength of a surgical wound is sigmoidal in trajectory, reaching maximal strength approximately 6 weeks postoperatively. Although human and clinical data are limited, the principles gained from laboratory investigation have provided important insights into the relationship among mechanical stress, collagen dynamics, and the time course of wound healing. Conclusion: Our postoperative activity recommendations are based on a series of animal studies. Clinical research supporting these recommendations is minimal, with the most relevant clinical data stemming from early motion protocols in the orthopedic literature. We must seek to establish clinical data to support our postoperative activity recommendations so that we can maximize the physiologic relationships between wound healing and mechanical stress. PMID:25289204

  20. Pyoderma gangrenosum following a routine caesarean section: Pseudo-infection in a caesarean wound

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, A.G.; Singal, Archana; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Singh, Smita

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old booked primigravida underwent lower segment caesarean section for breech presentation. She developed signs and symptoms of wound infection by the fourth postoperative day. This was initially managed with antibiotics and wound dressing, but debridement was later undertaken after consulting surgeons. This resulted in an alarming worsening of the wound with sudden and fast increase in its size along with systemic symptoms. Wound biopsy established the diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum. The patient's management included oral medication with prednisolone, cyclosporin and dapsone and wound care. There was a dramatic response to this treatment. The wound completely healed by the eighth postoperative month. The oral medications were tapered off slowly and stopped by that time. PMID:26535169

  1. Non-equilibrium Air Plasma for Wound Bleeding Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Lin, Chuan-Shun; Chiang, Shu-Hsing

    A low temperature non-equilibrium air plasma spray is tested as a blood coagulator. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma effluent indicates that it carries abundant reactive atomic oxygen (RAO), which can activate erythrocyte - platelet interactions to enhance blood coagulation for plug formation. Tests of the device for wound bleeding control were performed on pigs. Four types of wounds, straight cut and cross cut in the ham area, a hole in an ear saphenous vein, and a cut to an ear artery, were examined. The results showed that this plasma spray could effectively stop the bleeding and reduced the bleeding time considerably. Post-Operative observation of straight cut and cross cut wound healing was carried out. It was found that the plasma treatment had a positive impact on wound healing, in particular, of the cross cut wound; its healing time was shortened by a half.

  2. Wound care centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you go to a wound clinic, you will work with a team of health care providers trained in wound care. ... Physical therapists who help with wound care and work with you to help ... care physician up to date on your progress and treatment.

  3. Ultrasonic imaging of gunshot wounds in pig limb.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Deng, D; Tao, J; Wu, X; Yi, F; Wang, G; Yang, F

    2015-01-01

    We investigated wound tract extension of traumatic gunshot wounds in limb soft tissues as well as wound tract sonographic features and change-patterns when the limb position was changed. The experimental animals included 8 healthy crossbred pigs in the Chengdu plain region. Chinese Type 53 Carbine was used to establish the gunshot wound model of porcine soft tissues. Gunshot-injured zones in the soft tissues were dynamically observed at different time points using ultrasonic technology. Pathological examinations were performed for the corresponding regions for comparison and analysis. The internal echo of the wound tract was a pipe-like echo that changed over time. The wound tract extension changed with postural changes. The gas echo extended along the inside of the wound track, surrounding the fascia to further tissues. Ultrasonic imaging of gunshot wounds in pig soft tissues shows specific characteristics. The application of ultrasound technology may provide important imaging protection for gunshot wound debridement and postoperative unobstructed drainage, helping to improve the judgment and treatment of limb gunshot injuries. PMID:25966201

  4. Metabolic dysfunction in lymphocytes promotes postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark R; Sultan, Pervez; del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Whittle, John; Karmali, Shamir N; Moonesinghe, S Ramani; Haddad, Fares S; Mythen, Michael G; Singer, Mervyn; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-09-01

    Perioperative lymphopenia has been linked with an increased risk of postoperative infectious complications, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that bioenergetic dysfunction is an important mechanism underlying lymphopenia, impaired functionality and infectious complications. In two cohorts of patients (61-82 years old) undergoing orthopaedic joint replacement (n=417 and 328, respectively), we confirmed prospectively that preoperative lymphopenia (≤1.3 x 10(9)·l(-1); <20% white cell count; prevalence 15-18%) was associated with infectious complications (relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.0); P=0.008) and prolonged hospital stay. Lymphocyte respirometry, mitochondrial bioenergetics and function were assessed (n=93 patients). Postoperative lymphocytes showed a median 43% fall (range: 26-65%; P=0.029; n=13 patients) in spare respiratory capacity, the extra capacity available to produce energy in response to stress. This was accompanied by reduced glycolytic capacity. A similar hypometabolic phenotype was observed in lymphocytes sampled preoperatively from chronically lymphopenic patients (n=21). This hypometabolic phenotype was associated with functional lymphocyte impairment including reduced T-cell proliferation, lower intracellular cytokine production and excess apoptosis induced by a range of common stressors. Glucocorticoids, which are ubiquitously elevated for a prolonged period postoperatively, generated increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, activated caspase-1 and mature interleukin (IL)-1β in human lymphocytes, suggesting inflammasome activation. mRNA transcription of the NLRP1 inflammasome was increased in lymphocytes postoperatively. Genetic ablation of the murine NLRP3 inflammasome failed to prevent glucocorticoid-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and caspase-1 activity, but increased NLRP1 protein expression. Our findings suggest that the hypometabolic phenotype observed in chronically lymphopenic patients and/or acquired postoperatively increases the risk of postoperative infection through glucocorticoid activation of caspase-1 via the NLRP1 inflammasome. PMID:25891048

  5. Foot Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Complications > Foot Complications Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Foot Complications People with diabetes can develop many different foot problems. Even ordinary problems can get worse and ...

  6. Risks and complications in rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoplasty is regarded to be associated with many risks as the expectations of patient and physician are not always corresponding. Besides of postoperative deformities many other risks and complications have to be considered. Reduction-rhinoplasty e.g. can cause breathing disturbances which are reported in 70% of all revision-rhinoplasty-patients. One has to be aware however that scars and loss of mucosal-sensation can also give the feeling of a blocked nose. The main risks of autogenous transplants are dislocation and resorption, while alloplasts can cause infection and extrusion. In this respect silicone implants can have a complication rate between 5-20%. Less complications are reported with other materials like Gore-Tex. Complications of skin and soft tissues can be atrophy, fibrosis, numbness, cysts originating from displaced mucosa or subcutaneous granulomas caused by ointment material. Postoperative swelling depends mainly on the osteotomy technique. Percutaneous osteotomies cause less trauma, but may result in visible scars. Infections are rare but sometimes life-threatening (toxic-shock-syndrome). The risk is higher, when sinus surgery and rhinoplasty are combined. Osteotomies can also cause injuries of the orbital region. Necrosis of eye-lids by infections and blindness by central artery occlusion are known. There are reports on various other risks like rhinoliquorrhea, brain damage, fistulas between sinus-cavernosus and carotid artery, aneurysms and thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. Discoloration of incisors are possible by damage of vessels and nerves. Rhinoplasty can also become a court-case in dissatisfied patients, a situation that may be called a typical complication of rhinoplasty. It can be avoided by proper patient selection and consideration of psychological disturbances. Postoperative deformities are considered as main risks of rhinoplasty, causing revision surgery in 5% to 15% of the cases. The analysis of postoperative deformities allowes the identification of specific risks. The most frequent postoperative deformity is the pollybeak when a deep naso-frontal angle, cartilaginous hump and reduced tip projection are present preoperatively. The pollybeak is the indication in about 50% of all revision rhinoplasties. Other frequent postoperative deformities are a pendant and wide nasal tip, retractions of the columella base or irregularities of the nasal dorsum. These deformities are very often combined and caused by a loss of septal support. This is why the stability of the caudal septum in septorhinoplasty is the key for a predictable result. Maintaining the position of the tip and the columella is one of the main issues to avoid typical postoperative deformities. The risks for rhinoplasty-complications can be reduced with increasing experience. A prerequisite is continuing education and an earnest distinction between complication and mistake. PMID:22073084

  7. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  8. Advanced Therapeutic Dressings for Effective Wound Healing--A Review.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Catanzano, Ovidio

    2015-11-01

    Advanced therapeutic dressings that take active part in wound healing to achieve rapid and complete healing of chronic wounds is of current research interest. There is a desire for novel strategies to achieve expeditious wound healing because of the enormous financial burden worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of wound healing and wound management products, with emphasis on the demand for more advanced forms of wound therapy and some of the current challenges and driving forces behind this demand. The paper reviews information mainly from peer-reviewed literature and other publicly available sources such as the US FDA. A major focus is the treatment of chronic wounds including amputations, diabetic and leg ulcers, pressure sores, and surgical and traumatic wounds (e.g., accidents and burns) where patient immunity is low and the risk of infections and complications are high. The main dressings include medicated moist dressings, tissue-engineered substitutes, biomaterials-based biological dressings, biological and naturally derived dressings, medicated sutures, and various combinations of the above classes. Finally, the review briefly discusses possible prospects of advanced wound healing including some of the emerging physical approaches such as hyperbaric oxygen, negative pressure wound therapy and laser wound healing, in routine clinical care. PMID:26308473

  9. Comprehensive Postoperative Management After Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tien, Duc A; Stokken, Janalee K; Recinos, Pablo F; Woodard, Troy D; Sindwani, Raj

    2016-02-01

    To maximize outcomes from endoscopic skull base surgery, careful early postoperative management is critically important. Standardized postoperative regimens are lacking. The type of reconstruction and presence and type of cerebrospinal fluid leak dictate management. If a leak is encountered intraoperatively, patients should avoid maneuvers that increase intracranial pressures for at least 1month. Early postoperative care focuses on minimizing and managing nasal crusting. This article reviews the evidence in the literature on postoperative management, complications, and quality of life after surgery, and outlines our experience in the management of patients after endoscopic skull base surgery. PMID:26614842

  10. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  11. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment

    PubMed Central

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-01-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

  12. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

  13. Management of open wounds: lessons from orthopedic oncology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Herrick J

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex wounds remains a challenge, and although there have been many promising advances, patients often undergo a morbid and lengthy process to obtain sufficient, satisfactory healing. Sarcoma patients are especially vulnerable to soft tissue wound-healing complications. These patients are often treated with neoadjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy and have compromised local vascularity to healing tissue. The advent and refinement of wound vacuum-assisted closure technology have been shown to have a tremendous impact. This article reviews the benefits of some novel technologies currently undergoing investigation in orthopedic oncology that will likely have applications in wound management from other causes. PMID:24267211

  14. G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Aleah L.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation following Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (34 month) and aged (1820 month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal, subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 ?l/injection) or saline control (50 ?l/injection) 30 minutes after wound infection. Mice were sacrificed at days 3 and 7 post wound infection and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no affect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of post-operative wound infection or chronic, non-healing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

