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Sample records for postoperative wound complications

  1. [Immunoprophylaxis of postoperative inflammatory complications in thoracic and abdominal wounds].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Abakumov, M M; Danielian, Sh N; Nikulina, V P; Khvatov, V B

    2002-01-01

    Immune system (IS) was studied in 228 wounded with penetrating knife and shotgun wounds of the thorax and abdomen complicated by hemorrhage more than 1000 ml. Six variants of IS reaction to trauma, hemorrhage, surgical stress and intensive therapy 1-2 days after surgery were registered. Comparative analysis of laboratory and clinical efficacy of prophylactic use of leukinferon in 99 patients (test group) was carried out. Control group consisted of 129 patients matched by gender, age, type of wound, hemorrhage volume and fluid therapy. High immunoprophylactic efficacy of leukinferon was demonstrated. Period of immunorehabilitation (normalization of leukogram, correction of immune imbalance) in patients of the test group was shortened twice. Purulent complications rate reduced from 24.9 to 1.0%, hospital stay--from 41.7 +/- 3.6 to 16.3 +/- 1.1 days. PMID:12162084

  2. Hepatic transplantation: postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Heller, Matthew T; Tublin, Mitchell E

    2013-12-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppression have made orthotopic liver transplantation a first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. The early detection and treatment of postoperative complications has contributed significantly to improved graft and patient survival with imaging playing a critical role in detection. Complications that can lead to graft failure or patient mortality include vascular abnormalities, biliary abnormalities, allograft rejection, and recurrent or post-transplant malignancy. Vascular abnormalities include stenosis and thrombosis of the hepatic artery, portal vein, and inferior vena cava, as well as hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and celiac stenosis. Biliary abnormalities include strictures, bile leak, obstruction, recurrent disease, and infection. While imaging is not used to diagnose allograft rejection, it plays an important role in identifying complications that can mimic rejection. Ultrasound is routinely performed as the initial imaging modality for the detection and follow-up of both early and delayed complications. Cholangiography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are used to characterize biliary complications and computed tomography is used to confirm abnormal findings on ultrasound or for the evaluation of postoperative collections. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the imaging appearances and management of complications associated with liver transplantation. PMID:23644931

  3. [Incidence of postoperative complications in geriatric gynecology].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S

    1984-01-01

    The results of a retrospective-study concerning postoperative complications after gynecologic geriatric surgery (506 patients, aged 60 years and over) at the Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the District Hospital Stralsund/GDR are presented. In 106 patients (10,94 per cent) we have registered post-operative complications, in particular anaemia, fever and wound-period (1967 to 1971 = 8,22%, 1977 to 1981 = 13,29%). Gynecologic surgery in the aged requires a carefully clinical management in preoperative diagnostic and an intensive postoperative care. PMID:6475112

  4. Management of postoperative complications: general approach.

    PubMed

    Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

    2014-05-01

    The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible. PMID:24721365

  5. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within 'post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy' on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  6. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  7. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and ?{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  9. [Intravitreal injection. Monitoring to avoid postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Meyer, C H; Ziemssen, F; Heimann, H

    2008-02-01

    Intravitreal injection is generally regarded as safe. Many of the potential complications caused by this procedure are extremely rare and can be avoided by careful inspection beforehand and proper performance of the injection. In rare cases, however, the administered drugs may cause various pharmacological side effects. This article summarizes the safety profiles of Macugen and Lucentis from the drug approval studies and describes initial findings on possible or observed side effects after intravitreal administration of Avastin. In addition, important points to observe in order to avoid intra- and postoperative complications are provided. PMID:18256842

  10. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  11. Reconstruction of open wounds as a complication of spinal surgery with flaps: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Lee Onn; Hubbard, Zachary; Salgado, Christopher J; Levi, Allan D; Chim, Harvey

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT A systematic review of the available evidence on the prophylactic and therapeutic use of flaps for the coverage of complex spinal soft-tissue defects was performed to determine if the use of flaps reduces postoperative complications and improves patient outcomes. METHODS A PubMed database search was performed to identify English-language articles published between 1990 and 2014 that contained the following phrases to describe postoperative wounds ("wound," "complex back wound," "postoperative wound," "spine surgery") and intervention ("flap closure," "flap coverage," "soft tissue reconstruction," "muscle flap"). RESULTS In total, 532 articles were reviewed with 17 articles meeting the inclusion criteria of this study. The risk factors from the pooled analysis of 262 patients for the development of postoperative complex back wounds that necessitated muscle flap coverage included the involvement of instrumentation (77.6%), a previous history of radiotherapy (33.2%), smoking (20.6%), and diabetes mellitus (17.2%). In patients with instrumentation, prophylactic coverage of the wound with a well-vascularized flap was shown to result in a lower incidence of wound complications. One study showed a statistically significant decrease in complications compared with patients where prophylactic coverage was not performed (20% vs 45%). The indications for flap coverage after onset of wound complications included hardware exposure, wound infection, dehiscence, seroma, and hematoma. Flap coverage was shown to decrease the number of surgical debridements needed and also salvage hardware, with the rate of hardware removal after flap coverage ranging from 0% to 41.9% in 4 studies. CONCLUSIONS Prophylactic coverage with flaps in high-risk patients undergoing spine surgery reduces complications, while therapeutic coverage following wound complications allows the salvage of hardware in the majority of patients. PMID:26424341

  12. Wound complications of adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ormsby, M.V.; Hilaris, B.S.; Nori, D.; Brennan, M.F.

    1989-07-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy by the brachytherapy technique has been suggested by us to diminish local recurrence following resection of extremity and superficial truncal soft-tissue sarcoma. However, loading of the catheters with radioactive sources on the first through the fifth postoperative days results in a 48% significant wound-complication rate. Our previous animal experiments would suggest that delay of application of radiation to one week after wounding is accompanied by significant improvement in wound-breaking strength, new H3 hydroxyproline accumulation, and improved force-tension curves. As part of our ongoing prospective randomized trial of the effects of brachytherapy on local control, one change was made: the catheters were loaded five or more days after operation. Wound complications were then reviewed in 50 patients following this single change in brachytherapy delivery. Of the 21 patients receiving brachytherapy, 14% had significant wound complications; 10% of the 29 patients who did not receive radiation had wound complications of similar severity. This decrease in wound complications represents a major improvement over our prior experience and suggests that the timing of radioactive source loading in the postoperative period is a major factor in radiation-induced wound-healing delay.

  13. Abductor digiti minimi muscle flap transfer to prevent wound healing complications after ORIF of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Liang; Huang, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Sheng; Zhu, Tao; Lin, Chu; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the transfer of abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle flaps as a method for preventing wound healing complications in cases of closed calcaneal fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Method: Design: Retrospective review. Patients: Twenty-six cases of acute closed calcaneal fracture in patients at risk for serious wound complications or with serious fractures. Intervention: During the ORIF surgery, an ADM muscle flap was removed and used to cover the plate, filling the gap between the plate and skin. Main Outcome Measures: Wound healing rates, postoperative complications, and time to heal. Results: All wounds healed uneventfully, except for one case of minor superficial epithelial necrosis during the early postoperative period, which was treated conservatively. All patients regained ambulatory status with regular foot apparel. At last follow-up, the patients presented no clinical, laboratory, or radiological signs of complications. Conclusions: This ADM muscle flap transfer technique appeared to successfully prevent wound healing complications among patients undergoing ORIF for closed calcaneal fractures. This method offers a promising treatment option for calcaneal fractures in patients at high risk for serious wound complications, and future studies with greater numbers of cases are needed to further investigate its clinical application. PMID:26550221

  14. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

  15. Incidence of postoperative wound infections after open tendo Achilles repairs

    PubMed Central

    Marican, Mohd Mizan; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung; Rikhraj, Inderjeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Tendo Achilles (TA), which is the confluence of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, is one of the most commonly injured tendons. The surgical repair of TA ruptures is associated with a significant risk of infection. This study examined several factors (i.e. gender, age, body mass index, history of diabetes mellitus, steroid use, acute or chronic TA injuries, type of surgical incision and type of sutures used) that may be associated with postoperative wound infection after open TA repair. METHODS This was a retrospective study involving 60 patients who underwent open TA repair over an 18-month period. Patients who had prior TA surgery or open TA injuries, or who needed soft tissues flaps were excluded. RESULTS Among the patients, 7 (11.7%) developed superficial wound infections that were successfully treated with oral antibiotics, while 3 (5.0%) developed deep wound infections that required at least one debridement procedure. No significant association was found between the risk of postoperative wound infection and gender, age, the presence of diabetes mellitus, acute or chronic ruptures, site of surgical incision and type of deep or superficial sutures used. CONCLUSION While diabetes mellitus and age did not appear to be associated with postoperative wound infections after open TA repair, obese patients were found to be two times more likely to develop a wound infection than normal-weight patients. The incidence of superficial wound infections in this study was similar to previously published results (11.7% vs. 8.2%–14.6%), but the incidence of deep infections was higher (5% vs. 1%–2%). PMID:26512146

  16. Predebridement wound culture in open fractures does not predict postoperative wound infection: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lingaraj, Reddy; Santoshi, John Ashutosh; Devi, Sheela; Najimudeen, Syed; Gnanadoss, James J.; Kanagasabai, Rengasamy; Kanungo, Reba

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is confusion in the current literature regarding the value of obtaining predebridement wound cultures in the management of open fractures with several studies reporting contrasting results. We undertook a pilot study to determine the initial bacterial flora of open fractures in our environment and determine the correlation between subsequent wound infection if any, and the initial bacterial flora. Materials and Methods: Initial/predebridement wound swabs were obtained for 32 patients with open fractures. Patients underwent a debridement of the open wound and preliminary stabilization of fracture in the operating room within 24 h. Postdebridement wound cultures were obtained at 48 h and repeated subsequently, if indicated, during the follow-up period. The antibiotic therapy was modified based on the culture reports. Results: Initial wound swab culture showed bacterial contamination in 18 patients (56%); 14 patients (44%) developed an infection in the immediate postoperative period or during follow-up. Age, gender, co-morbid medical condition, delay in presentation, and grade of open fracture were not found to be predictors of postoperative infection. No patient had an infection with the same organism, which was present in the initial culture. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that the initial flora are not the infecting organisms in the open fracture wounds, and predebridement wound cultures have no value in predicting postdebridement wound infection.

  17. Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Erdem, ?evki; Mermerkaya, Musa U?ur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections. Materials and methods The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation) was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females) out of 317 (209 females; 108 males) were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 9–19) and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections. Results The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89%) patients (females) out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males) at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 3–8) irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 12–16) months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks. Conclusion The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections. PMID:25565903

  18. [Use of leukinferon for prophylaxis of pyogenic complications in victims with thoracic wounds].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Abakumov, M M; Druzenko, O A; Markova, O A; Pogodina, A N; Khvatov, V B

    1999-01-01

    The results of treatment of 131 victims with penetrating wounds of the thorax complicated by profuse bleeding, are presented. 36 of them after surgery to prevent pyogenous complications received 5 injections of leukinferon (test group); 95 patients who were not treated by leukinferon made up control group comparable with the test group by sex, age and character of wounds. Comparative analysis of the results showed that treatment with leukinferon has resulted in decrease of postoperative complications. In the test group the number of complications made up 47.2%, in control group--61%. Al the same time in the former group there was only one pyogenous complication (2.9%), while in control group--10 (10.6%). After the course of leukinferon leucocytic formula of the blood has become normal, the number of patients with immunodeficiency and imbalance of proteins markers of the acuteness of inflammatory process has decreased. PMID:10459185

  19. High Rates of Postoperative Wound Infection Following Elective Implant Removal

    PubMed Central

    Backes, M; Schep, N.W.L; Luitse, J.S.K; Goslings, J.C; Schepers, T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Metal implants placed during fracture surgery are often removed for various reasons (i.e. pain, prominent material, patients request). The removal of implants is considered a ‘clean’ procedure and as low risk surgery. The incidence of wound infections following implant removal has received little attention in the literature. The aim of the current study was to assess the incidence and risk factors of postoperative wound infections (POWIs) following implant removal. Material and Methods : All consecutive adult patients in a Level 1 and Level 2 Trauma Center who had their implants removed during a 6.5 years period were included. Exclusion criteria were removal of implants because of an ongoing infection or fistula and removal followed by placement of new implants. Primary outcome measure was a POWI as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patient characteristics and peri-operative characteristics were collected from the medical charts. Results : A total of 452 patients were included (512 procedures). The overall POWI rate was 11.6% (10% superficial, 1.6% deep). A total of 403 procedures (78.7%) comprised of implant removal below the knee joint with a 12.2% POWI rate. A POWI following initial fracture treatment was associated with a higher rate of POWI following implant removal (p=0.012). A POWI occurred more often in younger patients (median age 36 versus 43 years; p=0.004). Conclusion : The overall incidence of postoperative wound infection was 11.6% with 10% superficial and 1.6% of deep infections in patients with elective implant removal. A risk factor for POWI following implant removal was a previous wound infection. PMID:26401166

  20. Pancreaticoduodenectomy: expected post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, L P; Hoare, S M; O'Neill, A C; Awan, F N; Malone, D E; Ryan, E R; McCann, J W; Heffernan, E J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is a complex, high-risk surgical procedure performed for tumours of the pancreatic head and other periampullary structures. The rate of perioperative mortality has decreased in the past number of years but perioperative morbidity remains high. This pictorial review illustrates expected findings in early and late post-operative periods, including mimickers of pathology. It aims to familiarize radiologists with the imaging appearances of common and unusual post-operative complications. These are classified into early non-vascular complications such as delayed gastric emptying, post-operative collections, pancreatic fistulae and bilomas; late non-vascular complications, for example, biliary strictures and hepatic abscesses; and vascular complications including haemorrhage and ischaemia. Options for minimally invasive image-guided management of vascular and non-vascular complications are discussed. Familiarity with normal anatomic findings is essential in order to distinguish expected post-operative change from surgical complications or recurrent disease. This review summarizes the normal and abnormal radiological findings following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25026968

  1. Wound healing complications in brain tumor patients on Bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark R; Mandel, Jacob; O-Brien, Barbara; Conrad, Charles; Fields, Margaret; Hanna, Teresa; Loch, Carolyn; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-09-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is commonly used for treating recurrent glioblastoma (GBM), and wound healing is a well-established adverse event. Retrospective analysis of GBM patients with and without wound healing complications while on BEV treatment is reported. 287 patients identified, majority were males (60 %) with median age of 52.5 years. 14 cases identified with wound healing problems, related to either craniotomy (n = 8) or other soft tissue wounds (n = 6). Median duration of BEV treatment to complication was 62 days (range 6-559). Majority received 10 mg/kg (n = 11) and nine (64.3 %) were on corticosteroids, with median daily dose of 6 mg (range 1-16 mg) for median of 473 days before starting BEV. For dehisced craniotomy wounds, median time for starting BEV from last surgery was 29 days (range 27-345). Median time from starting BEV to developing wound complication was 47 days (range 16-173). Seven (87.5 %) had infected wounds requiring antibiotics, hospitalization. Four (50 %) required plastic surgery. BEV stopped and safely resumed in 6 (75 %) patients; median delay was 70 days (range 34-346). Soft tissue wounds included decubitus ulcer, dehisced striae, herpes simplex, trauma to hand and back, and abscess. Median time from starting BEV to wound issues was 72 days (range 6-559). Five (83.3 %) were infected, requiring antibiotics. While three (50 %) required hospitalization, none required plastic surgery. Treatment stopped in five (83.3 %) and restarted in two (median delay 48 days, range 26-69). Wound healing complications are uncommon but associated with significant morbidity. Identifying those at risk and contributing factors warrants further investigation. PMID:26298437

  2. Influence of yoga on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra M; Nagendra, H R; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Vinay, C; Chandrashekara, S; Gopinath, K. S.; Srinath, B. S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Pre- and postoperative distress in breast cancer patients can cause complications and delay recovery from surgery. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods: Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy and exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes and wound healing following surgery. Subjects were assessed at the baseline prior to surgery and four weeks later. Sociodemographic, clinical and investigative notes were ascertained in the beginning of the study. Blood samples were collected for estimation of plasma cytokines—soluble Interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma. Postoperative outcomes such as the duration of hospital stay and drain retention, time of suture removal and postoperative complications were ascertained. We used independent samples t test and nonparametric Mann Whitney U tests to compare groups for postoperative outcomes and plasma cytokines. Regression analysis was done to determine predictors for postoperative outcomes. Results: Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga: n = 33, control: n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the duration of hospital stay (P = 0.003), days of drain retention (P = 0.001) and days for suture removal (P = 0.03) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significant decrease in plasma TNF alpha levels following surgery in the yoga group (P < 0.001), as compared to the controls. Regression analysis on postoperative outcomes showed that the yoga intervention affected the duration of drain retention and hospital stay as well as TNF alpha levels. Conclusion: The results suggest possible benefits of yoga in reducing postoperative complications in breast cancer patients. PMID:21829282

  3. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  4. Cataract surgery and postoperative complications in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ivanci?, Dorotea; Mandi?, Zdravko; Bara?, Josip; Kopi?, Mirta

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus influences the function and morphology of the eye lens. The cataract is the second most common complication of diabetes mellitus on the eye. A hundred patients with cataract were examined in the prospective study. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group consisted of 50 patients with cataract who had not suffered from a system or local disease. The second group consisted of 50 patients with cataract and diabetes mellitus that had lasted for at least five years. In both groups the patients underwent identical cataract extra capsular extraction with intraocular PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) lens implantation in camera posterior. The objective of this study was to compare the two groups of patients in order to find out the most common intraoperative or postoperative complications in diabetics. The most common postoperative complications in patients suffering from diabetes were inflammatory reactions and bleeding: postoperative keratopathy, uveitis anterior serous and uveitis anterior fibrinous with posterior sinechia and opacity of the posterior lens capsule as results. Postoperative visual acuity was worse in the patients in group II on the seventh day and six months after operation. It was diabetic retinopathy and its progression that caused deterioration of visual acuity. Diabetic retinopathy and its progression, as well as maculopathy were found only in patients who were not treated with photocoagulation before the operation. PMID:16193678

  5. Use of intraoperative indocyanin-green angiography to minimize wound healing complications in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Bhanot, Parag; Franklin, Brenton; Albino, Frank; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2013-12-01

    Complication rates following abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) remain high. Early complications are related to skin necrosis and delayed healing, whereas late complications are related to recurrence. When concomitant body contouring procedures are performed, complication rates can be further increased. It is hypothesised that fluorescent angiography using indocyanin green (ICG) can identify poorly perfused tissues and thus reduce the incidence of delayed healing. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent AWR with concomitant panniculectomy from 2007-2012. Intraoperative ICG angiography with the SPY system (LifeCell Corp.) was used to determine the amount of resection for body contouring in patients who underwent reconstruction in a cohort of patients. SPY-Q was used to assess relative perfusion of analysed areas. Preoperative, postoperative, and operative details were analyzed. Seventeen patients met inclusion criteria, 12 patients were included in the non-ICG cohort, while five patients were included in the ICG cohorts. Wound-healing complications occurred in 5/12 (42%) patients in the non-ICG cohort vs 1/5 (20%) of the ICG cohorts. A description of the sole patient with complications in the ICG cohort is illustrated. Operative debridement and wound infection development occurred more frequently in the non-ICG cohort compared with the ICG cohort (17%, 17% vs 0%, 0%, respectively). Average time to wound healing was 41.1 days. Intraoperative ICG angiography can accurately detect perfusion abnormalities and can decrease wound healing related complications in complex hernia repair with concomitant panniculectomy. Assessing and ensuring skin viability can decrease the need for operative debridement. PMID:23596988

  6. Non-Activated Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma for the Prevention of Inguinal Wound-Related Complications After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Saratzis, Nikolaos; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) usually involves the surgical exposure and catheterization of the femoral arteries. Several inguinal surgical wound-related complications have been reported postoperatively. The aim of this report was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intraoperative application of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the prevention of wound-related complications in AAA EVAR. The authors conducted a patient- and assessor-blinded controlled trial involving 100 subjects undergoing EVAR of an AAA. PRP was produced using an autologous platelet separator and was applied, without prior thrombin activation, in 50 patients eligible for inclusion. The results were compared with a control group of 50 patients who underwent AAA EVAR within the same time period. The primary outcome was the difference in postoperative hospital stay. Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of wound healing and wound-related complications. Age, sex, and other comorbidities related to wound healing were not significantly different between cases and controls. One patient treated with PRP developed a unilateral wound infection with lymphorrhea, and two patients developed a bi-lateral superficial infection. Twelve patients within the control group developed a wound-related complication. The postoperative hospitalization was significantly lower in the PRP group. The overall surgical wound-related complications rate was also significantly lower in the PRP group. Application of non-thrombin-activated PRP seems to prevent major postoperative wound-related complications (p = .026) and shorten postoperative hospital stay duration after femoral artery exposure and catheterization for AAA EVAR (mean, 4.48 ± 0.48 vs. 6.14 ± 0.39 days). PMID:18389665

  7. Cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy: the effect of timing on postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Schuss, Patrick; Vatter, Hartmut; Marquardt, Gerhard; Imöhl, Lioba; Ulrich, Christian T; Seifert, Volker; Güresir, Erdem

    2012-04-10

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) due to intractably elevated intracranial pressure mandates later cranioplasty (CP). However, the optimal timing of CP remains controversial. We therefore analyzed our prospectively conducted database concerning the timing of CP and associated post-operative complications. From October 1999 to August 2011, 280 cranioplasty procedures were performed at the authors' institution. Patients were stratified into two groups according to the time from DC to cranioplasty (early, ?2 months, and late, >2 months). Patient characteristics, timing of CP, and CP-related complications were analyzed. Overall CP was performed early in 19% and late in 81%. The overall complication rate was 16.4%. Complications after CP included epidural or subdural hematoma (6%), wound healing disturbance (5.7%), abscess (1.4%), hygroma (1.1%), cerebrospinal fluid fistula (1.1%), and other (1.1%). Patients who underwent early CP suffered significantly more often from complications compared to patients who underwent late CP (25.9% versus 14.2%; p=0.04). Patients with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt had a significantly higher rate of complications after CP compared to patients without VP shunt (p=0.007). On multivariate analysis, early CP, the presence of a VP shunt, and intracerebral hemorrhage as underlying pathology for DC, were significant predictors of post-operative complications after CP. We provide detailed data on surgical timing and complications for cranioplasty after DC. The present data suggest that patients who undergo late CP might benefit from a lower complication rate. This might influence future surgical decision making regarding optimal timing of cranioplasty. PMID:22201297

  8. The chain of postoperative complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Mehmet; Gönenç, Murat; Al??, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct injuries are among the most dreadful complications of cholecystectomy. As laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become increasingly popular, the incidence of this complication increased and has remained unchanged in spite the learning curve being completed. A 50-year-old female underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstone disease. A complicated bile duct injury occurred during the procedure. As the injury was immediately recognized, it was treated with concomitant hepaticojejunostomy. In the postoperative period, biliary fistula, which was assumed to be the result of an anastomotic leak, was encountered. Diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was considered. It revealed that the anastomosis was intact and the source of biliary leak was an aberrant right posterior sectorial branch. A severe bleeding through the biliary catheter occurred due to transmigration of the catheter into the portal vein. Bleeding was controlled with embolization by the interventional radiologist. The patient thereafter was re-operated, and the leakage was sealed by ligation of the aberrant right posterior sectorial branch. The postoperative period was uneventful. As long as cholecystectomy is performed, bile duct injuries will always exist. Therefore, every abdominal surgeon should be aware of possible consequences of complications related to this procedure. PMID:25931907

  9. Exploring the Frontier of Electronic Health Record Surveillance: The Case of Post-Operative Complications

    PubMed Central

    FitzHenry, Fern; Murff, Harvey J.; Matheny, Michael E.; Gentry, Nancy; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Brown, Steven H; Reeves, Ruth M; Aronsky, Dominik; Elkin, Peter L.; Messina, Vincent P.; Speroff, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to build electronic algorithms using a combination of structured data and natural language processing (NLP) of text notes for potential safety surveillance of nine post-operative complications. Methods Post-operative complications from six medical centers in the Southeastern United States were obtained from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) registry. Development and test datasets were constructed using stratification by facility and date of procedure for patients with and without complication. Algorithms were developed from VASQIP outcome definitions using NLP coded concepts, regular expressions, and structured data. The VASQIP nurse reviewer served as the reference standard for evaluating sensitivity and specificity. The algorithms were designed in the development and evaluated in the test dataset. Results Sensitivity and specificity in the test set were 85% and 92% for acute renal failure, 80% and 93% for sepsis, 56% and 94% for deep vein thrombosis, 80% and 97% for pulmonary embolism, 88% and 89% for acute myocardial infarction, 88% and 92% for cardiac arrest, 80% and 90% for pneumonia, 95% and 80% for urinary tract infection, and 80% and 93% for wound infection, respectively. A third of the complications occurred outside of the hospital setting. Conclusions Computer algorithms on data extracted from the electronic health record produced respectable sensitivity and specificity across a large sample of patients seen in six different medical centers. This study demonstrates the utility of combining natural language processing with structured data for mining the information contained within the electronic health record. PMID:23673394

  10. Post-operative pulmonary complications after non-cardiothoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) occur in 5–10% of patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery and in 22% of high risk patients. PPCs are broadly defined as conditions affecting the respiratory tract that can adversely influence clinical course of the patient after surgery. Prior risk stratification, risk reduction strategies, performing short duration and/or minimally invasive surgery and use of anaesthetic technique of combined regional with general anaesthesia can reduce the incidence of PPCs. Atelectasis is the main cause of PPCs. Atelectasis can be prevented or treated by adequate analgesia, incentive spirometry (IS), deep breathing exercises, continuous positive airway pressure, mobilisation of secretions and early ambulation. Pre-operative treatment of IS is more effective. The main reason for post-operative pneumonia is aspiration along the channels formed by longitudinal folds in the high volume, low pressure polyvinyl chloride cuffs of the endotracheal tubes. Use of tapered cuff, polyurethane cuffs and selective rather than the routine use of nasogastric tube can decrease chances of aspiration. Acute lung injury is the most serious PPC which may prove fatal. PMID:26556919

  11. [Pleural hernia of an esophageal graft--late postoperative complication].

    PubMed

    Grabowski, K; Lewandowski, A; Moro?, K; Struty?ska-Karpi?ska, M; B?aszczuk, J; Macha?a, R

    1997-01-01

    Pleural hernia of the oesophageal substitute from pedicled intestinal segment is one of the late postoperative complications. 13 cases of patients with oesophagus reconstructed because of lye ingestion stenosis are presented. Problems concerning diagnosis and treatment of pleural hernia are analysed. Eight patients with minor symptoms were treated conservatively. Five patients were operated, two of them from acute necrosis of the substitute. Necrosis was caused by incarceration of the bowel and torsion of the mesentery. Elective operative treatment consisted of reduction of hernia sac contents, closing of the hernia orifice, chest drainage and temporary gastronomy. In patient operated as an emergency cases necrotic part of substitute was removed. This resulted in oesophageal exclusion in the neck, creating gastronomy. Chest drainage was also performed. PMID:9446380

  12. Open-label clinical trial comparing the clinical and economic effectiveness of using a polyurethane film surgical dressing with gauze surgical dressings in the care of post-operative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Ana Abejón; Casanova, Pabló López; Soriano, José Verdú; Torra I Bou, Joan-Enric

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common postoperative complication and can cause avoidable morbidity and excessive costs for the health service. Novel dressings, designed specifically for postoperative wounds, can help to reduce the risk of SSI and other complications such as blistering. This study compared the use of a new polyurethane film surgical dressing (Opsite Post-Op Visible, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) with gauze and tape in the management of postoperative wounds. The results show that the polyurethane film dressing results in a significant reduction in SSI (1·4% versus 6·6%, P = 0·006) as well as a reduction in other postoperative wound complications (e.g. blistering and erythema). Economic analysis conducted alongside the study suggests that these improved outcomes can be achieved at a lower treatment cost than gauze and tape dressings. The modest incremental cost of the polyurethane film surgical dressing is easily offset by the reduction in the costs related to treating SSI and other wound complications associated with gauze and tape dressings. PMID:23742125

  13. Obesity and the challenges of caesarean delivery: prevention and management of wound complications.

    PubMed

    Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo

    2015-04-01

    Caesarean section in obese patients is associated with an increased risk of surgical wound complications, including haematoma, seroma, abscess and dehiscence. This review focusses on the available strategies to decrease wound complications in this population, and on the clinical management of these situations. Appropriate dose of prophylactic antibiotics, closure of the subcutaneous tissue, and avoidance of subcutaneous drains reduce the incidence of wound complications associated with caesarean section in obese patients. For treatment of superficial wound infection associated with dehiscence, there are data from general surgery patients to suggest that the use of vacuum-assisted devices leads to faster healing and that surgical reclosure is preferable to healing by secondary intention, when there are no signs of ongoing infection. There is a need for stronger evidence regarding the prevention and management of wound complications for caesarean section in obese women. PMID:25457856

  14. Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Esther, Robert J.; Erfanian, Kamil; Green, Rebecca; Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell; Tepper, Joel E.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

  15. Correlation of fluid balance and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xuezhong; Wang, Haijun; Qu, Shining; Huang, Chulin; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Sun, Kelin

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the association between fluid balance and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer in a high volume cancer center. Methods Data of patients who admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) after esophagectomy at Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) between September 2008 and October 2010 were retrospectively collected and reviewed. Results There were 85 males and 15 females. Among them, 39 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications and hospital death was observed in 3 patients (3.0%). Univariable analysis showed that patients who developed postoperative pulmonary complications had more cumulative fluid balance in day 1 to 2 (2,669±1,315 vs. 3,815±1,353 mL, P<0.001; and 4,307±1,627 vs. 5,397±2,040 mL, P=0.014, respectively) compared with patients who did not have postoperative pulmonary complications. Multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that only more cumulative fluid balance in day 1 (P=0.008; OR =1.001; 95% CI, 1.000-1.002) was independent risk factor for postoperative pulmonary complications. Conclusions Positive fluid balance in postoperative day 1 is predictive of pulmonary complications in patients after esophagectomy for cancer. PMID:26716037

  16. Isolated sacral injuries: Postoperative length of stay, complications, and readmission

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Shi, Hanyuan; Thakore, Rachel V; Lee, Young M; Joyce, David; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate inpatient length of stay (LOS), complication rates, and readmission rates for sacral fracture patients based on operative approach. METHODS: All patients who presented to a large tertiary care center with isolated sacral fractures in an 11-year period were included in a retrospective chart review. Operative approach (open reduction internal fixation vs percutaneous) was noted, as well as age, gender, race, and American Society of Anesthesiologists’ score. Complications included infection, nonunion and malunion, deep venous thrombosis, and hardware problems; 90-d readmissions were broken down into infection, surgical revision of the sacral fracture, and medical complications. LOS was collected for the initial admission and readmission visits if applicable. Fisher’s exact and non-parametric t-tests (Mann-Whitney U tests) were employed to compare LOS, complications, and readmissions between open and percutaneous approaches. RESULTS: Ninety-four patients with isolated sacral fractures were identified: 31 (30.4%) who underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) vs 63 (67.0%) who underwent percutaneous fixation. There was a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach: 9.1 d for ORIF patients vs 6.1 d for percutaneous patients (P = 0.043), amounting to a difference in cost of $13590. Ten patients in the study developed complications, with no significant difference in complication rates or reasons for complications between the two groups (19.4% for ORIF patients vs 6.3% for percutaneous patients). Eight patients were readmitted, with no significant difference in readmission rates or reasons for readmission between the two groups (9.5% percutaneous vs 6.5% ORIF). CONCLUSION: There is a significant difference in LOS based on operative approach for sacral fracture patients. Given similar complications and readmission rates, we recommend a percutaneous approach. PMID:26396939

  17. Colorectal resection in deep pelvic endometriosis: Surgical technique and post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Marco; Vignali, Andrea; Milone, Francesco; Pignata, Giusto; Elmore, Ugo; Musella, Mario; De Placido, Giuseppe; Mollo, Antonio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Coretti, Guido; Bracale, Umberto; Rosati, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of different surgical techniques on post-operative complications after colorectal resection for endometriosis. METHODS: A multicenter case-controlled study using the prospectively collected data of 90 women (22 with and 68 without post-operative complications) who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for endometriosis was designed to evaluate any risk factors of post-operative complications. The prospectively collected data included: gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists risk class, endometriosis localization (from anal verge), operative time, conversion, intraoperative complications, and post-operative surgical complications such as anastomotic dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and bowel dysfunction. RESULTS: A similar number of complicated cases have been registered for the different surgical techniques evaluated (laparoscopy, single access, flexure mobilization, mesenteric artery ligation, and transvaginal specimen extraction). A multivariate regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical, demographic, and surgical characteristics, complicated cases were only associated with endometriosis localization from the anal verge (OR = 0.8, 95%CI: 0.74-0.98, P = 0.03). After analyzing the association of post-operative complications and each different surgical technique, we found that only bowel dysfunction after surgery was associated with mesenteric artery ligation (11 out of 44 dysfunctions in the mesenteric artery ligation group vs 2 out of 36 cases in the no mesenteric artery ligation group; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Although further randomized clinical trials are needed to give a definitive conclusion, laparoscopic colorectal resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis appears to be both feasible and safe. Surgical technique cannot be considered a risk factor of post-operative complications. PMID:26715819

  18. Effect of Pre-Designed Instructions for Mothers of Children with Hypospadias on Reducing Postoperative Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Sanaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital anomaly with a prevalence estimated to be as high as 1 in 125 live male births. Complications after surgical procedures are possible. The incidence of complications can be reduced by meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. So the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of…

  19. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  20. Correlation of early postoperative blood glucose levels with postoperative complications, hospital costs, and length of hospital stay in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-ying; Lin, Ming-zhu; Wen, Jun-ping; Li, Xue-jun; Shi, Xiu-lin; Zhang, Hui-jie; Chen, Ning; Li, Xiao-ying; Yang, Shu-yu; Chen, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Early postoperative hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients is an important risk factor affecting postoperative complications and mortality. This study aimed at investigating the effects of early postoperative hyperglycemia on postoperative complications, hospital costs, and length of hospital stay in non-diabetic patients with gastrointestinal malignancies; data of 1,015 non-diabetic patients with gastrointestinal malignancies, who underwent surgical intervention between January 2010 and January 2012, were retrospectively evaluated. Records on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), liver function, and kidney function were collected before and one day after surgery. Correlation of early postoperative FPG levels with postoperative complications, hospital costs, and length of hospital stay was further assessed in non-diabetic patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. One day after surgery, FPG results were significantly increased compared to preoperative values. FPG levels greater than or equal to 9.13 mmol/L (or 164.34 mg/dL) were associated with significant increases in the incidence of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs. An association is shown between FPG and postoperative hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal malignancies. Significant increases in postoperative complications among these patients suggest that measurement of early postoperative FPG levels is critical to identify patients with postoperative hyperglycemia. PMID:24853883

  1. Postoperative complications and survival of elderly breast cancer patients: a FOCUS study analysis.

    PubMed

    de Glas, N A; Kiderlen, M; Bastiaannet, E; de Craen, A J M; van de Water, W; van de Velde, C J H; Liefers, G J

    2013-04-01

    Old age is associated with comorbidity and decreased functioning which influences treatment decisions in elderly breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for complications after breast cancer surgery in elderly patients, and to assess mortality in patients with postoperative complications. The FOCUS cohort is a detailed retrospective cohort of all breast cancer patients aged 65 years and older who were diagnosed between 1997 and 2004 in the South-West of the Netherlands. Risk factors for postoperative complications were assessed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. One-year survival and overall survival were calculated using univariable and multivariable Cox Regression models, and relative survival was calculated according to the Ederer II method. 3179 patients received surgery, of whom 19 % (n = 618) developed 1 or more postoperative complication(s). The odds ratio of having postoperative complications increased with age [OR 1.85 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.50, p = 0.001) in patients >85 years] and number of concomitant diseases [OR 1.71 (95 % CI 1.30-2.24, p ? 0.001) for 4 or more concomitant diseases]. One-year overall survival, overall survival, and relative survival were worse in patients with postoperative complications [multivariable HR 1.49 (95 % CI 1.05-2.11), p = 0.025. HR 1.21, (95 % CI 1.07-1.36), p = 0.002 and RER 1.19 (95 % CI 1.05-1.34), p = 0.006 respectively]. Stratified for comorbidity, relative survival was lower in patients without comorbidity only. Increasing number of concomitant disease increased the risk of postoperative complications. Although elderly patients with comorbidity did have a higher risk of postoperative complications, relative mortality was not higher in this group. This suggests that postoperative complications in itself did not lead to higher relative mortality, but that the high relative mortality was most likely due to geriatric parameters such as comorbidity or poor physical function. PMID:23446810

  2. Imaging of the postoperative liver: review of normal appearances and common complications.

    PubMed

    Mulé, S; Colosio, A; Cazejust, J; Kianmanesh, R; Soyer, P; Hoeffel, C

    2015-10-01

    Several benign and malignant liver diseases may require surgical treatment for cure, including anatomical resections based on the segmental anatomy of the liver, non-anatomical (wedge) resections, and surgical management of biliary cysts. The type of surgery depends not only on the location and the nature of the disease, but also on the expertise of the surgeon. Whereas ultrasonography is often the first-line imaging examination in case of suspected postoperative complication, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is of greater value for identifying normal findings after surgery, early postoperative pathologic fluid collections and vascular thromboses, and tumor recurrence in patients who have undergone hepatic surgery. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is the imaging modality of choice for depicting early postoperative bile duct injuries and ischemic cholangitis that may occur in the late postoperative phase. Both MDCT and MRCP can accurately depict tumor recurrence. Radiologists should become familiar with these surgical procedures to better understand postoperative changes, and with the normal imaging appearances of various postoperative complications to better differentiate between complications and normal findings. PMID:26023007

  3. Postoperative Respiratory Complications of Laryngeal Mask Airway and Tracheal Tube in Ear, Nose and Throat Operations

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Reza; Hassani, Valiollah; Movasaghi, Gholamreza; Alimian, Mahzad; Faiz, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Supraglottic devices could be used to reduce postoperative respiratory complications, but there are few studies focused on their use in more prolonged surgeries. Objectives: In this study, we compared postoperative respiratory complications in patients with prolonged ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeries, whose airways were controlled with tracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Materials and Methods: In a randomized control trial (RCT), 171 candidates of prolonged ENT surgeries were randomly assigned into two groups. In group one (n = 85) LMA and in group two (n = 86) endotracheal tube were used for airway control. The incidences of four postoperative respiratory complications including sore throat, hoarseness, cough and shortness of breath in immediate postoperative period were measured and compared among patients of each group. Results: Sore throat was recorded in 32.9% of patients with LMA and 44.2% of intubated patients, but it was not statistically significant (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.158). Hoarseness was recorded in 3.5% of patients with LMA and 24.4% of intubated patients (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.000). In 1.2% of patients with LMA cough was recorded; it was also seen in 7% of the intubated patients (Fisher’s Exact test = 0.005). Shortness of breath was mentioned by two intubated patients (2.3%) and in patient with LMA we did not record this complication. Conclusions: LMA in prolonged ENT surgeries was associated with reduced respiratory complications. PMID:26473104

  4. Effects of Intravenous Fluid Restriction on Postoperative Complications: Comparison of Two Perioperative Fluid Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Brandstrup, Birgitte; Tønnesen, Hanne; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Hjortsø, Else; Ørding, Helle; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen; Rasmussen, Morten S.; Lanng, Charlotte; Wallin, Lene; Iversen, Lene H.; Gramkow, Christina S.; Okholm, Mette; Blemmer, Tine; Svendsen, Poul-Erik; Rottensten, Henrik H.; Thage, Birgit; Riis, Jens; Jeppesen, Inge S.; Teilum, Dorthe; Christensen, Anne Mette; Graungaard, Ben; Pott, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a restricted intravenous fluid regimen versus a standard regimen on complications after colorectal resection. Summary Background Data: Current fluid administration in major surgery causes a weight increase of 3–6 kg. Complications after colorectal surgery are reported in up to 68% of patients. Associations between postoperative weight gain and poor survival as well as fluid overload and complications have been shown. Methods: We did a randomized observer-blinded multicenter trial. After informed consent was obtained, 172 patients were allocated to either a restricted or a standard intraoperative and postoperative intravenous fluid regimen. The restricted regimen aimed at maintaining preoperative body weight; the standard regimen resembled everyday practice. The primary outcome measures were complications; the secondary measures were death and adverse effects. Results: The restricted intravenous fluid regimen significantly reduced postoperative complications both by intention-to-treat (33% versus 51%, P = 0.013) and per-protocol (30% versus 56%, P = 0.003) analyses. The numbers of both cardiopulmonary (7% versus 24%, P = 0.007) and tissue-healing complications (16% versus 31%, P = 0.04) were significantly reduced. No patients died in the restricted group compared with 4 deaths in the standard group (0% versus 4.7%, P = 0.12). No harmful adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: The restricted perioperative intravenous fluid regimen aiming at unchanged body weight reduces complications after elective colorectal resection. PMID:14578723

  5. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical intervention to manage, including lead migration or implant infection, although such complications do not directly threaten patient life or function. PMID:26424339

  6. Anti-Angiogenic Drugs: Involvement in Cutaneous Side Effects and Wound-Healing Complication

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The uses of anti-angiogenic drugs have not only made an impact on the battle to eliminate cancer but are also responsible for a number of medical complications. The long-term use of these drugs has increased the spectrum and incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the overall impact that these drugs have on patient care. Recent Advances: This review highlights the role of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in angiogenesis and wound healing and looks at how angiogenic inhibitors promote wound-healing complications. Critical Issues: With an increased use of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of various cancers and ocular diseases, there is an increased need for clinicians to define the risks and to optimize the usage of these drugs to reduce the incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. In addition, awareness is needed when treating patients on anti-angiogenic drugs so as not to exacerbate potential wound-healing complications when performing surgical procedures. Future Directions: Clinicians and surgeons will need to develop management guidelines to optimize patient care to reduce the risk of morbidity. When performing a surgical procedure, the impact of adverse effects from the use of anti-angiogenic drugs should be considered to ensure the welfare of the patient. In addition, the development of more specific inhibitors is necessary to reduce target effects to reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. PMID:25302138

  7. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  8. Post-Operative Complications in Living Liver Donors: A Single-Center Experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songfeng; Chen, Jihao; Wang, Jingqiao; Yang, Cheng; Jin, Mengmeng; Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Mangli; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the growing demand for available organs and the cadaveric organs facilitates the adoption of living donor liver transplantation. We retrospectively identified and evaluated the post-operative complications as per the modified Clavien classification system in 152 living liver donors at at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University between December, 2006 and June, 2014. Post-operative complications were observed in 61 patients (40.1%) in the present study, but no mortality was reported. Complications developed in 58 (40.0%) right, 1 (33.3%) left, and 2 (66.7%) lateral left hepatectomy donors. The prevalence of re-operation was 1.3%. Grade I and II complications were observed in 38 (25.0%) and 11 (7.2%) donors, respectively. Grade IIIa complications developed in 9 (5.9%) donors and only 3 (2.0%) patients reported grade IIIb complications. The most common complication was pleural effusion that occurred in 31 (20.4%) donors. No significant prognostic baseline factor was identified in this study. In conclusion, living donors experienced various complications, which were usually mild and had a good prognosis. PMID:26270475

  9. Perioperative synbiotics decrease postoperative complications in periampullary neoplasms: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sommacal, Heloisa Martins; Bersch, Vivian Pierri; Vitola, Santo Pascoal; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch

    2015-01-01

    Periampullary neoplasms are rapidly progressive tumors with a poor prognosis and high morbidity and mortality rates, which have a negative influence on patient outcomes. Some probiotics and prebiotics have the ability to protect the intestinal barrier and prevent bacterial translocation, infection, and postoperative complications. We evaluated the use of synbiotics in a prospective, double-blind study of patients undergoing surgery for periampullary neoplasms (PNs) and assessed the effect of these agents on nutritional status, postoperative complications, antibiotic use, length of hospital stay, and mortality. Patients were randomized to receive probiotics and prebiotics-synbiotics--group S [Lactobacillus acidophilus 10, 1 × 10(9)CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HS 111, 1 × 10(9) CFU, Lactobacillus casei 10, 1 × 10(9) CFU, Bifidobacterium bifidum, 1 × 10(9)CFU, and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) 100 mg]--or placebo-controls--group C, twice daily, for a total of 14 days. Risk, clinical status, and postoperative complication rates were assessed. Twenty-three patients were allocated to each group. The incidence of postoperative infection was significantly lower in group S (6 of 23 patients, 26.1%) than in group C (16 of 23 patients, 69.6%) (P = 0.00). Duration of antibiotic therapy was also shorter in group S (mean = 9 days vs. 15 days in group C; P = 0.01). Noninfectious complications were less common in group S (6 of 23 vs. 14 of 23 patients in group C; P = 0.03). Mean length of hospital stay was 12 ± 5 days in group S vs. 23 ± 14 days in group C (P = 0.00). No deaths occurred in group S, whereas 6 deaths occurred in group C (P = 0.02). Perioperative administration of synbiotics reduces postoperative mortality and complication rates in patients undergoing surgery for PNs. PMID:25803626

  10. Postoperative complications following TECA-LBO in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Rebecca E; Elkins, A Derrell; Moore, George E; Lantz, Gary C

    2013-01-01

    The medical records for 133 total ear canal ablations combined with lateral bulla osteotomies (TECA-LBOs) performed on 82 dogs (121 ears) and 11 cats (12 ears) between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed to determine if the duration of preoperative clinical signs was associated with the incidence of postoperative facial nerve injury and Horner's syndrome. Other perioperative complications, such as a head tilt, nystagmus, incisional drainage, draining tracts, hearing loss, as well as bacterial culture results, were noted. Postoperative facial nerve paresis occurred in 36 of 133 ears (27.1%), and paralysis occurred in 29 of 133 ears (21.8%), with no significant difference between species. Thus, postoperative facial nerve deficits occurred in 48.9% of ears. The median duration of clinically evident temporary facial nerve deficits was 2 wk for dogs and 4 wk for cats. Dogs had a significantly longer duration of preoperative clinical signs and were less likely than cats to have a mass in the ear canal. Dogs were less likely to have residual (> 1 yr) postoperative facial nerve deficits. The incidence of postoperative Horner's syndrome was significantly higher in cats than dogs. The duration of preoperative clinical signs of ear disease was not associated with postoperative facial nerve deficits. PMID:23535749

  11. Is low serum albumin associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Karas, Pamela L; Goh, Sean L; Dhital, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The clinical question investigated was: is low serum albumin associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery? There were 62 papers retrieved using the reported search strategy. Of these, 12 publications embodied the best evidence to answer this clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of the publication, patient group investigated, study design, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. This paper includes a total of 12 589 patients, and of the papers reviewed, 4 were level 3 and 8 level 4. Each of the publications reviewed and compared either all or some of the following postoperative complications: mortality, postoperative bleeding requiring reoperation, prolonged hospital stay and ventilatory support, infection, liver dysfunction, delirium and acute kidney injury (AKI). Of the studies that examined postoperative mortality, all except for three established a significant multivariate association with low preoperative albumin level. Some scepticism is required in accepting other results that were only present in univariate analysis. While three studies examined multiple levels of serum albumin, most dichotomized the serum albumin levels into normal and abnormal groups. This led to differing classifications of hypoalbuminaemia, ranging from less than 2.5 to 4.0 g/dl. The available evidence, however, suggests that low preoperative serum albumin level in patients undergoing cardiac surgery is associated with the following: (i) increased risk of mortality after surgery and (ii) greater incidence of postoperative morbidity. While the evidence supports the use of preoperative albumin in assessing post-cardiac surgery complications, a specific level of albumin considered to be abnormal cannot be concluded from this review. PMID:26362629

  12. Prognostic nutritional index predicts postoperative complications and long-term outcomes of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Deng, Jing-Yu; Ding, Xue-Wei; Ke, Bin; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Ru-Peng; Liang, Han

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of prognostic nutritional index (PNI) on the postoperative complications and long-term outcomes in gastric cancer patients undergoing total gastrectomy. METHODS: The data for 386 patients with gastric cancer were extracted and analyzed between January 2003 and December 2008 in our center. The patients were divided into two groups according to the cutoff value of the PNI: those with a PNI ? 46 and those with a PNI < 46. Clinicopathological features were compared between the two groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed. The relationship between postoperative complications and PNI was analyzed by logistic regression. The univariate and multivariate hazard ratios were calculated using the Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: The optimal cutoff value of the PNI was set at 46, and patients with a PNI ? 46 and those with a PNI < 46 were classified into PNI-high and PNI-low groups, respectively. Patients in the PNI-low group were more likely to have advanced tumor (T), node (N), and TNM stages than patients in the PNI-high group. The low PNI is an independent risk factor for the incidence of postoperative complications (OR = 2.223). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 54.1% and 21.1% for patients with a PNI ? 46 and those with a PNI < 46, respectively. The OS rates were significantly lower in the PNI-low group than in the PNI-high group among patients with stages II (P = 0.001) and III (P < 0.001) disease. CONCLUSION: The PNI is a simple and useful marker not only to identify patients at increased risk for postoperative complications, but also to predict long-term survival after total gastrectomy. The PNI should be included in the routine assessment of advanced gastric cancer patients. PMID:25132773

  13. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative complications and mortality following total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Viola, Jessica; Gomez, Miguel M; Restrepo, Camilo; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-05-01

    Single-institution, large case-controlled study examines the association between preoperative anemia and adverse outcomes following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). We collected data from our institutional database of patients who underwent primary and aseptic revision TJA. Only 2576 patients had anemia preoperatively, and 10,987 patients had hemoglobin within the normal range. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the effect of preoperative anemia on the incidence of medical complications, infection, LOS and mortality. Anemic patients had a higher rate of complications (odds ratio 2.11), namely cardiovascular 26.5% versus 11.8%, and genitourinary 3.9% versus 0.9%. Our study confirms that patients with preoperative anemia are likely to exhibit a higher incidence of postoperative complications following TJA. Preoperative optimization may be needed in an effort to reduce these complications. PMID:25669131

  14. The Preoperative CT-Scan Can Help to Predict Postoperative Complications after Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Femke F.; de Graaff, Feike; Bouman, Donald E.; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Slump, Kees H.; Klaase, Joost M.