  15. Supplemental Intravenous Crystalloid Administration Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kabon, Barbara; Akça, Ozan; Taguchi, Akiko; Nagele, Angelika; Jebadurai, Ratnaraj; Arkilic, Cem F.; Sharma, Neeru; Ahluwalia, Arundhathi; Galandiuk, Susan; Fleshman, James; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Wound perfusion and oxygenation are important determinants of the development of postoperative wound infections. Supplemental fluid administration significantly increases tissue oxygenation in surrogate wounds in the subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm in perioperative surgical patients. We tested the hypothesis that supplemental fluid administration during and after elective colon resections decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Patients undergoing open colon resection were randomly assigned to small (n=124, 8 mL·kg-1·h-1) or large volume (n=129, 16-18 mL·kg-1·h-1) fluid management. Our major outcomes were two distinct criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections: 1) purulent exudate combined with a culture positive for pathogenic bacteria and 2) Center for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections. All wound infections diagnosed using either criterion by a blinded observer in the 15 days following surgery were considered in the analysis. Wound healing was evaluated with the ASEPSIS scoring system. Of the patients given small fluid administration, 14 had surgical wound infections; 11 given large fluid therapy had infections, P=0.46. ASEPSIS wound healing scores were similar in both groups: 7±16 (small volume) vs. 8±14 (large volume), P=0.70. Our results suggest that supplemental hydration in the range tested does not impact wound infection rate. PMID:16244030

  16. Trauma and wound healing: role of the route of nutritional support.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, T; Efron, D T; Tantry, U; Barbul, A

    2001-01-01

    Following severe trauma and surgical injury, nutritional support via the enteral route has been shown to lead to increased survival and decreased complications when compared to the parenteral route. We hypothesized that the route of nutrient delivery may affect cutaneous wound healing following severe traumatic insult. Forty-six Sprague Dawley rats underwent bilateral closed femoral fractures, central venous catheterization, gastrostomy placement and dorsal skin incision with placement of polyvinyl alcohol sponges into subcutaneous pockets. Identical nutritional infusates of 25% dextrose, 4.25% amino acids, and vitamins were given, half the animals receiving the infusion via the gastrostomy (ENT) and the other half via the venous catheter (TPN). Animals were sacrificed on post-operative days 5, 7, or 10. Wound breaking strength (WBS, g) and sponge granuloma hydroxyproline content (OHP- a measure of wound collagen deposition, microg/ 100mg sponge) were measured. There were no significant nutritional differences between the two feeding groups. On days 5 and 7, WBS was significantly higher in the ENT group (58.0 +/- 3.1 g vs 48.9 +/- 2.6 g, p < 0.05, and 123 +/- 19 g vs 87.6 +/- 4.2 g, p < 0.05 vs TPN respectively). Sponge OHP content on day 5 was significantly higher in the ENT group (101 +/- 3 vs 86.7+/-5.8 microg/100 sponge, p < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the enteral feeding route imparts a benefit to early post-traumatic wound healing s compared to parenteral feeding. PMID:12678129

  17. Impact of Postoperative Venous Thromboembolism on Postoperative Morbidity, Mortality, and Resource Utilization after Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Newhook, Timothy E; Lapar, Damien J; Walters, Dustin M; Gupta, Shruti; Jolissaint, Joshua S; Adams, Reid B; Brayman, Kenneth L; Zaydfudim, Victor M; Bauer, Todd W

    2015-12-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after hepatectomy on patient morbidity, mortality, and resource usage remains poorly defined. Better understanding of thromboembolic complications is needed to improve perioperative management and overall outcomes. About 3973 patients underwent hepatectomy within NSQIP between 2005 and 2008. Patient characteristics, operative features, and postoperative correlates of VTE were compared with identify risk factors for VTE and to assess its overall impact on postoperative outcomes. Overall incidence of postoperative VTE was 2.4 per cent. Risk factors for postoperative VTE included older age, male gender, compromised functional status, degree of intraoperative blood transfusion, preoperative albumin level (all P < 0.05), and extent of hepatectomy (P = 0.004). Importantly, major postoperative complications, including acute renal failure, pneumonia, sepsis, septic shock, reintubation, prolonged ventilation, cardiac arrest, and reoperation were all associated with higher rates of VTE (all P < 0.05). Operative mortality was increased among patients with VTE (6.5% vs 2.4%, P = 0.03), and patients with VTE had a 2-fold increase in hospital length of stay (12.0 vs 6.0 days, P < 0.001). Postoperative VTE remains a significant source of morbidity, mortality, and increased resource usage after hepatectomy in the United States. Routine aggressive VTE prophylaxis measures are imperative to avoid development of VTE among patients requiring hepatectomy. PMID:26736156

  18. Thyroid surgery in octogenarians is associated with higher complication rates

    PubMed Central

    Mekel, Michal; Stephen, Antonia E.; Gaz, Randall D.; Muzikansky, Alona; Hodin, Richard A.; Parangi, Sareh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether thyroid surgery in patients ≥80 is associated with higher complication rates. Background The incidence of thyroid nodules increases with age and little information is available regarding the risks of thyroid surgery in elderly patients. Methods Out of 3568 patients undergoing thyroid surgery between July 2001 and October 2007 at a single institution, the records of 90 consecutive patients ≥80 years were retrospectively reviewed and compared to a cohort of 242 randomly selected patients aged 18–79, who underwent thyroid surgery during the same time period, using SAS statistical software. Clinical variables included age group, sex, medical co-morbidities, pre-operative diagnosis, substernal component, previous surgery, final pathology, length of stay (LOS), postoperative complications and mortality. Results Preoperative indications for surgery included benign disease in 51.1% vs. 40.9%, suspected malignancy in 18.9% vs. 26% and suspected follicular neoplasms including indeterminate/microfollicular cytology in 30% vs. 33.1% in the octogenarian patient group (≥80 yrs old) vs. the younger patient cohort (p=NS). Octogenarians had a 21.1% rate of significant malignancy on final pathology vs. 28.1% in the younger cohort (p=NS). The overall complication rate in the octogenarian group was 23.3% vs. 9.1% in the younger cohort (p=.0006). Male sex and lung disease were independent risk factors for perioperative complications. Complications unique to octogenarians included heart failure, atrial fibrillation, pneumonia, tracheotomy, urosepsis, blood transfusion, wound infection and ischemic colitis. There was no mortality in either group. Conclusions Patients ≥80 years of age can undergo successful thyroid surgery but with significantly higher morbidity. Earlier surgical intervention may be advised in those who are at high risk for disease progression whereas follow-up strategies without surgery may be advised for others. PMID:19744461

  19. Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy D. Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kirsch, David G.; Suit, Herman D.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Gebhardt, Marc C.; Mankin, Henry J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

  20. Increased Postoperative Bleeding Risk among Patients with Local Flap Surgery under Continued Clopidogrel Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Haase, Martina; Kluwe, Lan; Zeuch, Jrgen; Smeets, Ralf; Hanken, Henning; Wehrmann, Manfred; Grbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Birkelbach, Moritz; Rendenbach, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of a continued antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel on postoperative bleeding risk in patients undergoing skin tumor resection and reconstruction with local flaps or skin grafts under outpatient conditions. Patients and Methods. The authors designed and implemented a retrospective clinical cohort study at the General Hospital Balingen. The primary endpoint was the bleeding ratio in patients with clopidogrel treatment in comparison to patients without any anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. Wound healing was evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. Results. 650 procedures were performed, 123 of them under continued clopidogrel therapy. There were significantly more postoperative bleeding complications among patients with continued antiplatelet therapy. Regarding the whole study population, malignant lesions, a larger defect size, and skin grafts were accompanied by a higher rate of bleeding incidents. However, there were no significant findings in the univariate analysis of the clopidogrel group. All bleeding incidents were easily manageable. Conclusion. Despite an increased bleeding ratio among patients under continued clopidogrel therapy, the performance of simple surgical procedures can be recommended. However, cautious preparation and careful hemostasis are indispensable. PMID:26345612

  1. The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D. )

    1986-03-01

    During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation.

  2. Special postoperative diet orders: Irrational, obsolete, and imprudent.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Ramasubramanian, Vidhya; Meguid, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    There are no indications to prescribed special diets for postoperative patients. Low-sodium and low-fat or low-cholesterol diets are examples of restricted diets, especially in patients with heart disease and atherosclerosis. These restricted diets are unpalatable. Postoperative nausea, paralytic ileus, and vomiting caused by residual anesthetic effects and opioids used for pain control further contribute to the problem. Long-term adherence to these diets is necessary to derive benefits. Prescribing regular and palatable diets in the immediate postoperative period to meet protein and energy goals is important for wound healing and is commensurate with best clinical practices. In the following, we review the pertinent literature and offer clinical evidence that routine special diet orders for postoperative patients are not necessary. PMID:26746678

  3. Air leakage on the postoperative day: powerful factor of postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyun Woo; Kye, Yeo Kon; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a relatively common disorder in young patients. Although various surgical techniques have been introduced, recurrence after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) remains high. The aim of study was to identify the risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in the spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods From January 2011 through March 2013, two hundreds and thirty two patients underwent surgery because of pneumothorax. Patients with a secondary pneumothorax, as well as cases of single port surgery, an open procedure, additional pleural procedure (pleurectomy, pleural abrasion) or lack of medical records were excluded. The records of 147 patients with PSP undergoing 3-port video-assisted thoracoscopic bullectomy with staple line coverage using an absorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 19 years (range, 11−34 years) with male predominance (87.8%). Median postoperative hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1−10 days) without mortality. Complications were developed in five patients. A total of 24 patients showed postoperative recurrence (16.3%). Younger age less than 17 years old and immediate postoperative air leakage were risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Immediate postoperative air leakage was the risk factor for postoperative recurrence. However, further study will be required for the correlation of air leakage with recurrence. PMID:26904217

  4. Multiple recurrent postoperative spinal infections due to an unrecognized presacral abscess following placement of bicortical sacral screws: case report.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Laura; Burks, S Shelby; Levi, Allan D

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative wound infections in spinal surgery remain an important complication to diagnose and treat successfully. In most cases of deep infection, even with instrumentation, aggressive soft-tissue debridement followed by intravenous antibiotics is sufficient. This report presents a patient who underwent L3-S1 laminectomy and pedicle screw placement including bicortical sacral screws. This patient went on to develop multiple (7) recurrent infections at the operative site over a 5-year period. Continued investigation eventually revealed a large presacral abscess, which remained the source of recurrent bacterial seeding via the remaining bone tracts of the bicortical sacral screws placed during the original lumbar surgery. Two years after drainage of this presacral collection via a retroperitoneal approach, the patient remains symptom free. PMID:26613281

  5. Postoperative management of elective esophagectomy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Paola; Congedo, Elisabetta; Cardone, Alexander; Zappia, Luca; De Cosmo, Germano