    2015-01-01

    After pancreatoduodenectomy, complication rates are up to 40%. To predict the risk of developing postoperative pancreatic fistula or severe complications, various factors were evaluated. 110 consecutive patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy at our institute between January 2012 and September 2014 with complete CT scan were retrospectively identified. Pre-, per-, and postoperative patients and pathological information were gathered. The CT-scans were analysed for the diameter of the pancreatic duct, attenuation of the pancreas, and the visceral fat area. All data was statistically analysed for predicting POPF and severe complications by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The POPF rate was 18%. The VFA measured at umbilicus (OR 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00–1.02; P = 0.011) was an independent predictor for POPF. The severe complications rate was 33%. Independent predictors were BMI (OR 1.24; 95% CI = 1.10–1.42; P = 0.001), ASA class III (OR 17.10; 95% CI = 1.60–182.88; P = 0.019), and mean HU (OR 0.98; 95% CI = 0.96–1.00; P = 0.024). In conclusion, VFA measured at the umbilicus seems to be the best predictor for POPF. BMI, ASA III, and the mean HU of the pancreatic body are independent predictors for severe complications following PD. PMID:26605340

  15. Development and characterization of cefazolin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles composite gelatin nanofiber mats for postoperative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Rath, Goutam; Hussain, Taqadus; Chauhan, Gaurav; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Systemic antibiotic therapy in post-operative wound care remain controversial leading to escalation in levels of multi-resistant bacteria with unwanted morbidity and mortality. Recently zinc (Zn) because of multiple biophysiological functions, gain considerable interest for wound care. Based on our current understanding, the present study was designed with an intent to produce improve therapeutic approaches for post-operative wound management using composite multi-functional antibiotic carrier. The study involved the fabrication, characterization and pre-clinical evaluation of cefazolin nanofiber mats loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) and comparing co-formulated mats with individual component, enable a side by side comparison of the benefits of our intervention. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug, ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) and drug-ZnONP mixture against Staphylococcus aureus was determined using micro dilution assay. The fabricated nanofibers were then evaluated for in-vitro antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of inhibition was predicted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further these nanofiber mats were evaluated in-vivo for wound healing efficacy in Wistar rats. Study revealed that the average diameter of the nanofibers is around 200-900nm with high entrapment efficiency and display sustained drug release behavior. The combination of ZnO and cefazolin in 1:1 weight ratio showed higher anti-bacterial activity of 1.9±0.2?g/ml. Transmission electron microscopy of bacterial cells taken from the zone of inhibition revealed the phenomenon of cell lysis in tested combination related to cell wall disruption. Further composite medicated nanofiber mats showed an accelerated wound healing as compared to plain cefazolin and ZnONP loaded mats. Macroscopical and histological evaluations demonstrated that ZnONP hybrid cefazolin nanofiber showed enhanced cell adhesion, epithelial migration, leading to faster and more efficient collagen synthesis. Hence the fabricated composite nanofiber mats have the potential to be used as a postoperative antimicrobial wound dressings. PMID:26478308

  16. Immediate Postoperative Complications in Patients Undergoing CABG; Investigating the Role of Prior Coronary Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Negargar, Sohrab; Anvari, Shahriar; Abbasi, Kyomars; Enamzadeh, Elgar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately 15 to 30% of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) will require repeated revascularization. There is an ongoing debate concerning the impact of prior PCI on subsequent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. This study sought to compare immediate post-CABG complications between patients with and without previous coronary stenting. Methods: A total of 556 CABG candidates including 73 patients with previous coronary stenting and 483 patients without prior stenting were enrolled in this retrospective-prospective study. Demographic information, cardiac markers (CK-MB, Troponin T), and postoperative data including inotrope administration, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) use, bleeding, pathological electrocardiography (ECG) changes, and overall complications were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean age of the patients in stented group was significantly higher than that in unstented group (63.49±7.71 vs. 61.37±9.80 years, p=0.05). The mean serum level of Troponin T 12 h postoperation was significantly higher in the same group (323.26±33.16 vs. 243.30±11.52 ng/dL; p=0.03). Comparing the stented and unstented groups, the rates of inotrope use (17.8% vs. 7.2%; p=0.003), significant bleeding (15.1% vs. 4.3%; p=0.001), and overall complications (32.9% vs. 11.6%; odds ratio: 3.74 with 95% confidence interval of 2.13-6.55, p<0.001) were significantly higher in the former group. The association between overall complications and prior stenting was independent (odd ratio: 3.06). No significant connections were found between postoperative complications and stent number or type. Conclusion: A positive history of previous coronary stenting significantly increases the risk of immediate post-CABG complications. PMID:25610554

  17. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with pulsed radiofrequency helps relieve postoperative complications of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W-X; Wang, Q; He, M-W; Yang, L-Q; Wu, B-S; Ni, J-X

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a sudden, severe condition characterized by stabbing and recurrent pain. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFT) and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) are common surgical interventions used to treat trigeminal neuralgia. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and associated complications of a combination of RFT and PRF in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous RFT of the Gasserian ganglion was performed on 80 patients with trigeminal neuralgia. Patients were randomly assigned to either group A (RFT at 70°C) or group B (RFT at 75°C). Patients in each group were divided into 2 subgroups, receiving percutaneous RFT (240 s) with or without PRF (42°C, 2 Hz, 240 s). Six months later, pain relief and complication status were evaluated. There was no significant difference in visual analogue scores among groups with RFT at 70° or 75°C, with or without PRF. Data showed that facial numbness and postoperative masticatory muscle weakness recovered more rapidly in patients receiving combined RFT and PRF treatment. Decreased corneal reflex was relieved to a significantly greater extent in groups receiving PRF than those without. Thus, compared to the use of RFT at 75°C alone, the combination of PRF and RFT helped eliminate postoperative complications, such as facial numbness, masticatory muscle weakness, and decreased corneal reflex, indicating that it could be useful for surgically treating trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26214440

  18. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays.

  19. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: postoperative complication in tumours of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Arístegui, Miguel; García-Leal, Roberto; Fernández-Carballal, Carlos; Lowy, Alejandro; Martin-Oviedo, Carlos; Panadero, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) is a rare complication in posterior fossa tumour surgery. We present two patients with cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours who developed cerebral salt wasting postoperatively. Both patients deteriorated in spite of intensive fluid and salt replacement. On CT scan the patients presented mild to moderate ventricular dilation, which was treated with an external ventricular drainage. After the resolution of hydrocephalus, fluid balance rapidly returned to normal in both patients and the clinical status improved. Identification and treatment of secondary obstructive hydrocephalus may contribute to the management of CSW associated to posterior fossa tumour surgery. PMID:22520103

  20. Effect of body mass index on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shohab, Durre; Ayub, Ramsha; Alam, Muhammad Umar; Butt, Amna; Sheikh, Sanam; Assad, Salman; Akhter, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of body mass index (BMI) on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) by comparing three BMI groups. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of 129 patients who underwent PCNL from January 2010 to August 2013. All the patients underwent PCNL by a standard technique. The patients were divided into three groups: patients having a BMI ?24 kg/m2 were included in the normal group, those having a BMI of 24.1–30.0 kg/m2 were included in the overweight group, and those having a BMI >30 kg/m2 were included in the obese group. Three groups were compared for operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement. Results A total of 129 patients including 44 females and 85 males were included with a mean age of 45.00±1.44 years. The mean age in the normal group was 43.29±1.69 years, 47.08±1.29 years in the overweight group, and 43.61±1.25 years in the obese group. The mean stone size in the normal group was 25.46±8.92 mm, 28.01±8.40 mm in the overweight group, and 26.84±7.41 mm in the obese group. Our results showed no statistically significant difference with respect to mean operative time, mean hospital stay, and stone clearance in the normal, obese, and overweight patients undergoing PCNL. Postoperative complications and analgesia requirement were also similar in all the three groups. Conclusion There was no effect of BMI on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing PCNL. PCNL is a safe and effective procedure for the removal of renal stones in obese patients. PMID:26623145

  1. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  2. Analysis of the relationship between postoperative ophthalmic complications and dialysis time of pre-kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Lei; Qi, Fan; Xie, Jin-Liang; Qi, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Zhu, Xiang-Rong; Ding, Xiang; Yang, Bo; Jin, Peng

    2012-01-01

    AIM To determine the influence of the dialysis time before kidney transplantation on postoperative ophthalmic complications. METHODS One hundred and eighty three patients who were given the follow-up after kidney transplantation were selected, including 124 males and 59 females. The dialysis time before kidney transplantation was (2.9±2.1) years. Among them, there were 93 cases having cadaveric renal transplantation and 90 cases having living relative renal transplantation. The conditions of ophthalmic complications in all the patients after kidney transplantation were investigated and the incidence rate on ophthalmic complications having different dialysis time before kidney transplantation was given Chi-square test and Chi-square linear trend test. RESULTS Among 183 patients with kidney transplantation, 95 patients (51.9%) had at least one ophthalmic complication and the rest 88 patients (48.1%) had no significant abnormality at the eye region. The most common ophthalmic complications were pinguecula/conjunctival degeneration (31 cases), the following was caligo lentis (24 cases). The main manifestations were grayish white granule and plaque turbidity occurred in posterior capsule at the posterior pole of crystaline lens. The angulus iridocornealis of 5 patients (5.3%) with cataract and glaucoma were all open-angle through the detection by gonioscope. Through visual field examination, there were 2 patients with paracentral scotoma, 2 patients with arcuate scotoma and one case with nasal step. CONCLUSION The experiments verify that the incidence of glaucomawas relates to the dialysis time before kidney transplantation, and the incidence rate might be higher if the dialysis time is longer. PMID:22773990

  3. The Role of MicroRNAs in Diabetic Complications—Special Emphasis on Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Moura, João; Børsheim, Elisabet; Carvalho, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major problems in today’s society, driving the prevalence of diabetes and its related complications. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the chronic complications in diabetes in order to develop better therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Some of the most important complications include macrovascular abnormalities, e.g., heart disease and atherosclerosis, and microvascular abnormalities, e.g., retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, in particular diabetic foot ulceration. The highly conserved endogenous small non-coding RNA molecules, the micro RNAs (miRNAs) have in recent years been found to be involved in a number of biological processes, including the pathogenesis of disease. Their main function is to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), leading to mRNA degradation, suppression of translation or even gene activation. These molecules are promising therapeutic targets and demonstrate great potential as diagnostic biomarkers for disease. This review aims to describe the most recent findings regarding the important roles of miRNAs in diabetes and its complications, with special attention given to the different phases of diabetic wound healing. PMID:25268390

  4. Determining Surgical Complications in the Overweight (DISCOVER): a multicentre observational cohort study to evaluate the role of obesity as a risk factor for postoperative complications in general surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nepogodiev, Dmitri; Chapman, Stephen J; Glasbey, James; Kelly, Michael; Khatri, Chetan; Drake, Thomas M; Kong, Chia Yew; Mitchell, Harriet; Harrison, Ewen M; Fitzgerald, J Edward; Bhangu, Aneel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is increasingly prevalent among patients undergoing surgery. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the impact of obesity on postoperative complications. This multicentre study aims to determine whether obesity is associated with increased postoperative complications following general surgery. Methods and analysis This prospective, multicentre cohort study will be performed utilising a collaborative methodology. Consecutive adults undergoing open or laparoscopic, elective or emergency, gastrointestinal, bariatric or hepatobiliary surgery will be included. Day case patients will be excluded. The primary end point will be the overall 30-day major complication rate (Clavien-Dindo grade III–V complications). Data will be collected to risk-adjust outcomes for potential confounding factors, such as preoperative cardiac risk. This study will be disseminated through structured medical student networks using established collaborative methodology. The study will be powered to detect a two-percentage point increase in the major postoperative complication rate in obese versus non-obese patients. Ethics and dissemination Following appropriate assessment, an exemption from full ethics committee review has been received, and the study will be registered as a clinical audit or service evaluation at each participating hospital. Dissemination will take place through national and local research collaborative networks. PMID:26195471

  5. Intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis using two types of Moria microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Karabela, Yunus; Muftuoglu, Orkun; Gulkilik, Ibrahim Gokhan; Kocabora, Mehmet Selim; Ozsutcu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, management, and visual outcomes of intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery using two types of Moria M2 microkeratomes. This retrospective analysis was performed on 806 primary LASIK cases. The intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications were identified and categorized according to type of Moria microkeratome. There were 52 intraoperative and early postoperative complications--one case of partial flap (0.124 %), one case of free flap (0.124 %), one case of small flap (0.124 %), 13 cases of epithelial defect (1.61 %), 12 cases of flap striae (1.49 %), 10 cases of diffuse lamellar keratitis (1.24 %), 10 cases of interface debris (1.24 %), three cases of epithelial ingrowth (0.37 %), and one case of microbial infection (0.124 %). The overall incidence of flap complications was 6.45 %. There were 27 right eye (6.73 %) and 25 left eye (6.17 %) complications. The incidence of complications with the Moria automated metallic head 130 microkeratome was 4.22 % and with the Moria single-use head 90 microkeratome was 2.23 %. We observed one culture-negative interface abscess which was cured with surgical cleaning and intensive medical treatment. The most common complication encountered was epithelial defects, followed by flap striae. Our study showed that LASIK with a microkeratome has a relatively low incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative flap complications. The authors have no financial interest in any of the issues contained in this article and have no proprietary interest in the development of marketing of or materials used in this study. PMID:24531872

  6. EVALUATION OF EMPHYSEMA USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: ASSOCIATION WITH POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN LUNG CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    KAWAKAMI, KENICHI; IWANO, SHINGO; HASHIMOTO, NAOZUMI; HASEGAWA, YOSHINORI; NAGANAWA, SHINJI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) enables in vivo volumetry of total lung volume (TLV) and emphysematous low-attenuation volume (LAV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between preoperative 3D-CT volumetry and postoperative complications in lung cancer patients. We searched our institution’s surgical records from December 2006 to December 2009 and selected patients who had undergone pulmonary lobectomy for primary lung cancer. From 3D-CT data, TLV and LAV <–950 HU of thresholds were retrospectively measured. The LAV% was calculated as follows: LAV% = LAV/TLV*100. The associations between the seven independent variables (LAV%, age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as percent forced vital capacity [FEV1%], and resected lobe) and the two outcomes (postoperative complications and prolonged postoperative stay [PPS]) were compared using logistic regression analysis. A total of 309 patients (222 males, 87 females; mean age, 67 years; range, 40–87 years) were evaluated. On multivariate analysis, age and LAV% were significantly correlated with postoperative complications (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively), and LAV% was significantly correlated with PPS (p = 0.031). LAV% measured using 3D-CT is more sensitive for predicting complications after lobectomy for lung cancer than FEV1%. PMID:25797976

  7. Illegal tattoos complicated by Staphylococcus infections: a north Carolina wound care and medical center experience.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Alan C

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a major source of morbidity in Hamlet, NC; in 2011, there were 58 emergency room visits resulting from MRSA infections, leading to 31 admissions to Sandhills Regional Medical Center (Hamlet, NC). The situation is complicated by illegal tattoo artists offering less-expensive artwork, as their bargain prices often involve stinting on sterile technique. Three patients with infected tattoos were seen at Sandhills Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine (Hamlet, NC) with a range of tissue damage requiring different treatment plans. Closer scrutiny of tattoo ink and use of preservatives could prevent accidental or deliberate contamination, and reduce the risk of tattoo infection. ?. PMID:25876168

  8. [The use of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with infectious surgical complications of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Zavatski?, V V; Novitski?, A S

    2014-01-01

    In the Russian Federation diabetes affects about 11 million people. The frequency of amputation in patients with diabetes in Russia varies from 0.76 to 18.2 per 1.000 patients. From 48.9% to 60% are large amputation in which postoperative mortality reaches 50% and more. Up to half of all patients with diabetes have the defeat of major vessels of lower extremities with the formation of ischemic and neuroischemic forms of the diabetic foot syndrome. These patients are the most difficult and to save limbs need for revascularization. However, the existing algorithms of treatment of such patients do not take into account possible combination of such important pathogenetic factors, as ischemia, the prevalence of purulent-necrotic lesion of the tissues of the foot and the severity of clinical course of surgical infection. Also still not finally defined the sequence of execution of revascularization and rehabilitation of necrotic tissue, there are no indications for the use of new effective methods of treatment and rehabilitation of wounds in patients with diabetic foot. From the above, pathogenetic factors, the authors have developed a personalized Protocol of treatment of patients with ischemic and neuroischemic forms of the diabetic foot, the indications and conditions for holding therapy negative pressure. Efficiency of the proposed Protocol is accompanied by clinical examples. PMID:25484158

  9. Surgical Anatomy, Transperitoneal Approach, and Early Postoperative Complications of a Ventral Lumbar Spine Surgical Model in Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Sheela R; Krzyzanowska, Agata; Frawley, Robert J; Cunningham, Matthew E

    2013-01-01

    Surgical models in animals are used extensively to study small molecules and devices for lumbar intervertebral disc repair, replacement, and fusion. Although the ventral lumbar animal models themselves are well described, critical assessment of morbidity and mortality avoidance when using the models have not been reported. Hypothesizing that technique modifications and the relative prevalence and severity of complications would be correlated, we collected and examined peri- and postoperative data stratified by surgical technique. We here report complications associated with the transperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine in 268 Lewis rats and offer data-driven suggestions regarding complication avoidance through technique modification. Compared with wider exposure, limiting the width of exposure to a maximum of 3 mm resulted in fewer neurologic complications in the lower limbs. In addition, avoiding extracorporeal reflection of the small intestine during the exposure was associated with lower incidence of postoperative gastrointestinal distress and fewer situations requiring euthanasia. These findings underscore the importance of detailed approaches in minimizing postoperative morbidity and attrition in surgical models. PMID:24210017

  10. An analysis of limb-threatening lower extremity wound complications after 1090 consecutive coronary artery bypass procedures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T A; Taylor, S M; Crane, M M; Cornett, W R; Langan, E M; Snyder, B A; Cull, D L

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and characterize limb-threatening lower extremity wound or soft tissue complications after coronary artery bypass (CABG) and determine risk factors for their cause. While minor wound problems of the leg after CABG are not uncommon, serious limb-threatening complications, though less frequent, do occur and are often de-emphasized in the surgical literature. A review of 1090 consecutive CABG procedures performed from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995 was instituted, which screened for limb-threatening lower extremity wound or soft tissue complications defined as wounds that: required additional surgery for treatment; prolonged the length of stay; or which required lengthy home health nursing for treatment. Minor lymph leaks, leg swelling, infections or wound problems treated as an outpatient were excluded. Of 1090 patients, 54 (5.0%) experienced a limb-threatening lower extremity complication. Complications were categorized as vein harvest incision non-healing (n = 36, 66.7%), decubitus ulceration (n = 11, 20.4%), forefoot ischemia/embolization (n = 10, 18.5%), groin hematoma/abscess (n = 6, 11.1%), severe cellulitis (n = 3, 5.6%), or a combination (n = 12, 22.2%). Statistically significant risk factors by univariate and bivariate analysis for a complication included older age (68 years vs 62 years, p = 0.007), female sex (57% vs 28%, p < 0.001), diabetes (57% vs 33%, p = 0.005) and longer pump time (129 min vs 114 min, p = 0.009). These complications necessitated five major lower extremity amputations and nine revascularization procedures. Chronic lower extremity ischemia from peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was a major contributing factor for the development of wounds in at least 23 (42.6%) of these patients, though suspected in only 10 (43.5%) preoperatively. A non-healing vein harvest incision below the knee of a patient retrospectively found to have inadequate distal circulation for healing occurred in 17 (31.5%) of the total 54 cases. It was concluded that non-healing vein incisions, decubitus ulcers and forefoot ischemic lesions frequently occurring in older diabetic females with undetected pre-existing PVD, comprise the majority of limb-threatening leg complications after CABG. Nearly one-third of the complications may have been avoided had the vein harvest incision not been made at the ankle of a patient with unappreciated PVD. PMID:10406454

  11. Obesity, Outcomes and Quality of Care: BMI Increases the Risk of Wound-Related Complications in Colon Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Ramzi; Bordeianou, Liliana G.; Sylla, Patricia; Berger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Obese patients may face higher complication rates during surgical treatment of colon cancer. This paper aims to measure this effect in a high volume tertiary care center. Methods All colon cancer patients treated surgically at our center from 2004 through 2011 were reviewed. Multivariate regression assessed relationships of complications and stay outcomes with BMI controlled for age, gender, comorbidity score, surgical approach and history of smoking. Results In 1048 included patients, BMI was a predictor of several complications in both laparoscopic and open procedures. For every increase of BMI by one WHO category, the odds ratio (OR) was 1.61 (p<0.001) for wound infection and OR=1.54 for slow healing (p<0.001). Additionally, right colectomies had an OR=3.23 (p=0.017) for wound dehiscence. No further associations with BMI were found. Conclusions BMI was incrementally associated with wound-related complications, illustrating how the proliferation of obesity relates to a growing risk of surgical complications. As the surgical community strives to improve quality of care, patient controllable factors will play an increasingly important role in cost containment and quality improvement. PMID:24139555

  12. The comparative risk of developing postoperative complications in patients with distal radius fractures following different treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Jun; Li, Yi-Fan; Ji, Yun-Han; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Xian-Zhong; Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a network meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of seven most common surgical procedures to fix DRF, including bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Published studies were retrieved through PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. The database search terms used were the following keywords and MeSH terms: DRF, bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. The network meta-analysis was performed to rank the probabilities of postoperative complication risks for the seven surgical modalities in DRF patients. This network meta-analysis included data obtained from a total of 19 RCTs. Our results revealed that compared to DRF patients treated with bridging external fixation, marked differences in pin-track infection (PTI) rate were found in patients treated with plaster fixation, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Cluster analysis showed that plaster fixation is associated with the lowest probability of postoperative complication in DRF patients. Plaster fixation is associated with the lowest risk for postoperative complications in DRF patients, when compared to six other common DRF surgical methods examined. PMID:26549312

  13. Early Postoperative Complications following Gracilis Free Muscle Transfer for Facial Reanimation: A Systematic Review and Pooled Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Gosain, Arun K; Zenn, Michael R; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2015-10-01

    Background?Multiple studies have detailed promising smile restoration following gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation but information detailing the potential complications is lacking. The aim of this study is to systematically review the literature to evaluate the reported complication rate associated with this procedure. We also aim to determine the most common occurring complications. Methods?The PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were queried with multiple search strategies for published articles between January 1950 and February 2013 that detailed gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation. Title, abstract, and full text review was performed. Complications were defined as any reported, identifiable adverse outcome that required an alteration in treatment for correction. Results?The literature search yielded 62 studies of gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation. Overall, 36 articles (58%) reported whether or not a complication had occurred. The overall complication rate based on pooled proportions was 9.6% and the most commonly occurring complications were postoperative hematoma (3.6%) and infection (3.5%). Conclusions?Our data suggests that complications after gracilis free muscle transfer for facial reanimation may be underreported and this complex procedure may in fact be associated with significant adverse outcomes as high as 9.6%. PMID:26220430

  14. [Transrectal magnetotherapy of the prostate from Intramag device in prophylaxis of postoperative complications of transurethral resection of prostatic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Ne?mark, A I; Snegirev, I V; Ne?mark, B A

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyse preoperative preparation of 91 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Two groups of patients received conventional preparation (group 1) and magnetotherapy (group 2) before TUR of the prostate. The examination covered immune system, bacteriological indices of urine and prostatic tissue. Infection of the urinary tract is a main risk factor of complications after TUR. Conventional preoperative preparation fails to correct immunity, to change bacterial urine flora, to improve hemodynamics in the prostate. Transrectal magnetotherapy with running magnetic field eliminates deficiency of T- and B-cell immunity, raises functional activity of B-lymphocytes and phagocytic ability of neutrophils, reduces endogenic intoxication, tissue edema, bacterial contamination, number of thrombohemorrhagic complications. This leads to a decrease in the number of postoperative complications. PMID:16708596

  15. Liver injury and complications in the postoperative trauma patient: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, P.J.; Whitley, N.O.; Brotman, S.; Cunat, J.S.; Whitley, J.

    1982-08-01

    Twenty-eight patients with surgically documented and classified hepatic injury were studied by computed tomography (CT) in the postoperative period.CT demonstrated no abnormalities in 12 of these patients, most of whom has sustained simple lacerations of the liver. Of the 16 patients with abnormal scans, perihepatic fluid collections were present in six, five of whom had simple lacerations at surgery. The other 10 patients had CT evidence of parenchymal abnormalities, and all of these had sustained major hepatic injuries. CT is usful in depicting the postoperative anatomy, and in many cases demonstrates the nature and extent of damage; the likelihood of finding an abnormality varies with the severity of the injury, even though repair has been attempted. The frequent problem of postoperative sepsis is also amenable to CT evaluation, but the changes demonstrated are often nonspecific and the possibility of residual hepatic injury has to be considered. Finally, CT can document healing of parenchymal injury.

  16. Morphine Spinal Block Anesthesia in Patients Who Undergo an Open Hemorrhoidectomy: A Prospective Analysis of Pain Control and Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, José PT; Isaac, Raniere R; Alves-Neto, Onofre; Moreira, Thiago AC; Vieira, Tiago HM; Brasil, Andressa MS

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the use of adding morphine to bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia for pain control in patients who underwent an open hemorrhoidectomy. Methods Forty patients were prospectively selected for an open hemorrhoidectomy at the same institution and were randomized into two groups of 20 patients each: group 1 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with 80 µg of morphine (0.2 mg/mL). Group 2 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with distilled water, achieving the same volume of spinal infusion as that of group 1. Both groups were prescribed the same pain control medicine during the postoperative period. Pain scores were evaluated at the anesthetic recovery room and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Postoperative complications, including pruritus, nausea, headaches, and urinary retention, were also recorded. Results There were no anthropometric statistical differences between the two groups. Pain in the anesthetic recovery room and 3 hours after surgery was similar for both groups. However, pain was better controlled in group 1 at 6 and 12 hours after surgery. Although pain was better controlled for group 1 after 24 hours of surgery, the difference between the groups didn't achieved statistical significance. Complications were more common in group 1. Six patients (6/20) presented coetaneous pruritus and 3 with (3/20) urinary retention. Conclusion A hemorrhoidectomy under a spinal with morphine provides better pain control between 6 and 12 hours after surgery. However, postoperative complications, including cutaneous pruritus (30%) and urinary retention (15%), should be considered as a negative side of this procedure. PMID:24999465

  17. Health-related quality of life after cardiac surgery – the effects of age, preoperative conditions and postoperative complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Factors influencing the postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after cardiac surgery have not been well described yet, mainly in the older people. The study’s aim was to explore differences in clinical conditions and HRQOL of patients before and after cardiac surgery taking into account the influence of age and to describe factors influencing changes of HRQOL in the postoperative period. Methods This was a prospective consecutive observational study with two measurements using the SF-36 questionnaire before surgery and 1 year after surgery. It considered main clinical characteristics of participants prior to surgery as well as postoperative complications. Results At baseline assessment the study considered 310 patients, predominantly male (69%). Mean age was 65 (SD 10.4) years and 101 patients (33%), who were older than 70, constituted the older group. This older group showed greater comorbidity, higher cardiac operative risk and lower HRQOL in the preoperative period as well as a higher prevalence of postoperative complications than the younger group. Thirty-day mortality was 1.4% in the younger group and 6.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). One year mortality was 3.3% in the younger group and 10.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). There was a significant improvement in all 8 health domains of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.001) in the overall sample. There was no significant difference in change in a majority of HRQOL domains between the younger and the older group (p > 0.05). Logistic multivariate analysis identified a higher values of preoperative PCS (Physical component summary) scores (OR 1.03, CI 1.00 – 1.05, p = 0.0187) and MCS (Mental component summary) scores (OR 1.02, CI 0.997 – 1.00, p = 0.0846) as the only risk factors for potential non-improvement of HRQOL after cardiac surgery after correction for age, gender and type of surgery. Conclusions Older patients with higher operative risk have lower preoperative HRQOL but show a similar improvement in a majority of HRQOL domains after cardiac surgery as compared with younger patients. The multivariate analysis has shown the higher preoperative HRQOL status as a only significant factor of potential non-improvement of postoperative HRQOL. PMID:24618329

  18. Evidence-Based Strategies to Reduce Postoperative Complications in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Bridget; Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructive plastic surgery is vital in assisting patients with reintegration into society after events such as tumor extirpation, trauma, or infection have left them with a deficit of normal tissue. Apart from performing a technically sound operation, the plastic surgeon must stack the odds in the favor of the patient by optimizing them before and after surgery. The surgeon must look beyond the wound, at the entire patient, and apply fundamental principles of patient optimization. This article reviews the evidence behind the principles of patient optimization that are commonly used in reconstructive surgery patients. PMID:26371388

  19. Anterograde Amnesia as a Possible Postoperative Complication of Midazolam as an Agent for Intravenous Conscious Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Malamed, Stanley F.; Nikchevich, Donald; Block, James

    1988-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is often considered to be a beneficial effect of intravenous conscious sedation. The recently introduced benzodiazepine, midazolam, has associated with its administration a significant anterograde amnesic period. In the case presented here, a healthy young female presented for third molar extraction under midazolam conscious sedation and local anesthesia. After uncomplicated removal of the teeth and clinically adequate recovery from sedation, it was noted that the patient had swallowed the postsurgical gauze packs. Efforts at recovery of the gauze packs were futile. Follow-up discussion with the patient revealed a complete lack of recall of all events occurring for up to an hour or more after the administration of intravenous midazolam. The need for written and oral postoperative instructions to both the patient and his/her escort is emphasized. PMID:3166354

  20. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit. PMID:25861890

  1. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of immunomodulators in the treatment of patients with postoperative suppurative-septic complications].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Nikulina, V P

    1996-01-01

    The influence of immunoactive medicines on the cell immunity have been studied. There were differences in reaction to T-activin and Thymalin between various patients with septic postoperative complications. Thymalin stimulated T-cells while acting with immunoglobulins or immune plasmas only. T-activin led to the increase in the number of T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes independently of it's cooperation with the vaccines. The stimulating effect of myelopid demonstrated itself by increase in the number of B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins M and G after 14 days of treatment. The positive clinical effect was more impressive when immunomodulators were used in combinations with the vaccines; still it did not correlate completely with the dynamics of the cell immunity parameters. PMID:8754918

  2. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing screening and pre-operative pulmonary rehabilitation reduce postoperative complications and improve fast-track recovery after lung cancer surgery: A study for 342 cases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ke; Yu, Peng-ming; Su, Jian-hua; He, Cheng-qi; Liu, Lun-xu; Zhou, Yu-bin; Pu, Qiang; Che, Guo-wei

    2015-01-01

    Background An evaluation of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) screening and pre-operative pulmonary rehabilitation in reducing postoperative complications and improving fast-track recovery in high-risk patients who undergo resection for lung cancer. Methods Of 342 potential lung cancer cases, 142 high-risk patients were finally divided into two groups: group R (n = 71) underwent an intensive pre-operative pulmonary rehabilitation program (PRP), followed by lobectomy; group S (n = 71) underwent only lobectomy with conventional management. Postoperative complications, average days in hospital, postoperative days in hospital, and cost were analyzed. Results The 142 high-risk patients were screened by smoking history and CPET. Sixty-eight patients had bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and 47 patients had peak expiratory flow <250?L/minute by CPET. The rate of postoperative total complications in group R (16.90%) was significantly lower than in group S (83.31%) (P = 0.00), as was the rate of postoperative pulmonary complications PPC: group R (12.81%) versus?S (13.55%) (P = 0.009); the PPC in the left lung (17.9%) was higher than in the right lung (2.3%) (P = 0.00). The average days in hospital in group S was significantly higher than in group R (P = 0.03). There was no difference between groups in average hospital cost (P = 0.304). Conclusion Pre-operative screening using CPET is conducive to identifying high-risk patients for lung resection. Pre-operative pulmonary rehabilitation is helpful to reduce postoperative complications and improve fast-track recovery. PMID:26273399

  3. Non-injection-site necrotic skin lesions complicating postoperative heparin thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tassava, Twylla; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2015-08-01

    The patient case we present is a definite case of HIT from both clinical and serological perspectives. The 4Ts score was eventually 8/8 (maximum) based upon thrombocytopenia (88% platelet count fall to nadir of 58 × 109/L), appropriate timing (onset on Day 5 post-intraoperative UFH exposure), thrombosis (right lower limb DVTs, skin necrosis, anaphylactoid reaction to IV heparin, right hallux ischemic necrosis), and no plausible alternative explanation for thrombocytopenia. In addition, the patient had a strong positive SRA and PF4-dependent ELISA. Although necrotizing skin lesions distant from heparin injection sites are not a common consequence of HIT, their occurrence in this patient—along with previous supportive literature [11-13]—indicate that these lesions should be considered rare manifestations of HIT. Moreover, the distinct localization of the unusual necrotic skin rash to the right limb suggests that a low flow state due to the arterial obstruction or perhaps even as a result of an underlying venous thrombus, both of which were present in our patient, could play a key pathophysiological role in predisposing to this unusual complication of HIT. PMID:25808584

  4. Vacuum-assisted closure for open perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In colorectal cancer surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication, and especially, perineal wound complications after abdominoperineal resection (APR) remain to be serious clinical problems. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was first reported in another surgical field in 1997, and it is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. VAC therapy has been recently used for open abdominal wounds. We introduced VAC for treating open perineal wound of APR and report the usefulness of it. Presentation of case We treated four patients. Firstly, in cases 1 and 2, we introduced VAC therapy to the management of SSI of the perineal wound after APR, and it was useful to control postoperative perineal wound infection. And also, in cases 3 and 4, we introduced VAC therapy to prevent perineal wound infection. Perineal wound infection did not happen. Discussion A vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been reported to decrease perineal wound complications including pelvic abscess and open perineal wound; however it results in significant operative blood loss, increased operative time, and additional surgical complications. In our cases, there were no complications relating to VAC therapy and it promoted rapid wound healing. Our results suggested that it is an effective treatment for APR in a high-risk case of an open perineal wound. Conclusion VAC therapy is a less invasive method and a useful treatment for open perineal wound of APR. PMID:25942750

  5. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5 values, and absolute and relative V5 values in male vs. female patients. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine correlations between dosimetric factors. Results: Eighteen (16.4%) of the 110 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications. Two of these died of progressive pneumonia. Hospitalizations were significantly longer for patients with postoperative pulmonary complications than for those without (median, 15 days vs. 11 days, p = 0.003). On univariate analysis, female gender (p = 0.017), higher mean lung dose (p = 0.036), higher relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy (V5) (p = 0.023), and smaller volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5-35 Gy (VS5-VS35) (p < 0.05) were all significantly associated with an increased incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. No other clinical factors were significantly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort. On multivariate analysis, the volume of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5) was the only significant independent factor associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Dosimetric factors but not clinical factors were found to be strongly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation plus surgery. The volume of the lung spared from doses of {>=}5 Gy was the only independent dosimetric factor in multivariate analysis. This suggests that ensuring an adequate volume of lung unexposed to radiation might reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications.

  6. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka ; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

  7. Treatment of Sternal Wound Infection Using a Free Myocutaneous Flap.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Han; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Wang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-11-01

    Deep sternal wound infections are potentially life-threatening complications after cardiac operations because they can spread into the mediastinum and cause postoperative morbidity and mortality. We present a 65-year-old man with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting. A large sternal defect was left after debridement. After brief vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), a free myocutaneous flap of the anterolateral thigh (ALT) was used to fill the dead space. At the 9-month follow-up, the wound had healed completely without tissue loss or complications, and the patient returned to normal life. This was a successful treatment of a deep sternal wound with free flap coverage. PMID:26522542

  8. [Postoperative complications of self-catheterizable continent urinary diversions (Kock, Indiana, and appendiceal Mainz pouch) and patient care].

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Hamaguchi, A; Kageyama, S; Tomoyoshi, T; Kawakita, M; Terai, A; Yoshida, O

    1995-11-01

    A self-catheterizable continent urinary reservoir has become one of the major options for urinary diversion in patients with invasive bladder cancer or other pelvic malignancies. We performed the Kock pouch, the Indiana pouch and the appendiceal Mainz pouch in 124, 51 and 4 patients with the mean followup periods of 50, 33, and 10 months, respectively. In the Kock pouch, the efferent and afferent nipple valve malfunction was seen in 16.7 and 21.3 percent each, requiring repair surgery, such as fixation of the efferent nipple to the pouch wall, reconstruction of an isoperistaltic nipple valve in the former, and removal of the Dacron fabric collar or re-anastomosis of the ureter to the pouch using LeDuc technique in the latter. In the Indiana pouch, stomal stenosis, an hourglass-like pouch deformity, difficult catheterization occurred in 3, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. Among the 4 patients with the appendiceal Mainz pouch, there were no major late postoperative complications except for mild stenosis of the conduit, handled with bougienage. As a whole, surgical revisions, related to urinary diversion, was done in 20.3, 10.6, 0 percent in the Kock, Indiana, Mainz pouch patients, respectively. Stone formation, mostly multiple and recurrent, occurred in 27.8, 6.4, 0 percent in the Kock, Indiana, Mainz pouch, respectively. Most of the stones were removed endoscopically via a stoma or by percutaneous approach. Acidosis was seen in 3 patients in both the Kock and Indiana pouch, and 3 patients with the Kock pouch suffered from symptomatic choleithiasis. At the time of the latest observation, continence was achieved in 90.2, 93.0, and 100 percent, whereas excretory urograms showed normal collecting systems in 64.5, 90.4, and 100 percent in the Kock, Indiana, and Mainz pouch, respectively. In conclusion, the Kock pouch, performed by an original method using unabsorbable polyester fabric collars and metallic staples, has an intolerably high rate of late complications, and either the modified Indiana pouch with ileal patch or the appendiceal Mainz pouch using the umbilicus as a stoma is recommended for a self-catheterization continent urinary diversion. PMID:8533703

  9. Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. . E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Wang, Shulian; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

  10. Effects of Adding Midazolam and Sufentanil to Intrathecal Bupivacaine on Analgesia Quality and Postoperative Complications in Elective Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahpour, Abolfazl; Azadi, Raheleh; Bandari, Razieh; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intrathecal adjutants can be used for regional anesthesia (RA) in cesarean section to improve its quality in terms of time and complications. Some previous studies focused on the effects of adding sufentanil and/or midazolam to bupivacaine and compared each with using bupivacaine alone. However, there has been no study to assess the effects of using sufentanil and midazolam in combination with bupivacaine. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare properties (time of achievement/recovery of sensory/motor blocks; and time to request opium), complications (nausea, vomiting, shivering and hypotension), and neonatal first minute Apgar score with and without the addition of midazolam (M) or sufentanil (S) to bupivacaine (B) through intrathecal injection for spinal anesthesia, after the cesarean section. Patients and Methods: In this double blind randomized clinical trial participants were randomly allocated to three equal groups: Group B (2.5 cc of bupivacaine 0.5% + 1 cc normal saline 0.9%), Group BM (2.5 cc of bupivacaine + 0.02 mg/kg midazolam) and Group BS (2.5 cc of bupivacaine 0.5% + 0.7 cc normal saline 0.9% + 1.5 µg of sufentanil, 0.3 cc). We used analysis of variance (ANOVA), post hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment, and chi-square test for statistical analysis; the analyses were performed using the SPSS-16 software. Given a significant level of 0.05, overall and pair-wise comparisons were made. Results: Seventy-five females participated in the study with no significant age difference (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 28.60 ± 6.06, 28.12 ± 5.29 and 28.76 ± 3.97 year; P = 0.9). Except for “time to motor block recovery” (P = 0.057), the overall differences among the three groups was significant in terms of “time to sensory/motor block” (P < 0.001), “time to sensory block recovery” (P < 0.001), and “time to request opium” (P < 0.001). In all pair-wise comparisons there was no significant difference between the BM and BS group, except for “time to request opium”, which was longer in the BS group (P < 0.001). The occurrence of nausea (P = 0.02), postoperative shivering (P = 0.01) and hypotension (P < 0.001) were significantly different between the groups, unlike vomiting, where the difference was not significant (P = 0.2). All neonates had an Apgar score of nine. Conclusions: The findings showed that adding sufentanil or midazolam to bupivacaine shortens the onset of spinal anesthesia and increases the time duration of anesthesia; however it does not change the motor block recovery time. Adding sufentanil delays the first request for narcotic analgesics while adding midazolam leads to a decrease in nausea and hypotension. Adding sufentanil or midazolam does not have any deleterious effect on infants’ Apgar scores. However, increases shivering in patients. PMID:26473100

  11. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below. PMID:26157306

  12. Local Anaesthetic Infiltration and Indwelling Postoperative Wound Catheters for Patients with Hip Fracture Reduce Death Rates and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Lees, Deborah; A'Court, Jamie; Ankers, Thomas; Harper, Ian; Inman, Dominic; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An analgesic enhanced recovery (ER) protocol for patients with a hip fracture was introduced. It was hypothesised that the ER would reduce pain, length of stay and improve clinical outcomes. The protocol used intraoperative infiltration of levobupivacaine followed by ongoing wound infusions. Methods. Consecutive patients admitted to two hospitals were eligible for the ER protocol. Numerical Reporting Scale pain scores (0–10) were recorded alongside opiate requirements. 434 patients in the ER group (316 full ER, 90 partial ER, and 28 no ER) were compared to a control group (CG) of 100 consecutive patients managed with traditional opiate analgesia. Results. Mean opiate requirement was 49.2?mg (CG) versus 32.5?mg (ER). Pain scores were significantly reduced in the full ER group, p < 0.0001. Direct discharge home and mean acute inpatient stay were significantly reduced (p = 0.0031 and p < 0.0001, resp.). 30-day mortality was 15% (CG) versus 5.5% (ER), p = 0.0024. Conclusions. This analgesic ER protocol for patients with a hip fracture was safe and effective and was associated with reduced inpatient stay and mortality. PMID:26649330

  13. In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

    2012-01-01

    Objective To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Methods Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. Results With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. Conclusions It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated. PMID:23569962

  14. Acute Pulmonary Oedema: A Post-Operative Complication Due to Neostigmine and Post Obstructive Pulmonary Oedema in a Case of Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Durve, Shubhada R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema has been described in relation to perioperative period. The aetiology may be multifactorial and its management poses a challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Its occurrence in a normal healthy person with no other medical history makes the diagnosis difficult. The causes of pulmonary oedema are cardiac failure, fluid overload, airway obstruction, acid aspiration, gas embolism, anaesthetic drugs, sepsis, anaphylactic reaction and reaction to blood & blood products. Early detection, prompt management by an anaesthesiologist will help to prevent further postoperative complications. We report a case of 9-year-old male child, posted for tonsillectomy under general anaesthesia, who developed acute pulmonary oedema following extubation after reversal with neostigmine and how we managed it successfully. PMID:26266194

  15. Anal cushion lifting method is a novel radical management strategy for hemorrhoids that does not involve excision or cause postoperative anal complications

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Gentaro; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ishiyama, Yuji; Nishio, Akihiko; Tarumi, Ken; Kawamura, Maiko; Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Fujimiya, Mineko; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the anal cushion lifting (ACL) method with preliminary clinical results. METHODS: Between January to September 2007, 127 patients who received ACL method for hemorrhoid was investigated with informed consent. In this study, three surgeons who specialized in anorectal surgery performed the procedures. Patients with grade two or more severe hemorrhoids according to Goligher’s classification were considered to be indicated for surgery. The patients were given the choice to undergo either the ACL method or the ligation and excision method. ACL method is an original technique for managing hemorrhoids without excision. After dissecting the anal cushion from the internal sphincter muscle, the anal cushion was lifted to oral side and ligated at the proper position. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients were recorded including complications after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 127 patients were enrolled. Their median age was 42 (19-84) years, and 74.8% were female. In addition, more than 99% of the patients had grade 3 or worse hemorrhoids. The median follow-up period was 26 (0-88) mo, and the median operative time was 15 (4-30) min. After surgery, analgesics were used for a median period of three days (0-21). Pain control was achieved using extra-oral analgesic drugs, although some patients required intravenous injections of analgesic drugs. The median duration of the patients’ postoperative hospital stay was 7 (2-13) d. A total of 10 complications (7.9%) occurred. Bleeding was observed in one patient and was successfully controlled with manual compression. Urinary retention occurred in 6 patients, but it disappeared spontaneously in all cases. Recurrent hemorrhoids developed in 3 patients after 36, 47, and 61 mo, respectively. No anal stenosis or persistent anal pain occurred. CONCLUSION: We consider that the ACL method might be better than all other current methods for managing hemorrhoids. PMID:26525139

  16. Analysis of Complications in Postbariatric Abdominoplasty: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grieco, Michele; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Simonacci, Francesco; Raposio, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominoplasty is one of the most popular body-contouring procedures. It is associated with a significant number of complications: the most common ones are seroma, hematoma, infection, wound-healing problems, and skin flap necrosis. From January 2012 to December 2014, 25 patients (18 women and 7 men) (mean age: 51 years) underwent abdominoplastic surgery at the Plastic Surgery Section, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Italy. All patients reported a weight loss between 15?kg and 47?kg. All of the of 25 patients were included in the study; minor and major complications were seen in 17 (68%) and 8 (32%) patients, respectively. The percentage of complications in our patients was as follows: 9 patients with seroma (36%); 4 patients with wound dehiscence with delayed wound healing (16%); 3 cases with hematoma (12%); 2 patients with postoperative bleeding (8%); 1 patient (4%) with an umbilical necrosis; 1 patient (4%) with a deep vein thrombosis; 3 patients with infected seroma (12%); and 2 patients with wound infection (8%). There were no cases of postoperative mortality. The aim of this study is to analyze our complications in postbariatric abdominoplasty. PMID:26236501

  17. Transoral missile removal from the anterior C1 region following transpharyngeal missile wound.

    PubMed

    He?imovi?, I; Vrankovic, D; Rubin, O; Maksimovic, Z; Rukovanjski, M

    1999-01-01

    We present a successful treatment result in a rare case of low velocity missile transpharyngeal wound to the upper cervical area in a 33-year-old man. There are very few reports concerning related cases, with some disagreement regarding their treatment. The retained missile was successfully removed from the anterior region of the C1 vertebra through a transoral-transpharyngeal approach using the explosive transpharyngeal wound sustained. Neurological status and spine stability were not affected due to the missile's low velocity. The early soft-tissue debridement, missile removal, pharyngeal closure without wound drainage and broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage resulted in an uneventful postoperative course and good long-term outcome. Early surgery is important to prevent complications in such cases. However, the prophylactic tracheostomy, wound drainage and applying of a nasogastric tube could be left to the surgeon's judgment based on the individual patient's respiratory status, intraoperative findings and wound contamination/colonization. PMID:10447636

  18. Is closure of the peritoneal layer necessary in the repair of midline surgical abdominal wounds?

    PubMed

    Hugh, T B; Nankivell, C; Meagher, A P; Li, B

    1990-01-01

    This study describes a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether suture of the peritoneal layer is necessary as a separate step in the closure of midline abdominal surgical wounds. Consecutive patients undergoing abdominal operation--elective and emergency surgery--through a midline abdominal wound were randomized to have the peritoneal layer closed with continuous catgut, or to have this step omitted. The linea alba was closed with interrupted stainless steel sutures, and the skin approximated with staples. Patients were evaluated for wound sepsis, wound dehiscence, and subsequent incisional hernia development. Postoperative pain was assessed by a self-administered visual analogue score, and by measuring narcotic requirements. There was no significant difference in narcotic requirements, pain scores, or wound complications between the 2 groups. Single-layer closure of the abdominal wall is quicker, less costly, and theoretically safer than layered closure, and it is recommended that separate suture of the peritoneum be abandoned. PMID:2139269

  19. Studies on zinc in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Agren, M S

    1990-01-01

    Topical zinc is widely used in wound treatment although the beneficial effect of zinc has only been documented in zinc-deficient patients who were given zinc orally. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of topically applied zinc on leg ulcer healing and examine its effect on some mechanisms in wound healing using standardized animal models. Additionally, absorption of zinc into wounds and intact skin treated topically with zinc was studied. In a double-blind trial involving 37 leg ulcer patients with low serum zinc levels, topical zinc oxide promoted cleansing and re-epithelialization. Infections and deteriorations of ulcers were less common in zinc oxide treated patients. Re-epithelialization, an important mechanism in the closure of leg ulcers, was enhanced with zinc oxide applied topically on partial-thickness wounds in pigs with normal zinc status. Zinc sulfate at three different concentrations did not, however, result in this beneficial effect on the resurfacing of wounds. The inflammatory reaction was diminished in zinc treated wounds except when a high zinc sulfate concentration was applied. Bacterial growth and concomitant diseases such as diabetes can complicate wound healing. In normal rats, bacterial growth in full-thickness wounds was reduced with topical zinc oxide but not in hyperglycemic diabetic rats. The anti-bacterial mechanism of zinc oxide seemed to be more indirect and to be mediated via local defense systems rather than being directly toxic to the bacteria. Healing of 21-day-old skin incisions was impaired in zinc deficiency, as measured by a significantly decreased wound breaking strength in zinc-deficient rats compared with that of pair-fed controls. The decreased breaking strength did not seem to be due to differences in collagen concentration of the wounds. Zinc oxide was slowly but continuously solubilized when applied on open wounds in rats. On the other hand, with zinc sulfate, the zinc concentrations, either locally or systemically, did not maintain a constant level for the 48-hour post-operative treatment period as they did with zinc oxide. Zinc absorption in and through normal human forearm skin was demonstrated after treatment with a zinc oxide medicated occlusive dressing by increased zinc levels in epidermis, interstitial fluid and dermis compared with the non-zinc control dressing. In conclusion, topical zinc may stimulate leg ulcer healing by enhancing re-epithelialization, decreasing inflammation and bacterial growth. When zinc is applied on wounds it not only corrects a local zinc deficit but also acts pharmacologically.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2275309

  20. Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications in Patients With and Without an Obstruction Who Had Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer and Underwent a Single-Stage Operation After Mechanical Bowel Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare postoperative complications for single-stage surgery after mechanical bowel preparation in patients who experienced obstruction and those who did not. Methods From 2000 to 2011, 1,224 patients underwent a single-stage operation for left colorectal cancer after bowel preparation. Nonobstruction (NOB) and obstruction (OB) colorectal cancer patients were 1,053 (86.0%) and 171 (14.0%), respectively. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were compared between groups. Results The OB group had poor preoperative conditions (age, white blood cell, hemoglobin, albumin level, and advanced tumor stage) compared with the NOB group (P < 0.05). Mean on-table lavage time for the OB group was 17.5 minutes (range, 14-60 minutes). Mean operation time for the OB group was statistically longer than that of the NOB group (OB: 210 minutes; range, 120-480 minutes vs. NOB: 180 minutes; range, 60-420 minutes; P < 0.001). Overall morbidity was similar between groups (NOB: 19.7% vs. OB: 23.4%, P = 0.259). Major morbidity was more common in the OB group than in the NOB group, but the difference was without significance (OB: 11.7% vs. NOB: 7.6%, P = 0.070). Postoperative death occurred in 16 patients (1.3%), and death in the OB group (n = 7) was significantly higher than it was in the NOB group (n = 9) (4.1% vs. 0.9%, P = 0.001). Twelve patients had surgical complications, which were the leading cause of postoperative death: postoperative bleeding in five patients and leakage in seven patients. Conclusion Postoperative morbidity for a single-stage operation for obstructive left colorectal cancer is comparable to that for NOB, regardless of poor conditions of the patient. PMID:25580411

  1. Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

  2. Vacuum-assisted closure of necrotic and infected cranial wound with loss of dura mater: A technical note

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osama; Storey, Christopher M.; Zhang, Shihao; Chelly, Marjorie R.; Yeoh, Melvin S.; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complex cranial wounds can be a problematic occurrence for surgeons. Vacuum-assisted closure devices have a wide variety of applications and have recently been used in neurosurgical cases involving complex cranial wounds. There is only one report regarding the use of a vacuum-assisted closure device with loss of dura mater. We report a complicated case of a necrotic cranial wound with loss of dura mater. Case Description: A 68-year-old female underwent an evacuation of a subdural hematoma. Postoperatively, the patient developed a wound infection that required removal of the bone flap. The wound developed a wedge-shaped necrosis of the scalp with exposure of brain tissue due to loss of dura mater from previous surgeries. She underwent debridement and excision of the necrotic tissue with placement of a synthetic dural graft (Durepair®, Medtronic, Inc.) and placement of a wound vac. The patient underwent a latissismus dorsi muscle flap reconstruction that subsequently failed. After the wound vac was replaced, the synthetic dural graft was replaced with a fascia lata graft and an anterolateral thigh free flap reconstruction. We describe the technical nuances of this complicated case, how the obstacles were handled, and the literature that discusses the utility. Conclusion: We describe a case of a complex cranial wound and technical nuances on how to utilize a wound-vac with loss of dura mater. PMID:25657864

  3. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve. PMID:26022525

  4. [State of the immune system in patients with penetrating thoracic and abdominal injuries complicated by massive hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Bulava, G V; Abakumov, M M; Khvatov, V B

    2001-01-01

    Results of immune status examination on day 1-2 and 4-8 after operation in 217 patients with penetrating gunshot and stab-incised wounds of thorax and abdomen were analyzed. Correlation between immunogram and volume of acute hemorrhage was studied. Types of immunograms characteristic of good and complicated postoperative period were determined, their frequency was estimated, that permits to perform substantiated and timely special correction for acceleration of immunorehabilitation and prevention of infectious complications. PMID:11490494

  5. Laparoscopy in trauma: An overview of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kindel, Tammy; Latchana, Nicholas; Swaroop, Mamta; Chaudhry, Umer I; Noria, Sabrena F; Choron, Rachel L; Seamon, Mark J; Lin, Maggie J; Mao, Melissa; Cipolla, James; El Chaar, Maher; Scantling, Dane; Martin, Niels D; Evans, David C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of laparoscopy has provided trauma surgeons with a valuable diagnostic and, at times, therapeutic option. The minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic surgery, combined with potentially quicker postoperative recovery, simplified wound care, as well as a growing number of viable intraoperative therapeutic modalities, presents an attractive alternative for many traumatologists when managing hemodynamically stable patients with selected penetrating and blunt traumatic abdominal injuries. At the same time, laparoscopy has its own unique complication profile. This article provides an overview of potential complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in trauma, focusing on practical aspects of identification and management of laparoscopy-related adverse events. PMID:26557490

  6. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. PMID:22147959

  7. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group. PMID:26310621

  8. Computed tomography of the postoperative abdominal aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, S.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.; Bosniak, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen was performed on 46 patients who had undergone graft replacement of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twelve post-operative complications were found in nine patients. They included hemorrhage, infection, anastomotic pseudoaneurysms, major vessel occlusion, postoperative pancreatitis, and others. The varied apperance of the normal postoperative graft is also presented. It is concluded that CT is a rapid, sensitive, and noninvasive method for detecting or excluding postoperative complications of abdominal aortic surgery.

  9. A single-center experience of hemofiltration treatment for acute aortic dissection (Stanford type A) complicated with postoperative acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Peng; Zhang, Xi-Quan; Pang, Xin-Yan; Cao, Guang-Qing; Fang, Chang-Cun; Wu, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for aortic dissection patients with acute renal failure after surgery in retrospective manner. Methods: A total of thirty-seven aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure accepted CVVH therapy. The effect of CVVH was evaluated by analyzing clinical condition changes and laboratory examination results. Results: After treatment of CVVH, renal function and clinical symptoms were significantly improved in thirty patients. Eight of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within two weeks after CVVH therapy; and twenty-two of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within four weeks after CVVH therapy. Nevertheless, seven patients got no benefit from CVVH therapy with poor prognosis. Conclusion: CVVH is an effective treatment to most aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure. The effect of CVVH was correlated with original renal function, early CVVH therapy, and continuous intensive care. PMID:26550312

  10. Wound dressings for primary and revision total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing post-surgical complications after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is of great importance, and application of an appropriate wound dressing is necessary. Since no dressing encompasses all the parameters required for ideal wound healing, a comparison of the available dressing types can assist the surgeon to choose the best dressing after TJA. Methods Studies evaluating postoperative wound dressings after TJA were reviewed in order to assess the outcomes, complications and costs associated with dressing types. Results Traditional cotton dressings have a high ability to absorb exudate. However, they dry out sooner and there is a risk of pain and additional trauma during dressing changes. Although vapor permeable dressings allow transmission of moisture, but they have low absorptive capacity and require frequent changes even with moderately exudating wounds. On the other hand, hydrofiber and hydrocolloid dressings have high absorptive capacity and permeability, and can cope with exudate production. They are changed less often and have low blistering rates, which may reduce surgical site infection (SSI). Although the unit cost associated with advanced dressings is much higher than the traditional dressings, the decreased rate of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) and the cost associated with treating PJI more than compensate for it. Conclusions Choice of dressing type after TJA should depend upon permeability, absorptive capacity, documented rate of SSI and cost effectiveness with its use, apart from a surgeon’s past clinical experience and familiarity. PMID:26605314

  11. [Complex treatment of patients with purulent-necrotic complications of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Dmytriiev, B I; Demydov, V M; Kotik, Iu M

    2001-08-01

    Biochemical, immunological investigations were performed in dynamics for identification of pathogenic microorganisms in the wound in 375 patients with complicated diabetes mellitus. Content of the APUD-system hormones was determined using radioimmune method. Conservative treatment included administration of insulinum pro injectionibus, plasm, albumin, rheopolyglycine, vitamins, antihypoxants, antibiotics, metronidazole, immunotherapy, dalargin, sandostatinum, D-phenylalanine. In preoperative and postoperative periods were widely applied measures of organism detoxication, physiotherapeutic methods. Original method of xenoskin was applied for closure of the wound and ulcerative defect. Application of proposed method of treatment had permitted to improve its result. PMID:11794096

  12. Renal surgery for kidney cancer in Germany 2005–2006: length of stay, risk of postoperative complications and in-hospital death

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Representative statistics of surgical care among patients with kidney cancer are scant. With the introduction of the diagnosis related group system in Germany, it is now possible to provide nationwide statistics on surgical care. We studied in-hospital mortality risk in relation to comorbidity and complications, length of hospital stay in relation to surgical approach and comorbidity, and risk of complications in relation to surgical approach among kidney cancer patients undergoing nephrectomy. Methods We analyzed the nationwide hospitalization file of the years 2005 and 2006 including 23,753 hospitalizations with a diagnosis of renal cancer and partial or complete nephrectomy and classified comorbidity (Charlson comorbidity index) and complications. Length of stay, risk of in-hospital complications and in-hospital death were analyzed by linear regression and log-linear regression (relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI)). Results The overall in-hospital mortality was 1.4%. Per one unit increase of the Charlson comorbidity index, the adjusted risk of in-hospital mortality increased by 53% (95% CI 47-59%). The risks of bleeding or acute posthaemorrhagic anemia, respiratory, urological and gastrointestinal complications and infections ranged between 1.1% and 2.7% with the exception of bleeding or acute posthaemorrhagic anemia with 18.4%. Complications were associated with an increased adjusted in-hospital mortality risk. Highest adjusted mortality risk ratios were observed for gastrointestinal (RR?=?3.61, 95% CI 2.32-5.63) and urological complications (RR?=?3.62, 95% CI 2.62-5.00). The risk of haemorrhage or acute posthaemorrhagic anemia was lower for total laparoscopic nephrectomies than total open nephrectomies. The adjusted risk of gastrointestinal complications was lower for partial open compared to total open nephrectomy (adjusted RR?=?0.66, 95% CI 0.45-0.97). Total laparoscopic nephrectomy was associated with shorter length of stay (?3.3 days; 95% CI 2.9-3.7 days) compared to total open nephrectomy. The estimated age-adjusted increase of length of stay per one unit increase of the Charlson comorbidity index was 1.3 days (95% CI 1.2-1.4 days). Conclusions In this representative population-based analysis, we found that the surgical approach is associated with the risk of complications and length of hospital stay. Furthermore, in the era of ageing populations, renal cancer patients with comorbidities should be counseled about their increased in-hospital mortality risk. PMID:25217295

  13. Postoperative morbidity survey, mortality and length of stay following emergency laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Howes, T E; Cook, T M; Corrigan, L J; Dalton, S J; Richards, S K; Peden, C J

    2015-09-01

    Thirty-day mortality following emergency laparotomy is high, and greater amongst elderly patients. Studies systematically describing peri-operative complications are sparse, and heterogeneous. We used the postoperative morbidity survey to describe the type and frequency of complications, and their relationship with outcomes for 144 patients: 114 < 80 years old, and 30 ? 80 years old. Cumulative postoperative morbidity survey scores and patterns of morbidity were similar (p = 0.454); however, 28-day mortality was higher in the elderly (10/30 (33.3%) vs. 11/114 (9.6%), p = 0.008), and hospital stay was longer (median (IQR [range]) 17 (13-35 [6-62]) days vs. 11 (7-21 [2-159]) days, p = 0.006). Regression analysis indicated that cardiovascular, haematological, renal and wound complications were associated with longer hospital stay, and that cardiovascular complications predicted mortality. The postoperative morbidity survey system enabled structured mapping of the number and type of complications, and their relationship with outcome, following emergency laparotomy. These results indicate that rather than a greater propensity to complications following surgery, it was the failure to tolerate these that increased mortality in the elderly. PMID:25872411

  14. Puncture Wounds

    MedlinePLUS

    The official consumer website of: Visit ACFAS.org | About ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Puncture Wounds Text Size Print Bookmark Puncture Wounds What Is a Puncture Wound? Puncture wounds are not the same as cuts. A puncture ...

  15. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  16. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  17. Wound surgery.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael D

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the concepts behind, and practice of, wound surgery. The techniques of wound surgery, born of necessity in the art of military surgeons, have found their renaissance in the modern age of wound care driven by the economic and functional considerations inherent to the outcome-based management of chronic disease. Over 300 years of literature on wound healing has shown an innate ability of the wound (in the absence of infection and repeated trauma) to control its progress, largely through the local inflammatory cells. This article discusses several historical works on wound surgery and healing, topical wound therapy, minimal intervention, and emphasizes the closure of chronic wounds. PMID:21074031

  18. Postoperative Spinal Wound Infections and Postprocedural Diskitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Vives, Michael J; Basra, Sushil K; Reiter, Mitchell F

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Postprocedural infections are a significant cause of morbidity after spinal interventions. Methods: Literature review. An extensive literature review was conducted on postprocedural spinal infections. Relevant articles were reviewed in detail and additional case images were included. Results: Clinical findings, laboratory markers, and imaging modalities play important roles in the detection of postprocedural spinal infections. Treatment may range from biopsy and antibiotics to multiple operations with complex strategies for soft tissue management. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postprocedural spinal infections and limiting their long-term sequelae. PMID:18092559

  19. Current concepts in negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Howe, Lisa M

    2015-05-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming recognized in veterinary medicine as a viable option for the management of complex wounds. NPWT has many advantages over traditional wound care and results in quicker and improved wound healing in many instances. This article discusses the art and science of NPWT, as well as the many current indications, complications, advantages and disadvantages, and future directions of NPWT in small animal veterinary medicine. This therapy will likely have a growing role in veterinary medical practice for complicated wound management and other usages in coming years. PMID:25744142

  20. Periarticular Injection with Bupivacaine for Postoperative Pain Control in Total Knee Replacement: A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yuenyongviwat, Varah; Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Chinachoti, Thitima; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2012-01-01

    Background. Local periarticular injection with bupivacaine alone in TKA has not been studied. Thus, we aimed to examine the effectiveness of local periarticular injection with bupivacaine for post-operative pain control in TKA. Method. Sixty patients undergoing TKA by a single surgeon were randomly assigned into two groups in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In the injection group, patients received periarticular injections with 0.25% bupivacaine before wound closure; in the control group, patients received a 0.9% normal saline injection. Both groups received the same anesthetic procedure, post-operative pain control, and rehabilitation protocol. Results. There was a significant reduction in post-operative morphine consumption in the first six hours after the operation (mean 0.9?mg and 2.43?mg, P = 0.01), but there was no significant difference in post-operative morphine consumption between six hours and ninety-six hours after the operation, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, morphine side effects during the first 96 hours, length of hospital stay, or complications from morphine consumption. Conclusion. Local periarticular injection with bupivacaine alone before wound closer was shown to be an effective method to improve pain control after TKA with a few complications and ease of use. PMID:23125936

  1. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, D L; Plopper, C; Terra, R M

    1999-06-01

    Surgical trauma induces complex physiologic changes that lead to catabolism and loss of body cell mass. This reaction is usually mild but can be exacerbated by previous malnutrition and postoperative complications. To avoid severe metabolic distress, nutritional therapy may be prescribed, using the enteral route whenever possible. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is indicated for patients already receiving TPN preoperatively, those severely malnourished prior to major surgery, those unable to eat satisfactorily for 7 days, or patients presenting with severe complications. Postoperative TPN should last for at least 7 days. The total energy requirements are between 30 and 35 kcal/kg/day. About 50% to 70% should be provided in the form of carbohydrates, and 20% to 30% in the form of lipids. The optimal input rates for glucose and lipids are 4 to 5 g/kg/day and 80 mg/kg/hr, respectively. The ideal nitrogen administration is 250 to 300 mg/kg/day, and the optimal calorie/nitrogen ratio is 150 to 200. Some specific amino acids can be added as intravenous dipeptides. An adequate follow-up must include clinical and biochemical parameters. Several trials evaluated the impact of TPN in postoperative patients, but further well designed, controlled clinical trials are still necessary to address a great number of unanswered questions. PMID:10227924

  2. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  3. The Impact of Obesity on Complications of Elbow, Forearm, and Hand Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    London, Daniel A.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Lalchandani, Gopal R.; Okoroafor, Ugochi C.; Wildes, Troy S.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rates of postoperative complications in obese and non-obese patients following elbow, forearm, and hand surgeries. Methods: This case-control study examined 436 patients whose body mass index (BMI) was over 35 and who underwent hand, wrist, forearm, or elbow surgery between 2009-2013. Controls were patients (n=433) with a BMI<30 who had similar surgeries over the same period, and frequency-matched by type of surgery (i.e., bony, soft tissue, or nerve), age, and sex. Postoperative complications were defined as infection requiring antibiotic or reoperation, delayed incision healing, nerve dysfunction, wound dehiscence, hematoma, and other reoperation. Medical comorbidities (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, stroke, vascular disease, kidney disease, and liver disease) were recorded. Chi-square analyses were performed to explore the association between obesity and postoperative complications. Similar analyses were performed stratified by surgery type and BMI classification. Logistic regression modeling was performed to identify predictors of postoperative complications accounting for surgery type, BMI, the presence of comorbidities, patient age, and patient sex. This same model was also run separately for case and control patients. Results: The overall complication rate was 8.7% with similar rates between obese and non-obese patients (8.5% vs 9.0%). Bony procedures resulted in the greatest risk of complication in both groups (15% each group). Multivariate analysis confirmed surgery type as the only significant predictor of complications for non-obese patients. However, among obese patients, both bony surgery and increasing BMI were associated with greater complication rates. Discussion: Not all obese patients appear to be at any higher risk for complications after elbow, forearm, and hand surgery compared to non-obese patients. However, there appears to be a dose-dependent effect of BMI among obese patients such that increasing-obesity heightens the risk of complications, especially for those with a BMI greater than 45. Level of Evidence: Prognostic, Level II PMID:24975260

  4. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  5. Skin substitutes based on allogenic fibroblasts or keratinocytes for chronic wounds not responding to conventional therapy: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Rapisarda, Vicenzo; Somalvico, Francesco; Scotti, Andrea; Russo, Giulia Lo; Ciancio, Francesco; Sgrò, Arturo; Nebuloni, Manuela; Allevi, Raffaele; Torre, Maria L; Trabucchi, Emilio; Marazzi, Mario

    2014-02-12

    Chronic wounds are an expression of underlying complex pathologies and have a high incidence. Skin substitutes may represent an alternative approach to treat chronic ulcers. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to evaluate the wound reduction using skin substitutes based on allogenic fibroblasts or keratinocytes in 30 patients not responding to conventional therapy. Wound bed was prepared, then keratinocytes on Laserskin(®) to treat superficial wounds or fibroblasts on Hyalograft 3D(R) to treat deep leg ulcers were applied, and finally wounds were treated with a secondary dressing composed of nanocrystalline silver. Once a week constructs were removed and new bioengineered products were applied, as well as nanocrystalline silver medication. In none of the cases under examination did any complications arise relating to the treatment. We also achieved a reduction in wound dimension and exudates, and an increase in wound bed score. Postoperative assessment shows a degree of healing that is statistically higher in the group treated with keratinocytes as compared with the fibroblast group. This retrospective study improves our understanding and defines the clinical indications for the various uses of the two types of skin substitutes. PMID:24517418

  6. Wound healing.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, H; Fewkes, J

    1995-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic biologic process of repairing insults to the integumentary system. It is commonly divided into three phases: inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation. Each phase has unique cellular and substance constituents without which it cannot progress normally. A large variety of factors may influence any part of wound healing, including local factors such as bacteria, oxygen tension, and bleeding, and systemic factors such as the mental and physical health of the patient. There are also extrinsic factors that can be influenced by the caretakers of the wound to enhance wound healing. Areas of intervention include using antiseptic technique when one is dealing with the wound, using good surgical technique, choosing the appropriate wounding method and repair for the individual patient, and using antibiotics and special wound dressings. Modern science and technology are giving us new insights into wound healing and leading us to exciting new ways of influencing it, including the topical use of growth factors, artificial skins, cultured epithelium with and without dermal components, and electrical stimulation. The future of wound healing holds a better understanding of the complexities of the physiologic events that occur and a translation of that into a biologically active and interactive wound care. PMID:7794680

  7. Autologous Platelet Gel Fails to Show Beneficial Effects on Wound Healing after Saphenectomy in CABG Patients

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, Dirk; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Haardt, Helmut; Laczkovics, Axel; Reber, Delawer

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Wound healing impairment in the leg after removal of the saphenous vein within the framework of a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation represents a clinically significant problem. Patients suffer from this complication, and treatment of the wounds is costly in terms of both time and money. No method is known to date that reliably prevents postoperative wound healing disturbances. The effect of autologous platelet gel to stimulate wound healing is known from various medical disciplines. Within a prospective randomized study, we wanted to determine whether intraoperative use of autologous platelet gel on the leg during a CABG operation could reduce the incidence of postoperative wound healing disturbances. The application group (AG) included 35 patients and was compared to a control group (CG) that also had 35 patients. The platelet gel, as well as the thrombin required to activate the platelets, was prepared from autologous patient blood during the operation. Validation of the platelet gel comprised measurement of the growth factors platelet–derived growth factor AB (PDGF AB) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), as well as the thrombocyte and leukocyte counts. Wound healing was photographically documented after surgery, and the patients were contacted by telephone on day 50 after surgery to obtain information on wound healing status. After cell separation, the platelet count was 1616 ± 845/?L, which is higher than in whole blood by a factor of 7.1 ± 2.0, with a platelet yield of 47.0% ± 13.2%. The PDGF AB concentration after activation of the platelets was raised by a median factor of 158 and EGF by a median factor of 64 compared with whole blood. During the primary clinical stay, no statistically significant differences were recorded in the number of hematomas, postoperative leg swelling, or pain level. Large-area hematomas were less frequent in the application group (AG, 29.4% vs. CG, 60%, p = .007). In the follow-up 51 ± 9 days after surgery, 17.6% (6/34) of the patients from the AG and 31.4% (11/35) of the patients from the CG showed leg wound healing disturbances (p = .184). Using the cell separation system, a biological product that contains high concentrations of platelets, leukocytes, and growth factors can be prepared reproducibly. Despite optimum application of the autologous platelet gel to the wound, no clinically relevant differences were found between the groups, either during the primary clinic stay or in the follow-up period. PMID:18853833

  8. Postoperative Epidural Hematomas in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Arnold, Paul M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural hematomas are rare complications following lumbar spine surgery, but if they are not quickly identified and treated they can lead to permanent neurological deficits. Epidural hematomas occur in approximately 0.10%-0.24% of all spine surgeries, and despite the fact that multiple large studies have been performed attempting to identify risk factors for this complication, there is still significant debate about the effect of subfascial drains, postoperative anticoagulation, and antiplatelet medication on the incidence of postoperative hematoma. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of patients who develop a postoperative lumbar epidural hematoma. PMID:26484502

  9. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-29

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  10. Murine Model of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Louise; Prosser, Hamish C. G; Tan, Joanne T. M.; Vanags, Laura Z.; Ng, Martin K. C.; Bursill, Christina A.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing and repair are the most complex biological processes that occur in human life. After injury, multiple biological pathways become activated. Impaired wound healing, which occurs in diabetic patients for example, can lead to severe unfavorable outcomes such as amputation. There is, therefore, an increasing impetus to develop novel agents that promote wound repair. The testing of these has been limited to large animal models such as swine, which are often impractical. Mice represent the ideal preclinical model, as they are economical and amenable to genetic manipulation, which allows for mechanistic investigation. However, wound healing in a mouse is fundamentally different to that of humans as it primarily occurs via contraction. Our murine model overcomes this by incorporating a splint around the wound. By splinting the wound, the repair process is then dependent on epithelialization, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, which closely mirror the biological processes of human wound healing. Whilst requiring consistency and care, this murine model does not involve complicated surgical techniques and allows for the robust testing of promising agents that may, for example, promote angiogenesis or inhibit inflammation. Furthermore, each mouse acts as its own control as two wounds are prepared, enabling the application of both the test compound and the vehicle control on the same animal. In conclusion, we demonstrate a practical, easy-to-learn, and robust model of wound healing, which is comparable to that of humans. PMID:23748713

  11. Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two methods of securing skin grafts using negative pressure wound therapy: vacuum-assisted closure and gauze suction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Q; Franczyk, Mieczyslawa; Lee, Justine C; Greives, Matthew R; O'Connor, Annemarie; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionized the management of complicated wounds and has contributed an additional modality for securing split thickness skin grafts (STSG). The standard for NPWT is the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device. The authors' institution has accumulated experience using standard gauze sealed with an occlusive dressing and wall suction (GSUC) as their primary mode for NPWT. The authors report a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of the GSUC vs the VAC in securing STSG. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in 157 wounds in 104 patients requiring STSG from August 2009 to July 2012. All wounds were randomized to VAC or GSUC treatment and assessed for skin graft adherence/take. At postoperative day 4 or 5, NPWT was discontinued, and the size of the graft and any nonadherent areas were measured and recorded. Concomitant comorbidities, wound location, etiology, study failures, and reoperative rates were also reviewed. In all, 77 and 80 wounds were randomized to the GSUC and VAC study arms. Patient demographics were similar between both groups in terms of age, sex, comorbidities, etiology, and wound location. In all, 64 of 80 wounds in the GSUC group and 60 of 77 wounds in the VAC group had full take of the skin graft by postoperative day 4 or 5 (P = .80). The mean percent take in the GSUC group was 96.12% vs 96.21% in the VAC arm (P = .98). The use of NPWT in securing STSG is a useful method to promote adherence and healing. This study demonstrates that a low-cost, readily accessible system utilizing gauze dressings and wall suction (GSUC) results in comparable skin graft take in comparison to the VAC device. PMID:25162948

  12. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  13. The role of postoperative prophylactic antibiotics in the treatment of facial fractures: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical study. Part 3: Le Fort and zygomatic fractures in 94 patients.

    PubMed

    Soong, Poh Luon; Schaller, Benoit; Zix, Jürgen; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Mottini, Matthias; Lieger, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference between the effect of a 5-day and a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotics on the incidence of infection after midfacial fractures. A total of 98 patients with displaced Le Fort or zygomatic fractures that required operation were randomly assigned into 2 groups, both of which were given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1.2g intravenously every 8h from the time of admission until 24h postoperatively. The 5-day group was then given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 625 mg orally 8-hourly for another 4 days. The 1-day group was given placebo orally at the same time points. Patients were followed up 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks, and 6 months, postoperatively. The development of an infection of the wound was the primary end point. Ninety-four of the 98 patients completed the study. Two of the 45 patients in the 5-day group (4%) and 2/49 in the 1-day group (4%) developed postoperative wound infections. One in each group had a purulent infection, while the others had only wound breakdown. Two patients of the 5-day group and one in the 1-day group developed rashes on the trunk. There were no significant differences in the incidence of infection or side effects between the groups. In midfacial fractures a 1-day course of antibiotics postoperatively is as effective in preventing infective complications as a 5-day regimen. PMID:24602602

  14. The association between gastrostomy tube placement, poor post-operative outcomes, and hospital re-admissions in head and neck cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ashley C.; Worley, Mitchell; Ackall, Feras; D'Agostino, Ralph; Waltonen, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Investigate the relationship of G-tube placement timing on post-operative outcomes. Participants 908 patients underwent resection of head and neck upper aerodigestive tract tumors between 2007 and 2013. Patient charts were retrospectively screened for patient demographics, pre-operative nutrition variables, co-morbid conditions, Tumor-Node-Metastasis staging, surgical treatment type, and timing of G-tube placement. Exclusionary criteria included death within the first three months of the resection and resections performed solely for nodal disease. Main Outcomes Post-surgical outcomes, including wound and medical complications, hospital re-admissions, length of inpatient hospital stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) time. Results 793 surgeries were included: 8% of patients had G-tubes pre-operatively and 25% had G-tubes placed post-operatively. Patients with G-tubes (pre-operative or post-operative) were more likely to have complications and prolonged hospital care as compared to those without G-tubes (p < 0.001). Patients with pre-operative G-tubes had shortened length of stay (p = 0.007), less weight loss (p = 0.03), and fewer wound care needs (p < 0.0001), when compared to those that received G-tubes post-operatively. Those with G-tubes placed post-operatively had worse outcomes in all categories, except pre-operative BMI. Conclusions Though having enteral access in the form of a G-tube at any point suggests a more high risk patient, having a G-tube placed in the pre-operative period may protect against poor post-operative outcomes. Post-operative outcomes can be predicted based on patient characteristics available to the physician in the pre-operative period. PMID:26321115

  15. The Outcome of Using Closed Suction Wound Drains in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Waly, Feras; Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Abduljabbar, Fahad H.; Landry, Tara; Ouellet, Jean; Moran, Kathryn; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Objective?Determine whether closed suction wound drains decrease the incidence of postoperative complications compared with no drain use in patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Methods?Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched up through January 22, 2015, to identify studies comparing the use of closed suction wound drains with no drains in spine surgery for lumbar degenerative conditions. Outcomes assessed included the cumulative incidence of epidural hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, and postoperative blood transfusion. The overall strength of evidence across studies was based on precepts outlined by the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. Results?Five heterogeneous studies, three randomized controlled trials, and two cohort studies form the evidence basis for this report. There was no difference in the incidence of hematoma, superficial wound infection, or deep infection in patients with compared with patients without closed suction wound drains after lumbar surgery. The upper bounds of the 95% confidence interval for hematoma ranged from 1.1 to 16.7%; for superficial infection, 1.0 to 7.3%; and for deep infection, 1.0 to 7.1%. One observational study reported a 3.5-fold increase in the risk of blood transfusion in patients with a drain. The overall strength of evidence for these findings is considered low or insufficient. Conclusions?Conclusions from this systematic review are limited by the quality of included studies that assessed the use of closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgeries for degenerative conditions. We believe that spine surgeons should not routinely rely on closed suction wound drains in lumbar spine surgery until a higher level of evidence becomes available to support its use. PMID:26682098

  16. Contemporary demographics and complications of patients treated for open ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Madanat, Rami; Honkamaa, Maija; Mäkinen, Tatu J

    2015-08-01

    Open ankle fractures are rare injuries with a high likelihood of wound complications and subsequent infections. There is limited information about the complications and outcomes of these injuries in different age groups. The aim of this study was to assess the contemporary demographics and complications related to this injury. We performed a chart review of all the 3030 patients treated for ankle fractures at a Level 1 trauma centre from 2006 to 2011. 137 (4.5%) patients had an open ankle fracture. The demographic data, injury mechanism, comorbidities, and fracture type were collected. Treatment, complications, length of stay and number of outpatient visits were also recorded. The mean age of the patients was 60 years and 56% were women. Most fractures were Weber type B with a medial sided wound (93%). Only 20% of the fractures were the result of high-energy trauma, and 31% were Gustilo grade III injuries. Immediate internal fixation was performed in 82% of patients, and the wound was primarily closed in most cases (80%). The incidence of postoperative wound necrosis and deep infection was 18% and 17%, respectively. There were more deep infections if pulsatile lavage was used during the wound debridement (p=0.029). About 14 (10%) patients required a flap reconstruction to cover the soft-tissue defect. Every other patient (54%) had a complication, and 21 patients (15%) suffered a long-term disability related to the injury. The number complications did not differ for nighttime and daytime operations (p=0.083). High-energy injuries were more common in younger patients (p<0.001) and these patients also had more lateral sided open wounds than older patients (p=0.002). Interestingly, younger patients also had significantly more complications (p=0.024), suffered more often from chronic pain (p=0.003), and required more flap reconstructions (p=0.026), reoperations (p=0.026), and outpatient clinic visits (p=0.006). Open ankle fractures have a high complication rate and often require multiple surgical procedures. In young patients these injuries are more likely to be the consequence of high-energy trauma leading to more complications and subsequently increased healthcare resource utilisation. PMID:25935358

  17. Effect of Preoperative Biliary Drainage on Complications Following Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinting; Ou, Guangsheng; Lian, Guoda; Luo, Hui; Huang, Kaihong; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) prior to pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is still controversial; therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of PBD on complications following PD. A meta-analysis was carried out for all relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), prospective and retrospective studies published from inception to March 2015 that compared PBD and non-PBD (immediate surgery) for the development of postoperative complications in PD patients. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using fixed-effect analyses, or random-effects analyses if there was statistically significant heterogeneity (P?complication (OR 1.52, CI 1.07 to 2.17; P?=?0.02), wound infection (OR 2.09, CI 1.39 to 3.13; P?=?0.0004), and delayed gastric emptying (DGE) (OR 1.37, CI 1.08 to 1.73; P?=?0.009). This meta-analysis suggests that biliary drainage before PD increased postoperative infectious complication, wound infection, and DGE. In light of the results of the study, PBD probably should not be routinely carried out in PD patients. PMID:26200634

  18. Asymptomatic gunshot wound to the heart with retained intracardiac pellet.

    PubMed

    Mills, Erin E; Birnbaum, Peter L; Davis, James W

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old man was transferred to our institution with multiple penetrating thoracoabdominal wounds from a shotgun. Imaging revealed several retained shotgun pellets, 1 of which appeared to be located in the left atrium. He was asymptomatic from a cardiac standpoint and was first taken to the operating room to manage his multiple abdominal injuries. Neither an intraoperative echocardiogram nor a formal postoperative echocardiogram definitively determined pellet location (myocardium versus chamber). Because of concerns for pellet embolus from left atrial positioning, the patient was returned to the operating room. After placing the patient on cardiopulmonary bypass, the pellet was identified within the wall of the left atrium and was successfully removed without complication. PMID:24384215

  19. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

  20. Local flap therapy for the treatment of pressure sore wounds.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Reto; Tremp, Mathias; Baumberger, Michael; Schaefer, Dirk J; Kalbermatten, Daniel F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary cooperation between conservative and surgical disciplines for the treatment of pressure sores (PS). From January 2004 to December 2005, a single-centre study was performed with paraplegic and tetraplegic patients presenting with PS grades III-V. Outcome measures were defect size, grade, method of reconstruction, complication and recurrence rate as well as average length of hospitalisation. A total of 119 patients aged 22-84?years with totally 170 PS were included. The most common PS were located in the ischial region (47%), followed by the sacral (18%), trochanteric (11%), foot (9%) and the malleolar (8%) regions. Defect sizes ranged between 4 and 255?cm(2) . Grade IV was the most common PS (68%), followed by grade III (30%) and grade V (2%) PS. For wound closure, fasciocutaneous flaps were used most frequently (71%), followed by skin grafts (10%) and myocutaneous flaps (7%). Postoperative follow-up ranged between 6 and 38?months. The overall complication and recurrence rate was 26% and 11%, respectively. If no complication occurred, the average duration of hospitalisation stay after the first debridement was 98?±?62?days. In conclusion, our treatment concept is reliable, effective and results in a low recurrence rate. The complication rate, even though favourable when compared with the literature, still needs to be improved. PMID:24131657

  1. Abdominal gunshot wounds. An urban trauma center's experience with 300 consecutive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, D V; Burch, J M; Spjut-Patrinely, V; Mattox, K L; Jordan, G L

    1988-01-01

    From July 1983 through December 1987, 300 consecutive patients with penetrating gunshot wounds of the abdomen causing visceral or vascular injuries were treated. Resuscitative thoracotomy was required in 20 patients (6.6%), and only two survived. The most commonly injured organs were the small bowel (60%), colon (41.6%), liver (29.3%), vascular structures (24.6%), stomach (17.3%), and kidney (17.0%). The overall survival rate for the series was 88.3%; however, if only the 226 patients without vascular injuries are considered, the survival rate was 97.3%. In the 35 patients who died, the blood pressure on admission was 51 mmHg, 18 required a resuscitative thoracotomy, four visceral or vascular injuries were present, and the median blood replacement was 18 units. The cause of death was perioperative shock in 30 patients (85.7%), whereas five patients (14.3%) died of sepsis and multiple organ failure. The most common postoperative complication in survivors and patients who died later in the study was an intra-abdominal abscess (3.0%). Rapid conservative operative techniques for civilian gunshot wounds leads to few postoperative complications and an excellent survival rate, especially if vascular injuries are not present. PMID:3421760

  2. Complications and morbidity following breast reconstruction--a review of 16,063 cases from the 2005-2010 NSQIP datasets.

    PubMed

    Fischer, John P; Nelson, Jonas A; Au, Alexander; Tuggle, C T; Serletti, Joseph M; Wu, Liza C

    2014-04-01

    Post-operative complications pose a significant set-back for patients undergoing breast reconstruction. This study aims to characterize factors associated with postoperative complications following breast reconstruction using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database from 2005-2010. The 2005-2010 ACS-NSQIP databases were reviewed, identifying encounters for CPT codes including either implant-based reconstruction (immediate, delayed, and tissue expander) or autologous reconstruction (pedicled transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous (TRAM), free TRAM, and latissimus dorsi flap with or without implant). Complications were characterized into three categories: major surgical complications, wound complications, and medical complications. During the study period 16,063 breast reconstructions were performed. Autologous reconstructions were performed in 20.7% of patients and implant-based in 79.3%. The incidence of major surgical complications was 8.4%, whereas the incidence of medical and wound complications was 1.6% and 3.5%, respectively. Independent risk factors for major surgical complications included: immediate and autologous reconstructions, obesity, smoking, previous percutaneous cardiac surgery (PCS), recent weight loss, bleeding disorder, recent surgery, ASA ? 3, intra-operative transfusion, and prolonged operative times. Risk factors for medical complications included: autologous reconstruction, obesity, tumor involving CNS, bleeding disorders, recent surgery, ASA ? 3, intra-operative transfusion, and prolonged operative times. This study characterizes the incidence of surgical and medical complications following breast reconstruction using a large, prospective multicentre dataset. Key identifiable risk factors associated with both surgical and medical morbidity included: autologous breast reconstruction, obesity, ASA ? 3, bleeding disorders, and prolonged operative time. Data derived from this cohort can be used to risk-stratify patients and to enhance perioperative decision-making. PMID:23865900

  3. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  4. Gunshot wounds: 2. Radiology.

    PubMed

    Hollerman, J J; Fackler, M L; Coldwell, D M; Ben-Menachem, Y

    1990-10-01

    Radiologists can contribute substantially to the evaluation and treatment of the patient with a gunshot wound. Plain films, CT, angiography, and sometimes MR imaging are used to localize the missile, determine what path it followed in the body, assess missile and bone fragmentation, and identify missile emboli. If the peritoneal cavity was entered by a bullet, a laparotomy is required. Missiles subject to magnetic forces can complicate MR imaging. Certain locations of missile fragments predispose to lead poisoning or lead arthropathy. Angiography is useful for both diagnosis and treatment. Both angiographic hemostasis and percutaneous foreign body removal may be used. PMID:2119096

  5. A retrospective analysis of early and late term complications in patients who underwent application of retention sutures for gastrointestinal tract malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Bar??; Özemir, ?brahim Ali; Sa??ro?lu, Julide; Demiral, Gökhan; Çelik, Yahya; Aslan, Sinan; Tombalak, Ercüment; Y?lmaz, Ahmet; Yi?itba??, Rafet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Complications associated with wound healing after abdominal tumor operations continue to be a significant problem. This study aimed to determine the significance of retention sutures in preventing these complications. For this purpose, early and late term results of patients who underwent application of polydioxanone (PDS) and additional retention sutures for abdominal closure were retrospectively evaluated. Material and Methods: Clinical files of 172 patients who were operated due to gastrointestinal tract malignancies in our clinic between January 2007 and January 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients in whom the fascia was repaired only with PDS (Group 1) were compared to patients in whom the fascia was repaired with PDS and retention sutures (Group 2) in terms of age, gender, postoperative evisceration-wound infection (<1 month), incisional hernia (>1 month), incision type, co-morbid factors, and operative time. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age or gender (p=0.680 and p=0.763). No significant difference was detected in terms of postoperative incisional hernia (p=0.064). Evisceration and post-operative wound infection were significantly lower in Group 2 as compared to Group 1 (p=0.008 and p=0.002). Operative time was significantly longer in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p<0.0001). Co-morbid features were significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p<0.0001). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of incision type (p=0.743). Conclusion: In the presence of co-morbid factors that disrupt wound healing in surgical patients with gastrointestinal malignancy, retention suture can be safely used as a supplement for optimal wound care. PMID:25931939

  6. Exploring Predictors of Complication in Older Surgical Patients: A Deficit Accumulation Index and the Braden Scale

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rachel-Rose; Lagoo-Deenadayalan, Sandhya A.; Heflin, Mitchell T.; Sloane, Richard; Eisen, Irvin; Thacker, Julie M.; Whitson, Heather E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether readily collected perioperative information might identify older surgical patients at higher risk for complication. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study SETTING Medical chart review at a single academic institution PARTICIPANTS 102 patients aged 65 years and older who underwent abdominal surgery between January 2007 and December 2009. MEASUREMENTS Primary predictor variables were the first postoperative Braden Scale score (within 24 hours of surgery) and a Deficit Accumulation Index (DAI) constructed based on 39 available preoperative variables. The primary outcome was presence or absence of complication within 30 days of surgery date. RESULTS Of 102 patients, 64 experienced at least one complication with wound infection being the most common complication. In models adjusted for age, race, sex, and open vs. laparoscopic surgery, lower Braden Scale scores were predictive of 30-day postoperative complication (OR 1.30 [CI 95%, 1.06, 1.60]), longer length of stay (â = 1.44 (0.25) days; pvalue = ? 0.0001) and discharge to institution rather than home (OR 1.23 [CI 95%, 1.02, 1.48]). The cut-off value for the Braden Score with the highest predictive value for complication was ? 18 (OR 3.63 [CI 95%, 1.43, 9.19]; c statistic of 0.744). The DAI and several traditional surgical risk factors were not significantly associated with 30-day postoperative complications in this cohort. CONCLUSION This is the first study to identify the perioperative score on the Braden Scale, a widely used risk-stratifier for pressure ulcers, as an independent predictor of other adverse outcomes in geriatric surgical patients. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding as well as investigate other utilizations for this tool, which correlates well to phenotypic models of frailty. PMID:22906222

  7. A mathematical model of ischemic cutaneous wounds

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chuan; Friedman, Avner; Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a major public health problem affecting 6.5 million people in the United States. Ischemia, primarily caused by peripheral artery diseases, represents a major complicating factor in cutaneous wound healing. In this work, we sought to develop a mathematical model of ischemic dermal wounds. The model consists of a coupled system of partial differential equations in the partially healed region, with the wound boundary as a free boundary. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is assumed to be viscoelastic, and the free boundary moves with the velocity of the ECM at the boundary. The model equations involve the concentration of oxygen, PDGF and VEGF, the densities of macrophages, fibroblasts, capillary tips and sprouts, and the density and velocity of the ECM. Simulations of the model demonstrate how ischemic conditions may limit macrophage recruitment to the wound-site and impair wound closure. The results are in general agreement with experimental findings. PMID:19805373

  8. A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. Methods: A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 2007–2012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. Results: The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (p<0.0001). There were no substantial changes in the patient population risk factors over this time. As a result of the changes in incision management practice, a total of 92 cesarean post-operative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Conclusion: Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI. PMID:25826622

  9. Postoperative protein sparing.

    PubMed

    Wilmore, D W

    1999-06-01

    Postoperative nitrogen sparing refers to a therapy that decreases net nitrogen loss from the body following an operation. Protein sparing has long been regarded as a surrogate marker for improved outcome, but a critical review of the evidence indicates that this relation is difficult to establish, especially in the short term. Thus, specific endpoints that evaluate outcome are needed to determine the efficacy of a specific therapy that spares protein. Cost effectiveness must also be considered. A variety of therapies were evaluated using protein-sparing, efficiency, and cost criteria. Evidence was reviewed for glucose, amino acids, parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition, growth hormone, and glutamine administered during the perioperative period. Only three areas could be identified that spared nitrogen and provided efficacy: (1) preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 7 to 10 days before operation in a depleted patient (wound healing (especially in burns) and possibly to enhance muscle strength (particularly in the elderly); and (3) the use of glutamine-supplemented TPN in severely ill surgical patients to decrease mortality. The issue of early tube feeding in trauma patients is still confusing. This therapy must be evaluated by an appropriate study in trauma patients that compares a tube-fed group with an unfed control group. Only by demonstrating improved outcomes and enhanced cost saving with our protein-sparing therapy can we continue to enhance the care of our surgical patients. PMID:10227922

  10. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  11. Postoperative Immunosuppression After Open and Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Assessment of Cellular Immune Function and Monocytic HLA-DR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Schmidt, Sven C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Major abdominal procedures are strongly associated with postoperative immunosuppression and subsequent increased patient morbidity. It is believed that laparoscopic surgery causes less depletion of the systemic immune function because of the reduced tissue trauma. Various cytokines and monocytic HLA-DR expression have been successfully implemented to assess postoperative immune function. The aim of our study was to show the difference in immunologic profiles after minimally invasive versus conventional liver resection. Methods: Ten animals underwent either laparoscopic or conventional open left lateral liver resection. Flow cytometric characteristics of HLA-DR expression on monocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cellular secretion of tumor necrosis factor ?, interferon ?, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were measured and analyzed in ex vivo whole blood samples. Intraoperative and postoperative clinical outcome parameters were also documented and evaluated. Results: All animals survived the procedures. Postoperative complications were fever (n = 3), wound infections (n = 2), and biloma (n = 1). Open surgery showed a morbidity rate of 80% compared with 40% after laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic liver resection showed no postoperative immunoparalysis. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression in this group was elevated, whereas the open surgery group showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class II expression on postoperative day 1. Postoperative secretion of tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin 6, and interferon ? was lower in the open surgery group. Elevated transaminase levels after laparoscopy might have resulted from an ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by the capnoperitoneum. Conclusion: Major immunoparalysis depression was not observed in either group. Laparoscopic surgery shows a tendency to improve immunologic recovery after liver resection. PMID:24398205

  12. [New approach to postoperative delirium treatment].

    PubMed

    Pasechnik, I N; Makhla?, A V; Tepliakova, A N; Guba?dullin, R R; Sal'nikov, P S; Borisov, A Iu; Berezenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of different drugs for sedation was studied in 51 patients after large abdominal operations complicated by postoperative delirium. Diagnosis of postoperative delirium was established according to CAM-ICU criteria. Dexmedetomidine has demonstrated significantly decreased duration of delirium and hospital stay in intensive care unit in comparison with haloperidol. Besides, patients which received dexmedetomidine preserved opportunity for verbal contact. Also these patients interacted better with department's stuff. PMID:26031955

  13. Intensified neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for rectal cancer enhances surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy has proven superior to adjuvant treatment in reducing the rate of local recurrence without impairing cancer related survival or the incidence of distant metastases. The present study aimed at addressing the effects of an intensified protocol of neoadjuvant treatment on the development of postoperative complications. Methods A total of 387 patients underwent oncological resection for rectal cancer in our institution between January 2000 and December 2009. 106 patients received an intensified radiochemotherapy. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were analyzed retrospectively with special attention on complication rates after intensified radio-chemotherapy. Therefore, for each patient subjected to neoadjuvant treatment a patient without neoadjuvant treatment was matched in the following order for tumor height, discontinuous resection/exstirpation, T-category of the TNM-system, dividing stoma and UICC stage. Results Of all patients operated for rectal cancer, 27.4% received an intensified neoadjuvant treatment. Tumor location in the matched patients were in the lower third (55.2%), middle third (41.0%) and upper third (3.8%) of the rectum. Postoperatively, surgical morbidity was higher after intensified neoadjuvant treatment. In the subgroup with low anterior resection (LAR) the anastomosis leakage rate was higher (26.6% vs. 9.7%) and in the subgroup of patients with rectal exstirpations the perineal wound infection rate was increased (42.2% vs. 18.8%) after intensified radiochemotherapy. Conclusions In rectal cancer the decision for an intensified neoadjuvant treatment comes along with an increase of anastomotic leakage and perineal wound infection. Quality of life is often reduced considerably and has to be balanced against the potential benefit of intensifying neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. PMID:24073705

  14. Mind-body techniques in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Karen A

    2002-11-01

    Even the most skilled and resourceful wound care provider encounters stagnation of wound healing from time to time. Patients with chronic, nonhealing wounds often display negative thought patterns and behavioral tendencies that, in turn, hinder biological and emotional healing. An increasing body of research supports the negative effect of stress on wound healing. The impact of deeper, emotion-based "wounds" as complicating factors in conventional wound healing are being further explored. It is theorized that emotions such as lack of self worth, guilt, and anger are strongly correlated to the chronic, nonhealing wound. Mind-body techniques such as affirmations, creative visualization, relaxation, and conscious breathing are suggested for incorporation into the treatment program. These techniques seek to empower and engage the patient by promoting greater personal awareness and assertion in the healing process. Wound care providers are seen as facilitators of the innate healing potential inside each individual. Mind-body techniques are offered as a complement for a more comprehensive wound healing strategy. PMID:12426453

  15. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential. PMID:26493558

  16. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. PMID:26589696

  17. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life. PMID:16471044

  18. Perioperative Surgical Complications and Learning Curve Associated with Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Single-Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Bin; Seok, Sang Ok; Jo, Byung Woo; Ha, Joong Won

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgical complications tend to occur more frequently in the beginning stages of a surgeon's career, knowledge of perioperative complications is important to perform a safe procedure, especially if the surgeon is a novice. We sought to identify and describe perioperative complications and their management in connection with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive TLIF. The primary outcome measure was adverse events during the perioperative period, including neurovascular injury, implant-related complications, and wound infection. Pseudarthroses and adjacent segment pathologies were not included in this review. Adverse events that were not specifically related to spinal surgery and did not affect recovery were also excluded. Results Perioperative complications occurred in 9% of patients (11/124); including three cases of temporary postoperative neuralgia, two deep wound infections, two pedicle screw misplacements, two cage migrations, one dural tear, and one grafted bone extrusion. No neurologic deficits were reported. Eight complications occurred in the first one-third of the series and only 3 complications occurred in the last two-thirds of the series. Additional surgeries were performed in 6% of patients (7/124); including four reoperations (two for cage migrations, one for a misplaced screw, and one for an extruded graft bone fragment) and three hardware removals (one for a misplaced screw and two for infected cages). Conclusions We found perioperative complications occurred more often in the early period of a surgeon's experience with minimally invasive TLIF. Implant-related complications were common and successfully managed by additional surgeries in this series. We suggest greater caution should be exercised to avoid the potential complications, especially when surgeon is a novice to this procedure. PMID:25729524

  19. Management of penile gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Miles, B J; Poffenberger, R J; Farah, R N; Moore, S

    1990-10-01

    The management of 10 cases of penile gunshot wounds treated at Henry Ford Hospital from 1982 to 1986 is reviewed. All patients were assaulted by low velocity weapons (handguns). Eight patients had associated injuries, predominantly to the genital region (thigh, pubis, and scrotum). There were 5 urethral injuries; 4 were treated with primary repair, the remaining patient underwent delayed repair, complicated by severe urethral strictures requiring reoperation. Blood at the urethral meatus was suggestive of urethral injury but microscopic hematuria was not. Five penile injuries did not involve the urethra and were treated by debridement and primary wound closure with no immediate or delayed complications. In dealing with these injuries we recommend a high index of suspicion for urethral and regional organ injury and primary urethral closure if at all possible. PMID:2219610

  20. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. PMID:22998924

  1. Identification of complications that have a significant effect on length of stay after spine surgery and predictive value of 90-day readmission rate.