    2005-01-01

    Postoperative management after elective esophagectomy for cancer has not been standardized. Thoracoabdominal incision with associated pain, extended operative time with consequent extracellular fluid shifts, single lung ventilation, potential for prolonged postoperative mechanical ventilation and comorbidities in patients with esophageal cancer, all contribute to high perioperative risk. Respiratory problems remain the major cause of both mortality and morbidity after esophagectomy for cancer. A specific pulmonary disorder, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) occurs in 10-20% of patients after esophagectomy. ARDS mortality exceeds 50%. Atrial fibrillation, that complicates recovery in 20 to 25% of patients after esophagectomy, contributes to make outcome worse. Anesthesiologists should adopt strategies known to be able to optimize patient outcome. Decreased postoperative mortality and morbidity have been associated with epidural analgesia, bronchoscopy to clear persistent bronchial secretions, intraoperative fluid restriction and early extubation. It has been shown that setting up early respiratory physiotherapy and mobilitation may improve functional recovery. PMID:16792002

  6. Congenital Cataract: Progress in Surgical Treatment and Postoperative Recovery of Visual Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyue; Xiao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Congenital cataract is a common cause of childhood low vision or blindness worldwide. Early surgery should be performed in sensitive vision development period to avoid vision deprivation in cases of strabismus and nystagmus development. Postoperative recovery of visual function is of great significance for these patients and should include proper postoperative aphakia correction by the application of a contact lens and secondary implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). Patients should receive amblyopic training after surgery to improve their postoperative visual acuity. Although recent advances in surgery techniques and materials have brought better postoperative visual acuity and less complications, a few postoperative complications can still hamper vision condition and vision development, including posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma. Surgery in early infancy are risk factors for these two complications. Life-long follow-up is essential for these patients. Further study will continue to address the surgery timing issue and methods that prevent postoperative complications. PMID:26390798

  7. Extended negative pressure wound therapy-assisted dermatotraction for the closure of large open fasciotomy wounds in necrotizing fasciitis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapid progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue or fascia and may result in large open wounds. The surgical options to cover these wounds are often limited by the patient condition and result in suboptimal functional and cosmetic wound coverage. Dermatotraction can restore the function and appearance of the fasciotomy wound and is less invasive in patients with comorbidities. However, dermatotraction for scarred, stiff NF fasciotomy wounds is often ineffective, resulting in skin necrosis. The authors use extended negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) as an assist in dermatotraction to close open NF fasciotomy wounds. The authors present the clinical results, followed by a discussion of the clinical basis of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction. Methods A retrospective case series of eight patients with NF who underwent open fasciotomy was approved for the study. After serial wound preparation, dermatotraction was applied in a shoelace manner using elastic vessel loops. Next, the extended NPWT was applied over the wound. The sponge was three times wider than the wound width, and the transparent covering drape almost encircled the anatomical wound area. The negative pressure of the NPWT was set at a continuous 100mmHg by suction barometer. The clinical outcome was assessed based on wound area reduction after treatment and by the achievement of direct wound closure. Results After the first set of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction procedures, the mean wound area was significantly decreased (658.12cm2 to 29.37cm2; p?=?0.002), as five out of eight patients achieved direct wound closure. One patient with a chest wall defect underwent latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap coverage, with primary closure of the donor site. Two Fourniers gangrene patients underwent multiple sets of treatment and finally achieved secondary wound closure with skin grafts. The patients were followed up for 18.3months on average and showed satisfactory results without wound recurrence. Conclusions Extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction advances scarred, stiff fasciotomy wound margins synergistically in NF and allows direct closure of the wound without complications. This method can be another good treatment option for the NF patient with large open wounds whose general condition is unsuitable for extensive reconstructive surgery. PMID:24731449

  8. Bio-Conjugated Polycaprolactone Membranes: A Novel Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Teo, Erin Yiling; Jing, Lim; Koh, Yun Pei; Qian, Tan Si; Wen, Feng; Lee, James Wai Kit; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Yap, Yan Lin; Lee, Hanjing; Lee, Chuen Neng; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Lim, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of polycaprolactone and hyaluronic acid creates an ideal environment for wound healing. Hyaluronic acid maintains a moist wound environment and accelerates the in-growth of granulation tissue. Polycaprolactone has excellent mechanical strength, limits inflammation and is biocompatible. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of bio-conjugated polycaprolactone membranes (BPM) as a wound dressing. Methods 16 New Zealand white rabbits were sedated and local anaesthesia was administered. Two 3.0×3.0 cm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of each rabbit, between the lowest rib and the pelvic bone. The wounds were dressed with either BPM (n=12) or Mepitel (n=12) (control), a polyamide-silicon wound dressing. These were evaluated macroscopically on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days for granulation, re-epithelialization, infection, and wound size, and histologically for epidermal and dermal regeneration. Results Both groups showed a comparable extent of granulation and re-epithelialization. No signs of infection were observed. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in wound size between the two groups. BPM (n=6): 8.33 cm2, 4.90 cm2, 3.12 cm2, 1.84 cm2; Mepitel (n=6): 10.29 cm2, 5.53 cm2, 3.63 cm2, 2.02 cm2; at the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days. The extents of epidermal and dermal regeneration were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions BPM is comparable to Mepitel as a safe and efficacious wound dressing. PMID:25396174

  9. Reconstruction option of abdominal wounds with large tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal wall defects result from trauma, abdominal wall tumors, necrotizing infections or complications of previous abdominal surgeries. Apart from cosmetics, abdominal wall defects have strong negative functional impact on the patients. Many different techniques exist for abdominal wall repair. Most problematic and troublesome are defects, where major part of abdominal wall had to be resected and tissue for transfer or reconstruction is absent. Case presentation Authors of the article present operative technique, in which reconstruction of abdominal wall was managed by composite polypropylene mesh with absorbable collagen film, creation of granulation tissue with use of NPWT (negative pressure wound therapy), and subsequent split skin grafting. Three patients with massive abdominal wall defect were successfully managed and abdominal wall reconstruction was performed by mentioned technique. Functional and cosmetic effect is acceptable and patients have good postoperative quality of life. Conclusions Patients with giant abdominal defects can benefit from described technique. It serves as the only option, with which abdominal wall is fully reconstructed without need for the secondary intervention. PMID:25103782

  10. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing. PMID:25744144

  11. Spinal cord detethering procedures in children: a 5 year retrospective cohort study of the early post-operative course.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Matthew; Chaseling, Raymond; Fowler, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Tethered spinal cord can cause neurological, orthopaedic and sphincteric problems in children and detethering surgery may prevent or reverse these problems. This 5 year retrospective cohort study aimed to review our experience of detethering surgery at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia, particularly examining the early post-operative complications of this procedure. Between 2007 and 2012, 61 children underwent 63 detethering procedures. The median age at detethering surgery was 1.4 years old (interquartile range: 0.7-5.6 years). Fifty-five children (90.1%) had lumbosacral procedures, 31 (50.8%) were asymptomatic from tethering, 11 (18.0%) had motor or gait disturbance, 11 (18.0%) sphincteric disturbance, eight (13.1%) lower limb orthopaedic deformities, eight (13.1%) scoliosis, six (9.8%) back or leg pain and two (3.3%) sensory disturbance. The most common tethering pathologies were spinal lipomas in 32 children (52.5%), filum abnormalities in 23 (37.7%), dorsal sinus tracts in eight (13.1%) and diastematomyelia in seven (11.5%). Twenty-six children (42.6%) had either a syrinx or central canal dilatation preoperatively. The most common complications were wound infection and cerebrospinal fluid leak. Six children (9.8%) required reoperation for wound issues and two patients (3.3%) required subsequent reoperation for cord retethering during the study period. There were no deaths and no new neurological deficits. Of the children with the above preoperative deficits, 26.7% were documented to have improvement or resolution of their symptoms post-operatively. The highest rate of improvement occurred in children with motor or gait disturbance (36.4%) or sphincteric disturbance (27.3%). PMID:25818162

  12. Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

    2011-03-01

    The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

  13. Is the Center for Medicare and Medicaid's Lack of Reimbursement for Postoperative Urinary Tract Infections in Elderly Emergency Surgery Patients Justified?

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D.; Thomsen, Kristine M.; Polites, Stephanie F.; Khasawneh, Mohammad A.; Jenkins, Donald H.; Habermann, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Urinary tract infections (UTI), a risk factor for readmission, have been deemed a potentially preventable problem, and therefore not reimbursable, by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) since 2008. Defining the risk factors for UTI development in the postoperative period will provide risk stratification for UTI development in these challenging patients. Methods Pre-, intra-, and postoperative characteristics were collected for patients? 65 years old who underwent an emergency abdominal operation from the 20052012 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Participant User File (PUF), a database of 374 participating hospitals. In-hospital UTIs occurring within 30 days of the operation were identified. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify UTI risk factors. Results In total, 53,879 patients were included, 1881 (3.5%) of whom were diagnosed with a postoperative UTI prior to discharge. In-hospital UTI was associated with a greater hospital stay (27 vs 13 days, p<0.001) and greater 30-day mortality rates (18% vs 16%, p=0.003). The rate of UTI dropped from 4.5% prior to the CMS decree to 3.2% thereafter (p<0.001). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated advanced age, female sex, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, dependent functional status, open wound, hypoalbuminemia, elevated ASA class, operative approach, and prolonged operative time were independent risk factors for postoperative UTI development (Table). Conclusion While postoperative UTI rates dropped after the CMS decree, the lack of reimbursement is not justified as few modifiable risk factors to further improve postoperative UTI rates in elderly emergency surgical patients were identified. While targeted interventions may be developed, this complication is not easily preventable and will continue to plague acute care surgeons taking care of this challenging patient population. PMID:25239361

  14. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  15. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  16. Post-operative Abdominal Wall Mucormycosis-a Case Series.

    PubMed

    Nain, Prabhdeep Singh; Matta, Harish; Singh, Kuldip; Chhina, Deepinder; Trehan, Munish; Batta, Nishant

    2015-12-01

    Mucormycosis is caused by saprophtytic fungi which cause acute invasive zygomycosis. It clinically presents with necrosis, and on histopathology, acute and chronic infiltrates are seen. It rarely infects a healthy host, but is devastating in an immunocompromised host. We studied five cases with post-operative abdominal wall mucormycosis, three females and two males. Three patients were post-operative while the other two had mucormycosis following trauma and infection was found in sutured wound. All were initially diagnosed as cases of necrotizing fasciitis. Two patients eventually survived after intensive medical therapy and extensive debridements. PMID:26730004

  17. Gastrointestinal Complications and Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .387%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  18. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  19. Innovation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes. PMID:25853643

  20. Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, SJ Singh; Kulshrestha, A

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for prevention of this postoperative complication so as to decrease morbidity and mortality. The various search engines for preparation of this manuscript were used which included Entrez (including Pubmed and Pubmed Central), NIH.gov, Medknow.com, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, Scopus, Science Direct, MedHelp.org, yahoo.com and google.com. Manual search was carried out and various text books and journals of anesthesia and critical care medicine were also searched. From the information gathered, it was observed that postoperative cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients with serious cardiovascular diseases is most common followed by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema which can be due to fluid overload in the postoperative period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post-extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure. NPPE carries a good prognosis if promptly diagnosed and appropriately treated with or without mechanical ventilation. PMID:23439791

  1. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernndez-Pello; Rodrguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodrguez; Mendez, Begoa Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  2. Early application of negative pressure wound therapy to acute wounds contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus: An effective approach to preventing biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    LI, TONGTONG; ZHANG, LIHAI; HAN, LI; WANG, GUOQI; YIN, PENG; LI, ZHIRUI; ZHANG, LICHENG; GUO, QI; LIU, DAOHONG; TANG, PEIFU

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been demonstrated to be effective at preventing biofilm-associated infections; however, its role in biofilm prevention is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of NPWT on biofilm prevention when rapidly initiated following wound contamination. Full-thickness dermal wounds (8 mm) were created in rabbit ears and inoculated with green fluorescent protein-labeled Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). At 6 h following inoculation, continuous NPWT at −125 mmHg was initiated, with the wounds on the contralateral ear left untreated in order to serve as self-controls. S. aureus rapidly formed mature biofilms in the wound beds post-inoculation, with a persistent bacterial burden of ~105−107 colony-forming units (CFUs)/wound and impaired wound healing. Compared with the untreated group, NPWT resulted in a significant reduction in biofilm matrix, which was verified by scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence. A reduction in bacterial counts followed (P<0.05) with ~103 CFUs/wound on postoperative day 13 and improvement in all healing parameters (P<0.05) relative to control wounds. The results of the present investigation suggest that NPWT is an effective strategy to impeding the formation of S. aureus wound biofilms when initiated rapidly following bacterial contamination. The early application of NPWT, aimed at biofilm prevention, may improve wound care. PMID:26997991

  3. Imaging after cesarean delivery: acute and chronic complications.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Shuchi K; Kirby, Cheryl L; Smith, Ryan J; Horrow, Mindy M

    2012-10-01

    Cesarean delivery is a commonly performed operation and accounts for nearly one-third of all births in the United States. Although it is a safe procedure, cesarean delivery has a variety of acute and chronic complications that prompt imaging with ultrasonography (US), computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Acute complications include hematomas in specific locations that are unique to the procedure, as well as a variety of infections. A bladder flap hematoma occurs in the space between the bladder and the lower uterine segment, whereas a subfascial hematoma is an extraperitoneal collection located in the prevesical space posterior to the rectus muscles and anterior to the peritoneum. Puerperal infections after cesarean delivery include abscesses, wound infections and dehiscence, uterine dehiscence and rupture, and pelvic thrombophlebitis. The prevalence of chronic complications related to the healed cesarean delivery scar is unknown, but the scar may result in technical limitations for pelvic US due to the adhesions between the anterior lower uterine segment and the anterior abdominal wall. The cesarean delivery scar also leaves the patient susceptible to several unique diagnoses. A cesarean scar "niche" is a tethering of the endometrium that can serve as a reservoir for intermenstrual blood and fluid. Intrauterine devices can be malpositioned in the cesarean delivery scar, and endometrial implants can develop in the abdominal wall years after surgery. These patients are also at increased risk for implantation abnormalities including cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, retained products of conception, and placenta accreta. Familiarity with the normal postoperative findings following cesarean delivery is necessary to recognize acute and chronic complications, which are being encountered with increasing frequency. PMID:23065165

  4. Complications of Distal Biceps Repair.

    PubMed

    Garon, Mark Tyson; Greenberg, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Modern techniques to repair the distal biceps tendon include one-incision and 2-incision techniques that use transosseous sutures, suture anchors, interference screws, and/or cortical buttons to achieve a strong repair of the distal biceps brachii. Repair using these techniques has led to improved functional outcomes when compared with nonoperative treatment. Most complications consist of neuropraxic injuries to the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve, posterior interosseous nerve, stiffness and weakness with forearm rotation, heterotopic ossification, and wound infections. Although complications certainly affect outcomes, patients with distal biceps repairs report a high satisfaction rate after repair. PMID:26772952

  5. Incidence and impact of adverse effects of medical care on complications in patients who underwent excision of cervical lymph nodes.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Allareddy V; Elangovan S; Fletcher SL; Subbiah V; Rampa S; Nalliah R; Lee MK; Allareddy V

    2014-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and impact of adverse effects of medical care in patients who underwent excision of cervical lymph nodes.STUDY DESIGN: Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2009 and 2010 were used. The outcome variables were complications. The independent variables were occurrence of adverse effects of medical care and adverse effects of drugs/medication used in therapeutic use during hospitalization.RESULTS: A total of 48,413 hospitalizations involved excision of cervical lymph nodes. The mean age was 59 years. Males constituted 64.2% of hospitalizations. Adverse effects of medical care occurred in 9.5% of hospitalizations, and adverse effects due to therapeutic use of medications occurred in 1.8%. Frequently occurring complications included postoperative pneumonia (4.2%), hemorrhagic complications (3.5%), other infections (1.7%), cardiac complications (1.5%), bacterial infections (1.5%), respiratory complications (1.4%), nonhealing wounds (1.3%), septicemia (1.2%), and mycoses (1.2%).CONCLUSIONS: Occurrence of adverse effects of medical care was associated with high odds for multiple complications.

  6. Optimizing postoperative sexual function after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tutolo, Manuela; Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno; Gallina, Andrea; Abdollah, Firas; Capitanio, Umberto; Bianchi, Marco; Passoni, Niccol; Nini, Alessandro; Fossati, Nicola; Rigatti, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the complications associated with pelvic surgery. The significance of ED as a complication following pelvic surgery, especially radical prostatectomy (RP), lies in the negative impact that it has on patients sexual and overall life. In the literature, rates of ED following RP range from 25% to 100%. Such variety is associated with pelvic dissection and conservation of neurovascular structures. Another important factor impacting on postoperative ED is the preoperative erectile function of the patient. Advances in the knowledge of pelvic anatomy and pathological mechanisms led to a refinement of pelvic surgical techniques, with attention to the main structures that if damaged compromise erectile function. These improvements resulted in lower postoperative ED rates and better erectile recovery, especially in patients undergoing RP. Furthermore, surgery alone is not sufficient to prevent this complication, and thus, several medical strategies have been tested with the aim of maximizing erectile function recovery. Indeed it seems that prevention of postoperative ED must be addressed by a multimodal approach. The aim of this review is to give a picture of recent knowledge, novel techniques and therapeutic approaches in order to reach the best combination of treatments to reduce the rate of ED after pelvic surgery. PMID:23205061

  7. Infected ptosis surgery - a rare complication from a multidrug-resistant organism.

    PubMed

    Jan-Bond, Chan; Norazah, Abdul-Rahman; Sree-Kumar, Palani; Zunaina, Embong; Fazilawati, Qamarruddin

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy had a case of congenital ptosis of the right eye and has undergone frontalis sling surgery using Gore-tex material. There was no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication. However, the patient defaulted his follow-up and presented with right eye preseptal abscess secondary to infected surgical wound 1 month after surgery. He was treated with multiple antibiotics and underwent repeated incision and drainage procedures. However, there was still no resolution of the right eye preseptal abscess. The patient's condition subsequently improved after removal of the Gore-tex material and treatment with an antibiotic combination of ceftazidime and amikacin. Microbiological analysis finally isolated the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species. At 6 months follow-up, his right upper eyelid was healed with scarring, but without ptosis. PMID:25945032

  8. Infected ptosis surgery a rare complication from a multidrug-resistant organism

    PubMed Central

    Jan-Bond, Chan; Norazah, Abdul-Rahman; Sree-Kumar, Palani; Zunaina, Embong; Fazilawati, Qamarruddin

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy had a case of congenital ptosis of the right eye and has undergone frontalis sling surgery using Gore-tex material. There was no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication. However, the patient defaulted his follow-up and presented with right eye preseptal abscess secondary to infected surgical wound 1 month after surgery. He was treated with multiple antibiotics and underwent repeated incision and drainage procedures. However, there was still no resolution of the right eye preseptal abscess. The patients condition subsequently improved after removal of the Gore-tex material and treatment with an antibiotic combination of ceftazidime and amikacin. Microbiological analysis finally isolated the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species. At 6 months follow-up, his right upper eyelid was healed with scarring, but without ptosis. PMID:25945032

  9. Management of the perineal wound after rectal excision for carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maria, G; Mattana, C; Bonatti, P; Pescatori, M

    1984-01-01

    Two methods of treating the perineal wound after proctectomy are compared. One hundred and eleven patients had a Miles operation for rectal cancer: in 81 the perineal wound was left open, in 30, primary suture and suction were performed. A significant (p less than 0.001) decrease in the mean (+/- s.d.) duration of the postoperative period was observed after primary suture: 22 +/- 1.7 days, as compared with 44 +/- 2.2 days after healing by second intention. The occurrence of wound infection was similar in the two groups, whereas in 15 per cent of the patients treated without direct closure, a perineal sinus persisted. According to these data, primary closure seems to be very satisfactory in the management of the perineal wound after excision of the rectum. PMID:6500884

  10. Anesthesia, Microcirculation and Wound Repair in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bentov, Itay; Reed, May J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related changes in skin contribute to impaired wound healing after surgical procedures. Changes in skin with age include decline in thickness and composition, a decrease in the number of most cell types and diminished microcirculation. The microcirculation provides tissue perfusion, fluid homeostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause further disruption of the microvasculature of aged skin. Perioperative management can be modified to minimize insults to aged tissues. Judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control and increased tissue oxygen tension are examples of adjustable variables that support the microcirculation. Anesthetic agents influence the microcirculation from a combination of effects on cardiac output, arterial pressure and local micro-vascular changes. We examine the role of anesthetic management in optimizing the microcirculation and potentially improving post-operative wound repair in older persons. PMID:24195972

  11. Corneal wound healing after laser vision correction.

    PubMed

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Giammaria, Daniele; Trabucco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Any trauma can trigger a cascade of responses in tissues, with the purpose of safeguarding the integrity of the organ affected by the trauma and of preventing possible damage to nearby organs. Subsequently, the body tries to restore the function of the organ affected. The introduction of the excimer laser for keratorefractive surgery has changed the treatment landscape for correcting refractive errors, such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. In recent years, with the increased understanding of the basic science of refractive errors, higher-order aberrations, biomechanics, and the biology of corneal wound healing, a reduction in the surgical complications of keratorefractive surgery has been achieved. The understanding of the cascade of events involved in the corneal wound healing process and the examination of how corneal wound healing influences corneal biomechanics and optics are crucial to improving the efficacy and safety of laser vision correction. PMID:26405102

  12. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of— Preeclampsia. Early delivery. Cesarean birth . Having a big baby, which can complicate delivery. Having a baby ... health prevention with improved sources of maternal health data, and methods for measuring and studying the data. ...