    PubMed

    Yadla, Sanjay; Ghobrial, George M; Campbell, Peter G; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Harrop, James S; Ratliff, John K; Sharan, Ashwini D

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Complications after spine surgery have an impact on overall outcome and health care expenditures. The increased cost of complications is due in part to associated prolonged hospital stays. The authors propose that certain complications have a greater impact on length of stay (LOS) than others and that those complications should be the focus of future targeted prevention efforts. They conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database to identify complications with the greatest impact on LOS as well as the predictive value of these complications with respect to 90-day readmission rates. METHODS Data on 249 patients undergoing spine surgery at Thomas Jefferson University from May to December 2008 were collected by a study auditor. Any complications occurring within 30 days of surgery were recorded as was overall LOS for each patient. Stepwise regression analysis was performed to determine whether specific complications had a statistically significant effect on LOS. For correlation, all readmissions within 90 days were recorded and organized by complication for comparison with those complications affecting LOS. RESULTS The mean LOS for patients without postoperative complications was 6.9 days. Patients who developed pulmonary complications had an associated increase in LOS of 11.1 days (p < 0.005). The development of a urinary tract infection (UTI) was associated with an increase in LOS of 3.4 days (p = 0.002). A new neurological deficit was associated with an increase in LOS of 8.2 days (p = 0.004). Complications requiring return to the operating room (OR) showed a trend toward an increase in LOS of 4.7 days (p = 0.09), as did deep wound infections (3.3 days, p = 0.08). The most common reason for readmission was for wound drainage (n = 21; surgical drainage was required in 10 [4.01%] of these 21 cases). The most common diagnoses for readmission, in decreasing order of incidence, were categorized as hardware malpositioning (n = 4), fever (n = 4), pulmonary (n = 2), UTI (n = 2), and neurological deficit (n = 1). Complications affecting LOS were not found to be predictive of readmission (p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS Postoperative complications in patients who have undergone spine surgery are not uncommon and are associated with prolonged hospital stays. In the current cohort, the occurrence of pulmonary complications, UTI, and new neurological deficit had the greatest effect on overall LOS. Further study is required to determine the causative factors affecting readmission. These specific complications may be high-yield targets for cost reduction and/or prevention efforts. PMID:26315951

  2. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus. PMID:25722363

  3. Penetrating wounds of the neck.

    PubMed

    Miller, R H; Duplechain, J K

    1991-02-01

    The management of penetrating wounds of the neck provides several decision-making steps that remain controversial. The two basic concepts of management include the idea that all wounds deep to the platysma should be explored and (the more conservative concept) that selective neck exploration should be based on a battery of tests to identify traumatic injuries. The areas of agreement within these two schools of thought include exploration of wounds with obvious injury, exploration of wounds in which patients cannot be stabilized satisfactorily for further testing, and the idea that all patients with wounds deep to the platysma should be admitted to the hospital. The remaining issues, including the need for angiography, barium swallow, or endoscopy, still are contested. Mandatory exploration of neck wounds became popular during World War II. The weapons used, the lack of accurate testing, and delays in treatment caused by transport problems played significant roles in the development of this policy. Proponents of mandatory exploration of neck wounds contend that delays in treatment result in increased mortality rates. Also delays caused by lengthy diagnostic testing have resulted in rapid exsanguination of patients who might otherwise have been surgically salvageable. These factors, along with the potential for undetected injuries and the associated complications (including false aneurysms and mediastinitis) favor mandatory exploration. Advocates of routine neck explorations also note the low morbidity rates associated with a neck exploration. Reported rates of negative exploration are high, however, approaching 45%, and mortality rates vary from 2% to 9%. Selective neck exploration has gained popularity in some centers because of the lower negative exploration rates associated with this treatment, while comparable mortality rates are achieved. May found a negative exploration rate of 12% in his series of selective neck explorations and a mortality rate of approximately 3%. Furthermore, Noyes found that the hospital stay for patients with selective observation management not requiring a neck exploration was 2.8 days, compared with 4.2 days for patients with mandatory but negative neck explorations. A summary of diagnostic techniques and their indications in selecting patients with penetrating neck wounds for surgery is presented in Table 5. It has become apparent that both selective and mandatory explorations of neck wounds play important roles in treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2027695

  4. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  5. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  6. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  7. [Facial-cerebral gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Harat, M; Szo?na, A; Bia?ozyk, P

    2000-01-01

    The current frequency increase of gunshot wounds to the head is directly proportional to the access to firearms and to amount of firearm-related crimes. This risk is increasing especially in population groups that have not been threatened before. Hence the aim of this study was to analyse and resume our experiences in the management of faciocerebral gunshots. We retrospectively reviewed a series of 9 consecutive patients who were treated in the Department of Neurosurgery, Military Clinical Hospital in Bydgoszcz with the diagnosis of gunshot wound to the head from 1994 to 1999. All the cases were young males (mean, 26 yr). There were six suicidal attempts and three accidents at firearm service. KbkAK, that is a standard machine gun in the Polish Army, was most frequently related to gunshots in the analysed series. All the patients were assessed according to Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at arrival to hospital. Average of admission GCS Score was 6.1. The patients were also assessed after treatment using Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). One patient was dead (GOS Score 1), and 7 (78%) improved to good, independent functional status (GOS Score 4 or 5). The authors emphasize the necessity of multispecialistic initial operative management of faciocerebral gunshots wounds and aggressive pre- and postoperative care (tracheostomy, gastrostomy, treatment of encephalitis), which makes it possible to obtain good and very good outcomes. Furthermore, we stress the role of minimal primary debridement for the sake of frequent secondary reconstructive operations. PMID:10979543

  8. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  9. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds. PMID:18086294

  10. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Woo; Baek, Seung Ryeol; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Sang Ho; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo Yun; Moh, Ji Hong; Kondo, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Background Rosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice. Methods Sixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg) was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test. Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-?1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA. Conclusions Rose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing. PMID:26618114

  11. The Role of Wound Healing and Its Everyday Application in Plastic Surgery: A Practical Perspective and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ireton, Jordan E.; Unger, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After surgery it is often recommended that patients should refrain from strenuous physical activity for 4–6 weeks. This recommendation is based on the time course of wound healing. Here, we present an overview of incisional wound healing with a focus on 2 principles that guide our postoperative recommendations: the gain of tensile strength of a wound over time and the effect of mechanical stress on wound healing. Methods: A systematic search of the English literature was conducted using OVID, Cochrane databases, and PubMed. Inclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing the dynamics of incisional wound healing, and exclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing nonincisional wounds. Results: Experiments as early as 1929 laid the groundwork for our postoperative activity recommendations. Research using animal models has shown that the gain in tensile strength of a surgical wound is sigmoidal in trajectory, reaching maximal strength approximately 6 weeks postoperatively. Although human and clinical data are limited, the principles gained from laboratory investigation have provided important insights into the relationship among mechanical stress, collagen dynamics, and the time course of wound healing. Conclusion: Our postoperative activity recommendations are based on a series of animal studies. Clinical research supporting these recommendations is minimal, with the most relevant clinical data stemming from early motion protocols in the orthopedic literature. We must seek to establish clinical data to support our postoperative activity recommendations so that we can maximize the physiologic relationships between wound healing and mechanical stress. PMID:25289204

  12. Pyoderma gangrenosum following a routine caesarean section: Pseudo-infection in a caesarean wound

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, A.G.; Singal, Archana; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Singh, Smita

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old booked primigravida underwent lower segment caesarean section for breech presentation. She developed signs and symptoms of wound infection by the fourth postoperative day. This was initially managed with antibiotics and wound dressing, but debridement was later undertaken after consulting surgeons. This resulted in an alarming worsening of the wound with sudden and fast increase in its size along with systemic symptoms. Wound biopsy established the diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum. The patient's management included oral medication with prednisolone, cyclosporin and dapsone and wound care. There was a dramatic response to this treatment. The wound completely healed by the eighth postoperative month. The oral medications were tapered off slowly and stopped by that time. PMID:26535169

  13. Comprehensive Postoperative Management After Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tien, Duc A; Stokken, Janalee K; Recinos, Pablo F; Woodard, Troy D; Sindwani, Raj

    2016-02-01

    To maximize outcomes from endoscopic skull base surgery, careful early postoperative management is critically important. Standardized postoperative regimens are lacking. The type of reconstruction and presence and type of cerebrospinal fluid leak dictate management. If a leak is encountered intraoperatively, patients should avoid maneuvers that increase intracranial pressures for at least 1 month. Early postoperative care focuses on minimizing and managing nasal crusting. This article reviews the evidence in the literature on postoperative management, complications, and quality of life after surgery, and outlines our experience in the management of patients after endoscopic skull base surgery. PMID:26614842

  14. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  15. Non-equilibrium Air Plasma for Wound Bleeding Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Lin, Chuan-Shun; Chiang, Shu-Hsing

    A low temperature non-equilibrium air plasma spray is tested as a blood coagulator. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma effluent indicates that it carries abundant reactive atomic oxygen (RAO), which can activate erythrocyte - platelet interactions to enhance blood coagulation for plug formation. Tests of the device for wound bleeding control were performed on pigs. Four types of wounds, straight cut and cross cut in the ham area, a hole in an ear saphenous vein, and a cut to an ear artery, were examined. The results showed that this plasma spray could effectively stop the bleeding and reduced the bleeding time considerably. Post-Operative observation of straight cut and cross cut wound healing was carried out. It was found that the plasma treatment had a positive impact on wound healing, in particular, of the cross cut wound; its healing time was shortened by a half.

  16. Difficult wounds: an update.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Drake, David B

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to describe revolutionary advances in the treatment of Gardner's syndrome (GS), pseudofolliculitis barbae, nasal septal perforation, factitious wounds, and hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Gardner's syndrome or familial polyposis has various manifestations that appear to be controlled by a single genetic locus. Apart from the large bowel adenomas, which are always present, a common extracolonic symptom of Gardner's syndrome is the occurrence of epidermal cysts. These cysts can be seen before the intestinal polyps are evident. Because epidermal cysts in patients with Gardner's syndrome are always benign, we excise these cysts using incisions that are commonly used for rhytidectomy. Pseudofolliculitis barbae, a pseudofolliculitis caused by ingrown hairs, effects 85% of blacks who shave their beards. When this disease is allowed to progress to keloid formation, we use a surgical approach that includes excision of the keloidal scar, meticulous debridement of all residual ingrown hairs in the underlying wound, and coverage of the defect with a split-thickness skin graft. More recently, laser therapy has revolutionized the treatment of pseudofolliculitis barbae and has enabled a cure for the first time for those plagued with this disorder and for whom a beardless face is acceptable. Nasal septal perforation is a well recognized complication of septal surgery. Other iatrogenic causes of perforation include cryosurgery, electrocoagulation for epitaxis, nasotracheal intubation, or nose packing. In recent years drugs such as cocaine account for an increasing number of perforations. It has only been with the use of an external approach for the repair of the nasal septal defect that surgical closure has become easier and more reliable. The external approach allows for greater surgical closure and enables the surgeon to use both hands with the aid of binocular vision to mobilize and suture local mucosal advancement flaps and the intraseptal connective tissue grafts. More recently, surgeons have repaired large septal perforations with a radial forearm free flap. Because of its availability and deep emotional significance, the skin is a common site for self-destructive behavior with the development of factitious skin wounds. When suspected, psychiatric care must proceed immediately. Second, the ulcer can then be healed by appropriate techniques and wound repair. It is important to emphasize that the treating physician must first confront the patient, and then a psychiatrist should provide appropriate psychotherapy. Hidradenitis suppurativa is an inflammatory disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that occurs in apocrine-gland-bearing areas distributed in the axilla, mammary nipple areola, mons pubis, groin, scrotum, perineum, perianal region, and umbilicus. The condition has an insidious onset. The susceptibility of women's axillary skin to hidradenitis suppurativa may be related, in part, to the practice of axillary removal of hair with a safety razor. Consequently, the use of safety razors must be avoided and replaced with the use of an electric razor. The method of treatment will vary with the stage of the disease. Treatment of the chronic stage of axillary hidradenitis suppurativa is primarily surgical. More recently, carbon dioxide laser treatment, with healing by secondary intention, is proving to be a rapid, efficient, and economic treatment of this difficult wound. PMID:16022640

  17. Supplemental Intravenous Crystalloid Administration Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kabon, Barbara; Akça, Ozan; Taguchi, Akiko; Nagele, Angelika; Jebadurai, Ratnaraj; Arkilic, Cem F.; Sharma, Neeru; Ahluwalia, Arundhathi; Galandiuk, Susan; Fleshman, James; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Wound perfusion and oxygenation are important determinants of the development of postoperative wound infections. Supplemental fluid administration significantly increases tissue oxygenation in surrogate wounds in the subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm in perioperative surgical patients. We tested the hypothesis that supplemental fluid administration during and after elective colon resections decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Patients undergoing open colon resection were randomly assigned to small (n=124, 8 mL·kg-1·h-1) or large volume (n=129, 16-18 mL·kg-1·h-1) fluid management. Our major outcomes were two distinct criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections: 1) purulent exudate combined with a culture positive for pathogenic bacteria and 2) Center for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections. All wound infections diagnosed using either criterion by a blinded observer in the 15 days following surgery were considered in the analysis. Wound healing was evaluated with the ASEPSIS scoring system. Of the patients given small fluid administration, 14 had surgical wound infections; 11 given large fluid therapy had infections, P=0.46. ASEPSIS wound healing scores were similar in both groups: 7±16 (small volume) vs. 8±14 (large volume), P=0.70. Our results suggest that supplemental hydration in the range tested does not impact wound infection rate. PMID:16244030

  18. Trauma and wound healing: role of the route of nutritional support.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, T; Efron, D T; Tantry, U; Barbul, A

    2001-01-01

    Following severe trauma and surgical injury, nutritional support via the enteral route has been shown to lead to increased survival and decreased complications when compared to the parenteral route. We hypothesized that the route of nutrient delivery may affect cutaneous wound healing following severe traumatic insult. Forty-six Sprague Dawley rats underwent bilateral closed femoral fractures, central venous catheterization, gastrostomy placement and dorsal skin incision with placement of polyvinyl alcohol sponges into subcutaneous pockets. Identical nutritional infusates of 25% dextrose, 4.25% amino acids, and vitamins were given, half the animals receiving the infusion via the gastrostomy (ENT) and the other half via the venous catheter (TPN). Animals were sacrificed on post-operative days 5, 7, or 10. Wound breaking strength (WBS, g) and sponge granuloma hydroxyproline content (OHP- a measure of wound collagen deposition, microg/ 100mg sponge) were measured. There were no significant nutritional differences between the two feeding groups. On days 5 and 7, WBS was significantly higher in the ENT group (58.0 +/- 3.1 g vs 48.9 +/- 2.6 g, p < 0.05, and 123 +/- 19 g vs 87.6 +/- 4.2 g, p < 0.05 vs TPN respectively). Sponge OHP content on day 5 was significantly higher in the ENT group (101 +/- 3 vs 86.7+/-5.8 microg/100 sponge, p < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the enteral feeding route imparts a benefit to early post-traumatic wound healing s compared to parenteral feeding. PMID:12678129

  19. Wound care centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... order to treat your wound, your provider will clean out the wound and apply dressing. You also may have other types of treatment to help it heal. Debridement Debridement is the process of removing dead skin and tissue. This tissue ...

  20. Gunshot wounds - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

  1. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... care, and what is being applied to the wound. Healing may occur within weeks or require several months. ... may seem to you. The key to successful wound healing is regular podiatric medical care to ensure the ...

  2. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... wounds heal, you may have a wound VAC (Vacuum Assisted Closure) dressing. It increases blood flow in ... helps with healing. This is a negative pressure (vacuum) dressing. There is a vacuum pump, a foam ...

  3. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gastrointestinal system, or respiratory system — fluids and other contaminants could get into the wound and cause infection. ... sure there are no remaining bacteria or other contaminants, they will stitch or close the wound. Sometimes, ...

  4. Sweet NETs, Bitter Wounds.

    PubMed

    Papayannopoulos, Venizelos

    2015-08-18

    What causes slow wound healing rates in diabetes is poorly understood. Wong et al. (2015) report that an increase in the deployment of neutrophil extracellular traps associated with hyperglycemia slows down wound healing. PMID:26287680

  5. Advanced Therapeutic Dressings for Effective Wound Healing-A Review.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Catanzano, Ovidio

    2015-11-01

    Advanced therapeutic dressings that take active part in wound healing to achieve rapid and complete healing of chronic wounds is of current research interest. There is a desire for novel strategies to achieve expeditious wound healing because of the enormous financial burden worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of wound healing and wound management products, with emphasis on the demand for more advanced forms of wound therapy and some of the current challenges and driving forces behind this demand. The paper reviews information mainly from peer-reviewed literature and other publicly available sources such as the US FDA. A major focus is the treatment of chronic wounds including amputations, diabetic and leg ulcers, pressure sores, and surgical and traumatic wounds (e.g., accidents and burns) where patient immunity is low and the risk of infections and complications are high. The main dressings include medicated moist dressings, tissue-engineered substitutes, biomaterials-based biological dressings, biological and naturally derived dressings, medicated sutures, and various combinations of the above classes. Finally, the review briefly discusses possible prospects of advanced wound healing including some of the emerging physical approaches such as hyperbaric oxygen, negative pressure wound therapy and laser wound healing, in routine clinical care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:3653-3680, 2015. PMID:26308473

  6. Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy D. Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kirsch, David G.; Suit, Herman D.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Gebhardt, Marc C.; Mankin, Henry J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

  7. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

  8. Management of open wounds: lessons from orthopedic oncology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Herrick J

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex wounds remains a challenge, and although there have been many promising advances, patients often undergo a morbid and lengthy process to obtain sufficient, satisfactory healing. Sarcoma patients are especially vulnerable to soft tissue wound-healing complications. These patients are often treated with neoadjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy and have compromised local vascularity to healing tissue. The advent and refinement of wound vacuum-assisted closure technology have been shown to have a tremendous impact. This article reviews the benefits of some novel technologies currently undergoing investigation in orthopedic oncology that will likely have applications in wound management from other causes. PMID:24267211

  9. The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D. )

    1986-03-01

    During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation.

  10. Increased Postoperative Bleeding Risk among Patients with Local Flap Surgery under Continued Clopidogrel Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Haase, Martina; Kluwe, Lan; Zeuch, Jürgen; Smeets, Ralf; Hanken, Henning; Wehrmann, Manfred; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Birkelbach, Moritz; Rendenbach, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of a continued antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel on postoperative bleeding risk in patients undergoing skin tumor resection and reconstruction with local flaps or skin grafts under outpatient conditions. Patients and Methods. The authors designed and implemented a retrospective clinical cohort study at the General Hospital Balingen. The primary endpoint was the bleeding ratio in patients with clopidogrel treatment in comparison to patients without any anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. Wound healing was evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. Results. 650 procedures were performed, 123 of them under continued clopidogrel therapy. There were significantly more postoperative bleeding complications among patients with continued antiplatelet therapy. Regarding the whole study population, malignant lesions, a larger defect size, and skin grafts were accompanied by a higher rate of bleeding incidents. However, there were no significant findings in the univariate analysis of the clopidogrel group. All bleeding incidents were easily manageable. Conclusion. Despite an increased bleeding ratio among patients under continued clopidogrel therapy, the performance of simple surgical procedures can be recommended. However, cautious preparation and careful hemostasis are indispensable. PMID:26345612

  11. Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wounding following whole-body ?-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI) increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co ?-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI) vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in ?-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in ?-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI) included continuously decreased ?-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI) included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined injury and reduce related mortality. PMID:22686656

  12. Congenital Cataract: Progress in Surgical Treatment and Postoperative Recovery of Visual Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyue; Xiao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Congenital cataract is a common cause of childhood low vision or blindness worldwide. Early surgery should be performed in sensitive vision development period to avoid vision deprivation in cases of strabismus and nystagmus development. Postoperative recovery of visual function is of great significance for these patients and should include proper postoperative aphakia correction by the application of a contact lens and secondary implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). Patients should receive amblyopic training after surgery to improve their postoperative visual acuity. Although recent advances in surgery techniques and materials have brought better postoperative visual acuity and less complications, a few postoperative complications can still hamper vision condition and vision development, including posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma. Surgery in early infancy are risk factors for these two complications. Life-long follow-up is essential for these patients. Further study will continue to address the surgery timing issue and methods that prevent postoperative complications. PMID:26390798

  13. Is the Center for Medicare and Medicaid's Lack of Reimbursement for Postoperative Urinary Tract Infections in Elderly Emergency Surgery Patients Justified?

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D.; Thomsen, Kristine M.; Polites, Stephanie F.; Khasawneh, Mohammad A.; Jenkins, Donald H.; Habermann, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Urinary tract infections (UTI), a risk factor for readmission, have been deemed a potentially preventable problem, and therefore not reimbursable, by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) since 2008. Defining the risk factors for UTI development in the postoperative period will provide risk stratification for UTI development in these challenging patients. Methods Pre-, intra-, and postoperative characteristics were collected for patients? 65 years old who underwent an emergency abdominal operation from the 2005–2012 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Participant User File (PUF), a database of 374 participating hospitals. In-hospital UTIs occurring within 30 days of the operation were identified. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify UTI risk factors. Results In total, 53,879 patients were included, 1881 (3.5%) of whom were diagnosed with a postoperative UTI prior to discharge. In-hospital UTI was associated with a greater hospital stay (27 vs 13 days, p<0.001) and greater 30-day mortality rates (18% vs 16%, p=0.003). The rate of UTI dropped from 4.5% prior to the CMS decree to 3.2% thereafter (p<0.001). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated advanced age, female sex, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, dependent functional status, open wound, hypoalbuminemia, elevated ASA class, operative approach, and prolonged operative time were independent risk factors for postoperative UTI development (Table). Conclusion While postoperative UTI rates dropped after the CMS decree, the lack of reimbursement is not justified as few modifiable risk factors to further improve postoperative UTI rates in elderly emergency surgical patients were identified. While targeted interventions may be developed, this complication is not easily preventable and will continue to plague acute care surgeons taking care of this challenging patient population. PMID:25239361

  14. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  15. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  16. Bio-Conjugated Polycaprolactone Membranes: A Novel Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Teo, Erin Yiling; Jing, Lim; Koh, Yun Pei; Qian, Tan Si; Wen, Feng; Lee, James Wai Kit; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Yap, Yan Lin; Lee, Hanjing; Lee, Chuen Neng; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Lim, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of polycaprolactone and hyaluronic acid creates an ideal environment for wound healing. Hyaluronic acid maintains a moist wound environment and accelerates the in-growth of granulation tissue. Polycaprolactone has excellent mechanical strength, limits inflammation and is biocompatible. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of bio-conjugated polycaprolactone membranes (BPM) as a wound dressing. Methods 16 New Zealand white rabbits were sedated and local anaesthesia was administered. Two 3.0×3.0 cm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of each rabbit, between the lowest rib and the pelvic bone. The wounds were dressed with either BPM (n=12) or Mepitel (n=12) (control), a polyamide-silicon wound dressing. These were evaluated macroscopically on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days for granulation, re-epithelialization, infection, and wound size, and histologically for epidermal and dermal regeneration. Results Both groups showed a comparable extent of granulation and re-epithelialization. No signs of infection were observed. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in wound size between the two groups. BPM (n=6): 8.33 cm2, 4.90 cm2, 3.12 cm2, 1.84 cm2; Mepitel (n=6): 10.29 cm2, 5.53 cm2, 3.63 cm2, 2.02 cm2; at the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days. The extents of epidermal and dermal regeneration were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions BPM is comparable to Mepitel as a safe and efficacious wound dressing. PMID:25396174

  17. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  18. Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

    2011-03-01

    The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

  19. Diagnosis, prevention and management of postoperative pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Sj Singh; Kulshrestha, A

    2012-07-01

    Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for prevention of this postoperative complication so as to decrease morbidity and mortality. The various search engines for preparation of this manuscript were used which included Entrez (including Pubmed and Pubmed Central), NIH.gov, Medknow.com, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, Scopus, Science Direct, MedHelp.org, yahoo.com and google.com. Manual search was carried out and various text books and journals of anesthesia and critical care medicine were also searched. From the information gathered, it was observed that postoperative cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients with serious cardiovascular diseases is most common followed by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema which can be due to fluid overload in the postoperative period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post-extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure. NPPE carries a good prognosis if promptly diagnosed and appropriately treated with or without mechanical ventilation. PMID:23439791

  20. Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, SJ Singh; Kulshrestha, A

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for prevention of this postoperative complication so as to decrease morbidity and mortality. The various search engines for preparation of this manuscript were used which included Entrez (including Pubmed and Pubmed Central), NIH.gov, Medknow.com, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, Scopus, Science Direct, MedHelp.org, yahoo.com and google.com. Manual search was carried out and various text books and journals of anesthesia and critical care medicine were also searched. From the information gathered, it was observed that postoperative cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients with serious cardiovascular diseases is most common followed by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema which can be due to fluid overload in the postoperative period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post-extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure. NPPE carries a good prognosis if promptly diagnosed and appropriately treated with or without mechanical ventilation. PMID:23439791

  1. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  2. Foot Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your feet or toes may also cause problems. Neuropathy Although it can hurt, diabetic nerve damage can ... Diabetes Forecast® magazine: cc-feet-and-hands-peripheral-neuropathy, In this section Living With Diabetes Complications Skin ...

  3. Combined Treatment Of Purulent Wounds With CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstych, P. I.; Skobelkin, O. K.; Derbenev, V. A.

    1988-06-01

    The authors have worked out a programme for combined treatment of purulent wounds with CO2 laser. It consists of following components: a) laserinsision of suppurative wounds,necrectomy,or irradiation of the incised wound with the defocused laser beam; b )diplication of proteinerses and antiseptics immobilized on the textile dressing and dranaige materials; c) applications of biocompatible materials with the immobilized antiseptics and enzyme agents; d) application of low energy laser irradiation in the postoperative period; e) lavage of the sutured wound if indicated. The points of the above-mentioned programme can be used separately as independed methods in several thousands of patients. Their combined applications has been studied on 400 patients. Such treatment allowed to refuse the antibioticotherapy in 98,3% of cases,to reduce the terms of trestment in I,5-2 % times as compared with traditional methods, and to low significantely costs.

  4. Telemedicine for wound management

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi K.

    2012-01-01

    The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process. PMID:23162242

  5. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  6. Complications in cochlear implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, DC; Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A

    2015-01-01

    For the last 6 years, cochlear implantation has become a standard practice in our department. The number of patients rose from 5 to 21/ year. Using multiple types of cochlear implants and indicating the surgery also to malformed inner ears led to the encounter of some complications. Objective: to present the surgical complications from our department. Material: all the patients admitted and operated in our clinic have been reviewed. Results: 9 complications (8,86%) have occurred: the impossibility of establishing a reliable cochleostomy (due to ossification), air in the cochlea through lack of sealing of the cochleostomy (exteriorization of the electrode array), cochlear implant postoperative migration from its bed, weak hearing discrimination due to “double electrodes” in the scala tympani, gusher. Conclusions: cochlear implanting needs to respect the technical steps of the surgery and the best technical/ tactical solution has to be found to whatever complications arise in complex or malformed cases! PMID:26351535

  7. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy. PMID:26424336

  8. Postoperative Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Veerabhadram; Cellini, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The effective relief of pain is of the utmost importance to anyone treating patients undergoing surgery. Pain relief has significant physiological benefits; hence, monitoring of pain relief is increasingly becoming an important postoperative quality measure. The goal for postoperative pain management is to reduce or eliminate pain and discomfort with a minimum of side effects. Various agents (opioid vs. nonopioid), routes (oral, intravenous, neuraxial, regional) and modes (patient controlled vs. “as needed”) for the treatment of postoperative pain exist. Although traditionally the mainstay of postoperative analgesia is opioid based, increasingly more evidence exists to support a multimodal approach with the intent to reduce opioid side effects (such as nausea and ileus) and improve pain scores. Enhanced recovery protocols to reduce length of stay in colorectal surgery are becoming more prevalent and include multimodal opioid sparing regimens as a critical component. Familiarity with the efficacy of available agents and routes of administration is important to tailor the postoperative regimen to the needs of the individual patient. PMID:24436674

  9. Corneal wound healing after laser vision correction.

    PubMed

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Giammaria, Daniele; Trabucco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Any trauma can trigger a cascade of responses in tissues, with the purpose of safeguarding the integrity of the organ affected by the trauma and of preventing possible damage to nearby organs. Subsequently, the body tries to restore the function of the organ affected. The introduction of the excimer laser for keratorefractive surgery has changed the treatment landscape for correcting refractive errors, such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. In recent years, with the increased understanding of the basic science of refractive errors, higher-order aberrations, biomechanics, and the biology of corneal wound healing, a reduction in the surgical complications of keratorefractive surgery has been achieved. The understanding of the cascade of events involved in the corneal wound healing process and the examination of how corneal wound healing influences corneal biomechanics and optics are crucial to improving the efficacy and safety of laser vision correction. PMID:26405102

  10. Classification of Surgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dindo, Daniel; Demartines, Nicolas; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Although quality assessment is gaining increasing attention, there is still no consensus on how to define and grade postoperative complications. This shortcoming hampers comparison of outcome data among different centers and therapies and over time. Patients and Methods: A classification of complications published by one of the authors in 1992 was critically re-evaluated and modified to increase its accuracy and its acceptability in the surgical community. Modifications mainly focused on the manner of reporting life-threatening and permanently disabling complications. The new grading system still mostly relies on the therapy used to treat the complication. The classification was tested in a cohort of 6336 patients who underwent elective general surgery at our institution. The reproducibility and personal judgment of the classification were evaluated through an international survey with 2 questionnaires sent to 10 surgical centers worldwide. Results: The new ranking system significantly correlated with complexity of surgery (P < 0.0001) as well as with the length of the hospital stay (P < 0.0001). A total of 144 surgeons from 10 different centers around the world and at different levels of training returned the survey. Ninety percent of the case presentations were correctly graded. The classification was considered to be simple (92% of the respondents), reproducible (91%), logical (92%), useful (90%), and comprehensive (89%). The answers of both questionnaires were not dependent on the origin of the reply and the level of training of the surgeons. Conclusions: The new complication classification appears reliable and may represent a compelling tool for quality assessment in surgery in all parts of the world. PMID:15273542

  11. Effect of static magnetic field on experimental dermal wound strength

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Aydogan, Cem; Balcik, Cenk; Haberal, Nihan; Kirnap, Mahir; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Context: An animal model. Aim: We sought to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used. Wounds were created on the backs of all rats. Forty of these animals (M group) had NeFeB magnets placed in contact with the incisions, either parallel (Pa) and perpendicular (Pr) to the incision. The other 40 animals (sham [S] group) had nonmagnetized NeFeB bars placed in the same directions as the implanted animals. Half of the animals in each group were killed and assessed for healing on postoperative day 7 and the other half on postoperative day 14. The following assessments were done: gross healing, mechanical strength, and histopathology. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup differences were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U or t test. Values for P less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: There were no differences between the magnetic and sham animals with respect to gross healing parameters. The mechanical strength was different between groups. On postoperative day 14, the MPr14 had significantly higher scores than the other groups. When static, high-power, magnetic fields are placed perpendicular to the wound, increased wound healing occurs in the skin of the experimental model. PMID:23162219

  12. Effect of low-power density laser radiation on heatling of open skin wounds in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kana, J.S.; Hutschenreiter, G.; Haina, D.; Waidelich, W.

    1981-03-01

    Researchers performed a study to determine whether laser radation of low-power density would affect the healing of open skin wounds in rats. The wounds were irradiated daily with a helium-neon laser and an argon laser at a constant power density of 45 mW/sq cm. The rate of wound closure was followed by photographing the wounds in a standardized way. The collagen hydroxyproline concentration in the scar tissue was determined on the 18th postoperative day. Helium-neon laser radiation had a statistically significant stimulating effect on collagen synthesis in the wound, with a maximum effect at an energy density of 4 joules/sq cm. The rate of wound closure was enhanced significantly between the third and 12th postoperative days. The argon laser exposure produced a significant increase in collagen concentration both in irradiated and nonirradiated contralateral wounds. However, an acceleration of the healing rate was not registered in this case. The wound contraction up to the fourth day of the experiment was inhibited under helium-neon and argon laser exposure to 20 joules/sq cm. The described effects were not specific for the laser light. There may be a wavelength-selective influence of coherent light on the metabolic and proliferation processes in wound healing, with the associated problem of the possible carcinogenic effects of laser radiation.

  13. Preventing chronic postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postoperative pain is common. Nerve injury and inflammation promote chronic pain, the risk of which is influenced by patient factors, including psychological characteristics. Interventional trials to prevent chronic postoperative pain have been underpowered with inadequate patient follow-up. Ketamine may reduce chronic postoperative pain, although the optimum treatment duration and dose for different operations have yet to be identified. The evidence for gabapentin and pregabalin is encouraging but weak; further work is needed before these drugs can be recommended for the prevention of chronic pain. Regional techniques reduce the rates of chronic pain after thoracotomy and breast cancer surgery. Nerve-sparing surgical techniques may be of benefit, although nerve injury is not necessary or sufficient for chronic pain to develop. PMID:26620149

  14. Nanosecond Pulse Electric Field Activated-Platelet Rich Plasma Enhances the Return of Blood Flow to Large and Ischemic Wounds in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave, Barbara; Li, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a therapeutic strategy used for accelerating wound healing of a wide range of tissues through the release of platelet growth factors. Here, we describe a nonchemical, safe method for preparing platelet-rich plasma using nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) and investigated the effect of this platelet-rich plasma on reperfusion of blood in large skin flap or ischemic hind limb wounds in New Zealand White rabbits. Laser Doppler images of blood flow to the dorsal surface of skin flap wounds or to ischemic hind limb wounds were obtained from wounds treated with 0.9% saline or nanosecond-pulsed electric field prepared platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP). Reperfusion in the skin flap wounds was greater in the nsPRP-treated wounds than in the wounds treated with saline on postoperative days 3 (P < 0.001) and 21 (P < 0.03). Reperfusion in the ischemic hind-limb treated with nsPRP was greater than in the saline-treated limb on post-operative Day 3 (P < 0.001), post-operative week 1 (P < 0.025) and post-operative week 4 (P < 0.015). In the hind limb ischemic tissue, the number of endothelial cells, collagen, and cells containing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was greater in the nsPRP-treated tissue. These results demonstrate that nsPRP improves blood flow in large surgical skin wounds and in ischemic wounds. PMID:26197934

  15. Postoperative Surgical Chest and Leg Incision Sites Using Platelet Gel: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Susan J.; Estep, Thomas H.; Ellis-Stoll, Cynthia C.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the application of platelet gel (PG) on cardiac surgery wound incisions would promote wound healing and reduce the subsequent incidence of postoperative infections, thereby decreasing the length of hospital stay and hospital costs. Previous work has shown increased incisional healing effect among coronary artery bypass graft patients who received platelet gel. A 1-year retrospective review of 128 cardiac surgery patient charts was performed to determine the clinical impact on those patients whom received platelet gel applications (treatment group) and those whom did not receive platelet gel applications (control group). The outcomes measured were (i) total length of stay, (ii) the incidence of incision wound infection, and (iii) postoperative blood loss. The treatment group had significantly shorter intensive care unit and total length of stays and experienced less postoperative blood loss compared with the control group. In addition, the treatment group had no reported incisional wound infections; however, four patients (3.16%) in the control group experienced incision wound infections. This study was a descriptive chart review and not a controlled study. Our findings support previous research that platelet gel seems to positively influence incisional wound healing among those who undergo cardiac surgery. PMID:19192749

  16. Biomechanics and Wound Healing in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Dupps, William J.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    The biomechanical and wound healing properties of the cornea undermine the predictability and stability of refractive surgery and contribute to discrepancies between attempted and achieved visual outcomes after LASIK, surface ablation and other keratorefractive procedures. Furthermore, patients predisposed to biomechanical failure or abnormal wound healing can experience serious complications such as keratectasia or clinically significant corneal haze, and more effective means for the identification of such patients prior to surgery are needed. In this review, we describe the cornea as a complex structural composite material with pronounced anisotropy and heterogeneity, summarize current understanding of major biomechanical and reparative pathways that contribute to the corneal response to laser vision correction, and review the role of these processes in ectasia, intraocular pressure measurement artifact, diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and corneal haze. The current understanding of differences in the corneal response after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), LASIK and femtosecond-assisted LASIK are reviewed. Surgical and disease models that integrate corneal geometric data, substructural anatomy, elastic and viscoelastic material properties and wound healing behavior have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and minimize complications but depend on the identification of preoperative predictors of biomechanical and wound healing responses in individual patients. PMID:16720023

  17. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. This suggests that preoperative biliary drainage should be avoided whenever possible in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Such a change in current preoperative management may improve patient outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:10450725

  18. Superabsorbent dressings for copiously exuding wounds.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Nathalie; Safar, Helene; Baret, Mylène; Philippe, Anne; Farid, Rachida

    Exudate control is important in the management of both acute and chronic wounds. A new category of absorbent dressings that contain superabsorbent particles promises high absorbency. The aim of this multicentre, prospective, non-comparative observational study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and absorbent capacity of a superabsorbent dressing. Fifteen inpatients and outpatients with highly exuding wounds were included. Most patients (n=8) (53%) had chronic wounds; 20% (n=3) had ulcerating tumours. The superabsorbent dressing was used as a primary or a secondary dressing. Assessment was on day 0 (start), day 3 and day 7 (end of study). The study looked at wound bed and periwound skin condition, exudate production, pain upon dressing removal, reason for dressing removal, and frequency of dressing changes. A clinical visual scoring tool was used, together with digital photographs, which were assessed by the same experienced clinician. All 15 patients completed the study, during which no adverse events were noted. At day 7, maceration had reduced from 46.7% (n=7) at day 0 to 6.7% (n=1). After only 3 days, dressing change frequency was reduced from once daily to twice weekly in 80% (n=12) of patients. The superabsorbent dressing seems to reduce complications associated with exudate production, stimulate wound healing and increase patient comfort; it may also save time and costs for caregivers. PMID:22875373

  19. Wound cleaning versus wound disinfection: a challenging dilemma.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D; Davey, C

    1997-01-01

    Our experience with this resident has had a significant impact on our approach to wound management. We no longer accept normal saline as the only option for wound cleansing. Instead, we approach wound cleansing systematically using the wound cleansing model outlined in Figure 1. If healing is not apparent, we critically review the situation and consider the bacterial status of the wound, the phase of wound healing, and the effects of wound cleansing versus wound disinfection on both the bacteria and the cells responsible for wound repair. In infected wounds or those colonized with a high bacterial count, careful attention is given to eradicating bacterial contamination. We carefully weigh the benefits of wound disinfection (eradication of bacterial contamination) against wound cleansing and the potential harm to the resident (delayed wound healing and unnecessary discomfort). If the benefits of wound disinfection outweigh the potential harm to the resident, we choose wound disinfection and monitor its effectiveness on a daily basis. When bacterial contamination has been eradicated and the wound is clean, we resume wound cleansing with normal saline. PMID:9460442

  20. Analysis of a Mathematical Model of Ischemic Cutaneous wounds

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Avner; Xue, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a major public health problem affecting 6.5 million people in the United States. Ischemia represents a serious complicating factor in wound healing. In this paper we analyze a recently developed mathematical model of ischemic dermal wounds. The model consists of a coupled system of partial differential equations in the partially healed region, with the wound boundary as a free boundary. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is assumed to be viscoelastic, and the free boundary moves with the velocity of the ECM at the boundary of the open wound. The model equations involve the concentrations of oxygen, cytokines, and the densities of several types of cells. The ischemic level is represented by a parameter which appears in the boundary conditions, 0 <= gamma < 1; gamma near 1 corresponds to extreme ischemia and gamma = 0 corresponds to normal non-ischemic conditions. We establish global existence and uniqueness of the free boundary problem and study the dependence of the free boundary on...

  1. [Ambulant treatment of wounds by vacuum sealing].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, U E; Schmidt, K; Breithaupt, B; Menig, R; Debus, E S; Thiede, A

    2000-01-01

    The treatment of chronic wounds by vacuum sealing as an outpatient procedure is a new method of wound conditioning before closing the defect. The quality of life for the patient in his usual surrounding is maintained. Financial aspects also play a role in this treatment since costs for the health care system can be reduced. Various vacuum pumps, drainages and polymere foams are available and suitable for the outpatient treatment. The most important condition is to regularly check the vacuum. This can performed by the patient, the relatives or nursing staff. The main complication consists in loss of vacuum but technical and local or systemic complications can also appear. Individually applied vacuum dressings (polyvinyl foam, drainage tube and polymere foil) are practical. The ideal pump systems for the outpatient treatment are still not trial. PMID:10929655

  2. The role of postoperative prophylactic antibiotics in the treatment of facial fractures: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical study. Part 2: Mandibular fractures in 59 patients.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Benoit; Soong, Poh Luon; Zix, Jürgen; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Lieger, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference between a 5-day and a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotic on the incidence of infection after mandibular fractures involving the alveolus. Sixty-two patients with fractures of the mandible involving the dentoalveolar region were randomly assigned to 2 groups, both of which were given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1.2 g intravenously every 8 h from admission until 24 h postoperatively. The 5-day group were then given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 625 mg orally every 8 h for another 4 days. The 1-day group was given an oral placebo at the same intervals. Follow-up appointments were 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Development of an infection was the primary end point. Fifty-nine of the 62 patients completed this study. Six of the 30 patients in the 5-day group (20%) and 6 out of the 29 in the 1-day group (21%) developed local wound infections. Three of the 6 in the 1-day group developed purulent discharge and swelling. One patient in the 5-day group developed a rash on the trunk. There were no significant differences in the incidence of infection or side effects between the groups. In fractures of the mandible involving the alveolus, a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotic is as effective in preventing infective complications as a 5-day regimen. PMID:24012053

  3. Post-Op Bacterial Infection Raises Odds for Complications, Death

    MedlinePLUS

    ... journal JAMA Surgery . " C. difficile infection is a big hit to take for people who are already ... co-wrote an accompanying editorial. "It's just a big insult to their system, when they are vulnerable." ...

  4. [Treatment of purulent wounds by using of negative pressure].

    PubMed

    Riabov, A L; Skalozub, O I; Lapin, R V

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of wounds treatment complicated by surgical infection. An apparatus for creating negative pressure VivanoTec/S042 was used for this in 74 patients. Types of surgical interventions depended on phase of inflammatory process and severity of clinical manifestations. It was done 153 operations. Surgical management of infected wounds, necrectomy were performed. As the relief of inflammatory process repeated surgical management with plasty by using of local tissue was done. Short-term good anatomical results were achieved in 97% of patients. Good functional result was marked in all patients. Wound healing occurred at the optimum time. PMID:25042193

  5. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  6. The impact of body mass index on complication and survival in resected oesophageal cancer: a clinical-based cohort and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S S; Yang, H; Luo, K J; Huang, Q Y; Chen, J Y; Yang, F; Cai, X L; Xie, X; Liu, Q W; Bella, A E; Hu, R G; Wen, J; Hu, Y; Fu, J H

    2013-01-01

    Background: Body mass index (BMI) has been associated with the risk of oesophageal cancer. But the influence of BMI on postoperative complication and prognosis has always been controversial. Methods: In total, 2031 consecutive patients who underwent oesophagectomy between 1998 and 2008 were classified according to Asian-specific BMI (kg?m?2) cutoff values. The impact of BMI on overall survival (OS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models. We performed a meta-analysis to examine the association of BMI with OS and postoperative complication. Results: Patients with higher BMI had more postoperative complication (P=0.002), such as anastomotic leakage (P=0.016) and cardiovascular diseases (P<0.001), but less incidence of chylous leakage (P=0.010). Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI (P=0.005) was a confounding factor associated with postoperative complication. Multivariate analysis showed that overweight and obese patients had a more favourable survival than normal weight patients (HR (hazard ratio) = 0.80, 95% CI (confidence interval): 0.70–0.92, P=0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that the association with higher BMI and increased OS was observed in patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) (P<0.001), oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) (P=0.034), never-smoking (P=0.035), ever-smoking (P=0.035), never alcohol consumption (P=0.005), weight loss (P=0.003) and advanced pathological stage (P<0.001). The meta-analysis further corroborated that higher BMI was associated with increased complication of anastomotic leakage (RR (risk ratio)=1.04, 95% CI: 1.02–1.06, P=0.001), wound infection (RR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.00–1.05, P=0.031) and cardiovascular diseases (RR=1.02, 95% CI: 1.00–1.05, P=0.039), but decreased incidence of chylous leakage (RR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.96–0.99, P<0.001). In addition, high BMI could significantly improved OS (HR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.71–0.85, P<0.001). Conclusion: Preoperative BMI was an independent prognostic factor for survival, and strongly associated with postoperative complications in oesophageal cancer. PMID:24201750

  7. Outcomes Following Low-Energy Civilian Gunshot Wound Trauma to the Lower Extremities: Results of a Standard Protocol at an Urban Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Abghari, Michelle; Monroy, Alexa; Schubl, Sebastian; Davidovitch, Roy; Egol, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower extremity injuries secondary to low-energy gunshot wounds are frequently seen in the civilian populations of urban areas. Although these wounds have fewer complications than high-energy gunshot injuries, the functional and psychological damage is still significant making appropriate timely orthopaedic treatment and follow-up imperative. Purpose The purpose of this study is to present our outcomes in the treatment of low-energy gunshot wounds in a civilian population at an urban, level one trauma center in patients treated by a standard protocol. Methods One hundred and thirty three patients who sustained 148 gunshot wound injuries were treated at our level one trauma center between January 1st, 2009 and October 1st, 2011. Following IRB approval, we extracted information from medical records regarding hospital course, length of stay and type of operative or non-operative treatment. If available, injury and post-operative radiographs were also reviewed. Patients were contacted by telephone to obtain Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) surveys, pain on a scale of 0–10 and for the determination of any adverse events related to their shooting. Results There were 125 men (94.0%) and 8 women (6.0%) with an average age of 27.1 years (range 15.2–56.3). Seventy-six patients (57.1%) did not have any health insurance upon admission. The average length of stay in the hospital was 4.5 days (range 0.0–88.0). Fifty-one gun shots (34.5%) resulted in fractures of the lower extremities. Patients underwent a total of 95 lower extremity-related procedures during their hospitalization. Twenty-two patients (16.5%) experienced a complication related to their gunshot wounds. 38% of the cohort was available for long-term functional assessment At a mean 23.5 months (range 8–48) of follow up, patients reported mean Functional and Bothersome SMFA scores of 19.6 (SD 15.9) and 10.9 (SD 15.6) suggesting that these patients have poorer function scores than the general population. These patients still had pain related to their gunshot injury with an average pain score of 2.16 (range 0–8). Conclusions Gunshot injuries to the extremities may involve bone, soft tissue, and neurovascular structures. Execution of appropriate therapeutic methods in such situations is critical for treating surgeons given the potential for complications. At our level one trauma center, gunshot victims were predominantly young, uninsured adult men. Complications included infection, compartment syndrome, and arterial injuries. Functional data collected demonstrated that patients continued to have difficulties with ADL's at long-term follow-up. PMID:26361447

  8. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  9. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  10. Superficial Wound Swabbing

    PubMed Central

    Schmohl, Michael; Beckert, Stefan; Joos, Thomas O.; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Löffler, Markus W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In diabetic foot ulcers, wound fluid inflammatory mediators have previously been proposed as surrogate markers for nonhealing. However, currently available wound fluid sampling techniques are not suitable for clinical practice due to low levels of exudate and a high logistical effort. The aim of this investigation was to assess 1) the technique of superficial wound swabbing for harvesting wound fluid; and 2) the quality of the collected fluid for immunoassay analysis of inflammatory mediators. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Both nylon-flocked swabs and film dressings were used to collect wound fluid from foot ulcers of diabetic patients. In randomly selected patients, levels of wound fluid inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteases were determined using multiplexed bead-based sandwich immunoassays with respect to both sampling methods. Wound fluid spike-in experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of different sample processing protocols on subsequent immunoassay analysis. RESULTS Using the swabbing technique, a median amount of 40 µL (2–120 µL) wound exudate was collected, which allowed the measurement of several multiplex panels. Comparing both sampling methods, a similar qualitative protein recovery was observed with a trend to analyte enrichment by swabbing. Sample processing using swabs did not affect analyte recovery, with the exception of interleukin (IL)-8, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, IL-17A, interferon-?–induced protein 10, and IL-4. CONCLUSIONS The quality of wound fluid collected by superficial swabbing is not inferior to the current standard technique. Combined with subsequent bead-based sandwich immunoassay analysis, this new method offers a noninvasive technique, suitable for daily clinical routines, for assessment of inflammatory activity in diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22837363

  11. [Traumatic wounds of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Steinman, E; Utiyama, E M; Pires, P W; Birolini, D

    1990-01-01

    Thirty four (75.5%) individuals sustained gunshot wounds, nine (20%) stab wounds, while two (4.4%) suffered blunt trauma. Thirty four patients (75%) displayed severance of the cervical portion of the esophagus, seven (15.5%) of the thoracic segment and only four (8.8%) had injuries on the abdominal portion. The cervical esophagus was surgically approached through oblique left side cervicotomy with primary suture and drainage with Penrose drain. A postero-lateral right side thoracotomy was employed for lesions of the upper and intermediate portion of the thoracic esophagus. When the lower portion of the esophagus was injured, a left side thoracotomy was employed. When the injury involved less than half of the perimeter of the esophagus suturing with ample drainage was adopted. In more extensive injuries involving over half of the perimeter total esophagectomy was the treatment of choice. In abdominal esophageal injuries laparotomy, suture and drainage were performed. Complications occurred in 40% of all patients. Seven patients died though only one from direct consequences of the esophageal injury. The authors believe that an early surgical approach for traumatic esophageal injuries is the best procedure. Primary suture and drainage score the best results. Other measures (esophagectomy, esophagostomy, gastrostomy) should be adopted only when the injury is either extensive or mediastinal contamination is present. PMID:2135819

  12. Postoperative Vision Loss after Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Scadden, John

    2014-01-01

    We report a case which highlights the rare but devastating complication of postoperative vision loss (POVL) in orthopaedic surgery. Though documented previously, it has not been reported in shoulder arthroplasty surgery of which we present the first case. The aetiology of POVL is difficult to elucidate due to its elusive nature. We explain the risks associated with regional blocks used for such surgery and how this may be related to POVL. We must be vigilant of the possible causes of POVL as curative treatment is often not possible and hence must take preventative measures which we have recommended. Fortunately, the patient fully recovered at 10 months postoperatively with excellent function of her reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:25610682

  13. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM. PMID:24283346

  14. Cuts and puncture wounds

    MedlinePLUS

    Lammers RL. Principles of wound management. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Roberts and Hedges' Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA. Elsevier Saunders; 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, ...

  15. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bacteria, but wounds may have two or more pathogens ( aerobes and/or anaerobes ) that are contributing to ... may indicate a mixture of normal flora and pathogens from a contaminated sample or from a dirty ...

  16. How wounds heal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... smooth or jagged. It may be near the surface of the skin or deeper. Deep wounds can ... infection after surgery. Being overweight can also put tension on stitches, which can make them break open. ...

  17. In vitro electrical-stimulated wound-healing chip for studying electric field-assisted wound-healing process

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yung-Shin; Peng, Shih-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The wound-healing assay is an easy and economical way to quantify cell migration under diverse stimuli. Traditional assays such as scratch assays and barrier assays are widely and commonly used, but neither of them can represent the complicated condition when a wound occurs. It has been suggested that wound-healing is related to electric fields, which were found to regulate wound re-epithelialization. As a wound occurs, the disruption of epithelial barrier short-circuits the trans-epithelial potential and then a lateral endogenous electric field is created. This field has been proved invitro as an important cue for guiding the migration of fibroblasts, macrophages, and keratinocytes, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, we report a microfluidic electrical-stimulated wound-healing chip (ESWHC) integrating electric field with a modified barrier assay. This chip was used to study the migration of fibroblasts under different conditions such as serum, electric field, and wound-healing-promoting drugs. We successfully demonstrate the feasibility of ESWHC to effectively and quantitatively study cell migration during wound-healing process, and therefore this chip could be useful in drug discovery and drug safety tests. PMID:24009651

  18. Topical ampicillin in the appendicectomy wound: Report of double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Rickett, J. W. S.; Jackson, B. T.

    1969-01-01

    One hundred and thirty unselected patients undergoing appendicectomy were treated with topical ampicillin powder or topical placebo powder (lactose) before closing the wound. The postoperative wound infection rates were 3% in the ampicillin-treated group and 24% in the control group, a significant difference. This difference was not influenced by the degree of inflammation in the appendix. No side-effects of treatment were observed. PMID:4900147

  19. Topical ampicillin in the appendicectomy wound: report of double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Rickett, J W; Jackson, B T

    1969-10-25

    One hundred and thirty unselected patients undergoing appendicectomy were treated with topical ampicillin powder or topical placebo powder (lactose) before closing the wound. The postoperative wound infection rates were 3% in the ampicillin-treated group and 24% in the control group, a significant difference. This difference was not influenced by the degree of inflammation in the appendix. No side-effects of treatment were observed. PMID:4900147

  20. Wound dressings - a review.

    PubMed

    Dhivya, Selvaraj; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Santhini, Elango

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process which requires suitable environment to promote healing process. With the advancement in technology, more than 3000 products have been developed to treat different types of wounds by targeting various aspects of healing process. The present review traces the history of dressings from its earliest inception to the current status and also discusses the advantage and limitations of the dressing materials. PMID:26615539

  1. Surgical wound sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, P. J. E.

    1970-01-01

    With the help of a surgical nurse and using data-processing techniques, a prospective clinical study was conducted to determine the wound infection rate in two hospitals in Calgary. The overall sepsis rate was 5.2% and the clean wound rate 3.5%. The latter is the more meaningful figure as it allows for comparison between hospitals, specialties and individuals and is a good guide for hospital morbidity reviews. The groundwork for succeeding wound infection is laid in the operating theatre, and it is believed that wound infection would be reduced more by attention to Halsted's principles than by more rigid aseptic techniques. It is estimated that wound sepsis costs the Province of Alberta 1.5 million dollars per year for hospitalization alone. This amounts to roughly $1 per person per year. The annual cost of a prospective study such as the present one is approximately $7000. This is equivalent to the cost of hospitalizing 24 patients with infected wounds for one week (at $300 per week). One dividend of a prospective study is an associated reduction in infection rate. This reduction more than pays for the cost of the program. PMID:5414538

  2. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  3. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  4. Face lift postoperative recovery.