  13. The emergency care of traumatic wounds: current recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, R W; Crowe, D T

    1994-11-01

    Emergency management of wounds involves examination and protection of the wound with a wet dressing (when possible) to prevent further contamination and desiccation. Analgesia (or preferably anesthesia) is provided and the patient and the wound are prepared for surgery. Copious amounts of lavage solution are used under moderate pressure. Proper and thorough debridement under irrigation is tedious and time consuming, but is the most important factor that influences subsequent wound healing. Incomplete removal of devitalized or contaminated tissue and debris are a common cause of wound infection, breakdown, and delayed healing. Wound closure is only accomplished when the veterinarian is certain that all devitalized and contaminated tissue has been removed and there is adequate skin. Covering the wound to heal by second intention or delayed closure should be considered more often in veterinary medicine. All too often, the wound is closed prematurely, resulting in dehiscence and infection a few days later. This provides a source of complications to the pet, as well as a source of dissatisfaction for the client. If, after initial debridement and irrigation, there is any doubt about the advisability of surgical closure, the clinician should cover the wound with a proper dressing and continue daily (or more often) dressing changes with local irrigation and debridement as required. Drainage of wound fluid is critical to healing in contaminated wounds. Wound fluids interfere with healing and increase the likelihood of infection. Passive drains (Penrose) are frequently used, often incorrectly. The exposed end of passive drains should be covered with a sterile, absorbent dressing. Active drainage is more efficient than passive drainage and can be accomplished with minimal additional skill and material. Improper use of drains can cause more problems than no drainage at all. Patients suffering painful traumatic (or surgical) wounds should receive analgesic medications. The patient's response to pain may cause immunocompromise, resulting in increased infection rate. It may also induce a hypermetabolic state that may result in impaired wound healing, multiple organ dysfunction, and, possibly, death. Swelling in the area of wounds can create tension on the wound, which compromises the blood supply. Light pressure bandages are recommended to minimize swelling. Nutritional considerations should be given to the wounded patient. Additional protein, vitamins, and minerals may be required for immune function and wound repair.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7879362

  14. Preventing chronic postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postoperative pain is common. Nerve injury and inflammation promote chronic pain, the risk of which is influenced by patient factors, including psychological characteristics. Interventional trials to prevent chronic postoperative pain have been underpowered with inadequate patient follow-up. Ketamine may reduce chronic postoperative pain, although the optimum treatment duration and dose for different operations have yet to be identified. The evidence for gabapentin and pregabalin is encouraging but weak; further work is needed before these drugs can be recommended for the prevention of chronic pain. Regional techniques reduce the rates of chronic pain after thoracotomy and breast cancer surgery. Nerve-sparing surgical techniques may be of benefit, although nerve injury is not necessary or sufficient for chronic pain to develop. PMID:26620149

  15. Facial airgun wound.

    PubMed

    Girdler, N M

    1995-03-01

    A case is presented of a patient who received an airgun wound to the soft tissues of the right orbit. Because the pellet ricocheted off the bony orbital rim, it did not penetrate the globe and vision was not impaired. The increasing incidence of airgun wounds in Great Britain is also discussed. PMID:7897724

  16. [Dressings for superficial wounds].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Graldine

    2016-01-01

    The main dressings for superficial wounds are hydrocolloids, interfaces, greasy dressings, hydrocellular dressings, metalloprotease inhibitors and hyaluronic acid dressings. There are pros and cons specific to each type and their use depends on the particularities of the superficial wounds. PMID:26763566

  17. Percutaneous Posterolateral Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy: Clinical Outcome, Complications, and Learning Curve Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Shay; Arzi, Harel; Herman, Amir; Friedlander, Alon; Levinkopf, Moshe; Arnold, Paul M; Caspi, Isreal

    2011-12-01

    Ongoing technological development combined with better understanding of endoscopic anatomy has made posterolateral endoscopic discectomy an appealing surgical option for the management of herniated lumbar disc. We evaluated clinical outcomes, complication rates, and surgical learning curve with the percutaneous posterolateral transforaminal endoscopic discectomy technique (PPTED). PPTED was performed on 150 patients from 2004 to 2008. And 124 patients were available for follow-up. Data regarding pain, postoperative complications, neurological status, operation time, and subjective patient satisfaction were recorded. A satisfactory clinical outcome as reflected in the VAS (mean 3.6) and ODI improvement (mean 21%) scores was reported; 20.9% of the patients required additional surgery. Learning curve assessment showed a significant difference (p = 0.043) for fewer revision surgeries as surgeons became more experienced. Patients who had endoscopic discectomy as a primary surgery achieved significantly lower VAS (p = 0.04) and ODI improvement (p = 0.004) scores compared with patients having transforaminal endoscopic discectomy as revision surgery. The complication rate was 1.6%, including one case of post-surgery hypoesthesia and one deep wound infection. The percutaneous posterolateral transforaminal endoscopic discectomy technique has a satisfactory clinical outcome with a low complication rate. Results for endoscopic surgery for revision or recurrent disc herniation are comparable to those of open revision surgery; the steep learning curve can be overcome with training and suitable patient selection. PMID:22505002

  18. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine) for postoperative analgesia after PAO. Patients and methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00815503) in 53 patients undergoing PAO to evaluate the effect of local anesthetic infiltration on postoperative pain and on postoperative opioid consumption. All subjects received intraoperative infiltration followed by 5 postoperative injections in 10-hour intervals through a multi-holed catheter placed at the surgical site. 26 patients received ropivacaine and 27 received saline. The intervention period was 2 days and the observational period was 4 days. All subjects received patient-controlled opioid analgesia without any restrictions on the total daily dose. Pain was assessed at specific postoperative time points and the daily opioid usage was registered. Results Infiltration with 75 mL (150 mg) of ropivacaine did not reduce postoperative pain or opioid requirements during the first 4 days. Interpretation The clinical importance of ropivacaine as single component in postoperative treatment of pain is questionable, and we are planning further studies to explore the potential of LIA in larger volume—and also a multimodal regimen—to treat pain in this category of patients. PMID:24650022

  19. Biomechanics and Wound Healing in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Dupps, William J.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    The biomechanical and wound healing properties of the cornea undermine the predictability and stability of refractive surgery and contribute to discrepancies between attempted and achieved visual outcomes after LASIK, surface ablation and other keratorefractive procedures. Furthermore, patients predisposed to biomechanical failure or abnormal wound healing can experience serious complications such as keratectasia or clinically significant corneal haze, and more effective means for the identification of such patients prior to surgery are needed. In this review, we describe the cornea as a complex structural composite material with pronounced anisotropy and heterogeneity, summarize current understanding of major biomechanical and reparative pathways that contribute to the corneal response to laser vision correction, and review the role of these processes in ectasia, intraocular pressure measurement artifact, diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and corneal haze. The current understanding of differences in the corneal response after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), LASIK and femtosecond-assisted LASIK are reviewed. Surgical and disease models that integrate corneal geometric data, substructural anatomy, elastic and viscoelastic material properties and wound healing behavior have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and minimize complications but depend on the identification of preoperative predictors of biomechanical and wound healing responses in individual patients. PMID:16720023

  20. Effect of low-power density laser radiation on heatling of open skin wounds in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kana, J.S.; Hutschenreiter, G.; Haina, D.; Waidelich, W.

    1981-03-01

    Researchers performed a study to determine whether laser radation of low-power density would affect the healing of open skin wounds in rats. The wounds were irradiated daily with a helium-neon laser and an argon laser at a constant power density of 45 mW/sq cm. The rate of wound closure was followed by photographing the wounds in a standardized way. The collagen hydroxyproline concentration in the scar tissue was determined on the 18th postoperative day. Helium-neon laser radiation had a statistically significant stimulating effect on collagen synthesis in the wound, with a maximum effect at an energy density of 4 joules/sq cm. The rate of wound closure was enhanced significantly between the third and 12th postoperative days. The argon laser exposure produced a significant increase in collagen concentration both in irradiated and nonirradiated contralateral wounds. However, an acceleration of the healing rate was not registered in this case. The wound contraction up to the fourth day of the experiment was inhibited under helium-neon and argon laser exposure to 20 joules/sq cm. The described effects were not specific for the laser light. There may be a wavelength-selective influence of coherent light on the metabolic and proliferation processes in wound healing, with the associated problem of the possible carcinogenic effects of laser radiation.

  1. Pulmonary complications of general surgery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, A K; Robertson, J

    1977-01-01

    1. Patients should be divided preoperatively into low- or high-risk categories, depending on their probability of developing postoperative pulmonary complications. The evaluation should include spirometry as well as an assessment of the previously defined risk factors. 2. Patients in a low-risk category need only instruction in deep breathing pre- and postoperatively. Routine use of supplemented oxygen postoperatively is reasonable until it can be demonstrated whether such is necessary. 3. High-risk patients should be as free as possible of respiratory secretions at the time of surgery. A regimen for this purpose includes cessation of smoking, and administration of inhaled bronchodilators followed by chest percussion and postural drainage. 4. High-risk patients should be carefully instructed in deep breathing and coughing preoperatively. A mechanical device such as an incentive spirometer may be beneficial in this regard. If it is not possible to achieve spontaneous deep breathing, an attempt to accomplish this by IPPB may be undertaken. The tidal volume desired should be ordered. If IPPB does not result in large tidal volumes, it should be discontinued. 5. The deep breathing procedure found to be most successful preoperativelly should be continued postoperatively. 6. The patient should be as mobile as possible while in bed and ambulated as soon as is feasible. 7. Patients with preoperative expiratory flows of less than 20% of predicted values or with chronic hypercapnia should be carefully observed for postoperative ventilatory failure. PMID:324360

  2. Superabsorbent dressings for copiously exuding wounds.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Nathalie; Safar, Helene; Baret, Mylne; Philippe, Anne; Farid, Rachida

    Exudate control is important in the management of both acute and chronic wounds. A new category of absorbent dressings that contain superabsorbent particles promises high absorbency. The aim of this multicentre, prospective, non-comparative observational study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and absorbent capacity of a superabsorbent dressing. Fifteen inpatients and outpatients with highly exuding wounds were included. Most patients (n=8) (53%) had chronic wounds; 20% (n=3) had ulcerating tumours. The superabsorbent dressing was used as a primary or a secondary dressing. Assessment was on day 0 (start), day 3 and day 7 (end of study). The study looked at wound bed and periwound skin condition, exudate production, pain upon dressing removal, reason for dressing removal, and frequency of dressing changes. A clinical visual scoring tool was used, together with digital photographs, which were assessed by the same experienced clinician. All 15 patients completed the study, during which no adverse events were noted. At day 7, maceration had reduced from 46.7% (n=7) at day 0 to 6.7% (n=1). After only 3 days, dressing change frequency was reduced from once daily to twice weekly in 80% (n=12) of patients. The superabsorbent dressing seems to reduce complications associated with exudate production, stimulate wound healing and increase patient comfort; it may also save time and costs for caregivers. PMID:22875373

  3. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Stasiowska, Maria K; Ng, Su Cheen; Gubbay, Anthony N; Cregg, Roman

    2015-10-01

    This article provides an overview of current methods used in acute pain management and explains why effective analgesia is crucial in the early postoperative period. It describes the pharmacology of both common and specialist analgesics, as well as explaining the role and uses of regional and neuraxial analgesia, for the non-anaesthetist. PMID:26457937

  4. Post-Op Bacterial Infection Raises Odds for Complications, Death

    MedlinePLUS

    ... started adopting bleach-based solutions and other harsh disinfectants that have been proven to kill C. difficile , Zuckerbraun said. Adalja added that some facilities are using UV devices to kill off the bacteria. Health care workers and caregivers at home can ...