    PubMed

    Mottura, A Aldo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe what I have studied and experienced, mainly regarding the control and prediction of the postoperative edema; how to achieve an agreeable recovery and give positive support to the patient, who in turn will receive pleasant sensations that neutralize the negative consequences of the surgery.After the skin is lifted, the drainage flow to the flaps is reversed abruptly toward the medial part of the face, where the flap bases are located. The thickness and extension of the flap determines the magnitude of the post-op edema, which is also augmented by medial surgeries (blepharo, rhino) whose trauma obstruct their natural drainage, increasing the congestion and edema. To study the lymphatic drainage, the day before an extended face lift (FL) a woman was infiltrated in the cheek skin with lynfofast (solution of tecmesio) and the absorption was observed by gamma camera. Seven days after the FL she underwent the same study; we observed no absorption by the lymphatic, concluding that a week after surgery, the lymphatic network was still damaged. To study the venous return during surgery, a fine catheter was introduced into the external jugular vein up to the mandibular border to measure the peripheral pressure. Following platysma plication the pressure rose, and again after a simple bandage, but with an elastic bandage it increased even further, diminishing considerably when it was released. Hence, platysma plication and the elastic bandage on the neck augment the venous congestion of the face. There are diseases that produce and can prolong the surgical edema: cardiac, hepatic, and renal insufficiencies, hypothyroidism, malnutrition, etc. According to these factors, the post-op edema can be predicted, the surgeon can choose between a wide dissection or a medial surgery, depending on the social or employment compromises the patient has, or the patient must accept a prolonged recovery if a complex surgery is necessary. Operative measures which prevent extensive edemas are: avoiding transection of the temporal pedicle, or to realizing platysma plication too tight by using strong aspirative drainage instead of elastic bandages. In the post-op, the manual lymphatic drainage is initiated on the third or fifth day, but must be done by a trained professional, in a method contrary to that specified in the books for non-operated individuals. An aesthetician washes the hair and applies decongestive cold tea on the face the second day, and on the fifth, moisturizes the skin and cosmetically conceals any signs of bruising. The psychological support provided by the staff keeps the patient calm and relaxed. Five years experience with this protocol has enabled us to minimize post-op pain. The edema can be predicted with certain consistency (in which surgery there will be more or less edema) and the proper technique can be selected, permitting the patient to choose the best moment for a FL while the surgeon can avoid intra and postoperative measures that increase the edema. After surgery, the patient receives the daily assistance of the staff, which rapidly and efficiently improves this condition. We can predict and control the post-op recovery and the patient feels fine, unlike the past when recovery was abandoned to its natural evolution. If the patient perceived an intensive, positive support on behalf of the entire staff that kept him or her content, then we have succeeded in doing an excellent marketing. This may encourage others to undergo aesthetic surgery, especially those who are convinced that after surgery they might have to endure considerable suffering. PMID:12140694

  5. Bench-to-bedside review: Routine postoperative use of the nasogastric tube – utility or futility?

    PubMed Central

    Tanguy, Michèle; Seguin, Philippe; Mallédant, Yannick

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a summary of current information on rational postoperative use of the nasogastric tube, based on a review of literature related to postoperative gastrointestinal discomfort and management with the nasogastric tube. Routine gastric decompression after major surgery neither hastens the return of bowel function nor diminishes the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. The multimodal postoperative rehabilitation programme is a modern and more efficient approach. Omission of nasogastric tube decompression does not increase the incidence of anastomotic leakage or wound dehiscence. Conversely, early enteral feeding is feasible and safe, favours local immunity and gut integrity, and improves nutritional status. With the objective to feeding, nasogastric tube could be used in selected patients. To conclude, use of the nasogastric tube to prevent or limit postoperative gastrointestinal discomfort must be challenged. In contrast to gastric decompression, early gastric feeding must be considered within the new concept of fast track surgery. PMID:17214909

  6. Management of postoperative spinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vishal; Meredith, Dennis S; Kepler, Christopher K; Huang, Russel C

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after posterior lumbar spine surgery. This review details an approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. Factors contributing to the development of a SSI can be split into three categories: (1) microbiological factors; (2) factors related to the patient and their spinal pathology; and (3) factors relating to the surgical procedure. SSI is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The virulence of the organism causing the SSI can affect its presentation. SSI can be prevented by careful adherence to aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics, avoiding myonecrosis by frequently releasing retractors and preoperatively optimizing modifiable patient factors. Increasing pain is commonly the only symptom of a SSI and can lead to a delay in diagnosis. C-reactive protein and magnetic resonance imaging can help establish the diagnosis. Treatment requires acquiring intra-operative cultures to guide future antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement of all necrotic tissue. A SSI can usually be adequately treated without removing spinal instrumentation. A multidisciplinary approach to SSIs is important. It is useful to involve an infectious disease specialist and use minimum serial bactericidal titers to enhance the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A plastic surgeon should also be involved in those cases of severe infection that require repeat debridement and delayed closure. PMID:23330073

  7. Curcumin-encapsulated nanoparticles as innovative antimicrobial and wound healing agent.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Aimee E; Adler, Brandon L; Cabral, Vitor; Navati, Mahantesh; Doerner, Jessica; Charafeddine, Rabab A; Chandra, Dinesh; Liang, Hongying; Gunther, Leslie; Clendaniel, Alicea; Harper, Stacey; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Burn wounds are often complicated by bacterial infection, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Agents commonly used to treat burn wound infection are limited by toxicity, incomplete microbial coverage, inadequate penetration, and rising resistance. Curcumin is a naturally derived substance with innate antimicrobial and wound healing properties. Acting by multiple mechanisms, curcumin is less likely than current antibiotics to select for resistant bacteria. Curcumin's poor aqueous solubility and rapid degradation profile hinder usage; nanoparticle encapsulation overcomes this pitfall and enables extended topical delivery of curcumin. In this study, we synthesized and characterized curcumin nanoparticles (curc-np), which inhibited in vitro growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in dose-dependent fashion, and inhibited MRSA growth and enhanced wound healing in an in vivo murine wound model. Curc-np may represent a novel topical antimicrobial and wound healing adjuvant for infected burn wounds and other cutaneous injuries. PMID:25240595

  8. [Complication management in prolapse and incontinence surgery].

    PubMed

    Hampel, C; Roos, F; Neisius, A; Thüroff, J W; Thomas, C

    2014-07-01

    Tension-free alloplastic slings (TFAS) have revolutionized surgery for female stress urinary incontinence for more than 20 years. The procedure is easy to perform, minimally invasive with a short operating time in an outpatient setting and has proven efficacy comparable to retropubic colposuspension. The frequency of surgery for female stress incontinence has tripled within one decade which has to have an impact on the number of complications. In contrast, sacrocolpopexy has remained the gold standard in urological prolapse surgery as none of the new techniques has reached similar efficacy or safety; however, possible complications have to be named and their causes have to be understood to maintain the highest quality of care in the future. Possible complications of TFAS are potentially underestimated with respect to prevalence and manageability. Possible complications of prolapse and incontinence surgery are presented and the underlying causes are identified. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and the cause of complications together with the results of a postoperative diagnostic work-up, allow complication management to be tailored to each individual patient. To prevent complications all conservative treatment options should have been tried preoperatively and a complete evaluation (including urodynamics) should have been carried out for every patient. Postoperative urodynamics may help to document treatment success and to identify and quantify complications. PMID:25023238

  9. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  10. Peripheral surgical wounding and age-dependent neuroinflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J; Marcantonio, Edward R; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of ?-amyloid (A?) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent A? accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-?, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

  11. Peripheral Surgical Wounding and Age-Dependent Neuroinflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of ?-amyloid (A?) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent A? accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-?, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

  12. Evaluation of electrical stimulation for ischemic wound therapy: a feasibility study using the lapine wound model.

    PubMed

    Morris, Kimberly A; McGee, Michael F; Jasper, John J; Bogie, Kath M

    2009-04-01

    Chronic wounds are a major secondary complication for many people with impaired mobility. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been recommended as a adjunctive therapy, however optimal treatment paradigms have not been established. Our group seeks to determine the basic mechanisms underlying ES wound therapy, an area where understanding is currently limited. A feasibility study was carried out to develop the Ahn/Mustoe lapine wound model for systematic investigation of the effects of electrical stimulation on ischemic wound therapy. A standardized surgical procedure incorporated a hybrid stimulation system comprising an implantable mini-stimulator and surface electrodes, with creation of repeatable ischemic wounds. Twenty mature male New Zealand white rabbits (3 kg weight) were employed to evaluate the effects of two empirically selected stimulation paradigms applied continuously for 7-21 days, using each animal as its own control. Outcomes measures included transcutaneous blood gas levels, histology, total RNA content and analysis of alpha2 (I) collagen (COL-I), type IV collagen (COL-IV), alpha1 (V) collagen (COL-V), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression using real-time quantitative PCR. All markers for stimulated wounds showed increased activity relative to non-stimulated control wounds between 7 and 14 days following injury, with peak activity at 14 days. By 21 days post-injury, all activity had returned to near baseline level. VEGF and COL-IV levels were found to be significantly higher for pattern A (110 mus pulse width) compared to pattern B (5 mus pulse width) at 14 days, implying that pattern A may be more effective at promoting angiogenesis. All wounds were fully re-epithelialized by 10 days post-injury. Both COL-I and COL-V showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) increased activity between day 7 and day 14 for pattern A, potentially indicating a continued effect on matrix remodeling. The early closure of all wounds implies that the rabbit ear model may not be valid for chronic wound studies. PMID:19050907

  13. Wound cleaning and wound healing: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Robert G; Unverdorben, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic wounds present a significant societal burden in their cost of care, and they reduce patient quality of life. Key components of wound care include such measures as debridement, irrigation, and wound cleaning. Appropriate care removes necrotic tissue and reduces wound bioburden to enhance wound healing. Physical cleaning with debridement and irrigation is of documented efficacy. Wounds may be washed with water, saline, or Ringer's solution or cleaned with active ingredients, such as hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, alcohol, ionized silver preparations, chlorhexidine, polyhexanide/betaine solution, or povidone-iodine--the majority of which are locally toxic and of limited or no proven efficacy in enhancing wound healing. Although the consensus opinion is that these topical cleaning agents should not be routinely used, recent clinical evidence suggests that polyhexanide/betaine may be nontoxic and effective in enhancing wound healing. Further well-designed studies are needed. PMID:23507692

  14. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  15. Immunonutrition: Role in Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chow, Oliver; Barbul, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The role of immunonutrition in wound healing has been an area of both interest and controversy for many years. Although deficiencies in certain nutrients have long been known to impair healing, supplementation of specific immune modulating nutrients has not consistently yielded improvements in wound healing. Still, the prospect of optimizing nutrition to assist the immune system in wound repair bears great significance in both medical and surgical fields, as the costs of wound care and repair cannot be ignored. Recent Advances: Recent studies have rekindled efforts to elucidate the roles of specific immunonutrients, and we now have a better understanding of the conditionally essential role of various nutrients such as arginine, which becomes essential in certain clinical situations such as for the trauma patient or patients at high risk for malnutrition. Immunonutrition in its current formulation usually includes supplementation with arginine, glutamine, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, and trace minerals, and its use has often been associated with decreased infectious complications and sometimes with improvements in wound healing. Critical Issues: A key to understanding the role of immunonutrition in wound healing is recognizing the distinct contributions and importance of the various elements utilized. Future Directions: Critical areas for future study include identifying the specific populations, timing, and ideal composition of immunomodulating diets in order to optimize the wound healing process. PMID:24761344

  16. Efficacy of closed wound suction drainage after single-level lumbar laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Payne, D H; Fischgrund, J S; Herkowitz, H N; Barry, R L; Kurz, L T; Montgomery, D M

    1996-10-01

    The use of closed suction drainage after spinal surgery remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the indications for closed suction drainage after single-level lumbar surgery. Two hundred patients who were scheduled to undergo single-level lumbar surgery without fusion were prospectively randomized into two groups. One group had a closed wound suction drain placed deep to the lumbodorsal fascia before routine closure, whereas the second group had no drain placed. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients before the surgeon had knowledge of the randomization outcome. All drains were removed on the 2nd postoperative day, and the amount of drainage was recorded. After surgery, the patients were evaluated for signs and symptoms of continued wound drainage, hematoma/seroma formation, and/or infection as well as evidence of an acquired neurologic deficit. One hundred three patients had a drain placed before closure and two patients developed postoperative wound infection, both of which were successfully treated with orally administered antibiotics. Of the 97 patients who had no drain placed after the surgical procedure, one patient developed a postoperative wound infection that was treated with surgical incision and drainage, as well as intravenously administered antibiotics. Statistical analysis revealed that the presence or absence of a drain did not affect the postoperative infection rate. No new neurologic deficits occurred in any postoperative patient. The use of drains in single-level lumbar laminectomy without fusion did not affect patient outcome. There was no significant difference in the rate of infection or wound healing and no patient developed a postoperative neurologic deficit. PMID:8938608

  17. [Postoperative care after cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Cordes, Andreas K; Degenring, Robert F; Schrage, Norbert F

    2012-04-01

    The postoperative treatment of cataract surgery is an important element for success of the surgery. The postoperative therapy primarily aims at the prevention of intraocular bacterial infection by administration of antibiotics. Anti-inflammatory drugs can suppress the operation-related inflammation. In addition to fundamental risks of topical eye drop application, this review article discusses the current therapeutic strategies for the prevention of postoperative bacterial infection and suppression of surgically induced inflammation. PMID:22582516

  18. [Treatment of acute postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Langlade, A; Kriegel, I

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a subjective experience involving sensations and perceptions, which may be the result of tissue damage after surgery. Various analgesic drugs and techniques can be used to relief postoperative pain. They must be adapted to the surgery and to the patient. Moreover, adequate management of postoperative pain need to be organized. This include medical attitudes, clinical orientations, disciplinary involvements, consultative protocols and program education. PMID:10868044

  19. Management of human and animal bite wound infection: an overview.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2009-09-01

    Animal and human bite wounds can lead to serious infections. The organisms recovered generally originate from the biter's oral cavity and the victim's skin flora. Anaerobes were isolated from more than two thirds of human and animal bite infections. Streptococcus pyogenes is often recovered in human bites, Pasteurella multocida in animal bites, Eikenella corrodens in animal and human, Capnocytophaga spp, Neisseria weaveri, Weeksella zoohelcum, Neisseria canis, Staphylococcus intermedius, nonoxidizer-1, and eugonic oxidizer-2 in dog, Flavobacterium group in pig, and Actinobacillus spp in horse and sheep bites. Vibrio spp, Plesiomonas shigelloides, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Pseudomonas spp can cause infections in bites associated with marine settings. In addition to local wound infection, complications include lymphangitis, local abscess, septic arthritis, tenosynovitis, and osteomyelitis. Uncommon complications include endocarditis, meningitis, brain abscess, and sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation especially in immunocompromised individuals. Wound management includes administering local care and using proper antimicrobial therapy when needed. PMID:19698283

  20. Pharmacological management of postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Farhad; Stulberg, Jonah J; Delaney, Conor P

    2009-04-01

    The duration of postoperative ileus following abdominal surgery is quite variable, and prolonged postoperative ileus is an iatrogenic phenomenon with important influence on patient morbidity, hospital costs and length of stay in hospital. Adequate treatment for prolonged postoperative ileus is important to improve patient morbidity and clinical efficiency. Both clinical and pharmacological management strategies have improved rapidly over the last decade, and appropriate and timely management using multimodal techniques should be used for optimal care. In this review, we define postoperative ileus, describe the pathogenesis and briefly discuss clinical management before detailing potential pharmacologic management options. PMID:19399212

  1. Wounds caused by corn-harvesting machines: an unusual source of infection due to gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Agger, W A; Cogbill, T H; Busch, H; Landercasper, J; Callister, S M

    1986-01-01

    The infectious complications in 23 patients with mutilating wounds due to trauma during corn harvesting were compared with those in 41 patients with factory-related hand injuries of similar severity. Initial cultures revealed bacterial growth in 89% of the agricultural wounds and in 63% of the factory wounds. A mean of 3.8 initial bacterial species were isolated per corn-harvesting wound vs. 0.9 species per factory wound. Gram-negative rods were recovered from 81% of the agricultural wounds; the commonest of these organisms were Enterobacter species and Xanthomonas maltophilia. Only 7% of factory-wound cultures grew gram-negative rods. Osteomyelitis, all with gram-negative rods, developed in five (22%) of the patients with farm injuries but did not occur in patients with factory wounds. More gram-negative rods were recovered from environmental cultures of corn-harvesting machines and corn plants than from those of factory machinery. PMID:3797937

  2. [Atypical maxillofacial shot wound].

    PubMed

    Malachovský, I; Straka, L; Novomeský, F; Statelová, D; Janícková, M; Stilla, J; Urbanová, E

    2011-01-01

    Maxillofacial shot wounds belong to the relatively less frequent injuries. The soft tissues might be affected in particular, however the most of injuries are combined with infliction of hard tissues. Shot wounds by the bow or crossbow are very rare. They might result as a consequence of either accident or suicide. In the literature some cases of a suicidal experiments had been published, all of these cases were due to arrow from the crossbow. There was no injury being documented due to arrow from the bow. The authors present a case of maxillofacial injury done by shoot of arrow from the bow in the course of a child's play. PMID:21416697

  3. Management of radiation wounds

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Subramania; Balasubramanian, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy forms an integral part in cancer treatment today. It is used alone or in combination with surgery and chemotherapy. Although radiotherapy is useful to effect tumour death, it also exerts a deleterious effect on surrounding normal tissues. These effects are either acute or can manifest months or years after the treatment. The chronic wounds are a result of impaired wound healing. This impairment results in fibrosis, nonhealing ulcers, lymphoedema and radionecrosis amongst others. This article will discuss the pathophysiology in brief, along with the manifestations of radiation-induced injury and the treatment available currently PMID:23162232

  4. Imaging assessment of gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Reginelli, Alfonso; Russo, Anna; Maresca, Duilia; Martiniello, Ciro; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Brunese, Luca

    2015-02-01

    Gunshot injuries occur when someone is shot by a bullet or other sort of projectile from a firearm. Wounds are generally classified as low velocity (less than 609.6m/s) or high velocity (more than 609.6m/s). Those with higher velocity may be expected, on this basis, to dissipate more energy into surrounding tissue as they are slow and cause more tissue damage, but this is only a very approximate guide. However, these terms can be misleading; more important than velocity is the efficiency of energy transfer, which is dependent on the physical characteristics of the projectile, as well as the kinetic energy, stability, entrance profile and path traveled through the body, and the biological characteristics of the tissues injured. Hemodynamically stable patients and patients who stabilized after simple immediate resuscitation were evaluated with a careful history and physical examination. A routine x-ray is performed in patients with gunshot wounds. Indication for total body computed tomography (CT) is based on the presence of signs and symptoms of vascular damage at clinical examination. Patients are immediately transferred in the operating room for surgery if more serious injuries that require immediate surgical care are not diagnosed, or hemostasis may be preliminary reached in the emergency room. Hemodynamically stable patients with no history and clinical examination showing suspected vascular damage are allowed in the radiology department for obtaining a total body CT scan with intravenous contrast medium and then transferred to the surgical ward trauma for observation. After 24 hours without the complications, patient can be discharged. CT is the procedure of choice to identify hemorrhage, air, bullet, bone fragments, hemothorax, nerve lesion, musculoskeletal lesions, and vessels injuries and is useful for assessing medicolegal aspects as trajectory and the anatomical structures at risk. PMID:25639178

  5. A Meta-Analysis of Complications following Deceased Donor Liver Transplant

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Lisa; Daud, Amna; Davis, Ashley; Lapin, Brittany; Baker, Talia; Abecassis, Michael; Levitsky, Josh; Holl, Jane L.; Ladner, Daniela P

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation is a complex surgery associated with high rates of postoperative complications. While national outcomes data are available, national rates of most complications are unknown. Data Sources A systematic review of the literature reporting rates of postoperative complications between 2002 and 2012 was performed. A cohort of 29,227 deceased donor liver transplant recipients from 74 studies was used to calculate pooled incidences were for 17 major postoperative complications. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive review of postoperative complications after liver transplantation and can serve as a guide for transplant and non-transplant clinicians. Efforts to collect national data on complications, such as through the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, would improve the ability to provide patients with informed consent, serve as a tool for individual center performance monitoring, and provide a central source against which to measure interventions aimed at improving patient care. PMID:25118164

  6. The TopClosure® 3S System, for skin stretching and a secure wound closure.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris; Carmel, Narin-Nard; Silberman, Adi; Li, Ming Sen; Li, Yong Zhong

    2012-07-01

    The principle of stretching wound margins for primary wound closure is commonly practiced and used for various skin defects, leading at times to excessive tension and complications during wound closure. Different surgical techniques, skin stretching devices and tissue expanders have been utilized to address this issue. Previously designed skin stretching devices resulted in considerable morbidity. They were invasive by nature and associated with relatively high localized tissue pressure, frequently leading to necrosis, damage and tearing of skin at the wound margins. To assess the clinical effectiveness and performance and, to determine the safety of TopClosure® for gradual, controlled, temporary, noninvasive and invasive applications for skin stretching and secure wound closing, the TopClosure® device was applied to 20 patients for preoperative skin lesion removal and to secure closure of a variety of wound sizes. TopClosure® was reinforced with adhesives, staples and/or surgical sutures, depending on the circumstances of the wound and the surgeon's judgment. TopClosure® was used prior to, during and/or after surgery to reduce tension across wound edges. No significant complications or adverse events were associated with its use. TopClosure® was effectively used for preoperative skin expansion in preparation for dermal resection (e.g., congenital nevi). It aided closure of large wounds involving significant loss of skin and soft tissue by mobilizing skin and subcutaneous tissue, thus avoiding the need for skin grafts or flaps. Following surgery, it was used to secure closure of wounds under tension, thus improving wound aesthetics. A sample case study will be presented. We designed TopClosure®, an innovative device, to modify the currently practiced concept of wound closure by applying minimal stress to the skin, away from damaged wound edges, with flexible force vectors and versatile methods of attachment to the skin, in a noninvasive or invasive manner. PMID:22719176

  7. Postoperative nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a long-standing issue, not a new concept in anesthesiology. Despite many studies over the last several decades, PONV remains a significant problem due to its complex mechanism. This review presents a summary of the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PONV, focusing on preventive treatment, particularly the use of new drugs. In addition, we discuss the latest meta-analysis results regarding correct clinical use of classic drugs. I also summarize the latest trends of postdischarge nausea and vomiting and the pharmacogenetics, which is attracting a great deal of attention from other medical fields in PONV-related studies. Finally, we discuss the drawbacks of existing studies on PONV and suggest a focus for future investigations. PMID:25302092

  8. Wound healing and antibacterial properties of methanolic extract of Pupalia lappacea Juss in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound healing is a natural process that enables tissue repair after an injury. To shorten its duration and minimize associated complications, wounds are treated with medications. Currently there is a growing interest in the use of alternative wound dressing agents such as plant extracts. One plant used traditionally in wound treatment is Pupalia lappacea. In view of its use in wound care, we investigated the wound healing activities of 80% methanolic leave extract of Pupalia lappacea using excision, incision and dead space wound models. Also its effects on three common wound contaminants were investigated. Methods Excision wounds were created, contaminated with microbes and treated with ointments (10% and 20% w/w) prepared from Pupalia lappacea. Incision and dead space wounds were also created in rats which were subsequently dosed orally with the extract. The wound healing activities of Pupalia lappacea ointment on excision wound was assessed by rates of wound contraction and epithelialization as well as its antibacterial effects. The effects of Pupalia lappacea on incision and dead-space wounds were determined by the wound breaking strengths and weights of the granuloma tissues formed, respectively. Results Pupalia. lappacea ointments significantly (p?wound healing with 20% ointment having the highest percentage wound contraction and rate of epithelialization. At 4, 7 and 14 days post treatment, mean total viable bacterial count of excision wounds of the extract treated groups were significantly (p?Wound breaking strengths and weights of granuloma tissues formed in the extract treated groups were significantly (p?wound healing and antibacterial activities. These findings validate the use of this plant in traditional medicine for treatment of wounds. PMID:24886368

  9. [Useful wound management at home].

    PubMed

    Mizuhara, Akihiro; Taguchi, Akemi; Sato, Mikako; Shindo, Kazuko

    2014-12-01

    In wound care, close observation of the quantity and nature of exudate from a wound, and selection of appropriate dressing and/or medication are crucial. Care should be taken to prevent wounds with excessive exudate from becoming too moist. Furthermore, wound care at home must be easy, which is achievable through the use of readily available materials and medications. 1 ) A wound with little to moderate exudate should be treated using wrap therapy with perforated polyethylene sheets. This therapy can be used to treat pressure ulcers, wounds, wounds with slough, and burns. 2 ) An 18-gauge needle can be used to perforate wounds with little exudate, such as mild pressure ulcers or wounds with slough, and polyurethane film can then be applied. 3 ) Polyurethane film should be applied to blisters, pressure ulcers, or similar skin injuries with little exudate. 4 ) A hydrocolloid dressing should be used on wounds with light exudate. 5 ) An ointment containing steroids should be applied to critically colonized wounds. 6 ) Melolin dressings, Moiskin Pads, or a disposable diaper should be used to manage wounds with heavy exudate. PMID:25595088

  10. Methods for the postoperative management of the thoracic oncology patients: lessons from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Giovanni; Facciolo, Francesco; Pastorino, Ugo; Rocco, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    Oncological thoracic surgery comprises challenging procedures not only from a surgical point of view but also regarding the postoperative management. The most significant procedures performed for malignancy are those requiring resection of the lung, the pleura, the esophagus, mediastinal structures, the chest wall and airways. Especially after major procedures, postoperative complications occur frequently and usually require a multidisciplinary approach involving thoracic surgeons, anesthesiologists, pulmonologist, physiotherapists and oncologists. Thus, a proper postoperative management is as important as the surgical procedure to achieve the best outcome following surgery. In this article, we provide an overview of the basic principles for management of postoperative imaging and drain system and review the main postoperative complications following thoracic surgery, focusing also on new strategies to prevent them. PMID:26536136

  11. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, Eric E. (Apple Valley, MN); Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

    1999-01-01

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

  12. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  13. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-04-27

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

  14. The reinnervation and revascularization of wounds is temporarily altered after treatment with interleukin 10.

    PubMed

    Henderson, James; Ferguson, Mark W J; Terenghi, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Denervated wounds fail to heal normally, and hypertrophic scars are abnormally innervated. Wounds can be manipulated with cytokines to reduce subsequent scarring. Wounds treated with the antiscarring cytokine interleukin 10 (IL10) were investigated to assess if the treatment alterered patterns of reinnervation and revascularization as the wounds matured into scars. Thirty CD1 mice underwent intradermal injection of 100 ?L phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing 125 ng IL10 or placebo at the margins of 1 cm(2) full thickness dorsal skin excisions at the time of wounding and at 24 hours after wounding. Wounds were not dressed. Six IL10-treated and six control were harvested days 7, 14, 21, 42 and 84 postoperatively. Sections underwent histological scar assessment along with immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), a pan-neuronal marker, and the sensory neuropeptides calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). The endothelial marker von Willebrand factor (VWF) was used to allow co-localization and quantification of blood vessels. Quantitative analysis was performed on the periphery and center of wounds. Wounds treated with IL10 healed with dermal collagen organized into a pattern more closely resembling normal skin than control wounds. IL10 changed the pattern of CGRP reinnervation during the healing process, but at 84 days, the density levels of all nerve fiber types were similar to controls. Wounds treated with IL10 were more vascular than untreated wounds during healing, but by 84 days, VWF density was that of unwounded skin. PMID:21362095

  15. Selected Case From the Arkadi M. Rywlin International Pathology Slide: Massive Localized Lymphedema in Morbid Obesity Complicated by a Nonspecific Subcutaneous Abscess.

    PubMed

    Gunawardane, Dimuth N; Allen, Philip W

    2015-11-01

    A 59-year-old morbidly obese female developed an ulcerated, slowly growing, 25 cm, subcutaneous, pendulous mass in the right groin which became infected and was excised in January 2014. The excised skin and subcutaneous fat weighed 1901 g. The skin exhibited a cobblestone appearance, the dermis was thickened and edematous, and the subcutaneous fat was traversed by fibrous septae. Histologically, there were dilated, thin-walled vessels, perivascular chronic inflammatory cells, slightly atypical macrophages, and expanded subcutaneous fibrous septae surrounding degenerating adipocytes resembling lipoblasts. Nearly all the Club members agreed with the submitted diagnosis of massive localized lymphedema in morbid obesity. Postoperatively, the wound healed well, there has been no recurrence or further infection as of July 2015, but the patient suffers from diabetes and congestive cardiac, the more common complications of morbid obesity. PMID:26452214

  16. Incidence of Postoperative Ptosis Following Trabeculectomy With Mitomycin C

    PubMed Central

    Naruo-Tsuchisaka, Asako; Arimoto, Go; Goto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the incidence of postoperative ptosis following trabeculectomy by comparing preoperative and postoperative margin reflex distance (MRD), and to analyze the clinical factors associated with ptosis. Patients and Methods: Patients who underwent trabeculectomy with mitomycin C in unilateral eye between 2010 and 2012 were enrolled. MRD was measured before and 3 and 6 months after trabeculectomy. The MRD is the distance between the light reflex at central cornea and the upper eyelid margin when the patient gazed at a pen light placed 50 cm away straightly. Postoperative ptosis was defined as a decrease in MRD?2 mm from preoperative level. The correlation among ?MRD (difference between preoperative and 6 mo postoperative MRD) and clinical factors comprising age, spherical equivalent, preoperative MRD, 6-month postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP), and IOP reduction (difference between preoperative and 6 mo postoperative IOP) was analyzed. Results: Thirty-six patients (36 eyes) were analyzed. Preoperative median MRD was not different between the operated eye and nonoperated fellow eye (both 4.0 mm, P=0.65). The 3- and 6-month postoperative MRD in the operated eye were significantly reduced compared with preoperative MRD (3.0 mm, P=0.04 and 2.5 mm, P=0.01, respectively). The 3- and 6-month postoperative MRD in the nonoperated eye were not different from preoperative MRD (4.0 mm, P=0.81 and 4.0 mm, P=0.85, respectively). The incidence of ptosis at 6 months after operation was 19% (7 of 36 eyes). The IOP was significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months after operation (both P<0.01). No correlation was observed between ?MRD and all the factors analyzed. Conclusions: Ptosis is a major complication following trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, with an incidence of 19% at 6 months after operation. PMID:25318575

  17. Office management of minor wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, S.; Patel, H.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review office interventions for minor wounds not requiring sutures, such as abrasions, bites, and lacerations. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Most information on minor wound management comes from descriptive studies. Few comparative studies examine the effectiveness of topical antisepsis for minor wounds. Several clinical trials have demonstrated that tissue adhesives produce short- and long-term cosmetic results equivalent to those achieved with suture materials. MAIN MESSAGE: Sterile saline is the least toxic solution for wound irrigation. Chlorhexidine (2%) and povidone iodine (10%) have been the most investigated antiseptic solutions. Systemic antibiotics are unnecessary for wounds unlikely to be infected. All bite wounds require special attention. Primary closure of bite wounds is indicated in certain circumstances: less than 12-hour-old nonpuncture wounds, uninfected wounds, and low-risk lesions (such as on the face). In spite of their many advantages, skin tapes should be used for low-tension wounds only. The popularity of tissue adhesives has greatly increased. Since the advent of newer products (with increased bonding strength and flexibility), adhesives are used to manage most lacerations except those in areas of high tension (e.g., joints) and on mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSION: Minor wounds not requiring sutures can be managed easily in the office. PMID:11340758

  18. The revisit of 2004 tsunami in Thailand: characteristics of wounds.

    PubMed

    Prasartritha, Thavat; Tungsiripat, Rachata; Warachit, Pairoj

    2008-03-01

    The name, tsunami that was unknown to most Thai people, had hit west southern coast of Thailand on 26 December 2004. Following the disaster, prices have been paid and many lessons have been learnt. The current report provides a historical background of the incident, which was reviewed by documents, brief discussion and observation. Data of the patients from three hospitals involved in the management were collected and reviewed. Some of the illustrations were from the operating rooms of Takuapa, Surat Thani and Songklanagarind hospitals. There were totally 2311 patients. Of these, 45% were males and 40% were multinationals. Nearly 40% suffered from salted water aspiration, while 2% developed complication associated with near drowning. The most common orthopaedic-related injury were minor [559 patients (24%)] and major wounds [586 (25%)]. Around 7% sustained fracture dislocation. Lower extremity fractures were more common. The characteristics of wounds associated with the tsunami were severe contamination, multiple sites and organ involvement. Another characteristic was the early development and spreading of infection. The lessons proposed by the study are that minor wound should be left open, small penetrating wound should be thoroughly explored and observed and lacerated wounds need emergency dressing, debridement and subsequent cleansing procedures. Re-evaluation and closed surveillance of the seriously injured patients are mandatory to eliminate the complicated infection and life-threatening conditions. Medical record of any disastrous event should be completed by health care professionals. The model and reporting system should be internationalised. PMID:18336378

  19. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  20. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings. PMID:25530825

  1. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing using a novel protease-anti-protease combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Nguyen, Trung T; Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Gooyit, Major; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2015-12-01

    Nonhealing chronic wounds are major complications of diabetes resulting in >70,000 annual lower-limb amputations in the United States alone. The reasons the diabetic wound is recalcitrant to healing are not fully understood, and there are limited therapeutic agents that could accelerate or facilitate its repair. We previously identified two active forms of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-8 and MMP-9, in the wounds of db/db mice. We argued that the former might play a role in the body's response to wound healing and that the latter is the pathological consequence of the disease with detrimental effects. Here we demonstrate that the use of compound ND-336, a novel highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and MMP-14, accelerates diabetic wound healing by lowering inflammation and by enhancing angiogenesis and re-epithelialization of the wound, thereby reversing the pathological condition. The detrimental role of MMP-9 in the pathology of diabetic wounds was confirmed further by the study of diabetic MMP-9-knockout mice, which exhibited wounds more prone to healing. Furthermore, topical administration of active recombinant MMP-8 also accelerated diabetic wound healing as a consequence of complete re-epithelialization, diminished inflammation, and enhanced angiogenesis. The combined topical application of ND-336 (a small molecule) and the active recombinant MMP-8 (an enzyme) enhanced healing even more, in a strategy that holds considerable promise in healing of diabetic wounds. PMID:26598687

  2. [Postoperative computed tomography control of allogeneic vascular prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwicker, C; Langer, M; Cordes, M; Langer, R; Hepp, W; Felix, R

    1989-03-01

    33 CT-studies of 26 patients with alloplastic vascular prostheses were evaluated and compared with postoperative digital subtraction-angiography in 16 cases. 13 patients had no pathologic findings confirmed by further clinical development. In 4 cases bypass infection was diagnosed, which CT findings were perigraft gas (2/4), perigraft fluid (4/4), cm-enhancement (4/4) and fistulas (2/4). 10-21 d. post.-op. sterile hematomas were found in 3 patients. Further 3 cases had 5 weeks-2 post.-op. perigraft seromas. CT was method of first choice for diagnostic of perivascular alterations after bypass surgery. DSA was complementary to CT and should be performed to detect vascular complications. PMID:2706889

  3. Hydrogel Microencapsulated Insulin-Secreting Cells Increase Keratinocyte Migration, Epidermal Thickness, Collagen Fiber Density, and Wound Closure in a Diabetic Mouse Model of Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Aijaz, Ayesha; Faulknor, Renea; Berthiaume, François; Olabisi, Ronke M

    2015-11-01

    Wound healing is a hierarchical process of intracellular and intercellular signaling. Insulin is a potent chemoattractant and mitogen for cells involved in wound healing. Insulin's potential to promote keratinocyte growth and stimulate collagen synthesis in fibroblasts is well described. However, there currently lacks an appropriate delivery mechanism capable of consistently supplying a wound environment with insulin; current approaches require repeated applications of insulin, which increase the chances of infecting the wound. In this study, we present a novel cell-based therapy that delivers insulin to the wound area in a constant or glucose-dependent manner by encapsulating insulin-secreting cells in nonimmunogenic poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel microspheres. We evaluated cell viability and insulin secretory characteristics of microencapsulated cells. Glucose stimulation studies verified free diffusion of glucose and insulin through the microspheres, while no statistical difference in insulin secretion was observed between cells in microspheres and cells in monolayers. Scratch assays demonstrated accelerated keratinocyte migration in vitro when treated with microencapsulated cells. In excisional wounds on the dorsa of diabetic mice, microencapsulated RIN-m cells accelerated wound closure by postoperative day 7; a statistically significant increase over AtT-20ins-treated and control groups. Histological results indicated significantly greater epidermal thickness in both microencapsulated RIN-m and AtT-20ins-treated wounds. The results suggest that microencapsulation enables insulin-secreting cells to persist long enough at the wound site for a therapeutic effect and thereby functions as an effective delivery vehicle to accelerate wound healing. PMID:26239745

  4. Hydrogel Microencapsulated Insulin-Secreting Cells Increase Keratinocyte Migration, Epidermal Thickness, Collagen Fiber Density, and Wound Closure in a Diabetic Mouse Model of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Faulknor, Renea; Berthiaume, François; Olabisi, Ronke M.

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a hierarchical process of intracellular and intercellular signaling. Insulin is a potent chemoattractant and mitogen for cells involved in wound healing. Insulin's potential to promote keratinocyte growth and stimulate collagen synthesis in fibroblasts is well described. However, there currently lacks an appropriate delivery mechanism capable of consistently supplying a wound environment with insulin; current approaches require repeated applications of insulin, which increase the chances of infecting the wound. In this study, we present a novel cell-based therapy that delivers insulin to the wound area in a constant or glucose-dependent manner by encapsulating insulin-secreting cells in nonimmunogenic poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel microspheres. We evaluated cell viability and insulin secretory characteristics of microencapsulated cells. Glucose stimulation studies verified free diffusion of glucose and insulin through the microspheres, while no statistical difference in insulin secretion was observed between cells in microspheres and cells in monolayers. Scratch assays demonstrated accelerated keratinocyte migration in vitro when treated with microencapsulated cells. In excisional wounds on the dorsa of diabetic mice, microencapsulated RIN-m cells accelerated wound closure by postoperative day 7; a statistically significant increase over AtT-20ins-treated and control groups. Histological results indicated significantly greater epidermal thickness in both microencapsulated RIN-m and AtT-20ins-treated wounds. The results suggest that microencapsulation enables insulin-secreting cells to persist long enough at the wound site for a therapeutic effect and thereby functions as an effective delivery vehicle to accelerate wound healing. PMID:26239745

  5. Use of collagenase ointment in conjunction with negative pressure wound therapy in the care of diabetic wounds: a case series of six patients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John D.; Carter, Elizabeth; Hatch, David C.; Zhubrak, Michelle; Giovinco, Nicholas A.; Armstrong, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic wounds with additional comorbidities are costly, time intensive, and difficult to heal. Often, multiple modalities may be necessary to achieve wound resolution, relying on the synergistic advantage of each therapy to affect wound healing. The selectivity of Clostridium collagenase is physiologically effective at degrading non-viable collagen fibers while preserving living collagen tissue. Additionally, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has long been used to aid wound healing while concurrently depreciating biological wound burden time. Methods Six patients were selected from those appearing to our university based limb salvage service. Inclusion criteria included patients with a recurrent mixed fibrotic and granular wound base, in which NPWT was indicated, without exclusion criteria. Patients enrolled were administered clostridial collagenase ointment at each regularly scheduled NPWT dressing change. Patients were followed until healing, with visual representations of wound progression and time to full healing recorded. Results Tandem application of these therapies appeared to expedite wound healing by clearing degenerative fibrous tissue and expediting wound granulation without additional complication. Unfortunately, not all patients were able to reach full healing; with two patients experiencing ulcer recurrence, likely a result of their significant comorbid nature. Conclusion In our experience, we have noticed a specific subgroup of patients who benefit greatly when collagenase enzymatic debridement therapy is combined with NPWT. It is our belief that this combination therapy combines the molecular clearing of non-viable collagen with the wound granulation necessary to advance complex wounds to the next step in healing despite the current paucity in literature discussing this specific pairing. PMID:25630362

  6. Indications and postoperative treatment for Ex-PRESS® insertion in Japanese patients with glaucoma: comparison with standard trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Noriko; Takahashi, Genichiro; Kumegawa, Koichi; Kabata, Yoshiaki; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated indications and early postoperative treatment for Ex-PRESS® insertion for glaucoma by comparing postoperative outcomes with those for standard trabeculectomy. Methods Ex-PRESS insertion was performed in 21 eyes and standard trabeculectomy (TLE) in 22 eyes. Mean intraocular pressure (IOP) in the 6 months after surgery, success rate for postoperative IOP decline, postoperative complications, postoperative treatment, filtering blebs, and indications were then retrospectively investigated. Results Mean postoperative IOP did not differ significantly between the groups at any observation time for 6 months after surgery. Further, it did not differ between either the groups of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and neovascular glaucoma (NTG), or the patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and NTG in the Ex-PRESS group. Comparison of success rates in reduction of postoperative IOP between the groups under the following four survival conditions showed no significant differences: postoperative IOP <30% of the preoperative IOP, complete success (no additional ophthalmic solution), and qualified success (ophthalmic solution required); 5 mmHg ? postoperative IOP ?21 mmHg, complete success (no additional ophthalmic solution), and qualified success (ophthalmic solution required). With regard to postoperative complications and postoperative treatment, the incidence of hyphema was significantly lower in the Ex-PRESS group, but no other significant intergroup differences were seen. The height of the filtering bleb was lower in the Ex-PRESS group. Conclusion Postoperative outcomes in the Ex-PRESS and TLE groups were comparable. The incidence of hyphema was significantly lower in the Ex-PRESS group. Ex-PRESS insertion appears to be useful in patients with NTG and in those prone to postoperative bleeding. There were no significant intergroup differences in postoperative treatment. Assessment of outcome after Ex-PRESS insertion was difficult in some patients. Postoperative treatment should be developed to suit the specific requirements of Ex-PRESS insertion. PMID:26316691

  7. The effect of local anaesthetic wound infiltration on chronic pain after lower limb joint replacement: A protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background For the majority of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), joint replacement is a successful intervention for relieving chronic joint pain. However, between 10-30% of patients continue to experience chronic pain after joint replacement. Evidence suggests that a risk factor for chronic pain after joint replacement is the severity of acute post-operative pain. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to determine if intra-operative local anaesthethic wound infiltration additional to a standard anaethesia regimen can reduce the severity of joint pain at 12-months after total knee replacement (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) for OA. Methods 300 TKR patients and 300 THR patients are being recruited into this single-centre double-blind RCT. Participants are recruited before surgery and randomised to either the standard care group or the intervention group. Participants and outcome assessors are blind to treatment allocation throughout the study. The intervention consists of an intra-operative local anaesthetic wound infiltration, consisting of 60 mls of 0.25% bupivacaine with 1 in 200,000 adrenaline. Participants are assessed on the first 5 days post-operative, and then at 3-months, 6-months and 12-months. The primary outcome is the WOMAC Pain Scale, a validated measure of joint pain at 12-months. Secondary outcomes include pain severity during the in-patient stay, post-operative nausea and vomiting, satisfaction with pain relief, length of hospital stay, joint pain and disability, pain sensitivity, complications and cost-effectiveness. A nested qualitative study within the RCT will examine the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention for both patients and healthcare professionals. Discussion Large-scale RCTs assessing the effectiveness of a surgical intervention are uncommon, particulary in orthopaedics. The results from this trial will inform evidence-based recommendations for both short-term and long-term pain management after lower limb joint replacement. If a local anaesthetic wound infiltration is found to be an effective and cost-effective intervention, implementation into clinical practice could improve long-term pain outcomes for patients undergoing lower limb joint replacement. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN96095682 PMID:21352559

  8. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    PubMed

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the treatment of acute pain.Non-pharmacological methods for the management of postoperative pain include acupuncture, electromagnetic millimetre waves, hypnosis and the use of music during surgery. However, further research of these techniques is warranted to elucidate their effectiveness in this indication. Pain is a multifactorial experience, not just a sensation. Emotion, perception and past experience all affect an individual's response to noxious stimuli. Improved postoperative pain control through innovation and creativity may improve compliance, ease of delivery, reduce length of hospital stay and improve patient satisfaction. Patient education, early diagnosis of symptoms and aggressive treatment of pain using an integrative approach, combining pharmacotherapy as well as complementary technique, should serve us well in dealing with this complex problem. PMID:12678572

  9. Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation

    E-print Network

    Stromswold, Karin

    1 Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation Preterm Labor Labor that starts and uterine tenderness. Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy induced high blood sugar. Diabetes that begins in pregnancy and goes away after delivery. Preeclampsia (hypertension) Pregnancy induced high blood pressure

  10. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    You, Je Sung; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  11. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications.

    PubMed

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Yong Eun; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  12. Minimally Invasive Sinus Tarsi Approach With Cannulated Screw Fixation Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure for Treatment of Severe Open Calcaneal Fractures With Medial Wounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taiyuan; Yan, Yan; Xie, Xinmin; Mu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our prospective study was to investigate the clinical results and advantages of a minimally invasive sinus tarsi approach with cannulated screw fixation combined with vacuum-assisted closure for the treatment of severe open calcaneal fractures with medial wounds. A total of 31 patients (32 feet) with open calcaneal fractures who were admitted to our hospital from January 2008 to May 2013 were selected for the study and randomly divided into 2 groups: the cannulated screw group (n = 16 patients, 16 feet) and the plate group (n = 15 patients, 16 feet). The Böhler and Gissane angles were compared before and after surgery. The clinical results were evaluated using according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale and the rate of infection. The follow-up duration for all patients ranged from 10 to 36 (mean 24) months. No statistically significant differences were found in the radiologic indicators, incidence of early postoperative complications, or American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scores (p > .05) between the 2 groups. However, a statistically significant difference was seen in the duration of hospitalization (p < .05) between the 2 groups. A minimally invasive sinus tarsi approach with cannulated screw fixation combined with vacuum-assisted closure is an effective method for the treatment of severe open calcaneal fractures with medial wounds. It provides good reduction and requires fewer days of hospitalization. PMID:26372552

  13. [Prospective study of the MEDIZIP surgical zipper in relation to efficacy of skin closure, course of wound healing, and results of the healing process in surgical wounds].

    PubMed

    Hasse, F M; Rademacher, C; Bokel, G

    1999-01-01

    A skin closing system formed like a zipper (MEDIZIP) was tested in a total of 75 operated patients. The handling, wound healing, and scar formation at two and six to eight weeks postoperatively were evaluated. The time required for closing of the skin was on average 2.3 min. The ease of handling during operation and wound inspections was rated very good to good in 88% and 86%, respectively. Cosmetically and therapeutically, the results of scar formation are of high quality. The comfort of the skin closure was evaluated by the patients as pleasant, the assessment of the scars was positive. PMID:10327577

  14. Post-operative cyclizine misuse.

    PubMed

    Woodfield, J; St George, E J

    2013-11-01

    Cyclizine is commonly prescribed as an anti-emetic post-operatively. We report a case of a 51-year-old woman who developed addiction to intravenous cyclizine following regular administration at recommended doses. This is the first report of cyclizine misuse post-operatively. We compare this case to cyclizine abuse reported amongst other populations. Prescribers should be aware of the potential of cyclizine as a drug of abuse. PMID:24215049

  15. Complications of Medium Depth and Deep Chemical Peels

    PubMed Central

    Nikalji, Nanma; Godse, Kiran; Sakhiya, Jagdish; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin

    2012-01-01

    Superficial and medium depth peels are dynamic tools when used as part of office procedures for treatment of acne, pigmentation disorders, and photo-aging. Results and complications are generally related to the depth of wounding, with deeper peels providing more marked results and higher incidence of complications. Complications are also more likely with darker skin types, certain peeling agents, and sun exposure. They can range from minor irritations, uneven pigmentation to permanent scarring. In very rare cases, complications can be life-threatening. PMID:23378707

  16. Fluid Lavage of Open Wounds (FLOW): design and rationale for a large, multicenter collaborative 2 × 3 factorial trial of irrigating pressures and solutions in patients with open fractures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Open fractures frequently result in serious complications for patients, including infections, wound healing problems, and failure of fracture healing, many of which necessitate subsequent operations. One of the most important steps in the initial management of open fractures is a thorough wound irrigation and debridement to remove any contaminants. There is, however, currently no consensus regarding the optimal approach to irrigating open fracture wounds during the initial operative procedure. The selection of both the type of irrigating fluid and the pressure of fluid delivery remain controversial. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of irrigation solutions (soap vs. normal saline) and pressure (low vs. high; gravity flow vs. high; low vs. gravity flow) on re-operation within one year among patients with open fractures. Methods/Design The FLOW study is a multi-center, randomized controlled trial using a 2 × 3 factorial design. Surgeons at clinical sites in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit 2 280 patients who will be centrally randomized into one of the 6 treatment arms (soap + low pressure; soap + gravity flow pressure; soap + high pressure; saline + low pressure; saline + gravity flow pressure; saline + high pressure). The primary outcome of the study is re-operation to promote wound or bone healing, or to treat an infection. This composite endpoint of re-operation includes a narrow spectrum of patient-important procedures: irrigation and debridement for infected wound, revision and closure for wound dehiscence, wound coverage procedures for infected or necrotic wound, bone grafts or implant exchange procedures for established nonunion in patients with postoperative fracture gaps less than 1 cm, intramedullary nail dynamizations in the operating room, and fasciotomies for compartment syndrome. Patients, outcome adjudicators, and data analysts will be blinded. We will compare rates of re-operation at 12 months across soap vs. saline, low pressure vs. high pressure, gravity flow pressure vs. high pressure, and low pressure vs. gravity flow pressure. We will measure function and quality of life with the Short Form-12 (SF-12) and the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) at baseline, 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months after initial surgical management, and measure patients' illness beliefs with the Somatic Pre-Occupation and Coping (SPOC) questionnaire at 1 and 6 weeks. We will also compare non-operatively managed infections, wound healing, and fracture healing problems at 12 months after initial surgery. Discussion This study represents a major international effort to identify a simple and easily applicable strategy for emergency wound management. The importance of the question and the potential to identify a low cost treatment strategy argues strongly for global participation, especially in low and middle income countries such as India and China where disability from traumatic injuries is substantial. Trial Registration This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00788398). PMID:20459600

  17. Delayed Wound Healing in Heat Stable Antigen (HSA/CD24)-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Shiran; Ben-Amotz, Oded; Sher, Osnat; Kazanov, Dina; Mashiah, Jacob; Kraus, Sarah; Gur, Eyal; Arber, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthy individuals rarely have problems with wound healing. Most skin lesions heal rapidly and efficiently within one to two weeks. However, many medical and surgical complications can be attributed to deficiencies in wound repair. Open wounds have lost the barrier that protects tissues from bacterial invasion and allows the escape of vital fluids. Without expeditious healing, infections become more frequent. The CD24 gene encodes a heavily-glycosylated cell surface protein anchored to the membrane by phosphatidylinositol. CD24 plays an important role in the adaptive immune response and controls an important genetic checkpoint for homeostasis and autoimmune diseases in both mice and humans. We have previously shown that overexpression of CD24 results in increased proliferation and migration rates. Aim To examine the role of CD24 in the wound healing process. Methods An excisional model of wound healing was used and delayed wound healing was studied in genetically modified heat stable antigen (HSA/CD24)-deficient mice (HSA-/-) compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Results Large full-thickness skin wounds, excised on the back of mice, exhibited a significant delay in the formation of granulation tissue, and in wound closure when compared to their WTHSA+/+ littermates. Wounds were histologically analyzed and scored, based on the degree of cellular invasion, granulation tissue formation, vascularity, and re-epithelialization. Additionally, in stitched wounds, the HSA-/- mice failed to maintain their stitches; they did not hold and fell already 24 hours, revealing erythematous wound fields. Re-expression of HSA, delivered by lentivirus, restored the normal healing phenotype, within 24 hours post-injury, and even improved the healing in WT, and in BalbC mice. Conclusions Delayed wound-healing in the absence of HSA/CD24 suggests that CD24 plays an important role in this process. Increased expression of CD24, even in the normal state, may be used to enhance wound repair. PMID:26440795

  18. Postoperative Alterations in Taste and Smell

    PubMed Central

    Elterman, Kelly Galina; Mallampati, Seshagiri Rao; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Context: Alterations in taste and smell, including but not limited to anosmia, ageusia, hypogeusia, and dysgeusia, have been described in association with various medications, including anesthetic agents. Frequently, these symptoms occur 1-2 weeks after medication administration and last several months. While such a phenomenon is a rare occurrence, it nonetheless can significantly impact patients’ satisfaction and quality of life. Evidence Acquisition: The methodology consisted of a thorough literature search using the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases utilizing keywords such as anosmia, ageusia, olfactory disorders, postoperative, and anesthesia. Results: Our results yielded several previously published case report, and were not limited to a specific type of anesthesia. Based on available literature, we review the physiology of taste and smell as well as the medications associated with loss of these senses. We describe perioperative agents that could lead to postoperative complications associated with anosmia and and ageusia. Conclusions: Based on available literature recommendations for anesthesiologists caring for patients at risk for this occurrence are presented in this review. The symptoms are usually temporary as in the majority of the patients the sensory receptor cells are able to regenerate themselves after injury. Anesthesia providers need to aware of this phenomenon to be able to reassure patients and possibly avoid anesthetic techniques associated with anosmia and ageusia. PMID:25599025

  19. [Postoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer and cardiotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Nagykálnai, Tamás; Nagy, A Csaba; Landherr, László

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac complications may present a particular problem following radiation treatment applied to the mediastinum and thoracic wall (and especially to the left breast). Exposure of the heart during radiotherapy increases the risk of ischemic heart disease occurring generally years after the treatment. The incidence of radiation cardiotoxicity depends on various factors related to oncological therapies and the patient (details of radiotherapy, age, gender, comorbidities, smoking habits, etc.). Until recently the majority of clinical studies reported increased cardiac morbidity in patients receiving radiation treatment of the chest wall and the breast. Due to modern methods, however, postoperative chest wall and left breast irradiation is much safer today than previously. In order to avoid cardiotoxicity, adherence to clinical practice guidelines for chemo- and targeted therapy of breast cancer, use of the most advanced irradiation procedures, regular monitoring of patients, and close cooperation between cardiologists and oncologists are all recommended. PMID:24880968

  20. [Neurological complications of surgery for spinal deformities].

    PubMed

    Michel, F; Rubini, J; Grand, C; Bérard, J; Kohler, R; Michel, C R

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to precisely analyse the physio-pathogenic mechanisms, bring to light the risk factors, and find a more practical way of proceeding in spinal surgery. Out of 667 spinal instrumentation surgical operations carried out between 1980-1989, we found 33 (4.8 per cent) neurological complications and have divided them into 2 groups: 7 peripheral complications, 26 cord and central complications. After further analysis, especially of the cord complications (2.5 per cent), we were able to pick out the factors which influence the rate of neurological complications and their evolution: secondary aetiology and the kyphotic composition of spinal deformation, and above all the notion of cord at risk. The delay of cord complications and especially the relation between the severity of the neurological syndrome and its evolution is extremely important. Somesthesic evoked potential monitoring confirmed that per operative diagnosis of a cord injury is possible. The steps to take when confronted with neurological complications, depend on the results of many examinations: pre and post-operative neurological evaluations electrophysiological exploration of the cord and neuro radiological explorations (myelography, scanner and IRM). This helps to complete aetiology and eliminate mechanical causes, which are the only positive indications of iterative surgery. The problems of instrumentation removal in emergency and the legal-medical aspect brought on by this type of complication are discussed. PMID:1410727

  1. Management of complicated duodenal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Oukachbi, N; Brouzes, S

    2013-06-01

    The duodenum is the second most common location of intestinal diverticula after the colon. Duodenal diverticulum (DD) is usually located in the second portion of the duodenum (D2), close to the papilla. Most duodenal diverticula are extraluminal and acquired rather than congenital; more rare is the congenital, intraluminal diverticulum. DD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, but can become symptomatic in 1% to 5% of cases when complicated by gastroduodenal, biliary and/or pancreatic obstruction, by perforation or by hemorrhage. Endoscopic treatment is the most common first-line treatment for biliopancreatic complications caused by juxtapapillary diverticula and also for bleeding. Conservative treatment of perforated DD based on fasting and broad-spectrum antibiotics may be offered in some selected cases when diagnosis is made early in stable patients, or in elderly patients with comorbidities who are poor operative candidates. Surgical treatment is currently reserved for failure of endoscopic or conservative treatment. The main postoperative complication of diverticulectomy is duodenal leak or fistula, which carries up to a 30% mortality rate. PMID:23810155

  2. Use of Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Median Sternal Incisions after Cardiothoracic Surgery: Clinical Evidence and Consensus Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M.; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors’ own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  3. Healing in the irradiated wound

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

  4. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  5. Synthesis of type I collagen in healing wounds in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Haukipuro, K; Melkko, J; Risteli, L; Kairaluoma, M; Risteli, J

    1991-01-01

    To quantify wound healing in surgical patients, samples of wound fluid were collected through a silicone rubber tube for 7 postoperative days and their concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) were measured with specific radioimmunoassays. The mean concentration of PICP in would fluid on day 1 was 207 +/- 92 (SD) micrograms/L, and on day 2 908 +/- 469 micrograms/L (p less than 0.001, signed rank test). On day 7, the mean concentration reached was 380 times higher than that of day 1 (79,330 +/- 54,151 micrograms/L). Only one peak of PICP antigenicity, corresponding to the intact propeptide as set free during synthesis of type I procollagen, was detected on Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration analysis of wound fluid samples. The mean concentration of PIIINP was 70 +/- 61 micrograms/L on day 1, 86 +/- 88 micrograms/L on day 2, and 180 +/- 129 micrograms/L on day 3 (p less than 0.001 when compared with day 1). Finally on day 7, a 250-fold concentration (17,812 +/- 9839 micrograms/L), compared with day 1, was reached. Methods described in the present paper allow separate and repetitive quantification of the synthesis of both type I and type III procollagen during human wound healing. PMID:1985542

  6. [Gunshot wound to the kidney: case report and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Maruschke, M; Hakenberg, O W

    2008-04-01

    Gunshot wounds to the kidney occur with different regional incidence. They are commonly combined with thoracic and abdominal injuries. Gunshot wounds may be caused by low-velocity or high-velocity bullets. The latter are usually used with military weapons and cause a higher degree of tissue damage. The therapeutic management of renal gunshot wounds has changed in recent decades resulting in more organ-preserving strategies. An imperative indication for surgical exploration of the kidney is critical renal bleeding with symptoms of hypovolaemic shock. We report the case of a 23-year-old male admitted to the hospital with combined gunshot wounds from a small-bore weapon with damage of the liver, stomach and the left kidney. There were no signs of thoracic injuries. The patient underwent transabdominal exploration with treatment of the liver and stomach lesions, removal of the bullet and preservation of the left kidney. A percutaneous nephrostomy and drainage of the retroperitoneal region were inserted; antibiotic prophylaxis was given. A 4-week postoperative intravenous pyelogram showed complete integrity of the upper left tract and good renal function. PMID:18210067

  7. Closed incision management with negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Pascal M; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2014-07-01

    Post-sternotomy mediastinitis is the most severe surgical site infection after sternotomy with an incidence between 1-4% related to the patient co-morbidity. This complication will increase morbidity and mortality and may also have an economic impact. There are guidelines to prevent surgical site infections; however, age and co-morbidities increase and therefore it is important to develop new tools to improve wound healing. This manuscript will give an overview of a new concept using negative pressure wound therapy over a closed incision (so-called, closed incision management) after surgery and will include the principles of negative pressure wound therapy and the positively applied mechanical forces as a permutation of Wolff's law. The use and indication of this therapy is supported by experimental studies divided into physiological and biomechanical property studies. Finally, an overview of clinical studies is given based on the evidence rating scale for therapeutic studies. PMID:24754343

  8. Perioperative Complications of Orthopedic Surgery for Lower Extremity in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Because complications are more common in patients with cerebral palsy (CP), surgeons and anesthesiologists must be aware of perioperative morbidity and be prepared to recognize and treat perioperative complications. This study aimed to determine the incidence of and risk factors for perioperative complications of orthopedic surgery on the lower extremities in patients with CP. We reviewed the medical records of consecutive CP patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Medical history, anesthesia emergence time, intraoperative body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, immediate postoperative complications, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, Cormack-Lehane classification, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification were analyzed. A total of 868 patients was included. Mean age at first surgery was 11.8 (7.6) yr. The incidences of intraoperative hypothermia, absolute hypotension, and absolute bradycardia were 26.2%, 4.4%, and 20.0%, respectively. Twenty (2.3%) patients had major complications, and 35 (4.0%) patients had minor complications postoperatively. The incidences of intraoperative hypothermia, absolute hypotension, and major postoperative complications were significantly higher in patients at GMFCS levels IV and V compared with patients at GMFCS levels I to III (P<0.001). History of pneumonia was associated with intraoperative absolute hypotension and major postoperative complications (P<0.001). These results revealed that GMFCS level, patient age, hip reconstructive surgery, and history of pneumonia are associated with adverse effects on intraoperative body temperature, the cardiovascular system, and immediate postoperative complications. PMID:25829819

  9. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  10. Wounded Nucleons, Wounded Quarks, and Relativistic Ion Collisions

    E-print Network

    Helena Bialkowska

    2006-09-06

    A concept of wounded nucleons and/or wounded quarks plays an important role in parametrizing and to some extent explaining many a feature of the relativistic ion collisions. This will be illustrated in a historical perspective, up to and including the latest developpments.

  11. Impact of surgical approach on postoperative delirium in elderly patients undergoing gastrectomy: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Hee; Jeong, Hee-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery and is associated with a poor outcome. We compared postoperative delirium in elderly patients following laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) versus open gastrectomy (OG). Methods In total, 130 patients aged ? 65 years with gastric cancer undergoing LG and OG were enrolled prospectively. Postoperative delirium and cognitive status were assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), respectively, for 3 days postoperatively. For CAM-positive patients, delirium severity was then assessed using the Delirium Index (DI). Results In total, 123 subjects (LG, n = 60; OG, n = 63) were included in the analysis. In both groups, the overall incidences of postoperative delirium were similar: 31.6% (19/60) in the LG group and 41.2% (26/63) in the OG group. When considering only those with delirium, the severity, expressed as the highest DI score, was similar between the groups. A decline in cognitive function (reduction in MMSE ? 2 points from baseline) during 3 days postoperatively was observed in 23 patients in the LG group (38.3%) and 27 patients in the OG group (42.9%) (P = 0.744). In both groups, postoperative cognitive decline was significantly associated with postoperative delirium (P < 0.001). Conclusions We found that, compared with traditional open gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastrectomy did not reduce either postoperative delirium or cognitive decline in elderly patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26257851

  12. Topical application of Cleome viscosa increases the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and type III collagen in rat cutaneous wound.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Aadesh; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Goyary, Danswrang; Mazumder, Papiya M; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Cleome viscosa L. (Cleomaceae) is an important traditional medicine of the Indian-Ayurvedic and Chinese-medicine system documented for rheumatic arthritis, hypertension, malaria, neurasthenia, and wound healing. The plant is also known as Asian spider flower and is distributed throughout the greater part of India. The present study explored the wound healing property of C. viscosa methanol extract (CvME) and its related mechanism using Wistar rat cutaneous excision wound model. Wound contraction rate, hydroxyproline quantification, and histopathological examination of wound granulation tissue were performed. The healing potential was comparatively assessed with a reference gentamicin sulfate hydrogel (0.01% w/w). Western blot for COL3A1, bFGF, and Smad-2, Smad-3, Smad-4, and Smad-7 was performed with 7-day postoperative granulation tissue. Results revealed that the topical application of CvME (2.5% w/w) significantly accelerated the wound contraction rate (95.14%, 24 postoperative days), increased the hydroxyproline content (3.947 mg/100 mg tissue), and improved histopathology of wound tissue as compared to control groups. Western blot analysis revealed that CvME significantly upregulated the expression of COL3A1 and bFGF and increased the Smad-mediated collagen production in granulation tissue. These findings suggest that C. viscosa promoted the wound repair process by attenuating the Smad-mediated collagen production in wound granulation tissue. PMID:24864253

  13. Topical Application of Cleome viscosa Increases the Expression of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Type III Collagen in Rat Cutaneous Wound

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Aadesh; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Mazumder, Papiya M.; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Cleome viscosa L. (Cleomaceae) is an important traditional medicine of the Indian-Ayurvedic and Chinese-medicine system documented for rheumatic arthritis, hypertension, malaria, neurasthenia, and wound healing. The plant is also known as Asian spider flower and is distributed throughout the greater part of India. The present study explored the wound healing property of C. viscosa methanol extract (CvME) and its related mechanism using Wistar rat cutaneous excision wound model. Wound contraction rate, hydroxyproline quantification, and histopathological examination of wound granulation tissue were performed. The healing potential was comparatively assessed with a reference gentamicin sulfate hydrogel (0.01% w/w). Western blot for COL3A1, bFGF, and Smad-2, Smad-3, Smad-4, and Smad-7 was performed with 7-day postoperative granulation tissue. Results revealed that the topical application of CvME (2.5% w/w) significantly accelerated the wound contraction rate (95.14%, 24 postoperative days), increased the hydroxyproline content (3.947?mg/100?mg tissue), and improved histopathology of wound tissue as compared to control groups. Western blot analysis revealed that CvME significantly upregulated the expression of COL3A1 and bFGF and increased the Smad-mediated collagen production in granulation tissue. These findings suggest that C. viscosa promoted the wound repair process by attenuating the Smad-mediated collagen production in wound granulation tissue. PMID:24864253

  14. Wound healing: calcium flashes illuminate early events.

    PubMed

    Wood, Will

    2012-01-10

    What are the earliest signals produced at a wound edge that mobilise epithelial cells to heal the wound? Live analysis of wound healing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans shows that calcium may be the key early trigger. PMID:22240471

  15. Perioperative Complications in Patients with Inflammatory Arthropathy Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schnaser, Erik A; Browne, James A; Padgett, Douglas E; Figgie, Mark P; D'Apuzzo, Michele R

    2015-09-01

    Little data exists comparing acute post-operative outcomes in patients with different types of inflammatory arthritis (IA) after undergoing a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Our objectives were to compare perioperative complications and determine the most common complications between the different IA subtypes compared with patients with osteoarthritis undergoing primary TKA. We found significant differences when comparing complications within the different subtypes of IA. RA patients, despite having a greater number of comorbidities had a reduced rate of medical complications postoperatively compared to the OA cohort. All of the inflammatory subtypes had a higher rate of orthopedic complications postoperatively compared to the OA group except for patients with AS. However, ankylosing spondylitis had the highest mortality rate as well as medical complication rate among the subtypes. PMID:26111792

  16. Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described. PMID:23285333

  17. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF ACUTE POST-OPERATIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT & ITS ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anuj; Kaur, Kirtipal; Sharma, Sheeshpal; Goyal, Shubham; Arora, Saahil; Murthy, R.S.R

    2010-01-01

    Management of postoperative pain relieve suffering and leads to earlier mobilization, shortened hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An effective postoperative management is not a standardized regime rather is tailored to the needs of the individual patient, taking into account medical, psychological, and physical condition; age; level of fear or anxiety; surgical procedure; personal preference; and response to therapeutic agents given. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is to minimize the dose of medications to lessen side effects & provide adequate analgesia. Postoperative pain is still under managed due to obstacles in implementation of Acute Pain Services due to insufficient education, fear of complications associated with available analgesic drugs, poor pain assessment and inadequate staff. This review reflects the clinical aspects of postoperative pain & its assessment & management with an emphasis on research for new analgesic molecules & delivery system. PMID:22247838

  18. Multimodal imaging of ischemic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Liu, Peng; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, no method is available for noninvasive, simultaneous, and quantitative imaging of these tissue parameters. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities into a single setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Advanced algorithms were developed for accurate reconstruction of wound oxygenation and appropriate co-registration between different imaging modalities. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated by an ongoing clinical trials approved by OSU IRB. In the clinical trial, a wound of 3mm in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was serially monitored by the multimodal imaging setup. Our experiments demonstrated the clinical usability of multimodal wound imaging.

  19. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of standard wound management versus negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of adult patients with an open fracture of the lower limb: UK Wound management of Open Lower Limb Fractures (UK WOLFF)

    PubMed Central

    Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Bruce, Julie; Petrou, Stavros; Tutton, Elizabeth; Willett, Keith; Lamb, Sarah E; Costa, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients who sustain open lower limb fractures have reported infection risks as high as 27%. The type of dressing applied after initial debridement could potentially affect this risk. In this trial, standard dressings will be compared with a new emerging treatment, negative pressure wound therapy, for patients with open lower limb fractures. Methods and analysis All adult patients presenting with an open lower limb fracture, with a Gustilo and Anderson (G&A) grade 2/3, will be considered for inclusion. 460 consented patients will provide 90% power to detect a difference of eight points in the Disability Rating Index (DRI) score at 12?months, at the 5% level. A randomisation sequence, stratified by trial centre and G&A grade, will be produced and administered by a secure web-based service. A qualitative substudy will assess patients’ experience of giving consent for the trial, and acceptability of trial procedures to patients and staff. Patients will have clinical follow-up in a fracture clinic up to a minimum of 12?months as per standard National Health Service (NHS) practice. Functional and quality of life outcome data will be collected using the DRI, SF12 and EQ-5D questionnaires at 3, 6, 9 and 12?months postoperatively. In addition, information will be requested with regards to resource use and any late complications or surgical interventions related to their injury. The main analysis will investigate differences in the DRI score at 1?year after injury, between the two treatment groups on an intention-to-treat basis. Tests will be two sided and considered to provide evidence for a significant difference if p values are less than 0.05. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was given by NRES Committee West Midlands—Coventry & Warwickshire on 6/2/2012 (ref: 12/WM/0001). The results of the trial will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and presentations at relevant conferences. Trial registration number ISRCTN33756652. PMID:26395498

  20. Effect of Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 on Wound Healing in Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    El Gazaerly, Hanaa; Elbardisey, Dorria M.; Eltokhy, Heba M.; Teaama, Doaa

    2013-01-01

    Objective Delayed wound healing is one of the complications of diabetes mellitus, exhibited by profound inflammation and decreased granulation tissues. The current study was carried out to evaluate wound healing in both normal and diabetic rats. In addition, it evaluated the potential protective effect of transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF ?1), that has the broadest spectrum of actions, affecting all cell types that are involved in all stages of wound healing to accelerate wound healing in normal & diabetic rats. Methods : The present study was performed on 40 male albino rats. Each 10 rats were designed as a group. Group I saved as control. They received incisional wound in their tongues 1 cm length and 1/2 cm depth. Group II received 500 ng/kg of TGF ?1 5 minutes before wounding. Group III diabetes was induced then rats were treated as second group. At the 14th day post wounding, sections of tongues were taken for hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichome staining to examine the histological changes. The intracellular actions of TGF ?1 were studied by TEM. Results A higher cell proliferation rate and a denser and more organized new extracellular matrix and complete wound closure was detected at the 14th days in the TGF ?1 treated wound in comparison with the 14th days for the untreated, control groups. There were delayed wound healing in diabetic rats, decreased re-epithelialization, granulation tissue thickness, matrix density, number of infiltrated cells, and number of capillaries. In TGF ?1 treated diabetic rats, showed significant healing improvement was obvious as compared with diabetic rats. Conclusions A single intravenous injection of TGF ?1 was sufficient to enhance wound healing in rat's tongue. This approach represents a new strategy that may be applied to the treatment of incisional wounds in human diabetic patients. PMID:24421745

  1. Prognostic factors predicting ischemic wound healing following hyperbaric oxygenation therapy.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Idov, Yulie; Melamed, Yehuda; Linn, Shai; Ore, Liora

    2013-01-01

    Identifying patients who benefit from hyperoxygenation therapy is important, because treatment is time-consuming and involves high costs and complications (minor). Our objective was to develop a model for predicting therapy outcome based on population of patients with and without diabetes. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a major hospital in Israel. All 385 patients treated between 1/1/1998 and 1/1/2007 for ischemic nonhealing lower extremities wounds were included. Data on medical history, demographic, transcutaneous oximetry, wounds, treatment, and outcome characteristics were collected. Eight factors were identified to optimally predict wound healing: (1) number of hyperbaric oxygenation treatments (odds ratio [OR]?=?1.034, p?wound duration (OR?=?0.988, p?=?0.022), (4) absence of heart disease (OR?=?3.304, p?wound appearance (OR?=?2.73, p?=?0.022), (7b) wounds covered with fibrin (OR?=?3.16, p?=?0.015), and (8) absence of anemia (OR?=?2.13, p?=?0.016). The model's sensitivity is 78.7%, specificity is 62.9%, and accuracy is 71.8%. We suggest using our model as an adjunct to patients' clinical evaluation. Also, we recommend initiating hyperoxygenation therapy no later than 2 months after wound appearance. PMID:23590699

  2. Portable single port 23-gauge vitrectomy in postoperative endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Fabian; Kretz, Florian TA; Sheth, Saumil; Natarajan, S; Singh, Pankaj; Koch, Frank H; Koss, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Intrector® for treating postoperative endophthalmitis. Materials and methods In a retrospective multicenter study, patients who received a single port 23-gauge core pars plana vitrectomy and isovolumetric injection of vancomycin, ceftazidime, and dexamethasone/amphotericin B using the Intrector® for postoperative endophthalmitis of intermediate severity (grade II or III vitreous inflammation and best-corrected visual acuity between hand movements and 0.3 logMAR [logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution]) were evaluated. Improvement in visual acuity, resolution of intraocular inflammation, the need for additional surgical procedures, and the development of complications were evaluated at a 1-month follow-up examination. Results Fifteen patients (mean age 55.6±7.2 years) underwent treatment with the Intrector®. The mean vitreous volume aspirated was 0.78±0.22 mL. The vitreous samples indicated positive microorganism culture results in six of the 15 cases, but the samples were positive when analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in all cases (15/15). The mean best-corrected visual acuity improved significantly (P=0.01) from 0.88±0.29 (logMAR) to 0.32±0.28. Each patient demonstrated at least three lines of visual improvement. No additional medical or surgical interventions were required, and the complete resolution of intraocular inflammation was noted in all patients at the 1-month follow-up examination. No procedure-related complications were observed. Conclusion The Intrector® may be a safe and effective treatment option for infectious postoperative endophthalmitis. Larger studies comparing the outcomes of the Intrector® to the traditional treatments for postoperative endophthalmitis need to be conducted before its role in the treatment of postoperative endophthalmitis can be properly defined. PMID:26316685

  3. Closure or Non-Closure of Peritoneum in Cesarean Section: Outcomes of Short-Term Complications

    PubMed Central

    Tabasi, Zohreh; Mahdian, Mehrdad; Abedzadeh-Kalahroudi, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide. The complications following a CS include fever, wound infection, post-operative pain and bleeding which are not usually found in a normal vaginal delivery. Traditionally, suturing of peritoneal layers for CS patients has been done, but in some studies it has been shown that this procedure could be eliminated without affecting the rate of morbidity. Objectives The objective of this study was to assess the short-term outcomes of two different cesarean delivery techniques. Patients and Methods A total of 100 cases who underwent CS were randomly assigned equally to either closure of both the visceral and parietal peritoneum or no peritoneum closure. Duration of operation, pain scores, analgesic requirements, alterations in hemoglobin levels and febrile morbidity were assessed accordingly. Results Pain scores, analgesic requirements assessed at 24 hours and operation duration were significantly lower in the non-closure group as compared to the closure group. Febrile conditions and changes in hemoglobin levels were similar in both groups. Conclusions Non-closure of both visceral and the parietal peritoneum when performing a CS produces a significant reduction in pain, fewer analgesic requirements and a shorter operation duration without increasing the febrile morbidity and changes in hemoglobin levels as compared to the standard methods. PMID:24396774

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid A? to Tau Ratio and Postoperative Cognitive Change

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhongcong; McAuliffe, Sayre; Swain, Celeste A.; Ward, Sarah A. P.; Crosby, Catherine A.; Zheng, Hui; Sherman, Janet; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Sunder, Neelakantan; Burke, Dennis; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determination of biomarker and neuropathogenesis of postoperative cognitive change (POCC) or postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Background POCC is one of the most common postoperative complications in elderly patients. Whether preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ?-amyloid protein (A?) to tau ratio, an Alzheimer disease biomarker, is a biomarker for risk of POCC remains unknown. We therefore set out to assess the association between preoperative CSF A?42 or A?40 to tau ratio and POCC. Methods Patients who had total hip/knee replacement were enrolled. The CSF was obtained during the administration of spinal anesthesia. Cognitive tests were performed with these participants at 1 week before and at 1 week and 3 to 6 months after the surgery. Z scores of the changes from preoperative to postoperative on several key domains of the cognitive battery were determined. We then examined the association between preoperative CSF A?42/tau or A?40/tau ratio and the outcome measures described earlier, adjusting for age and sex. Results Among the 136 participants (mean age = 71 ± 5 years; 55% men), preoperative CSF A?42/tau ratio was associated with postoperative Hopkins Verbal Learning Test Retention [Z score 8.351; age, sex-adjusted (adj.) P = 0.003], and the Benton Judgment of Line= Orientation (Z score 1.242; adj. p = 0.007). A?40/tau ratio was associated with Brief Visuospatial Memory Test Total Recall (Z score = 1.045; adj. P = 0.044). Conclusions Preoperative CSF A?/tau ratio is associated with postoperative changes in specific cognitive domains. The presence of the Alzheimer's disease biomarker, specifically the A?/tau ratio, may identify patients at higher risk for cognitive changes after surgery. PMID:23732272

  5. [Nursing Experience With Providing Wound Care for a Newborn With Epidermolysis Bullosa].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Yi; Hsu, Mei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare hereditary, chromosomal disease of the skin. Life-threatening septicemia may result if appropriate care is not provided to alleviate the extensive skin irritation that is the main symptom of this disease. This case report describes the experience of the author in nursing a wound area on a newborn that was suspected of being caused by EB. This wound area comprised blisters and peeling skin that covered 30% of the entire skin area of the infant. A holistic assessment conducted from December 1st, 2013 to January 7th, 2014 revealed that this large of an area of damage to the skin and mucosa considerably complicated the task of wound care and caused severe pain to the infant. In response to the special needs of this case, our medical team conducted a literature review of wound care for this rare disease. Based on the suggestions of previous empirical studies, nursing measures for the skin, mucosa, and wounds of the newborn were then administered through inter-team cooperation. These actions effectively reduced the pain, controlled the infection, and accelerated wound healing. In addition, progressive contact was used to guide the primary caregivers of the newborn, which alleviated their physical and psychological stresses effectively. The caregivers were educated systematically on wound care and guided to learn techniques for nursing and dressing wounds. Thus, these caregivers were better prepared to continue providing wound care at home. We suggest that healthcare professionals reference empirical studies when providing care to EB newborns during the acute-care period and provide wound care and supportive therapies to control the occurrence of complications using a multidisciplinary team-care model. In addition, social resources should be used effectively in nursing care plans to mitigate the effect of this rare disease on families. PMID:26645451

  6. Outcomes of WHO Grade I Meningiomas Receiving Definitive or Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzler, Emily; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Amdur, Robert J.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We analyzed long-term local control and complications in patients with either pathologically confirmed or clinical World Health Organization Grade I meningiomas treated with definitive or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Methods: Between 1984 and 2006, 146 patients were treated with definitive (n = 88) or postoperative RT after subtotal resection (n = 57) or gross total resection (n = 1). Patients were treated with conventional (n = 41), stereotactic (n = 103), or intensity-modulated RT (n = 2) to a median dose of 52.7 Gy and followed for a median of 7.3 years (range, 0.6-22.0 years) Results: The local control rates at 5 and 10 years were as follows: definitive RT, 99% and 99%; postoperative RT, 96% and 93%; and overall, 97% and 96%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were as follows: definitive RT 94% and 94%, postoperative RT, 100% and 96%; and overall, 96% and 95%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were as follows: definitive RT, 81% and 75%; postoperative RT, 96% and 85%; and overall, 87% and 79%, respectively. Severe RT complications occurred in 6.8% of patients; severe surgery-related complications occurred in 10 (17%) of 58 patients treated surgically. Conclusions: The likelihood of cure after definitive RT or following subtotal resection is excellent. However, a small population of patients experience severe complications, even at the moderate dose used for this disease.

  7. Necrotising fasciitis in a domestic shorthair cat--negative pressure wound therapy assisted debridement and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nolff, M C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2015-04-01

    A 10-year-old, domestic shorthair cat was presented for acute lameness of the left forelimb accompanied by severe pain, swelling, skin necrosis, malodorous discharge and pyrexia. Following a presumptive diagnosis of necrotising fasciitis aggressive surgical debridement of the affected soft tissues of the antebrachium and negative pressure wound treatment of the open defect were performed. Surgical findings supported the tentative diagnosis of necrotising fasciitis and Streptococcus canis was isolated from the wound. A free skin graft was performed 29 days after admission, and augmented by 3 days of negative pressure wound therapy to facilitate graft incorporation. Healing was achieved without complications and no functional or aesthetic abnormalities remained. PMID:25323110

  8. Recovery of anaerobic bacteria from wounds after lawn-mower injuries.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2005-02-01

    Accidental injury while using lawn mowers can cause serious infectious complications in the injured extremity. Anaerobic bacteria were rarely recovered from this infection. Two children who sustained injury in their foot by a lawn mower developed severe wound infection. Culture of the wound from 1 patient had heavy growth of Clostridium bifermentans and Peptostreptococcus magnus, and the culture from the other child grew Clostridium perfringens. Antimicrobial therapy directed at the pathogens and vigorous surgical irrigation and debridement led to complete recovery from the infection. This report illustrates the recovery of anaerobic bacteria from children that had wound infection after lawn-mower injury. PMID:15699821

  9. Wound healing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tisi, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases (CuAO) and flavin-containing amine oxidases (PAO) are hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of polyamines. Currently, a key role has been ascribed to apoplastic amine oxidases in plants, i.e., to behave as H2O2-delivering systems in the cell wall during cell growth and differentiation as well as in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Indeed, H2O2 is the co-substrate for the peroxidase-driven reactions during cell-wall maturation and a key signalling molecule in defence mechanisms. We recently demonstrated the involvement of an apoplastic PAO in the wound-healing process of the Zea mays mesocotyl. Experimental evidence indicated a similar role for an apoplastic PAO in Nicotiana tabacum. In this addendum we suggest that a CuAO activity is also involved in this healing event. PMID:19704660

  10. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  11. Modeling of anisotropic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Menzel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Biological soft tissues exhibit non-linear complex properties, the quantification of which presents a challenge. Nevertheless, these properties, such as skin anisotropy, highly influence different processes that occur in soft tissues, for instance wound healing, and thus its correct identification and quantification is crucial to understand them. Experimental and computational works are required in order to find the most precise model to replicate the tissues' properties. In this work, we present a wound healing model focused on the proliferative stage that includes angiogenesis and wound contraction in three dimensions and which relies on the accurate representation of the mechanical behavior of the skin. Thus, an anisotropic hyperelastic model has been considered to analyze the effect of collagen fibers on the healing evolution of an ellipsoidal wound. The implemented model accounts for the contribution of the ground matrix and two mechanically equivalent families of fibers. Simulation results show the evolution of the cellular and chemical species in the wound and the wound volume evolution. Moreover, the local strain directions depend on the relative wound orientation with respect to the fibers.

  12. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  13. Postoperative Delayed Duodenum Perforation following Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Jing, Kong; Shuo-Dong, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Background. Duodenum injury is extremely rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy with potentially fatal consequences. Methods. Over the past 13-year period, 3000 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed in our institution. Duodenum injury only occurred in one patient recently who had undergone gastrectomy owing to duodenal diverticulum. The diagnosis and management of this rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy are described, and the literature is reviewed. Results. We present this case of duodenum injury on the fourth postoperative day after selective laparoscopic cholecystectomy was treated successfully by percutaneous needle aspiration and catheter drainage. The hospital stay was 26 days. No abscess recurred during the follow-up period. Conclusion. Duodenum injuries are extremely rare complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy with potentially fatal consequences if not promptly recognized and treated. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle aspiration and catheter drainage can be used to treat the intraperitoneal abscess. Billroth II subtotal gastrectomy and gastrojejunostomy were beneficial for the treatment. PMID:24790609

  14. Postoperative Delayed Duodenum Perforation following Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Kong; Shuo-Dong, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Background. Duodenum injury is extremely rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy with potentially fatal consequences. Methods. Over the past 13-year period, 3000 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed in our institution. Duodenum injury only occurred in one patient recently who had undergone gastrectomy owing to duodenal diverticulum. The diagnosis and management of this rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy are described, and the literature is reviewed. Results. We present this case of duodenum injury on the fourth postoperative day after selective laparoscopic cholecystectomy was treated successfully by percutaneous needle aspiration and catheter drainage. The hospital stay was 26 days. No abscess recurred during the follow-up period. Conclusion. Duodenum injuries are extremely rare complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy with potentially fatal consequences if not promptly recognized and treated. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle aspiration and catheter drainage can be used to treat the intraperitoneal abscess. Billroth II subtotal gastrectomy and gastrojejunostomy were beneficial for the treatment. PMID:24790609

  15. Complication during Postacute Rehabilitation: Patients with Posttraumatic Hydrocephalus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denes, Zoltan; Barsi, Peter; Szel, Istvan; Boros, Erzsebet; Fazekas, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of posttraumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) among patients in our rehabilitation unit for traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, we aimed to assess the effect of shunt implantation and to identify the postoperative complication rate. This is a retrospective cohort study, in which between 2000 and…

  16. Pain management of wound care.

    PubMed

    Senecal, S J

    1999-12-01

    Children and adults still suffer pain during wound dressing changes despite national guidelines. Assessing and managing pain are essential components of comprehensive wound care. Developmentally sensitive pain assessment tools are available to measure verbal, behavioral, and physiologic responses to pain. Holistic pain assessment includes pain intensity, location, description, relief measures, cultural background, and the patient's developmental level and anxiety. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions should be combined to manage pain based upon patient's response and nursing assessment. Nurses with a fundamental knowledge of pain assessment and management provide their patients with pain and symptom relief during wound care. PMID:10523438

  17. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  18. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  19. Electric Current Wound Healing David Cukjati

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    31 Electric Current Wound Healing David Cukjati Laboratory of Biocybernetics, Faculty of Electrical of their efficiency. Wound healing quantification methods, wound healing dynamics and prognostic factors in the prediction of wound healing proposed by the authors represent significant contribution in understanding

  20. The Elastodynamics of Embryonic Epidermal Wound Closure

    E-print Network

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    in embryonic mammalian skin. Interest in wound healing probably existed long before recorded history, the underlying bio-dynamical process of wound healing is still far from well understood. It is customary to divide wound healing into three stages, inflammation, wound closure, and extracellular matrix remodeling

  1. Organic light emitting diode improves diabetic cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xingjia; Alberico, Stephanie; Saidu, Edward; Rahman Khan, Sazzadur; Zheng, Shijun; Romero, Rebecca; Sik Chae, Hyun; Li, Sheng; Mochizuki, Amane; Anders, Juanita

    2015-01-01

    A major complication for diabetic patients is chronic wounds due to impaired wound healing. It is well documented that visible red wavelengths can accelerate wound healing in diabetic animal models and patients. In vitro and in vivo diabetic models were used to investigate the effects of organic light emitting diode (OLED) irradiation on cellular function and cutaneous wound healing. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured in hyperglycemic medium (glucose concentration 180?mM) and irradiated with an OLED (623?nm wavelength peak, range from 560 to 770?nm, power density 7 or 10?mW/cm2 at 0.2, 1, or 5?J/cm2). The OLED significantly increased total adenosine triphosphate concentration, metabolic activity, and cell proliferation compared with untreated controls in most parameters tested. For the in vivo experiment, OLED and laser (635?±?5?nm wavelength) treatments (10?mW/cm2 , 5?J/cm2 daily for a total of seven consecutive days) for cutaneous wound healing were compared using a genetic, diabetic rat model. Both treatments had significantly higher percentage of wound closure on day 6 postinjury and higher total histological scores on day 13 postinjury compared with control. No statistical difference was found between the two treatments. OLED irradiation significantly increased fibroblast growth factor-2 expression at 36-hour postinjury and enhanced macrophage activation during initial stages of wound healing. In conclusion, the OLED and laser had comparative effects on enhancing diabetic wound healing. PMID:25684653

  2. Vacuum Assisted Closure Therapy versus Standard Wound Therapy for Open Musculoskeletal Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Kushagra; Chauhan, Vijendra D; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Chauhan, Neena; Rajan, Manu; Agrawal, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study was performed to evaluate the results of vacuum assisted wound therapy in patients with open musculoskeletal injuries. Study Design and Setting. Prospective, randomized, and interventional at tertiary care hospital, from 2011 to 2012. Materials and Methods. 30 patients of open musculoskeletal injuries underwent randomized trial of vacuum assisted closure therapy versus standard wound therapy around the upper limb and lower limb. Mean patient age was 39 ± 18 years (range, 18 to 76 years). Necrotic tissues were debrided before applying VAC therapy. Dressings were changed every 3 or 4 days. For standard wound therapy, debridement followed by daily dressings was done. Data Management and Statistical Analysis. The results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis. Results. The size of soft tissue defects reduced more than 5?mm to 25?mm after VAC (mean decrease of 26.66%), whereas in standard wound therapy, reduction in wound size was less than 5?mm. A free flap was needed to cover exposed bone and tendon in one case in standard wound therapy group. No major complication occurred that was directly attributable to treatment. Conclusion. Vacuum assisted wound therapy was found to facilitate the rapid formation of healthy granulation tissue on open wounds in the upper limb and lower limb, thus to shorten healing time and minimize secondary soft tissue defect coverage procedures. PMID:23878741

  3. Self-Management of Injection-Related Wounds Among Injecting Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Roose, Robert J.; Hayashi, A. Seiji; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2009-01-01

    Injection-related wounds are an important complication of injection drug use. This study describes behaviors related to self-management of injection-related wounds and identifies factors associated with behaviors that may increase the potential for harm. We conducted interviews with 101 injecting drug users in Washington, DC. A total of 82 (81.2%) injecting drug users reported ever having an injection-related wound, and of these 93.9% reported self-management of their wounds. The most commonly reported behaviors were cleaning and applying ointment to wounds; however, several participants engaged in behaviors determined to be more potentially harmful, including acquiring antibiotics without prescriptions and manipulating their wounds. In multivariate analysis, injecting drug users who had ever injected amphetamines were more likely to engage in potentially harmful self-management behaviors (adjusted odds ratio = 4.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.15–16.64). Self-management of injection-related wounds is common and certain behaviors may increase the potential for harm. Further research is needed to best focus efforts to improve wound care for injecting drug users. PMID:19197599

  4. Proliferation of Keratinocytes Induced by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on a Chitosan Scaffold and Its Role in Wound Healing, a Review

    PubMed Central

    Gomathysankar, Sankaralakshmi; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2014-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering and reconstruction, the development of efficient biomaterial is in high demand to achieve uncomplicated wound healing. Chronic wounds and excessive scarring are the major complications of tissue repair and, as this inadequate healing continues to increase, novel therapies and treatments for dysfunctional skin repair and reconstruction are important. This paper reviews the various aspects of the complications related to wound healing and focuses on chitosan because of its unique function in accelerating wound healing. The proliferation of keratinocytes is essential for wound closure, and adipose-derived stem cells play a significant role in wound healing. Thus, chitosan in combination with keratinocytes and adipose-derived stem cells may act as a vehicle for delivering cells, which would increase the proliferation of keratinocytes and help complete recovery from injuries. PMID:25276634

  5. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  6. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  7. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Information Page Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of AIDS? AIDS is primarily an immune system disorder caused ...

  8. Recent accomplishments in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Elizabeth J

    2015-02-01

    The challenge to balance limited resources with infinite demand has encouraged an evolution in the way health care services are managed and operated. Chronic wound management is complex and prolonged, and places a considerable financial burden on health services. A typical driver of cost includes the necessity to change dressings on a regular basis. Over the last few decades, several scientific and biological advances have furthered the development of wound care products and facilitated wound management. This article investigates some of the major advancements that have occurred within the wound-care arena during the last 5 years and how these advancements are being translated to provide better delivery of clinical care to patients. PMID:24618286

  9. Factors That Impair Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristin; Hamm, Rose L.

    2014-01-01

    The body's response to tissue injury in a healthy individual is an intricate, sequential physiologic process that results in timely healing with full re-epithelialization, resolution of drainage, and return of function to the affected tissue. Chronic wounds, however, do not follow this sequence of events and can challenge the most experienced clinician if the underlying factors that are impairing wound healing are not identified. The purpose of this article is to present recent information about factors that impair wound healing with the underlying pathophysiological mechanism that interferes with the response to tissue injury. These factors include co-morbidities (diabetes, obesity, protein energy malnutrition), medications (steroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs, anti-rejection medications), oncology interventions (radiation, chemotherapy), and life style habits (smoking, alcohol abuse). Successful treatment of any chronic wound depends upon identification and management of the factors for each individual. PMID:26199879

  10. Diabetes, a risk factor for both infectious and major complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Leng, Jiangyong; Shao, Hongxiang; Wang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is reported that up to one-third of patients might have some postoperative complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). The predictive factors for infectious and major complications remains conflicted, which was the main objective of this study. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis using data from enrolled 411 patients diagnosed with renal stones underwent PCNL from 2008 to 2013. The correlation between postoperative complications with demographic characteristics, comorbidities and perioperative features was analyzed by Fisher’s exact test or Mann-Whitney test. Logistic regression analysis was used for assessment of risk factors associatedwith infectious and major complications. Results: The mean age of 411 patients included was 53.6 years and male patients occupied 57.9%. Of all the 411 patients enrolled, 145 patients were diagnosed with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The comorbidity of diabetes and complete staghorn calculi were suggested to be independent risk factors for postoperative infectious complications by Logistic regression analysis. The overall complication rate was 31.1% (128/411) and 33 cases (8.0%) was categorized as major complications according to the modified Clavien score. The comorbidity of diabetes and an upper pole tract were risk factors for the occurrence of major complications after PCNL. Conclusions: The comorbidity of diabetes was significantly associated with an increasing incidence of both infectious and major postoperative complications after PCNL. PMID:26629193

  11. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  12. Effective wound management: identifying criteria for infection.

    PubMed

    Moore, Zena; Cowman, Seamus

    This article provides an overview of the European Wound Management Association's (2005) position document Identifying Criteria for Wound Infection and outlines its relevance and clinical applicability. The document is divided into four parts: understanding wound infection; clinical identification of wound infection--a Delphi approach; identifying criteria for pressure ulcer infection; and identifying surgical site infection in wounds healing by primary intention. Each part is discussed separately. PMID:17345911

  13. Postoperative fungal endophthalmitis caused by Trichosporon asahii treated with voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Gonul, Saban; Gedik, Sansal; Ozturk, Banu Turgut; Bakbak, Berker; Koktekir, Bengu Ekinci; Okudan, Suleyman; Dag?, Hatice Turk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative fungal endophthalmitis is a rare but devastating complication of cataract surgery. Vitrectomy and intravitreal amphotericin B injection as well as administration of systemic antifungal agents have been suggested as optimal treatments for fungal endophthalmitis. However, this therapy may fail to eliminate fungal species resistant to current antifungal agents. The saprophytic fungus Trichosporon asahii is frequently observed as a cause of endogenous endophthalmitis in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of postoperative endophthalmitis caused by T. asahii, resistant to amphotericin B. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of T. asahii endophthalmitis successfully treated with intravitreal and systemic voriconazole, pars plana vitrectomy, and removal of the intraocular lens and entire lens capsule. PMID:26375343

  14. Complications of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bergh, M S; Peirone, B

    2012-01-01

    The tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) is one of the most common surgical procedures used to treat cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs. Complications occurring during or after TPLO can range in severity from swelling and bruising to fracture and osteomyelitis. Ten to 34% of TPLO surgical procedures are reported to experience a complication and approximately two to four percent require revision surgery to address a complication. Although the risk factors for many complications have not been fully assessed, the best available evidence suggests that complications of TPLO can be reduced with increased surgeon experience, careful surgical planning, and accurate execution of the surgical procedure. Identification of known or suspected risk factors and intra-operative technical errors allow subsequent action to be taken that is aimed at decreasing postoperative morbidity. There is a need for prospective studies with consistent data reporting in order to fully reveal the incidence risk factors for complications associated with TPLO. PMID:22534675

  15. Pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery complicating medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Pritom Mohan; Oh, Hyung Keun; Choi, Jun Young; Yoo, Si Hoon; Han, Seung Beom; Yoon, Jung Ro; Koo, Ja Sung; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2009-06-01

    The popliteal artery is vulnerable to injury during surgeries performed around the knee joint. Pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery following a high tibial osteotomy is rare. Few case reports describe the development of this complication after a lateral closing wedge high tibial osteotomy. Our patient underwent an uneventful medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy and autogenous bone grafting fixed with dual plating for medial osteoarthritis of the knee. The procedure was performed under tourniquet control, which was released only once after the wound closure. Postoperatively, the dressing was soaked, and a large volume of hemorrhagic collection was present in the suction drain. The patient experienced decreased sensation over the sole, which was successfully treated conservatively with medication. Other clinical parameters like motor function and distal pulses were normal. The patient was discharged after 2 weeks. Two days later, the patient presented with pain and numbness over the entire lower limb and a pulsatile swelling in the popliteal fossa. A femoral angiogram revealed a pseudoaneurysm arising from the popliteal artery just below the osteotomy site. Open vascular surgery with resection of the pseudoaneurysm and end-to-end anastomosis using contralateral saphenous vein interposition graft was performed. During the vascular surgery, a pinhead-sized tear was clearly identified on the anterior wall of the popliteal artery, which may have occurred while using the oscillating saw during opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. Careful placement of retractors around the osteotomy site during sawing and flexing the knee to displace the popliteal artery away are recommended to prevent this complication. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm occurring after a medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. PMID:19634816

  16. Wound classification reporting in HPB surgery: can a single word change public perception of institutional performance?

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Paul J; Nussbaum, Daniel P; Scarborough, John E; Zani, Sabino; White, Rebekah R; Blazer, Dan G; Mantyh, Christopher R; Tyler, Douglas S; Clary, Bryan M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The drive to improve outcomes and the inevitability of mandated public reporting necessitate uniform documentation and accurate databases. The reporting of wound classification in patients undergoing hepato-pancreatico-biliary (HPB) surgery and the impact of inconsistencies on quality metrics were investigated. Methods The 2005–2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) participant use file was interrogated to identify patients undergoing HPB resections. The effect of wound classification on post-operative surgical site infection (SSI) rates was determined through logistic regression. The impact of variations in wound classification reporting on perceived outcomes was modelled by simulating observed-to-expected (O/E) ratios for SSI. Results In total, 27?376 patients were identified with significant heterogeneity in wound classification. In spite of clear guidelines prompting at least ‘clean-contaminated’ designation for HPB resections, 8% of all cases were coded as ‘clean’. Contaminated [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.39, P = 0.001] and dirty (AOR: 1.42, P = 0.02] cases were associated with higher odds of SSI, whereas clean-contaminated were not (P = 0.99). O/E ratios were highly sensitive to modest changes in wound classification. Conclusions Perceived performance is affected by heterogeneous reporting of wound classification. As institutions work to improve outcomes and prepare for public reporting, it is imperative that all adhere to consistent reporting practices to provide accurate and reproducible outcomes. PMID:24852206

  17. Bioinspired porous membranes containing polymer nanoparticles for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana M; Mattu, Clara; Ranzato, Elia; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-12-01

    Skin damages covering a surface larger than 4 cm(2) require a regenerative strategy based on the use of appropriate wound dressing supports to facilitate the rapid tissue replacement and efficient self-healing of the lost or damaged tissue. In the present work, A novel biomimetic approach is proposed for the design of a therapeutic porous construct made of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). Biomimicry of ECM was achieved by immobilization of type I collagen through a two-step plasma treatment for wound healing. Anti-inflammatory (indomethacin)-containing polymeric nanoparticles (nps) were loaded within the porous membranes in order to minimize undesired cell response caused by post-operative inflammation. The biological response to the scaffold was analyzed by using human keratinocytes cell cultures. In this work, a promising biomimetic construct for wound healing and soft tissue regeneration with drug-release properties was fabricated since it shows (i) proper porosity, pore size, and mechanical properties, (ii) biomimicry of ECM, and (iii) therapeutic potential. PMID:24522948

  18. Determining risk factors for surgical wound dehiscence: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sandy-Hodgetts, Kylie; Carville, Keryln; Leslie, Gavin D

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative wound healing plays a significant role in facilitating a patient's recovery and rehabilitation. Surgical wound dehiscence (SWD) impacts on mortality and morbidity rates and significantly contributes to prolonged hospital stays and associated psychosocial stressors on individuals and their families. A narrative review of SWD was undertaken on English-only studies between 1945 and 2012 using three electronic databases Ovid CINHAL, Ovid Medline and Pubmed. The aim of this review was to identify predisposing factors for SWD and assessment tools to assist in the identification of at-risk patients. Key findings from the included 15 papers out of a search of 1045 revealed the most common risk factors associated with SWD including obesity and wound infection, particularly in the case of abdominal surgery. There is limited reporting of variables associated with SWD across other surgical domains and a lack of risk assessment tools. Furthermore, there was a lack of clarity in the definition of SWD in the literature. This review provides an overview of the available research and provides a basis for more rigorous analysis of factors that contribute to SWD. PMID:23692188

  19. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Vishwanath, Guruswamy

    2012-05-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier's gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon. PMID:23162231

  20. [Review of the Literature for Interpretation of Endobronchial Wound Healing after Tracheobronchial Sleeve Resection].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, C; Koryllos, A; Zalepugas, D; Stoelben, E

    2015-07-01

    Sleeve resection comprises 3.1?% to 27.7?% of all anatomic lung resections performed in Germany. Anastomotic insufficiency is a feared complication that should be avoided. When anastomotic insufficiency does lead to secondary pneumonectomy, postoperative morbidity and mortality is high (30?% to 80?%). It is therefore very important to standardize the technique of sleeve resection as well as postoperative care. The time-point of postoperative follow-up and the interpretation of endobronchial healing have not yet been defined. In this paper anastomotic healing is described and interpreted with the help of a 5-step classification that allows bronchoscopic evaluation and classification of the anastomosis. The aim is to provide a standardized algorithm for postoperative care after sleeve resection. The basis of this classification and postoperative care measures derived from it are described and illustrated with the help of clinical examples. PMID:26171714

  1. Influence of postoperative enteral nutrition on postsurgical infections.

    PubMed Central

    Beier-Holgersen, R; Boesby, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that early enteral nutrition might reduce the incidence of serious complications after major abdominal surgery. METHODS: In a randomised double blind prospective trial 30 patients received Nutri-drink and 30 patients received placebo through a nasoduodenal feeding tube. On the day of operation the patients were given median 600 ml of either nutrition or placebo, 60 ml per hour. On the first postoperative day the patients received either 1000 ml (median) of nutrition or placebo, on day 2 1200 ml (median) nutrition, 1400 ml placebo, on day 3 1000 ml (median) nutrition, 1150 ml placebo, and on day 4 1000 ml (median) nutrition, 800 ml placebo. All patients were followed up for 30 days by the same investigator. RESULTS: The two groups were similar with regard to nutritional status and type of operation. The rate of postoperative infectious complications was significantly lower in the nutrition group, two of 30 compared with 14 of 30 in the placebo group (p = 0.0009). CONCLUSION: Early enteral nutrition given to patients after major abdominal surgery results in an important reduction in infectious complications. PMID:9038665

  2. Excellent local control with IOERT and postoperative EBRT in high grade extremity sarcoma: results from a subgroup analysis of a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To report the results of a subgroup analysis of a prospective phase II trial focussing on radiation therapy and outcome in patients with extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods Between 2005 and 2010, 50 patients (pts) with high risk STS (size???5 cm, deep/extracompartimental location, grade II-III (FNCLCC)) were enrolled. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with EIA (etoposide, ifosfamide and doxorubicin), definitive surgery with IOERT, postoperative EBRT and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. 34 pts, who suffered from extremity tumors and received radiation therapy after limb-sparing surgery, formed the basis of this subgroup analysis. Results Median follow-up from inclusion was 48 months in survivors. Margin status was R0 in 30 pts (88%) and R1 in 4 pts (12%). IOERT was performed as planned in 31 pts (91%) with a median dose of 15 Gy, a median electron energy of 6 MeV and a median cone size of 9 cm. All patients received postoperative EBRT with a median dose of 46 Gy after IOERT or 60 Gy without IOERT. Median time from surgery to EBRT and median EBRT duration was 36 days, respectively. One patient developed a local recurrence while 11 patients showed nodal or distant failures. The estimated 5-year rates of local control, distant control and overall survival were 97%, 66% and 79%, respectively. Postoperative wound complications were found in 7 pts (20%), resulting in delayed EBRT (>60 day interval) in 3 pts. Acute radiation toxicity mainly consisted of radiation dermatitis (grade II: 24%, no grade III reactions). 4 pts developed grade I/II radiation recall dermatitis during adjuvant chemotherapy, which resolved during the following cycles. Severe late toxicity was observed in 6 pts (18%). Long-term limb preservation was achieved in 32 pts (94%) with good functional outcome in 81%. Conclusion Multimodal therapy including IOERT and postoperative EBRT resulted in excellent local control and good overall survival in patients with high risk STS of the extremities with acceptable acute and late radiation side effects. Limb preservation with good functional outcome was achieved in the majority of patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01382030, EudraCT 2004-002501-72, 17.06.2011 PMID:24885755

  3. A Comparison of Postoperative Outcomes in Immediate Versus Delayed Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Massenburg, Benjamin B.; Rozehnal, John M.; Gupta, Nachi; Rosa, Jonatan Hernandez; Ingargiola, Michael J.; Taub, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of various postoperative complications in patients undergoing either immediate or delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy for malignancy. Methods: The ACS-NSQIP 2005–2012 database was queried for patients who underwent mastectomy for the treatment of breast malignancy. These mastectomy cases were then stratified, generating “mastectomy alone” and “mastectomy with immediate reconstruction” cohorts. Database analysis also identified “delayed-reconstruction” oncologic patients. All patients undergoing reconstruction were then stratified into the tissue expander/implant or flap-based reconstruction group. The frequency of postoperative complications was assessed. A multiplicative risk model was used to calculate the probability of postoperative complications after undergoing a mastectomy alone, followed by reconstruction on a different date. These values were compared with the frequency of postoperative complications in the “mastectomy with immediate reconstruction” cohort, and 1-sample binomial tests were performed to determine statistical significance. Results: A total of 49,450 cases that underwent either mastectomy alone (n = 30,226), mastectomy with immediately tissue expander/implant reconstruction (n = 13,513), mastectomy with immediate flap reconstruction (n = 2854), delayed tissue expander/implant reconstruction (n = 2047), or delayed flap reconstruction (n = 810) were identified. When compared with a delayed reconstructive model, immediate reconstruction after mastectomy was associated with increased flap or tissue expander/implant failure. However, delayed reconstructive modalities were associated with increased postoperative medical and surgical complications. Finally, in flap-based reconstruction, the incidence of return to the operating room was higher in delayed reconstruction than in immediate reconstruction. Conclusions: Awareness of complications associated with each reconstructive modality will allow both surgeons and patients to effectively decide upon reconstructive options. PMID:26483861

  4. Sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors according to clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Lemaignen, A; Birgand, G; Ghodhbane, W; Alkhoder, S; Lolom, I; Belorgey, S; Lescure, F-X; Armand-Lefevre, L; Raffoul, R; Dilly, M-P; Nataf, P; Lucet, J C

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery depends on the definition used. A distinction is generally made between mediastinitis, as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and superficial SSI. Our objective was to decipher these entities in terms of presentation and risk factors. We performed a 7-year single centre analysis of prospective surveillance of patients with cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. SSI was defined as the need for reoperation due to infection. Among 7170 patients, 292 (4.1%) developed SSI, including 145 CDC-defined mediastinitis (CDC-positive SSI, 2.0%) and 147 superficial SSI without associated bloodstream infection (CDC-negative SSI, 2.1%). Median time to reoperation for CDC-negative SSI was 18 days (interquartile range, 14-26) and 16 (interquartile range, 11-24) for CDC-positive SSI (p 0.02). Microorganisms associated with CDC-negative SSI were mainly skin commensals (62/147, 41%) or originated in the digestive tract (62/147, 42%); only six were due to Staphylococcus aureus (4%), while CDC-positive SSI were mostly due to S. aureus (52/145, 36%) and germs from the digestive tract (52/145, 36%). Risk factors for SSI were older age, obesity, chronic obstructive bronchopneumonia, diabetes mellitus, critical preoperative state, postoperative vasopressive support, transfusion or prolonged ventilation and coronary artery bypass grafting, especially if using both internal thoracic arteries in female patients. The number of internal thoracic arteries used and factors affecting wound healing were primarily associated with CDC-negative SSI, whereas comorbidities and perioperative complications were mainly associated with CDC-positive SSI. These 2 entities differed in time to revision surgery, bacteriology and risk factors, suggesting a differing pathophysiology. PMID:25882356

  5. HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS IN DIABETES AND WOUND HEALING

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Mustafa; Oksala, Niku; Lappalainen, Jani; Laaksonen, David E.; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2009-01-01

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs), originally identified as heat-inducible gene products, are a highly conserved family of proteins that respond to a wide variety of stress. Although HSPs are among the most abundant intracellular proteins, they are expressed at low levels under normal physiological conditions, and show marked induction in response to various stressors. HSPs function primarily as molecular chaperones, facilitating the folding of other cellular proteins, preventing protein aggregation, or targeting improperly folded proteins to specific pathways for degradation. By modulating inflammation, wound debris clearance, cell proliferation, migration and collagen synthesis, HSPs are essential for normal wound healing of the skin. In this review, our goal is to discuss the role and clinical implications of HSP with respect to skin wound healing and diabetes. The numerous defects in the function of HSPs associated with diabetes could contribute to the commonly observed complications and delayed wound healing in diabetics. Several physical, pharmacological and genetic approaches may be considered to address HSP-directed therapies both in the laboratory and in the clinics. PMID:19275675

  6. Avoiding Complications in Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic neurosurgical techniques hold the potential for reducing morbidity. But they are also associated with limitations such as the initial learning curve, proximal blind spot, visual obscurity, difficulty in controlling bleeding, disorientation, and loss of stereoscopic image. Although some of the surgical techniques in neuroendoscopy and microsurgery are similar, endoscopy requires additional skills. A thorough understanding of endoscopic techniques and their limitations is required to get maximal benefit. Knowledge of possible complications and techniques to avoid such complications can improve results in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The surgeon must be able to manage complications and have a second strategy such as a cerebrospinal fluid shunt if ETV fails. It is better to abandon the procedure if there is disorientation or a higher risk of complications such as bleeding or a thick and opaque floor without any clear visualization of anatomy. Attending live workshops, practice on models and simulators, simpler case selection in the initial learning curve, and hands-on cadaveric workshops can reduce complications. Proper case selection, good surgical technique, and better postoperative care are essential for a good outcome in ETV. Although it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis of complex hydrocephalus (combination of communicating and obstructive), improving methods to detect the exact type of hydrocephalus before surgery could increase the success rate of ETV and avoid an unnecessary ETV procedure in such cases. PMID:26140421

  7. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zv??ina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Sk?ivan, Ji?í; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  8. Complications and Outcomes of Primary Phacotrabeculectomy with Mitomycin C in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Chelvin; Aquino, Maria C.; Chew, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to three years after primary phacotrabeculectomy with intraoperative use of Mitomycin C (MMC) in primary open angle (POAG) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) patients, and the effect of postoperative complications on surgical outcome. Methods Retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients with POAG (n = 105) and PACG (n = 55), who underwent primary phacotrabeculectomy with MMC at the National University Hospital, Singapore, from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data was collected using a standardized form that included patient demographic information, ocular characteristics and postoperative complications, including hypotony (defined as intraocular pressure < 6 mmHg), shallow anterior chamber (AC) and hyphema. Results The mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of patients was 68.2 ± 8.2 years. No patient lost light perception during duration of follow-up. 77% of the postoperative complications occurred within the first month only. The commonest complications were hypotony (n = 41, 25.6%), hyphema (n = 16, 10.0%) and shallow AC (n = 16, 10.0%). Five patients (3.1%) required reoperation for their complications. Early hypotony (defined as hypotony < 30 days postoperatively) was an independent risk factor for surgical failure (hazard ratio [HR], 5.1; 95% CI, 1.6–16.2; p = 0.01). Hypotony with another complication was also a risk factor for surgical failure (p < 0.02). Conclusions Hypotony, hyphema and shallow AC were the commonest postoperative complications in POAG and PACG patients after phacotrabeculectomy with MMC. Most complications were transient and self-limiting. Early hypotony within the first month was a significant risk factor for surgical failure. PMID:25775362

  9. Pterygia: Single-fraction postoperative beta irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, D.C. )

    1991-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation was performed with records of 128 patients with 146 eyes that underwent applications of strontium-90 after pterygium excisions performed between 1982 and 1988. With a median follow-up of 13 months, 135 eyes were evaluable. Most pterygia (127 of 135) were treated with a single postoperative application of Sr-90 that delivered 3,000 cGy of beta radiation in one fraction. The actuarial freedom from relapse was 87%; all recurrences occurred within the first 18 months, and 46% of these within the first 3 months. Of the 13 recurrences, 10 have been re-treated with surgery and a second course of beta irradiation with excellent results. All eight eyes for which follow-up was available had no evidence of disease. The ultimate control rate was 96.3% for the series. Correlation of various treatment parameters, including age, bilaterality, prior recurrence, and interval from surgery to irradiation, was performed, and no statistically significant difference was seen. No serious complications have developed. Transient conjunctivitis and photophobia were almost universally seen, with five cases lasting beyond 5 months. The authors conclude that a single application of Sr-90 after surgery is effective and safe in managing pterygia.

  10. Phasic disappearance of left circumflex coronary artery from an early complication of mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Devabhaktuni, Subodh; Sunkara, Nirmal; Ahsan, Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message LV pseudoaneurysm can be a late complication of mitral valve replacement. In our case, it was an early postoperative complication. This pseudoaneurysm was causing compression of LCX artery during systole, leading to presentation of NSTEMI two weeks after the surgery. PMID:26576286

  11. Effect of blockade of the EGF system on wound healing in patients vaccinated with CIMAvax® EGF

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling system is frequently unbalanced in human malignancies due to increased ligand production, receptor overexpression, receptor mutations, and/or cross-talk with other receptor systems. For this reason, the EGFR is an attractive target for anticancer therapy. The epidermal growth factor also plays an important role in regulating multiple facets of cutaneous wound healing, including inflammation, wound contraction, proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. In the Center of Molecular Immunology, a cancer vaccine is produced (CIMAvax® EGF) that blocks the binding of EGF to its receptor. This blockade causes a significant inverse association between the anti-EGF antibody titers and EGF concentration. Around 1,500 patients with non-small cell lung cancer have been treated, showing that this vaccine is safe, immunogenic, increases survival and improves quality of life. Taking into account the therapeutic benefits of CIMAvax® EGF vaccination and the role of EGF-EGFR system in the wound healing process, we decided to conduct a retrospective research with the aim of determining the effect to the CIMAvax® EGF vaccine on the wound healing process in patients undergoing surgical treatment. Methods Medical records of 452 vaccinated patients were reviewed and only six patients receiving surgical treatment were identified. Further information about these six patients was obtained from source documents, including medical records and operative reports using an observational list that included different variables. Post-surgical wound healing complications were identified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTC) version 3.0. Results None of the six patients operated on presented adverse events related to the wound healing, that is to say, no wound dehiscence, wound infection, delayed wound healing, fistula formation, abscess formation or hemorrhage/bleeding associated with surgery during treatment with CIMAvax® EGF occurred. Conclusions These results suggest that the use of CIMAvax® EGF does not produce a deleterious effect in the wound healing process. PMID:24127898

  12. [Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: 100 consecutive cases without postoperative morbidity].

    PubMed

    Klaiber, C; Metzger, A; Leepin, H; Saager, C

    1991-06-15

    100 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallbladder stones. We report our results and the management of choledocholithiasis. In two cases the laparoscopic procedure had to be converted into open cholecystectomy due to bleeding. There were no complications postoperatively. The results show that laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a safe procedure with real benefits. The main advantages are greater comfort for the patient, better cosmetic results, shortening of hospital stay and earlier return to full activity. We feel that, with a proper indication, laparoscopic removal of the gallbladder will establish itself as the procedure of choice in stone disease. PMID:1830401

  13. Effect of Sugammadex on Postoperative Bleeding and Coagulation Parameters After Septoplasty: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ta?, Nilay; Korkmaz, Hakan; Ya?an, Özgür; Korkmaz, Mukadder

    2015-01-01

    Backround Sugammadex is a reversal agent with well known advantages but it’s effects on haemostasis and bleeding have been a topic of interest. Septoplasty is a common surgical procedure with postoperative respiratory complications and bleeding. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of sugammadex on postoperative coagulation parameters and bleeding after septoplasty procedure. Material/Methods In this randomized controlled study, fifty patients were grouped into two groups; neostigmine (Group N) vs. sugammadex (Group S). For the evaluation of PT, aPTT and INR, blood samples were taken for at the postoperative 120th minutes and alteration of these values with respect to preoperative values were documented. Postoperative bleeding was measured by evaluating the amount of blood absorbed on the nasal tip dressing during 3 hours postoperatively. Results Postoperative bleeding amount was significantly higher in the Group S compared to Group N (p=0.013). No significant difference was observed between two groups according to coagulation parameters (PT; p=0.953, aPTT; p=0.734, INR; p=0.612). Conclusions Sugammadex was associated with higher amount of postoperative bleeding than neostigmine in septoplasty patients. In surgical procedures having high risk of bleeding the safety of sugammadex need to be verified. PMID:26271275

  14. Effects of ketoprofen for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Iwata, Hideki; Morikawa, Akihiro; Imori, Satoko; Waki, Sayaka; Tamura, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Fumimoto; Eguchi, Satoru; Kumagai, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common geriatric complication that may be associated with increased mortality. Here, we investigated the effects of postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen on cognitive functions in aged animals and compared its effectiveness to morphine. Rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups: isoflurane anesthesia without surgery (group C), isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy (group IL), and isoflurane anesthesia with laparotomy plus postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen or morphine. There was no difference in postoperative locomotor activity among groups. In group IL, postoperative pain levels assessed by the Rat Grimace Scale significantly increased until 8 h after surgery, which was similarly inhibited by both ketoprofen and morphine. Cognitive function was assessed using radial arm maze testing for 12 consecutive days from postoperative day 3. Results showed that the number of memory errors in group IL were significantly higher than those in goup C. However, both ketoprofen and morphine could attenuate the increase in memory errors following surgery to a similar degree. Conversely, ketoprofen showed no effect on cognitive function in the nonsurgical rats that did not experience pain. Our findings suggest that postoperative analgesia with ketoprofen can prevent the development of surgery-associated memory deficits via its pain-relieving effects. PMID:24676769

  15. Cellular innate immune responses to lung resection via video- assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and thoracotomy : predictors of post-operative pneumonia 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Richard Oliver

    2013-07-06

    Background and Objectives: The pathophysiology of post-operative pneumonia following lung resection is poorly understood despite it being the most common complication which may lead to death. The role of the acute ...

  16. Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.; Trauner, Kenneth

    2000-08-22

    Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

  17. Management of complications associated with total ear canal ablation and bulla osteotomy in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Smeak, Daniel D

    2011-09-01

    Total ear canal ablation combined with bulla osteotomy is a salvage procedure recommended primarily for end-stage inflammatory ear canal disease but also for neoplasia and severe traumatic injuries. Due to the complexity of the procedure and the poor exposure associated with the surgical approach, there is significant risk for a variety of complications. This review discusses intraoperative, early postoperative, and late postoperative complications reported in large retrospective studies, the causes for these complications, and recommendations about how to prevent them. PMID:21889696

  18. Early complications with the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Stewart, Steven C.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Poon, Michael W.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report early complications in our initial experience with the holmium laser in 133 patients. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. Complications included urinary tract infection (3), post-operative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower pole calyx with a 365 micron fiber (9), stone migration (5), termination of procedure due to poor visualization (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of genitourinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microns occasionally limit deflection into a lower pole or dependent calyx.

  19. Anteromedian external urethral sphincterotomy: technique, rationale and complications.

    PubMed

    Yalla, S V; Fam, B A; Gabilondo, F B; Jacobs, S; Di Benedetto, M; Rossier, A B; Gittes, R F

    1977-04-01

    Experiences are presented with bilateral (3 and 9 o'clock incisions) and anteromedian (12 o'clock incision) external urethral sphincterotomy in 84 patients with neuropathic vesicourethral dysfunctions. Hemorrhage and loss of reflexogenic erections have been notably absent in 31 patients who underwent anteromedian sphincterotomy. The rationale is discussed for the preference of anteromedian over bilateral sphincterotomy based on postoperative complications. The postoperative, radiologically aided cystosphincterometric and electromyographic studies during micturition indicated the adequacy of the surgical procedures, satisfying the urodynamic criteria, although dyssynergic myolectric activity of the periurethral striated muscle continued to exist. PMID:850324

  20. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  1. The Role of Myofibroblasts in Wound Healing, Contraction and its Clinical Implications in Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Balasubramaniam, A Murali; Parameswar, R Arjun; Kesavan, G; Haris, K T Muhamed; Mohideen, Khadijah

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblasts after its discovery in 1971 as the principal cell for wound healing has come a long way as far as research is concerned. The primary focus of research has been regarding preventing certain unwanted effects of this cell such as wound contraction and scarring. As far as the oral and maxillofacial region is concerned, the primary concern of this untoward effect is during repair of cleft palate surgically which results impaired development of palate and the dentoalveolar structures. This review focuses on the basic aspects of myofibroblasts such as its origin, formation, function in wound healing, role in wound contraction and ways by which its unwanted effects can be overcome to improve the quality of the post surgical complications of cleft palate surgery. PMID:25878485

  2. Use of Postoperative Palatal Obturator After Total Palatal Reconstruction With Radial Forearm Fasciocutaneous Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Euicheol C; Jung, Young Ho; Shin, Jin-yong

    2015-07-01

    A 67-year-old-male patient visited our hospital for a mass on the soft palate of approximately 5.0 × 6.0? cm in size. He was diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma and reconstruction after total palate resection was planned. After ablative surgery, a radial forearm free flap procedure was successfully performed to cover the hard and soft palates. However, wound disruption occurred twice during the postoperative period. When a palate defect is reconstructed using a soft tissue free flap, flap drooping by gravitation and the flap itself can generate irregularity in the lower contour of the palate and, in the long-term, insufficiencies of velopharyngeal function, speech, and mastication. To complement such functional and aesthetic problems caused by flap drooping, conventional prosthetics and new operative techniques have been discussed. However, overcoming wound disruption caused by flap drooping in the acute postoperative period has not been discussed. In this case, the temporary use of a palatal obturator during the postoperative period was beneficial after soft tissue reconstruction of the palate. PMID:26114541

  3. A Rat Model of Diabetic Wound Infection for the Evaluation of Topical Antimicrobial Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, João J; Leandro, Clara I; Bonaparte, Dolores P; Pinto, Andreia L

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an epidemic multisystemic chronic disease that frequently is complicated by complex wound infections. Innovative topical antimicrobial therapy agents are potentially useful for multimodal treatment of these infections. However, an appropriately standardized in vivo model is currently not available to facilitate the screening of these emerging products and their effect on wound healing. To develop such a model, we analyzed, tested, and modified published models of wound healing. We optimized various aspects of the model, including animal species, diabetes induction method, hair removal technique, splint and dressing methods, the control of unintentional bacterial infection, sampling methods for the evaluation of bacterial burden, and aspects of the microscopic and macroscopic assessment of wound healing, all while taking into consideration animal welfare and the ‘3Rs’ principle. We thus developed a new wound infection model in rats that is optimized for testing topical antimicrobial therapy agents. This model accurately reproduces the pathophysiology of infected diabetic wound healing and includes the current standard treatment (that is, debridement). The numerous benefits of this model include the ready availability of necessary materials, simple techniques, high reproducibility, and practicality for experiments with large sample sizes. Furthermore, given its similarities to infected-wound healing and treatment in humans, our new model can serve as a valid alternative for applied research. PMID:22330650

  4. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Pawel; König, Matthias Alexander; Osterhoff, Georg; Wilzeck, Verena; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Jukema, Gerrolt Nico

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland) nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43-87 years) were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30). The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:24416474

  5. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. PMID:26600443

  6. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  7. Wound Dressings and Comparative Effectiveness Data

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Aditya; Granick, Mark S.; Tomaselli, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Injury to the skin provides a unique challenge, as wound healing is a complex and intricate process. Acute wounds have the potential to move from the acute wound to chronic wounds, requiring the physician to have a thorough understanding of outside interventions to bring these wounds back into the healing cascade. Recent Advances: The development of new and effective interventions in wound care remains an area of intense research. Negative pressure wound therapy has undoubtedly changed wound care from this point forward and has proven beneficial for a variety of wounds. Hydroconductive dressings are another category that is emerging with studies underway. Other modalities such as hyperbaric oxygen, growth factors, biologic dressings, skin substitutes, and regenerative materials have also proven efficacious in advancing the wound-healing process through a variety of mechanisms. Critical Issues: There is an overwhelming amount of wound dressings available in the market. This implies the lack of full understanding of wound care and management. The point of using advanced dressings is to improve upon specific wound characteristics to bring it as close to “ideal” as possible. It is only after properly assessing the wound characteristics and obtaining knowledge about available products that the “ideal” dressing may be chosen. Future Directions: The future of wound healing at this point remains unknown. Few high-quality, randomized controlled trials evaluating wound dressings exist and do not clearly demonstrate superiority of many materials or categories. Comparative effectiveness research can be used as a tool to evaluate topical therapy for wound care moving into the future. Until further data emerge, education on the available products and logical clinical thought must prevail. PMID:25126472

  8. Management of civilian gunshot wounds in a Nigerian general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Onuba, O

    1987-01-01

    In a 3-year period (1981-1984), 52 male patients aged 10-60 years were treated for fresh gunshot wounds. The injuries varied from minor soft tissue injuries to major organ and tissue damage, and were all sustained by low-velocity missiles. Six of the patients (11.5%) died of their injuries or complications while 46 (88.46%) survived and were discharged after 1-15 weeks (a mean hospital time of 3 weeks). Some of the patients were treated before referral and for some there was a delay of more than 48 h before definitive specialist treatment. Mortality was related to the severity of wounding and the delay before treatment. PMID:3620058

  9. Ixora coccinea Enhances Cutaneous Wound Healing by Upregulating the Expression of Collagen and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Aadesh; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Goyary, Danswrang; Mitra Mazumder, Papiya; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Background. Ixora coccinea L. (Rubiaceae) has been documented for traditional use in hypertension, menstrual irregularities, sprain, chronic ulcer, and skin diseases. In the present study, I. coccinea was subjected to in vitro and in vivo wound healing investigation. Methods. Petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol, and water sequential I. coccinea leaves extracts were evaluated for in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and fibroblast proliferation activities. The promising I. coccinea methanol extract (IxME) was screened for in vivo wound healing activity in Wistar rat using circular excision model. Wound contraction measurement, hydroxyproline quantification, and western blot for collagen type III (COL3A1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and Smad-2, -3, -4, and -7 was performed with 7-day postoperative wound granulation tissue. Gentamicin sulfate (0.01% w/w) hydrogel was used as reference standard. Results. IxME showed the potent antimicrobial, antioxidant activities, with significant fibroblast proliferation inducing activity, as compared to all other extracts. In vivo study confirmed the wound healing accelerating potential of IxME, as evidenced by faster wound contraction, higher hydroxyproline content, and improved histopathology of granulation tissue. Western blot analysis revealed that the topical application of I. coccinea methanol extract stimulates the fibroblast growth factor and Smad mediated collagen production in wound tissue. PMID:24624303

  10. Effects of an orabase formulation with ethanolic extract of Malva sylvestris L. in oral wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Kovalik, Ana Cristina; Bisetto, Paula; Pochapski, Márcia Thaís; Campagnoli, Eduardo Baulm; Pilatti, Gibson Luiz; Santos, Fábio André

    2014-05-01

    Malva sylvestris L. is widely used in medicine for treatment of inflammatory processes. The plant has anti-inflammatory properties due to substances such as mucilage, flavonoids, and tannins. A mouthwash with leaves from the plant can be used for the treatment of wounds in the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to assess the wound healing effect of Malva sylvestris L. on a palate mucosa wound in rats. After intraperitoneal anesthesia, a 4-mm-diameter excisional wound was made in the center of the palatal mucosa of 136 rats, using a punch-out biopsy tool. Eight animals were used as baseline wound. The remaining rats were divided into four groups: CO, control; OB, orabase vehicle; CX, 2% chlorhexidine; and MA, 20% Malva in orabase. At 24?h postoperatively, the animals were immobilized without anesthetic to apply 25?mg of each substance twice a day, totaling 50?mg daily. The wound areas were measured photographically and the reepithelialization rates were determined histologically (%) after 0, 3, 7, 15, and 21 days. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. Similar healing pattern was observed among the groups (P>.05; ANOVA). According to the methodology, Malva sylvestris L. extract had no effect on wound healing in the palatal mucosa of rats. PMID:24476217

  11. Ty-raps in trauma: a novel closing technique of extremity fasciotomy wounds.

    PubMed

    Govaert, Geertruida A M; van Helden, Svenhjalmar

    2010-10-01

    The challenge of closing extremity fasciotomy wounds is well known to every trauma and orthopedic surgeon. We developed a new, easy, and inexpensive dermatotraction technique based on the simple use of Ty-Raps and report on the first pilot study using this novel technique for the closure of 23 extremity fasciotomy wounds. The Ty-Rap system consists of several combinations of two Ty-Raps and four surgical staples. Immediately after fasciotomy, the system is secured to the skin by the surgical staples, and once the swelling of the affected limb is subsided, the Ty-Raps are tightened every 24 hours to 48 hours until full approximation of the skin edges is achieved. We recorded the time to closure of the wound, the time to removal of the Ty-Raps, and the complications related to the procedure. Also, a cost analyses was calculated. The mean time of approximation of the skin was 6.3 days, and after a further 9.4 days, the Ty-Raps could be removed. The majority of the wounds (91%) healed without complications, and only one patient in our series required a secondary surgical procedure for the closure of one fasciotomy wound. The total cost to close a fasciotomy wound of 30 cm with the use of Ty-Raps is US dollar 23.33. We regard the use of Ty-Raps a good alternative for the current closing techniques of extremity fasciotomy wounds. We value its low cost, general availability, effectiveness, and the fact that, in this pilot study, both the application and the tightening of the Ty-Raps were well tolerated by our patients with a minimal need for secondary procedures. Knowledge of this technique is a useful adjunct to the existing surgical array for every trauma and orthopedic surgeon for the closure of extremity fasciotomy wounds, especially in austere or military environments. PMID:20938282

  12. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  13. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(12):e1059-e1064.]. PMID:26652325

  14. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gan, Tong J; Joseph, Nicholas; Uribe, Alberto; Pandya, Jyoti; Dalal, Rohan; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a complication affecting between 20 and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain and anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu) at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, postdischarge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu), as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release and modulation of opioid neuropeptides. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing. PMID:26734609

  15. Preoperative Statin Use and Postoperative Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Steven M.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Bateman, Brian T.; Chang, Tara I.; Lii, Joyce; Garg, Amit X.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Choudhry, Niteesh K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute kidney injury is a frequent postoperative complication that confers increased mortality, morbidity, and costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether preoperative statin use is associated with a decreased risk of postoperative acute kidney injury. METHODS We assembled a retrospective cohort of 98,939 patients who underwent a major open abdominal, cardiac, thoracic, or vascular procedure between 2000 and 2010. Statin users were pair-matched to nonusers on the basis of surgery type, baseline kidney function, days from admission until surgery, and propensity score based on demographics, comorbid conditions, and concomitant medications. Acute kidney injury was defined based on changes in serum creatinine measurements applying Acute Kidney Injury Network and Risk-Injury-Failure staging systems, and on the need for renal replacement therapy. Associations between statin use and acute kidney injury were estimated by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS Across various acute kidney injury definitions, statin use was consistently associated with a decreased risk: adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) varied from 0.74 (0.58–0.95) to 0.80 (0.71–0.90). Associations were similar among diabetics and nondiabetics, and across strata of baseline kidney function. The protective association of statins was most pronounced among patients undergoing vascular surgery and least among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative statin use is associated with a decreased risk of postoperative acute kidney injury. Future randomized clinical trials are needed to determine causality. PMID:23062398

  16. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gan, Tong J.; Joseph, Nicholas; Uribe, Alberto; Pandya, Jyoti; Dalal, Rohan; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a complication affecting between 20 and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain and anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu) at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, postdischarge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu), as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release and modulation of opioid neuropeptides. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing.

  17. Diffuse lymphatic leakage after continuous vacuum-assisted closure therapy for thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization.

    PubMed

    Dackam, Sandrine; Furrer, Katarzyna; Haug, Martin; Lardinois, D

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a useful tool in the management of a wide spectrum of complex wounds in cardiothoracic surgery. It promotes healing through the application of a controlled and localized negative pressure on porous polyurethane absorbent foams. Known advantages of the VAC therapy are the acceleration of wound healing, stimulation of granulation tissue and reduced tissue edema. Despite its excellent properties, some related complications after and during the therapy have been reported. We report the case of a 47-year-old female with a thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization, managed with open surgery and VAC therapy, which was complicated by a diffuse lymphatic leakage. This is the first case described of diffuse lymphatic leakage followed by partial necrosis of the breast after continuous VAC therapy. We recommend the application of a lower pressure level of this device for complex wounds of the chest wall near the breast. PMID:26675995

  18. Diffuse lymphatic leakage after continuous vacuum-assisted closure therapy for thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dackam, Sandrine; Furrer, Katarzyna; Haug, Martin; Lardinois, D.

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a useful tool in the management of a wide spectrum of complex wounds in cardiothoracic surgery. It promotes healing through the application of a controlled and localized negative pressure on porous polyurethane absorbent foams. Known advantages of the VAC therapy are the acceleration of wound healing, stimulation of granulation tissue and reduced tissue edema. Despite its excellent properties, some related complications after and during the therapy have been reported. We report the case of a 47-year-old female with a thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization, managed with open surgery and VAC therapy, which was complicated by a diffuse lymphatic leakage. This is the first case described of diffuse lymphatic leakage followed by partial necrosis of the breast after continuous VAC therapy. We recommend the application of a lower pressure level of this device for complex wounds of the chest wall near the breast. PMID:26675995

  19. Animal models of external traumatic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

  20. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery. PMID:25195116

  1. Amniocentesis: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    Vrettos, A S; Koliopoulos, C; Panayotou, P P

    1975-02-01

    Transabdominal amniocentesis is described and our experience with this method is presented. No severe maternal complications were recorded. In two cases accidental puncture of fetal blood vessels in pregnancies over 40 weeks led to delivery by cesarean section. We believe that, although fetal complications are rare, the indications for amniocentesis should be significant enough to discount the hazards of the procedure. PMID:1116906

  2. UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre

    E-print Network

    UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre The UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre (DCRC) investigates the microvascular complications of diabetes. Our work focuses on identifying novel drivers innovative therapeutic paradigms and biomarkers. Diabetes Complications Research Centre The DCRC comprises

  3. Photobiomodulation of Surgical Wound Dehiscence in a Diabetic Individual by Low-Level Laser Therapy Following Median Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Snehil; Maiya, Arun; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Borkar, Shirish

    2013-01-01

    In this single case study, we attempt to outline the possible effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on delayed wound healing and pain in chronic dehiscent sternotomy of a diabetic individual. The methods that were employed to evaluate changes pre and post irradiation were wound photography, wound area measurement, pressure ulcer scale of healing (PUSH), and visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. After irradiation, proliferation of healthy granulation tissue was observed with decrease in scores of PUSH for sternal dehiscence and VAS for bilateral shoulders and sternal dehiscence. We found that LLLT irradiation could be a novel method of treatment for chronic sternal dehiscence following coronary artery bypass grafting, as it augments wound healing with an early closure of the wound deficit. Hence, this might be translated into an early functional rehabilitation and decreased pain perception of an individual following surgical complication. PMID:23766600

  4. Photobiomodulation of surgical wound dehiscence in a diabetic individual by low-level laser therapy following median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Snehil; Maiya, Arun; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Borkar, Shirish

    2013-01-01

    In this single case study, we attempt to outline the possible effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on delayed wound healing and pain in chronic dehiscent sternotomy of a diabetic individual. The methods that were employed to evaluate changes pre and post irradiation were wound photography, wound area measurement, pressure ulcer scale of healing (PUSH), and visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. After irradiation, proliferation of healthy granulation tissue was observed with decrease in scores of PUSH for sternal dehiscence and VAS for bilateral shoulders and sternal dehiscence. We found that LLLT irradiation could be a novel method of treatment for chronic sternal dehiscence following coronary artery bypass grafting, as it augments wound healing with an early closure of the wound deficit. Hence, this might be translated into an early functional rehabilitation and decreased pain perception of an individual following surgical complication. PMID:23766600

  5. A Global Perspective on Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an interprofessional team approach to the care of acute and chronic wounds is a worldwide challenge. This global unmet need has recently been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and addressed by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Global Volunteers program. This article provides an overview of the escalating international wound problem. Current programs established to deal with wounds in resource-poor countries are presented as well as information on volunteering. PMID:25126476

  6. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  7. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  8. Small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser LASIK: comparison of corneal wound healing and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zixian; Zhou, Xingtao; Wu, Jihong; Zhang, Zhehuan; Li, Tao; Zhou, Zimei; Zhang, Shenghai; Li, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate and compare early corneal wound healing and inflammatory responses after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) versus femtosecond laser laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods Thirty-six eyes of 36 rabbits underwent SMILE, while another 36 eyes of 36 rabbits were treated with femtosecond laser LASIK. All the eyes were subjected to the same refractive correction of ?6.00?DS/?1.00?DC. Twelve eyes that had no surgery were included for control. After euthanisation, corneal tissue sections were evaluated with terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay to detect apoptosis at postoperative 4 and 24?h, immunocytochemistry for Ki67 to detect keratocyte proliferation at postoperative day 3, week 1 and month 1, and immunocytochemistry for CD11b to detect inflammation at postoperative day 1, day 3 and week 1, respectively. Results No adverse effects were noted after SMILE or LASIK. Corneal healing postoperatively was uneventful in all cases. There were significantly fewer TUNEL-positive corneal stromal cells after the SMILE procedure at 4 and 24?h postoperatively (p<0.01) compared with the LASIK procedure. In addition, immunocytochemistry showed significantly fewer Ki67-positive cells in the SMILE group than those in the femtosecond laser LASIK group at day 3 and week 1 postoperatively (p<0.05), but there was little expression of Ki67 at month 1 postoperatively in both groups. The CD11b-positive cells were significantly fewer in the SMILE group at day 1, day 3 and week 1 postoperatively (p<0.01). Conclusions SMILE induces less keratocyte apoptosis, proliferation and inflammation compared with femtosecond laser LASIK. PMID:24227802

  9. Complications of Hair Restoration Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Eswari; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Gorur, Divya; Suresh, Deepak Hurkudli; Siddaraju, Maheshwari Nallur; Narasimhan, Revathi Thimmanhalli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hair restoration surgery (HRS) is a very promising and sought after aesthetic procedure with very few complications. Complications may occur in the donor or the recipient area, and it may be due to surgical or idiopathic causes. Aim: The aim was to analyze the complications in male patients who underwent HRS for androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of male patients who underwent HRS for AGA from December 2010 to August 2014. Data were collected from the registers, telephonic enquiry and electronic mails. All complications during and after surgery, and their subjective feeling about hair growth was recorded. Results: Seventy-three patients were included in the analysis. A total of 65 patients had undergone follicular unit transplant, 7 patients underwent FUE, and one patient had body hair transplantation. Postoperative edema was found in 42.47% of patients, followed by sterile folliculitis in 23.29% of patients, wide donor scar in 15.07% of patients, bacterial folliculitis and numbness/paresthesia in 10.96% of patients. Other complications such as raised scar, hiccups, pruritus, excessive bleeding were found in isolated cases. Conclusion: Thorough preoperative evaluation, skillful surgical techniques, good communication and postoperative follow-up go a long way in giving satisfactory outcome with fewer complications in HRS. PMID:25368473

  10. Influence of radiation crosslinked carboxymethyl-chitosan/gelatin hydrogel on cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Yaqing; Zhang, Xiangmei; Xu, Ling; Chen, Xin; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-12-01

    A series of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) and gelatin hydrogels were prepared by radiation crosslinking. A pre-clinical study was performed by implantation model and full-thickness cutaneous wound model in Sprague-Dawley rats to preliminarily evaluate the biocompatibility, biodegradability and effects on healing. In the implantation test, as a component of the hydrogels, CM-chitosan showed a positive effect on promoting cell proliferation and neovascularization, while gelatin was efficient to stabilize the structure and prolong the degradation time. To evaluate the function on wound healing, the hydrogels were applied to the relatively large full-thickness cutaneous wounds (?3.0 cm). Compared with the control groups, the hydrogel group showed significantly higher percentage of wound closure on days 9, 12 and 15 postoperatively, which was consistent with the significantly thicker granulation tissue on days 3 and 6. All results apparently revealed that the radiation crosslinked CM-chitosan/Gelatin hydrogels could induce granulation tissue formation and accelerate the wound healing. PMID:24094192

  11. Swellability of Silver (I) Antimicrobial Wound Dressings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important characteristic of moist wound dressings is their ability to swell and absorb exudates from the wound, while maintaining a moist atmosphere at the wound site. At the Southern Regional Research Center, we have developed antimicrobial silver- CM-cotton print cloth from CM-Printcloth with l...

  12. BURN WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF Euphorbia hirta

    PubMed Central

    Jaiprakash, B.; Chandramohan; Reddy, D. Narishma

    2006-01-01

    The Ethanolic extract of whole plant of Euphorbia hirta was screened for burn wound healing activity in rats as 2% W/W cream. The study was carried out based on the assessment of percentage reduction in original wound. It showed significant burn wound healing activity. PMID:22557201

  13. Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Here we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues on in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration, and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 d alongside adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of TGF-? and ICAM-1 were significantly lower, while TNF-? was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical brassinosteroids accelerate wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and re-epithelialization phases of the wound-repair process, in partby enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in a wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing. PMID:23937635

  14. Chemokine Regulation of Angiogenesis During Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis plays a critical role in wound healing. A defect in the formation of a neovasculature induces ulcer formation. One of the challenges faced by the clinician when devising strategies to promote healing of chronic wounds is the initiation of angiogenesis and the formation of a stable vasculature to support tissue regeneration. Understanding the molecular factors regulating angiogenesis during wound healing will lead to better therapies for healing chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Classically, chronic wounds are treated with debridement to remove inhibitory molecules to reestablish angiogenesis and normal wound healing. The addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, becaplermin) has shown some promise as an adjunctive therapy, but better therapies are still needed. Current treatment strategies include investigating the outcome of augmenting cytokines locally to reduce the inflammatory response and promote angiogenesis. Critical Issues: The failure of wounds to form a new vasculature results in the inability of the wound to fully heal, and thus may develop into a chronic ulcer if left untreated. Inhibition of neovascularization commonly results from an overactive inflammatory response that includes an excessive chemokine response. Therefore, understanding how the chemokine response regulates neoangiogenesis will enhance our ability to develop new treatment strategies to improve neovascularization and wound healing. Future Directions: The ability to regulate the chemokine environment in chronic wounds may enhance the development of the neovasculature to reduce invasive treatments and enhance wound healing. Either inhibiting chemokines that promote a chronic inflammatory response or increasing the levels of proangiogenic chemokines may enhance angiogenesis in chronic wounds. PMID:26543678

  15. In vivo wound-healing effects of novel benzalkonium chloride-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Dong-Wuk; Li, Dong Xun; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing effects of a novel benzalkonium chloride (BC)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD). A BC-loaded HCD was prepared with various constituents using a hot melting method, and its mechanical properties and antimicrobial activities were assessed. The in vivo wound healings of the BC-loaded HCD in various would models were evaluated in rats compared with a commercial wound dressing, Duoderm™. This BC-loaded HCD gave better skin adhesion, swelling, mechanical strength, and flexibility compared with the commercial wound dressing. It showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, as compared with the commercial wound dressing, it showed more improved wound healings and tissue restoration effect on the excision, infection, and abrasion wounds in rats. Thus, this novel BC-loaded HCD would be an excellent alternative to the commercial wound dressing for treatment of various wounds. PMID:25959289

  16. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage Complicating Unintended Durotomy in Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Millgram, Michael A; Ashkenazi, Ely; Rand, Nahshon

    2015-01-01

    Study design Case reports and retrospective review of accidental durotomies in lumbar surgeries during 5 years. Objectives To draw attention to a potentially serious complication of incidental durotomy-remote cerebellar hemorrhage. Summary and background data Accidental durotomy is a frequent complication of spinal surgery. In most cases the outcome of incidental durotomy is favorable. A delayed potentially serious complication of CSF loss during and after lumbar surgery is remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH). Methods During 2008-2012, 1169 lumbar spine procedures were performed at our spine center. In 210 surgeries incidental or intentional durotomies occurred. All patients with durotomies were managed with suturing of the dural wound followed by deep wound drainage left for 5 days and tight wound closure. Results Of the 210 patients with CSF loss three patients were identified to suffer from RCH-an incidence of 0.26%. The three patients ages 56, 67 and 75 years developed RCH between 36-192 hours after surgery. All three were managed with supportive treatment and close clinical supervision. A gradual clinical and radiological improvement was noted in all three patients. Conclusions Severe headache after spinal surgery and or declining mental status should not be attributed only to low CSF pressure secondary to dural tearing. It can also be the result of remote cerebral or cerebellar hemorrhage. Once the diagnosis of RCH is made, close clinical supervision is mandatory. In most cases non-operative supportive treatment may lead to eventual full clinical recovery. PMID:26273547

  17. Platelet-Rich Plasma Combined With Skin Substitute for Chronic Wound Healing: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Rebecca L.; Hunt, Allen R.; Collins, John C.; DeSmet, Marie; Barnes, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Contemporary management of chronic wounds focuses on improving natural healing and individualization of treatment. Incorporating multiple therapies has become increasingly common. Of interest are autologous growth factors, which are especially important in chronic wound healing and may contribute to tissue formation and epithelialization. Autologous platelet concentrate or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentration of at least five autologous growth factors and has been shown to accelerate wound healing and may have infection-fighting properties. Chronic wound healing is complicated by both decreased growth factor availability and infection, making PRP use valuable in these types of wounds. In this report, the use of PRP therapy alone and in combination with a bioengineered skin substitute as a platelet-rich tissue graft in a chronic, non-healing wound is detailed. Over 27 weeks, the patient received multiple therapies in attempts to heal a severe decubitus ulcer of the sacrum. The introduction of PRP therapy at Week 14 led to a 26% reduction in wound depth over 4 weeks. At Week 19, PRP therapy was combined with a powdered skin substitute to create a platelet-rich tissue graft. The combination brought dramatic results, eliminating wound tunneling and reducing the wound dimensions from 6.2 cm long × 6.7 cm wide × 2.7 cm deep to 5.0 cm long × 6.0 cm wide × 1.4 cm deep. The promising observations from this case report indicate that further study on the combining of PRP therapy and skin substitutes is necessary. PMID:17089514

  18. Severely Impaired Insulin Signaling in Chronic Wounds of Diabetic ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Itamar; Müller, Elke; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Frank, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Wound-healing disorders are major complications of diabetes mellitus. Here, we investigated insulin-mediated signaling in nonwounded skin and in cutaneous tissue regeneration of healthy C57BL/6 and diabetes-impaired leptin-deficient obese/obese (ob/ob) mice. The insulin receptor (InsR) was abundantly expressed in wound margins and granulation tissue during acute healing in healthy mice. Remarkably, active signaling from the InsR, as assessed by phosphorylation of downstream targets such as protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B, glycogen synthase (GS), and GS kinase, was nearly absent in nonwounded and acutely healing skin from ob/ob mice. Systemic leptin administration to ob/ob mice reverted the diabetic phenotype and improved tissue regeneration as well as the impaired expression of InsR, insulin receptor substrate-1 and insulin receptor substrate-2, and downstream signaling (phosphorylation of GS kinase and GS) in late wounds and nonwounded skin of ob/ob mice. Importantly, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? was a mediator of insulin resistance in keratinocytes in vitro and in ob/ob wound tissue in vivo. Systemic administration of a monoclonal anti-TNF-? antibody (V1q) in wounded ob/ob mice attenuated wound inflammation, improved re-epithelialization, and restored InsR expression and signaling in wound tissue of ob/ob mice. These data suggest that InsR signaling in diabetes-impaired wounds is sensitive to inflam-matory conditions and that anti-inflammatory approaches, such as anti-TNF-? strategies, improve diabetic wound healing. PMID:16507892

  19. Wound Drainage Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading All About Allergies First Aid: What to Do Pregnant? What to Expect Sports: Keeping Kids Safe Concussions: What to Know Wound Drainage Culture KidsHealth > Parents > ...

  20. Population-based analysis of tonsil surgery and postoperative hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mueller, J; Boeger, D; Buentzel, J; Esser, D; Hoffmann, K; Jecker, P; Mueller, A; Radtke, G; Geißler, K; Bitter, T; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2015-12-01

    Although tonsil surgery is one of the most frequent otorhinolaryngological procedures, not many population-based regional or country-wide studies are published on the incidence of postoperative bleeding and its risk factors. 2,216 patients underwent tonsil surgery in 2012 in Thuringia, a federal state in Germany. Most frequent indications were recurrent tonsillitis (44 % of all cases), tonsillar abscess (27 %), and tonsillar hyperplasia (20 %). 29 % of the patients were <10 years of age. Most frequent methods of surgery were tonsillectomy (73 %) and tonsillotomy (19 %). 215 patients (10 %) had 221 events of a postoperative hemorrhage. Re-surgery for hemostasis was necessary in 137 patients (6 %). The interval to re-surgery was 4.4 ± 4.6 days. The re-surgery rate was 8, 0.2, and 15 % after tonsillectomy, tonsillotomy, and radical tonsillectomy, respectively. In cases of recurrent tonsillitis, male gender (p < 0.001), age >24.78 years (median; (p = 0.018), and waiving of perioperative antibiotics (p = 0.029) were independent factors associated with hemorrhage. In cases of tonsillar hyperplasia tonsillectomy instead of tonsillotomy, the only significant risk factor was postoperative hemorrhage (p = 0.005). The overall incidence of tonsillar surgery was 87.6/100,000. The highest incidence was seen for patients 3-4 years of age with 862.7/100,000. In children <10 years, the incidence was always higher for boys than for girls. Throughout all age groups, a reverse gender relation was only seen, if surgery was indicated for recurrent tonsillitis. We recommend establishing national guidelines for indication of tonsil surgery, especially of tonsillectomy, including recommendations for perioperative care to decrease variations in tonsil surgery rates and minimize postoperative complications. PMID:25502742

  1. Recent Developments in Topical Wound Therapy: Impact of Antimicrobiological Changes and Rebalancing the Wound Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Erfurt-Berge, Cornelia; Renner, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Wound therapy improves every year by developing new wound treatment options or by advancing already existing wound materials, for example, adding self-releasing analgesic drugs or growth factors to wound dressings, or by binding and inactivating excessive proteases. Also new dressing materials based on silk fibers and enhanced methods to reduce bacterial burden, for example, cold argon plasma, might help to fasten wound healing. PMID:24829919

  2. A new lamellar wound configuration for penetrating keratoplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Busin, Massimo

    2003-02-01

    A modified penetrating keratoplasty procedure with a new lamellar configuration of the surgical wound was performed on 8 eyes with endothelial decompensation. This technique allows complete suture removal by 3 months postoperatively, substantially shortening the time necessary for visual rehabilitation. Refractive astigmatism before and after suture removal was minimized to 4 diopters or less in all of the eyes in our preliminary series. Because the anterior surface of the donor button is smaller than the posterior one (diameter, 7.0 mm and 9.0 mm, respectively), more endothelial cells can be transplanted while maintaining the anterior graft surface at a safe distance from the corneoscleral limbus. Finally, no expensive instrumentation is required for this procedure except for an artificial anterior chamber if whole globes are not available. The surgical technique and clinical results are presented in this article. PMID:12583794

  3. Bedside Tool for Predicting the Risk of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation After Cardiac Surgery: The POAF Score

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Biancari, Fausto; Zanobini, Marco; Cottini, Marzia; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Saccocci, Matteo; Banach, Maciej; Beghi, Cesare; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) remains the most common complication after cardiac surgery. The present study aim was to derive an effective bedside tool to predict postoperative AF and its related complications. Methods and Results Data of 17 262 patients undergoing adult cardiac surgery were retrieved at 3 European university hospitals. A risk score for postoperative AF (POAF score) was derived and validated. In the overall series, 4561 patients (26.4%) developed postoperative AF. In the derivation cohort age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emergency operation, preoperative intra?aortic balloon pump, left ventricular ejection fraction <30%, estimated glomerular filtration rate <15 mL/min per m2 or dialysis, and any heart valve surgery were independent AF predictors. POAF score was calculated by summing weighting points for each independent AF predictor. According to the prediction model, the incidences of postoperative AF in the derivation cohort were 0, 11.1%; 1, 20.1%; 2, 28.7%; and ?3, 40.9% (P<0.001), and in the validation cohort they were 0, 13.2%; 1, 19.5%; 2, 29.9%; and ?3, 42.5% (P<0.001). Patients with a POAF score ?3, compared with those without arrhythmia, revealed an increased risk of hospital mortality (5.5% versus 3.2%, P=0.001), death after the first postoperative day (5.1% versus 2.6%, P<0.001), cerebrovascular accident (7.8% versus 4.2%, P<0.001), acute kidney injury (15.1% versus 7.1%, P<0.001), renal replacement therapy (3.8% versus 1.4%, P<0.001), and length of hospital stay (mean 13.2 versus 10.2 days, P<0.001). Conclusions The POAF score is a simple, accurate bedside tool to predict postoperative AF and its related or accompanying complications. PMID:24663335

  4. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  5. Post-operative radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paumier, Amaury

    2013-01-01

    In completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with pathologically involved mediastinal lymph nodes (N2), administration of adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy is now considered the standard of care, based on level 1 evidence. The role of post-operative radiotherapy (PORT) in this group of patients remains controversial. In the PORT meta-analysis published in 1998, the conclusions were that if adjuvant radiotherapy was detrimental to patients with early-stage completely resected NSCLC, the role of PORT in the treatment of tumours with N2 involvement was unclear and further research was warranted. Recent retrospective and non-randomized studies as well as subgroup analyses of recent randomized trials evaluating adjuvant chemotherapy, provide evidence of the possible benefit of PORT in patients with mediastinal nodal involvement. The question of PORT indication is also valid for those patients with proven N2 disease who undergo neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. The risk of local recurrence for N2 patients varies between 20% and 60%. Based on currently available data, PORT should be discussed for fit patients with completely resected NSCLC with N2 nodal involvement, within a multidisciplinary setting, preferably after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy or after surgery if patients have had neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. There is need for new randomized evidence to reassess PORT using modern three-dimensional conformal radiation technique, with attention to normal organ sparing, particularly lung and heart, to reduce the possible additional toxicity. Randomized evidence is needed. A new large international multi-institutional randomized trial Lung ART evaluating PORT in this patient population is now underway, as well as a Chinese study comparing postoperative sequential chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy versus adjuvant chemotherapy alone. PMID:25806262

  6. Sleep disturbances and quality of life in postoperative management after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this prospective study were to analyze the predictors of postoperative sleep disturbance after esophagectomy for cancer and to identify patients at risk for postoperative hypnotic administration. Methods Sixty two consecutive patients who underwent cancer-related esophagectomy were enrolled in this study from May 2011 to February 2012. Data about perioperative management, postoperative complications, ICU stay, and vasopressor, hypnotic, and painkiller administration were retrieved. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was used and global quality of life (QL2 item) and sleep disturbance (SL item) were the primary endpoints. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results Postoperative request of hypnotics independently predicted bad quality of life outcome. Sleep disturbance after esophagectomy was independently predicted by the duration of dopamine infusion in the ICU and the daily request of benzodiazepines. Even in this case, only sleep disturbance at diagnosis revealed to be an independent predictor of hypnotic administration need. ROC curve analysis showed that sleep disturbance at diagnosis was a good predictor of benzodiazepine request (AUC?=?73%, P?=?0.02). Conclusions The use of vasopressors in the ICU affects sleep in the following postoperative period and the use of hypnotics is neither completely successful nor lacking in possible consequences. Sleep disturbance at diagnosis can successfully predict patients who can develop sleep disturbance during the postoperative period. PMID:24886219

  7. The Incidence of Early Postoperative Conductive Hearing Loss after Microvascular Decompression of Hemifacial Spasm.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tingting; Thirumala, Parthasarathy; Gardner, Paul; Habeych, Miguel; Crammond, Donald; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Objectives?To evaluate the incidence and discuss the pathogenesis of early postoperative conductive hearing loss (CHL) after microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS). Design?Pre- and postoperative audiogram data and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) from patients who had underwent MVD for HFS were analyzed. Setting?The study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Participants?MVD for HFS patients who had pre- and postoperative audiogram data, BAEP data, and normal structure of the external and middle ear were included in the study. Main Outcome Measures?CHL was diagnosed if there was an air-bone gap in pure tone audiometry of at least 10?dB at 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 kHz. Results?The incidence of early postoperative CHL in the ipsilateral ear was 18.7% postoperatively. No CHL was observed in the contralateral side. No significant relationship between CHL and intraoperative BAEP changes was found. Demographic parameters were not significantly different between groups with and without CHL. Conclusions?Early postoperative CHL is a significant complication after MVD. Fluid entering the mastoid air cells and/or bone-dust deposition during craniotomy may result in CHL. Long-term audiograms will be needed to evaluate the risk factors that lead to permanent CHL. PMID:26682118

  8. Using the Mouse Grimace Scale to Reevaluate the Efficacy of Postoperative Analgesics in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumiya, Lynn C; Sorge, Robert E; Sotocinal, Susana G; Tabaka, John M; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Zaloum, Austin; King, Oliver D; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pain management in animals is complicated greatly by the inability to recognize pain. As a result, the choice of analgesics and their doses has been based on extrapolation from greatly differing pain models or the use of measures with unclear relevance to pain. We recently developed the Mouse Grimace Scale (MGS), a facial-expression–based pain coding system adapted directly from scales used in nonverbal human populations. The MGS has shown to be a reliable, highly accurate measure of spontaneous pain of moderate duration, and therefore is particularly useful in the quantification of postoperative pain. In the present study, we quantified the relative intensity and duration of postoperative pain after a sham ventral ovariectomy (laparotomy) in outbred mice. In addition, we compiled dose–response data for 4 commonly used analgesics: buprenorphine, carprofen, ketoprofen, and acetaminophen. We found that postoperative pain in mice, as defined by facial grimacing, lasts for 36 to 48 h, and appears to show relative exacerbation during the early dark (active) photophase. We find that buprenorphine was highly effective in inhibiting postoperative pain-induced facial grimacing in mice at doses equal to or lower than current recommendations, that carprofen and ketoprofen are effective only at doses markedly higher than those currently recommended, and that acetaminophen was ineffective at any dose used. We suggest the revision of practices for postoperative pain management in mice in light of these findings. PMID:22330867

  9. Safety of liposome extended-release bupivacaine for postoperative pain control

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Juan; Kamar, Nawal; Melibary, Somayah; Quevedo, Eduardo; Bergese, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ideal postoperative pain management requires a multidisciplinary approach in combination with a variety of dosage regimens. Approximately 21–30% of patients experience moderate to severe pain in the postoperative period, which may have a significant impact on recovery rate, standard of living, psychological health, and postoperative complications. Objective: Analysis of the incidence and characterization of reported adverse effects with DepoFoam bupivacaine compared to conventional bupivacaine or placebo. Methods: A systematic review of prospective studies on the use of DepoFoam versus bupivacaine or placebo was performed in order to answer the clinically relevant question: is DepoFoam a safer formulation in place of bupivacaine single injection or continuous local infusion techniques for postoperative pain management? Inclusion criteria required randomized, controlled, double-blind trials in patients 18 years old or older, single dose used for postoperative pain control, and a primary procedure performed. Results: Six studies fitted the inclusion criteria for analysis, DepoFoam bupivacaine used in therapeutic doses was well-tolerated, had a higher safety margin, and showed a favorable safety profile compared to bupivacaine and control groups. Conclusion: Extended drug delivery system DepoFoam bupivacaine is a promising drug formulation that may significantly improve postoperative care and pain control in surgical patients. PMID:24817851

  10. Chylous ascites: a rare complication of radical gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, A; Ravi, N R; Diggory, R T

    2000-04-01

    Chylous ascites is the accumulation of lymphatic fluid within the peritoneal cavity, due to trauma or obstruction to the lymphatic system. Postoperative chylous ascites is a rare complication of abdominal surgery. This is frequently reported after retroperitoneal dissections, and results in high morbidity and mortality. The treatment options are varied and include total parenteral nutrition (TPN), elemental diet with medium chain triglycerides (MCT), repeated paracentesis and surgical ligation. We report a case of post-operative chylous ascites after D2 distal gastrectomy. Treatment by fasting, TPN followed by fat-free diet resulted in complete resolution of ascites within 3 weeks. To our knowledge this is the first report of such a complication following radical gastrectomy. We review the literature and briefly discuss the management options. PMID:10829366

  11. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  12. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IgM Serology Publications and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  13. Management of medical complications.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Carolin I; Reding, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Medical comorbidities and complications are expected following stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. The neurorehabilitation physician's role is to manage these comorbidities, prevent complications, and serve as a medical and neurologic resource for the patient, family, and neurorehabilitation team. The most common comorbidities are similar to those found in the general population, namely hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Frequent complications encountered in the neurorehabilitation unit relate to medication side effects, medical comorbidities, and the direct effect of the neurologic injury. They include orthostatic hypotension; syncope or presyncope; cardiac arrhythmia; bowel and bladder dysfunction; seizures; pressure sores; dysphagia-related pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; venous thromboembolism; falls; and sexual dysfunction. This article discusses strategies for managing comorbidities and avoiding complications. PMID:22810865

  14. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered kidney complications of IBD—particularly oxalate stones. Kidney stones are more common in Crohn's patients with disease ...

  15. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ...

  16. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    PubMed

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. PMID:24863025

  17. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  18. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  19. Wound bed preparation from a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Halim, A. S.; Khoo, T. L.; Saad, A. Z. Mat

    2012-01-01

    Wound bed preparation has been performed for over two decades, and the concept is well accepted. The ‘TIME’ acronym, consisting of tissue debridement, infection or inflammation, moisture balance and edge effect, has assisted clinicians systematically in wound assessment and management. While the focus has usually been concentrated around the wound, the evolving concept of wound bed preparation promotes the treatment of the patient as a whole. This article discusses wound bed preparation and its clinical management components along with the principles of advanced wound care management at the present time. Management of tissue necrosis can be tailored according to the wound and local expertise. It ranges from simple to modern techniques like wet to dry dressing, enzymatic, biological and surgical debridement. Restoration of the bacterial balance is also an important element in managing chronic wounds that are critically colonized. Achieving a balance moist wound will hasten healing and correct biochemical imbalance by removing the excessive enzymes and growth factors. This can be achieved will multitude of dressing materials. The negative pressure wound therapy being one of the great breakthroughs. The progress and understanding on scientific basis of the wound bed preparation over the last two decades are discussed further in this article in the clinical perspectives. PMID:23162216

  20. Physics of Wound Healing I: Energy Considerations

    E-print Network

    Apell, S Peter; Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many components and interrelated processes on a microscopic level. This paper addresses a macroscopic view on wound healing based on an energy conservation argument coupled with a general scaling of the metabolic rate with body mass M as M^{\\gamma} where 0 wound healing rate peaks at a value determined by {\\gamma} alone, suggesting a concept of wound acceleration to monitor the status of a wound. 2) We find that the time-scale for wound healing is a factor 1/(1 -{\\gamma}) longer than the average internal timescale for producing new material filling the wound cavity in corresondence with that it usually takes weeks rather than days to heal a wound. 3) The model gives a prediction for the maximum wound mass which can be generated in terms of measurable quantities related to wound status. We compare our model predictions to experimental results for a range of different wound conditions (healthy, lean, diabetic and obses...

  1. Photobiomodulation in promoting wound healing: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuffler, Damien P

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse methods being applied to induce wound healing, many wounds remain recalcitrant to all treatments. Photobiomodulation involves inducing wound healing by illuminating wounds with light emitting diodes or lasers. While used on different animal models, in vitro, and clinically, wound healing is induced by many different wavelengths and powers with no optimal set of parameters yet being identified. While data suggest that simultaneous multiple wavelength illumination is more efficacious than single wavelengths, the optimal single and multiple wavelengths must be better defined to induce more reliable and extensive healing of different wound types. This review focuses on studies in which specific wavelengths induce wound healing and on their mechanisms of action. PMID:26681143

  2. Complications from the use of intrawound vancomycin in lumbar spinal surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Cadotte, David W; Williams, Kim; Fehlings, Michael G; Harrop, James S

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The use of intrawound vancomycin is rapidly being adopted for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) in spinal surgery. At operative closure, the placement of vancomycin powder in the wound bed-in addition to standard infection prophylaxis-can provide high concentrations of antibiotics with minimal systemic absorption. However, despite its popularity, to date the majority of studies on intrawound vancomycin are retrospective, and there are no prior reports highlighting the risks of routine treatment. METHODS A MEDLINE search for pertinent literature was conducted for studies published between 1966 and May 2015 using the following MeSH search terms: "intrawound vancomycin," "operative lumbar spine complications," and "nonoperative lumbar spine complications." This was supplemented with references and known literature on the topic. RESULTS An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 6, 2015, using the search string "intrawound vancomycin" found 22 results. After a review of all abstracts for relevance to intrawound vancomycin use in spinal surgery, 10 studies were reviewed in detail. Three meta-analyses were evaluated from the initial search, and 2 clinical studies were identified. After an analysis of all of the identified manuscripts, 3 additional studies were included for a total of 16 studies. Fourteen retrospective studies and 2 prospective studies were identified, resulting in a total of 9721 patients. A total of 6701 (68.9%) patients underwent treatment with intrawound vancomycin. The mean SSI rate among the control and vancomycin-treated patients was 7.47% and 1.36%, respectively. There were a total of 23 adverse events: nephropathy (1 patient), ototoxicity resulting in transient hearing loss (2 patients), systemic absorption resulting in supratherapeutic vancomycin exposure (1 patient), and culture-negative seroma formation (19 patients). The overall adverse event rate for the total number of treated patients was 0.3%. CONCLUSIONS Intrawound vancomycin use appears to be safe and effective for reducing postoperative SSIs with a low rate of morbidity. Study disparities and limitations in size, patient populations, designs, and outcomes measures contribute significant bias that could not be fully rectified by this systematic review. Moreover, care should be exercised in the use of intrawound vancomycin due to the lack of well-designed, prospective studies that evaluate the efficacy of vancomycin and include the appropriate systems to capture drug-related complications. PMID:26424335

  3. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  4. Hypoxia inducible microRNA 210 attenuates keratinocyte proliferation and impairs closure in a murine model of ischemic wounds

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sabyasachi; Roy, Sashwati; Banerjee, Jaideep; Hussain, Syed-Rehan A.; Khanna, Savita; Meenakshisundaram, Guruguhan; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Friedman, Avner; Sen, Chandan K.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia complicates wound closure. Here, we are unique in presenting a murine ischemic wound model that is based on bipedicle flap approach. Using this model of ischemic wounds we have sought to elucidate how microRNAs may be implicated in limiting wound re-epithelialization under hypoxia, a major component of ischemia. Ischemia, evaluated by laser Doppler as well as hyperspectral imaging, limited blood flow and lowered tissue oxygen saturation. EPR oximetry demonstrated that the ischemic wound tissue had pO2 <10 mm Hg. Ischemic wounds suffered from compromised macrophage recruitment and delayed wound epithelialization. Specifically, epithelial proliferation, as determined by Ki67 staining, was compromised. In vivo imaging showed massive hypoxia inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) stabilization in ischemic wounds, where HIF-1? induced miR-210 expression that, in turn, silenced its target E2F3, which was markedly down-regulated in the wound-edge tissue of ischemic wounds. E2F3 was recognized as a key facilitator of cell proliferation. In keratinocytes, knock-down of E2F3 limited cell proliferation. Forced stabilization of HIF-1? using Ad-VP16- HIF-1? under normoxic conditions up-regulated miR-210 expression, down-regulated E2F3, and limited cell proliferation. Studies using cellular delivery of miR-210 antagomir and mimic demonstrated a key role of miR-210 in limiting keratinocyte proliferation. In summary, these results are unique in presenting evidence demonstrating that the hypoxia component of ischemia may limit wound re-epithelialization by stabilizing HIF-1?, which induces miR-210 expression, resulting in the down-regulation of the cell-cycle regulatory protein E2F3. PMID:20308562

  5. Progress in corneal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-11-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-? inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and nanocarriers for corneal drug delivery are discussed. Attention is also paid to problems in wound healing understanding and treatment, such as lack of specific epithelial stem cell markers, reliable identification of stem cells, efficient prevention of haze and stromal scar formation, lack of data on wound regulating microRNAs in keratocytes and endothelial cells, as well as virtual lack of targeted systems for drug and gene delivery to select corneal cells. PMID:26197361

  6. Prevalence of and risk factors for persistent postoperative nonanginal pain after cardiac surgery: a 2-year prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Choinière, Manon; Watt-Watson, Judy; Victor, J. Charles; Baskett, Roger J.F.; Bussières, Jean S.; Carrier, Michel; Cogan, Jennifer; Costello, Judy; Feindel, Christopher; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Racine, Mélanie; Taillefer, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persistent postoperative pain continues to be an underrecognized complication. We examined the prevalence of and risk factors for this type of pain after cardiac surgery. Methods: We enrolled patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting or valve replacement, or both, from Feb. 8, 2005, to Sept. 1, 2009. Validated measures were used to assess (a) preoperative anxiety and depression, tendency to catastrophize in the face of pain, health-related quality of life and presence of persistent pain; (b) pain intensity and interference in the first postoperative week; and (c) presence and intensity of persistent postoperative pain at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. The primary outcome was the presence of persistent postoperative pain during 24 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 1247 patients completed the preoperative assessment. Follow-up retention rates at 3 and 24 months were 84% and 78%, respectively. The prevalence of persistent postoperative pain decreased significantly over time, from 40.1% at 3 months to 22.1% at 6 months, 16.5% at 12 months and 9.5% at 24 months; the pain was rated as moderate to severe in 3.6% at 24 months. Acute postoperative pain predicted both the presence and severity of persistent postoperative pain. The more intense the pain during the first week after surgery and the more it interfered with functioning, the more likely the patients were to report persistent postoperative pain. Pre-existing persistent pain and increased preoperative anxiety also predicted the presence of persistent postoperative pain. Interpretation: Persistent postoperative pain of nonanginal origin after cardiac surgery affected a substantial proportion of the study population. Future research is needed to determine whether interventions to modify certain risk factors, such as preoperative anxiety and the severity of pain before and immediately after surgery, may help to minimize or prevent persistent postoperative pain. PMID:24566643

  7. Unilobed Rotational Flap for Plantar Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Ulceration Complicated by Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Hyllengren, Shelby B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes-related neuropathic ulcers located at the plantar aspect of the hallux interphalangeal joint are often chronic or recurrent and frequently become complicated by osteomyelitis. Once infected, treatment will typically involve hallux amputation. Although intended as a definitive procedure, amputation of the first toe is not desirable from a cosmetic or functional standpoint and often leads to transfer ulcers at adjacent locations of the foot. Reconstructive wound surgery, combined with limited bone resection, is possible if the infection is caught early before the local tissue and bone have become necrotic. In addition to neuropathy, biomechanical issues, including ankle equinus, hallux limitus, hallux extensus, and hallux valgus, predispose patients with diabetes mellitus to developing plantar hallux ulcers. We commonly employ a proximal based unilobed plantar rotational flap combined with hallux interphalangeal joint arthroplasty as an alternative to hallux amputation. We present a typical case with long-term follow-up to highlight our flap protocol, including patient selection criteria, flap design, surgical technique, bone resection and biopsy pearls, staging timeline, and a typical postoperative course. Periodic follow-up during the next 72 months for unrelated conditions allowed long-term monitoring with no recurrence of osteomyelitis or subsequent amputation. The foot remained ulcer free 6 years later. The benefits of this surgical approach include complete excision of the ulcer, adequate exposure for bone resection, early bone biopsy before the spread of infection or necrosis of local tissue, flap coverage with viable soft tissue, and partial offloading of mechanical pressure at the plantar interphalangeal joint. PMID:25681281

  8. Management of Traumatic Wounds and a Novel Approach to Delivering Wound Care in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe, Kathryn Q.; Desmarais, Thomas J.; Keller, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The costs and morbidity of pediatric traumatic wounds are not well known. The literature lacks a comprehensive review of the volume, management, and outcomes of children sustaining soft tissue injury. We briefly review the existing literature for traumatic wounds such as open fractures and burns. Such injuries require dedicated wound care and we propose a novel approach for more efficient and more effective delivery of dedicated pediatric wound care. Recent Advances: New pediatric literature is emerging regarding the long-term effects of wound care pain in traumatic injuries—especially burns. A variety of wound dressings and alternative management techniques exist and are geared toward reducing wound care pain. Our institution utilizes a unique model to provide adequate sedation and pain control through a dedicated pediatric wound care unit. We believe that this model reduces the cost of wound care by decreasing emergency department and operating room visits as well as hospital length of stay. Critical Issues: First, medical costs related to pediatric traumatic wound care are not insignificant. The need for adequate pain control and sedation in children with complex wounds is traditionally managed with operating room intervention. Afterward, added costs can be from a hospital stay for ongoing acute wound management. Second, morbidities of complex traumatic wounds are shown to be related to the acute wound care received. Future Directions: Further guidelines are needed to determine the most effective and efficient care of complex traumatic soft tissue injuries in the pediatric population. PMID:24761364

  9. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Role of Interventional Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  10. Vascular complications of pancreatitis: role of interventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Barge, Jaideep U; Lopera, Jorge E

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  11. C-reactive protein is a predictor of complications after elective laparoscopic colorectal surgery: five-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Karnusevicius, Ignas; Andreikaite, Gintare; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Poskus, Tomas; Strupas, Kestutis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the development and improvement of laparoscopic surgery, procedures have become common. However, post-operative complications occur when patients are released from hospital. These complications increase patients’ morbidity and mortality. They also lead to re-hospitalization, an extended recovery period, and an increase in the cost of treatment. Aim To evaluate and determine the prognostic properties of C-reactive protein in the early diagnosis of postoperative complications after a laparoscopic colon resection. Material and methods The prospective study included patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery in 2010–2014. The patients were divided into two groups – uncomplicated ones and those with complications. C-reactive protein concentrations in their blood serum were measured on the 2nd, 4th and 6th day after surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relation between C-reactive protein values measured on the 2nd, 4th and 6th postoperative day and related complications. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of each C-reactive protein value measured on the 2nd, 4th and 6th postoperative day. Results One hundred and six patients were included in the trial; 14 of them had complications. On the second day, a C-reactive protein cut-off value of 88.6 mmol/l provided the highest sensitivity and specificity for predicting evolving complications, being 71.4% and 84.8% respectively (p = 0.003). The significant predictive cut-off value decreases and becomes more sensitive and specific each post-operative day. Conclusions It is possible to detect developing post-operative complications early on by monitoring C-reactive protein concentration levels in the blood serum on the 2nd, 4th, and 6th post-operative days.

  12. A Wireless Electroceutical Dressing Lowers Cost of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Piya Das; Schlanger, Richard; Ganesh, Kasturi; Lambert, Lynn; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Martinsek, Patsy; Roy, Sashwati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the use of a wireless electroceutical dressing (WED) (Procellera®) in conjunction with a 5-day negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) may reduce the number of dressing changes required per week with this therapy. Approach: At the Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, chronic wound patients (n=30) undergoing NPWT were randomized into two arms following consent as approved by the institutional review board. The control arm received standard of care NPWT, where the dressing change was performed thrice a week. The test arm received the same care except that the WED was added as an interface layer and dressing change was limited to twice a week. Results: A reduced cost of care was achieved using the WED in conjunction with NPWT. Despite fewer dressing changes in wounds dressed with the WED, closure outcomes were comparable with no overt signs of any wound complication, including infection. The cost of NPWT care during the week was significantly lower (from $2918 to $2346) in the WED-treated group compared with patients in the control arm. Innovation: This work introduces a novel technology platform involving a WED, which may be used in conjunction with NPWT. If used as such, NPWT is effective in decreasing the frequency of dressing change and lowering the cost of care. Conclusion: This work points toward the benefit of using the WED combined with NPWT. A larger clinical trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of WED in wound care is warranted. PMID:26005596

  13. Human fetal skin fibroblasts: Extremely potent and allogenic candidates for treatment of diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Larijani, Bagher; Ghahari, Aziz; Warnock, Garth L; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Arjmand, Babak

    2015-06-01

    The number of patients with diabetes has been expected around 300 million by 2025 and 366 million by 2030 by WHO. On the other hand, diabetic wounds as one of the common complications of diabetes represent major health challenges. Recently, wound care biological products have been proposed for treatment of chronic wounds such as the diabetic wound. Accordingly, tissue-engineered skin substitutes have demonstrated promising effects. Some of these products have used adult skin and neonatal foreskin fibroblasts to produce a tissue-engineered skin substitute. Although adult skin and neonatal foreskin fibroblasts have demonstrated promising effects, but fetal skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes have depicted some unique and considerable properties over adult and neonatal skin cells for instance, skin regeneration with no inflammation and scar formation, low immunogenicity, more VEGF-A secretion than their adult counterparts, immunomodulatory effect by the expression of Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, more resistance to oxidative and physical stresses, etc. On the other hand fetal dermal cells with intrinsic IDO-dependent immunosuppressive activity have introduced them as an allogeneic alternative for treatment of chronic wounds. Therefore, based on the mentioned advantages they are ideal skin substitutes. Accordingly, we suggest that using these cells alone or in combination with biocompatible scaffolds for treatment of different types of ulcers such as diabetic wounds. PMID:25784640

  14. Surgical Sutures Filled with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Promote Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Reckhenrich, Ann Katharin; Kirsch, Bianca Manuela; Wahl, Elizabeth Ann; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Rezaeian, Farid; Harder, Yves; Foehr, Peter; Machens, Hans-Günther; Egaña, José Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Delayed wound healing and scar formation are among the most frequent complications after surgical interventions. Although biodegradable surgical sutures present an excellent drug delivery opportunity, their primary function is tissue fixation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) act as trophic mediators and are successful in activating biomaterials. Here biodegradable sutures were filled with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) to provide a pro-regenerative environment at the injured site. Results showed that after filling, ASCs attach to the suture material, distribute equally throughout the filaments, and remain viable in the suture. Among a broad panel of cytokines, cell-filled sutures constantly release vascular endothelial growth factor to supernatants. Such conditioned media was evaluated in an in vitro wound healing assay and showed a significant decrease in the open wound area compared to controls. After suturing in an ex vivo wound model, cells remained in the suture and maintained their metabolic activity. Furthermore, cell-filled sutures can be cryopreserved without losing their viability. This study presents an innovative approach to equip surgical sutures with pro-regenerative features and allows the treatment and fixation of wounds in one step, therefore representing a promising tool to promote wound healing after injury. PMID:24625821

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing: A Review of Technologies and Tools for Wound Microbiome Research

    PubMed Central

    Hodkinson, Brendan P.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The colonization of wounds by specific microbes or communities of microbes may delay healing and/or lead to infection-related complication. Studies of wound-associated microbial communities (microbiomes) to date have primarily relied upon culture-based methods, which are known to have extreme biases and are not reliable for the characterization of microbiomes. Biofilms are very resistant to culture and are therefore especially difficult to study with techniques that remain standard in clinical settings. Recent Advances: Culture-independent approaches employing next-generation DNA sequencing have provided researchers and clinicians a window into wound-associated microbiomes that could not be achieved before and has begun to transform our view of wound-associated biodiversity. Within the past decade, many platforms have arisen for performing this type of sequencing, with various types of applications for microbiome research being possible on each. Critical Issues: Wound care incorporating knowledge of microbiomes gained from next-generation sequencing could guide clinical management and treatments. The purpose of this review is to outline the current platforms, their applications, and the steps necessary to undertake microbiome studies using next-generation sequencing. Future Directions: As DNA sequencing technology progresses, platforms will continue to produce longer reads and more reads per run at lower costs. A major future challenge is to implement these technologies in clinical settings for more precise and rapid identification of wound bioburden. PMID:25566414

  16. [LOXOCELES BITE WOUND TREATMENT WITH SYNTHETIC POLYMER MATRIX].

    PubMed

    Navarro Caballero, Ma Ascensión

    2015-05-01

    Loxocelism is a toxic condition produces by the venom inoculated by the bit of the recluse spider (genus Loxosceles). In can appear in two clinical forms: cutaneous loxocelism and viscerocutaneous Ioxocelim. The species Loxoceles rufescens, found in Spain, is responsible of cases of cutaneous loxocelism. Cutaneous loxocelism starts with an itch, later giving rise to intense pain, and it later takes either a more or less severe necrotic form or an edematous form. The latter, with a better prognosis, is the one we focus on here. The diagnosis is clinical. The systemic treatment consists in analgesics, antihistamines, corticosteroids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and dapsone in severe cases. The local treatment is based on the cleaning and debridement of the wound, and in advanced treatments for complex wounds. It is not uncommon that such wounds require skin grafting. We present the case of an 18-year female bitten by a loxosceles on the dorsal area of the foot. She developed a deep tissue necrosis in the area. She presented systemic complications such as leucocitosis, fever, local infection and cellulitis. Systemic treatment and hospitalization were required, as well as advanced therapeutic care. Finally, cutaneous integrity was restored after 84 days. PMID:26540898

  17. Atypical gunshot wound: Bullet trajectory analyzed by computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Tae; Murray, Richard; Galvan, Dan; Nazim, Muhammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gunshot injuries are a result of a bullet or projectile fired from a weapon that penetrates the body. Homicide, suicide, and occasionally, accidental events are a significant cause of firearm-related injuries. In rare cases, the damage from the gunshot injury can be masked due to an atypical bullet trajectory. Presentation of case A 63-year-old male was found with a gunshot wound to the anterior left knee. Computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a bullet track extending from the anterior aspect of the left knee that traveled cephalad subcutaneously and entered into the peritoneal cavity, perforating the distal descending colon. The bullet was found to be at rest adjacent to the spleen and posterior chest wall, with no injury to the lungs, kidneys or the spleen. The patient required a sigmoid colectomy with descending colostomy and was subsequently discharged home without any complications. Discussion Intra-abdominal organ damage from a gunshot wound to the distal limb is a rare occurrence. Atypical gun shot wounds, such as this case, have the potential for multiple issues including: delayed diagnostic tests, inaccurate radiological readings, and inappropriate medical management. Conclusion If an abnormal trajectory is maintained, it is possible for a bullet to traverse half the length of the body without the patient realizing it. Accurate CT analysis and quick decisions in surgical and medical management are critical takeaways to provide quality care to patients with these injuries. PMID:26263447

  18. Community health nursing, wound care, and...ethics?

    PubMed

    Bell, Sue Ellen

    2003-09-01

    Because of changing demographics and other factors, patients receiving care for wounds, ostomies, or incontinence are being referred in increasing numbers to community health nursing organizations for initial or continued care. As home-based wound care becomes big business, little discussion is being focused on the moral and ethical issues likely to arise in the high-tech home setting. Progressively more complex and expensive home care relies on family members to take on complicated care regimens in the face of decreasing numbers of allowable skilled nursing home visits. A framework and a principle-based theory for reflection on the character and content of moral and ethical conflicts are provided to encourage informed and competent care of patients in the home. Common moral and ethical conflicts for WOC nurses in the United States are presented. These conflicts include issues of wound care supply procurement; use of documentation to maximize care or profit; problems of quality, care consistency, and caregiver consent; and dilemmas of tiered health care options. The advantages of a framework to address ethical conflicts are discussed. PMID:14560284

  19. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  20. Porous polyethylene implants in facial reconstruction: Outcome and complications.

    PubMed

    Ridwan-Pramana, Angela; Wolff, Jan; Raziei, Ashkan; Ashton-James, Claire E; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the indications, results and complications of patients treated with porous polyethylene (Medpor(®)) implants in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam over 17 years. A total of 69 high-density porous polyethylene implants (Medpor(®) Biomaterial; Porex Surgical, Newman, GA) were used in forty patients (22 males, 18 females). All patients were analysed for gender, age, diagnosis, indications for surgery, follow-up period and postoperative complications. A mean age of 34.1 years was observed. The main reason for implant surgery was post-traumatic functional impairment (27.5%). Most implants were placed at the mandibular angel and the orbital floor. Unsatisfactory appearance scored the highest in postoperative complications (10.1%) followed by infection rate (7.2%). Comparing the number of implants placed over the years and the incidence of complications, makes the overall complications rate of porous polyethylene very low. A consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis is needed. The objective measurements in patient satisfaction and proper implant design would be of great use. PMID:26276064

  1. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-10-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we determined which patient- and wound-related characteristics best predict time to complete wound healing and derived a prediction formula to estimate how long this may take. We selected 563 patients with acute wounds, documented in the WEC registry between 2007 and 2012. Wounds had existed for a median of 19 days (range 6-46?days). The majority of these were located on the leg (52%). Five significant independent predictors of prolonged wound healing were identified: wound location on the trunk [hazard ratio (HR) 0·565, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·405-0·788; P?=?0·001], wound infection (HR 0·728, 95% CI 0·534-0·991; P?=?0·044), wound size (HR 0·993, 95% CI 0·988-0·997; P?=?0·001), wound duration (HR 0·998, 95% CI 0·996-0·999; P?=?0·005) and patient's age (HR 1·009, 95% CI 1·001-1·018; P?=?0·020), but not diabetes. Awareness of the five factors predicting the healing of complex acute wounds, particularly wound infection and location on the trunk, may help caregivers to predict wound healing time and to detect, refer and focus on patients who need additional attention. PMID:24007311

  2. Lensectomy for complicated cataract in juvenile chronic iridocyclitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kanski, J J

    1992-01-01

    Experience with the removal of complicated cataract by lensectomy in patients with juvenile chronic iridocyclitis (JCI) has so far been limited. The results of lensectomy were reviewed retrospectively in 131 patients with JCI (187 eyes). The mean follow up period was 5 years 4 months. The main operative complication was accidental loss of lens material into the vitreous cavity. The postoperative complications were glaucoma (23 eyes, 15%), phthisis (14 eyes, 8%), secondary pupillary membranes (11 eyes, 6%), and retinal detachment (six eyes, 3%). The incidence of postoperative phthisis was related to the level of intraocular pressure (IOP) at the time of surgery. Twenty four per cent of hypotonous eyes and 4% of eyes with normal or elevated IOP became phthisical. Visual acuity was improved in 77%, was worse in 13%, and unchanged in 10% of eyes. The main causes of a postoperative visual acuity of 6/60 or less were glaucoma, amblyopia, and phthisis. Lensectomy did not appear to alter the course of uveitis. PMID:1739719

  3. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  4. TGF?-Smad signalling in postoperative human lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Saika, S; Miyamoto, T; Ishida, I; Shirai, K; Ohnishi, Y; Ooshima, A; McAvoy, J W

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To localise Smads3/4 proteins in lens epithelial cells (LECs) of fresh and postoperative human specimens. Smads3/4 are involved in signal transduction between transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) cell surface receptors and gene promoters. Nuclear localisation of Smads indicates achievement of endogenous TGF? signalling in cells. Methods: Three circular sections of the anterior capsule, one lens, and 17 capsules undergoing postoperative healing were studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Smads3/4 in paraffin sections of the specimens. The effect of exogenous TGF?2 on Smad3 subcellular localisation was examined in explant cultures of extracted human anterior lens epithelium. Results: The cytoplasm, but not the nuclei, of LECs of uninjured lenses was immunoreactive for Smads3/4. In contrast, nuclear immunoreactivity for Smads3/4 was detected in LECs during capsular healing. Nuclei positive for Smads3/4 were observed in monolayered LECs adjacent to the regenerated lens fibres of Sommerring’s ring. Interestingly, the nuclei of LECs that were somewhat elongated, and appeared to be differentiating into fibre-like cells, were negative for Smads3/4. Fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped lens cells with nuclear immunoreactivity for nuclear Smads3/4 were occasionally observed in the extracellular matrix accumulated in capsular opacification. Exogenous TGF? induced nuclear translocation of Smad3 in LECs of anterior capsule specimens in explant culture. Conclusions: This is consistent with TGF? induced Smad signalling being involved in regulating the behaviour of LECs during wound healing after cataract surgery. PMID:12446380

  5. Complications in the treatment with alveolar extraosseous distractors. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Grandjean, Alfredo; Reininger, David

    2015-01-01

    Background To review the literature that analyses the types and frequency of complications associated with the use of extraosseous alveolar distraction from 2007 to 2013. Material and Methods Review of the literature in PubMed, using these keywords; alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. Inclusion criteria were: articles published between 2007 and 2013 that included the distraction protocol, the complications encountered and the time when they occurred. Results According to the above criteria, 12 articles were included in this review, where 334 extraosseous distractors were placed and 395 complications were encountered, of which 19 (4.81%) were intraoperative, 261 (66.07%) postoperative and 115 (29.11 %) were postdistraction. The most common complication was the incorrect distraction vector found in 105 cases (26.58%), in 23 cases (5.82%) there were severe complications, of which 14 (3.54%) were mandibular fracture and 9 (2.27%) were fractures of the distractor elements. Conclusions According to this review, although alveolar distraction is a safe and predictable technique, it can cause complications; however, they are usually minor and easily resolved without affecting the treatment outcome. Key words: Alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. PMID:25858083

  6. Complications associated with prone positioning in elective spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    DePasse, J Mason; Palumbo, Mark A; Haque, Maahir; Eberson, Craig P; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with prone surgical positioning during elective spine surgery have the potential to cause serious patient morbidity. Although many of these complications remain uncommon, the range of possible morbidities is wide and includes multiple organ systems. Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a well described, but uncommon complication that may occur due to ischemia to the optic nerve, retina, or cerebral cortex. Closed-angle glaucoma and amaurosis have been reported as additional etiologies for vision loss following spinal surgery. Peripheral nerve injuries, such as those caused by prolonged traction to the brachial plexus, are more commonly encountered postoperative events. Myocutaneous complications including pressure ulcers and compartment syndrome may also occur after prone positioning, albeit rarely. Other uncommon positioning complications such as tongue swelling resulting in airway compromise, femoral artery ischemia, and avascular necrosis of the femoral head have also been reported. Many of these are well-understood and largely avoidable through thoughtful attention to detail. Other complications, such as POVL, remain incompletely understood and thus more difficult to predict or prevent. Here, the current literature on the complications of prone positioning for spine surgery is reviewed to increase awareness of the spectrum of potential complications and to inform spine surgeons of strategies to minimize the risk of prone patient morbidity. PMID:25893178

  7. Micronutrients, Arginine, and Glutamine: Does Supplementation Provide an Efficient Tool for Prevention and Treatment of Different Kinds of Wounds?

    PubMed Central

    Ellinger, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Wound-healing complications are a clinical problem with a considerable socioeconomic burden. Since several nutrients play a physiological role in wound healing, supplementation of these nutrients may improve wound healing. Recent Advances: Oral nutritional supplements and enteral formulas providing arginine, glutamine, and micronutrients such as ascorbic acid and zinc should improve the healing of pressure ulcers (PU) and the healing of surgical, traumatic, and burned wounds. Is their efficacy proved from clinical intervention trials? Critical Issues: Formulas that are rich in energy, protein, arginine, vitamin C, and zinc can improve PU healing, whereas their efficacy for PU prevention is less clear. High-dose supplementation of vitamin C, zinc, and pantothenic acid may improve the healing of surgical wounds in healthy subjects. Arginine lowers the risk of fistulas in patients undergoing elective surgery due to gastrointestinal cancer. However, formulations also enriched with n-3–fatty acids and ribonucleic acids lower the risk of several wound complications, thus being more effective than isolated arginine. Glutamine and antioxidant micronutrients (vitamin C and E, zinc, selenium, and copper) can improve the healing of surgical, traumatic, and burned wounds. Future Directions: Considerable evidence suggests that formulations, indicated especially for critically ill patients, support the healing of PU and the healing of surgical and burned wounds. However, their optimal composition with regard to the dose of individual components has to be determined in future studies. Further well-designed trials should investigate the impact of certain nutrients for the prevention of PU and for the healing of surgical wounds in healthy subjects. PMID:25371852

  8. Basic fibroblast growth factor in an artificial dermis promotes apoptosis and inhibits expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, leading to reduction of wound contraction.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Ono, Ichiro; Tominaga, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ito, Kinji; Suzuki, Takeya; Imaizumi, Risa; Ishiguro, Shigeki; Jimbow, Kowichi; Ishii, Toshiharu

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the mechanisms underlying declines in wound contraction caused by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and the role of autologous fibroblasts in modulating wound healing, we have examined the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and apoptosis in a model of wound healing using collagen sponges with and without bFGF (1 microg) and/or fibroblasts (1 x 10(6) cells/cm(2)) applied to experimentally produced full-thickness skin wounds in rats (n=10 for each group). At 7 days postoperatively, wounds filled with a fibroblast-seeded collagen sponge (fibroblast-seeded group) displayed a greater area of collagen sponge and a smaller area of fibroblasts compared with control wounds filled with collagen sponge alone (control group). Therefore, seeding of fibroblasts in the dermal substitute might retard degradation of the collagen sponge, inhibiting fibroblast infiltration into the substitute. By day 14, wounds filled with bFGF-treated collagen sponge without fibroblast seeding (bFGF group) displayed decreased alpha-SMA expression and significantly increased apoptosis compared with other wounds. Double staining revealed that apoptosis in alpha-SMA-positive fibroblastic cells was significantly increased in the bFGF group, suggesting that bFGF treatment is a potent stimulator of myofibroblast apoptosis. Furthermore, morphometric analysis demonstrated the significant decrease in the level of wound contraction and the degree of mature collagen bundle formation in the bFGF group by day 42. The bFGF group also showed increased bFGF expression in macrophages by day 28. These results suggest that bFGF administration to an artificial dermis promotes apoptosis of alpha-SMA-positive fibroblastic cells and inhibits alpha-SMA expression in the treated wound, thus reducing wound contraction. PMID:17537125

  9. Triclosan-coated sutures and sternal wound infections: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Steingrimsson, S; Thimour-Bergström, L; Roman-Emanuel, C; Scherstén, H; Friberg, Ö; Gudbjartsson, T; Jeppsson, A

    2015-12-01

    Surgical site infection is a common complication following cardiac surgery. Triclosan-coated sutures have been shown to reduce the rate of infections in various surgical wounds, including wounds after vein harvesting in coronary artery bypass grafting patients. Our purpose was to compare the rate of infections in sternotomy wounds closed with triclosan-coated or conventional sutures. A total of 357 patients that underwent coronary artery bypass grafting were included in a prospective randomized double-blind single-center study. The patients were randomized to closure of the sternal wound with either triclosan-coated sutures (Vicryl Plus and Monocryl Plus, Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) (n?=?179) or identical sutures without triclosan (n?=?178). Patients were followed up after 30 days (clinical visit) and 60 days (telephone interview). The primary endpoint was the prevalence of sternal wound infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The demographics in both groups were comparable, including age, gender, body mass index, and rate of diabetes and smoking. Sternal wound infection was diagnosed in 43 patients; 23 (12.8 %) sutured with triclosan-coated sutures compared to 20 (11.2 %) sutured without triclosan (p?=?0.640). Most infections were superficial (n?=?36, 10.1 %), while 7 (2.0 %) were deep sternal wound infections. There were 16 positive cultures in the triclosan group and 17 in the non-coated suture group (p?=?0.842). The most commonly identified main pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (45.4 %) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (36.4 %). Skin closure with triclosan-coated sutures did not reduce the rate of sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass grafting. (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01212315). PMID:26432552

  10. Evaluation of healing of infected cutaneous wounds treated with different energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Nicole R. S.; Cangussú, Maria C. T.; N. dos Santos, Jean; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    We aimed assess the effects of different energy densities of the association of red/IR laser light on the healing of cutaneous wounds infected Staphylococcus aureus. Background: Wound infection is the most common complication on healing wounds and cause both vascular and cellular responses on the tissue. Several therapeutics is used for improving wound healing including the use of different light sources, such as the Laser. Some energy densities present positive photobiological effects on the healing process. Material and Methods: 24 young adult male Wistar rats, under general anesthesia, had their dorsum shaven, cleaned and a 1 x 1cm cutaneous wound created with a scalpel and left without no suturing or dressings. The wounds were infected with Staphylococcus aureus and were randomly divided in 8 subgroups of 3 animals in each: Control, Group 10J/cm2, Group 20J/cm2, and Group 30J/cm2, 7 and 14 days each group. Laser phototherapy was carried out with a diode (?680nm/790nm, P= 30mW/40mW, CW, Laser, Ø = 3mm, PD=424mW/cm2 and 566mW/cm2, t=11.8/ 8.8 sec, E=0.35J) and started immediately after surgery and repeated at every other day during 7 days. Laser light was applied on 4 points around wounded area. The animals were killed at either 8th or 15th day after contamination. Specimens were taken, routinely cut and processed to wax, stained and underwent histological analysis. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Both 20 and 30J/cm2 caused intense collagen deposition at the end of the experimental time. But, when 20 J/cm2 was used the fibers were also well organized. Conclusion: Our results indicate that irradiated subjects showed improved wound healing being the 20 J/cm2 the energy the caused better histological response.

  11. Wound fixation for pressure ulcers: a new therapeutic concept based on the physical properties of wounds.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Nagai, Yayoi; Tanaka, Makiko; Utani, Atsushi; Furuta, Katsunori; Isogai, Zenzo

    2015-02-01

    A pressure ulcer is defined as damage to skin and other tissues over a bony prominence caused by excess pressure. Deep pressure ulcers that develop over specific bony prominences often exhibit wound deformity, defined as a change in the 3-dimensional shape of the wound. Subsequently, the wound deformity can result in undermining formation, which is a characteristic of deep pressure ulcers. However, to date, a concept with respect to alleviating wound deformity has yet to be defined and described. To clarify the issue, we propose a new concept called "wound fixation" based on the physical properties of deep pressure ulcers with wound deformity. Wound fixation is defined here as the alleviation of wound deformity by exogenous materials. The wound fixation methods are classified as traction, anchor, and insertion based on the relation between the wound and action point by the exogenous materials. A retrospective survey of a case series showed that wound fixation was preferentially used for deep pressure ulcers at specific locations such as the sacrum, coccyx, and greater trochanter. Moreover, the methods of wound fixation were dependent on the pressure ulcer location. In conclusion, our new concept of wound fixation will be useful for the practical treatment and care of pressure ulcers. Further discussion and validation by other experts will be required to establish this concept. PMID:25660756

  12. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Lyme Disease - Neurological Complications ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial ...

  13. Complications associated with preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 brachytherapy for localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, R.C.; Patterson, J.; Mendiondo, O.A.; Gee, W.F.; Lucas, B.A.; McRoberts, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with 1,050 rad preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy are reviewed. Significant long-term postoperative complications included radiation cystitis (12%), radiation proctitis (4%), genital and leg edema (12%), stress incontinence (8%), total incontinence (4%), and impotence (26%). Complications occurred in 75 per cent of patients who received additional postoperative radiation. Improved staging with CT scan, lymphangiography, and Chiba needle biopsy of any possibly abnormal lymph nodes provided excellent preoperative staging with only 1 patient (6%) upstaged at surgery to Stage D1.

  14. Anesthetic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Amie; Yu, Albert; Kaminski, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia complications in the parturient can be divided into 2 categories: those related to airway manipulation and those related to neuraxial anesthesia. Physiologic changes of pregnancy can lead to challenging intubating conditions in a patient at risk of aspiration. Neuraxial techniques are used to provide analgesia for labor and anesthesia for surgical delivery. Therefore, complications associated with neuraxial techniques are often seen in this population. In the event of maternal cardiac arrest, modification to advanced cardiac life support algorithms must be made to accommodate the gravid uterus and to deliver the fetus if return of maternal circulation is not prompt. PMID:26600441

  15. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  16. Orbital Complications of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Radovani, Pjerin; Vasili, Dritan; Xhelili, Mirela; Dervishi, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the modern antibiotherapies applied in the practice of otorhinolaryngology, the orbital complications of sinusitis are still considered a serious threat to essential functions of the eye, including loss of vision, and at worst, life threatening symptoms. Aims: The goal of this study is to consider and analyse patients who were treated for these complications in the last decade in our hospital, which is the only tertiary hospital in our country. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of cases. Methods: In our practice, cases treated in the hospital are rhinosinusitis cases where surgical intervention is necessary, or those with a suspicion of complications. Between the years 1999 and 2009 there were 177 cases, the clinical charts of which were reviewed. The cases that are omitted from this study are those involving soft tissues, bone, and intracranial complications. The diagnoses were determined based on anamnesis, anterior rhinoscopy, x-rays of the sinuses with the Water’s projection or where there was a suspicion of a complication, and CT scans with coronal and axial projections. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of cefalosporines, aminoglycosides and Proetz manoeuvre. When an improvement in the conditions did not occur within 24–48 hours, we intervened with a surgical procedure, preferably the Lynch-Patterson external frontoethmoidectomy. Results: In our study, we encountered 35 cases (19.8%) of orbital complications with an average age of 25 (range: 3–75); Palpebral inflammatory oedema (15), orbital cellulitis (10), subperiosteal abscess (6), orbital abscess (3), and cavernous sinus thrombosis (1 patient). The average time that patients remained in hospital was 4.6 days; for those with orbital complications this was 7 days. Conclusion: Orbital complications of sinusitis are considered to be severe pathologies. The appearance of oedema in the corner of the eye should be evaluated immediately and the means to exclude acute sinusitis should be taken under serious consideration. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are key to the reduction of these unwanted manifestations. PMID:25207092

  17. The role of topical negative pressure in wound repair: expression of biochemical markers in wound fluid during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mouës, Chantal M; van Toorenenbergen, Albert W; Heule, Freerk; Hop, Wim C; Hovius, Steven E R

    2008-01-01

    The clinical effects of topical negative pressure therapy (TNP) on wound healing are well described in numerous articles. While the mechanism(s) of action are not completely understood, it is postulated that reduction of local and interstitial tissue edema, increased perfusion of the (peri-) wound area, changed bacterial composition, and mechanical stimulation of the woundbed contribute to the clinical success. Our hypothesis is that with the removal of excessive fluid, proteolytic enzymes negatively influencing the healing process are removed. Our aim was to assess whether the concentrations of albumin, matrixmetalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) were different between wounds treated with TNP and conventional gauze therapy. We analyzed wound fluid samples of 33 wounds treated with either TNP therapy (n=15) or conventional therapy (n=18) on albumin, pro- and activated MMP-9, TIMP-1, and the ratio of total MMP-9/TIMP-1. Albumin levels were found to increase significantly in acute wounds compared with chronic wounds; however, no difference could be found on comparing TNP with conventional therapy. We did find significantly lower levels of pro-MMP-9 and lower total MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio in TNP-treated wounds during the follow-up of 10 days. These data strongly suggest that TNP therapy influences the microenvironment of the wound. PMID:18638266

  18. Multimodal imaging of cutaneous wound tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Ren, Wenqi; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, few methods are available for simultaneous assessment of these tissue parameters in a noninvasive and quantitative fashion. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities in a single-experimental setup