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-Ying; Wang, Guo-Guang; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Lu, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Ping-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ulcers are one of the most serious and costly chronic complications for diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress may play an important role in diabetes and its complications. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of heme oxygenase-1 on wound closure in diabetic rats. Diabetic wound model was prepared by making an incision with full thickness in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Wounds from diabetic rats were treated with 10% hemin ointment for 21 days. Increase of HO-1 protein expression enhanced anti-inflammation and antioxidant in diabetic rats. Furthermore, HO-1 increased the levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and expressions of CBS and CSE protein. In summary, HO-1 promoted the wound closure by augmenting anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and angiogenesis in diabetic rats. PMID:26798657

  6. The Impact of Psychological Stress on Wound Healing: Methods and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a critical process involved in the recovery from injury and surgical procedures. Poor healing increases the risk for wound infections or complications, lengthens hospital stays, magnifies patient discomfort, and slows return to activities of daily living. Converging evidence from different research paradigms suggests that psychological stress and other behavioral factors can affect wound healing. A meta-analytical study using diverse wound-healing models and outcomes found that across studies there was an average correlation of ?0.42 between psychological stress and wound healing.1 This result suggests that the relationship between stress and wound repair is not only statistically significant but also clinically relevant. This review presents data and methods from observational, experimental, and interventional studies corroborating the impact of stress on wound healing. Potential behavioral and physiologic mechanisms explaining the association between stress and impaired wound healing are also discussed. PMID:22548859

  7. Complications in cochlear implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, DC; Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A

    2015-01-01

    For the last 6 years, cochlear implantation has become a standard practice in our department. The number of patients rose from 5 to 21/ year. Using multiple types of cochlear implants and indicating the surgery also to malformed inner ears led to the encounter of some complications. Objective: to present the surgical complications from our department. Material: all the patients admitted and operated in our clinic have been reviewed. Results: 9 complications (8,86%) have occurred: the impossibility of establishing a reliable cochleostomy (due to ossification), air in the cochlea through lack of sealing of the cochleostomy (exteriorization of the electrode array), cochlear implant postoperative migration from its bed, weak hearing discrimination due to double electrodes in the scala tympani, gusher. Conclusions: cochlear implanting needs to respect the technical steps of the surgery and the best technical/ tactical solution has to be found to whatever complications arise in complex or malformed cases! PMID:26351535

  8. Dysphagia, hoarseness, and globus in a postoperative patient.

    PubMed

    Kahmke, Russel; Woodard, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    Sore throat, hoarseness, and dysphagia are known and recognized postoperative complications of laryngeal mask airway use during operative procedures. The patient's symptoms, present immediately after surgery, are thought related to airway manipulation. Airway foreign bodies, although low on the differential, can cause similar symptoms. We present a case of a single patient who presented to a tertiary care center after an elective outpatient procedure with postoperative sore throat, hoarseness, and dysphagia. A foreign body was found lodged in the patient's hypopharynx. The differential diagnosis of sore throat, hoarseness, and dysphagia in the postoperative patient is explored in further detail. PMID:25498994

  9. Maggot Debridement Therapy in the Treatment of Complex Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Mark T; Swenor, Karen M; Eron, Lawrence J

    2011-01-01

    The growth and aging of the population of Hawaii with a high incidence of diabetes mandates a need for more effective strategies to manage the healing of complicated wounds. Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is one alternative utilized with successful results. Observations have indicated that maggots have the ability to debride wound beds, provide anti-microbial activity and also stimulate wound healing in diabetic patients. None of the patients refused MDT due to aversion of this treatment modality and the majority of patients had minimal discomfort. In 17 of 23 patients with multiple co-morbidities, the treatment of their complex diabetic wounds by MDT resulted in improvement or cure. Maggot debridement therapy is an effective treatment of diabetic wounds. PMID:22162609

  10. Wound prophylaxis in thoracic surgery: a new approach.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, W S; Faichney, A; Raychaudhury, T; Prescott, R J; Calder, M A; Sang, C T; Cameron, E W; Walbaum, P R

    1984-01-01

    A prospective double blind, randomised study was performed in 100 patients undergoing major elective thoracic surgery to assess a new method of prophylaxis of wound infection using one preincisional intraparietal infiltration of cefuroxime sodium along the line of proposed incision as the sole protection against wound infection. A significant (p less than 0.01) reduction in the incidence of wound infection occurred in the antibiotic treated group (2%) compared with the control group (20%), who received by the same route the same volume of saline only. The groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, pathological condition, and operative variables. The use of additional antibiotics was significantly greater in the control group (p less than 0.01), largely owing to a much greater incidence of postoperative pulmonary infection in the control group (60%) than in the antibiotic treated group (40%). No morbidity was associated with this technique. The organisms found in oesophageal and bronchial operative luminal specimens did not correlate with postoperative wound or pulmonary infection or with organisms causing these infections. Reductions in wound and pulmonary infection rates equivalent to those produced by conventional multiple dose parenteral regimens were achieved by this technique. PMID:6367129

  11. Nanosecond Pulse Electric Field Activated-Platelet Rich Plasma Enhances the Return of Blood Flow to Large and Ischemic Wounds in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave, Barbara; Li, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a therapeutic strategy used for accelerating wound healing of a wide range of tissues through the release of platelet growth factors. Here, we describe a nonchemical, safe method for preparing platelet-rich plasma using nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) and investigated the effect of this platelet-rich plasma on reperfusion of blood in large skin flap or ischemic hind limb wounds in New Zealand White rabbits. Laser Doppler images of blood flow to the dorsal surface of skin flap wounds or to ischemic hind limb wounds were obtained from wounds treated with 0.9% saline or nanosecond-pulsed electric field prepared platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP). Reperfusion in the skin flap wounds was greater in the nsPRP-treated wounds than in the wounds treated with saline on postoperative days 3 (P<0.001) and 21 (P<0.03). Reperfusion in the ischemic hind-limb treated with nsPRP was greater than in the saline-treated limb on post-operative Day 3 (P<0.001), post-operative week 1 (P<0.025) and post-operative week 4 (P<0.015). In the hind limb ischemic tissue, the number of endothelial cells, collagen, and cells containing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was greater in the nsPRP-treated tissue. These results demonstrate that nsPRP improves blood flow in large surgical skin wounds and in ischemic wounds. PMID:26197934

  12. Approach-Related Complications of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Combined Spine and Vascular Surgical Team.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Daly, Daniel; Rao, Prashanth J; Lennox, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cohort data. Objective Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Detailed and comprehensive descriptions of intra- and postoperative complications of ALIF are surprisingly limited in the literature. In this report, we describe our experience with a team model for ALIF and report all complications occurring in our patient series. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled between January 2009 and January 2013 by a combined spine surgeon and vascular surgeon team. All patients underwent an open ALIF using an anterior approach to the lumbosacral spine. Results From the 227 ALIF cases, mean operative blood loss was 103 mL, ranging from 30 to 900 mL. Mean operative time was 78 minutes. The average length of stay was 5.2 days. Intraoperative vascular injury requiring primary repair with suturing occurred in 15 patients (6.6%). There were 2 cases of postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma. Three patients (1.3%) had incisional hernia requiring revision surgery; 7 (3.1%) patients had prolonged ileus (>7 days) managed conservatively. Four patients described retrograde ejaculation. Sympathetic dysfunction occurred in 15 (6.6%) patients. There were 5 (2.2%) cases of superficial wound infection treated with oral antibiotics, with no deep wound infections requiring reoperation or intravenous therapy. There were no mortalities in this series. Conclusions ALIF is a safe procedure when performed by a combined vascular surgeon and spine surgeon team with acceptably low complication rates. Our series confirms that the team approach results in short operative times and length of stay, with rapid control of intraoperative vessel injury and low overall blood loss. PMID:26933616

  13. Approach-Related Complications of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Combined Spine and Vascular Surgical Team

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.; Phan, Kevin; Daly, Daniel; Rao, Prashanth J.; Lennox, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cohort data. Objective Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Detailed and comprehensive descriptions of intra- and postoperative complications of ALIF are surprisingly limited in the literature. In this report, we describe our experience with a team model for ALIF and report all complications occurring in our patient series. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled between January 2009 and January 2013 by a combined spine surgeon and vascular surgeon team. All patients underwent an open ALIF using an anterior approach to the lumbosacral spine. Results From the 227 ALIF cases, mean operative blood loss was 103 mL, ranging from 30 to 900 mL. Mean operative time was 78 minutes. The average length of stay was 5.2 days. Intraoperative vascular injury requiring primary repair with suturing occurred in 15 patients (6.6%). There were 2 cases of postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma. Three patients (1.3%) had incisional hernia requiring revision surgery; 7 (3.1%) patients had prolonged ileus (>7 days) managed conservatively. Four patients described retrograde ejaculation. Sympathetic dysfunction occurred in 15 (6.6%) patients. There were 5 (2.2%) cases of superficial wound infection treated with oral antibiotics, with no deep wound infections requiring reoperation or intravenous therapy. There were no mortalities in this series. Conclusions ALIF is a safe procedure when performed by a combined vascular surgeon and spine surgeon team with acceptably low complication rates. Our series confirms that the team approach results in short operative times and length of stay, with rapid control of intraoperative vessel injury and low overall blood loss. PMID:26933616

  14. Postoperative Surgical Chest and Leg Incision Sites Using Platelet Gel: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Susan J.; Estep, Thomas H.; Ellis-Stoll, Cynthia C.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the application of platelet gel (PG) on cardiac surgery wound incisions would promote wound healing and reduce the subsequent incidence of postoperative infections, thereby decreasing the length of hospital stay and hospital costs. Previous work has shown increased incisional healing effect among coronary artery bypass graft patients who received platelet gel. A 1-year retrospective review of 128 cardiac surgery patient charts was performed to determine the clinical impact on those patients whom received platelet gel applications (treatment group) and those whom did not receive platelet gel applications (control group). The outcomes measured were (i) total length of stay, (ii) the incidence of incision wound infection, and (iii) postoperative blood loss. The treatment group had significantly shorter intensive care unit and total length of stays and experienced less postoperative blood loss compared with the control group. In addition, the treatment group had no reported incisional wound infections; however, four patients (3.16%) in the control group experienced incision wound infections. This study was a descriptive chart review and not a controlled study. Our findings support previous research that platelet gel seems to positively influence incisional wound healing among those who undergo cardiac surgery. PMID:19192749

  15. Negative pressure wound therapy as an adjunct in healing of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Langer, Vijay; Bhandari, Prem S; Rajagopalan, Satyamoorthy; Mukherjee, Mrinal K

    2015-08-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has emerged as a cutting-edge technology and provides an alternative solution to the problem of wounds. This study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of this technique in the treatment of chronic wounds. A prospective clinical study was used to evaluate our experience in use of NPWT in the healing of pressure ulcers and chronic wounds over 2 years. The primary end point of the study group was the time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue and full reepithelialisation without drainage. All patients with sepsis were excluded from the study. The statistical analysis of the data was carried out. Of the 60 patients studied, 41 had associated comorbidities including diabetes mellitus. The commonest site of occurrence was the lower limb. Coverage in the form of a flap was required at presentation in 6333% of patients. However, after initiation of NPWT, none of them required the procedure and they healed spontaneously either by secondary intention or by skin grafting. The time taken for appearance of healthy granulation tissue was 1436 424 days. Complete healing of wounds occurred by 331 1022 days. There was a statistically significant difference in the volume of the wounds before and after the intervention (P = 0000). Complications resulting from NPWT were minimal. This technique is an excellent adjunct to surgical debridement. PMID:23855645

  16. Integrins in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Regulation of cell adhesions during tissue repair is fundamentally important for cell migration, proliferation, and protein production. All cells interact with extracellular matrix proteins with cell surface integrin receptors that convey signals from the environment into the nucleus, regulating gene expression and cell behavior. Integrins also interact with a variety of other proteins, such as growth factors, their receptors, and proteolytic enzymes. Re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation are crucially dependent on the temporospatial function of multiple integrins. This review explains how integrins function in wound repair. Recent Advances: Certain integrins can activate latent transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) that modulates wound inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Dysregulation of TGF-β1 function is associated with scarring and fibrotic disorders. Therefore, these integrins represent targets for therapeutic intervention in fibrosis. Critical Issues: Integrins have multifaceted functions and extensive crosstalk with other cell surface receptors and molecules. Moreover, in aberrant healing, integrins may assume different functions, further increasing the complexity of their functionality. Discovering and understanding the role that integrins play in wound healing provides an opportunity to identify the mechanisms for medical conditions, such as excessive scarring, chronic wounds, and even cancer. Future Directions: Integrin functions in acute and chronic wounds should be further addressed in models better mimicking human wounds. Application of any products in acute or chronic wounds will potentially alter integrin functions that need to be carefully considered in the design. PMID:25493210

  17. Fetal skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Edward P; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2009-01-01

    The developing fetus has the ability to heal wounds by regenerating normal epidermis and dermis with restoration of the extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture, strength, and function. In contrast, adult wounds heal with fibrosis and scar. Scar tissue remains weaker than normal skin with an altered ECM composition. Despite extensive investigation, the mechanism of fetal wound healing remains largely unknown. We do know that early in gestation, fetal skin is developing at a rapid pace and the ECM is a loose network facilitating cellular migration. Wounding in this unique environment triggers a complex cascade of tightly controlled events culminating in a scarless wound phenotype of fine reticular collagen and abundant hyaluronic acid. Comparison between postnatal and fetal wound healing has revealed differences in inflammatory response, cellular mediators, cytokines, growth factors, and ECM modulators. Investigation into cell signaling pathways and transcription factors has demonstrated differences in secondary messenger phosphorylation patterns and homeobox gene expression. Further research may reveal novel genes essential to scarless repair that can be manipulated in the adult wound and thus ameliorate scar. PMID:19803418

  18. Thirty-day complications in rheumatoid patients following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Dixit, Anant; Naziri, Qais; Hip-Flores, David J; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Although total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is highly successful for patients with end-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the risks and complications associated with surgery in this cohort are less defined. The objectives of our study were to analyze the demographic and perioperative factors of RA patients that may affect post-TKA outcomes, as well as to assess the 30-day complication rates compared to osteoarthritis patients. We retrospectively evaluated the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from 2006 to 2012 to assess all patients who underwent a primary TKA and had a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (n?=?141) or primary knee osteoarthritis (n?=?7125). We evaluated and compared the demographic factors, social factors, preoperative factors, operative factors, and postoperative complications. The RA cohort had a lower mean age and body mass index than patients in the OA group. There was also a significantly higher incidence of women and Hispanics in the RA cohort. There was a lower incidence of diabetes and hypertension requiring medication in the rheumatoid cohort, but also a higher incidence of bleeding disorders. The RA cohort had an increased proportion of patients requiring blood transfusions and had a longer mean length of stay. The incidence of pneumonia and postoperative bleeding that required transfusion was also higher in RA patients. Rheumatoid patients had higher rates of wound infections, pulmonary embolisms, and deep vein thrombosis; however, these findings were not significant. Although RA patients with end-stage knee arthritis may benefit from TKA, these patients should be preoperatively optimized to minimize complication risks. PMID:26238666

  19. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy. PMID:26424336

  20. Superficial Wound Swabbing

    PubMed Central

    Schmohl, Michael; Beckert, Stefan; Joos, Thomas O.; Knigsrainer, Alfred; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Lffler, Markus W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In diabetic foot ulcers, wound fluid inflammatory mediators have previously been proposed as surrogate markers for nonhealing. However, currently available wound fluid sampling techniques are not suitable for clinical practice due to low levels of exudate and a high logistical effort. The aim of this investigation was to assess 1) the technique of superficial wound swabbing for harvesting wound fluid; and 2) the quality of the collected fluid for immunoassay analysis of inflammatory mediators. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Both nylon-flocked swabs and film dressings were used to collect wound fluid from foot ulcers of diabetic patients. In randomly selected patients, levels of wound fluid inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteases were determined using multiplexed bead-based sandwich immunoassays with respect to both sampling methods. Wound fluid spike-in experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of different sample processing protocols on subsequent immunoassay analysis. RESULTS Using the swabbing technique, a median amount of 40 L (2120 L) wound exudate was collected, which allowed the measurement of several multiplex panels. Comparing both sampling methods, a similar qualitative protein recovery was observed with a trend to analyte enrichment by swabbing. Sample processing using swabs did not affect analyte recovery, with the exception of interleukin (IL)-8, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, IL-17A, interferon-?induced protein 10, and IL-4. CONCLUSIONS The quality of wound fluid collected by superficial swabbing is not inferior to the current standard technique. Combined with subsequent bead-based sandwich immunoassay analysis, this new method offers a noninvasive technique, suitable for daily clinical routines, for assessment of inflammatory activity in diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22837363

  1. [Synovectomy of the knee joint and postoperative exercise treatment in peridural anesthesia and analgesia].

    PubMed

    Schnittker, F J; Voigt, M; Haike, H J; Hegemann, B

    1986-01-01

    The operative treatment of synovialitides of the knee-joint requires apart from an exact operative technique an effective postoperative therapy. The painless postoperative gymnastik treatment is an important factor to achieve a satisfactory result of therapy. The exercise of this "wounded articulation" by the "Frankfurter-mowing splint" needs sufficient analgesie for a long period which will be attained through our experience under continuous epidural anaesthesia and analgesia. PMID:3564644

  2. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, Mira; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60 kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7 days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030 g/cm(2) at an EBI dose of 30 kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. PMID:26117742

  3. Delayed Wound Repair in Sepsis Is Associated with Reduced Local Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Katharina; Sander, Anna Lena; Albig, Michael; Weber, Roxane; Henrich, Dirk; Frank, Johannes; Marzi, Ingo; Jakob, Heike

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the main causes for morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Moreover, sepsis associated complications involving impaired wound healing are common. Septic patients often require surgical interventions that in-turn may lead to further complications caused by impaired wound healing. We established a mouse model to the study delayed wound healing during sepsis distant to the septic focus point. For this reason cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was combined with the creation of a superficial wound on the mouse ear. Control animals received the same procedure without CPL. Epithelialization was measured every second day by direct microscopic visualization up to complete closure of the wound. As interplay of TNF-?, TGF-?, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) is important in wound healing in general, TNF-?, TGF-?, MMP7, and TIMP1 were assessed immunohistochemical in samples of wounded ears harvested on days 2, 6, 10 and 16 after wounding. After induction of sepsis, animals showed a significant delay in wound epithelialization from day 2 to 12 compared to control animals. Complete wound healing was attained after mean 12.2 standard deviation (SD) 3.0 days in septic animals compared to 8.7 SD 1.7 days in the control group. Septic animals showed a significant reduction in local pro-inflammatory cytokine level of TNF-? on day 2 and day 6 as well as a reduced expression of TGF-? on day 2 in wounds. A significant lower expression of MMP7 as well as TIMP1 was also observed on day 2 after wounding. The induction of sepsis impairs wound healing distant to the septic focus point. We could demonstrate that expression of important cytokines for wound repair is deregulated after induction of sepsis. Thus restoring normal cytokine response locally in wounds could be a good strategy to enhance wound repair in sepsis. PMID:24086305

  4. Topical Naltrexone as Treatment for Type 2 Diabetic Cutaneous Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Jessica A.; Zagon, Ian S.; McLaughlin, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with impaired cutaneous wound healing and can result in ulceration, infection, and/or amputation. More than 25 million people in the United States have T2D and are vulnerable to epithelial-related complications. Current therapies are limited in their efficacy. New treatments for full-thickness cutaneous wounds that focus on underlying diabetic pathways are needed. Approach: Topical application of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (NTX) dissolved in cream reverses delayed wound closure in type 1 diabetic rat by the acceleration of reepithelialization and enhancement of angiogenesis and remodeling. NTX blocks the opioid growth factor (OGF)OGF receptor (OGFr) axis and upregulates DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. To investigate whether NTX is an effective therapy for T2D wound closure, genetically obese mice (db/db) and normal C57Bl/6J mice received full-thickness cutaneous wounds. Wounds (5?mm in diameter) were treated topically three times daily with 10?5 M NTX or sterile saline dissolved in cream and photographed every 2 days. Results: Wounds in db/db mice treated with saline were 1192% larger than those in normal mice throughout the 2-week observation. Topical NTX therapy in T2D mice reduced the residual wound size by 1330% between days 8 and 14 relative to diabetic mice receiving saline. Reepithelialization and DNA synthesis, as analyzed by epithelial thickness and BrdU labeling indexes, respectively, were accelerated in NTX-treated wounds. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that the OGF-OGFr axis plays a role in epithelial-related complications of T2D and that blockade of this pathway by NTX may be an effective treatment for wound repair. PMID:24940556

  5. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. This suggests that preoperative biliary drainage should be avoided whenever possible in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Such a change in current preoperative management may improve patient outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:10450725

  6. An improved method of wound management for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lobe, T E; Anderson, G F; King, D R; Boles, E T

    1980-12-01

    Polyurethane moisture-vapor permeable film (MVPF), a new product for the management of superficial wounds, was studied in an uncontrolled clinical trial in 50 pediatric patients. MVPF was used in the management of skin graft donor sites, partial thickness burns, traumatic abrasions, decubitus ulcers, intravenous skin sloughs, and a variety of other wounds. Advantages of this material over standard dressing techniques include: more comfort, freedom of motion of the injured part, fewer dressing changes, and apparently faster epithelialization in many cases. Folliculitis, noted in one patient, was the only complication. MVPF is easily adaptable to outpatient wound management, and has gained rapid acceptance by nurses, patients and parents. PMID:7463291

  7. Complications of female circumcision in the Sudan.

    PubMed

    El Dareer, A

    1983-07-01

    This paper aims to identify and determine the prevalence of health problems encountered as a result of practising the Pharaonic, Intermediate and Sunna types of circumcision. A population of 3210 females from Northern Sudan were chosen by multistage random sampling. The study was carried out by means of a detailed questionnaire. Two types of complications were found: immediate and delayed. The immediate complications amounted to 790 (25%) from all the circumcised cases. The frequency for each type was: Pharaonic 26%, Intermediate 24%, Sunna 8%. The most common immediate complications were: difficulty in passing urine, wound infection and bleeding. The delayed complications amounted to 1023 (32%): Pharaonic 33%, Intermediate 31% and Sunna 15%. The most common delayed complications were the urinary tract infection, chronic pelvic infection, and results of tight circumcision. Circumcised respondents sometimes suffered more than one complication. The pattern of complications of Intermediate and Pharaonic circumcision was found to be the same. PMID:6879696

  8. Best practice in wound assessment.

    PubMed

    Benbow, Maureen

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and considered wound assessment is essential to fulfil professional nursing requirements and ensure appropriate patient and wound management. This article describes the main aspects of holistic assessment of the patient and the wound, including identifying patient risk factors and comorbidities, and factors affecting wound healing to ensure optimal outcomes. PMID:26932649

  9. Management of acute postoperative hemorrhage in the bariatric patient.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lincoln E V V; Song, Louis M Wong Kee; Baron, Todd H

    2011-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is one of the treatment options for achieving and preserving weight loss and managing medical complications related to obesity. After bariatric surgery, early or late adverse events, such as intraluminal or extraluminal gastrointestinal hemorrhage, can occur. Early gastrointestinal bleeding is more often a complication associated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery than other bariatric procedures and usually arises from the gastrojejunal anastomosis. Early postoperative bleeding may be potentially life threatening, although death after postbariatric surgery as a consequence of acute bleeding is uncommon. Although early postoperative intraluminal bleeding can usually be managed conservatively, endoscopic therapy may be required. PMID:21569980

  10. Superficial fascial system repair: an abdominoplasty technique to reduce local complications after caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Al-Benna, Sammy; Al-Ajam, Yazan; Tzakas, Elias

    2009-05-01

    Abdominal incision complications are a major source of morbidity after caesarean delivery. Repair of the superficial fascial system may avert local complications after caesarean delivery by minimising tension to the skin and increasing the initial biomechanical strength of wound which has the potential to decrease early wound dehiscence and as a by-product correct suprapubic bulging. PMID:18810475

  11. Management of radiation wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, J.F.; Puckett, C.L.

    1984-08-01

    Radiation wounds caused by newer high-voltage radiotherapy techniques are very difficult to manage. Recent developments in flap design and transfer aid the surgeon in successfully treating these difficult problems.

  12. Effectively managing wound exudate.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The management of wound exudate remains a clinical challenge despite technological advances in products with better exudate-handling capacities. This clinical challenge is occasionally encountered when thick exudate (viscous exudate) is present, and when most modern dressings do not possess the capabilities to manage the viscosity while enabling exudate absorption. Maceration to the peri-wound area poses another challenge, irrespective of the number of topical barrier application products on the market and the innovation of dressing products that lock exudate away or those that encourage vertical wicking. In addition to all the above, in clinical practice, the assessment and documentation of wound exudate remains sporadic, leading to the challenges of effective wound exudate dressing selection and cost-effective dressings. PMID:26322408

  13. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-03-01

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  14. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-01-16

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  15. Scars and Wounds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables, whole grains, meat, fish, and eggs. They contain protein, vitamins, and minerals ... or longer Has a wound that looks very red around the edges and is hot or swollen ...

  16. Sternum wound contraction and distension during negative pressure wound therapy when using a rigid disc to prevent heart and lung rupture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are increasing reports of deaths and serious complications associated with the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), of which right ventricular heart rupture is the most devastating. The use of a rigid barrier has been suggested to offer protection against this lethal complication by preventing the heart from being drawn up against the sharp edges of the sternum. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a rigid barrier can be safely inserted over the heart with regard to the sternum wound edge movement. Methods Sternotomy wounds were created in eight pigs. The wounds were treated with NPWT at -40, -70, -120 and -170 mmHg in the presence and absence of a rigid barrier between the heart and the edges of the sternum. Wound contraction upon NPWT application, and wound distension under mechanical traction to draw apart the edges of the sternotomy were evaluated. Results Wound contraction resulting from NPWT was similar with and without the rigid barrier. When mechanical traction was applied to a NPWT treated sternum wound, the sternal edges were pulled apart. Wound distension upon traction was similar in the presence and absence of a the rigid barrier during NPWT. Conclusions A rigid barrier can safely be inserted between the heart and the edges of the sternum to protect the heart and lungs from rupture during NPWT. The sternum wound edge is stabilized equally well with as without the rigid barrier during NPWT. PMID:21450095

  17. Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chelazzi, C.; Villa, G.; De Gaudio, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is common among surgical patients and associated with a worse outcome. Pathophysiology of POAF is not fully disclosed, and several perioperative factors could be involved. Direct cardiac stimulation from perioperative use of catecholamines or increased sympathetic outflow from volume loss/anaemia/pain may play a role. Metabolic alterations, such as hypo-/hyperglycaemia and electrolyte disturbances, may also contribute to POAF. Moreover, inflammation, both systemic and local, may play a role in its pathogenesis. Strategies to prevent POAF aim at reducing its incidence and ameliorate global outcome of surgical patients. Nonpharmacological prophylaxis includes an adequate control of postoperative pain, the use of thoracic epidural analgesia, optimization of perioperative oxygen delivery, and, possibly, modulation of surgery-associated inflammatory response with immunonutrition and antioxidants. Perioperative potassium and magnesium depletion should be corrected. The impact of those interventions on patients outcome needs to be further investigated. PMID:22347631

  18. Wound dressings - a review.

    PubMed

    Dhivya, Selvaraj; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Santhini, Elango

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process which requires suitable environment to promote healing process. With the advancement in technology, more than 3000 products have been developed to treat different types of wounds by targeting various aspects of healing process. The present review traces the history of dressings from its earliest inception to the current status and also discusses the advantage and limitations of the dressing materials. PMID:26615539

  19. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  20. Surgical wound sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, P. J. E.

    1970-01-01

    With the help of a surgical nurse and using data-processing techniques, a prospective clinical study was conducted to determine the wound infection rate in two hospitals in Calgary. The overall sepsis rate was 5.2% and the clean wound rate 3.5%. The latter is the more meaningful figure as it allows for comparison between hospitals, specialties and individuals and is a good guide for hospital morbidity reviews. The groundwork for succeeding wound infection is laid in the operating theatre, and it is believed that wound infection would be reduced more by attention to Halsted's principles than by more rigid aseptic techniques. It is estimated that wound sepsis costs the Province of Alberta 1.5 million dollars per year for hospitalization alone. This amounts to roughly $1 per person per year. The annual cost of a prospective study such as the present one is approximately $7000. This is equivalent to the cost of hospitalizing 24 patients with infected wounds for one week (at $300 per week). One dividend of a prospective study is an associated reduction in infection rate. This reduction more than pays for the cost of the program. PMID:5414538

  1. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  2. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  3. Thiolated carboxymethyl-hyaluronic-Acid-based biomaterials enhance wound healing in rats, dogs, and horses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghui; Prestwich, Glenn D; Mann, Brenda K

    2011-01-01

    The progression of wound healing is a complicated but well-known process involving many factors, yet there are few products on the market that enhance and accelerate wound healing. This is particularly problematic in veterinary medicine where multiple species must be treated and large animals heal slower, oftentimes with complicating factors such as the development of exuberant granulation tissue. In this study a crosslinked-hyaluronic-acid (HA-) based biomaterial was used to treat wounds on multiple species: rats, dogs, and horses. The base molecule, thiolated carboxymethyl HA, was first found to increase keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. Crosslinked gels and films were then both found to enhance the rate of wound healing in rats and resulted in thicker epidermis than untreated controls. Crosslinked films were used to treat wounds on forelimbs of dogs and horses. Although wounds healed slower compared to rats, the films again enhanced wound healing compared to untreated controls, both in terms of wound closure and quality of tissue. This study indicates that these crosslinked HA-based biomaterials enhance wound healing across multiple species and therefore may prove particularly useful in veterinary medicine. Reduced wound closure times and better quality of healed tissue would decrease risk of infection and pain associated with open wounds. PMID:23738117

  4. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket() regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM. PMID:24283346

  5. Wound care in the dermatology office: where are we in 2011?

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2011-03-01

    Dermatologists perform several minor surgical procedures in their offices on a daily basis that result in superficial cutaneous wounds. Conventionally, the approach to postoperative care for these superficial wounds has been the application of a topical antibiotic ointment. In reality, this practice is based more on perception and habit, and not on sound scientific evidence, especially regarding reduction in postoperative infection rates and risk of adverse reactions. In addition, the routine use of a topical antibiotic in this scenario may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and has been shown to increase the risk of allergic contact dermatitis. With few new antibiotics in development and several worldwide initiatives to curb the increase in antibiotic resistance in progress, it is important that clinicians reevaluate the standard postoperative wound care that is used after superficial office-based dermatologic procedures. PMID:21247666

  6. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinic