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1

Predictive factors for postoperative wound complications after neck dissection.  

PubMed

The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate risk factors for wound complications after neck dissection. One hundred and nineteen patients were treated with neck dissection for squamous-cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract at the National Cancer Institute in Rome between 2006 and 2009. Postoperative wound complications were divided into major or minor and were related to different variables to identify risk factors. Postoperative wound complications were found in 20.2% of patients with an individual patient probability for different risk factors ranging from 2% to 34.1%. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and the type of neck dissection were associated with a higher risk of major complications (p ? 0.05). Previous CRT and radical neck dissection/modified radical neck dissection are risk factors for major wound complications in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma undergoing neck dissection. Patients requiring neck dissection after CRT should be informed about the increased risk of the procedure, and selective neck dissection, if oncologically appropriate, should be considered to reduce complications. PMID:23620635

Pellini, R; Mercante, G; Marchese, C; Terenzi, V; Sperduti, I; Manciocco, V; Ruscito, P; Cristalli, G; Marchesi, P; Pichi, B; Spriano, G

2013-02-01

2

Relations between Long-term Glycemic Control and Postoperative Wound and Infectious Complications after Total Knee Arthroplasty in Type 2 Diabetics  

PubMed Central

Background The authors examined whether poor preoperative glucose control, as indicated by the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of more than 8%, is associated with postoperative wound and infectious complications in diabetic patients that have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods One hundred and sixty-seven TKAs performed in 115 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, from January 2001 through March 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. Logistic regression was used to identify the variables that had a significant effect on the risk of wound complications or early deep infection. The variables considered were age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, operation time, antibiotic-impregnated cement use, amount of blood transfusion, close suction drain use, duration of diabetes, method of diabetes treatment, diabetes complications, and preoperative HbA1c level. Results The overall incidence of wound complications was 6.6% (n = 11) and there were seven cases (4.2%) of early postoperative deep infection. Logistic regression revealed that the independent risk factors of wound complications were preoperative HbA1C ? 8% (odds ratio [OR], 6.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 33.0) and operation time (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.03). No variable examined was found to be significantly associated with the risk of early postoperative deep infection. Conclusions Poorly controlled hyperglycemia before surgery may increase the incidence of wound complications among diabetic patients after TKA. PMID:23730475

Han, Hyuk-Soo

2013-01-01

3

[Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].  

PubMed

Plastic surgery covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions in the areas of reconstructive surgery, hand, burn and aesthetic surgery. Besides acquired defects or malformations an increasing number of patients are being treated for surgical or multimodal complications. In a considerable number of patients plastic and reconstructive surgery remains the only therapeutic alternative after other therapy has failed. Therefore complication management in plastic surgery is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. In addition patient expectations in the results of plastic surgery as a discipline of invention and problem solving are steadily increasing. This challenge is reflected in clinical patient management by intensive research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Patients in plastic surgery are recruited from all age groups of either gender, involving traumatic and oncologic as well as congenital and aesthetic disorders. The demographics of aging, multimorbidity and obesity pose new challenges to plastic surgery. Although age over 70 years is not an independent risk factor per se for complications in plastic surgery, e.g. for complex free flap transfer, medical problems are present at a higher rate, which is to be expected in this age group. Risk factors such as alcoholism and coronary heart diseases seem to be independent predictors of perioperative complications. Therefore older patients can also benefit from plastic surgery and recurrent operations by the corresponding risk and complication management. Complication management necessitates careful patient selection, estimation of operative risks and patient-adapted selection of procedures. In addition to expertise in plastic surgery a thorough knowledge of non-surgical and surgical back-up procedures for technical incidents as well as vascular circulatory and wound healing disorders is required to deal successfully with complications in plastic surgery. This article presents these specific aspects of postoperative complication management in plastic surgery. PMID:19669715

Vogt, P M

2009-09-01

4

Acute postoperative complications of hypospadias repair  

PubMed Central

Purpose Complications in hypospadias surgery are higher than other reconstructive procedures. The incidence of complications can be reduced if proper preventive measures are taken. The review aims to highlight incidences, causes, and preventive measures of acute complications of hypospadias repair. Materials and Methods Literature reports were reviewed in Pubmed by giving the key word acute complications of hypospadias repair, wound infection, wound dehiscence, flap necrosis, edema, penile torsion, urethral fistula, bleeding and hematoma and urethral stents problems. Summaries of all articles were reviewed with full text of relevant article and results were analyzed. Results Besides mentioning the complications of hypospadias repair in individual articles on the subject, we did not come across any separate article on this subject in the published English literature. Fistula is the commonest complication followed by edema and penile torsion. Conclusions Most acute complications can be prevented with adherence to principles of plastic and microsurgery, meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. Deviation from these principles may lead to disaster and even failure of the repair. The aim in hypospadias surgery should be following these principles and bring down the complication rates < 5% in distal hypospadias and < 10% in proximal hypospadias. PMID:19468404

Bhat, Amilal; Mandal, Arup Kumar

2008-01-01

5

[Postoperative complications and management of filtration surgery].  

PubMed

Of the filtering procedures employed, trabeculectomy is the one most frequently used for surgical therapy in primary open angle glaucoma patients. Intra- and postoperative complications must be detected promptly and treated adequately. Many complications arise within the first weeks, such as bleb scaring, decreased flow beneath the scleral flap, extensive filtration with choroidal detachment and anterior chamber narrowing. Fibrin reaction, corneal dellen, iris prolapse, conjunctival leakage and ciliary body detachment are seen more rarely. With prophylactic pre- and perioperative application of antibiotics, wound infections are rare and the risk of endophthalmitis following trabeculectomy remains small. Careful surgical planning requires special consideration of the conjunctiva and provides the basis for long-term success as long as intensive follow-up treatment is ensured. The success of trabeculectomy depends on the preoperative, intraoperative as well as postoperative condition and in particular on bleb development. Early detection of postoperative complications, especially in terms of early scaring in the bleb area, enables implementation of adequate therapeutic measures, such as needling procedures and early bleb revision. Close patient monitoring substantially increases long-term success rates. PMID:19908048

Jonescu-Cuypers, C P; Seitz, B

2009-11-01

6

Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy  

PubMed Central

Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer. Abbreviations: PRS- Piver Rutledge-Smith, II- class II, III- class III PMID:24653760

Marin, F; Ple?ca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burl?nescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicol?escu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

2014-01-01

7

POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN THE ONCOLOGY DOG PATIENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Objective: to investigate post0operative complications in the dogs' oncology patients Design : retrospective study of the 211 canines with cancer. Intervention: curative, palliative, or cytoreductive surgery. Results: after 211 oncology surgery 17 per cent complications were assessed; wound complication (30.5%), excessive pain (25%), hypothermia (22%), and sinus tachycardia (11%) of the total complications. Conclusion: common complications registered after the

C. IGNA; A. SALA; LARISA SCHUSZLER; M. SAB?U; C. LUCA

2009-01-01

8

Prevalence of 90-days postoperative wound infections after cardiac surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Postoperative wound infections generally cause considerable extra morbidity, mortality and costs. As nowadays length of hospitalization shortens, post-discharge surveillance is important to get reliable information on the prevalence of postoperative wound infections. In this study, the prevalences of sternal wound (SWI) and donor site infections (DSI) during hospitalization as well as, 30 and 90 days after cardiac surgery were

Daisy Jonkers; Ted Elenbaas; Peter Terporten; Fred Nieman; Ellen Stobberingh

2003-01-01

9

Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and ?{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

Wang, Jingya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-08-01

10

Excess costs attributable to postoperative complications.  

PubMed

This article estimates excess costs associated with postoperative complications among inpatients treated in Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals. The authors conducted an observational study on 43,822 hospitalizations involving inpatient surgery in one of 104 VA hospitals during fiscal year 2007. Hospitalization-level cost regression analyses were performed to estimate the excess cost of each of 18 unique postoperative complications. The authors used generalized linear modeling techniques to account for the heavily skewed cost distribution. Costs were measured using an activity-based cost accounting system and complications were assessed based on medical chart review conducted by the VA 'National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The authors found excess costs associated with postoperative complications ranging from $8,338 for "superficial surgical site infection" to $29,595 for "failure to wean within 24 hours in the presence of respiratory complications." The results obtained suggest that quality improvement efforts aimed at reducing postoperative complications can contribute significantly to lowering of hospital costs. PMID:21536599

Carey, Kathleen; Stefos, Theodore; Shibei Zhao; Borzecki, Ann M; Rosen, Amy K

2011-08-01

11

Management of postoperative complications: anemia.  

PubMed

Anemia is extremely common following hip fracture. Consistent data from randomized trials show that transfusion of less blood, with a transfusion threshold around 8 g/dL hemoglobin concentration, is preferable to a traditional threshold of 10 g/dL. Adoption of a lower threshold leads to at least equivalent clinical outcomes, with much less exposure to transfusion costs and risks. The most common complication of transfusion is circulatory overload. Future research may elucidate the optimal transfusion threshold for these elderly patients and address the specific needs of subgroups of patients, including those with acute coronary syndrome or chronic kidney disease. PMID:24721367

Willett, Laura Rees; Carson, Jeffrey L

2014-05-01

12

Postoperative complications among octogenarians after cardiovascular surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe octogenarian patient is often perceived as too fragile to undergo cardiothoracic surgery. Our study aimed to compare postoperative complications in patients aged less than 80 versus elderly patients (80 years or more) after surgical cardiac intervention (coronary artery bypass or valve replacement).

Scott D Barnett; Linda S Halpin; Alan M Speir; Robert A Albus; Bechara F Akl; Paul S Massimiano; Nelson A Burton; Lucas R Collazo; Edward A Lefrak

2003-01-01

13

Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

2014-10-15

14

[Use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Incisions (Prevena™) after Surgery of Pectus Deformities Reduces Wound Complications.  

PubMed

Introduction: Pectus surgery can lead to postoperative wound complications in some cases. The purpose of this study is to determine whether preventive negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) could reduce wound complications after open pectus surgery. Material and Methods: 100 patients after open procedure for the treatment of pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum in the years 2010 to 2012 were retrospectively analysed. 50 patients treated with Prevena™ (KCI Medical Products GmbH, Wiesbaden, Germany) were compared with 50 patients whose wounds were covered with OPSITE® film (Smith & Nephew, Hamburg, Germany). Wound closure was performed following a standard procedure as well as the placement of subcutaneous drains. Therefore two comparable groups of patients were formed and analysed by standardised parameters. The wound dressing was placed epicutaneously immediately after wound closure in the operating room and removed after 5 days in each case. Follow-ups were performed immediately after removal of the wound dressing, at the time of discharge from hospital as well as 6 and 12 weeks after operation. The wounds were checked for tenderness, pain, secretion, redness and fistulas. Results: The Prevena group showed 10?% wound complications which needed operative treatment, whereas the OPSITE group showed complications in 24?%. Some patients who were treated with Prevena showed superficial skin lesions at the rim of the foam and the film. All of these lesions healed well. Conclusion: Treating wounds postoperatively with preventive measures (NPWT) showed a remarkable reduction of wound complications following open pectus surgery whereas statistically the difference was not significant (p?=?0.074). PMID:24647815

Simon, K; Schulz-Drost, M; Besendörfer, M; Carbon, R T; Schulz-Drost, S

2014-03-19

15

Type of skin incision and wound complications in the obese parturient.  

PubMed

We examined the relationship between type of skin incision at time of cesarean delivery and postoperative wound complications in the obese parturient. Women with a body mass index (BMI) of greater than 29 who had undergone cesarean delivery at The University of North Carolina were identified from the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition study. Inpatient and outpatient medical records were reviewed for maternal demographics as well as intrapartum and intraoperative characteristics. The exposure of interest was type of incision, classified as vertical or transverse. The primary outcome was wound complication, defined as partial or complete wound separation. Logistic regression analysis was used to create a final model of risk factors for wound complications while controlling for potentially confounding variables. From 1998 to 2005, 238 women with a BMI greater than 29 who underwent cesarean delivery were identified. Of these 238 women, a vertical skin incision was performed in 25 (11%) and a transverse skin incision in 213 (89%). The overall incidence of wound complications in this group was 13%. BMI was associated with wound complications (p < 0.01). After controlling for confounding factors, no difference in wound complication based on type of skin incision was apparent. The type of skin incision does not appear to be associated with wound complications in the obese parturient; however, larger studies would be needed to confirm this finding. Increased BMI is associated with a higher rate of wound complications. PMID:22105439

McLean, Mamie; Hines, Rachel; Polinkovsky, Margaret; Stuebe, Alison; Thorp, John; Strauss, Robert

2012-04-01

16

Noninfectious Wound Complications in Clean Surgery: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Association with Antibiotic Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Noninfectious wound complications are frequent and often are confused with and treated as infection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We assessed the epidemiology, impact, risk factors, and associations with antibiotic use of noninfectious wound complications\\u000a in clean orthopedic and trauma surgery. We report a single-center, prospective, observational study in an orthopedic department.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Among 1,073 adult patients, 630 (59%) revealed clinically relevant postoperative noninfectious wound complications,

Ilker UckayAmerico; Americo Agostinho; Wilson Belaieff; Laurence Toutous-Trellu; Saja Scherer-Pietramaggiori; Axel Andres; Louis Bernard; Hubert Vuagnat; Pierre Hoffmeyer; Blaise Wyssa

2011-01-01

17

Effectiveness of Postoperative Wound Drains in One- and Two-Level Cervical Spine Fusions  

PubMed Central

Background Cervical drains have historically been used to avoid postoperative wound and respiratory complications such as excessive edema, hematoma, infection, re-intubation, delayed extubation, or respiratory distress. Recently, some surgeons have ceased using drains because they may prolong hospital stay, operative time, or patient discomfort. The objective of this retrospective case-control series is to investigate the effectiveness of postoperative drains following one- and two-level cervical fusions. Methods A chart review was conducted at a single institution from 2010-2013. Outcome measures included operative time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss and incidence of wound complications (infection, hematoma, edema, and complications with wound healing or evacuation), respiratory complications (delayed extubation, re-intubation, and respiratory treatment), and overall complications (wound complications, respiratory complications, dysphagia, and other complications). Statistical analyses including independent samples t-test, chi-square, analysis of covariance, and linear regression were used to compare patients who received a postoperative drain to those who did not. Results The study population included 39 patients who received a postoperative drain and 42 patients who did not. There were no differences in demographics between the two groups. Patients with drains showed increased operative time (100.1 vs 69.3 min, p < 0.001), hospital stay (38.9 vs. 31.7 hrs, p = 0.021), and blood loss (62.7 vs 29.1 mL, p < 0.001) compared to patients without drains. The frequency of wound complications, respiratory complications, and overall complications did not vary significantly between groups. Conclusions/Level of Evidence Cervical drains may not be necessary for patients undergoing one- and two-level cervical fusion. While there were no differences in incidence of complications between groups, patients treated with drains had significantly longer operative time and length of hospital stay. Clinical relevance This could contribute to excessive costs for patients treated with drains, despite the lack of compelling evidence of the advantages of this treatment in the literature and in the current study. PMID:25694927

Poorman, Caroline E.; Bianco, Kristina M.; Boniello, Anthony; Yang, Sun; Gerling, Michael C.

2014-01-01

18

Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

2014-01-01

19

Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections. Materials and methods The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation) was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females) out of 317 (209 females; 108 males) were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 9–19) and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections. Results The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89%) patients (females) out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males) at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 3–8) irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 12–16) months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks. Conclusion The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections. PMID:25565903

Karaaslan, Fatih; Erdem, ?evki; Mermerkaya, Musa U?ur

2015-01-01

20

Early postoperative complications in primary cleft lip and palate surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the occurrence of early complications of cleft lip and palate surgery by the retrospective study of 132 consecutive cases (160 procedures) operated between three and six months of age. Three children presented with major complications within the immediate postoperative period. All were treated successfully. A local complication directly related to the operation occurred in 7.5% of the cases

A. DeMey; J. Vadoud-Seyedi; F. Demol; M. Govaerts

1997-01-01

21

Postoperative complications with protruding monofilament nylon sutures.  

PubMed

Cut ends of 10-0 monofilament nylon sutures protruded and caused various combinations of severe pain, conjunctival inflammation, tarsal conjunctival ulcerations, eyelid edema, and corneal epithelial erosions in six patients postoperatively. These changes occurred one to three weeks after keratoplasty and one to three months after cataract surgery. In all six patients the signs and symptoms cleared after we trimmed or removed the offending sutures. PMID:326051

Shahinian, L; Brown, S I

1977-04-01

22

Risk Factors for Complications after Reconstructive Surgery for Sternal Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Although the utility of flaps for the treatment of sternal wound infections following median sternotomy has been reported for 30 years, there have been few reports on the risk factors for complications after reconstruction. The objective of this investigation was to identify factors related to complications after the reconstruction of sternal wound infections. Methods A retrospective analysis of 74 patients with reconstructive surgery after sternal wound infection over a 5-year period was performed. Clinical data including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, bacterial culture, previous cardiac surgery, wound depth, mortality rate, type of reconstructive procedure, and complication rate were collected. Results The patients' BMI ranged from 15.2 to 33.6 kg/m2 (mean, 23.1±3.74 kg/m2). Wound closure complications after reconstructive surgery were observed in 36.5% of the cases. The mortality rate was 2.7%. Diabetes mellitus significantly affected the rate of wound closure complications (P=0.041). A significant difference in the number of complications was seen between Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (P=0.011). There was a correlation between harvesting of the internal thoracic artery and postoperative complications (P=0.048). The complication rates of the pectoralis major flap, rectus abdominis flap, omentum flap, a combination of pectoralis major flap and rectus abdominis flap, and direct closure were 23.3%, 33.3%, 100%, 37.5%, and 35.7%, respectively. Conclusions Diabetes mellitus, S. aureus, harvesting of the internal thoracic artery, and omentum flap were significant factors for complications after reconstruction. The omentum flap volume may be related to the complications associated with the omentum flap transfer in the present study. PMID:24883276

Takaku, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Shinji; Abe, Yoshiro; Harada, Hiroshi; Nagae, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Yusuke; Anraku, Kuniaki; Inagawa, Kiichi; Nakanishi, Hideki

2014-01-01

23

Increased postoperative complications after protective ileostomy closure delay: An institutional study  

PubMed Central

AIM: To study the morbidity and complications associated to ileostomy reversal in colorectal surgery patients, and if these are related to the time of closure. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 93 patients, who had undergone elective ileostomy closure between 2009 and 2013 was performed. Demographic, clinical and surgical variables were reviewed for analysis. All complications were recorded, and classified according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification. Statistical univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, setting a P value of 0.05 for significance. RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of 60.3 years, 58% male. The main procedure for ileostomy creation was rectal cancer (56%), and 37% had received preoperative chemo-radiotherapy. The average delay from creation to closure of the ileostomy was 10.3 mo. Postoperative complications occurred in 40% of the patients, with 1% mortality. The most frequent were ileus (13%) and wound infection (13%). Pseudomembranous colitis appeared in 4%. Increased postoperative complications were associated with delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.041). Male patients had more complications (P = 0.042), mainly wound infections (P = 0.007). Pseudomembranous colitis was also associated with the delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.003). End-to-end intestinal anastomosis without resection was significantly associated with postoperative ileus (P = 0.037). CONCLUSION: Although closure of a protective ileostomy is a fairly common surgical procedure, it has a high rate of complications, and this must be taken into account when the indication is made. The delay in stoma closure can increase the rate of complications in general, and specifically wound infections and colitis. PMID:25276286

Rubio-Perez, Ines; Leon, Miguel; Pastor, Daniel; Diaz Dominguez, Joaquin; Cantero, Ramon

2014-01-01

24

Septic necrosis of the midline wound in postoperative peritonitis. Successful management by debridement, myocutaneous advancement, and primary skin closure.  

PubMed Central

Wound management following laparotomy for postoperative peritonitis and varying degrees of parietal necrosis remains a challenging and controversial problem. Because maintained peritoneal integrity and primary wound closure offer the best opportunity for survival, an original technique involving bilateral incisions to relax skin and rectus fascia is proposed. This technique permits medial myocutaneous advancement and primary tension-free skin closure of midline laparotomy incisions. Sixty-nine patients with severe postoperative peritonitis were treated according from 1980 through 1985. Nine of these patients died of advanced multiple organ failure soon after referral, and eight more died after prolonged treatment. Fourteen patients had one or more reoperations for complications. Only nine wound failures resulted, including five eviscerations and four wound infections followed by progressive dehiscence. The bilateral relaxing incisions healed secondarily without complication. Survivors developed midline wound hernia; ten of the 52 surviving patients have had these repaired. This method of primary closure is safe when performed in conjunction with rigorous surgical care of intraperitoneal infection and may enhance survival. We recommend the technique to surgeons who treat severe postoperative peritonitis and septic necrosis of midline laparotomy wounds. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. Figs. 8A and B. Fig. 9. PMID:3281613

Lévy, E; Palmer, D L; Frileux, P; Hannoun, L; Nordlinger, B; Tiret, E; Honiger, J; Parc, R

1988-01-01

25

Incisional negative pressure wound therapy after hemiarthroplasty for femoral neck fractures - reduction of wound complications.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (iNPWT) in wound healing after femoral neck fracture (FNF) treated with hip hemiarthroplasty (HA) and its influence on postoperative seromas, wound secretion, as well as time and material consumption for dressing changes. The study is a prospective randomised evaluation of iNPWT in patients with large surgical wounds after FNF. Patients were randomised either to be treated by iNPWT (group A) or a standard wound dressing (group B). Follow-up included ultrasound measurements of seroma volumes on postoperative days 5 and 10, duration of wound secretion, and time and material spent for wound dressing changes. For comparison of the means, we used the t-test for independent samples, P?>?0·05 was considered significant. There were 21 patients randomised in this study. Group A (11 patients, 81·6?±?5·2?years of age) developed a seroma of 0·257?±?0·75?cm(3) after 5?days and had a secretion of 0·9?±?1·0?days, and the total time for dressing changes was 14·8?±?3·9?minutes, whereas group B (ten patients, 82·6?±?8·6?years of age) developed a seroma of 3·995?±?5·01?cm(3) after 5?days and had a secretion of 4·3?±?2·45?days, and the total time for dressing changes was 42·9?±?11·0?minutes. All mentioned differences were significant. iNPWT has been used on many different types of traumatic and non-traumatic wounds. This prospective, randomised study has demonstrated decreased development of postoperative seromas, reduction of total wound secretion days and reduction of needed time for dressing changes. PMID:25125244

Pauser, Johannes; Nordmeyer, Matthias; Biber, Roland; Jantsch, Jonathan; Kopschina, Carsten; Bail, Hermann J; Brem, Matthias H

2014-08-14

26

Postoperative Changes in Serum CO2 as an Indicator of Postoperative Complications After Radical Cystectomy.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article was to review the relationship of postoperative CO2 levels to the risk of complications after radical cystectomy. In this review, we summarize the existing body of literature on the topic as well as metabolic complications after urinary diversion. Currently, there are no studies that specifically examine CO2 levels in the context of complications after radical cystectomy; therefore, we also present our own institutional data which demonstrate that a drop in postoperative CO2 levels is highly predictive of complications, the most common of which is failure to thrive. These data indicate that significant changes in CO2 levels prior to discharge after a radical cystectomy may be a harbinger of forthcoming complications. PMID:25773345

Tyson, Mark D; Wisenbaugh, Eric S; Patton, Michael; Salevitz, Daniel; Castle, Erik P

2015-05-01

27

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement: Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications  

PubMed Central

Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a treatment option for patients with symptomatic glenohumeral arthritis and a deficient rotator cuff. The reported complication rates vary from 0% to 68%. Given this variation, our purposes were to (1) determine the learning curve for the procedure, (2) identify complications and surgical pitfalls, and (3) compare our results with those of similar published series. We retrospectively reviewed 20 consecutive patients (mean age, 73 years; range, 45–88 years) who had reverse total shoulder arthroplasty by one surgeon, tabulating intraoperative and postoperative complications. Minimum followup was 3 months (average, 9 months; range, 3–21 months). The intraoperative complication rate for the first 10 patients was higher than that for the second 10 patients. There were 33 complications in 15 patients: 11 patients collectively had 22 intraoperative complications and eight patients collectively had 11 postoperative complications. At radiographic followup, 11 patients had scapular notching and nine patients had heterotopic ossification. Our complication rate was higher than published rates. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18685908

Wierks, Carl; Skolasky, Richard L.; Ji, Jong Hun

2008-01-01

28

Risk factors for postoperative complication after spinal fusion and instrumentation in degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Relatively few studies have focused on the major medical complications that are more common in older adults. Furthermore, these studies have generally not reported how accurately a risk factor, or combination of risk factors, can distinguish between those who will have a complication and those who will not. Methods A total of 236 consecutive patients who had undergone surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar scoliosis between June 2008 and June 2012 were included retrospectively in this study. The demographic distribution, medical history, and clinical data were collected to investigate the predictive factors of postoperative complications by logistic regression. Results Among 236 eligible patients, major medical complications occurred in 7.2% of cases and wound complications occurred in 1.7% of cases. Ninety-day mortality rate was 0.4%. Postoperative complications were strongly associated with history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (P = 0.031), dyspnea with minimal exertion (P = 0.041), being at least partially dependent (P = 0.041), smoking within the past year (P = 0.044), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of more than 2 (P = 0.000), diabetes treated with insulin (P = 0.003), and steroid use for chronic condition (P = 0.003). In logistic regressions, operation time (odds ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11–4.78), ASA class (class 3 or 4 vs. class 1 or 2: odds ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.22–3.45), insulin-dependent diabetes (odds ratio 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.18–2.43), and steroid use for chronic condition (odds ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.32) may be reasonable predictors for an individual's likelihood of surgical complications. Conclusions The occurrence of postoperative complications is most likely multifactorial and is related to operation time, ASA class, insulin-dependent diabetes and steroid use for chronic condition. PMID:24606963

2014-01-01

29

Pilonidal sinus surgery: could we predict postoperative complications?  

PubMed

Pilonidal sinus surgery could, as of now, be considered a surgery tailored more to the surgeon than to the patient. In an attempt to give to surgeons an objective instrument of decision, we have evaluated which variables could be considered predictive of postoperative complications after pilonidal sinus surgery. A prospective electronic database of all patients treated for sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease was analysed. Sex, age, obesity, smoking, recurrent disease, the presence of multiple orifices and the distance between the most lateral orifice and midline were recorded and correlated with the occurrence of postoperative complications (infection and recurrence); 1006 patients were evaluated. Excision with primary mid-line closure was performed on all the patients. Mean follow-up was 7·3?±?3·6?years. A total of 158 patients with postoperative complications (infection and/or recurrence) were recorded during this period. A multivariate analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical and demographic characteristics, only a recurrent disease [odds ratio (OR): 3·41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1·89-6·15, P?postoperative complications. Focussing on the distance from midline, the receiver operative characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the distance of lateral orifice from midline predicted 79·2% of complications and the Youden's test identified the best cut-off as 2·0?cm for this variable. An evidence-based tool for deciding on the type of surgical intervention could be developed and validated by further ad hoc prospective studies evaluating our results in comparison to other different types of surgical techniques. Our results support the use of these variables as an effective way to tailor pilonidal sinus surgery to the patient, so as to obtain the best results in patient care. PMID:24894163

Milone, Marco; Di Minno, Matteo Nd; Bianco, Paolo; Coretti, Guido; Musella, Mario; Milone, Francesco

2014-06-01

30

The postoperative morbidity index: a quantitative weighing of postoperative complications applied to urological procedures  

PubMed Central

Background The reporting of post-operative complications in the urological field is lacking of a uniform quantitative measure to assess severity, which is essential in the analysis of surgical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of estimating quantitative severity weighing of post-operative complications after common urologic procedures. Methods Using a large healthcare system’s quality database, complications were identified in eleven common urologic procedures (e.g., insertion or replacement of inflatable penile prosthesis, nephroureterectomy, partial nephrectomy, percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement, radical cystectomy, radical prostatectomy, renal/ureteral/bladder extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), transurethral destruction of bladder lesion, transurethral prostatectomy, transurethral removal of ureteral obstruction, and ureteral catheterization) from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011. Complications were classified by the Expanded Accordion Severity Grading System, which was then quantified by validated severity weighting scores. The Postoperative Morbidity Index (PMI) for each procedure was calculated where an index of 0 would indicate no complication in any patient and an index of 1 would indicate that all patients died. Results This study included 654 procedures of which 148 (22%) had one or more complications. As would be expected, a more complex procedure like radical cystectomy possessed a higher PMI (0.267), while a simpler procedure like percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement possessed a lower PMI (0.011). The PMI of the additional nine procedures fell within the range of these PMIs. These PMIs could be used to compare surgeons, hospitals or procedures. Conclusions Quantitative severity weighing of post-operative complications for urologic procedures is feasible and may provide exceptionally informative data related to outcomes. PMID:24383457

2014-01-01

31

Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain  

PubMed Central

An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23256003

Modrzejewski, Andrzej; ?mieta?ski, Maciej

2011-01-01

32

Retropubic Versus Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications  

PubMed Central

Purpose To compare the complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) with those of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) performed by a single surgeon for the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The postoperative complications of 341 patients who underwent RRP and 524 patients who underwent RALP for prostate cancer at the Asan Medical Center between July 2007 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and compared. Complications were classified according to the modified Clavien classification system. Results RALP was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay (mean, 7.9 days vs. 10.1 days, p<0.001) and duration of urethral catheterization (6.2 days vs. 7.5 days, p<0.001) than RRP. Major complications (Clavien grade III-IV) were less common in the RALP group than in the RRP group (3.4% vs. 7.6%, p=0.006). There were no significant differences in medical complications between procedures. Considering surgical complications, urinary retention (7.0% vs. 2.7%, p=0.002) and wound repair (4.1% vs. 0.2%, p<0.001) were more common after RRP than after RALP. Extravasation of contrast medium during cystography was more common in the RRP group than in the RALP group (10.0% vs. 2.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions RALP is associated with a lower complication rate than RRP. PMID:24255757

Ryu, Jeman; Kwon, Taekmin; Kyung, Yoon Soo; Hong, Sungwoo; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab

2013-01-01

33

Risk factors for postoperative infectious complications after hepatectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/purpose  This study aimed to clarify the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) after hepatectomy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The database records of three hundred and eight patients who underwent elective surgical treatment for hepatolithiasis, hepatocellular\\u000a carcinoma (HCC), and metastatic carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed to determine the occurrence of postoperative infectious\\u000a complications. The incidences of SSIs, classified as superficial or deep incisional SSIs and organ

Kazuhisa Uchiyama; Masaki Ueno; Satoru Ozawa; Shigehisa Kiriyama; Manabu Kawai; Seiko Hirono; Masaji Tani; Hiroki Yamaue

2011-01-01

34

Fournier's Gangrene as a Postoperative Complication of Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Fournier's gangrene is the necrotizing fasciitis of perianal, genitourinary, and perineal regions. Herein, we present a case of scrotal Fournier's gangrene as a postoperative complication of inguinal hernia repair. A 51-year-old male with giant indirect hernia is presented. Patient underwent inguinal hernia repair, and after an unproblematic recovery period, he was discharged. He applied to our outpatient clinic on the fifth day with swollen and painful scrotum and it turned out to be Fournier's gangrene. Polypropylene mesh was not infected. Patient recovered and was discharged after repeated debridements. Basic principles in treatment of Fournier's gangrene are comprised of initial resuscitation, broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy, and early aggressive debridement. In the management of presented case, aggressive debridement was made right after diagnosis and broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to the hemodynamically stable patient. In these circumstances, the important question is whether we could prevent occurrence of Fournier's gangrene. PMID:25506030

Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Sozen, Isa; Yildiz, Baris Dogu; Coskun, Faruk

2014-01-01

35

Postoperative complications after major head and neck surgery with free flap repair--prevalence, patterns, and determinants: a prospective cohort study.  

PubMed

This study aims to give a better understanding of the prevalence, patterns, and determinants of postoperative complications, to evaluate the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications, and to set out a protocol to improve postoperative recovery. Over a period of 27 months we studied 192 patients who had had major head and neck operations with free flaps. Data on complications were gathered prospectively along with patients' details, comorbidities, factors indicative of the magnitude of the surgical insult, and variations in perioperative care. Complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo system. Outcomes analysed comprised any complication, major complications (Clavien-Dindo III and above), wound complications, and pulmonary complications. A total of 64% of patients had complications, and in around one third they were serious; wound and pulmonary complications were the most common. Factors significantly associated with complications reflected an interaction between coexisting conditions of the patient at operation and the magnitude of the surgery. Perioperative interventions to ensure preoperative optimisation of patients, and to lessen the systemic inflammatory response that results from operation offer the best prospect of reducing the burden of surgical complications. A protocol to improve recovery after operation would be appropriate. The Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications is useful in this group. PMID:23727043

McMahon, Jeremy D; MacIver, Colin; Smith, Miller; Stathopoulos, Panos; Wales, Craig; McNulty, Richard; Handley, Thomas P B; Devine, John C

2013-12-01

36

Usefulness of intrinsic surgical wound infection risk indices as predictors of postoperative pneumonia risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this report was to use two indices of intrinsic surgical wound infection risk, the SENIC index (Haley et al., 1985) and the NNIS index (Culver et al., 1991), to predict risk of postoperative pneumonia in general surgery patients. A prospective cohort study on 1483 patients admitted under the general surgery speciality of a tertiary hospital was

M. Delgado-Rodríguez; M. Medina-Cuadros; G. Martínez-Gallego; M. Sillero-Arenas

1997-01-01

37

Development of a Prediction Rule for Estimating Postoperative Pulmonary Complications  

PubMed Central

Patient- and procedure-related factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) have changed over the last decade. Therefore, we sought to identify independent risk factors of PPCs and to develop a clinically applicable scoring system. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 2,059 patients who received preoperative evaluations from respiratory physicians between June 2011 and October 2012. A new scoring system for estimating PPCs was developed using beta coefficients of the final multiple regression models. Of the 2,059 patients studied, 140 (6.8%) had PPCs. A multiple logistic regression model revealed seven independent risk factors (with scores in parentheses): age ?70 years (2 points), current smoker (1 point), the presence of airflow limitation (1 point), American Society of Anesthesiologists class ?2 (1 point), serum albumin <4 g/dL (1 point), emergency surgery (2 points), and non-laparoscopic abdominal/cardiac/aortic aneurysm repair surgery (4 points). The area under the curve was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.75–0.83) with the newly developed model. The new risk stratification including laparoscopic surgery has a good discriminative ability for estimating PPCs in our study cohort. Further research is needed to validate this new prediction rule. PMID:25437175

Eom, Jung Seop; Yoo, Hongseok; Song, Wonjun; Han, Sangbin; Lee, Kyung Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O. Jung; Woo, Sookyoung; Park, Hye Yun

2014-01-01

38

Treatment outcomes of postoperative mediastinitis in cardiac surgery; negative pressure wound therapy versus conventional treatment  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of the present study is to compare negative pressure wound therapy versus conventional treatment outcomes at postoperative mediastinitis after cardiac surgery. Methods Between January 2000 and December 2011, after 9972 sternotomies, postoperative mediastinitis was diagnosed in 90 patients. The treatment modalities divided the patients into two groups: group 1 patients (n?=?47) were initially treated with the negative pressure wound therapy and group 2 patients (n?=?43) were underwent conventional treatment protocols. The outcomes were investigated with Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, Student’s test and Fisher’s exact test. Results The 90-days mortality was found significantly lower in the negative pressure wound group than in the conventionally treated group. Overall survival was significantly better in the negative pressure wound group than in the conventionally treated group. Conclusion Negative pressure wound therapy is safe and reliable option in mediastinitis after cardiac surgery, with excellent survival and low failure rate when compared with conventional treatments. PMID:22784512

2012-01-01

39

Causes and managements of postoperative complications after degenerative scoliosis treatments with internal fixation  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the causes and managements of early postoperative complications of degenerative scoliosis (DS) treated with internal pedicle screw fixation. Methods: From Jan 2000 to Apr 2013, 325 DS patients treated with internal pedicle screw fixation in our hospital were retrospectively involved. The categories, causes, managements and outcomes of early postoperative complications were statistically analyzed. Results: Early postoperative complications occurred in 10.76% of the patients including 16 cases of lower limb numb or pain, 6 cases of decreased lower limb sensitivity and motor functions, which accounted for 62.86% of all complications, followed by incision infections (4/35, 11.43%) and rare cases of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, cardiac and renal inadequacy, urinary system and pulmonary infections. The incidence of overall complications (19.79%, p = 0.001) and nerve injuries (11.46%, p = 0.000) were significantly higher in long-segment than in short-segment fixations. Improper screw implanting, over correction of scoliosis and insufficient blood supply of the spinal cord during operation were risk factors for early postoperative complications and most of them were cured by anti-infection medication, incision dressing change, nerve nourishment, adjusting the screws and anti-osteoporosis treatments within 6 months after surgery. Only three cases with severe nerve injury did not improve until the 6 months postoperative follow-up. Conclusions: Most of the postoperative complications in our DS patients disappeared within 6 months after surgery and more than half of complications were nerve injuries. PMID:25550945

Yang, Yong-Hong; Zheng, Jie; Lou, Shu-Liang

2014-01-01

40

Role of Muscle Free Flap in the Salvage of Complicated Scalp Wounds and Infected Prosthetic Dura  

PubMed Central

Background The prosthetic dura is an essential element in the protection of the cranial parenchyma and prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Although prosthetic dura are widely used in neurosurgery, they occasionally provoke infection, which can be a major concern after neurosurgical treatment. However, removal of the prosthetic dura carries a risk of brain parenchyma injury and cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The salvage of infected prosthetic dural material has not been adequately addressed in the literature. In this study, we demonstrate the value of the combination of a meticulous surgical debridement of necrotic tissue and simultaneous muscle free flap for intractable postoperative epidural abscess without removal of the infected prosthetic dura. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, we reviewed the data of 11 patients with persistent infection on the prosthetic dura. The epidural infections each occurred after a neurosurgical procedure, and there was soft tissue necrosis with the disclosure of the underlying prosthetic dura and dead bone around the scalp wound. To salvage the infected prosthetic dura, meticulous debridement and a muscle free flap were performed. Results All 11 patients experienced complete recovery from the complicated wound problem without the need for further surgical intervention. No signs of prosthetic dural infection were observed during the mean follow-up period of 11 months. Conclusions The combination of a meticulous surgical debridement and coverage with a muscle free flap is an effective treatment for salvage of infected prosthetic dura. PMID:24286047

Han, Dae Hee; Park, Myong Chul; Park, Dong Ha; Song, Hyunsuk

2013-01-01

41

Efficacy of Postoperative Continuous Wound Infiltration With Local Anesthesia After Open Hepatectomy  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Local anesthetic wound infiltration is widely used as an effective adjunct during multimodal postoperative pain management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine in postoperative pain relief, opioid sparing, incidence of nausea and vomiting, and bowel and liver function improvement in patients undergoing open hepatectomy. Methods: Forty patients undergoing open hepatectomy were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the 0.9% saline continuous infusion group (the control group; n=20) and the ropivacaine continuous infusion group (the Ropi group; n=20). Outcomes measured postoperatively were pain score at rest and on movement, sufentanil consumption, incidence of nausea and vomiting, and sedation score across 48 postoperative hours. Time to bowel recovery, liver function change, mean length of hospitalization, patient satisfaction, and other data after 48 postoperative hours were collected until hospital discharge. Results: Pain scores at rest were lower for the ropivacaine group and reached significance after 8 and 16 hours (P<0.01). Sufentanil consumption (41.50±21.80 vs. 89.70±35.22 ?g; P<0.01) after 48 hours, time to bowel recovery (1.80±0.70 vs. 3.15±1.04 d; P<0.01), incidence of nausea and vomiting (1.75±0.72 vs. 2.40±0.68; P<0.05), and mean length of hospitalization (5.6±2.44 vs. 7.35±2.85 d; P<0.01) were significantly reduced, and the sedation score and liver function change were also comparable between the 2 groups. There was no difference with respect to pain scores on movement, nor with respect to patient satisfaction. Conclusions: Surgical wound infusion with ropivacaine after hepatectomy can improve pain relief at rest and accelerate recovery and discharge. PMID:24281275

Hong, Yu; Yong, Li Zhe

2014-01-01

42

Obesity and the challenges of caesarean delivery: Prevention and management of wound complications.  

PubMed

Caesarean section in obese patients is associated with an increased risk of surgical wound complications, including haematoma, seroma, abscess and dehiscence. This review focusses on the available strategies to decrease wound complications in this population, and on the clinical management of these situations. Appropriate dose of prophylactic antibiotics, closure of the subcutaneous tissue, and avoidance of subcutaneous drains reduce the incidence of wound complications associated with caesarean section in obese patients. For treatment of superficial wound infection associated with dehiscence, there are data from general surgery patients to suggest that the use of vacuum-assisted devices leads to faster healing and that surgical reclosure is preferable to healing by secondary intention, when there are no signs of ongoing infection. There is a need for stronger evidence regarding the prevention and management of wound complications for caesarean section in obese women. PMID:25457856

Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo

2015-04-01

43

Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P =.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P =.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes. PMID:22677371

Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Esther, Robert J.; Erfanian, Kamil; Green, Rebecca; Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell; Tepper, Joel E.

2014-01-01

44

Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

Rosenberg, Lewis A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Esther, Robert J. [Department of Orthopedics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Orthopedics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Erfanian, Kamil [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Green, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tepper, Joel E., E-mail: tepper@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

2013-02-01

45

The utility of midtrimester ultrasound assessment of the subcutaneous space in predicting cesarean wound complications.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective: To evaluate the association between cesarean wound complications and thickness of the subcutaneous space within the anterior abdomen at the midtrimester fetal anatomical survey. Methods: In this case-control study, cases were identified using an ICD9 code for wound complications of cesarean delivery. For each case, we identified the woman with the next consecutive midtrimester ultrasound who had a cesarean delivery without a wound complication, matched on age and race, as the control. A blinded investigator measured subcutaneous space at three distinct suprapubic levels in the midsagital plane. Results: Of 7228 women with a cesarean delivery, 123 (1.7%) had a wound complication. Seventy-nine cases were eligible. Midline suprapubic subcutaneous thickness did not differ between cases and controls at the superior, middle or inferior locations (p???0.35). Body mass index was moderately correlated with ultrasound-derived measurements (r???0.63; p?wound complication risk with increasing subcutaneous space thickness, even after adjustment (p???0.34). Conclusion: Prenatal ultrasound can quantify the subcutaneous space. Vertical skin incision, stapled wound closure, and a classical hysterotomy were associated with cesarean wound complication, but midtrimester subcutaneous thickness was not. PMID:25302863

Shainker, Scott A; Raghuraman, Nandini; Modest, Anna M; Schnettler, William T; Hacker, Michele R; Ralston, Steven J

2014-11-11

46

[Intraoperative possibilities of reduction of postoperative complications frequency in pancreaticoduodenal resection on its reconstructive stage].  

PubMed

Experience of pancreaticoduodenal resection (PDR) performance in 81 patients in 2007-2008 yrs was summarized. There were studied up the risk of postoperative gastrostasis occurrence and factors, promoting such a risk lowering. In 24 patients (the main group) gastro- and duodenoenteroanastomosis were formatted in antecolic position, while in 57 (the control group) the gut continuity was restored according to standard method. Postoperative gastrostasis in a control group had occurred in 10 (17.5%) patients, while in the main group this complication was absent. Formation of gastro- and duodenoenteroanastomoses in antecolic fashion and absence of early postoperative complications are considered the factors, trustworthy influencing the risk of postoperative gastrostasis occurring. Application of a pylorus--preserving procedure of PDR had not promoted the risk of raising of postoperative gastrostasis occurrence. PMID:20568503

Kopchak, V M; Kopchak, K V; Khomiak, I V; Duvalko, A V; Borisov, B V; Davidenko, N G

2010-04-01

47

[The use of low-energy lasers for preventing and treating postoperative and radiation-induced complications in patients with head and neck tumors].  

PubMed

The efficacy of low-energy helium-neon and copper vapor lasers for prevention and treatment of postoperative and irradiation complications was assessed in 195 patients with locally advanced tumors of the head and neck. The control group included 118 patients. Intravenous laser irradiation of the blood was associated with a higher percentage of wound healing by first intention and better course of the postoperative period. Laser treatment of skin irradiation fields was shown to improve skin tolerance to the neutron beam. The study failed to establish tumor growth stimulation by the laser irradiation in terms of recurrence and metastasis development. The data obtained showed low-energy laser irradiation to offer promise for prevention and treatment of postoperative and irradiation complications. PMID:1300810

Kitsmaniuk, Z D; DëmochkoVB; Popovich, V I

1992-01-01

48

Preoperative and modifiable factors to lower postoperative complications after radical cystectomy.  

PubMed

Radical cystectomy is the gold standard for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. It is a challenging procedure comprising of two steps: removal of the bladder followed by construction of a new urinary diversion. Despite advances in surgical and postoperative management within the last decades, postoperative complication rates for this procedure are still considerably high. Many complications are avoidable in the pre-/intra-/postoperative setting by carefully selecting patients eligible for this procedure and by considering prophylactic measures. Fast-track concepts demonstrate current intentions to optimize perioperative management. This review summarizes the most recent studies and findings on how to lower postoperative complications with the help of preoperative and modifiable factors. PMID:25691438

Hupe, Marie C; Kramer, Mario W; Merseburger, Axel S

2015-04-01

49

Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery  

PubMed Central

Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

2013-01-01

50

[Tension pneumopericardium: a rare complication after thoracic stab wound].  

PubMed

The authors report a case involving a patient with thoracic stab wound. The patient developed tension pneumopericardium with acute cardiac tamponade. The clinical and radiological features of tension pneumopericardium and its treatment are discussed. PMID:12494808

Faroudy, M; Marzouk, N; Ababou, A; Lazreq, C; Sbihi, A

2002-11-01

51

Surgical Site Infections and Other Postoperative Complications following Prophylactic Anticoagulation in Total Joint Arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

Background Anticoagulants reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total joint replacement. However, concern remains that pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis can lead to bleeding, which may impact on postoperative complications such as infections and reoperations. Methods and Findings From the Global Orthopedic Registry (GLORY), we reviewed 3,755 patients in US who elected for primary total hip or knee arthroplasty, received either warfarin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) as VTE prophylactics, and had up-to-90-day follow-up after discharge. We compared incidence rates of VTE, infections and other complications between LMWH and warfarin groups, and used multivariate analyses with propensity score weighting to generate the odds ratio (OR). Patients receiving LMWH tended to be older and higher in the American Society of Anesthesiologists grade scores. In contrast, warfarin was used more frequently for hip arthroplasty with longer duration among patients with more pre-existing comorbidity (all P<0.02). A weight variable was created with propensity score to account for differences in covariate distributions. Propensity score-weighted analyses showed no differences in VTE complications. However, compared to warfarin, LMWH was associated with significantly higher rates of bleeding (6.2% vs. 2.1%; OR?=?3.82, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.64 to 5.52), blood transfusion (29.4% vs. 22.0%; OR?=?1.75, 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.04), reoperations (2.4% vs. 1.3%; OR?=?1.77, 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.93) and infections (1.6% vs. 0.6%; OR?=?2.79, 95% CI, 1.42 to 5.45). Similar results were obtained from compliant uses of warfarin (26%) and LMWH (62%) according to clinical guidelines. While surgical site infections were mostly superficial, current study was underpowered to compare incidence rates of deep infections (<1.0%). Conclusions Surgical site infections and reoperations in 3 months following primary total joint arthroplasty may be associated with anticoagulant use that exhibited higher bleeding risk. Long-term complications and deep wound infections remain to be studied. PMID:24717837

Wang, Zhong; Anderson, Frederick A.; Ward, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

2014-01-01

52

Successful Treatment of a Patient With Complicated Diabetic Foot Wound: A Case Report.  

PubMed

Foot ulceration is one of the most serious complications of diabetes mellitus and may lead to amputation of the lower extremity. Timely prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic foot ulceration are important to maintain a good quality of life. This article reports a complicated diabetic patient with severe limb-threatening necrotizing infection. We successfully applied endovascular stent insertion, digit amputation, negative pressure wound therapy, and advanced dressings in different wound phases to achieve definitive wound healing after 12 months of treatment. Based on this case report, we would like to emphasize the importance of combined multiple therapies and patient compliance for severe diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:24743750

Zheng, Yurong; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Liping; You, Chuangang; Feng, Zhanzeng; Han, Chunmao

2014-04-16

53

Is low serum albumin associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing oesophagectomy for oesophageal malignancies?  

PubMed

A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: in patients undergoing oesophagectomy for oesophageal malignancy, is low serum albumin associated with postoperative complications? Altogether, 87 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 demonstrated the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. This paper includes 2 level 2 papers, 12 level 3 papers and 2 level 4 papers. All the papers compared either all or some of the following postoperative complications: mortality, morbidity, anastomotic leak, respiratory and non-respiratory complications, and length of hospital stay. Eleven of the 16 papers found an association between low serum albumin and postoperative complications. Of these, one study showed that low serum albumin combined with low fibrinogen levels (FA score) was predictive of postoperative recurrence of oesophageal cancer. Another study showed that when combined with white cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP, NUn score), serum albumin had a high diagnostic accuracy for major complications after postoperative day 3. The largest study compared the in-hospital mortality in 7227 patients who underwent oesophageal surgery for malignancy. The percentage of in-hospital mortality was associated with low serum albumin (<15.0 vs >35.0 g/l, 21.0 vs 11.3%, P <0.001). Five of the 16 papers found no significant association between low serum albumin and postoperative complications. Of these papers, one showed that low serum albumin was not an independent risk factor, while four others found no association between low serum albumin with respiratory complications, anastomotic leak and postoperative mortality. Instead, these studies found other factors responsible for postoperative complications such as: CRP, smoking, disease duration, malnutrition and low T-cell levels. Taken together, while low serum albumin is associated with postoperative complications, opinion regarding the prognostic value of low serum albumin and nutritional support remains conflicted. Because of the confounding factors encountered in these studies, the clinician should consider the finding of low serum albumin in patients, together with disease and surgical factors to provide optimal care for these patients. PMID:25260893

Goh, Sean L; De Silva, Ramesh P; Dhital, Kumud; Gett, Rohan M

2015-01-01

54

Early postoperative complications in patients with Crohn's disease given and not given preoperative total parenteral nutrition  

PubMed Central

Objective The effect of preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on the rate of early (within 30 days) postoperative complications in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease (CD) was examined. Material and methods A series of 15 consecutive patients with CD (mean CD activity index score, 270) given preoperative TPN for 18–90 days (mean, 46 days) and undergoing bowel resection and primary anastomosis was compared with matching controls (105 patients) consecutively selected from all CD patients operated in Stockholm County during a preceding 20-year period without preoperative TPN. Results During the preoperative TPN, all the patients studied displayed clinical remission of CD as reflected in improvement in their general well-being, relief of abdominal pain, and abatement of fever and diarrhea. There was no significant early postoperative complication in the TPN-treated group, whereas there were 29 patients with early postoperative complications in the control group, which means a significantly higher rate of postoperative complications when preoperative TPN was not provided. During the preoperative TPN, some crucial variables increased such as the body weight, the serum concentrations of albumin and triiodothyronine reflecting improved nutritional state, whereas the serum concentration of haptoglobin and the white cell count decreased reflecting decreased inflammatory activity. Conclusions This study shows that preoperative TPN for at least 18 days may be recommended to be given to patients with moderate to severe CD until clinical remission is achieved in order to minimize the risk of early postoperative complications. PMID:22242614

Jacobson, Stefan

2012-01-01

55

Perioperative strategies to reduce postoperative complications after radical cystectomy.  

PubMed

Radical cystectomy with creation of urinary diversion is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Despite advances in perioperative care, radical cystectomy is associated with significant morbidity. Reduction in perioperative morbidity and mortality remains a primary focus of bladder cancer outcome improvement. A number of evidence-based approaches to perioperative care have been proposed to reduce the overall burden of complications associated with radical cystectomy. Herein, we highlight and review recent and evolving evidence-based strategies to minimize the morbidity associated with surgical management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:25773348

Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J; Smaldone, Marc C

2015-05-01

56

Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.  

PubMed Central

A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures. PMID:7925666

Poulsen, K. B.; Bremmelgaard, A.; Sørensen, A. I.; Raahave, D.; Petersen, J. V.

1994-01-01

57

Reinfusion of postoperative wound drainage in total joint arthroplasty. Red blood cell survival and coagulopathy risk.  

PubMed

Fifty patients with total joint arthroplasties (28 total hip arthroplasties, 11 total knee arthroplasties, and 11 bilateral total knee arthroplasties) received autotransfusions from their postoperative wound drainage. The blood was collected in a closed sterile drainage system without any additional anticoagulant. Pre- and postoperative measurements were made of the patient's hemoglobin, platelets, fibrinogen, haptoglobin, fibrin degradation products, and D-dimer (a specific type of fibrin degradation product). Red blood cell survival was assessed in 16 of the patients by labeling the shed blood with 51Cr sodium chromate prior to reinfusion. To control for fluid shifts, continued bleeding, and dilution effects of further transfusions in the immediate postoperative period, 10 patients also had their native blood labeled with 111In oxime. In this study, the mean estimated blood loss was 1,062 mL (+/- 1,247) with a mean wound drainage of 836 mL (+/- 338). Of this, a mean of 450 mL (+/- 261) of blood was was given back to the patient in addition to routine, preoperative autologous donated blood. Six (12%) patients experienced transient fevers at the time of retransfusion. Detailed hematologic studies were performed on the shed blood in 19 patients. The collected blood was completely defibrinated, but did contain fibrin degradation products, as indicated by the D-dimer level, and hemolyzed blood as the haptoglobin was reduced. Even though the blood containing the above breakdown products was reinfused to the patients, there were no clinical manifestations of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Both the hemolyzed and defibrinated products were subsequently cleared by the body.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7964765

Wixson, R L; Kwaan, H C; Spies, S M; Zimmer, A M

1994-08-01

58

Impact of advancing age on post-operative complications of deep brain stimulation surgery for essential tremor.  

PubMed

Essential tremor (ET) was the original indication for deep brain stimulation (DBS), with USA Food and Drug Administration approval since 1997. Despite the efficacy of DBS, it is associated with surgical complications that cause sub-optimal clinical outcomes. Given that ET is a progressive disease with increase in symptom severity with increasing age, this study evaluated the impact of increasing age on short-term complications following DBS surgery for ET. The Thomson-Reuters MarketScan database was utilized (New York, NY, USA). Patients selected were over age 18 and underwent DBS for ET between the years 2000 and 2009. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to calculate complication odds ratios (OR) for a 5year increase in age, after controlling for other covariates. Six hundred sixty-one patients were included in the analysis. The mean (standard deviation) age was 61.9 (14.3) years, with 17% of individuals aged ?75years. Overall 56.9% of patients were male, and 44.6% had a Charlson Comorbidity Score of ?1. Additionally, 7.1% of patients experienced at least one complication within 90days, including wound infections (3.0%), pneumonia (2.4%), hemorrhage or hematoma (1.5%), or pulmonary embolism (0.6%). Increasing age was not significantly associated with the overall 90day complication rates (OR 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77-1.02; p=0.102). The risk of the two most common procedure-related complications, hemorrhage and infection, did not significantly increase with age (hemorrhage: OR 1.02; 95%CI 0.77-1.37; p=0.873; and infection: OR 0.88; 95%CI 0.72-1.07; p=0.203). Our findings suggest that age should not be a primary exclusion factor for determining candidacy for DBS and also suggest a possible expansion of the traditional therapeutic window since post-operative complications remained relatively stable. PMID:25669119

Verla, Terence; Marky, Andrew; Farber, Harrison; Petraglia, Frank W; Gallis, John; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Parente, Beth; Hickey, Patrick; Turner, Dennis A; Lad, Shivanand P

2015-05-01

59

Anti-Angiogenic Drugs: Involvement in Cutaneous Side Effects and Wound-Healing Complication  

PubMed Central

Significance: The uses of anti-angiogenic drugs have not only made an impact on the battle to eliminate cancer but are also responsible for a number of medical complications. The long-term use of these drugs has increased the spectrum and incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the overall impact that these drugs have on patient care. Recent Advances: This review highlights the role of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in angiogenesis and wound healing and looks at how angiogenic inhibitors promote wound-healing complications. Critical Issues: With an increased use of anti-angiogenic drugs for the treatment of various cancers and ocular diseases, there is an increased need for clinicians to define the risks and to optimize the usage of these drugs to reduce the incidence of cutaneous side effects and wound-healing complications. In addition, awareness is needed when treating patients on anti-angiogenic drugs so as not to exacerbate potential wound-healing complications when performing surgical procedures. Future Directions: Clinicians and surgeons will need to develop management guidelines to optimize patient care to reduce the risk of morbidity. When performing a surgical procedure, the impact of adverse effects from the use of anti-angiogenic drugs should be considered to ensure the welfare of the patient. In addition, the development of more specific inhibitors is necessary to reduce target effects to reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. PMID:25302138

Bodnar, Richard J.

2014-01-01

60

Comparing Scalpel, Electrocautery and Ultrasonic Dissector Effects: The Impact on Wound Complications and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Levels in Wound Fluid from Mastectomy Patients  

PubMed Central

Purpose Introducing the relationship between the surgical instruments used in modified radical mastectomy and wound complications is important for preventing and decreasing complications. This prospective randomized trial was designed to assess the impact of scalpel, electrocautery, and ultrasonic dissector usage on wound complications and tissue damage. Methods Eighty-two consecutive patients operated with mastectomy were studied. The postoperative time period needed for hemovac drainage, the amount and duration of seroma, infection, flap ecchymosis and necrosis rates were compared. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in drainage fluids were determined to confirm the inflammatory response and tissue damage. Results The numbers of patients included in the scalpel, electrocautery and ultrasonic dissector groups were 27, 26, and 29, respectively. The groups were homogenous with respect to age, body mass index, stage, cormorbidities, breast volume and flap area. Operation time and the amount of bleeding were statistically higher in the scalpel group. The incidence of seroma was higher in the electrocautery group and arm mobilization had to be delayed in this group. There were no differences between groups with respect to hematoma, infection, ecchymosis, necrosis, hemovac drainage and the total and first 3 days of seroma volume. TNF-? and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in samples obtained from the drains of patients operated with electrocautery. Conclusion Ultrasonic dissector decreases operation time by decreasing the amount of bleeding without increasing the seroma incidence. High cytokine levels in drainage fluids from patients operated with elecrocautery indicates that electrocautery induces more tissue damage and acute inflammatory response. Therefore, seroma, due to acute inflammatory response, was seen more frequently in the electrocautery group. Ultrasonic dissector coagulates protein by breaking hydrogen bonds which may close vascular and lymphatic channels more precisely. But, its actual preventive effect on seroma formation might be related to diminished inflammatory response. PMID:21847396

Dogan, Lutfi; Nalbant, Handan; Akinci, Melih; Karaman, Niyazi; Ozaslan, Cihangir; Kulacoglu, Hakan

2011-01-01

61

Efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis on postoperative inflammatory complications in Chinese patients having impacted mandibular third molars removed: a split-mouth, double-blind, self-controlled, clinical trial.  

PubMed

We investigated the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on postoperative inflammatory complications after operations for impacted mandibular third molars in Chinese patients. A total of 207 patients had their bilateral third molars removed in a split-mouth, double-blind, self-controlled, clinical trial in two visits. For one side amoxicillin (or clindamycin) was given (antibiotic group) from one hour before operation until 3 days postoperatively. For the other side a placebo was given (placebo group) at the same time. The outcome, including alveolar osteitis, surgical wound infection, prebuccal infection, and infection of the anterior isthmus of fauces, was assessed 2 and 10 days postoperatively. A total of 192 patients completed the study, and there was no difference between the groups in the incidence of inflammatory complications. In the treatment group, there were 4 cases of alveolar osteitis (2%), 2 infections of the wound (1%), and 14 other reactions (gastrointestinal (n=4), bleeding (n=2), ulcer (n=2), and fever (n=6)). In the placebo group, there were 6 cases of alveolar osteitis (3%), 2 wound infections (1%), and 22 other reactions (bleeding (n=6), ulcer (n=2) and fever (n=14)). There was no significant difference in the extraction time and postoperative reactions, except the pain score on day 10 (p=0.005). Prophylactic amoxicillin (or clindamycin) is not effective for the prevention or reduction of postoperative inflammatory complications after the removal of impacted mandibular third molars in Chinese patients. PMID:25794779

Xue, P; Wang, J; Wu, B; Ma, Y; Wu, F; Hou, R

2015-05-01

62

Perioperative synbiotics decrease postoperative complications in periampullary neoplasms: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.  

PubMed

Periampullary neoplasms are rapidly progressive tumors with a poor prognosis and high morbidity and mortality rates, which have a negative influence on patient outcomes. Some probiotics and prebiotics have the ability to protect the intestinal barrier and prevent bacterial translocation, infection, and postoperative complications. We evaluated the use of synbiotics in a prospective, double-blind study of patients undergoing surgery for periampullary neoplasms (PNs) and assessed the effect of these agents on nutritional status, postoperative complications, antibiotic use, length of hospital stay, and mortality. Patients were randomized to receive probiotics and prebiotics-synbiotics-group S [Lactobacillus acidophilus 10, 1 × 10(9)CFU, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HS 111, 1 × 10(9) CFU, Lactobacillus casei 10, 1 × 10(9) CFU, Bifidobacterium bifidum, 1 × 10(9)CFU, and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) 100 mg]-or placebo-controls-group C, twice daily, for a total of 14 days. Risk, clinical status, and postoperative complication rates were assessed. Twenty-three patients were allocated to each group. The incidence of postoperative infection was significantly lower in group S (6 of 23 patients, 26.1%) than in group C (16 of 23 patients, 69.6%) (P= 0.00). Duration of antibiotic therapy was also shorter in group S (mean = 9 days vs. 15 days in group C; P= 0.01). Noninfectious complications were less common in group S (6 of 23 vs. 14 of 23 patients in group C; P= 0.03). Mean length of hospital stay was 12 ± 5 days in group S vs. 23±14 days in group C (P= 0.00). No deaths occurred in group S, whereas 6 deaths occurred in group C (P= 0.02). Perioperative administration of synbiotics reduces postoperative mortality and complication rates in patients undergoing surgery for PNs. PMID:25803626

Sommacal, Heloisa Martins; Bersch, Vivian Pierri; Vitola, Santo Pascoal; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch

2015-04-01

63

Sarcopenia Adversely Impacts Postoperative Complications Following Resection or Transplantation in Patients with Primary Liver Tumors  

PubMed Central

Background Sarcopenia is a surrogate marker of patient frailty that estimates the physiologic reserve of an individual patient. We sought to investigate the impact of sarcopenia on short- and long-term outcomes in patients having undergone surgical intervention for primary hepatic malignancies. Methods Ninety-six patients who underwent hepatic resection or liver transplantation for HCC or ICC at the John Hopkins Hospital between 2000 and 2013 met inclusion criteria. Sarcopenia was assessed by the measurement of total psoas major volume (TPV) and total psoas area (TPA). The impact of sarcopenia on perioperative complications and survival was assessed. Results Mean age was 61.9 years and most patients were men (61.4 %). Mean adjusted TPV was lower in women (23.3 cm3/m) versus men (34.9 cm3/m) (P<0.01); 47 patients (48.9 %) had sarcopenia. The incidence of a postoperative complication was 40.4 % among patients with sarcopenia versus 18.4 % among patients who did not have sarcopenia (P=0.01). Of note, all Clavien grade ?3 complications (n=11, 23.4 %) occurred in the sarcopenic group. On multivariable analysis, the presence of sarcopenia was an independent predictive factor of postoperative complications (OR=3.06). Sarcopenia was not associated with long-term survival (HR=1.23; P=0.51). Conclusions Sarcopenia, as assessed by TPV, was an independent factor predictive of postoperative complications following surgical intervention for primary hepatic malignancies. PMID:25389056

Valero, Vicente; Amini, Neda; Spolverato, Gaya; Weiss, Matthew J.; Hirose, Kenzo; Dagher, Nabil N.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Cameron, Andrew A.; Philosophe, Benjamin; Kamel, Ihab R.

2015-01-01

64

Polypropylene mesh closure of the complicated abdominal wound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Closure of the abdominal wall in the face of fascial necrosis or massive intestinal edema remains a difficult problem with frequent complications. Prior studies have addressed both the utility and the pitfalls of placing polypropylene mesh in this setting.Methods: We performed a retrospective evaluation of our experience with polypropylene mesh in traumatic and nontraumatic difficult abdominal closures. Timing of

Richard F. Fansler; Paul Taheri; Carey Cullinane; Braulio Sabates; Lewis M. Flint

1995-01-01

65

Postoperative complications following TECA-LBO in the dog and cat.  

PubMed

The medical records for 133 total ear canal ablations combined with lateral bulla osteotomies (TECA-LBOs) performed on 82 dogs (121 ears) and 11 cats (12 ears) between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed to determine if the duration of preoperative clinical signs was associated with the incidence of postoperative facial nerve injury and Horner's syndrome. Other perioperative complications, such as a head tilt, nystagmus, incisional drainage, draining tracts, hearing loss, as well as bacterial culture results, were noted. Postoperative facial nerve paresis occurred in 36 of 133 ears (27.1%), and paralysis occurred in 29 of 133 ears (21.8%), with no significant difference between species. Thus, postoperative facial nerve deficits occurred in 48.9% of ears. The median duration of clinically evident temporary facial nerve deficits was 2 wk for dogs and 4 wk for cats. Dogs had a significantly longer duration of preoperative clinical signs and were less likely than cats to have a mass in the ear canal. Dogs were less likely to have residual (> 1 yr) postoperative facial nerve deficits. The incidence of postoperative Horner's syndrome was significantly higher in cats than dogs. The duration of preoperative clinical signs of ear disease was not associated with postoperative facial nerve deficits. PMID:23535749

Spivack, Rebecca E; Elkins, A Derrell; Moore, George E; Lantz, Gary C

2013-01-01

66

Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with postoperative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery.  

PubMed

Our aim was to investigate the correlation among antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications in the removal of lower 3rd molars. A total of 1222 such extractions in 890 patients between January 2010 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. The difficulty of extraction measured by Pederson's index, antibiotic prophylaxis with cefditoren, and postoperative complications were recorded. The difficulty of extraction was significantly associated with postoperative complications (p=0.03). There were no significant associations between antibiotic prophylaxis and postoperative complications in groups of equal difficulty ("easy" group (class I) p=1.00; "moderate" group (class II) p=1.00; and "difficult" group (class III) p=0.65). There was a small but insignificant increase in the number of dry sockets and infections in class III cases. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative inflammatory complications is unnecessary for extraction of 3rd molars. PMID:24029441

Lee, J Y; Do, H S; Lim, J H; Jang, H S; Rim, J S; Kwon, J J; Lee, E S

2014-01-01

67

Use of cross-leg flap for wound complications resulting from open pilon fracture.  

PubMed

Pilon fractures and associated soft-tissue complications present treatment challenges for orthopedic surgeons. Open fractures may require additional soft-tissue coverage. When local soft tissues do not allow for viable coverage, a cross-leg flap is available as a salvage procedure with successful outcomes. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of using cross-leg flaps for wound complications in high-energy pilon fractures. PMID:25750947

Sood, Amit; Khamsi, Babak; Datiashvili, Ramazi; Berberian, Wayne S

2015-03-01

68

The incidence of early post-operative complications following uvulopalatopharyngoplasty: identification of predictive risk factors  

PubMed Central

Objective Characterize complications following uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) for obstructive sleep apnea. Study design Retrospective chart review. Subjects and methods Charts of patients undergoing UPPP at an academic teaching hospital from 1999 to 2005 were reviewed. Results 345 consecutive patients (248 inpatients; 97 outpatients) were studied. The most common post-operative complication in the entire study was oxyhemoglobin desaturation (12.8%). Three patients suffered major complications (airway obstruction, pulmonary edema, arrhythmia). Regarding complications limited to the post-anaesthetic care unit alone, only 8.2% of patients had oxyhemoglobin desaturation after discontinuation of oxygen supplementation. Inpatients requiring supplemental oxygen on the ward had significantly higher mean AHI (37.4 vs. 31.4; p=0.05) and BMI (32.3 kg/m2 vs. 28.9 kg/m2; p=0.004) than those who did not. Those inpatients who were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) with an AHI?22 were associated with an increased risk of requiring oxygen on the ward (odds ratio = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.56 – 7.78). Conclusion The incidence of post-UPPP complications is much lower than the literature has historically suggested. Selected patients should be able to safely undergo outpatient UPPP. Patients with higher AHI, higher BMI, or multiple comorbidities are at higher risk for postoperative complications and are most appropriate for overnight monitoring. PMID:23570393

2013-01-01

69

[Diagnosis of inflammatory complications in patients with long bone fractures in the postoperative period].  

PubMed

The serum levels of some indices of the LPO antioxidant system (dienic conjugates, antioxidative activity), cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-4) and the blood antiprotease system protein alpha2-macroglobulin were studied in 97 patients with closed long bone fractures. Based on the finding, a procedure was devised to evaluate the course of an inflammatory process in the early postoperative period, which predicted the development of pyoinflammatory complications at a stage of preclinical manifestations. PMID:20524339

Miromanov, A M; Namokonov, E V; Gerasimov, A A; Mironova, O B; Uskov, S A; Miromanova, N A

2010-04-01

70

[Retrospective study of postoperative complications in primary lip and palate surgery].  

PubMed

This retrospective study addressed the complications of primary lip and palate surgeries, and was carried out at Craniofacial Anomalies Rehabilitation Hospital at University of São Paulo. The present study aimed to identify the most frequent complications, as well as verifying the rela-tions between demographic variables and the complications observed. The sample comprised the records of 484 patients submitted to primary lip and palate surgery during the period of November 2000 to April 2001. The results demonstrated predominance of white male individuals with a median age of 12 months. The most frequent type of cleft was complete cleft lip and palate, and cheiloplasty was the most prevalent surgery. Of the 484 patients included in the study, 58.05% presented at least one or more postoperative complications. Pain was the most frequent problem in the evaluated group, followed by oxygen desaturation and tachycardia. PMID:18856120

Biazon, Janir; Peniche, Aparecida Cássia Giani

2008-09-01

71

The Effect of Modified TURP (M-TURP) in Intra and Postoperative Complications  

PubMed Central

Background Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is the most common surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Objectives The aim of the present study was to compare the conventional bipolar transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) with a modified transurethral resection of the prostate (M-TURP) in men with mild to moderate symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Patients and Methods To compare and evaluate the clinical outcomes of M-TURP, a new electrosurgical suggested method, with the standard treatment, transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), 200 patients with benign prostatic enlargement causing moderate to severe clinical lower urinary symptoms were selected and divided into two equal groups of A and B. Patients of group A underwent M-TURP (incomplete bladder neck resection), resecting only from 1 to 11 O'clock position and group B underwent conventional TURP. These patients were evaluated between Jun 2008 and April 2011, after excluding 24 patients, finally 176 men were studied, 98 in the conventional monopolar transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) group and 78 in the (M-TURP) group. Postoperative follow up to assess the results of the surgeries and the complication rates, began from the operation and continued with postoperative visits of the patient at 24 hour after the catheter remove, two weeks, three months and finally six months. Results The age range of both groups were the same (65-82 years old), preoperative IPSS score in study and control groups were 18 ± 3.3, 17 ± 4.6 (nonsignificant P value = ns) respectively. The size of prostate gland was 58 ± 3.5 g in study and 78 ± 1.2 g in control (ns) preoperatively. Intra and postoperative complications including hematuria (need for transfusion), urine retention (need for catheterization), fever after operation in study and control groups were 2.04%, 6.41%, 1.02% and 0.0%, 3.06%, 6.41% respectively. ISI score (stress incontinence score index) were 7 ± 2.5 and 19 ± 3.6 and UR (urge ratio) were %26 and %70 for study and control groups respectively; P < 0.05. IIEF (international index of erectile function) in study group was better than control (23 ± 3.2 vs. 11 ± 1.7), P < 0.05. Conclusions The results of this study showed that the support of anterior fibro muscular zone (anterior lobe) of prostate after TUR-P has a significant role in postoperative complications, especially in postoperative stress incontinence. So, we strongly recommend to preserve this segment of prostate for prevention of incontinence and other intra and postoperative complications. PMID:23841040

Ketabchi, Ali Asghar; Ketabchi, Mahsa; Barkam, Mohsen

2013-01-01

72

Risk adjusted auditing of postop complications in gastric cancer patients by POSSUM.  

PubMed

POSSUM (Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Morbidity and mortality) has been proposed as a promising system for risk adjusted audit in surgical practice. However it has not been generalized in gastric cancer surgery. Present study evaluates the POSSUM on malignant gastric cases in Chinese hospital where patient population or healthcare system might be different than United Kingdom (UK) where the formula was devised. Total of 389 patients who underwent surgical intervention for gastric cancer and malignant gastric lymphomas during the year 2006 were included in the study. Median age was 58 years, with male:female ratio of 7:3. POSSUM data were collected according to standard criteria described by the original authors. Exponential analysis method was used for morbidity predictions. POSSUM predicted satisfactorily for morbidity, observed morbidity was not significantly different than estimated morbidity (p=0.962). Overall, 176 cases were observed to have postoperative complications (including death). The observed to expect ratio (O:E) was 0.99. There was no significant increase in complication rate with increasing age (chi(2)=3.75, 4 d.f, p=0.44). Overall 176 cases were observed to have postop complications (including death). Age was not a risk factor for early postoperative complication. POSSUM predicted well in this study, which means it is a valid system for gastric cancer surgery. However, overall complication rate considered being higher if it is recorded according to POSSUM criteria. Modification in POSSUM equation with revised morbidity definition may be more feasible for major operations. PMID:18562259

Sah, Birendra Kumar; Min, Chen Ming; Yan, Wang Xiao; Meng, Yang Qiu; Chen, Li; Ming, Xiang; Jun, Chen; Min, Yan; Gang, Zhu Zheng

2008-08-01

73

Postoperative wound infection: a controlled study of the increased duration of hospital stay and direct cost of hospitalization.  

PubMed Central

The increased hospital stay and direct cost of hospitalization that resulted from a postoperative wound infection (presence of pus at the incision site) after each of 6 common operations were evaluated. With the aid of the hospital computer, matched controls were obtained with respect to patient age, sex, exact operation performed, clinical service performing operation, pathologic finding, and underlying disease process which might alter the patient's predisposition toward infection. Several of the operations (appendectomy. cholecystectomy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and coronary artery bypass graft) were subtyped in order to obtain equivalence between controls and infected patients. In general, an infection doubles the postoperative stay and significantly increases the hospital expense. PMID:300233

Green, J W; Wenzel, R P

1977-01-01

74

Wound infection in the obese pregnant woman.  

PubMed

Obesity has been linked as a risk factor for wound complications and is becoming a more common occurrence. We reviewed the risk factors, preventive strategies, and recommended management of wound complications in obese women undergoing cesarean delivery. The limited available data support the use of prophylactic antibiotic before cesarean delivery, closure of subcutaneous space >2 cm, and maintaining normothermia intraoperatively to help reduce the incidence of postoperative wound complications. Data regarding management of cesarean wound complications in the obese patient are sparse, but they do suggest either primary or secondary closure of wounds is preferred to healing by secondary intention. Antibiotics should be administered in the presence of cellulitis or systemic toxicity. Use of vacuum-assisted wound closure devices may be useful in wound management. There is a need for randomized controlled trials which evaluate the prevention and management of wound complications in obese women undergoing cesarean delivery. PMID:22108085

Tipton, Amanda M; Cohen, Stephen A; Chelmow, David

2011-12-01

75

Wound conditioning by vacuum assisted closure (V.A.C.) in postoperative infections after dorsal spine surgery  

PubMed Central

The use of vacuum assisted closure (V.A.C.) therapy in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery was studied retrospectively. Successful treatment was defined as a stable healed wound that showed no signs of acute or chronic infection. The treatment of the infected back wounds consisted of repeated debridement, irrigation and open wound treatment with temporary closure by V.A.C. The instrumentation was exchanged or removed if necessary. Fifteen patients with deep subfascial infections after posterior spinal surgery were treated. The implants were exchanged in seven cases, removed completely in five cases and left without changing in one case. In two cases spinal surgery consisted of laminectomy without instrumentation. In two cases only the wound defects were closed by muscle flap, the remaining ones were closed by delayed suturing. Antibiotic treatment was necessary in all cases. Follow up was possible in 14 patients. One patient showed a new infection after treatment. The study illustrates the usefulness of V.A.C. therapy as a new alternative management for wound conditioning of complex back wounds after deep subfascial infection. PMID:16835734

Keel, Marius; Trentz, Otmar; Heinzelmann, Michael

2006-01-01

76

Immediate Postoperative Complications in Patients Undergoing CABG; Investigating the Role of Prior Coronary Stenting  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Approximately 15 to 30% of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) will require repeated revascularization. There is an ongoing debate concerning the impact of prior PCI on subsequent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. This study sought to compare immediate post-CABG complications between patients with and without previous coronary stenting. Methods: A total of 556 CABG candidates including 73 patients with previous coronary stenting and 483 patients without prior stenting were enrolled in this retrospective-prospective study. Demographic information, cardiac markers (CK-MB, Troponin T), and postoperative data including inotrope administration, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) use, bleeding, pathological electrocardiography (ECG) changes, and overall complications were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean age of the patients in stented group was significantly higher than that in unstented group (63.49±7.71 vs. 61.37±9.80 years, p=0.05). The mean serum level of Troponin T 12 h postoperation was significantly higher in the same group (323.26±33.16 vs. 243.30±11.52 ng/dL; p=0.03). Comparing the stented and unstented groups, the rates of inotrope use (17.8% vs. 7.2%; p=0.003), significant bleeding (15.1% vs. 4.3%; p=0.001), and overall complications (32.9% vs. 11.6%; odds ratio: 3.74 with 95% confidence interval of 2.13-6.55, p<0.001) were significantly higher in the former group. The association between overall complications and prior stenting was independent (odd ratio: 3.06). No significant connections were found between postoperative complications and stent number or type. Conclusion: A positive history of previous coronary stenting significantly increases the risk of immediate post-CABG complications. PMID:25610554

Negargar, Sohrab; Anvari, Shahriar; Abbasi, Kyomars; Enamzadeh, Elgar

2014-01-01

77

Neuropsychological examination detects post-operative complications in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH): report of two cases.  

PubMed

Subdural fluid collections (SFC) are characteristic complications of shunting for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). This report presents two shunted iNPH patients with clinically silent postoperative SFC, detected after abnormal neuropsychological findings. These cases highlight the value of neuropsychological assessment in the routine postoperative assessment of iNPH. PMID:24579876

Liouta, Evangelia; Kalamatianos, Theodosis; Liakos, Faidon; Stranjalis, George

2015-01-01

78

Late postoperative complications of backward implantation of a Vivarte phakic intraocular lens.  

PubMed

A 34-year-old man had bilateral implantation of a Vivarte phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) (Ciba Vision) to correct high myopia. Postoperatively, both pIOLs appeared to have been implanted backward. After a few weeks, the position of the pIOL in the right eye was corrected in a second procedure. For unknown reasons, the pIOL in the left eye was untouched. Three years after the initial implantation, the patient visited our hospital for a second opinion. He presented with a decrease in visual acuity from an intrapupillary membrane in the left eye. Endothelial cell count of the left cornea showed markedly decreased endothelial cell density. The patient was successfully treated by removing the IOL and excising the intrapupillary membrane, leading to recovery of visual acuity. This case presents the rare occurrence and management of late postoperative complications of backward implantation of a Vivarte pIOL. PMID:17662446

Van Cleynenbreugel, Hugo

2007-08-01

79

Male circumcision uptake, postoperative complications, and satisfaction associated with mid-level providers in rural Kenya  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to assess postoperative complications and patient satisfaction associated with mid-level provision of male circumcision in rural Kenya. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among children, adolescents, and adult men undergoing male circumcision from September 1, 2008 to December 4, 2008 at Marie Stopes International Kenya mobile outreach sites located in eight districts in the Nyanza and Western Provinces, Kenya. Male circumcision procedures were performed by registered nurses, surgical technicians, or nurse aides. Postoperative follow-up visits took place on the day of the procedure and at postoperative days 3, 7, and 30, with additional visits as necessary. Data on adverse events, healing conditions, satisfaction level, and resumption of activities were assessed at each follow-up visit. Results A total of 285 individuals were screened, and 240 underwent male circumcision procedures. All procedures were performed using the guided forceps technique by mid-level providers. At the first follow-up visit (postoperative day 3), 5.8% (n = 14) individuals did not return for post-surgical assessment. Retention rates at the second (day 7) and third (day 30) follow-up visits were 91.3% (n = 219) and 84.6% (n = 203), respectively. The prevalence of complications (moderate and severe adverse events) was 1.3% (3/240). At the first and second follow-up visits, 91.7% of patients (n = 220) were capable of resuming their daily activities, and 100% by day 30. The majority of patients (>99%) were satisfied with the procedure, counseling, and information received. Conclusion Male circumcisions can be delivered safely and successfully by mid-level providers in rural settings with high client satisfaction, thereby increasing access to human immunodeficiency virus prevention services in Kenya. PMID:22570573

Ngo, Thoai D; Obhai, George

2012-01-01

80

Deep Sternal Wound Complications: An Overview of Old and New Therapeutic Options  

PubMed Central

Deep sternal wound complications represent a significant problem in current open heart surgery and still pose a tremendous challenge to surgeons. Over the years, many treatment modalities have been proposed, but only few found their way into daily clinical practice of cardiothoracic surgeons. A gold standard has not been defined yet. This review was designed to give an overview of the preferred surgical strategies. PMID:25512698

Rupprecht, Leopold; Schmid, Christof

2013-01-01

81

Wound morbidity after kidney transplant.  

PubMed

Context-Wound morbidity is an important surgical complication after kidney transplant.Objective-To assess risk factors for postoperative wound complications and the impact of such complications on outcomes of kidney transplant.Design and Patients-Retrospectively, 108 consecutive kidney transplant patients between January 2010 and December 2010 were included in the analysis. Wound morbidity was defined as a surgical site infection or symptomatic lymphocele requiring intervention. Patient, donor, and surgical characteristics were reviewed.Results-Eight lymphoceles and 5 surgical site infections occurred in 12 patients. Risk factors for wound complications were recipient's age (P<.01), body mass index (P=.01), urinary tract infection (P=.01), and prolonged postoperative wound drainage (P=.047). Wound morbidity did not increase the incidence of delayed graft function, acute rejection, graft failure, or mortality. Obesity, recipient's age, urinary tract infection, and prolonged wound drainage are risk factors for wound-related complications. Graft and patient survival rates are comparable between patients with and without wound-related complications. PMID:25758800

Fockens, M Matthijs; Alberts, Victor P; Bemelman, Frederike J; van der Pant, Karlijn A M I; Idu, Mirza M

2015-03-01

82

Effect of surgical work volume on postoperative complication: superiority of specialized center in gastric cancer treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  We investigated the risk factors for early postoperative complications after gastric cancer surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  The data from a total of 273 patients with gastric cancer were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. We applied\\u000a physiological and operative severity score for the enumeration of morbidity and mortality (POSSUM) to compare risk-adjusted\\u000a surgical outcomes among different surgical units.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Among the preoperative

Birendra Kumar Sah; Zheng Gang Zhu; Ming Min Chen; Ming Xiang; Jun Chen; Min Yan; Yan Zhen Lin

2009-01-01

83

Self-powered instrumented knee implant for early detection of postoperative complications.  

PubMed

In-vivo measurement of tibiofemoral forces transmitted through Total Knee Replacement (TKR) during normal walking allows the early detection of postoperative complications such as the tibiofemoral misalignment and soft-tissue imbalance. In addition, the in-vivo data can help to improve the design of TKR in order to reduce polyethylene wear and consequently to increase the lifespan of knee implant. A self-powered custom-designed tibial implant instrumented with four piezoceramics has been developed in order to detect the aforementioned complications by measuring the relative change in pressure center (COP) position for different levels of eccentric compressive loading. Moreover, the energy harvested by the piezoceramics can be used to power a transmission system located at the stem of knee implant to wirelessly transmit the in-vivo data outside the implant for further processing and display. PMID:21095807

Almouahed, Shaban; Gouriou, Manuel; Hamitouche, Chafiaa; Stindel, Eric; Roux, Christian

2010-01-01

84

Median sternotomy wound complication: the effect of reconstruction on lung function.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to evaluate the lung function of patients with median sternotomy wound complication during the early postmedian sternotomy period and to compare the long-term pulmonary effects of reconstruction using pectoralis major and rectus abdominis muscle flaps. The percentage of predicted, standardized forced vital capacity (FVC); the standardized forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and FEV1/FVC ratios of 45 patients with a median sternotomy wound complication were evaluated before and at a mean time of 10.6 months after wound reconstruction. Both mean FVC and FEV1 increased after wound revision compared with the prereconstruction results (8.4% and 9.2% increase, respectively). Patients with painful chest wall movement had the worst (60%) mean FVC and FEV1 before reconstruction when compared with a nonpainful complication. Reconstruction with a muscle flap was followed by an increase of 8.6% and 7.3% in FEV1 and FVC, respectively, from prereconstruction results. However, long-term results indicate that these patients have a mild, restrictive impairment of their lung function tests (LFTs), with about 80% of the predicted FVC and FEV1. Among the muscle flaps, the best improvement and best long-term LFT results were after sternectomy and reconstruction with a pectoralis major muscle flap as compared with a rectus abdominis muscle flap. Sternectomy and reconstruction with a muscle flap is a well-tolerated procedure associated with improvement of lung function compared with prereconstruction values. A pectoralis major muscle flap should be the first choice for muscle flap reconstruction while a rectus abdominis muscle flap should be reserved only for patients with good LFTs before reconstruction. PMID:9229090

Cohen, M; Yaniv, Y; Weiss, J; Greif, J; Gur, E; Wertheym, E; Shafir, R

1997-07-01

85

Complicated lower extremity wound caused by immune thrombocytopenic purpura leading to hypercoagulable state: a team approach for limb salvage.  

PubMed

This article describes a complicated lower extremity wound due to hypercoagulable state caused by immune thrombocytopenic purpura. A team approach was important to limb salvage. A literature review is included. PMID:24527141

Simman, Richard; Haluschak, John; Jackson, Sarah

2010-06-01

86

Comparison of Prospective Risk Estimates for Postoperative Complications: Human vs Computer Model  

PubMed Central

Background Surgical quality improvement tools such as NSQIP, are limited in their ability to prospectively impact individual patient care by the retrospective audit and feedback nature of their design. We hypothesized that statistical models using patient preoperative characteristics could prospectively provide risk estimates of postoperative adverse events comparable to risk estimates provided by experienced surgeons, and could be useful for stratifying preoperative assessment of patient risk. Study Design Prospective observational cohort. Using previously developed models for 30- day postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, cardiac, thromboembolic, pulmonary, renal, and SSI complications, model and surgeon estimates of risk were compared to each other and to actual 30-day outcomes. Results The study cohort included 1791 general surgery patients operated between June, 2010 and January, 2012. Observed outcomes were: mortality(0.2%), overall morbidity(8.2%) {pulmonary(1.3%), cardiac(0.3%), thromboembolism(0.2%), renal(0.4%), SSI(3.8%)}. Model and surgeon risk estimates showed significant correlation (p<0.0001) for each outcome category. When surgeons perceived patient risk for overall morbidity to be low, the model predicted risk and observed morbidity rates were 2.8% and 4.1%, respectively, compared to 10% and 18% in perceived high risk patients. Patients in the highest quartile of model predicted risk accounted for 75% of observed mortality and 52% of morbidity. Conclusions Across a broad range of general surgical operations, we confirmed that the model risk estimates are in fairly good agreement with risk estimates of experienced surgeons. Using these models prospectively can identify patients at high risk for morbidity and mortality who could then be targeted for intervention to reduce postoperative complications. PMID:24440066

Glasgow, Robert E; Hawn, Mary T; Hosokawa, Patrick W; Henderson, William G; Min, Sung-Joon; Richman, Joshua S; Tomeh, Majed G; Campbell, Darrell; Neumayer, Leigh A

2014-01-01

87

Wound infiltration with plain bupivacaine as compared with bupivacaine fentanyl mixture for postoperative pain relief after abdominal surgery  

PubMed Central

Aim: To compare the efficacy of wound infiltration with Bupivacaine or Bupivacaine with fentanyl for post operative analgesia. Background: The role of Bupivacaine and fentanyl mixture as wound infiltration for post operative analgesia is less explored in human subjects. Materials and Methods: This prospective, randomized included 60 ASA grade I, II, and III patients in the age group of 20-75 years of age. The patients were randomized into two groups of 30 patients each: Group A received wound infiltration with a solution containing 0.5% bupivacaine (2 mg/kg), while, Group B received infiltration with a solution containing fentanyl 25 ?g added to 0.5% bupivacaine (2 mg/kg). Results: None of the patients in both groups had unbearable incisional pain but addition of fentanyl to 0.5% bupivacaine reduced analgesic consumption in the postoperative period (P<0.05). Conclusion: Addition of opioids to local anesthetics results in better postoperative analgesia and reduced opioid requirement post operatively.

Chander, Reetika; Liddle, Dootika; Kaur, Baljinder; Varghese, Mary

2011-01-01

88

Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ?20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

2014-01-01

89

Postoperative Pain Relief Using Wound Infiltration With 0.5% Bupivacaine in Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for an Appendectomy  

PubMed Central

Purpose Recently, single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been popular for minimally invasive surgery and cosmetic improvement. However, some papers have reported that SILS for an appendectomy (SILS-A) has had the more postoperative complaints of pain. We investigated postoperative pain relief using wound infiltration with 0.5% bupivacaine in SILS-A and compared the result with that for conventional SILS-A. Methods Between July 2010 and September 2012, 75 patients who underwent SILS-A were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: conventional SILS-A group (C-SILS-A) or wound infiltrated with 0.5% bupivacaine in SILS-A group (W-SILS-A). Forty-five patients were in the C-SILS-A, and 30 patients were in the W-SILS-A. Patients with perforated appendicitis were excluded. The clinical outcomes were compared between the groups by using the verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS). Results Clinical outcomes were similar in both study groups except for the pain score. The W-SILS-A group showed significantly lower numbers of additional pain killers and lower VNRS scores 1, 6, and 12 hours after surgery than the C-SILS-A group. Conclusion W-SILS-A is a technically simple and effective method of reducing early postoperative pain. It may be applicable in SILS-A for pain control system. PMID:24466538

Ahn, So Ra; Lee, Cheol; Park, Won Cheol; Lee, Jeong Kyun

2013-01-01

90

Postoperative infections in obstetrics and gynecology.  

PubMed

Postoperative infection is the most commonly seen complication of surgery in obstetrics and gynecology. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis has greatly decreased though not completely eliminated this adverse outcome. Postoperative infections include wound cellulitis, wound abscess, endomyometritis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscess. Infections usually manifest as fever and greater than normal postoperative pain. Refractory fevers maybe because of septic pelvic vein thrombophlebitis or maybe noninfectious in origin. Broad-spectrum antibiotics should be initiated as soon as possible when diagnosis of postoperative infection is made; most patients will respond to treatment within 24 to 48 hours when appropriate antibiotics are selected. PMID:23090459

Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

2012-12-01

91

Alcohol Screening and Risk of Postoperative Complications in Male VA Patients Undergoing Major Non-cardiac Surgery  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Patients who misuse alcohol are at increased risk for surgical complications. Four weeks of preoperative abstinence decreases the risk of complications, but practical approaches for early preoperative identification of alcohol misuse are needed. OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether results of alcohol screening with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption (AUDIT-C) questionnaire—up to a year before surgery—were associated with the risk of postoperative complications. DESIGN This is a cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Male Veterans Affairs (VA) patients were eligible if they had major noncardiac surgery assessed by the VA’s Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) in fiscal years 2004-2006, and completed the AUDIT-C alcohol screening questionnaire (0-12 points) on a mailed survey within 1 year before surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE One or more postoperative complication(s) within 30 days of surgery based on VASQIP nurse medical record reviews. RESULTS Among 9,176 eligible men, 16.3% screened positive for alcohol misuse with AUDIT-C scores ? 5, and 7.8% had postoperative complications. Patients with AUDIT-C scores ? 5 were at significantly increased risk for postoperative complications, compared to patients who drank less. In analyses adjusted for age, smoking, and days from screening to surgery, the estimated prevalence of postoperative complications increased from 5.6% (95% CI 4.8–6.6%) in patients with AUDIT-C scores 1–4, to 7.9% (6.3–9.7%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 5–8, 9.7% (6.6–14.1%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 9–10 and 14.0% (8.9–21.3%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 11–12. In fully-adjusted analyses that included preoperative covariates potentially in the causal pathway between alcohol misuse and complications, the estimated prevalence of postoperative complications increased significantly from 4.8% (4.1–5.7%) in patients with AUDIT-C scores 1–4, to 6.9% (5.5–8.7%) in patients with AUDIT-Cs 5-8 and 7.5% (5.0–11.3%) among those with AUDIT-Cs 9–10. CONCLUSIONS AUDIT-C scores of 5 or more up to a year before surgery were associated with increased postoperative complications. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1475-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20878363

Rubinsky, Anna D.; Sun, Haili; Bryson, Chris L.; Bishop, Michael J.; Blough, David K.; Henderson, William G.; Maynard, Charles; Hawn, Mary T.; Tønnesen, Hanne; Hughes, Grant; Beste, Lauren A.; Harris, Alex H. S.; Hawkins, Eric J.; Houston, Thomas K.; Kivlahan, Daniel R.

2010-01-01

92

Preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations are associated with a risk of postoperative complications after cardiac surgery.  

PubMed

This study aimed to assess whether preoperative oxidative stress levels can predict postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Ninety-five cardiac surgery patients received an assessment of preoperative oxidative stress by measurement of hydroperoxide values in blood via the d-Rom test. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and also multivariate logistic regression were used to evaluate the prognostic significance of preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations in predicting the occurrence of major organ morbidity and mortality (MOMM). MOMM included death, deep sternal infection, reoperation, stroke, renal failure requiring haemodialysis and prolonged ventilation (>48 hours). The ability of preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations to predict MOMM was not significantly different from that of the European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.822 versus 0.821 respectively, P=0.983). The optimal threshold value of hydroperoxide concentration to differentiate between patients with and without MOMM was 450 UCarr (sensitivity, 87.0%; specificity, 81.9%). Duration of intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation time and hospital stay were significantly longer in patients with preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations ?450 UCarr (H group) compared to those patients with preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations <450 UCarr (L group). An increase in preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations remained associated with an increased risk of MOMM (odds ratios: 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00 to 1.03) and prolonged intensive care unit stay (odds ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00 to 1.02), after adjusting for age, gender and EuroSCORE. In conclusion, an increased hydroperoxide concentration before cardiac surgery is an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications. PMID:24967764

Suehiro, K; Tanaka, K; Matsuura, T; Funao, T; Yamada, T; Mori, T; Tsuchiya, M; Nishikawa, K

2014-07-01

93

Use of Electrocautery for Coagulation and Wound Complications in Caesarean Sections  

PubMed Central

Objective. To evaluate the safety of electrocautery for coagulation during Caesarean sections. Study Design. A randomized, controlled, clinical pilot study was performed at a university maternity hospital. After admission for delivery and decision to perform a C-section, volunteers were randomized to either the intervention group (use of electrocautery for coagulation) or nonintervention group. The women were examined at the time of postpartum discharge (day 3), at days 7 to 10, and again at days 30 to 40 for signs of infection, hematoma, seroma, or dehiscence. Data were analyzed using an intention-to-treat analysis, and risk ratios were calculated. Results. No significant differences were found between the two groups. Only 2.8% of patients in the intervention group developed surgical wound complications during hospitalization. However, 7 to 10 days following discharge, these rates reached 23.0% and 15.4% in the intervention and nonintervention groups, respectively (RR = 1.50, 95% CI = 0.84–2.60). Conclusion. Further studies should confirm whether the use of electrocautery for coagulation does not increase the risk of surgical wound complications in patients undergoing Caesarean sections. PMID:25143985

Moreira, Cristiane M.; Amaral, Eliana

2014-01-01

94

The Role of MicroRNAs in Diabetic Complications—Special Emphasis on Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Overweight and obesity are major problems in today’s society, driving the prevalence of diabetes and its related complications. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the chronic complications in diabetes in order to develop better therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Some of the most important complications include macrovascular abnormalities, e.g., heart disease and atherosclerosis, and microvascular abnormalities, e.g., retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, in particular diabetic foot ulceration. The highly conserved endogenous small non-coding RNA molecules, the micro RNAs (miRNAs) have in recent years been found to be involved in a number of biological processes, including the pathogenesis of disease. Their main function is to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), leading to mRNA degradation, suppression of translation or even gene activation. These molecules are promising therapeutic targets and demonstrate great potential as diagnostic biomarkers for disease. This review aims to describe the most recent findings regarding the important roles of miRNAs in diabetes and its complications, with special attention given to the different phases of diabetic wound healing. PMID:25268390

Moura, João; Børsheim, Elisabet; Carvalho, Eugenia

2014-01-01

95

Relationship between Postoperative Infectious Complications and Glycemic Control for Diabetic Patients in an Orthopedic Hospital in Kuwait  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the relationship between postoperative infectious complications and glycemic control for diabetic patients in an orthopedic hospital in Kuwait. Subjects and Methods: Patients who underwent surgical orthopedic procedures between 2006 and 2007 were identified to provide demographic and clinical informations including age, gender, type of surgery, length of operation, HbA1c values, nature of specimens and species of the

S. M. Lamloum; L. A. Mobasher; A. H. Karar; L. Basiony; T. H. Abdallah; A. I. Al-Saleh; N. A. Al-Shamali

2009-01-01

96

Evaluation of emphysema using three-dimensional computed tomography: association with postoperative complications in lung cancer patients.  

PubMed

Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) enables in vivo volumetry of total lung volume (TLV) and emphysematous low-attenuation volume (LAV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between preoperative 3D-CT volumetry and postoperative complications in lung cancer patients. We searched our institution's surgical records from December 2006 to December 2009 and selected patients who had undergone pulmonary lobectomy for primary lung cancer. From 3D-CT data, TLV and LAV <-950 HU of thresholds were retrospectively measured. The LAV% was calculated as follows: LAV% = LAV/TLV*100. The associations between the seven independent variables (LAV%, age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as percent forced vital capacity [FEV1%], and resected lobe) and the two outcomes (postoperative complications and prolonged postoperative stay [PPS]) were compared using logistic regression analysis. A total of 309 patients (222 males, 87 females; mean age, 67 years; range, 40-87 years) were evaluated. On multivariate analysis, age and LAV% were significantly correlated with postoperative complications (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively), and LAV% was significantly correlated with PPS (p = 0.031). LAV% measured using 3D-CT is more sensitive for predicting complications after lobectomy for lung cancer than FEV1%. PMID:25797976

Kawakami, Kenichi; Iwano, Shingo; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Naganawa, Shinji

2015-02-01

97

EVALUATION OF EMPHYSEMA USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: ASSOCIATION WITH POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN LUNG CANCER PATIENTS  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) enables in vivo volumetry of total lung volume (TLV) and emphysematous low-attenuation volume (LAV) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We retrospectively investigated the correlation between preoperative 3D-CT volumetry and postoperative complications in lung cancer patients. We searched our institution’s surgical records from December 2006 to December 2009 and selected patients who had undergone pulmonary lobectomy for primary lung cancer. From 3D-CT data, TLV and LAV <–950 HU of thresholds were retrospectively measured. The LAV% was calculated as follows: LAV% = LAV/TLV*100. The associations between the seven independent variables (LAV%, age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as percent forced vital capacity [FEV1%], and resected lobe) and the two outcomes (postoperative complications and prolonged postoperative stay [PPS]) were compared using logistic regression analysis. A total of 309 patients (222 males, 87 females; mean age, 67 years; range, 40–87 years) were evaluated. On multivariate analysis, age and LAV% were significantly correlated with postoperative complications (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, respectively), and LAV% was significantly correlated with PPS (p = 0.031). LAV% measured using 3D-CT is more sensitive for predicting complications after lobectomy for lung cancer than FEV1%. PMID:25797976

KAWAKAMI, KENICHI; IWANO, SHINGO; HASHIMOTO, NAOZUMI; HASEGAWA, YOSHINORI; NAGANAWA, SHINJI

2015-01-01

98

Risk factors for postoperative infectious complications following percutaneous nephrolithotomy: a prospective clinical study.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to assess the preoperative and intraoperative potential risk factors for infectious complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). A total of 303 patients who underwent PCNL for renal stones were included in the recent study. A detailed history including past renal surgery, nephrostomy insertion and recurrent urinary infection were obtained from all patients. Preoperative urine culture, renal pelvic urine culture and stone culture were obtained from all patients. The intraoperative data were prospectively noted. All patients were followed up postoperatively for signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. In 83 (27.4%) of the patients, SIRS was observed and of these patients 23 (7.6%) were diagnosed as sepsis. Escherichia coli was the most common organism detected in cultures, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus and Klebsiella spp. in all patients. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, presence of infection stone, stone burden and recurrent urinary tract infection were associated with both SIRS and sepsis development. Presence of infection stone, stone burden ?800 mm(2) and recurrent urinary tract infection can be identified as independent predictors for the development of SIRS and sepsis. PMID:25269441

Koras, Omer; Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Yonguc, Tarik; Degirmenci, Tansu; Arslan, Burak; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Minareci, Suleyman

2015-02-01

99

Effects of surgical wound infiltration with bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy.  

PubMed

The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners' anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a "numerical rating scale" for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

Yilmaz, Özge Turna; Toydemir, T Seval Fatma; Kir?an, ?smail; Dokuzeylul, Banu; Gunay, Zeynep; Karacam, Esra

2014-12-31

100

Effects of Surgical Wound Infiltration with Bupivacaine on Postoperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Bilateral Mastectomy  

PubMed Central

The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners’ anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a “numerical rating scale” for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

YILMAZ, Özge Turna; TOYDEMIR, T. Seval Fatma; KIR?AN, ?smail; DOKUZEYLUL, Banu; GUNAY, Zeynep; KARACAM, Esra

2014-01-01

101

A prospective two-armed trial assessing the efficacy and performance of a silver dressing used postoperatively on high-risk, clean surgical wounds.  

PubMed

Surgical site infections (SSI) are a known complication of surgery. Silver-containing wound treatments are popular, despite the lack of evidence of SSI reduction. A two-armed study was conducted between July 2007 and November 2008 to evaluate the efficacy and ease of use of a postoperative silver dressing. In the first arm of the study, patients undergoing clean general, vascular, orthopedic, and neurosurgical procedures were allocated to receive a postoperative silver dressing (POSD) or a standard dressing of nonstick gauze under a fluid occlusive dressing. Outcome variables included the incidence of antibiotic initiation for SSI, clinical signs of infection, and leukocyte counts. The second arm of the study was a prospective case series designed to evaluate the performance and handling characteristics of the POSD. Onehundred- ninety-nine (199) patients (mean age 59.2 [range 21-94] years) were enrolled in the first arm of the study. Three out of 99 (3%) patients in the POSD and six out of 100 (6%) control group patients received antibiotic therapy for SSI (P = 0.498). Differences in the percentage of patients with clinical signs of infection following surgery also were not statistically significant (POSD: n = 24, 24.2%; control: n = 30, 30%; P = 0.426). In the second arm, 34 out of 36 patients rated the study dressing easy to apply in (94%), and no pain on removal was noted in 38 out of 57 (66.7%) assessments. No patients in the dressing performance cohort developed an SSI. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies with large sample sizes are warranted to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the POSD. PMID:24706401

Schwartz, Jamie; Goss, Selena; Facchin, Federico; Manizate, Fotini; Gendics, Cynthia; Braitman, Elissa; Lantis, John

2014-04-01

102

Laparoscopic Myomectomy: Technique, Complications, and Ultrasound Scan Evaluations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study ObjectiveTo evaluate the feasibility, limits, and complications of laparoscopic myomectomy, assess time to full recovery, and evaluate uterine wound healing by ultrasound in the early postoperative period.

S. Landi; R. Zaccoletti; L. Ferrari; L. Minelli

2001-01-01

103

Clinical assessment of peripheral perfusion to predict postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery early: a prospective observational study in adults  

PubMed Central

Introduction Altered peripheral perfusion is strongly associated with poor outcome in critically ill patients. We wanted to determine whether repeated assessments of peripheral perfusion during the days following surgery could help to early identify patients that are more likely to develop postoperative complications. Methods Haemodynamic measurements and peripheral perfusion parameters were collected one day prior to surgery, directly after surgery (D0) and on the first (D1), second (D2) and third (D3) postoperative days. Peripheral perfusion assessment consisted of capillary refill time (CRT), peripheral perfusion index (PPI) and forearm-to-fingertip skin temperature gradient (Tskin-diff). Generalized linear mixed models were used to predict severe complications within ten days after surgery based on Clavien-Dindo classification. Results We prospectively followed 137 consecutive patients, from among whom 111 were included in the analysis. Severe complications were observed in 19 patients (17.0%). Postoperatively, peripheral perfusion parameters were significantly altered in patients who subsequently developed severe complications compared to those who did not, and these parameters persisted over time. CRT was altered at D0, and PPI and Tskin-diff were altered on D1 and D2, respectively. Among the different peripheral perfusion parameters, the diagnostic accuracy in predicting severe postoperative complications was highest for CRT on D2 (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.83 to 0.92)) with a sensitivity of 0.79 (95% CI = 0.54 to 0.94) and a specificity of 0.93 (95% CI = 0.86 to 0.97). Generalized mixed-model analysis demonstrated that abnormal peripheral perfusion on D2 and D3 was an independent predictor of severe postoperative complications (D2 odds ratio (OR) = 8.4, 95% CI = 2.7 to 25.9; D2 OR = 6.4, 95% CI = 2.1 to 19.6). Conclusions In a group of patients assessed following major abdominal surgery, peripheral perfusion alterations were associated with the development of severe complications independently of systemic haemodynamics. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and to explore in more detail the effects of peripheral perfusion–targeted resuscitation following major abdominal surgery. PMID:24894892

2014-01-01

104

Early increase of procalcitonin after cardiovascular surgery in patients with postoperative complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. Type and frequency of postoperative abnormalities were registered after cardiovascular surgery to evaluate the aetiology and diagnostic value of increased concentrations of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) during the early postoperative period. Design. Prospective, observational study. Patients. Two hundred and eight patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting or valve replacement requiring cardiopulmonary bypass were monitored for 7 days

M. Meisner; C. Rauschmayer; J. Schmidt; R. Feyrer; R. Cesnjevar; D. Bredle; K. Tschaikowsky

2002-01-01

105

Post-operative complications after removal of sporadic vestibular schwannoma via retrosigmoid-suboccipital approach: current diagnosis and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The retrosigmoid (suboccipital) approach is one of four surgical approaches for the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (acoustic\\u000a neuromas). It is increasingly used by otologic surgeons, and in experienced hands is associated with improved results and\\u000a more limited complications. Mortality rates are minimal and often zero, while postoperative sequelae, on the other hand, are\\u000a not rare. In order to not only

Stylianos Charalampakis; Dimitrios Koutsimpelas; Haralampos Gouveris; Wolf Mann

2011-01-01

106

A Comparative Study of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Using Fast Track Regimen and Conservative Analgesic Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Postoperative pulmonary complications and pain are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. This study aimed to compare the effects of fast track and conservative treatment regimens on patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods In this randomized controlled clinical trial, we recruited 60 patients admitted to the thoracic ICU of Imam Reza Hospital in two matched groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 patients received fast track regimen randomly; whereas, group 2 cases randomly received conservative analgesic regimen after thoracotomy and pulmonary resection. The outcome was determined based on the incidence of pulmonary complications and reduction of post-thoracotomy pain in all patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) <75% predicted value which was measured while the patients were in ICU. The length of ICU stay, thoracotomy pain, morbidity, pulmonary complications and mortality were compared in two groups. Results A total of 60 patients, 45 (75%) males and 15(25%) females with ASA class I-III were recruited in this study. Postoperative pulmonary complications were observed in 5 (16.7%) patients in group 1 versus 17 (56.7%) patients in group 2. There were statistically significant differences in development of postoperative pulmonary complications such as atelectasis and prolonged air leak between both groups (P< 0.001 and P = 0.003). There was also a statistically significant difference in the rate of preoperative FEV1 (p = 0.001) and ASA scoring (p = 0.01) and value of FEV1 < 75% predicted in the two groups. The difference in length of ICU stay in two groups was statistically significant (P= 0.003 and P = 0.017 in FEV1 < 75% group). Four patients in group 1 and 9 patients in group 2 had FEV1reduced to less than 75% of predicted value (p = 0.03). Conclusion Using fast track regimen reduced postoperative pain and incidence of some pulmonary complications significantly when compared to the conservative regimen following thoracotomy and various lung surgeries. PMID:25191370

Aghdam, Babak Abri; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal; Moghadaszadeh, Majid

2011-01-01

107

Risk of perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative complications associated with serotonergic antidepressants in older adults undergoing hip fracture surgery.  

PubMed

Serotonergic antidepressants (SAds) are associated with bleeding-related adverse events. An increased risk of bleeding with SAds may have important implications in surgical settings. Our study evaluates the risk of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and postoperative complications associated with SAds among older adults undergoing hip fracture surgery. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of individuals 66 years or older who underwent hip fracture surgery in Ontario, Canada. The risk of RBC transfusion among current users of SAds and nonserotonergic antidepressants (NSAds) was compared with recent former SAd users. Secondary outcomes included measures of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Subgroup analyses were undertaken in groups who were coprescribed other medications known to effect bleeding. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to determine the odds ratios (ORs) for antidepressants and postoperative outcomes. A total 11,384 individuals were included in the study sample. Current SAd users had an increased risk of RBC transfusion compared with recent former users of SAds (OR, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.43) as did current NSAd users (OR, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.33). The risk of RBC transfusion with SAds or NSAds was further increased among individuals receiving antiplatelet agents. However, postoperative morbidity and mortality were not increased among either group of antidepressant users. In conclusion, SAds are associated with an increased risk of RBC transfusions, although this does not appear to result in major postoperative complications. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk, although routine discontinuation of antidepressants before surgery is likely unwarranted in most cases. PMID:24091859

Seitz, Dallas P; Bell, Chaim M; Gill, Sudeep S; Reimer, Cara L; Herrmann, Nathan; Anderson, Geoffrey M; Newman, Alice; Rochon, Paula A

2013-12-01

108

Evaluation of the role of antibiotics in preventing postoperative complication after routine periodontal surgery: A comparative clinical study  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Aim of this randomly controlled clinical study was to evaluate the role of antibiotics to prevent postoperative complications after routine periodontal surgery and also to determine whether their administration improved the surgical outcome. Materials and Methods: Forty-five systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis requiring flap surgery were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, and control groups. Surgical procedures were carried out with complete asepsis as per the protocol. Postoperative assessment of patient variables like swelling, pain, temperature, infection, ulceration, necrosis, and trismus was performed at intervals of 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 3 months. Changes in clinical parameters such as gingival index, plaque index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were also recorded. Results: There was no incidence of postoperative infection in any of the patients. Patient variables were comparable in all the three groups. Though there was significant improvement in the periodontal parameters in all the groups, no statistically significant result was observed for any group over the others. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that when periodontal surgical procedures were performed following strict asepsis, the incidence of clinical infection was not significant among all the three groups, and also that antibiotic administration did not influence the outcome of surgery. Therefore, prophylactic antibiotics for patients who are otherwise healthy administered following routine periodontal surgery to prevent postoperative infection are unnecessary and have no demonstrable additional benefits. PMID:24872630

Mohan, Rosh Radhika; Doraswamy, Dwarakanath Chinni; Hussain, Ahad M.; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Jayaprakash, Deepika

2014-01-01

109

Multifocal cutaneous mucormycosis complicating polymicrobial wound infections in a tsunami survivor from Sri Lanka.  

PubMed

A man injured in the tsunami of Dec 26, 2004, returned to Sydney for management of his soft-tissue injuries. Despite broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical wound debridement, and vigilant wound care, his condition worsened. Muscle and fat necrosis developed in a previously debrided thigh wound, and necrotising lesions arose from previous abrasions. Histological analysis showed mucormycosis in three non-contiguous sites, and Apophysomyces elegans was isolated from excised wound tissue. Wound infections, both bacterial and fungal, will undoubtedly add to the morbidity and mortality already recorded in tsunami-affected areas. Other cases [correction] of cutaneous mucormycosis might develop in survivors, but this disease can be difficult to diagnose and even harder to treat, particularly in those remaining in affected regions. PMID:15752532

Andresen, David; Donaldson, Annabelle; Choo, Lennart; Knox, Adrian; Klaassen, Michael; Ursic, Caesar; Vonthethoff, Leon; Krilis, Steven; Konecny, Pamela

110

Postoperative complications and their management after arterial switch operation in infants with transposition of great arteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Arterial switch operation (ASO) has been optimal for children with transposition of great arteries (TGA) in either simple or complex form with an excellent survival rate. This operation was introduced late in China, but there has been a decreasing mortality in recent years. Optimizing the postoperative management has been essential to improve the survival rate after ASO. This study

Li-Xing Zhu; Lin-Hua Tan; Xiao-Jun He; Cai-Yun Zhang; Yan-Ping Yu; Ze-Wei Zhang

2007-01-01

111

Simple adaptations of surgical technique to critically reduce the risk of postoperative sternal complications in patients receiving bilateral internal thoracic arteries  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Limited blood supply to the thoracic chest wall is a known risk factor for sternal wound complications after CABG. Therefore, bilateral internal thoracic arteries are still rarely utilized despite their proven superior graft patency. The aim of our study was to analyse whether modification of the surgical technique is able to limit the risk of sternal wound complications in patients receiving bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting. METHODS All 418 non-emergent CABG patients receiving bilateral internal thoracic artery CABG procedures (BITA) from January 2001 to January 2012 were analysed for sternal wound complications. Surgical technique together with known risk factors and relevant comorbidity were analysed for their effect on the occurrence of sternal wound complications by means of multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Sternal wound complications occurred in 25 patients (5.9%), with a sternal dehiscence rate of 2.4% (10 patients). In multivariate analysis, diabetes (odds ratio [OR]: 4.8, 95% CI: 1.9–11.7, P = 0.001), but not obesity (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 0.7–4.2, P = 0.28) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 0.87–5.6, P = 0.1) was a relevant comorbid condition for sternal complications. Skeletonization of ITA grafts (OR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.06–0.5, P = 0.001) and the augmented use of sternal wires (OR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.06–0.95, P = 0.04) were highly effective in preventing sternal complications. The use of platelet-enriched-fibrin glue (PRF) sealant, however, was associated with more superficial sternal infections (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.3–10.5, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Adjusted for common risk factors, skeletonization of BITA grafts together with augmented sternal wires is effective in preventing sternal complications. The use of PRF sealant, however, increased the risk for superficial wound complications. PMID:23681126

Sakic, Adel; Chevtchik, Orest; Kilo, Juliane; Schistek, Roland; Mueller, Ludwig C.; Ulmer, Hanno; Grimm, Michael; Ruttmann, Elfriede

2013-01-01

112

Impact of Preoperative Physiological Risk Profile on Postoperative Morbidity and Mortality After Emergency Operation of Complicated Peptic Ulcer Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim  The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative physiological risk profile for postoperative morbidity and mortality\\u000a after emergency treatment of complicated peptic ulcer disease (PUD).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Operative notes and hospital files of 261 patients—111 female, 150 male; median age 67 years (range 17–100 years)—undergoing\\u000a an emergency operation from 1993 to 2005 were analyzed retrospectively. The physiologic subscore of the

Jan-Hendrik Egberts; Birte Summa; Ulrike Schulz; Clemens Schafmayer; Sebastian Hinz; Juergen Tepel

2007-01-01

113

Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after septoplasty: A potential complication of occult anterior skull base encephalocele  

PubMed Central

Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea after septoplasty is a known entity resulting from errors in surgical technique and improper handling of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. When these occur, urgent management is necessary to prevent deleterious sequelae such as meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. Encephaloceles are rare occurrences characterized by herniation of intracranial contents through a skull base defect that can predispose patients to CSF rhinorrhea. In this report, we present a case of CSF rhinorrhea occurring 2 weeks after septoplasty likely from manipulation of an occult anterior skull base encephalocele. To our knowledge, no previous similar case has been reported in the literature. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of occult encephaloceles while performing septoplasties because minimal manipulation of these entities may potentially result in postoperative CSF leakage. PMID:23772326

Soni, Resha S.; Choudhry, Osamah J.; Liu, James K.

2013-01-01

114

Mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by perioperative complications in veterans undergoing elective surgery: data from Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP)—a cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by postoperative complications. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Using data from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Surgical Quality Improvement Programme, a quality assurance programme for major surgical procedures in the VA healthcare system, we assessed the association of current smoking at the time of the surgery with 6-month and 1-year mortality. Primary and secondary outcome measures Using mediation analyses, we calculated the relative contribution of each smoking-associated complication to smoking-associated postoperative mortality, both unadjusted and adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, work relative value unit of the operation, surgeon specialty, American Society of Anesthesiologists class and year of surgery. Smoking-associated complications included surgical site infection (SSI), cardiovascular complications (myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest and/or stroke) and pulmonary complications (pneumonia, failure to wean and/or reintubation). Results There were 186?632 never smokers and 135?741 current smokers. The association of smoking and mortality was mediated by smoking-related complications with varying effects. In unadjusted analyses, the proportions of mediation of smoking to 6-month mortality explained by the complications were as follows: SSIs 22%, cardiovascular complications 12% and pulmonary complications 89%. In adjusted analyses, the per cents mediated by each complication were as follows: SSIs 2%, cardiovascular complications 4% and pulmonary complications 22%. In adjusted analyses for 1-year mortality, respective per cents mediated were 2%, 3% and 16%. Conclusions Pulmonary complications, followed by cardiovascular complications and SSIs were mediators of smoking-associated 6-month and 1-year mortality. Interventions targeting smoking cessation and prevention and early treatment of pulmonary complications has the likelihood of reducing postoperative mortality after elective surgery. PMID:23604347

Singh, Jasvinder A; Hawn, Mary; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Henderson, William G; Richman, Joshua; Houston, Thomas K

2013-01-01

115

Factors Associated with Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Patients with Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine the inci- dence of different postoperative pulmonary complica- tions (PIG) and their associated risk factors in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (forced expiratory volume in 1 s lFEV,l ~1.2 L and FEV,\\/forced vital capacity (F'VC) <75%) undergo- ing noncardiothoracic operations. Thirty-nine of 105 patients (37%) had one or more

David H. Wong; Erich C. Weber; Michael J. Schell; Anne B. Wong; Cynthia T. Anderson; Steven J. Barker

1995-01-01

116

Health-related quality of life after cardiac surgery – the effects of age, preoperative conditions and postoperative complications  

PubMed Central

Background Factors influencing the postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after cardiac surgery have not been well described yet, mainly in the older people. The study’s aim was to explore differences in clinical conditions and HRQOL of patients before and after cardiac surgery taking into account the influence of age and to describe factors influencing changes of HRQOL in the postoperative period. Methods This was a prospective consecutive observational study with two measurements using the SF-36 questionnaire before surgery and 1 year after surgery. It considered main clinical characteristics of participants prior to surgery as well as postoperative complications. Results At baseline assessment the study considered 310 patients, predominantly male (69%). Mean age was 65 (SD 10.4) years and 101 patients (33%), who were older than 70, constituted the older group. This older group showed greater comorbidity, higher cardiac operative risk and lower HRQOL in the preoperative period as well as a higher prevalence of postoperative complications than the younger group. Thirty-day mortality was 1.4% in the younger group and 6.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). One year mortality was 3.3% in the younger group and 10.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). There was a significant improvement in all 8 health domains of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.001) in the overall sample. There was no significant difference in change in a majority of HRQOL domains between the younger and the older group (p > 0.05). Logistic multivariate analysis identified a higher values of preoperative PCS (Physical component summary) scores (OR 1.03, CI 1.00 – 1.05, p = 0.0187) and MCS (Mental component summary) scores (OR 1.02, CI 0.997 – 1.00, p = 0.0846) as the only risk factors for potential non-improvement of HRQOL after cardiac surgery after correction for age, gender and type of surgery. Conclusions Older patients with higher operative risk have lower preoperative HRQOL but show a similar improvement in a majority of HRQOL domains after cardiac surgery as compared with younger patients. The multivariate analysis has shown the higher preoperative HRQOL status as a only significant factor of potential non-improvement of postoperative HRQOL. PMID:24618329

2014-01-01

117

Postoperative complications do not influence the pattern of early lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer in patients at risk  

PubMed Central

Background The pattern and factors influencing the lung function recovery in the first postoperative days are still not fully elucidated, especially in patients at increased risk. Methods Prospective study on 60 patients at increased risk, who underwent a lung resection for primary lung cancer. Inclusion criteria: complete resection and one or more known risk factors in form of COPD, cardiovascular disorders, advanced age or other comorbidities. Previous myocardial infarction, myocardial revascularization or stenting, cardiac rhythm disorders, arterial hypertension and myocardiopathy determined the increased cardiac risk. The severity of COPD was graded according to GOLD criteria. The trend of the postoperative lung function recovery was assessed by performing spirometry with a portable spirometer. Results Cardiac comorbidity existed in 55%, mild and moderate COPD in 20% and 35% of patients respectively. Measured values of FVC% and FEV1% on postoperative days one, three and seven, showed continuous improvement, with significant difference between the days of measurement, especially between days three and seven. There was no difference in the trend of the lung function recovery between patients with and without postoperative complications. Whilst pO2 was decreasing during the first three days in a roughly parallel fashion in patients with respiratory, surgical complications and in patients without complications, a slight hypercapnia registered on the first postoperative day was gradually abolished in all groups except in patients with cardiac complications. Conclusion Extent of the lung resection and postoperative complications do not significantly influence the trend of the lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer. PMID:24884793

2014-01-01

118

Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) follow-up imaging: the assessment and treatment of common postoperative complications.  

PubMed

Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a well-established procedure, which has long-term mortality rates similar to that of open repair. It has the additional benefit of being less invasive, making it the favoured method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms in elderly and high-risk patients with multiple co-morbidities. The main disadvantage of EVAR is the higher rate of re-intervention, due to device-related complications, including endoleaks, limb occlusion, stent migration, kinking, and infection. As a result lifelong surveillance is required. In order to avoid missing these complications, intricate knowledge of stent graft design, good-quality diagnostic ultrasound skills, multiplanar reformatting of CT images, and reproducible investigations are important. Most of these complications can be treated via an endovascular approach using cuff extensions, uncovered stents, coils, and liquid embolic agents. Open surgery is reserved for complex complications, where an endovascular approach is not feasible. PMID:25443774

Ilyas, S; Shaida, N; Thakor, A S; Winterbottom, A; Cousins, C

2015-02-01

119

Pre-operative granulocyte/lymphocyte ratio as a predictive marker of post-operative complications in patients with colorectal cancer  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical relevance of the pre-operative granulocyte/lymphocyte (G/L) ratio as a predictive marker of post-operative complications in patients with colorectal cancer. In total, 85 patients (59 males and 26 females; mean age, 68.9 years) underwent surgery for colorectal cancer at the Department of Surgery, Ibraki Medical Center, Tokyo Medical University (Ami, Japan), and were divided into post-operative complication and non-complication groups. Clinical data, including age, gender, body mass index, tumor localization, tumor pathological type, cancer staging, surgery time, volume of surgical bleeding, pre-operative G/L ratio and further pre-operative laboratory data, including levels of albumin and C-reactive protein, Glasgow Prognostic Score, white blood cell count and levels of hemoglobin, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were analyzed between these groups. The total post-operative complication rate was 18.8%. On univariate analysis, the amount of surgical bleeding and the pre-operative G/L ratio were significantly higher in the complication group than in the non-complication group (299.8±361.7 vs. 155.6±268.6 ml, P<0.05; and 6.73±10.38 vs. 3.49±2.78, P<0.05, respectively). Multivariate logistic regression analysis for the risk factors of post-operative complications, determined using univariate analysis, demonstrated that the amount of surgical bleeding and the pre-operative G/L ratio were independent risk factors of post-operative complications in patients with colorectal cancer. In conclusion, the G/L ratio may be a clinically relevant pre-operative predictive marker for post-operative complications. PMID:25436003

SHIMAZAKI, JIRO; TABUCHI, TAKANOBU; NAKACHI, TAKESHI; MOTOHASHI, GYO; NISHIDA, KIYOTAKA; UBUKATA, HIDEYUKI; TABUCHI, TAKAFUMI

2015-01-01

120

[Postoperative spine].  

PubMed

Approximately 15-30?% of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are associated with complications that require further diagnostic work-up. The choice of imaging modality for postoperative complications depends on the extent, pattern and temporal evolution of the postoperative neurological signs and symptoms as well as on the preoperative clinical status, the surgical procedure itself and the underlying pathology. The interpretation of imaging findings, in particular the distinction between postoperative complications and normally expected nonspecific postoperative imaging alterations can be challenging and requires the integration of clinical neurological information and the results of laboratory tests. The combination of different imaging techniques might help in cases of equivocal imaging results. PMID:25398572

Schlaeger, R; Lieb, J M; Shariat, K; Ahlhelm, F J

2014-11-01

121

Risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications: an update of the literature.  

PubMed

Perioperative medicine is a growing area of research that brings together internists, anesthesiologists, surgeons, and hospitalists. A medical team approach to ensure the best possible patient outcomes has fostered collaborative strategies across disciplines. Perioperative pulmonary complications are common and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective strategies to identify and reduce risks of pulmonary complications can improve patient outcomes. We review the new literature (2013 to early 2014) in the field of perioperative pulmonary medicine that reports new strategies to improve outcomes in the area of perioperative pulmonary care. PMID:25485924

Smetana, Gerald W; Pfeifer, Kurt J; Slawski, Barbara A; Jaffer, Amir K; Dutta, Suparna; Cohn, Steven L

2014-12-01

122

Impact of Mycophenolate Mofetil on Wound Complications and Lymphoceles after Kidney Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Despite improved efficacy, modern immunosuppressive agents may show unanticipated side effects. In this study we investigated the possible interactions of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with wound healing and lymphocele formation. Methods: We conducted a retrospective single-center analysis in 144 patients receiving a cyclosporine A-based immunosuppression with prednisolone and either MMF (n = 77) or azathioprine (AZA, n = 77). Endpoints

Kai Lopau; Karin Syamken; Peter Rubenwolf; Hubertus Riedmiller; Christoph Wanner

2010-01-01

123

An acute fatality from suicidal caustic soda ingestion complicated by stab wound penetrating the stomach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute death from caustic ingestion is uncommon. We report an autopsy case of acute fatality from suicidal ingestion of a liquid caustic soda solution with peritoneal leakage due to a stab wound to the stomach. The victim was a 58-year-old man, who died about 1 h after being transported to a hospital emergency care unit. There were corrosive erosions around

Bao-Li Zhu; Shigeki Oritani; Kaori Ishida; Li Quan; Mari Taniguchi; Dong-Ri Li; Yasunobu Kamikodai; Masaki Q. Fujita; Masafumi Ogawa; Hitoshi Maeda

2002-01-01

124

Incidence and Risk Factors of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications in Noncardiac Chinese Patients: A Multicenter Observational Study in University Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To assess the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) in Chinese inpatients, and to develop a brief predictive risk index. Methods. Between August 6, 2012, and August 12, 2012, patients undergoing noncardiac operations in four university hospitals were enrolled. The cohort was divided into two subsamples, cohort 1 to develop a predictive risk index of PPCs and cohort 2 to validate it. Results. 1673 patients were enrolled. PPCs were recorded for 163 patients (9.7%), of whom the hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (P < 0.001). The mortality was 1.84% in patients with PPCs and 0.07% in those without. Logistic Regression modeling in cohort 1 identified nine independent risk factors, including smoking, respiratory infection in the last month, preoperative antibiotic use, preoperative saturation of peripheral oxygen, surgery site, blood lost, postoperative blood glucose, albumin, and ventilation. The model was validated within cohort 2 with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.90 (95% CI 0.86 to 0.94). Conclusions. PPCs are common in noncardiac surgical patients and are associated with prolonged LOS in China. The current study developed a risk index, which can be used to assess individual risk of PPCs and guide individualized perioperative respiratory care.

Jin, Yue; Xie, Guohao; Wang, Haihong; Jin, Lielie; Li, Jun; Cheng, Baoli; Zhang, Kai; Fang, Xiangming

2015-01-01

125

Incidence and risk factors of postoperative pulmonary complications in noncardiac chinese patients: a multicenter observational study in university hospitals.  

PubMed

Purpose. To assess the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) in Chinese inpatients, and to develop a brief predictive risk index. Methods. Between August 6, 2012, and August 12, 2012, patients undergoing noncardiac operations in four university hospitals were enrolled. The cohort was divided into two subsamples, cohort 1 to develop a predictive risk index of PPCs and cohort 2 to validate it. Results. 1673 patients were enrolled. PPCs were recorded for 163 patients (9.7%), of whom the hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (P < 0.001). The mortality was 1.84% in patients with PPCs and 0.07% in those without. Logistic Regression modeling in cohort 1 identified nine independent risk factors, including smoking, respiratory infection in the last month, preoperative antibiotic use, preoperative saturation of peripheral oxygen, surgery site, blood lost, postoperative blood glucose, albumin, and ventilation. The model was validated within cohort 2 with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.90 (95% CI 0.86 to 0.94). Conclusions. PPCs are common in noncardiac surgical patients and are associated with prolonged LOS in China. The current study developed a risk index, which can be used to assess individual risk of PPCs and guide individualized perioperative respiratory care. PMID:25821791

Jin, Yue; Xie, Guohao; Wang, Haihong; Jin, Lielie; Li, Jun; Cheng, Baoli; Zhang, Kai; Hoeft, Andreas; Fang, Xiangming

2015-01-01

126

Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries  

PubMed Central

This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed. PMID:25593443

Thomas, Jimmy

2014-01-01

127

Management of gunshot wounds  

SciTech Connect

Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

1987-01-01

128

Aorta-Left Renal Vein Fistula Complicating an Aortic Aneurysm: Preoperative and Postoperative Multislice CT Findings  

SciTech Connect

Fistulas complicating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are rare, and fistulas involving the left renal vein are particularly uncommon. We highlight here a fistula between an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a retroaortic left renal vein, revealed by left flank pain associated with hematuria and acute renal failure. The multislice CT angiography performed in this 68-year-old patient revealed communication and equal enhancement between the aorta and the left gonadic vein, suggesting the presence of a fistula. The three-dimensional VRT reconstructions presented in this case were of great value in the preoperative planning, enabling immediate visualization of this unusual feature. Alternative diagnoses to consider when encountering this clinical presentation are reviewed.

Barrier, Pierre, E-mail: p.barrier@gmail.com; Otal, Philippe [Hopital de Rangueil CHU de Toulouse, Department of Radiology (France); Garcia, Olivier; Vahdat, Olivier; Domenech, Brice [Clinique Pasteur, Department of Radiology (France); Lannareix, Valerie; Joffre, Francis; Rousseau, Herve [Hopital de Rangueil CHU de Toulouse, Department of Radiology (France)

2007-06-15

129

Use of “custom made” porous hydroxyapatite implants for cranioplasty: postoperative analysis of complications in 1549 patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Cranioplasty is a surgical intervention aimed at reestablishing the integrity of skull defects, and should be considered the conclusion of a surgical act that began with bone flap removal. Autologous bone is still considered the treatment of choice for cranioplasty. An alternative choice is bioceramic porous hydroxyapatite (HA) as it is one of the materials that meets and comes closest to the biomimetic characteristics of bone. Methods: The authors analyzed the clinical charts, compiled by the neurosurgeon, of all patients treated with custom-made porous HA devices (Custom Bone Service Fin-Ceramica, Faenza) from which epidemiological and pathological data as well as material-related complications were extrapolated. Results: From November 1997 to December 2010, 1549 patients underwent cranioplasty with the implantation of 1608 custom-made porous HA devices. HA was used in 53.8% of patients for decompressive craniectomy after trauma or intracranial hemorrhage, while the remaining cases were for treated for comminuted fracture, cutaneous or osseous resection, cranial malformation, autologous bone reabsorption or infection or rejection of previously implanted material. The incidence of adverse events in patients treated for cranioplasty, as first line treatment was 4.78% (56 events/1171 patients), and 5.02%, (19 events/378 patients) at second line. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that HA is a safe and effective material, is well tolerated in both adult and pediatric patients, and meets the requirements necessary to repair craniolacunia. PMID:23493459

Stefini, Roberto; Esposito, Giacomo; Zanotti, Bruno; Iaccarino, Corrado; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Servadei, Franco

2013-01-01

130

Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5 values, and absolute and relative V5 values in male vs. female patients. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine correlations between dosimetric factors. Results: Eighteen (16.4%) of the 110 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications. Two of these died of progressive pneumonia. Hospitalizations were significantly longer for patients with postoperative pulmonary complications than for those without (median, 15 days vs. 11 days, p = 0.003). On univariate analysis, female gender (p = 0.017), higher mean lung dose (p = 0.036), higher relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy (V5) (p = 0.023), and smaller volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5-35 Gy (VS5-VS35) (p < 0.05) were all significantly associated with an increased incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. No other clinical factors were significantly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort. On multivariate analysis, the volume of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5) was the only significant independent factor associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Dosimetric factors but not clinical factors were found to be strongly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation plus surgery. The volume of the lung spared from doses of {>=}5 Gy was the only independent dosimetric factor in multivariate analysis. This suggests that ensuring an adequate volume of lung unexposed to radiation might reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications.

Wang Shulian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu, Helen [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swisher, Stephen [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology and Digestive Disease, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2006-03-01

131

Unanticipated complication of a malpositioned central venous catheter  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report an unusual complication that occurred late in the postoperative period, due to a damaged and malpositioned peripherally\\u000a inserted central catheter (PICC) used for central venous pressure monitoring during esophagocoloplasty and for postoperative\\u000a parenteral nutrition. On the seventh postoperative day, the development of a leak from the neck wound coincided with the administration\\u000a of intravenous fluids via the PICC.

Pankaj Kundra; Bathala V. Sai Chandran; Kasturi S. V. K. Subbarao

2009-01-01

132

Postoperative Delirium  

PubMed Central

Delirium (acute confusion) complicates 15% to 50% of major operations in older adults and is associated with other major postoperative complications, prolonged length of stay, poor functional recovery, institutionalization, dementia, and death. Importantly, delirium may be predictable and preventable through proactive intervention. Yet clinicians fail to recognize and address postoperative delirium in up to 80% of cases. Using the case of Ms R, a 76-year-old woman who developed delirium first after colectomy with complications and again after routine surgery, the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of delirium in the postoperative setting is reviewed. The risk of postoperative delirium can be quantified by the sum of predisposing and precipitating factors. Successful strategies for prevention and treatment of delirium include proactive multifactorial intervention targeted to reversible risk factors, limiting use of sedating medications (especially benzodiazepines), effective management of postoperative pain, and, perhaps, judicious use of antipsychotics. PMID:22669559

Marcantonio, Edward R.

2013-01-01

133

Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

134

Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

Isohashi, Fumiaki, E-mail: isohashi@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mabuchi, Seiji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Maruoka, Shintaroh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Tadashi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

2013-03-01

135

Could routine saphenous vein ultrasound mapping reduce leg wound complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting?†  

PubMed Central

A best evidence topic was written in cardiothoracic surgery based on a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether ultrasound mapping of the long saphenous vein (LSV) might reduce leg wound complications by reducing unnecessary leg incisions due to poor quality veins. Altogether, 32 abstracts were identified from the search, from which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Surgical site infections can be extremely distressing for patients, and it is estimated that treating a surgical wound can cost up to £1554 each. Ultrasound mapping of the LSV has been reported to be an accurate way of assessing vein quality preoperatively, reducing unnecessary surgical dissection, theatre time and cost to both the patient and the health service. We identified four studies that showed that ultrasound scanning preoperatively could accurately predict the anatomy and quality of the LSV (correlation coefficient 0.87). One paper showed that ultrasound scanning reduced length of incision (P = 0.005), harvest time (P = 0.04) and hospital stay and reduced morbidity (although not statistically significant). However, one study found that it could not accurately predict vein wall changes. Evidence from the papers supports the use of preoperative ultrasound assessment of the saphenous vein. Benefits to the patient include a smaller scar, reduced harvest time and minimizing unnecessary incisions. PMID:23044343

Broughton, Jonathan David; Asopa, Sanjay; Goodwin, Andrew Timothy; Gildersleeve, Sue

2013-01-01

136

[Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography findings and postoperative neurological complications in 93 cases of CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass].  

PubMed

Between February 1994 and January 1997, 102 of the 146 patients treated by coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had undergone magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the brain and neck before the operation, and arterial stenosis or occlusion had been detected in 38 (36.9%) of them. Two of these patients had complicating severe calcification of the ascending aorta, and CABG was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Seven patients without stenotic lesions on MRA were also treated by CABG without CPB for other complications. In addition to the 102 patients one patient had been found to have occlusion of the left common carotid artery and poor enhancement of the distal portion, and as a result we switched from CABG to percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA). We enrolled 93 patients in this study excluding these 10 patients. The patients were distributed into the three groups according to the MRA findings. Group C = no stenotic lesions (58 patients). Group S = stenosis of < 70% (26 patients), Group SS = stenosis of > or = 70% (9 patients). Enhancement distal to the stenotic or occlusive lesions was good in all patients in group S and SS. We then examined them for the incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There were no significant differences among the three groups in regard to age, male/female ratio, or incidence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. In Group S, the incidence of diabetes was significantly higher than in the other Groups. The incidence of prior stroke was significantly higher and the number of coronary arteries affected was significantly larger in group SS than the other groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups with regard to intraoperative variables. The lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was 44.3 +/- 7.4 mmHg, 48.0 +/- 8.8 mmHg, 46.3 +/- 7.8 mmHg in Group C, S, and SS, respectively, In all groups the lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was below 50 mmHg. There were no significant differences among the three groups with regard to time to awaken and time to extubation. Two patients experienced transient conciousness disturbance after CABG, one in Group C, the other in Group SS, but no new lesions were detected by brain CT. Only one patient, in Group C. suffered a stroke and had a new lesion on brain CT a month after the operation. No strokes occurred in the perioperative period. In nine patients with good enhancement distal to the severe stenotic or occlusive lesion on MRA of the brain and neck the lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was below 50 mmHg, but there was no postoperative neurological complications due to the low perfusion pressure on CPB. The results of this study suggested that CABG with CPB can be performed safely in patients with good enhancement distal to the stenotic or occlusive lesions on MRA of the brain and neck. PMID:10037831

Koyama, T; Mochizuki, T; Mitsui, N; Marui, A

1998-12-01

137

Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity. While once thought to function primarily as a pro-  

E-print Network

Abstract Chronic, non-healing wounds are a major complication of diabetes and are characterized inflammation and cleave extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that are essential for proper wound healing, including fibronectin. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound

Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

138

Infl uence of yoga on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

After surgery, breast cancer patients experience particularly high levels of distress(1-4) manifested as anxiety, depression and anger due to the effects of surgery and the disease itself on life expectancy, physical appearance and sexual identity.(5) Furthermore, concerns regarding one's physical condition, postoperative recovery, hospital admissions, anticipating painful procedures, image problems, confronting cancer diagnosis and worries about survival and recovery can

Raghavendra M Rao; Nagendra H R; Nagarathna Raghuram; Vinay C; Chandrashekara S

139

Comparison of laparoscopic versus conventional open cryptorchidectomies on intraoperative and postoperative complications and duration of surgery, anesthesia, and hospital stay in horses.  

PubMed

Objective-To compare surgical preparation time, surgery and anesthesia times, hospitalization duration, and intra- and postoperative complications between laparoscopic and conventional open cryptorchidectomy in horses. Design-Retrospective cohort study. Animals-60 horses that underwent cryptorchidectomy. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed to identify horses that had undergone cryptorchidectomy from 1991 to 2012. Thirty horses that underwent laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy (case horses) were matched with 30 control horses that had undergone open cryptorchidectomy (ie, inguinal and parainguinal surgical approaches). Horses were matched according to history of previous surgery, testicle location, and type of closure following removal of an undescended unilateral testicle. Duration of surgery, surgical preparation and anesthesia times, hospitalization duration, and number of intra- and postoperative complications were compared between horses that underwent laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy versus open cryptorchidectomy. Comparisons were also made between horses in terms of whether there was a history of previous failed cryptorchidectomy or unknown location of testicle prior to surgery. Results-Horses that underwent laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy had significantly longer surgery and anesthesia times overall, compared with horses that underwent open cryptorchidectomy. No difference in surgery time was found between case and control horses that had a previous surgical attempt to remove an undescended testicle or in which the testicle location was unknown prior to surgery. Overall, horses undergoing laparoscopy had a nonsignificant increase in intraoperative complications, compared with control horses, and had significantly more postoperative complications. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Horses undergoing laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy had increased surgical preparation time, increased surgery and anesthesia times, and more postoperative complications, compared with horses undergoing open cryptorchictomy. Laparoscopy may be advantageous for a second attempt at cryptorchidectomy or if the testicle location is unknown prior to surgery. PMID:25835173

Cribb, Nicola C; Koenig, Judith; Sorge, Ulrike

2015-04-15

140

Postoperative Infectious Complications in Our Early Experience With Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia  

PubMed Central

Purpose The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate postoperative infectious complications (PICs) in our early experience with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) followed by mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of the clinical data for 90 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between February 2008 and March 2011. All patients were evaluated for the emergence of PICs, including prophylactic antibiotic administration (PAA) and the influence of the kind or duration of PAA on PIC. The details of cases with PICs were also examined. Results The patients' mean age was 71 years (range, 50 to 95 years), and their mean prostate volume was 60 mL (range, 2 to 250 mL). There were 7 cases (7.78%) with PICs; in detail, 3 patients were diagnosed with prostatitis, 2 with pyelonephritis, and 2 with epididymitis. Three patients had positive urine cultures: 1 had Serratia marcescens/Proteus mirabilis, 1 had S. marcescens, and 1 had Klebsiella pneumonia; only one case had urological sepsis. Our statistical data showed no significant differences between 2 or fewer days and 3 or more days of PAA and PIC occurrence. There was also no significant effect on PIC occurrence of sulbactam/ampicillin compared with other antibiotics. Conclusions The results of this retrospective study showed that PIC occurrence did not depend on the duration or the kind of PAA. Further prospective study is necessary for the evaluation and establishment of prophylactic measures for PICs. PMID:23526729

Tanaka, Kazushi; Haraguchi, Takahiro; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Muramaki, Mototsugu; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

2013-01-01

141

Elective use of intra-aortic balloon pump during aortic valve replacement in elderly patients to reduce postoperative cardiac complications.  

PubMed

This is a retrospective cohort study to determine if routine intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) placement prior to aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis without significant coronary artery stenosis reduces cardiac complications. Participants were patients aged ?70 years without significant coronary stenosis, who had severe aortic stenosis, and were undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement. Our primary endpoint was postoperative cardiac morbidity rate as a composite of the adverse cardiac events: elevated creatine kinase with muscle and brain subunits (CK-MB)/CK (>5%), fatal ventricular arrhythmias requiring therapy, or catecholamine index of >10. Eighteen patients had elective IABP insertion prior to surgery, and 16 patients had no planned IABP insertion. One patient died (5.6%) in the elective IABP group (P?=?1.0 compared with the non-IABP group). The overall rate of in-hospital death was 2.9% (1/34). In the non-IABP group, one patient had rescue IABP insertion after surgery (6.3%). The elective IABP group had a significantly lower cardiac morbidity rate than the non-IABP group (44.4 vs. 87.5%, respectively, P?=?0.013). According to multivariate analysis using a logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation value of >10% to define increased morbidity, elective IABP use significantly reduced cardiac morbidity (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.67; P?=?0.016). Additionally, the elective IABP group was more likely to show low CK-MB/CK than the non-IABP group (4.1?±?1.9% vs. 6.1?±?3.1%, respectively, P?=?0.026). We concluded that among elderly aortic valve replacement patients without significant coronary artery stenosis, elective IABP use may reduce the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. PMID:24256099

Nakahira, Junko; Sawai, Toshiyuki; Minami, Toshiaki

2014-06-01

142

Evaluation of procalcitonin as a biomarker of diagnosis, severity and postoperative complications in adult patients with acute appendicitis  

PubMed Central

Background: Delay in diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis (AA) results in an increased rate of perforation, postoperative morbidity, mortality and hospital length of stay. Several biochemical parameters including white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL6) and Procalcitonin (PCT) have been used to further improve the clinical diagnosis of AA. The aim of this study was to assess the value of procalcitonin as a predictor of diagnosis and severity of appendicitis in order to improve the clinical decision making, since other studies have been unable to demonstrate a diagnostic value for PCT elevation in acute appendicitis. Methods: One-hundred patients who underwent open appendectomy, including 75 men and 25 women with a mean age of 28 years were included in this study. Procalcitonin values were measured by an immunofluorescent method). Serum PCT>0.5 ng/ml was considered positive. The PCT serum values were measured in four different categories, including ?0.5ng/ml, 0.5-2 ng/ml, 2-10ng/ml and more than 10ng/ml. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of PCT level measurement for acute appendicitis diagnosis were 44% and 100% respectively. The value of PCT increased with the severity of appendicitis and also with the presence of peritonitis and infection, at the site of surgery. Conclusions: Procalcitonin measurement cannot be used as a diagnostic test for adult patients with acute appendicitis and its routine use in such patients is not cost effective and conclusive. Procalcitonin values can be used as a prognostic marker and predictor of infectious complications following surgery and it can help to carry out timely surgical intervention which is highly recommended in patients with PCT values more than 0.5ng/ml. PMID:25405116

Vaziri, Mohammad; Ehsanipour, Fahimeh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Tamannaie, Zeinab; Taghavi, Roohollah; Pishgahroudsari, Mohaddese; Jesmi, Fatemeh; Chaichian, Shahla

2014-01-01

143

Risk factors for postoperative complications after lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer in elderly patients at a single institution in China  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the postoperative complications after lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in elderly patients and to identify possible associated risk factors. Methods All patients aged 70 years or older who underwent pulmonary resection for NSCLC by either an open approach or by a thoracoscopic approach between January 2003 and December 2013 at our institution were reviewed. Postoperative events were divided into minor and major complications. Risk factors for complications were assessed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. A matched case-control study was performed to determine if the utilization of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for lung resection for NSCLC in elderly patients’ results in decreased complications compared with thoracotomy. Results During the study period, 476 consecutive patients (410 thoracotomy, 66 thoracoscopy) older than 70 years underwent resection for NSCLC. Postoperative complications occurred in 169 patients (35.5%) and the overall operative mortality was 2.3% (11 patients). Univariate predictors of complications included history of smoking (P=0.032), CCI scores ?3 (P<0.001), pneumonectomy (P=0.016), as well as the duration of surgery (P=0.003). After multiple logistic regression analysis, CCI scores ?3 [odds ratio (OR) =29.95, P<0.001], pneumonectomy (OR =2.26, P=0.029) and prolonged surgery (?180 min) (OR =1.93, P=0.003) remained the only independent risk factors. After matching based on age, gender, the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), pathologic stage, and the type of resection, there were 60 patients in each group. Patients had similar preoperative characteristics. A VATS approach resulted in a significantly lower rate of complications (25.0% vs. 43.3%, P=0.034) and a shorter median length of stay (19 days, range, 12 to 35 vs. 21 days, range, 13 to 38, P=0.013) compared with thoracotomy. Conclusions Pulmonary resection for NSCLC in patients older than 70 years shows acceptable morbidity and mortality. Postoperative complications are more likely to develop in patients with CCI scores ?3, those who undergo pneumonectomy, and those with a prolonged surgery. Thoracoscopic minimally invasive surgery for NSCLC in elderly patients is associated with fewer complications as well as a shorter hospital stay compared with thoracotomy. PMID:25276365

Pei, Guotian; Zhou, Shijie; Han, Yi

2014-01-01

144

A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

2014-01-01

145

Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Shulian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2006-11-01

146

Postoperative Course After Emergency Colorectal Surgery for Secondary Peritonitis in the Elderly Is Often Complicated by Delirium  

PubMed Central

Postoperative delirium, morbidity, and mortality in our elderly patients with secondary perionitis of colorectal origin is described. This is a chart-based retrospective analysis of 63 patients who were operated on at the University Hospital Basel from April 2001 to May 2004. Postoperative delirium occurred in 33%. Overall morbidity was 71.4%. Surgery-related morbidity was 43.4%. Mortality was 14.4%. There was no statistical significance between delirium, morbidity and mortality (P ?=? 0.279 and P ?=? 0.364). There was no statistically significant correlation between the analyzed scores (American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, Mannheimer Peritonitis Index, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score II, physiological and operative surgical severity and enumeration of morbidity and mortality score‚ or short ‚cr-POSSUM’) and postoperative delirium, morbidity or mortality. Postoperative delirium occurred in one-third of the patients, who seem to have a trend to higher morbidity. Even if the different scores already had proven to be predictive in terms of morbidity and mortality, they do not help the risk stratification of postoperative delirium, morbidity, or mortality in our collective population. PMID:23102078

Engelberger, Stephan; Zürcher, Manuel; Schuld, Jochen; Viehl, Carsten Thomas; Kettelhack, Christoph

2012-01-01

147

A multivariate analysis to assess the effect of packed red cell transfusion and the unit age of transfused red cells on postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries  

PubMed Central

Background: Transfusion of blood components and age of transfused packed red cells (PRCs) are independent risk factors for morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgeries. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined data of patients undergoing cardiac surgery at our institute from January 1, 2012 to September 30, 2012. Details of transfusion (autologous and allogenic), postoperative length of stay (PLOS), postoperative complications were recorded along with other relevant details. The analysis was done in two stages, in the first both transfused and nontransfused individuals and in the second only transfused individuals were considered. Age of transfused red cells as a cause of morbidity was analyzed only in the second stage. Results: Of the 762 patients included in the study, 613 (80.4%) were males and 149 (19.6%) were females. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors like the number and age of transfused PRCs and age of the patient had significant bearing upon the morbidity. Morbidity was significantly higher in the patients transfused with allogenic PRCs when compared with the patients not receiving any transfusion irrespective of the age of transfused PRCs. Transfusion of PRC of over 21 days was associated with higher postoperative complications, but not with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, allogenic blood transfusion increases morbidity. The age of PRCs transfused has a significant bearing on morbidity, but not on in-hospital mortality. Blood transfusion services will therefore have to weigh the risks and benefits of providing blood older than 21 days in cardiac surgeries. PMID:25722566

Makroo, Raj Nath; Hegde, Vikas; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Arora, Bhavna; Rosamma, N.L; Thakur, Uday Kumar

2015-01-01

148

Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT. PMID:24106562

Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

2013-01-01

149

Alterations in plasma soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (sFlt-1) concentrations during coronary artery bypass graft surgery: relationships with post-operative complications  

PubMed Central

Background Plasma concentrations of sFlt-1, the soluble form of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF), markedly increase during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery with extracorporeal circulation (ECC). We investigated if plasma sFlt-1 values might be related to the occurrence of surgical complications after CABG. Methods Plasma samples were collected from the radial artery catheter before vascular cannulation and after opening the chest, at the end of ECC just before clamp release, after cross release, after weaning from ECC, at the 6th and 24th post-operative hour. Thirty one patients were investigated. The presence of cardiovascular, haematological and respiratory dysfunctions was prospectively assessed. Plasma sFlt-1 levels were measured with commercially ELISA kits. Results Among the 31 investigated patients, 15 had uneventful surgery. Patients with and without complications had similar pre-operative plasma sFlt-1 levels. Lowered plasma sFlt-1 levels were observed at the end of ECC in patients with haematological (p = 0.001, ANOVA) or cardiovascular (p = 0.006) impairments, but not with respiratory ones (p = 0.053), as compared to patients with uneventful surgery. Conclusion These results identify an association between specific post-CABG complication and the lower release of sFlt-1 during ECC. sFlt-1-induced VEGF neutralisation might, thus, be beneficial to reduce the development of post-operative adverse effects after CABG. PMID:18423019

Denizot, Yves; Leguyader, Alexandre; Cornu, Elisabeth; Laskar, Marc; Orsel, Isabelle; Vincent, Christelle; Nathan, Nathalie

2008-01-01

150

Measuring alterations in intra-abdominal pressure during abdominoplasty as a predictive value for possible postoperative complications.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to measure the changes in Intra-Abdominal Pressure (IAP) during abdominoplasty and the relevance of these changes to the immediate postoperative recovery period. Eighteen patients (17 females and one male) who underwent abdominoplasty for aesthetic reasons participated in the study. The data collected included measurements of height, weight, and measurements of the intra-urinary bladder pressure prior to surgery, immediately post operative, and 18-24 hours postoperative. Changes in tidal volume and ventilation pressures were also measured prior to surgery and immediately postoperative. The weight of the excised tissue ranged between 1150 g-6500 g with an average of 2700 g. Three patients had significant diasthesis recti repair during surgery. In these patients the measured intra-vesicular pressure was above 24 cm of H(2)O by the end of the operation and above 20 cm of H(2)O the day following surgery. Two out of the three patients were treated with anticoagulants and the symptoms subsided within a week. The third patient recovered spontaneously by the third day. In conclusion, patients with an intra-urinary bladder pressure above 20 cm of H(2)O following abdominoplasty were felt to be at significant risk for development of respiratory distress in the immediate postoperative period. PMID:12140697

Talisman, Ran; Kaplan, Baruch; Haik, Josef; Aronov, Stanislav; Shraga, Arkadi; Orenstein, Arie

2002-01-01

151

Efficacy of Postoperative Transarterial Chemoembolization and Portal Vein Chemotherapy for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicated by Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis—a Randomized Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The aim of this single, randomized study was to explore the efficacy of postoperative transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)\\u000a and portal vein chemotherapy (PVC) for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated by portal vein tumor thrombosis\\u000a (PVTT) and to evaluate prognostic factors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The study cohort consisted of 112 patients with HCC and PVTT randomly divided into three groups: Group A (37 patients),

Q. Li; J. Wang; Y. Sun; Y. L. Cui; J. T. Juzi; H. X. Li; B. Y. Qian; X. S. Hao

2006-01-01

152

[Surgical complications in kidney transplantation].  

PubMed

Kidney transplantation has become the treatment of choice for patients with end stage renal disease since it offers an excellent quality of life. Moreover, the economic impact is considerable, particularly beyond the first year. Indeed, the annual cost of a successful renal transplantation is ten fold lower than haemodialysis. But surgical complications remain one of our main concerns. Surgical complications are various. They may be non-specific as haematomas, incision-induced hernias and wound infections. They may also be directly related to the procedure as vascular thrombosis and urinary fistula in the early postoperative period or arterial stenosis and ureteral obstruction in the late post-operative period. The accurate diagnosis and the appropriate management of these complications are the most important tasks for the surgical team. This review is based upon our experience in kidney transplantation and upon the medical published data. PMID:18457318

Karam, G; Maillet, F; Braud, G; Battisti, S; Hétet, J F; Glémain, P; Le Normand, L; Bouchot, O; Rigaud, J

2007-12-01

153

Prospective Study of Postoperative Complications After Total Thyroidectomy for Multinodular Goiters by Surgeons With Experience in Endocrine Surgery  

PubMed Central

Objetives: (1) To show that total thyroidectomy (TT) can be performed in multinodular goiter (MG) by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery with a definitive complication rate of 1% or less; and (2) to analyze the risk factors for complications in these patients. Summary Background Data: There is current controversy over the role of TT in the treatment of MG; although there are potential benefits, high rates of complications are not acceptable in surgery for a benign pathology. Patients and Method: A prospective study was conducted on 301 MGs meeting the following criteria: (1) bilateral MG; (2) no prior cervical surgery; (3) operation by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery; (4) no associated parathyroid pathology; (5) no initial thoracic approach; and (6) minimum follow-up of 1 year. Age, sex, time of evolution, symptoms, cervical goiter grade, intrathoracic component, thyroid weight, and presence of associated carcinoma were analyzed as risk factors for complications. The ?2 test and a logistic regression analysis were applied. Results: Complications were presented by 62 patients (21%), corresponding to 29 hypoparathyroidisms, 26 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries, 4 lesions of the superior laryngeal nerve, 3 cervical hematomas, and 1 infection of the cervicotomy. The variables associated with the presence of these complications were hyperthyroidism (P = 0.0033), compressive symptoms (P = 0.0455), intrathoracic component (P = 0.0366), goiter grade (P = 0.0195), and weight of excised specimen (P = 0.0302); hyperthyroidism (relative risk [RR] 2.5) and intrathoracic component (RR 1.5) persisted as independent risk factors. Definitive complications appeared in 3 patients (1%), corresponding to 2 hypoparathyroidisms and 1 recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Two cases corresponded to a toxic goiter, and the third to an intrathoracic goiter with compressive symptoms. Conclusion: In endocrine surgery units, TT can be performed for MG with a definitive complication rate of around 1%; the main independent risk factors for the development of complications are hyperthyroidism and goiter size. PMID:15213613

Zambudio, Antonio Ríos; Rodríguez, José; Riquelme, Juan; Soria, Teresa; Canteras, Manuel; Parrilla, Pascual

2004-01-01

154

Postoperative pain: nurses' knowledge and patients' experiences.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding postoperative pain and identify postoperative patients' pain intensity experiences. The assessment and management of acute postoperative pain is important in the care of postoperative surgical patients. Inadequate relief of postoperative pain can contribute to postoperative complications such as atelectasis, deep vein thrombosis, and delayed wound healing. A pilot study with an exploratory design was conducted at a large teaching hospital in the eastern United States. The convenience samples included 31 nurses from the gastrointestinal and urologic surgical units and 14 first- and second-day adult postoperative open and laparoscopic gastrointestinal and urologic patients who received patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain was used to measure nurses' knowledge about pain management. The Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) was used to measure patients' pain intensity. The nurses' mean score on the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain was 69.3%. Patients experienced moderate pain, as indicated by the score on the SF-MPQ. There is a need to increase nurses' knowledge of pain management. PMID:24315258

Francis, Lavonia; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

2013-12-01

155

Perioperative complications of total ankle arthroplasty.  

PubMed

A retrospective radiographic and chart review was performed for the initial 50 patients who underwent Agility (DePuy, Warsaw IN) total ankle arthroplasty by the senior author (M.S.M.). The review focused on the perioperative complications of nerve or tendon lacerations, intraoperative fractures, acute deep infections, wound complications and component positioning. Major wound complications were defined as those requiring a soft-tissue coverage procedure. Minor wound complications did not require soft tissue coverage and included wound breakdowns, wound edge necrosis, and superficial infections. The immediate mortise and lateral postoperative radiographs were reviewed to measure component positioning. The patients were divided into two groups to compare the initial 25 patients (Group A) with the subsequent 25 patients (Group B). There were no major wound complications in either group. Minor wound complications decreased from six in Group A to two in Group B. There were four lacerations (flexor hallucis longus, posterior tibial tendon, deep peroneal nerve, and superficial peroneal nerve), all occurring in Group A. Five patients sustained intraoperative fractures in Group A, as compared with two fractures in Group B. The number of components varying greater than 4 degrees from neutral as measured by the lateral talar, lateral tibial and mortise tibial component angles decreased by 9% from Group A to Group B. The only tibial component to be placed in more than 4 degrees of valgus occurred in Group A. It seems that a notable learning curve exists in the performance of total ankle arthroplasty as demonstrated by a comparison of the initial 25 patients with the subsequent 25 patients performed by one orthopaedic surgeon. This improvement most likely resulted from the use of enhanced techniques and further training with the prosthesis. This information can be used as a teaching tool to decrease the incidence of complications for surgeons performing their initial arthroplasties with this potentially technically demanding procedure. PMID:12540076

Myerson, Mark S; Mroczek, Kenneth

2003-01-01

156

Subjective outcome, neurophysiological investigations, postoperative complications and recurrence rate of partial medial epicondylectomy in cubital tunnel syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical outcome with subjective and neurophysiological parameters following partial\\u000a medial epicondylectomy (pME) and to evaluate complications and recurrence rates. A retrospective analysis was performed in\\u000a 29 patients (18 males and 11 females) with cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS) who underwent pME. Mean time follow-up was 41.4 months.\\u000a For subjective parameters, DASH (Disabilities of

Saskia M. Schnabl; Franziska Kisslinger; Axel Schramm; Adrian Dragu; Ulrich Kneser; Frank Unglaub; Raymund E. Horch

2011-01-01

157

In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Objective To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Methods Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. Results With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. Conclusions It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated. PMID:23569962

Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

2012-01-01

158

Postoperative vascular complications in unrecognised Obstructive Sleep apnoea (POSA) study protocol: an observational cohort study in moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Introduction Emerging epidemiological data suggest that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general surgical population. Unfortunately, the majority of these patients are unrecognised and untreated at the time of surgery. There is substantial biological rationale to indicate that patients with unrecognised OSA are at a higher risk of postoperative vascular events. However, the extent of this morbidity is currently unknown. We have initated the postoperative vascular complications in the unrecognised obstructive sleep apnoea (POSA) study to determine the associations between OSA, nocturnal hypoxia and major postoperative vascular events in 1200 moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis The POSA study is an international prospective observational cohort study. Using a type 3 portable sleep monitoring device and ambulatory oximetry, we will quantify the severity of OSA. The primary outcome is a composite of vascular death, myocardial infarction; non-fatal cardiac arrest; stroke; pulmonary embolism; congestive heart failure and new arrhythmia within 30?days of surgery. As of November 2013, we have recruited over 700 patients from nine centres in six countries. The mean age is 68?years, the mean body mass index is 27?kg/m2 and 55% of patients are men. 27.9% of patients have known coronary artery disease, over 76% have diabetes. The majority of patients underwent orthopaedic surgery (28%) and colorectal resection (18.5%). Ethics and dissemination The POSA study has received ethics approval from all study sites before patient recruitment. Informed consent will be obtained from all patients. The POSA study will determine the risk of unrecognised OSA in major non-cardiac surgery. We will publish these findings in peer-reviewed journals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01494181 PMID:24413351

Chan, Matthew T V; Wang, Chew-Yin; Seet, Edwin; Tam, Stanley; Lai, Hou-Yee; Walker, Stuart; Short, Timothy G; Halliwell, Richard; Chung, Frances

2014-01-01

159

Phacoemulsification with a blow-out fracture in the early postoperative period.  

PubMed

An 81-year-old woman had uneventful phacoemulsification through a self-sealing clear corneal wound. The postoperative course was complicated by a fall 10 days after surgery during which she hit her face on the carpet with sufficient force to cause an orbital floor blow-out fracture. Despite the blow, the corneal wound remained intact. As well as the advantage of rapid visual rehabilitation, sutureless corneal wounds provide a secure incision that has the ability to avoid leakage and iris prolapse despite great forces that may be applied to them. PMID:12498866

Teenan, David W; Saunders, David C

2002-12-01

160

[Some aspects of surgical treatment of postoperative ventral hernia].  

PubMed

The results of surgical treatment of of 392 patients with postoperative ventral hernia are discussed. The algorithm of treatment of patients with large hernias was developed. Special preoperative management by dosed pneumocompression in an antioverload costume makes it possible to avoid menacing complications after the operation, which are caused by increased intraabdominal pressure. Test for tolerance to increase of intraabodominal pressure allowed prognostication of the character of the operative intervention: with or without decrease of the volume of the abdominal cavity (autoplasty or alloplasty, respectively). Prevention of wound complications consisted in control of infection, improvement of operative techniques, and use of modern surgical instruments. The prevention of recurrent hernias should be directed at correct choice of the method of plastics and removal of wound complications. PMID:7745938

Lukomski?, G I; Shulutko, A M; Antropova, N V; Moiseev, A Iu; El-Said, A Kh

1995-01-01

161

Postoperative anatomic and pathologic findings at CT following gastrectomy.  

PubMed

Helical computed tomography (CT) is useful in identifying postoperative anatomic changes, complications, and tumor recurrence in gastric cancer patients who have undergone gastrectomy. Postoperative anatomic changes can usually be identified on consecutive CT scans. Complications include anastomotic leakage, duodenal stump leakage, intraabdominal bleeding, wound complications, and other less common complications (postoperative pancreatitis, retention of surgical foreign bodies, diffuse peritonitis). The degree and extent of bowel wall thickening is important in diagnosing tumor recurrence; however, CT lacks specificity. Large or conglomerated lymph node metastases can be easily diagnosed at CT; however, small solitary or focal metastases may not be detected or differentiated from nonmetastatic nodes. Ascites, a common finding with peritoneal seeding in gastrointestinal tumors, is well depicted at CT. Hematogenous metastases from gastric carcinoma are most frequently seen in the liver and are best demonstrated with helical CT performed during the portal venous phase of enhancement (sensitivity >90% for the detection of lesions >1 cm). The sophisticated surgical procedures used in gastrectomy can alter normal anatomy and make image interpretation difficult; thus, familiarity with the appearance of postoperative anatomic changes, complications, and tumor recurrence is essential for accurate CT evaluation of affected patients. PMID:11896222

Kim, Kyoung Won; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Lee, Min Woo

2002-01-01

162

Alcoholic Chlorhexidine or Alcoholic Iodine Skin Antisepsis (ACAISA): protocol for cluster randomised controlled trial of surgical skin preparation for the prevention of superficial wound complications in prosthetic hip and knee replacement surgery  

PubMed Central

Introduction Wound complications following arthroplasty are associated with significant impact on the patient and healthcare system. Skin cleansing prior to surgical incision is a simple and effective method to prevent wound complications however, the question of which agent is superior for surgical skin antisepsis is unresolved. Methods and analysis This cluster randomised controlled trial aims to compare the incidence of superficial wound complications in patients undergoing elective prosthetic hip or knee replacement surgery receiving surgical skin antisepsis with either: 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone in 70% alcohol. The trial will be conducted at an Australian tertiary, university affiliated hospital over a 3-year period involving 750 participants. Participants will be drawn from the surgical waiting list. Consent for this study will be ‘opt-out’ consent. On a given day, all eligible participants will have skin preparation either with 0.5% chlorhexidine in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone iodine in 70% alcohol. The primary outcome is superficial wound complications (comprised of superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSI) and/or prolonged wound ooze) in the first 30?days following prosthetic joint replacement surgery. Secondary outcomes will include the incidence of wound complications according to the joint replaced, assessment of the causative agents of SSI and cost-effectiveness analysis. The primary analysis is an intention-to-treat analysis including all participants who undergo randomisation and will be performed at the individual level taking into account the clustering effect. Ethics and dissemination The study design and protocol was reviewed and approved by the St Vincent's Hospital Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC-A 016/14 10/3/2014). Study findings will be disseminated in the printed media, and learned forums. A written lay summary will be available to study participants on request. Trial registration number The trial has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000177651. PMID:24833699

Peel, T N; Cheng, A C; Buising, K L; Dowsey, M M; Choong, P F M

2014-01-01

163

A comparison of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing in the prediction of postoperative cardiac complications in patients requiring arterial reconstruction  

SciTech Connect

The individual and combined predictive values of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and exercise testing were compared in a prospective study of 70 patients who had abdominal aortic aneurysms or aortoiliac occlusive disease that required surgical repair. All patients were evaluated clinically by the same cardiologist and had exercise stress testing and dipyridamole-thallium imaging before admission for surgery. Ten patients were excluded from the study because they had evidence of severe ischemia when tested (ST segment depression greater than 2 mm on exercise testing, severe multivessel disease on thallium imaging). The remaining 60 patients were operated on (abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, 40; aortobifemoral repair, 17; femorofemoral graft, 3). The test results were withheld from the surgeon, anesthetist, and cardiologist before surgery. A total of 22 patients experienced major cardiac complications postoperatively (acute pulmonary edema, 17; acute myocardial infarction, 5; cardiac death, 2). Thallium imaging showed myocardial ischemia in 31/60 patients. Exercise testing was positive (greater than or equal to 1 mm ST segment depression) in 10/60 patients. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging with a high sensitivity and reasonable specificity is the initial test of choice. Exercise testing is a poor screening test because of its low sensitivity. The combination of the two tests gives the highest positive predictive value and the greatest likelihood ratio. Thus patients assessed initially and found to have positive thallium scan results may be further stratified by exercise testing.

McPhail, N.V.; Ruddy, T.D.; Calvin, J.E.; Davies, R.A.; Barber, G.G.

1989-07-01

164

The nutritional risk is a independent factor for postoperative morbidity in surgery for colorectal cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose The authors evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition and its effect on the postoperative morbidity of patients after surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods Three hundred fifty-two patients were enrolled prospectively. Nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS 2002) score was calculated through interview with patient on admission. Clinical characteristics, tumor status and surgical procedure were recorded. Results The prevalence of patients at nutritional risk was 28.1 per cent according to the NRS 2002. The rate of postoperative complication was 27%. There was a significant difference in postoperative complication rates between patients at nutritional risk and those not at risk (37.4% vs. 22.9%, P = 0.006). Nutritional risk was identified as an independent predictor of postoperative complications (odds ratio, 3.05; P = 0.045). Nutritional risk increased the rate of anastomotic leakage (P = 0.027) and wound infection (P = 0.01). Conclusion NRS may be a prognostic factor for postoperative complication after surgery for colorectal cancer. A large scaled prospective study is needed to confirm whether supplementing nutritional deficits reduces postoperative complication rates. PMID:24783180

Kwag, Seung-Jin; Kim, Jun-Gi; Kang, Won-Kyung; Lee, Jin-Kwon

2014-01-01

165

Wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting is accelerated with the use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent applied to silver nylon wound contact dressings.  

PubMed

Wound healing after graft closure of excised burn wounds is a critical factor in the recovery process after thermal injury. Processes that speed time to stable wound closure should lead to improved outcomes, shorter lengths of hospital stays, and decreased complications. A randomized clinical trial to test the ability of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application to silver nylon wound contact dressings was designed. Time for wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting was observed. Thirty patients with full-thickness thermal burns were randomized into two groups. The control group received postoperative dressing care using moistened silver nylon fabric covered with gauze after tangential burn wound excision and split-thickness skin grafting. The study group received an identical protocol with the addition of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application. Time to 95% wound closure was measured using digital photography. The digital photographs were evaluated by a burn surgeon blinded to the patient's randomization. An independent t-test was used to analyze the data. The study group experienced a 36% reduction in time to wound closure (mean of 4.6 days) as compared to the control group (mean of 7.2 days). This was statistically significant at a P value of <.05. The use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent decreased time to wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting. PMID:17667128

Huckfeldt, Roger; Flick, A Bart; Mikkelson, Debbie; Lowe, Cindy; Finley, Phillip J

2007-01-01

166

Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications in Patients With and Without an Obstruction Who Had Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer and Underwent a Single-Stage Operation After Mechanical Bowel Preparation  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare postoperative complications for single-stage surgery after mechanical bowel preparation in patients who experienced obstruction and those who did not. Methods From 2000 to 2011, 1,224 patients underwent a single-stage operation for left colorectal cancer after bowel preparation. Nonobstruction (NOB) and obstruction (OB) colorectal cancer patients were 1,053 (86.0%) and 171 (14.0%), respectively. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were compared between groups. Results The OB group had poor preoperative conditions (age, white blood cell, hemoglobin, albumin level, and advanced tumor stage) compared with the NOB group (P < 0.05). Mean on-table lavage time for the OB group was 17.5 minutes (range, 14-60 minutes). Mean operation time for the OB group was statistically longer than that of the NOB group (OB: 210 minutes; range, 120-480 minutes vs. NOB: 180 minutes; range, 60-420 minutes; P < 0.001). Overall morbidity was similar between groups (NOB: 19.7% vs. OB: 23.4%, P = 0.259). Major morbidity was more common in the OB group than in the NOB group, but the difference was without significance (OB: 11.7% vs. NOB: 7.6%, P = 0.070). Postoperative death occurred in 16 patients (1.3%), and death in the OB group (n = 7) was significantly higher than it was in the NOB group (n = 9) (4.1% vs. 0.9%, P = 0.001). Twelve patients had surgical complications, which were the leading cause of postoperative death: postoperative bleeding in five patients and leakage in seven patients. Conclusion Postoperative morbidity for a single-stage operation for obstructive left colorectal cancer is comparable to that for NOB, regardless of poor conditions of the patient. PMID:25580411

Jung, Sang Hun

2014-01-01

167

Effects of intra-operative end-tidal carbon dioxide levels on the rates of post-operative complications in adults undergoing general anesthesia for percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background: A retrospective study has shown lesser days of hospital stay in patients with increased levels of intra-operative end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2). It is probable that hypercapnia may exert its beneficial effects on patients’ outcome through optimization of global hemodynamic and tissue oxygenation, leading to a lower rate of post-operative complications. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that higher values of intra-operative ETCO2 decrease the rate of post-operative complications. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 78 adult patients scheduled for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) were prospectively enrolled and randomly divided into three groups. ETCO2 was set and maintained throughout the procedure at 31-33, 37-39 and 43-45 mmHg in the hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia groups, respectively. The rates of post-operative complications were compared among the three groups. Results: Seventy-five patients completed the study (52 male and 23 female). Ten (38.5%), four (16%) and two (8.3%) patients developed post-operative vomiting in the hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia groups, respectively (P = 0.025). The nausea score was significantly lower in the hypercapnic group compared with the other groups (3.9 ± 1.8, 3.2 ± 2.1 and 1.3 ± 1.8 in the hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia groups, respectively; P = 0.000). Time to return of spontaneous respiration and awakening were significantly decreased in the hypercapnia group compared with the other groups (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Mild intra-operative hypercapnia has a protecting effect against the development of post-operative nausea and vomiting and decreases the duration of emergence and recovery from general anesthesia. PMID:24761392

Saghaei, Mahmoud; Matin, Gholamreza; Golparvar, Mohammad

2014-01-01

168

A prospective study of wound infections after laparotomy in obstetrics and gynaecology department.  

PubMed

Postoperative wound infection is of great importance to both surgeon and patient. All surgeons know that postoperative wound infection means morbidity, anxiety, longer hospitalization, higher cost; not to forget the embarrassment to the surgeons. However, it is still a common surgical complication despite other advances in modern medicine. This study was conducted to find out the incidence of postoperative wound infection and to survey the risk factors for wound infection in obstetrics and gynaecology department of Nepal medical college teaching hospital (NMCTH). A prospective study of all the cases with infected wound after laparotomy and lower segment cesarean section done in NMCTH in obstetrics and gynaecology department was carried out in this study from Chaitra 2068 to Falgun 2069. The frequency of wound infection was 5.87%. Most of the wound infection after lower segment cesarean section occurred in emergency cases (16 out of 19). Seventy percent of patients had preoperative hospital stay range of 0-2 days whereas the range was 3-18 days for the rest 30%. The range of blood loss was 150-300 ml in nearly 75.7 % of patients. Duration of operation was 1-2 hours in 89.2% cases. Only 48.6% of wound infection was identified within 8th postoperative day. Number of infected cases getting prophylactic antibiotic was 25 (67.6%). BMI was >25 in 62.2% of patients. Type of skin incision was pfannenstiel in 94.6%. Skin was closed subcuticularly with vicryl no. 1 in 81.1%. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in swab culture in 24.3%. Resuturing was required in 18.9% of cases. PMID:24579531

Suwal, A; Shrivastava, V R; Giri, A

2012-12-01

169

Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in the prevention of postoperative infectious complications and sub-optimal recovery from operation in patients with colorectal cancer and increased preoperative risk (ASA 3 and 4)¶ Protocol of a controlled clinical trial developed by consensus of an international study group¶ Part three: individual patient, complication algorithm and quality management¶  

Microsoft Academic Search

General design: Presentation of a new type of a study protocol for evaluation of the effectiveness of an immune modifier (rhG-CSF, filgrastim): prevention of postoperative infectious complications and of sub-optimal recovery from operation in patients with colorectal cancer and increased preoperative risk (ASA 3 and 4). A randomi- sed, placebo controlled, double-blinded, single-centre study

B. Stinner; A. Bauhofer; W. Lorenz; M. Rothmund; U. Plaul; A. Torossian; I. Celik; H. Sitter; M. Koller; A. Black; D. Duda; A. Encke; B. Greger; H. van Goor; E. Hanisch; R. Hesterberg; K. J. Klose; F. Lacaine; R. H. W. Lorijn; C. Margolis; E. Neugebauer; P. O. Nyström; P. H. M. Reemst; M. Schein; J. Solovera

2001-01-01

170

Factors independently associated with complications and length of stay after hip arthroplasty: analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.  

PubMed

By analysis of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we identified factors associated with postoperative complications and increased hospital stay after total hip arthroplasty in 4281 patients. There was a minor complication rate of 2.7%, a major complication rate of 4.2%, and a mortality rate of 0.26% within 30 days of the procedure. After adjusted analysis, obesity, preoperative anemia, and longer operative time were all associated with wound complications. Preoperative anemia, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists class, and prolonged operative time were associated with development of a major complication. A predischarge major complication resulted in an increased length of stay of 6.248 days (±0.286, P < .0001). One in 25 hip arthroplasty patients developed a major postoperative complication, and 1 in 16, a medical complication after elective hip arthroplasty. PMID:22810006

O'Malley, Natasha T; Fleming, Fergal J; Gunzler, Douglas D; Messing, Susan P; Kates, Stephen L

2012-12-01

171

Vacuum-assisted therapy accelerates wound healing in necrotizing soft tissue infections: our experience in two intravenous drug abuse patients.  

PubMed

Negative pressure wound therapy using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) devices is currently a well established technique for managing complicated wounds. Such wounds occur after aggressive surgical debridement for necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI). In this report we present our experience in two intravenous drug abusers managed with VAC for NSTIs. The patients were 25 and 34 years old, HCV positive and presented with oedema of the upper femoral compartments and concomitant severe sepsis. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed severe cellulitis, fluid collection and necrosis of the affected fasciae and muscles. After emergent and subsequent aggressive surgical debridement during the first 48h, the VAC device was applied. Both patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course and a fast recovery from their multiorgan dysfunction. Suture closure of the wounds was achieved at the 25th and 38th postoperative days respectively and patients were discharged without any motor deficit. Negative pressure wound therapy is a modern therapeutic modality for treating complicated infected wounds. Moreover, it accelerates wound healing and primary closure, facilitating patient ambulation and recovery. A dedicated medical and nursing team is an important prerequisite for a successful outcome. PMID:24335462

Marinis, Athanasios; Voultsos, Mavroudis; Grivas, Paraskevas; Dikeakos, Panagiotis; Liarmakopoulos, Emmanouil; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Rizos, Spyros

2013-12-01

172

Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

2014-01-01

173

[Classification of complications of combined injuries of abdominal organs and long tubular bones in traffic accidents].  

PubMed

The outcomes of treatment of 386 victims with abdominal trauma and fractures of the long tubular bones were studied. The authors systematized the typical complications developing after the trauma, both on the part of the injured organs of the abdominal cavity and true pelvis and the fractures of the long tubular bones. This allowed the developed complications to be divided according to time into early, late, and sequelae of trauma. The early complications of injuries to the organs of the abdomen and true pelvis are as follows: suppuration of postoperative wounds, postoperative wound dehiscence with or without eventration, recurrent intracavitary hemorrhage, progressing local peritonitis, incompetence of anastomoses, intestinal obstruction, abdominal abscesses and infiltrates, abscesses and infiltrates in the true pelvis, intestinal paresis, large hematomas, phlegmons of the anterior abdominal wall. The late complications are: sluggish wounds of the anterior abdominal wall, formation of ligature fistulas, postoperative ventral hernias, suppuration of intraorganic and interstitial hematomas, subclinical forms of sepsis and sepsis, thrombophlebitic complications, chronic venous insufficiency, persistent wounds, and other complications. The sequelae of injury to the organs of the abdominal cavity and true pelvis are: intestinal fistulas, functional intestinal disorders, gastric disease, the dumping syndrome, cicatricial changes of the anterior abdominal wall, posttraumatic disease, venous insufficiency, pneumosclerosis, chronic pneumonia, pulmonary emphysema, chronic vascular insufficiency, etc. The early complications in fractures of long tubular bones in the group of studied patients: suppuration of osteomuscular wounds, recurrent displacement of bone fragments, bone necrosis in open type IIIC, IIID fractures, gangrene of the limb consequent upon crushing of skin and subcutaneous tissue, subluxations, secondary subluxations of limbs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1469878

Popov, I F; Berezka, N I; Gnedushkin, Iu N; Iavdak, A K

1992-01-01

174

Vacuum-assisted closure of necrotic and infected cranial wound with loss of dura mater: A technical note  

PubMed Central

Background: Complex cranial wounds can be a problematic occurrence for surgeons. Vacuum-assisted closure devices have a wide variety of applications and have recently been used in neurosurgical cases involving complex cranial wounds. There is only one report regarding the use of a vacuum-assisted closure device with loss of dura mater. We report a complicated case of a necrotic cranial wound with loss of dura mater. Case Description: A 68-year-old female underwent an evacuation of a subdural hematoma. Postoperatively, the patient developed a wound infection that required removal of the bone flap. The wound developed a wedge-shaped necrosis of the scalp with exposure of brain tissue due to loss of dura mater from previous surgeries. She underwent debridement and excision of the necrotic tissue with placement of a synthetic dural graft (Durepair®, Medtronic, Inc.) and placement of a wound vac. The patient underwent a latissismus dorsi muscle flap reconstruction that subsequently failed. After the wound vac was replaced, the synthetic dural graft was replaced with a fascia lata graft and an anterolateral thigh free flap reconstruction. We describe the technical nuances of this complicated case, how the obstacles were handled, and the literature that discusses the utility. Conclusion: We describe a case of a complex cranial wound and technical nuances on how to utilize a wound-vac with loss of dura mater. PMID:25657864

Ahmed, Osama; Storey, Christopher M.; Zhang, Shihao; Chelly, Marjorie R.; Yeoh, Melvin S.; Nanda, Anil

2015-01-01

175

[Principles of wound treatment].  

PubMed

New techniques and devices have revolutionized the treatment of wounds during the last years. For the treatment of wounds we have nowadays a great variety of new gadgets, tools and methods. Complex wounds require specific skills, given the fact that a great number of different promising methods are on the market to enable an optimal wound management. Well educated "wound experts" are required to overcome the problems of very complicated and chronic wound problems. The importance of an interdisciplinary team increases while facing the problems of special wound disorders such as a diabetic food, food ulcers or the problems of open abdomen in case of severe peritonitis. In this overview the main principles of modern wound treatment are outlined. The aim of this article is to present a good summary of wound judgement and treatment for the practioner. Increasingly important is it to point out the situation of complexe wounds which should be judgded and treated with the help of a "wound expert". PMID:18075140

Bruhin, A; Metzger, J

2007-09-01

176

miRNA in Diabetic Wound Healing  

Cancer.gov

Impairment of dermal wound healing is a debilitating complication commonly encountered during diabetes mellitus. Dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenesis phases are key players in the impairment of diabetic wound healing. Emerging studies indicate that miRNAs play a key role in regulating several hubs that orchestrate the wound inflammation and angiogenesis processes. Our laboratory first reported dysfunction in wound macrophage efferocytosis function leading to impaired resolution of wound inflammation in diabetic wounds.

177

Management of chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia with life-threatening complications under negative pressure wound therapy and isolation of Helcococcus kunzii.  

PubMed

We report the case of an 86-year-old man with severe wound infection originating from a chronic crural ulcer of the lower limb, which under negative pressure wound therapy led to excessive tissue necrosis and perforation of the anterior tibial artery. A swab taken 10 and 7?days preoperatively was positive for Helcococcus kunzii. H. kunzii has been described as a potentially pathogenic organism. The questions whether the negative pressure wound therapy itself caused the bleeding or the negative pressure wound therapy, which generates an anaerobic atmosphere, has triggered the growth and invasion of the facultative anaerobic bacterium H. kunzii and owing to the infection the artery perforated or whether the bacteria has no influence at all remain currently unanswered. After surgical debridement the signs of infection were completely eliminated, and a free musculocutaneous flap led to rapid healing of the wound. Following which H. kunzii was no longer detectable. PMID:23855685

Stanger, Katrin M; Albert, Frauke; Kneser, Ulrich; Bogdan, Christian; Horch, Raymund

2013-07-16

178

Obesity and Surgical Wound Healing: A Current Review  

PubMed Central

Objective. The correlation between obesity and deficient wound healing has long been established. This review examines the current literature on the mechanisms involved in obesity-related perioperative morbidity. Methods. A literature search was performed using Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Internet searches. Keywords used include obesity, wound healing, adipose healing, and bariatric and surgical complications. Results. Substantial evidence exists demonstrating that obesity is associated with a number of postoperative complications. Specifically in relation to wound healing, explanations include inherent anatomic features of adipose tissue, vascular insufficiencies, cellular and composition modifications, oxidative stress, alterations in immune mediators, and nutritional deficiencies. Most recently, advances made in the field of gene array have allowed researchers to determine a few plausible alterations and deficiencies in obese individuals that contribute to their increased risk of morbidity and mortality, especially wound complications. Conclusion. While the literature discusses how obesity may negatively affect health on various of medical fronts, there is yet to be a comprehensive study detailing all the mechanisms involved in obesity-related morbidities in their entirety. Improved knowledge and understanding of obesity-induced physiological, cellular, molecular, and chemical changes will facilitate better assessments of surgical risks and outcomes and create efficient treatment protocols for improved patient care of the obese patient population. PMID:24701367

Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Dinh, Trish Phuong; Salas, R. Emerick; Johnson, Erika L.; Wright, Terry G.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

2014-01-01

179

[Errors in wound management].  

PubMed

Chronic ulcers have adverse effects on the patient quality of life and productivity, thus posing financial burden upon the healthcare system. Chronic wound healing is a complex process resulting from the interaction of the patient general health status, wound related factors, medical personnel skill and competence, and therapy related products. In clinical practice, considerable improvement has been made in the treatment of chronic wounds, which is evident in the reduced rate of the severe forms of chronic wounds in outpatient clinics. However, in spite of all the modern approaches, efforts invested by medical personnel and agents available for wound care, numerous problems are still encountered in daily practice. Most frequently, the problems arise from inappropriate education, of young personnel in particular, absence of multidisciplinary approach, and inadequate communication among the personnel directly involved in wound treatment. To perceive them more clearly, the potential problems or complications in the management of chronic wounds can be classified into the following groups: problems mostly related to the use of wound coverage and other etiology related specificities of wound treatment; problems related to incompatibility of the agents used in wound treatment; and problems arising from failure to ensure aseptic and antiseptic performance conditions. PMID:25326993

Filipovi?, Marinko; Novinscak, Tomislav

2014-10-01

180

Intravitreal fluorinated gas preference and occurrence of rare ischemic postoperative complications after pars plana vitrectomy: a survey of the american society of retina specialists.  

PubMed

Objective. To perform a survey of the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) regarding the use of vitreous cavity fluorinated gas as an adjunct to pars plana vitrectomy for retinal detachment or macular hole repair. Methods. A multiple-choice online questionnaire was administered to members of ASRS. Physician experience, gas preference for vitrectomy, and categorical estimate of observation of blinding postoperative ischemic events were recorded. Results. 282 questionnaires were completed. Mean years in vitreoretinal practice were 15 ± 10. A decrease in yearly vitrectomy volume was associated with increased number of years in practice (P = 0.011). Greater than 95% of respondents preferred fluorinated gas to air alone for both retinal detachment and macular hole repair. 38% of respondents reported at least one observation of a blinding ischemic postoperative event. Overall estimated incidence of blinding postoperative ischemic event was 0.06 events/year in practice. Conclusions. Currently, C3F8 and SF6 are the postoperative gas preference for ASRS respondents, in contrast to previous North American surveys. The occurrence of blinding ischemic events appears unrelated to number of years in practice, was reported by less than half of those surveyed, and has occurred at an infrequent rate of approximately once for every ten years of practice for those observing the phenomena. PMID:22997567

Sigler, Eric J; Randolph, John C; Charles, Steve; Calzada, Jorge I

2012-01-01

181

A clinical study comparing BIVAP saline vaporization of the prostate with bipolar TURP in patients with prostate volume 30 to 80 mL: Early complications, physiological changes and postoperative follow-up outcomes  

PubMed Central

Introduction: We compare BIVAP saline vaporization of the prostate with bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Methods: In total, we included 86 patients treated with BIVAP (n = 44) and bipolar TURP (n = 42). The inclusion criteria were maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) ?10 mL/s, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) ?16, and prostate volume measured with transrectal ultrasound scan between 30 and 80 mL. Serum electrolyte, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels were determined preoperatively and postoperatively. All patients were evaluated at the postoperative first and third months and the IPSS score, post-void residual urinary volume (PVR), Qmax, and average urinary flow rate (Qave) were compared. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 16.0 program and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: Preoperative demographic characteristics were similar in the 2 groups. The mean operation time was significantly higher (p = 0.02) and hospitalization time was significantly lower (p = 0.04) in the BIVAP group when compared to the bipolar TURP group. There was no significant difference between 2 groups in terms of preoperative and postoperative serum electrolyte, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Postoperative complication rates were similar in the 2 groups. The only exception was the rate of severe dysuria, which was significantly higher in the BIVAP group. No statistical difference was noted between the groups in terms of postoperative follow-up results. Conclusion: Bipolar TURP is a safe and highly effective technique which can be used in the surgical treatment of benign prostatic obstruction with minimal side effects. BIVAP saline vaporization of the prostate seems to be a potential alternative to bipolar TURP with shorter hospitalization time. PMID:25132894

Aydogdu, Ozgu; Karakose, Ayhan; Atesci, Yusuf Ziya

2014-01-01

182

The accelerating effect of negative pressure wound therapy with Prevena™ on the healing of a closed wound with persistent serous secretion.  

PubMed

Negative pressure wound therapy has been lately used on closed incisions in the immediate postoperative period to accelerate wound healing. However, there are no data in the literature regarding the use of this type of therapy for wounds with persistent secretion in the early postoperative care. We present the first report of persistent postoperative serous wound secretion in a patient after femoral nailing treated successfully with Prevena™ (KCI), a closed incision negative pressure management system (CINPWT). PMID:24393137

Altintas, Burak; Biber, Roland; Brem, Matthias H

2014-01-01

183

Perineal resuturing versus expectant management following vaginal delivery complicated by a dehisced wound (PREVIEW): protocol for a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Each year, approximately 350?000 women in the UK experience perineal suturing following childbirth. For those women whose perineal wound dehisces, the management will vary according to individual practitioner's preferences. For most women, the wound will be managed expectantly (healing by secondary intention), whereas others may be offered resuturing. However, there is limited scientific evidence and no clear guidelines to inform best practice. PREVIEW is a two-part study aiming to identify the best management strategy for dehisced perineal wounds, in terms of clinical effectiveness and women's preferences. Methods/design The main part of this study is a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial designed to provide preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of resuturing versus expectant management for dehisced perineal wounds following childbirth and to feed into the design and feasibility of a larger definitive trial. 144 participants will be randomly allocated to either intervention. The primary outcome is the proportion of women with a healed perineal wound at 6–8?weeks from the trial entry. Secondary outcomes include perineal pain, breast feeding rates, dyspareunia and women's satisfaction with the aesthetic results of the wound healing at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months post randomisation. Information will be collected using validated questionnaires. The second part of this study will be to conduct semistructured interviews with 12 study participants, aiming to capture information relating to their physical and psychological experiences following perineal wound dehiscence, assess the acceptability of the research plan and ensure that all outcomes relevant to women are included in the definitive trial. Dissemination The results of this study will inform a definitive randomised controlled trial that will provide conclusive evidence of what is the best management of perineal wound dehiscence. This will potentially lead to significant improvements in perineal care and will help to reduce the short- and long-term morbidity experienced by women. Clinical trials registration PREVIEW is registered with the International Standard Research for Clinical Trials (no: ISRCTN05754020) and adopted as a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Reproductive Health and Childbirth specialty group portfolio study UKCRN ID 9098. PMID:22833651

Kettle, Christine; Carter, Pamela; Thomas, Peter; Ismail, Khaled M

2012-01-01

184

New approach in surgical management of complicated umbilical hernia in the cirrhotic patient with ascites.  

PubMed

A total of 23 consecutive patients operated upon on emergency basis for the treatment of complicated umbilical hernias associated with liver cirrhosis and ascites. The hernia was complicated by strangulation in 11 and ascitic fluid leak in twelve of the patients. Patients were assigned randomly in two groups. In the first group (GI, n = 12) peritoneal drainage at the conclusion of their surgery was done but no drainage was applied in the second group (GII, n=12). All patients were operated upon and when closed system peritoneal drainage was done, it was brought to outside of the abdomen through a separate stab. No negative pressure was applied. The main outcome measures were postoperative wound healing, control of ascites, complications, and hernia recurrence rate at follow up. The male/female ratio, Child's class, ascites severity, and mode of hernia complication were almost matched in both groups. Postoperative wound dehiscence occurred in four patients in G II (23.5%) but in none of GI. Control of ascites was achieved in all patients of GI. The overall mean hospital stay was significantly lower in-patient of GI than those of the G II (P < 0.0 1). Recurrences of the hernia occurred in one patient only of the G I and in three of the G II on a mean follow- up of 19+/-3 months. So, postoperative closed peritoneal drainage in the management of complicated umbilical hernias associated with liver cirrhosis and ascites safe and effective in assuring postoperative wound healing, control of ascites and the prevention of hernia recurrence. It is specifically indicated in cases with bowel resection anastomosis and in patients with low preoperative serum albumin and history of rapid ascites re-accumulation under medical therapy. PMID:17366867

Elsebae, Magdy M A; Nafeh, Ayman I; Abbas, Mohamed; Farouk, Youssef; Seyam, Moatz; Raouf, Emad Abdel

2006-08-01

185

Postoperative fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uncomplicated major surgery is followed by a pronounced increased feeling of fatigue extending throughout the first month in about one-third of patients. Postoperative fatigue correlates with the degree of surgical trauma but is not related to duration of general anesthesia and surgery or to preoperative nutritional status, age, or sex. Fatigue also correlates with postoperative deterioration in nutritional parameters and

Tom Christensen; Henrik Kehlet

1993-01-01

186

JAMA Patient Page: Wound Infections  

MedlinePLUS

... through punctures (like a nail or a thorn), abrasions (scrapes or scratches), or lacerations (rips in the ... increases risk for infection by organisms that are resistant to antibiotics COMPLICATIONS OF WOUND INFECTIONS • Death of ...

187

Pre-operative long saphenous vein mapping predicts vein anatomy and quality leading to improved post-operative leg morbidity.  

PubMed

Long saphenous vein harvesting for coronary bypass surgery is associated with significant morbidity. Furthermore, vein quality is often variable sometimes requiring incisions in both legs. This prospective randomised control study assessed the usefulness of pre-operative long saphenous vein mapping in terms of conduit quality and location, incision lengths and post-operative morbidity. The long saphenous vein was assessed and mapped pre-operatively (n=31) by venous Doppler ultrasound or not (n=30). The size and anatomical distribution of the long saphenous vein was well predicted by the ultrasound study (correlation coefficient=0.87). Intra-operatively, the mean length of leg wound incision per vein graft performed was significantly less in the mapped group [16.8 (4.0) vs. 24.1 (10.4) cm, P=0.005]. This translated in a shorter operative time for vein harvesting per length of vein graft needed [36 (13) vs. 47 (17) min, P=0.04]. Post-operatively there was a tendency to less leg wound complications in the mapped group (P=0.08) and earlier hospital discharge (median length of stay 6.5 days vs. 8.0 days, P=0.05). Thus, long saphenous vein mapping pre-operatively predicted the size and anatomy of the vein appropriately. This led to a selective leg wound incision and reduced operative time with the benefit of reduced leg complication post-operatively. PMID:18203766

Luckraz, Heyman; Lowe, Julie; Pugh, Neil; Azzu, Ahmed A

2008-04-01

188

Strategies to reduce deep sternal wound infection after bilateral internal mammary artery grafting.  

PubMed

Deep sternal wound infections (DSWI) continue to be an infrequent but potentially devastating complication after cardiac surgical procedures. Its prevalence is more after coronary artery bypass grafting using single internal mammary artery (IMA) graft. Bilateral internal mammary artery (BIMA) harvesting carries a higher risk of sternal infection than harvesting single IMA. Several risk factors have been identified with sternal wound infections and a few are modifiable. Strategies that reduce DSWI target the modifiable risk factors that include microbiological factors, appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis, tight glycemic control. Surgical strategies to reduce DSWI following BIMA harvest include techniques of IMA harvesting with lesser devascularization of sternum using skeletonized, semiskeletonized and modified pedicle harvest are associated with greater preservation of sternal blood supply and sternal closure and stability techniques. The various strategies to minimize sternal wound infections during preoperative, intra and postoperative periods are summarized in this article. PMID:25463763

Sajja, Lokeswara Rao

2014-11-18

189

Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

2014-01-01

190

Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds  

SciTech Connect

The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

1983-10-01

191

The enhanced healing of a high-risk, clean, sutured surgical incision by prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™: cosmetic and therapeutic results.  

PubMed

According to the literature, incisional closure complications may range from postoperative surgical site infections, representing 17-22% of health care-associated infections, surgical wound dehiscence and formation of haematomas or seromas, and can lead to delayed or impaired incision healing. These kinds of situations are more common when wounds are closed under tension or in specific patient morbidities. Obesity, in particular, is associated with an impaired blood flow to tissues, predisposing the patient to increased risk of wound complications by various mechanisms. Incisional complications can become relevant economic burdens for health care systems because of an increase in the average length of hospital stay and readmissions, and additional medical and surgical procedures. Thus, a preventive therapy may have a critical role in the management of healing. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) technology as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™ (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) has recently been the focus of a new investigation, as a prophylactic measure to prevent complications via immediate postoperative application in high-risk, clean, closed surgical incisions. The authors present a 62-year-old class II obese female, who underwent bilateral inguinal dermolipectomy. Prophylactic NPWT as delivered by Prevena™ was performed successfully over surgical incisions. Cosmetic and therapeutic results are shown. PMID:25234139

Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Calamita, Roberto; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Pierangeli, Marina; Grassetti, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

2015-04-01

192

Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery  

PubMed Central

Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials – one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery – show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:276–84. PMID:24352756

Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

2013-01-01

193

Postoperative pain management  

PubMed Central

Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

2015-01-01

194

Sternal plate fixation for sternal wound reconstruction: initial experience (Retrospective study)  

PubMed Central

Background Median sternotomy infection and bony nonunion are two commonly described complications which occur in 0.4 - 5.1% of cardiac procedures. Although relatively infrequent, these complications can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the initial experience of a transverse plate fixation system following wound complications associated with sternal dehiscence with or without infection following cardiac surgery. Methods A retrospective chart review of 40 consecutive patients who required sternal wound reconstruction post sternotomy was performed. Soft tissue debridement with removal of all compromised tissue was performed. Sternal debridement was carried using ronguers to healthy bleeding bone. All patients underwent sternal fixation using three rib plates combined with a single manubrial plate (Titanium Sternal Fixation System®, Synthes). Incisions were closed in a layered fashion with the pectoral muscles being advanced to the midline. Data were expressed as mean ± SD, Median (range) or number (%). Statistical analyses were made by using Excel 2003 for Windows (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA). Results There were 40 consecutive patients, 31 males and 9 females. Twenty two patients (55%) were diagnosed with sternal dehiscence alone and 18 patients (45%) with associated wound discharge. Thirty eight patients went on to heal their wounds. Two patients developed recurrent wound infection and required VAC therapy. Both were immunocompromised. Median post-op ICU stay was one day with the median hospital stay of 18 days after plating. Conclusion Sternal plating appears to be an effective option for the treatment of sternal wound dehiscence associated with sternal instability. Long-term follow-up and further larger studies are needed to address the indications, benefits and complications of sternal plating. PMID:21529357

2011-01-01

195

Utility of the Omentum in the Reconstruction of Complex Extraperitoneal Wounds and Defects  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine donor-site complications after omental harvest for the reconstruction of extraperitoneal wounds and defects. Summary Background Data The omentum, with its immunologic and angiogenic properties, is a versatile organ with well-documented utility in the reconstruction of complex wounds and defects. However, the need for laparotomy and the potential for intraabdominal complications have been cited as relative contraindications to the use of the omentum as a reconstructive flap. Further, few series have assessed long-term results, and no reports have focused on donor-site complications. Methods Patients who underwent reconstruction of extraperitoneal defects with the omentum at a single university healthcare system were identified by searching discharge databases and office records. Charts were reviewed to determine patient demographics, surgical indications and technique, postoperative complications, and outpatient follow-up. Patients with donor-site complications were compared with patients who had no complications using the Student t test and chi-square analysis. Statistical significance was defined at P < .05. Results From 1975 to 2000, the authors successfully harvested 135 omental flaps (64 pedicled, 71 free transfer) for reconstruction of the following defects: scalp (n = 16), intracranial (n = 1), orbitofacial (n = 33), neck (n = 8), upper extremity (n = 7), lower extremity (n = 4), intrathoracic (n = 3), sternal (n = 34), breast (n = 3), chest wall (n = 18), abdominal wall (n = 1), and perineal (n = 7). Donor-site complications in 25 patients (18.5%) included abdominal wall infection (n = 9), fascial dehiscence (n = 8), symptomatic hernia (n = 8), unplanned reexploration (n = 6), postoperative ileus (n = 3), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (n = 2), delayed splenic rupture (n = 1), gastric outlet obstruction (n = 1), and late partial small bowel obstruction (n = 1). Factors associated with increased donor-site complications included the use of pedicled flaps (compared with free tissue transfer), mediastinitis, advanced age, and pulmonary failure. Of note, 53 patients had undergone previous abdominal surgery; of these, 26 patients required extensive adhesiolysis and 4 patients sustained enterotomies. Eleven patients (8.1%) had partial flap loss and three patients (2.2%) had total flap loss. Mean length of stay was 28 days. Average follow-up was 2.4 years. The death rate was 5.9%. Conclusions The omentum can be safely harvested and reliably used to reconstruct a diverse range of extraperitoneal wounds and defects. Donor-site complications can be significant but are usually limited to abdominal wall infection and hernia. Risk factors associated with complications include the use of pedicled flaps, mediastinitis, and pulmonary failure. This low rate of donor-site complications strongly supports the use of the omentum in the reconstruction of complex wounds and defects. PMID:12035034

Hultman, C. Scott; Carlson, Grant W.; Losken, Albert; Jones, Glyn; Culbertson, John; Mackay, Gregory; Bostwick, John; Jurkiewicz, M. J.

2002-01-01

196

[Smoking in postoperative period].  

PubMed

Smokers have an elevated risk of perioperative respiratory distress and of transfer to intensive care. Tobacco smoke substantially alters the healing process and constitutes a documented risk factor for postoperative complications (anastomotic leakage, delayed healing etc.). Risk of postoperative infection is also higher in smokers. When patients stop smoking 6 to 8 weeks before surgery, the incidence of complications related to tobacco smoke drops nearly to zero. Even stopping for a short period reduces the risk of complications, although the benefits of stopping increase with length of time. Preoperative smoking cessation should take place as early as possible. The general practitioner and the surgeon both have essential roles to play. Identification of smokers must be accompanied by measures to help the patient stop smoking, including advice, and if necessary, nicotine substitutes. Anxiety levels are higher in smokers than nonsmokers. Nonetheless smoking cessation for hospitalization does not increase these levels, even without nicotine substitutes. There is no interaction between anesthetic agents and nicotine substitutes: the latter may be continued through the morning of surgery and reinitiated in the immediate postoperative period. Patients who stop smoking for surgery should be encouraged to continue to stop, permanently. The general practitioner's support is essential for this. PMID:16783265

Dureuil, Bertrand; Dautzenberg, Bertrand; Masquelet, Alain-Charles

2006-06-01

197

Delayed Complications after Anterior Craniofacial Resection of Malignant Skull Base Tumors  

PubMed Central

Objective?To report complications occurring at least 6 months after completion of treatment for patients with anterior skull base malignancy undergoing anterior craniofacial resection (CFR). Design?Retrospective review of medical records of all patients undergoing traditional CFR for treatment of anterior skull base malignancy from 2002 through 2011. Setting?Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Cranial Base Center. Participants?Thirty-one consecutive patients who had at least 18 months of follow-up for analysis were reviewed. All patients underwent traditional CFR. A total of 28 patients received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy. Eleven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Main Outcome Measures?A delayed complication was any complication occurring at least 6 months after the completion of treatment. Results?Seventeen patients had delayed complications. Orbital complications were the most common type (13 patients) followed by issues with wound healing (6 patients). The most common orbital complication was epiphora (7 patients). The most common wound complication was a nasocutaneous fistula (5 patients). Conclusions?Patients with anterior skull malignancy can develop complications months to years after the completion of treatment. Therefore, it is important to continue to follow and report complications for several years when deciding on the optimal approach for treatment of these patients. PMID:24719797

Gray, Stacey T.; Lin, Alice; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Busse, Paul; Sanan, Akshay; Deschler, Daniel G.; Lin, Derrick T.

2013-01-01

198

Delayed complications after anterior craniofacial resection of malignant skull base tumors.  

PubMed

Objective?To report complications occurring at least 6 months after completion of treatment for patients with anterior skull base malignancy undergoing anterior craniofacial resection (CFR). Design?Retrospective review of medical records of all patients undergoing traditional CFR for treatment of anterior skull base malignancy from 2002 through 2011. Setting?Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Cranial Base Center. Participants?Thirty-one consecutive patients who had at least 18 months of follow-up for analysis were reviewed. All patients underwent traditional CFR. A total of 28 patients received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy. Eleven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Main Outcome Measures?A delayed complication was any complication occurring at least 6 months after the completion of treatment. Results?Seventeen patients had delayed complications. Orbital complications were the most common type (13 patients) followed by issues with wound healing (6 patients). The most common orbital complication was epiphora (7 patients). The most common wound complication was a nasocutaneous fistula (5 patients). Conclusions?Patients with anterior skull malignancy can develop complications months to years after the completion of treatment. Therefore, it is important to continue to follow and report complications for several years when deciding on the optimal approach for treatment of these patients. PMID:24719797

Gray, Stacey T; Lin, Alice; Curry, William T; Barker, Fred G; Busse, Paul; Sanan, Akshay; Deschler, Daniel G; Lin, Derrick T

2014-04-01

199

Infection in conflict wounded  

PubMed Central

Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

2011-01-01

200

[Colostomies in gunshot wounds of the large intestine].  

PubMed

The frequency and indications to colostoma formation are shown that were performed during the recent military conflicts in 40-70% of the wounded with large intestinal injuries. The authors state the indications to colostoma formation in the injuries of extra- and intra-abdominal parts of rectum and colon as well as the conditions when colostoma could be avoided. Different methods of colostoma formation and technical details are presented. In field surgery it is reasonable to apply the more simple methods. The operation defects, colostoma complications, measures of their prevention and treatment are discussed in details. The authors distinguish the complications developed in the early postoperative periods and colostoma diseases having independent significance and which become manifestative in 2-3 months after operation. PMID:11561429

Petrov, V P; Efimenko, N A; Mikha?lova, E V

2001-07-01

201

Investigating the relationship between intra-operative electrolyte abnormalities (sodium and potassium) with post-operative complications of coronary artery bypass surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Generally, the electrolyte abnormalities are seen in many hospitalized patients, and this problem increases in ones with heart diseases. The purpose of this study is determination of the prevalence of electrolyte abnormalities during the coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) and detecting the relationship between these abnormalities with the complications after the surgeries. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, which is done in Chamran hospital, the medical and educational center of Isfahan, Iran, in 2011. The target population included the patients who have undergone CABG in this hospital. In this study, 100 patients who had been candidates for CABG were selected, and we extracted their recorded intra-operative electrolyte information. The collected data was entered into the computer and analyzed by SPSS software. The Chi-square and t student tests were used for data analysis. Results: The mean ± SD of sodium during CABG was 137.95 ± 4.6 (range 127-152) mg\\dl. Also, the mean ± SD of potassium was 4.65 ± 0.9 (range: 2.9-7.4). According to these results, 48 patients (48% of all) had electrolyte imbalance and 52 patients (52% of all) were normal. Sodium level in 71% of patients was normal, and in 29% of them was abnormal. Potassium level in 73% of individuals was normal, and in 27% of them was abnormal. Conclusion: Giving an attention to electrolyte abnormalities in patients who have undergone CABG surgery is a considerable necessity for them, and sufficient arrangements are needed to prevent such abnormalities. PMID:24520549

Bagheri, Kaivan; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Kashefi, Parviz; Ghasemi, Marziye; Mohammadinia, Leila

2013-01-01

202

Skin substitutes based on allogenic fibroblasts or keratinocytes for chronic wounds not responding to conventional therapy: a retrospective observational study.  

PubMed

Chronic wounds are an expression of underlying complex pathologies and have a high incidence. Skin substitutes may represent an alternative approach to treat chronic ulcers. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to evaluate the wound reduction using skin substitutes based on allogenic fibroblasts or keratinocytes in 30 patients not responding to conventional therapy. Wound bed was prepared, then keratinocytes on Laserskin(®) to treat superficial wounds or fibroblasts on Hyalograft 3D(R) to treat deep leg ulcers were applied, and finally wounds were treated with a secondary dressing composed of nanocrystalline silver. Once a week constructs were removed and new bioengineered products were applied, as well as nanocrystalline silver medication. In none of the cases under examination did any complications arise relating to the treatment. We also achieved a reduction in wound dimension and exudates, and an increase in wound bed score. Postoperative assessment shows a degree of healing that is statistically higher in the group treated with keratinocytes as compared with the fibroblast group. This retrospective study improves our understanding and defines the clinical indications for the various uses of the two types of skin substitutes. PMID:24517418

Pajardi, Giorgio; Rapisarda, Vicenzo; Somalvico, Francesco; Scotti, Andrea; Russo, Giulia Lo; Ciancio, Francesco; Sgrò, Arturo; Nebuloni, Manuela; Allevi, Raffaele; Torre, Maria L; Trabucchi, Emilio; Marazzi, Mario

2014-02-12

203

Complication Rates of the 720 Video-Assisted Minilaparotomy Living Donor Nephrectomies: Supplementing Clavien Classification  

PubMed Central

Purpose Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN) has been reported to be as safe and effective as open surgery. We systematically evaluated the safety of video-assisted minilaparotomy surgery-living donor nephrectomy (VAMS-LDN) with use of the modified Clavien classification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed complications in 720 cases of VAMS-LDN conducted in our institute from 2003 to 2010 by use of the modified Clavien classification of surgical complications. Results The mean age of the donors was 39.3 years (range, 16 to 66 years) and their mean body mass index was 23.3 kg/m2 (range, 15.8 to 36.4 kg/m2). A total of 67 complications occurred (9.3%). Based on the modified Clavien classification, grade 1, 2a, and 2b complications occurred in 49 (6.8%), 16 (2.2%), and 2 (0.3%) of the donors, respectively. Most grade 1 complications involved mild vascular injuries that were immediately repaired with polypropylene sutures during the surgery. These did not cause any postoperative problems. The other grade 1 complications were wound dehiscence, not requiring secondary closure, and wound site pain in 11 (1.5%) and 5 (0.7%) cases, respectively. Grade 2a complications occurred in 16 (2.2%) cases: 9 (1.3%) involved postoperative transfusions and 1 (0.1%) involved a renal fossa hematoma. One grade 2b complication occurred; it was a lymphocele that resolved with placement of a pigtail catheter. No complications classified as grade 2c or worse occurred. Conclusions According to the present analysis of complications, VAMS-LDN is a safe procedure with complication rates comparable to those of LLDN as evaluated in previous studies. PMID:22323976

Jung, Ha Bum; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Yang, Seung Choul

2012-01-01

204

A rare case of isolated wound implantation of colorectal adenocarcinoma complicating an incisional hernia: case report and review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The reported case illustrates an instance of colonic adenocarcinoma presenting as an isolated tumour 3 1\\/2 years after open surgery. The presentation was in some respects unique as it was complicated by an incisional hernia and occurred in the anterior abdominal wall. A literature review was performed. CASE PRESENTATION: An 83 year old lady initially underwent an extended right

Aninda Chandra; Lester Lee; Fahad Hossain; Harnaik Johal

2008-01-01

205

Wound healing.  

PubMed

Wound healing is a dynamic biologic process of repairing insults to the integumentary system. It is commonly divided into three phases: inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation. Each phase has unique cellular and substance constituents without which it cannot progress normally. A large variety of factors may influence any part of wound healing, including local factors such as bacteria, oxygen tension, and bleeding, and systemic factors such as the mental and physical health of the patient. There are also extrinsic factors that can be influenced by the caretakers of the wound to enhance wound healing. Areas of intervention include using antiseptic technique when one is dealing with the wound, using good surgical technique, choosing the appropriate wounding method and repair for the individual patient, and using antibiotics and special wound dressings. Modern science and technology are giving us new insights into wound healing and leading us to exciting new ways of influencing it, including the topical use of growth factors, artificial skins, cultured epithelium with and without dermal components, and electrical stimulation. The future of wound healing holds a better understanding of the complexities of the physiologic events that occur and a translation of that into a biologically active and interactive wound care. PMID:7794680

Waldorf, H; Fewkes, J

1995-01-01

206

A rare complication of suprapubic catheterisation following pelvic reconstructive surgery for urinary incontinence  

PubMed Central

Suprapubic (SP) catheterisation is commonly used for drainage of the bladder following pelvic surgery. Although it is a widely employed procedure, it is not without complications, such as infection and blockage. The authors report a rare complication of SP catheterisation involving a persistent SP catheter site fistulous tract and an infected haematoma significantly complicating a patient’s postoperative course. Wound debridement, bladder drainage and a prolonged course of antibiotics were employed to successfully treat this complication. The exact mechanism of her complication is only speculative, however to our knowledge no similar cases of a fistula after removal of a SP catheter used for short-term bladder drainage have been reported. PMID:22962370

Liang, Tina; Lazare, Darren; Schulz, Jane; Flood, Cathy

2012-01-01

207

[Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].  

PubMed

Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described. PMID:23193824

Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

2012-10-01

208

Perioperative and postoperative morbidity after sacrocolpopexy according to age in Korean women  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed to compare perioperative and postoperative morbidity of older and younger women undergoing sacrocolpopexy (SCP). Methods A retrospective study included 271 patients who underwent laparotomic SCP for symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse from November 2008 to June 2013 at our institution. By the review of medical records, perioperative and postoperative data including the length of the surgery, estimated blood loss, blood transfusion, the length of hospital stay, wound complications and febrile morbidity were collected. In addition, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, or neurological adverse events were retrieved. The need for an indwelling urinary catheter or performance of clean intermittent self-catheterization, mesh erosion rate and the number of days required for each were included in the postoperative outcomes. For the outcome variable analyzed in this study, the patients was dichomotized into women aged 65 and older and those younger than 65. Results One hundred and thirty-five (49.8%) patients were younger than 65 and 136 (50.2%) were aged 65 and older. Older women had higher body mass index, vaginal parity and prior surgery for hysterectomy than younger women (P<0.05). And older women had higher baseline comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes, cardiac disease (P<0.05), and their American society of Anesthesiologist class was higher (P<0.001). In the perioperative and postoperative complication, older group showed no differences in most of the operation-related complication rates, but gastrointestinal complication rate. Also, mesh erosion rate was not found to be significantly different between the two groups at the last visit. Conclusion Older women undergoing laparotomic SCP have similar perioperative and postoperative morbidities as younger women, suggesting surgeons can counsel older and younger women similarly in terms of operative risks. PMID:25629020

Oh, Sumin; Shin, So Hyun; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Maria

2015-01-01

209

Complications after cryosurgery with new miniature cryoprobes in long hollow bones: An animal trial  

PubMed Central

Background In vitro studies show that new miniature cryoprobes are suitable for cryoablation of bone tissue. The aim of this animal trial on 24 sheep was to examine the perioperative complications, particularly the danger of embolism, of cryoablation when using miniature cryoprobes. Methods Cryoablations with 2 freeze-thaw cycles each were carried out in the epiphysis of the right tibia and the metaphysis of the left femur. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and central venous pressure (CVP) were measured. Throughout the intra- and perioperative phase, heart rate and oxygen saturation by pulse oxymetry, blood gas and electrolytes were monitored regularly. Postoperative complications were examined up to 24 weeks postoperativ. Results As result, no significant increase of PAP, CVP or heart rate were observed. Blood gases were unremarkable, with pO2 and pCO2 remaining constant throughout the operation. Regarding pH, standard bicarbonate and base excess, only a non-significant shift towards a slight acidosis was seen. There was a mean hemoglobin decrease of 0.5 g/dl. One animal showed postoperative wound infection and wound edge necrosis. No major peri- and postoperative complications associated with cryosurgery of bone were observed, especially regarding clinically relevant pulmonary embolism. Conclusion Surgery with new types of miniature cryoprobes appears to be a safe alternative to or a complement to conventional resection of abnormal bone tissue. PMID:16083509

Popken, Frank; Meschede, Peter; Erberich, Heike; Koy, Timmo; Bosse, Marfalda; Fischer, Jürgen H; Eysel, Peer

2005-01-01

210

Complications from micronutrient deficiency following bariatric surgery.  

PubMed

We report a case of clinically significant micronutrient deficiencies following biliary pancreatic diversion (BPD) surgery. Our patient was admitted to hospital six years after BPD surgery following a low impact humeral fracture complicated by postoperative wound infection. On presentation she complained of a widespread rash and loss of night vision. Laboratory testing confirmed hypoalbuminaemia, deficiencies of vitamins A, E and D and of the trace elements copper, zinc and selenium. Bone densitometry confirmed osteoporosis. The skin rash was thought to be due to zinc deficiency and improved with conservative measures and trace element replacement. Her night blindness resolved 48 hours after receiving high dose parenteral vitamin A. Six months later she was readmitted to our intensive care unit with wound dehiscence at her fracture site and clinical features of sepsis and encephalopathy. This case highlights the importance of devising treatment and follow-up guidance prior to surgery and multidisciplinary team involvement including the patient so that long-term metabolic complications are avoided. PMID:24847133

Wilson, Helen O; Datta, Dev Bn

2014-11-01

211

A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

2014-10-29

212

Cost and quality of life outcome analysis of postoperative infections after subaxial dorsal cervical fusions.  

PubMed

OBJECT Infections following spine surgery negatively affect patient quality of life (QOL) and impose a significant financial burden on the health care system. Postoperative wound infections occur at higher rates following dorsal cervical procedures than ventral procedures. Quantifying the health outcomes and costs associated with infections following dorsal cervical procedures may help to guide treatment strategies to minimize the deleterious consequences of these infections. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine the cost and QOL outcomes affecting patients who developed deep wound infections following subaxial dorsal cervical spine fusions. METHODS The authors identified 22 (4.0%) of 551 patients undergoing dorsal cervical fusions who developed deep wound infections requiring surgical debridement. These patients were individually matched with control patients who did not develop infections. Health outcomes were assessed using the EQ-5D, Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and visual analog scale (VAS). QOL outcome measures were collected preoperatively and after 6 and 12 months. Health resource utilization was recorded from patient electronic medical records over an average follow-up of 18 months. Direct costs were estimated using Medicare national payment amounts, and indirect costs were based on patients' missed workdays and income. RESULTS No significant differences in preoperative QOL scores were found between the 2 cohorts. At 6 months postsurgery, the noninfection cohort had significant pre- to postoperative improvement in EQ-5D (p = 0.02), whereas the infection cohort did not (p = 0.2). The noninfection cohort also had a significantly higher 6-month postoperative EQ-5D scores than the infection cohort (p = 0.04). At 1 year postsurgery, there was no significant difference in EQ-5D scores between the groups. Health care-associated costs for the infection cohort were significantly higher ($16,970 vs $7658; p < 0.0001). Indirect costs for the infection cohort and the noninfection cohort were $6495 and $2756, respectively (p = 0.03). Adjusted for inflation, the total costs for the infection cohort were $21,778 compared with $9159 for the noninfection cohort, reflecting an average cost of $12,619 associated with developing a postoperative deep wound infection (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Dorsal cervical infections temporarily decrease patient QOL postoperatively, but with no long-term impact; they do, however, dramatically increase the cost of care. Knowledge of the financial burden of wound infections following dorsal cervical fusion may stimulate the development and use of improved prophylactic and therapeutic techniques to manage this serious complication. PMID:25615630

Kuhns, Benjamin D; Lubelski, Daniel; Alvin, Matthew D; Taub, Jason S; McGirt, Matthew J; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

2015-04-01

213

Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two methods of securing skin grafts using negative pressure wound therapy: vacuum-assisted closure and gauze suction.  

PubMed

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionized the management of complicated wounds and has contributed an additional modality for securing split thickness skin grafts (STSG). The standard for NPWT is the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device. The authors' institution has accumulated experience using standard gauze sealed with an occlusive dressing and wall suction (GSUC) as their primary mode for NPWT. The authors report a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of the GSUC vs the VAC in securing STSG. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in 157 wounds in 104 patients requiring STSG from August 2009 to July 2012. All wounds were randomized to VAC or GSUC treatment and assessed for skin graft adherence/take. At postoperative day 4 or 5, NPWT was discontinued, and the size of the graft and any nonadherent areas were measured and recorded. Concomitant comorbidities, wound location, etiology, study failures, and reoperative rates were also reviewed. In all, 77 and 80 wounds were randomized to the GSUC and VAC study arms. Patient demographics were similar between both groups in terms of age, sex, comorbidities, etiology, and wound location. In all, 64 of 80 wounds in the GSUC group and 60 of 77 wounds in the VAC group had full take of the skin graft by postoperative day 4 or 5 (P = .80). The mean percent take in the GSUC group was 96.12% vs 96.21% in the VAC arm (P = .98). The use of NPWT in securing STSG is a useful method to promote adherence and healing. This study demonstrates that a low-cost, readily accessible system utilizing gauze dressings and wall suction (GSUC) results in comparable skin graft take in comparison to the VAC device. PMID:25162948

Nguyen, Trang Q; Franczyk, Mieczyslawa; Lee, Justine C; Greives, Matthew R; O'Connor, Annemarie; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

2015-01-01

214

Effect of immediate postoperative portable radiographs on reoperation in primary total knee arthroplasty.  

PubMed

Cost-containment strategies are of increasing importance in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Obtaining immediate postoperative radiographs following primary TKA is common practice, but their usefulness is controversial. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate postoperative radiographs on reoperation within 60 days, assess film quality, and determine the cost associated with these radiographs. Using a billing registry at the authors' institution, the number of TKAs performed from 2000 to 2011 was determined. Of those, the authors determined which had undergone reoperation within 60 days. They evaluated those who had immediate postoperative radiographs following their primary TKA, and determined those who had been reoperated on as a result of information obtained from these radiographs. Of 6603 patients who underwent primary TKA from 2000 to 2011, 136 (2%) underwent reoperation within the first 60 days. The causes leading to reoperation were arthrofibrosis, infection, wound-healing complications, and hematoma. Of the 136 who underwent reoperation, 76 had immediate postoperative radiographs. None of them underwent reoperation as a result of findings noted in the radiographs. Of the radiographs reviewed, only 43% were deemed adequate by predetermined criteria. The results of the current study demonstrate that these radiographs do not affect the decision for reoperations that occur within 60 days of the index procedure. Although there may be a benefit to immediate postoperative radiographs in selected clinical situations, the decision for routine use needs to be weighed in light of significant cost and limited clinical usefulness. PMID:25350625

Moussa, Mohamed E; Malchau, Henrik; Freiberg, Andrew A; Kwon, Young-Min

2014-09-01

215

Continuous intravenous insulin infusion reduces the incidence of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients after cardiac surgical procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for deep sternal wound infection after open heart surgical procedures. We previously showed that elevated postoperative blood glucose levels are a predictor of deep sternal wound infection in diabetic patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that aggressive intravenous pharmacologic control of postoperative blood glucose levels would reduce the incidence of deep sternal wound infection.Methods. In

Anthony P Furnary; Kathryn J Zerr; Gary L Grunkemeier; Albert Starr

1999-01-01

216

Wound Healing and Care  

MedlinePLUS

... stitches or a hospital stay? Different Types of Wounds Most of us think of wounds happening because ... into the wound and cause infection. Closing Serious Wounds If a wound is clean, a doctor will ...

217

Comparison of analgesic efficiency between wound site infiltration and ultra-sound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after cesarean delivery under spinal anaesthesia  

PubMed Central

Backround: Local anesthetic infiltration applied on the wound site or abdominal wall may be used for relieving postoperative pain after delivery by caesarean section. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficiency of ultrasound (USG)-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with local anesthetic infiltration on a wound site. Methods: This study was designed as a prospective randomized trial, and consisted of 70 pregnant women of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I-II. Patients were randomized into Group I (wound site infiltration, n=35) and Group T (TAP block, n=35). Spinal anaesthesia was administered to all patients. In Group I, wound site infiltration was applied by the surgical team. In Group T, a USG-guided bilateral TAP block was applied. Patients’ numeric pain scale (NPS) levels at 2, 6, 12 and 24th hours, after the operation (NPS0) and during mobilization were assessed. Postoperative complications, time to first analgesic request and patient satisfaction were recorded. Results: The NPS0 values of Group T were found to higher and time to first analgesic request longer than those of Group I. The NPS values of Group I at 2, 6, 12, and 24th hours were found to be statistically significantly higher than those of Group T. Conclusions: According to our results, USG-guided TAP block might be superior to infiltration anaesthesia for postoperative pain management of patients who have had caesarean section and it provided longer-lasting and more efficient analgesia. PMID:25125948

Aydogmus, MT; Sinikoglu, SN; Naki, MM; Ocak, NB; Sanl?, N; Alagol, A

2014-01-01

218

Distally based sural fasciomyocutaneous flap: anatomic study and modified technique for complicated wounds of the lower third leg and weight bearing heel.  

PubMed

The reconstruction of the distal third leg and weight-bearing heel, especially when complicated with infection and/or dead space, remains a challenge in reconstructive surgery. The distally based sural neurofasciomyocutaneous flap has been proved a valuable tool in repair of the soft tissue defects of those areas. In this report, we present the results of the anatomical study on vascular communication between the suprafascial sural neurovascular axis and the deep gastrocnemius muscle and a modified technique in clinical applications for reconstruction of the soft tissue defects in the distal lower leg and heel. Six lower limbs of fresh cadavers were injected with red gelatin and dissected. A constant vascular connection with average four musculo-fasciocutaneous perforators with diameter 0.2-0.5 mm was identified in the overlapping area between the suprafascial sural neurovascular axis and the deep gastrocnemius muscle. Based on these findings, a modified distally based sural neurofasciomyocutaneous flap including the distal gastrocnemius muscle component was designed and used for repairs of the soft tissue defects in the distal lower limb and plantar heel pad in six patients. The blood supplies of flaps comprised either the peroneal perforator and adipofascial pedicle or the peroneal perforator only. The average size of the fasciocutaneous flap was 51 cm(2), and the muscle component 17.7 cm(2). All flaps survived uneventfully. Our results suggest that this technical modification could provide wider range for applications of the distally based sural neurofasciomyocutaneous flap in repair of the soft tissue defects of the lower extremity and heel. PMID:19031395

Chang, Shi-Min; Zhang, Kai; Li, Hai-Feng; Huang, Yi-Gang; Zhou, Jia-Qian; Yuan, Feng; Yu, Guang-Rong

2009-01-01

219

Wounded Constituents  

E-print Network

The concept of the "wounded" hadronic constituents is formulated. Preliminary estimates indicate that it may help to understand the transverse mass dependence of particle production in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions.

A. Bialas

2012-02-21

220

Systematic review of high-volume multimodal wound infiltration in total knee arthroplasty.  

PubMed

Pain relief following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is challenging because early mobilization and rehabilitation are essential for a successful outcome. Postoperative pain can limit recovery, leading to reduced mobility and prolonged hospitalization. There are potential benefits of infiltrating high volumes of local anesthetics around the soft tissues of replaced hip and knee joints. The risk of systemic toxicity is minimized with diluted local anesthetic solution, which also allows a high volume to be used. One of the principal advantages is that analgesia agents are administered intraoperatively by the surgeon, thereby minimizing the need for additional invasive procedures. The authors conducted a systematic review to evaluate whether high-volume multimodal wound infiltration reduces pain and opiate intake while enhancing early rehabilitation and discharge when used in patients undergoing TKA. Only randomized controlled studies were included. Although better pain relief in the immediate postoperative period with wound infiltration is gained after TKA, there is no definite evidence that this leads to a reduction in opiate consumption, the achievement of early milestones, or a reduction in hospital stay. The roles of individual agents in achieving pain relief and the use of percutaneous wound catheter for postoperative doses are also unclear. There are few reports of complications, including falls and delayed mobilization, when femoral nerve blocks are used. Wound infiltration analgesia should be used at the preference of the surgeon and anesthetist provided regular review of their practice is undertaken to identify any untoward side effects. Further randomized trials with sufficient sample size comparing each outcome, including pain scores, opiate consumption, and length of hospital stay, should be undertaken. PMID:24972430

Banerjee, Purnajyoti; Rogers, Benedict A

2014-06-01

221

Current wound healing procedures and potential care.  

PubMed

In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

2015-03-01

222

Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care.  

PubMed

Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

2014-04-01

223

Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care  

PubMed Central

Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

2014-01-01

224

Perioperative complications with rhBMP-2 in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.  

PubMed

Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) is commonly used as an ICBG substitute for transforaminal lumbar interbody spine fusion (TLIF). However, multiple recent reports have raised concerns regarding a substantial incidence of perioperative radiculopathy. Also, given the serious complications reported with anterior cervical BMP use, risks related to swelling and edema with TLIF need to be clarified. As TLIF related complications with rhBMP-2 have generally been reported in small series or isolated cases, without a clear denominator, actual complication rates are largely unknown. The purpose this study is to characterize perioperative complications and complication rates in a large consecutive series of TLIF procedures with rhBMP-2. We reviewed inpatient and outpatient medical records for a consecutive series of 204 patients [113 females, 91 males, mean age 49.3 (22-79) years] who underwent TLIF using rhBMP-2 between 2003 and 2007. Complications observed within a 3-month perioperative interval were categorized as to etiology and severity. Wound problems were delineated as wound infection, hematoma/seroma or persistent drainage/superficial dehiscence. Neurologic deficits and radiculopathies were analyzed to determine the presence of a clear etiology (screw misplacement) and identify any potential relationship to rhBMP-2 usage. Complications were observed in 47 of 204 patients (21.6%) during the 3-month perioperative period. Major complications occurred in 13 patients (6.4%) and minor complications in 34 patients (16.7%). New or more severe postoperative neurologic complaints were noted in 13 patients (6.4%), 6 of whom required additional surgery. These cases included one malpositioned pedicle screw and one epidural hematoma. In four patients (2.0%), localized seroma/hematoma in the area of the foramen caused neural compression, and required revision. In one additional patient, vertebral osteolysis caused foraminal narrowing and radiculopathy, but resolved without further surgery. Persistent radiculopathy without clear etiology on imaging studies was seen in six patients. Wound related problems were seen in six patients (2.9%), distributed as wound infection (3), hematoma/seroma (1) and persistent drainage/dehiscence (2). Overall, this study demonstrates a modest complication rate for TLIF using rhBMP-2. While perioperative complications which appeared specific to BMP usage were noted, they occurred infrequently. It will be necessary to weigh this incidence of complications against the complication rate associated with ICBG harvest and any differential benefit in obtaining a solid arthrodesis. PMID:20582554

Owens, Kirk; Glassman, Steven D; Howard, Jennifer M; Djurasovic, Mladen; Witten, Jonathan L; Carreon, Leah Y

2011-04-01

225

Regression analysis of controllable factors of surgical incision complications in closed calcaneal fractures  

PubMed Central

Background: In surgeries of closed calcaneal fractures, the lateral L-shaped incision is usually adopted. Undesirable post-operative healing of the incision is a common complication. In this retrospective study, controllable risk factors of incision complications after closed calcaneal fracture surgery through a lateral L-shaped incision are discussed and the effectiveness of clinical intervention is assessed. Materials and Methods: A review of medical records was conducted of 209 patients (239 calcaneal fractures) surgically treated from June 2005 to October 2012. Univariate analyses were performed of seven controllable factors that might influence complications associated with the surgical incision. Binomial multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors of statistical significance. Results: Twenty-one fractures (8.79%) involved surgical incision complications, including 8 (3.35%) cases of wound dehiscence, 7 (2.93%) of flap margin necrosis, 5 (2.09%) of hematoma, and 1 (0.42%) of osteomyelitis. Five factors were statistically significant : The time from injury to surgery, operative duration, post-operative drainage, retraction of skin flap, bone grafting, and patients’ smoking habits. The results of multivariate analyses showed that surgeries performed within 7 days after fracture, operative time > 1.5 h, no drainage after surgery, static skin distraction, and patient smoking were risk factors for calcaneal incision complications. The post-operative duration of antibiotics and bone grafting made no significant difference. Conclusion: Complications after calcaneal surgeries may be reduced by postponing the surgery at least 7 days after fracture, shortening the time in surgery, implementing post-operative drainage, retracting skin flaps gently and for as short a time as possible, and prohibiting smoking. PMID:25197289

Wu, Kai; Wang, Chuanshun; Wang, Qiugen; Li, Haoqing

2014-01-01

226

Treatment of hardware infection after osteosynthesis of lower leg using negative pressure wound therapy and transforming powder dressing.  

PubMed

Fractures of the distal part of the lower leg are more common in everyday practice and traumatology. In young and active patients these injuries are mainly caused by high energy trauma. They are treated with external fixator in first step, and in second step, after sanation of the soft tissue, with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). It is very safe and effective method of treatment. Treatment of the infections that occur in the early postoperative period after open reduction and internal fixation represents a great problem and challenge for surgeons. It is widely accepted that the presence of deep infection can't be cured in the presence of hardware. However, removal of hardware in the presence of unhealed fractures significantly complicates sanation of infection and fracture itself We have decided to present a 35-years-old patient with a hardware infection with present chronic wound with hardware exposed eight months after the first operation and six months after second operation. The wound measured one centimeter in diameter with cell detritus and bad granulations tissue inside the wound. Hardwre was exposed in the depth of the wound.The secretion was minimal. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was applicated after debridemet and lavage performed in ambulatory conditions. The starting therapy was continuously -125 mm Hg of vacuum. After five days of NPWT the defect was partially filled with granula- tion tissue. For another five days we continue with NPWT with the same values of-125 mm Hg pressure but in the inter- mitent mode. After that period we used transforming powder dressing for covering and protection of the wound with was filled with granulation tissue. Five days later, wound was completely healed with epithelisation. After four months of patient follow-up, we found the wound is completely repaired. The patient denies pain and has continued orderly flow of fracture healing, with no signs of infection. PMID:25842766

Marinovi?, Marin; Ivandci?, Aldo; Spanjol, Josip; Pina, Maja; Bakota, Bore; Bandalovi?, Ante; Cukeljs, Fabijan

2014-12-01

227

Prevention and Management of Nonhealing Perineal Wounds  

PubMed Central

Complex perineal wounds are at risk for nonhealing. High-risk procedures include proctectomy for Crohn disease, anal cancer and radiated distal rectal cancers. A basic understanding of both patient and procedural risk factors is helpful in planning and executing operative procedures for these conditions and to minimize associated wound complications. Diabetes, obesity, and malnutrition may contribute to wound breakdown and failure to heal. Delaying operative intervention, adding nutritional supplementation, and employing intestinal diversion as well as myocutaneous flaps may help optimize conditions for wound healing. PMID:24436658

Kamrava, Allen; Mahmoud, Najjia N.

2013-01-01

228

Sutureless closure of scleral wounds in animal models by the use of laser welded biocompatible patches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The common procedures used to seal the scleral or conjunctival injuries are based on the traditional suturing techniques, that may induce foreign body reaction during the follow up, with subsequent inflammation and distress for the patient. In this work we present an experimental study on the laser welding of biocompatible patches onto ocular tissues, for the closure of surgical or trauma wounds. The study was performed ex vivo in animal models (porcine eyes). A penetrating perforation of the ocular tissue was performed with a surgical knife. The wound walls were approximated, and a biocompatible patch was put onto the outer surface of the tissue, in order to completely cover the wound as a plaster. The patches were prepared with a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, showing high mechanical strength, good elasticity, high permeability for vapour and gases and rather low biodegradation. During preparation, Indocyanine Green (ICG) was included in the biopolymeric matrix, so that the films presented high absorption at 810 nm. Effective adhesion of the membranes to the ocular tissues was obtained by using diode laser light emitted from an 810 nm diode laser and delivered by means of a 300 ?m core diameter optical fiber, to produce spots of local film/tissue adhesion, due to the photothermal effect at the interface. The result is an immediate closure of the wound, thus reducing post-operative complications due to inflammation.

Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Menabuoni, Luca; Lenzetti, Ivo; Pini, Roberto

2011-03-01

229

Laparoscopic Harvest of Omental Flaps for Reconstruction of Complex Mediastinal Wounds  

PubMed Central

Background: Omental harvest for complex poststernotomy mediastinal wounds has traditionally required a formal laparotomy in often high-risk patients, thus making it the procedure of last resort. Methods: The charts of all patients who underwent a laparoscopic omental harvest at the Texas Endosurgery Institute were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Seven patients, 4 males and 3 females with an average age of 65.1±6.3 years, with complex mediastinal wounds following coronary artery bypass grafting were studied. All patients underwent laparoscopic harvest of omental flaps based on the right gastroepiploic artery (3), the left gastroepiploic artery (1) or both (3), along with pectoralis major myocutaneous advancement flaps in 5 patients and partial-thickness skin graft and a vacuum-assisted closure device in 2 patients. The average operative time for the entire procedure was 196±54 minutes. Enteric feedings could be tolerated early postoperatively with a mean of 3.8 days. One death (14.2%) occurred. All surviving patients had excellent wound healing results at a mean follow-up of 19.1 months. Conclusion: Laparoscopic harvest of omental flaps for the reconstruction of complex mediastinal wounds is a valid and potentially less morbid alternative for the treatment of this infrequent but disastrous complication of open heart surgery. PMID:14626397

Salameh, Jihad R.; Chock, Deborah A.; Gonzalez, John J.; Koneru, Suresh; Glass, Jeffrey L.

2003-01-01

230

Sternal wound care to prevent infections in adult cardiac surgery patients.  

PubMed

Sternal wound infection post-cardiac surgery is a serious complication that can lead to increased length of stay, substantial financial impact, and increased mortality. The occurrence of sternal wound infections has been reported from 0.4% to 4% of postoperative cardiac surgeries. It is imperative that every heart surgery program implements the best practice to prevent the detrimental effects of sternal wound infections. In an effort to improve the cardiothoracic (CT) surgery program in a community hospital, a decision was made to create a specialty floor including specialized nurses to care for open-heart surgery patients. In October 2010, a group of these nurses formed a working committee to explore ways to improve the overall care of our CT surgery patients. A vision and purpose for this committee were identified: (1) update and improve practice for CT surgery patients utilizing evidence-based standards, (2) successfully disseminate this information to all staff caring for the CT surgery patients, and (3) evaluate the impact of any practice changes on patient outcomes. An initial focus for the committee was to standardize sternal wound care among all staff members on the cardiovascular floors, cardiac care unit, and progressive care unit. PMID:22157494

Stoodley, Lynda; Lillington, Linda; Ansryan, Lianna; Ota, Reiko; Caluya, Jun; Camello, Edwin; Huskins, Maria; Franco, Daniella; Silvino, Cherry Mae; Nwokafor, Ezioma; Van Zitter, Brandy; Olton, Maria; Howard, Linda; Bailey, Lorri; Mohler, Rhonda

2012-01-01

231

Does a continuous local anaesthetic pain treatment after immediate tissue expander reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients more efficiently reduce acute postoperative pain - a prospective randomised study  

PubMed Central

Background Immediate breast reconstruction with an expander is a reasonable option for properly selected patients. After reconstruction, patients have severe postoperative pain, which responds poorly to opioids. Our aim was to evaluate if continuous wound infusion of a local anaesthetic into the surgical wound reduces postoperative pain, consumption of opioids and incidence of chronic pain compared to standard intravenous piritramide after primary breast reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients. Methods Altogether, 60 patients were enrolled in our study; one half in the group with wound infusion of a local anaesthetic, and the other half in the standard (piritramide) group. Parameters measured included: pain intensity (visual analogue scale), drug requirements, alertness, hospitalisation, side-effects and late complications. A p-value of?wound infusion of a local anaesthetic significantly reduces acute pain and enables reduced opioid consumption, resulting in less postoperative sedation and reduced need for antiemetic drugs. Wound infusion of a local anaesthetic reduces chronic pain. PMID:24433317

2014-01-01

232

[Use of polyfepan in the treatment of suppurative wounds].  

PubMed

An analysis of application of medical lignin (polyfepan) in treatment of purulent wounds of different etiology in 60 patients is presented. Good clinical effects of polyfepan in treatment of purulent wounds allow putting secondary sutures or approximating the wound margins at earlier terms. It gives no complications, is well endurable by the patients and easy in use. All these qualities allow polyfepan to be recommended for the local treatment of purulent wounds as a sorbent. PMID:2690447

Katsadze, M A; Isakova, G I; Miroshnichenko, A G; Smirnova, L A; Zriachikh, G A; Bo?ko, T A; Gvozdeva, Z N

1989-08-01

233

Complications following hepatectomy.  

PubMed

As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications. PMID:25444470

Russell, Maria C

2015-01-01

234

A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. Methods: A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 2007–2012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. Results: The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (p<0.0001). There were no substantial changes in the patient population risk factors over this time. As a result of the changes in incision management practice, a total of 92 cesarean post-operative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Conclusion: Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI. PMID:25826622

Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette

2015-01-01

235

Postoperative doppler evaluation of liver transplants  

PubMed Central

Doppler ultrasound plays an important role in the postoperative management of hepatic transplantation, by enabling early detection and treatment of various vascular complications. This article describes the normal Doppler findings following liver transplantation and reviews the imaging appearances of various vascular complications associated with it. The article also discusses transient waveform abnormalities, often seen on a post-transplant Doppler examination, and the importance of differentiating them from findings suggestive of ominous vascular complications. PMID:25489129

Sanyal, Rupan; Zarzour, Jessica G; Ganeshan, Dakshina M; Bhargava, Puneet; Lall, Chandana G; Little, Mark D

2014-01-01

236

Perioperative Complications in Abdominal Sacrocolpopexy, Sacrospinous Ligament Fixation and Prolift Procedures  

PubMed Central

Background: Pelvic organ prolapse is an important problem for women. To overcome this issue, different operational technics are in use, such as abdominal sacrocolpopexy, sacrospinous fixation, and the total Prolift procedure. Aims: This study assessed perioperative complications in abdominal sacrocolpopexy, sacrospinous fixation, and the total Prolift procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Perioperative complications were defined as any complication occurring during surgery or the first 6 weeks postoperatively. Forty-five patients underwent abdominal procedures, 60 patients underwent sacrospinous fixation, and 43 patients underwent the total Prolift procedure. Results: In the abdominal group, one bladder injury, four hemorrhages, and three wound dehiscences occurred. In the sacrospinous group, one rectal injury and one postoperative vault infection occurred. In the Prolift group, one bladder injury and one hemorrhage occurred. Minor complications were more frequent in the abdominal group than the others. The operating time and hospital stay of the abdominal group were significantly longer than the others. The Pro-lift procedure had less operating time and hospital stay than other procedures. Conclusion: The total Prolift may be a novel alternative for apical prolapse with low perioperative morbidities and complications. PMID:25207189

Demirci, Fuat; Demirci, Oya; Dolgun, Zehra Nihal; Karakoç, Birgül; Demirci, Elif; Somunk?ran, Asl?; ?yibozkurt, Cem; Karaalp, Erhan

2014-01-01

237

[Modern wound dressings].  

PubMed

Chronic wounds are, due to the slow healing, a major clinical problem. In addition to classic materials, a great number of supportive wound dressings for chronic wound treatment, developed on the basis of new knowledge about the pathophysiological events in non-healing wounds, are available on the market. Today we know that modern wound dressings provide the best local environment for optimal healing (moisture, warmth, appropriate pH). Wound dressings control the amount of exudate from the wound and bacterial load, thus protecting local skin from the wound exudate and the wound from secondary infections from the environment. Using supportive wound dressings makes sense only when the wound has been properly assessed, the etiologic factors have been clarified and the obstacles making the wound chronic identified. The choice of dressing is correlated with the characteristics of the wound, the knowledge and experience of the medical staff, and the patient's needs. We believe that the main advantage of modern wound dressing versus conventional dressing is more effective wound cleaning, simple dressing application, painless bandaging owing to reduced adhesion to the wound, and increased absorption of the wound exudate. Faster wound granulation shortens the length of patient hospitalization, and eventually facilitates the work of medical staff. The overall cost of treatment is a minor issue due to faster wound healing despite the fact that modern supportive wound dressings are more expensive than conventional bandaging. The article describes different types of modern supportive wound dressings, as well as their characteristics and indications for use. PMID:24371980

Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Planinsek Rucigaj, Tanja

2013-10-01

238

Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.  

PubMed

Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely. PMID:22718712

Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

2012-06-01

239

Large piece of wood board removal and long term survival in a patient with stabbed thoracic wound - case report.  

PubMed

Stabbed thoracic trauma is quite common in military practice,but they very rarely occur in civilian life, where they are predominantly accidental injuries. Thoracic stabbed wounds are more commonly observed in men than in women and in younger rather than older people. The management and prognosis depend on the composition, size and location of the foreign body. A 28-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the emergency room with hemorrhagic shock, a large stabbed wound and retention of a large piece of wood board.Less than 10 minutes after arriving to the emergency room she underwent open surgical thoracotomies and resection of the spleen rupture without any significant postoperative complications. At the end of the procedure the left breast was reconstructed. The original aspects of this case are the singularity of the foreign body and its relative harmlessness in spite of its large size. PMID:25375058

Suciu, B A; Bud, V; Strat, A; Copotoiu, A C

2014-01-01

240

Toxic shock syndrome associated with surgical wound infections.  

PubMed

In 13 cases of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) associated with postoperative wound infections, clinical findings were similar to those observed in cases of TSS in menstruating women. While local signs of a surgical wounds infection were minimal, Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from cultures of wounds in 12 of 12 patients; multiple blood cultures were negative for 11 of 11 patients. Toxic shock syndrome due to surgical wound infections accompanied a wide variety of surgical procedures in both men and women and was not necessarily associated with menstruation in women. The median interval between surgery and onset of TSS was two days. Toxic shock syndrome can develop in association with surgical wound infections caused by S aureus and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative fever and hypotension. PMID:7057535

Bartlett, P; Reingold, A L; Graham, D R; Dan, B B; Selinger, D S; Tank, G W; Wichterman, K A

1982-03-12

241

Postoperative Immunosuppression After Open and Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Assessment of Cellular Immune Function and Monocytic HLA-DR Expression  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Major abdominal procedures are strongly associated with postoperative immunosuppression and subsequent increased patient morbidity. It is believed that laparoscopic surgery causes less depletion of the systemic immune function because of the reduced tissue trauma. Various cytokines and monocytic HLA-DR expression have been successfully implemented to assess postoperative immune function. The aim of our study was to show the difference in immunologic profiles after minimally invasive versus conventional liver resection. Methods: Ten animals underwent either laparoscopic or conventional open left lateral liver resection. Flow cytometric characteristics of HLA-DR expression on monocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cellular secretion of tumor necrosis factor ?, interferon ?, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were measured and analyzed in ex vivo whole blood samples. Intraoperative and postoperative clinical outcome parameters were also documented and evaluated. Results: All animals survived the procedures. Postoperative complications were fever (n = 3), wound infections (n = 2), and biloma (n = 1). Open surgery showed a morbidity rate of 80% compared with 40% after laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic liver resection showed no postoperative immunoparalysis. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression in this group was elevated, whereas the open surgery group showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class II expression on postoperative day 1. Postoperative secretion of tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin 6, and interferon ? was lower in the open surgery group. Elevated transaminase levels after laparoscopy might have resulted from an ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by the capnoperitoneum. Conclusion: Major immunoparalysis depression was not observed in either group. Laparoscopic surgery shows a tendency to improve immunologic recovery after liver resection. PMID:24398205

Haacke, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Schmidt, Sven C.

2013-01-01

242

[Complications in pediatric anesthesia].  

PubMed

As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia. PMID:25004872

Becke, K

2014-07-01

243

[Obstacles in wound healing].  

PubMed

Wound healing is a complex process that involves a significant number of chemical and physiological events acting on the cellular and molecular level. Wound healing passes through four stages, which are not distinctly separated one from another. There are many factors that can affect the wound healing process and their activities slow down, or completely interrupt the healing process. Wound around tissue ischemia, which is due to spasm of the arteries or atherosclerotic changes in them, can easily lead to slowing down or even stops the wound healing process. Wound infections and use of corticosteroids are significant barriers to healing. Other factors that can influence the course of wound healing are inadequate nutrition with consequent lack of energy or protein and some vitamins, wound abidance, wound bed status, localization of wound, etc. Only with the knowledge of the wound healing pathophysiology and understanding all the factors that may affect delayed wound healing, we can adequately prevent and treat chronic wounds. PMID:24371970

Huljev, Dubravko

2013-10-01

244

Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia in febrile patients as early signs of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Sternal wound infection is a devastating complication of cardiothoracic surgery that carries high postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. We explored whether our current program of extensive bacteriological examination including repeat blood cultures may contribute to the early diagnosis of sternal wound infection. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 112 patients who were subjected to our bacteriological examination protocol including within 90 days after cardiothoracic surgery. Univariate and multivariate analyses were made in order to identify risk factors for sternal infection. Results The median patient age was 75 years, and 65 patients were male. In 35 cases (31.2%) the blood cultures showed the presence of bacterial infection with the following frequencies: Staphylococcus aureus, 18 cases; Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 7 cases; other organisms, 10 cases. Eleven patients presented repeat bacteremia on at least 2 different occasions. Twenty patients (17.8%) presented sternal wound infections. There was no difference in operative mortality between the patients with and without sternal wound infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that bilateral mammary artery use (OR, 13.68, 95% CI, 1.09-167.36, p?=?0.043), positive blood culture for Staphylococcus aureus (OR, 19.51, 95% CI, 4.46-104.33, p?wound infection. Conclusion Repeat blood cultures in febrile patients appear to be useful for the early detection of Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia, and these were associated with sternal wound infection. Bilateral internal mammary artery use was another risk factor of sternal wound infection in febrile patients. These factors may identify patients suitable for expeditious radiological examination and aggressive treatments. PMID:24885820

2014-01-01

245

Acute Heart Failure in the Postoperative Period  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the perioperative period, heart failure is one of the most common conditions requiring evaluation and treatment. Furthermore,\\u000a heart failure is the most frequently encountered postoperative cardiac complication of noncardiac surgery (1, 2). Postoperatively, acute heart failure (AHF), defined as the rapid onset of symptoms and signs secondary to abnormal cardiac\\u000a function, often presents in patients with underlying chronic heart

Todd A. Watson; Lee A. Fleisher

246

Four-fold benefit of wound closure under high magnification  

PubMed Central

Background: Unaffected wound healing and good cosmetic result after a neurosurgical procedure are important factors measuring a level of care. The usefulness of high magnification of the operating microscope during closure of neurosurgical wounds is evaluated. Methods: During a one-year microneurosurgical fellowship, the first author (JK) performed wound closure under the microscope in 200 of 524 neurosurgical operations carried out by the senior author (JH) at the Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Supratentorial approaches were employed most frequently in 143 patients (72%). Surgeries for infratentorial lesions and the spinal canal comprised 48 (24%) and 9 procedures (4%), respectively. Mean duration of the surgery from skin to skin was 1.8 (range 0.5-6.2) hours. After intradural hemostasis was completed by the senior author, further steps including dural suturing, bone flap fixation, and wound closure were performed by the first author. Wound condition was assessed during the early and late postoperative period. Mean follow-up was 3.2 (range 1-10) months. Results: Early postoperative healing of the wound was uneventful in 180 patients (90%). No wound rupture or postoperative hematoma occurred. In five patients (2.5%), lumbar puncture or spinal drainage was necessary due to significant subcutaneous liquor collection. No wound revision was required. At follow-up, in 196 patients (98%) the postoperative scar was in perfect condition. Neither skin necrosis nor healing problems occurred. Conclusion: Based on our results, we found the high magnification of operating microscope to be beneficial when closing neurosurgical wounds; it allows (1) better hemostasis, (2) precise wound margin approximation, (3) atraumatic handling of the tissues, and (4) improvement of the manual dexterity of the neurosurgeon. PMID:24083051

Kivelev, Juri; Hernesniemi, Juha

2013-01-01

247

Avoiding complications in the repair of orbital floor fractures.  

PubMed

Fractures of the orbital floor are commonly repaired by all specialists who manage facial trauma. Potential complications include incomplete correction of preoperative enophthalmos or diplopia, as well as induction of hypoglobus or hyperglobus, eyelid malposition, or optic nerve injury. To optimize functional and aesthetic results, a stepwise analysis of the surgical procedure is presented-from the election and timing of repair, through the incision and dissection path, release of herniated orbital tissue, implant material and placement, wound closure, and postoperative care. Key elements include the distinction of floor fracture subtypes, avoiding cicatricial contraction of the lower eyelid, complete release of herniated soft tissue, direct observation of all fracture margins, and proper contouring and positioning of the implant. PMID:24874836

Harris, Gerald J

2014-01-01

248

[Do anesthetic techniques influence postoperative outcomes? Part II].  

PubMed

The knowledge of the influence of anesthetic techniques in postoperative outcomes has opened a large field of research in recent years. In this second part, we review some of the major controversies arising from the literature on the impact of anesthetic techniques on postoperative outcomes in 6 areas: postoperative cognitive dysfunction, chronic postoperative pain, cancer recurrence, postoperative nausea/vomiting, surgical outcomes, and resources utilization. The development of protective and preventive anesthetic strategies against short and long-term postoperative complications will probably occupy an important role in our daily anesthetic practice. Dynamic postoperative pain control has been confirmed as one of the basic requirements of accelerated postoperative recovery programs ("fast-track surgery"), and it is also a preventive factor for development of chronic postoperative pain. The weight of anesthetic technique on postoperative immunosuppression is to be defined. The potential influence of anesthesia on cancer recurrence, is a highly controversial area of research. The classic pattern of perioperative fluid therapy may increase postoperative complications. On the other hand, the maintenance of normoglycemia and normothermia was associated with a decreased postoperative morbidity. The high volume of surgical procedures means that the adequacy of human, organizational and technological resources have a major impact on overall costs. PMID:23099035

Esteve, N; Valdivia, J; Ferrer, A; Mora, C; Ribera, H; Garrido, P

2013-02-01

249

Proper Care for Wounds  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Motor Vehicle Safety En Español About Emergencies Wound Care Proper Care For Wounds Most cuts are minor but it is still important to properly care for them. Wound Care Dr. David Ross, emergency ...

250

Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management  

PubMed Central

Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development. PMID:20351978

Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

2010-01-01

251

Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing  

PubMed Central

Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

2013-01-01

252

Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis – unusual management of unusual complication of Whipple procedure  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Pancreatoduodenectomy is an extensive procedure carrying risk of a number of postoperative complications. Of these the most common are surgical site infections (SSI), bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, and anastomotic leakage. However, the most serious complications are ones, that are rare, clinically hardly diagnosed, and if untreated, leading to the death of a patient. Among the latter complications is thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Its clinical signs are unspecific and diagnostics complicated. Treatment requires aggressive approach. If this is absent, intestinal necrosis with septic state, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) lead to a death of a patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE Authors present a case of a patient after pancreatoduodenectomy, complicated by the thrombosis of superior mesenteric vein. Patient was managed by resection of the necrotic bowel, venous decompression by venous bypass from superior mesenteric vein to the right ovarian vein, and open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Patient suffered severe abdominal sepsis with need for intensive organ support. Abdomen was definitely closed on fourth NPWT redress. Patient healed without any further complications, is well and was released to the ambulatory setting. DISCUSSION Superior mesenteric vein (VMS) thrombosis is a rare complication. It diagnosis requires high level of vigilance and once diagnosed, aggressive therapy is essential. Two goals of surgical treatment exist: resection of the necrotic bowel and facilitation of the blood outflow. CONCLUSION Mesenteroovarian anastomosis is one of the options in treatment of thrombosis of VMS if thrombectomy is not feasible. PMID:25255475

Hu?an, Martin; Bartko, Christian; Slyško, Roman; Seká?, Jaroslav; Prochotský, Augustín; Majeský, Ivan; Škultéty, Ján

2014-01-01

253

Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery  

PubMed Central

The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

2014-01-01

254

Dermal wound transcriptomic responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model  

PubMed Central

Background Bacterial infections of wounds impair healing and worsen scarring. We hypothesized that transcriptome analysis of wounds infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.p.) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) would indicate host-responses associated with the worse healing of P.a.- than K.p.-infected wounds. Methods Wounds created on post-operative day (POD) 0 were infected during the inflammatory phase of healing on POD3 and were harvested on POD4 for microarray and transcriptome analysis. Other wounds received topical antibiotic after infection for 24 hours to promote biofilm development, and were harvested on POD6 or POD12. Results Wounds infected for 24 hours, relative to uninfected wounds, elevated transcripts of immune-response functions characteristic of infiltrating leukocytes. But P.a.-infected wounds elevated many more transcripts and to higher levels than K.p.-infected wounds. Coincidently, suppressed transcripts of both wounds enriched into stress-response pathways, including EIF2 signaling; however, this was more extensive for P.a.-infected wounds, including many-fold more transcripts enriching in the ‘cell death’ annotation, suggesting resident cutaneous cell toxicity in response to a more damaging P.a. inflammatory milieu. The POD6 wounds were colonized with biofilm but expressed magnitudes fewer immune-response transcripts with no stress-response enrichments. However, elevated transcripts of P.a.-infected wounds were inferred to be regulated by type I interferons, similar to a network unique to P.a.-infected wounds on POD4. On POD12, transcripts that were more elevated in K.p.-infected wounds suggested healing, while transcripts more elevated in P.a.-infected wounds indicated inflammation. Conclusions An extensive inflammatory response of wounds was evident from upregulated transcripts 24 hours after infection with either bacterium, but the response was more intense for P.a.- than K.p.-infected wounds. Coincidently, more extensive down-regulated transcripts of P.a.-infected wounds indicated a stronger “integrated stress response” to the inflammatory milieu that tipped more toward cutaneous cell death. Unique to P.a.-infected wounds on POD4 and POD6 were networks inferred to be regulated by interferons, which may result from intracellular replication of P.a. These data point to specific downregulated transcripts of cells resident to the wound as well as upregulated transcripts characteristic of infiltrating leukocytes that could be useful markers of poorly healing wounds and indicators of wound-specific treatments for improving outcomes. PMID:25035691

2014-01-01

255

Postoperative cerebral venous infarction  

PubMed Central

Background: Postoperative cerebral venous infarction (POCVI) is not an uncommon complication in cranial surgeries. However, literature is sparse on the epidemiology and management of postoperative venous infarcts. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to study the incidence and clinico-radiological course of POCVI in patients in a tertiary level neurosurgical unit and compare the outcome between pediatric and adult patients following POCVI. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study carried out over an 8 month period, consecutive patients undergoing elective major cranial surgeries were monitored neurologically and with serial computed tomography (CT) of the head for POCVI in the postoperative period. All patients had at least one CT head done within 24 hours of surgery. Diagnosis of hemorrhagic POCVI was based on the presence of subcortical, multifocal hyperdensities with irregular margins and or low density areas in the perioperative fields. Nonhemorrhagic POCVI was diagnosed if CT showed a localized hypodensity poorly demarcated in the subcortical white matter with/without mass effect, along with the presence of fresh neurological deficits. Observations and Results: A total of 376 patients were enrolled in the study period. Of these, 26 (7%) developed POCVI. The male: female ratio was 1.2:1 and age ranged from 6 to 68 years with 12 (46%) being under the age of 18 years. Sixteen (61%) patients developed hemorrhagic POCVI and 10 (39%) patients developed nonhemorrhagic POCVI. The mean time to POCVI detection was 72 hours (range 24–144 hours). Seventeen (66%) patients were managed conservatively, and nine (34%) patients underwent decompressive craniectomy as an additional procedure for management of POCVI. In five patients (all with hemorrhagic POCVI), the infarction was an incidental finding. Of the 21 patients with symptomatic POCVI, 13 (61.9%) patients improved neurologically and were discharged with residual deficits. Two (9.5%) showed no neurological improvement till discharge, and 6 (28.5%) died during the hospital stay following POCVI. Conclusions: Children constitute a significant population (46% in our study) of the patients who develop POCVI with poor outcome similar to that seen in adult patients.

Agrawal, Deepak; Naik, Vikas

2015-01-01

256

Perioperative Surgical Complications and Learning Curve Associated with Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Single-Institute Experience  

PubMed Central

Background As surgical complications tend to occur more frequently in the beginning stages of a surgeon's career, knowledge of perioperative complications is important to perform a safe procedure, especially if the surgeon is a novice. We sought to identify and describe perioperative complications and their management in connection with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive TLIF. The primary outcome measure was adverse events during the perioperative period, including neurovascular injury, implant-related complications, and wound infection. Pseudarthroses and adjacent segment pathologies were not included in this review. Adverse events that were not specifically related to spinal surgery and did not affect recovery were also excluded. Results Perioperative complications occurred in 9% of patients (11/124); including three cases of temporary postoperative neuralgia, two deep wound infections, two pedicle screw misplacements, two cage migrations, one dural tear, and one grafted bone extrusion. No neurologic deficits were reported. Eight complications occurred in the first one-third of the series and only 3 complications occurred in the last two-thirds of the series. Additional surgeries were performed in 6% of patients (7/124); including four reoperations (two for cage migrations, one for a misplaced screw, and one for an extruded graft bone fragment) and three hardware removals (one for a misplaced screw and two for infected cages). Conclusions We found perioperative complications occurred more often in the early period of a surgeon's experience with minimally invasive TLIF. Implant-related complications were common and successfully managed by additional surgeries in this series. We suggest greater caution should be exercised to avoid the potential complications, especially when surgeon is a novice to this procedure. PMID:25729524

Lee, Soo Bin; Seok, Sang Ok; Jo, Byung Woo; Ha, Joong Won

2015-01-01

257

A Look at Bioengineering: Wound Dressings  

E-print Network

A Look at Bioengineering: Wound Dressings................................................................................................................................................. 3 Wound dressing kit contents ............................................................................................................. 4 INTRODUCTION Wounds and Wound Dressings 101

Virginia Tech

258

[Chronic wounds: differential diagnosis].  

PubMed

Wound is a disruption of anatomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. According to the healing process, wounds are classified as acute and chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if standard medical procedures do not lead to the expected healing, or if the wound does not heal within six weeks. Chronic wounds are classified as typical and atypical. Typical wounds include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic wounds. Diabetic foot and decubitus ulcers stand out as a specific entity among typical wounds. About 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder are mostly neuropathic ulcers. About 95 percent of chronic wounds manifest as one of the above-mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds are atypical chronic wounds, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, psychiatric disorders, drug related reactions, etc. Numerous systemic diseases can present with atypical wounds. The primary cause of the wound can be either systemic disease itself (Crohn's disease) or aberrant immune response due to systemic disease (pyoderma gangrenosum, paraneoplastic syndrome). Although atypical wounds are a rare cause of chronic wounds, it should always be taken in consideration during diagnostic procedure. PMID:24371971

Situm, Mirna; Koli?, Maja

2013-10-01

259

Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds  

SciTech Connect

The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

Jaing, C

2012-03-19

260

Comparison in Terms of Postoperative Morbidity and Hospital Stay between Open Cholecystectomy and Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Type of study: Comparative. Aim: To compare the postoperative morbidity in terms of post- operative pain, gait disturbances, wound and respiratory infections along with length of hospital stay in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy with those undergoing open surgery for symptomatic gallstone disease to compare the effectivity of minimally invasive surgery with open surgery in reducing postoperative morbidity and thus length

Faryal Gul Afridi; Javeria Iqbal; Jehangir Akbar; Zahoor Khan; M Zarin; Samiullah Wazir

2008-01-01

261

A clinical chameleon: postoperative hypoparathyroidism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  About 1,200 patients per year develop postoperative hypoparathyroidism alone in Germany. Many of those patients may be misdiagnosed\\u000a as the symptoms of this disease may vary and can be atypical.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patient\\/results  As an example, we describe the first known case of an elderly patient with a long history of seizures as a complication of\\u000a an undiagnosed chronic hypoparathyroidism after surgery of

Thomas Bohrer; Mark Hagemeister; Olaf Elert

2007-01-01

262

Postoperative visual loss associated with spine surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postoperative visual loss associated with spine surgery is a rare complication with no established definitive etiology. Multiple case reports have been published in the literature, and an overview of the case reports of the various visual disturbances following spine surgery is presented. Our objective was to review the current literature and determine if there were any risk factors that suggest

Brian Gill; James E. Heavner

2006-01-01

263

Acute postoperative endophthalmitis by Gemella haemolysans  

PubMed Central

Endophthalmitis is a rare and serious post-surgical complication. We report a case of acute postoperative endophthalmitis after an uneventful cataract surgery caused by a commensal organism, Gemella haemolysans. The patient was successfully treated with vitrectomy and intravitreal antibiotics like vancomycin, along with topical cefazolin. PMID:20413936

Nalamada, Suma; Jalali, Subhadra; Reddy, Ashok Kumar

2010-01-01

264

Novel Composite Antibiotic-Eluting Structures for Wound Healing Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a There are various wounds with tissue loss. These include burn wounds, wounds caused as a result of trauma, diabetic ulcers\\u000a and pressure sores. Every year in the United States more than 1.25 million people experience burns and 6.5 million experience\\u000a various chronic skin ulcers. In burns, infection is the major complication after the initial period of shock and it is

Jonathan J. Elsner; Israela Berdicevsky; Adaya Shefy-Peleg; Meital Zilberman

265

Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications  

PubMed Central

Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

Kozak, Józef

2014-01-01

266

The tip of the iceberg: Post caesarean wound dehiscence presenting as abdominal wound sepsis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Uterine scar dehiscence can complicate caesarean section with complications like post partum hemorrhage, endomyometritis, localized/generalized peritonitis, and sepsis. Presentation of case Our patient had abdominal wound infection after LSCS surgery and features of sepsis. The wound infection was actually the presentation of a uterine scar dehiscence and localized peritonitis. Discussion Incidence of uterine scar dehiscence is around 0.6%. Presentation can be post partum hemorrhage, endomyometritis, and generalized/localized peritonitis. Peritonitis caused by uterine incisional necrosis must be dealt surgically. A high index of suspicion with appropriate investigations can highlight such problems for early treatment and cure with least morbidity especially related to further pregnancies. Conclusion Uterine scar dehiscence with infection requires high index of suspicion as rare cause for post partum localized/generalized peritonitis with sepsis. Severe abdominal wound infection after caesarean section may be associated with uterine wound dehiscence, which poses a grave risk to the mother in a future pregnancy. PMID:25728672

Bharatam, Kaundinya Kiran; Sivaraja, P.K.; Abineshwar, N.J.; Thiagarajan, Vasundhara; Thiagarajan, D.A.; Bodduluri, Sudeep; Sriraman, K.B.; Vasantha Ragavan, A.; Priya, Shanmuga

2015-01-01

267

Abdominal stab wounds: self-inflicted wounds versus assault wounds.  

PubMed

Intentional penetrating wounds, self inflicted or inflicted by others, are increasingly common. As a result, it can be difficult for the forensic examiner to determine whether the cause is self-inflicted or not. This type of trauma has been studied from a psychological perspective and from a surgical perspective but the literature concerning the forensic perspective is poorer. The objective of this study was to compare the epidemiology of abdominal stab wounds so as to distinguish specific features of each type. This could help the forensic scientist to determine the manner of infliction of the wound. We proposed a retrospective monocentric study that included all patients with an abdominal wound who were managed by the visceral surgery department at Angers University Hospital. Demographic criteria, patient history, circumstances and location of the wound were noted and compared. A comparison was drawn between group 1 (self inflicted wound) and group 2 (assault). This study showed that the only significant differences are represented by the patient's prior history and the circumstances surrounding the wound, i.e. the scene and time of day. In our study, neither the site, nor the injuries sustained reveal significant clues as to the origin of the wound. According to our findings, in order to determine the cause, the forensic examiner should thus carefully study the circumstances and any associated injuries. PMID:23622473

Venara, Aurélien; Jousset, Nathalie; Airagnes, Guillaume; Arnaud, Jean-Pierre; Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde

2013-05-01

268

Ceftriaxone versus povidone iodine in preventing wound infections following biliary surgery.  

PubMed Central

The effect of either prophylactic antibiotic or wound antiseptic on bile bacteriology, wound and other postoperative sepsis has been studied in a controlled prospective randomised trial of 243 patients undergoing biliary surgery at a district general hospital. Wound infection rates were significantly less in patients given intravenous ceftriaxone (1%) at induction of anaesthesia when compared to povidone iodine sprayed into the wound at the completion of surgery (9%) (P = 0.02). In all but one patient infected wounds grew organisms identical to those cultured from the bile. There were also fewer chest and urinary infections in the ceftriaxone group but this was not statistically significant. PMID:3056208

Kiff, R. S.; Lomax, J.; Fowler, L.; Kingston, R. D.; Hoare, E. M.; Sykes, P. A.

1988-01-01

269

A Rare Complication of Septorhinoplasty  

PubMed Central

Summary: Septoplasty and septorhinoplasty are common procedures. A 28-year-old woman underwent the procedure and presented postoperatively with headache and vomiting and had developed a large pneumocephalus. We describe the case in detail and analyze the possible causes and ways to prevent such a complication. PMID:25587507

2014-01-01

270

Enhancement of lysine acetylation accelerates wound repair.  

PubMed

In physiopathological conditions, such as diabetes, wound healing is significantly compromised and chronic complications, including ulcers, may occur. In a mouse model of skin repair, we recently reported that wound treatment with Sirtuin activators and class I HDAC inhibitors induced keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced healing via a nitric oxide (NO) dependent mechanism. We observed an increase in total protein acetylation in the wound area, as determined by acetylation of ?-tubulin and histone H3 Lysine 9. We reasoned that this process activated cell function as well as regulated gene expression to foster tissue repair. We report here that the direct activation of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) by the histone acetylase activator pentadecylidenemalonate 1b (SPV-106) induced Lysine acetylation in the wound area. This intervention was sufficient to enhance repair process by a NO-independent mechanism. Hence, an impairment of PCAF and/or other GCN5 family acetylases may delay skin repair in physiopathological conditions. PMID:24265859

Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Straino, Stefania; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio; Gaetano, Carlo

2013-09-01

271

Thyroid surgery in octogenarians is associated with higher complication rates  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine whether thyroid surgery in patients ?80 is associated with higher complication rates. Background The incidence of thyroid nodules increases with age and little information is available regarding the risks of thyroid surgery in elderly patients. Methods Out of 3568 patients undergoing thyroid surgery between July 2001 and October 2007 at a single institution, the records of 90 consecutive patients ?80 years were retrospectively reviewed and compared to a cohort of 242 randomly selected patients aged 18–79, who underwent thyroid surgery during the same time period, using SAS statistical software. Clinical variables included age group, sex, medical co-morbidities, pre-operative diagnosis, substernal component, previous surgery, final pathology, length of stay (LOS), postoperative complications and mortality. Results Preoperative indications for surgery included benign disease in 51.1% vs. 40.9%, suspected malignancy in 18.9% vs. 26% and suspected follicular neoplasms including indeterminate/microfollicular cytology in 30% vs. 33.1% in the octogenarian patient group (?80 yrs old) vs. the younger patient cohort (p=NS). Octogenarians had a 21.1% rate of significant malignancy on final pathology vs. 28.1% in the younger cohort (p=NS). The overall complication rate in the octogenarian group was 23.3% vs. 9.1% in the younger cohort (p=.0006). Male sex and lung disease were independent risk factors for perioperative complications. Complications unique to octogenarians included heart failure, atrial fibrillation, pneumonia, tracheotomy, urosepsis, blood transfusion, wound infection and ischemic colitis. There was no mortality in either group. Conclusions Patients ?80 years of age can undergo successful thyroid surgery but with significantly higher morbidity. Earlier surgical intervention may be advised in those who are at high risk for disease progression whereas follow-up strategies without surgery may be advised for others. PMID:19744461

Mekel, Michal; Stephen, Antonia E.; Gaz, Randall D.; Muzikansky, Alona; Hodin, Richard A.; Parangi, Sareh

2013-01-01

272

Pregnancy Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... Emergency Preparedness and Response Pregnant Women and Flu Pregnancy Complications On this Page Before Pregnancy During Pregnancy ... to decrease the risk of pregnancy complications. Before Pregnancy Make sure to talk to your doctor about ...

273

Surgical wound care - closed  

MedlinePLUS

... your doctor used one of the following: Stitches (sutures) Clips Staples Skin glue Proper wound care can help prevent ... infection Cover your wound so that stitches or staples don't catch on clothing Protect the area ...

274

Gunshot wounds - aftercare  

MedlinePLUS

... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

275

Inflammation and wound repair.  

PubMed

Wound repair requires the integration of complex cellular networks to restore tissue homeostasis. Defects in wound repair are associated with human disease including pyoderma gangrenosum, a heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by unhealed wounds and chronic inflammation of unclear etiology. Despite its clinical importance, there remain significant gaps in understanding how different types of cells communicate to integrate inflammation and wound repair. Recent progress in wound and regenerative biology has been gained by studying genetically tractable model organisms, like zebrafish, that retain the ability to regenerate. The optical transparency and ease of genetic manipulation make zebrafish an ideal model system to dissect multi-cellular and tissue level interactions during wound repair. The focus of this review is on recent advances in understanding how inflammation and wound repair are orchestrated and integrated to achieve wound resolution and tissue regeneration using zebrafish. PMID:24853879

LeBert, Danny C; Huttenlocher, Anna

2014-08-01

276

CCMR: Wound Dressing Tool and Wound Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of our project is to develop a Wound Dressing Tool (WDT) that in addition to extracting overabundant chemicals like the VAC system does, can also allow for variable rates of mass transfer as well as a way for clinicians to monitor the fluid chemical composition of the wound bed during the healing and treatment processes.

Men, Shannon

2005-08-17

277

Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.  

PubMed

Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

Topaz, Moris

2012-05-01

278

Post-operative delirium in elderly patients.  

PubMed

Delirium is a common, but an often underdiagnosed complication in the elderly following major surgery. Recognising delirium in early stages and diagnosing the condition based on established criteria can improve the outcome and management. Managing delirium with environmental, supportive and pharmacological interventions will possibly reduce the incidence and side-effects associated with post-operative delirium. The purpose of this article is to provide an over view of the current knowledge about the disease, diagnosis, pathogenesis, preventive strategies, and treatment of post-operative delirium. PMID:25024465

Vijayakumar, B; Elango, P; Ganessan, R

2014-05-01

279

Post-operative delirium in elderly patients  

PubMed Central

Delirium is a common, but an often underdiagnosed complication in the elderly following major surgery. Recognising delirium in early stages and diagnosing the condition based on established criteria can improve the outcome and management. Managing delirium with environmental, supportive and pharmacological interventions will possibly reduce the incidence and side-effects associated with post-operative delirium. The purpose of this article is to provide an over view of the current knowledge about the disease, diagnosis, pathogenesis, preventive strategies, and treatment of post-operative delirium. PMID:25024465

Vijayakumar, B; Elango, P; Ganessan, R

2014-01-01

280

Supplemental Intravenous Crystalloid Administration Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Wound perfusion and oxygenation are important determinants of the development of postoperative wound infections. Supplemental fluid administration significantly increases tissue oxygenation in surrogate wounds in the subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm in perioperative surgical patients. We tested the hypothesis that supplemental fluid administration during and after elective colon resections decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Patients undergoing open colon resection were randomly assigned to small (n=124, 8 mL·kg-1·h-1) or large volume (n=129, 16-18 mL·kg-1·h-1) fluid management. Our major outcomes were two distinct criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections: 1) purulent exudate combined with a culture positive for pathogenic bacteria and 2) Center for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections. All wound infections diagnosed using either criterion by a blinded observer in the 15 days following surgery were considered in the analysis. Wound healing was evaluated with the ASEPSIS scoring system. Of the patients given small fluid administration, 14 had surgical wound infections; 11 given large fluid therapy had infections, P=0.46. ASEPSIS wound healing scores were similar in both groups: 7±16 (small volume) vs. 8±14 (large volume), P=0.70. Our results suggest that supplemental hydration in the range tested does not impact wound infection rate. PMID:16244030

Kabon, Barbara; Akça, Ozan; Taguchi, Akiko; Nagele, Angelika; Jebadurai, Ratnaraj; Arkilic, Cem F.; Sharma, Neeru; Ahluwalia, Arundhathi; Galandiuk, Susan; Fleshman, James; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

2005-01-01

281

Chronic Morphine Administration Delays Wound Healing by Inhibiting Immune Cell Recruitment to the Wound Site  

PubMed Central

Patients prescribed morphine for the management of chronic pain, and chronic heroin abusers, often present with complications such as increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and inadequate healing of wounds. We investigated the effect of morphine on wound-healing events in the presence of an infection in an in vivo murine model that mimics the clinical manifestations seen in opioid user and abuser populations. We show for the first time that in the presence of an inflammatory inducer, lipopolysaccharide, chronic morphine treatment results in a marked decrease in wound closure, compromised wound integrity, and increased bacterial sepsis. Morphine treatment resulted in a significant delay and reduction in both neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site. The delay and reduction in neutrophil reduction was attributed to altered early expression of keratinocyte derived cytokine and was independent of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 expression, whereas suppression of macrophage infiltration was attributed to suppressed levels of the potent macrophage chemoattractant monocyte chemotactic protein-1. When the effects of chronic morphine on later wound healing events were investigated, a significant suppression in angiogenesis and myofibroblast recruitment were observed in animals that received chronic morphine administration. Taken together, our findings indicate that morphine treatment results in a delay in the recruitment of cellular events following wounding, resulting in a lack of bacterial clearance and delayed wound closure. PMID:20042674

Martin, Josephine L.; Koodie, Lisa; Krishnan, Anitha G.; Charboneau, Richard; Barke, Roderick A.; Roy, Sabita

2010-01-01

282

[Thoracic and abdominal wounds].  

PubMed

Thoracic and abdominal wounds are characterized by their diversity, their possible danger and the necessity of a successful diagnosis and therapy strategy. Management of thoracic wounds and indications of surgical treatment are conditioned by airway and hemodynamic states, paraclinical exams and chest drainage. The approach of abdominal wounds is based upon their possible penetrating character. Surgical indications, even if very discussed, are still wider. Thoraco-abdominal wounds could concern the diaphragm and are remarkable for their surgical strategy. PMID:9208685

Martinod, E; Lang-Lazdunski, L; Liard, O; Jancovici, R

1997-05-01

283

Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

Wagner, Timothy D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: timothy.wagner@amedd.army.mil; Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Suit, Herman D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S. [Orthopaedic Oncology, Department of Orthopaedics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yoon, Sam S. [Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Gebhardt, Marc C. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Mankin, Henry J. [Orthopaedic Oncology, Department of Orthopaedics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2009-01-01

284

Management and complications of stomas.  

PubMed

Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management. PMID:23177069

Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

2013-02-01

285

The tolerance of skin grafts to postoperative radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma  

SciTech Connect

During the last ten years at the National Cancer Institute, 11 patients have received 12 courses of postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy to skin grafts used for wound closure after the resection of soft-tissue sarcomas. The intervals between grafting and the initiation of radiation ranged between 3 and 20 weeks, and 4 patients received chemotherapy at the same time as their radiation. Ten of the 12 irradiated grafts remained intact after the completion of therapy. One graft had several small persistently ulcerated areas that required no further surgical treatment, and one graft required a musculocutaneous flap for reconstruction of a persistent large ulcer. Acute radiation effects on the grafted skin sometimes developed at slightly lower doses than usually seen with normal skin, but these acute effects necessitated a break in therapy on only five occasions. Concurrent chemotherapy and a relatively short interval between grafting and the initiation of radiation seemed to contribute to more severe radiation reactions. This experience indicates that postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy can be delivered to skin grafted areas without undue fear of complications, especially if the graft is allowed to heal adequately prior to initiating therapy and if chemotherapy is not given in conjunction with radiation.

Lawrence, W.T.; Zabell, A.; McDonald, H.D. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1986-03-01

286

Post-operative depletion of platelet count is associated with anastomotic insufficiency following intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy: a case–control study from the results of 220 cases of intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy  

PubMed Central

Background Post-operative anastomotic insufficiency following major hepato-biliary surgery has significant impacts on the post-operative course. Recent reports have revealed that platelets play an important role in liver regeneration and wound healing. From these experimental and clinical results on platelet function, we hypothesized that post-operative platelet depletion (to <10?×?104/?L) would be associated with delayed liver regeneration as well as anastomotic insufficiency of intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy. However, little information is available regarding correlations between platelet count and these complications. The purposes of the present study were, firstly, to evaluate the incidence of anastomotic insufficiency following intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy and, secondly, to evaluate whether platelet depletion represents a risk factor for anastomotic insufficiency in intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy. Methods Participants in this study comprised 220 consecutive patients who underwent intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy following hepato-biliary resection for biliary malignancies between September 1998 and December 2010. Anastomotic insufficiency was confirmed by cholangiographic demonstration of leakage from the anastomosis using contrast medium introduced via a biliary drainage tube or prophylactic drain placed during surgery. Results Anastomotic insufficiency of the intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy occurred in 13 of 220 patients (6%). Thirteen of the 220 patients, including one with anastomotic insufficiency, died during the study. Uni- and multivariate analyses both revealed that platelet depletion on post-operative day 1 (<10?×?104/?L) correlated with anastomotic insufficiency. Conclusion Post-operative platelet depletion was closely associated with anastomotic insufficiency following intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy. This correlation has been established, but the underlying mechanisms have not. PMID:25323783

2014-01-01

287

Computerized assessment of complications after colorectal surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Historically, complication rates after colorectal surgery have been stratified by disease process, type of operation, or anesthesia risk derived after an intensive review of the medical record. Newer computer applications purport to shorten this process and predict the probability of postoperative complications by distinguishing them from comorbidities that are commingled on uniform discharge codes. We analyzed CaduCIS™ software, which

Khawaja Azimuddin; Lester Rosen; James F. Reed III

2001-01-01

288

A Newly Designed Postoperative Ischial Weight-Bearing Proximal Contact Lower-Limb Prosthesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postamputation prostheses for the lower extremities help reduce medical complications and improve patients overall function. However, there were drawbacks with these postoperative prostheses that limited their use. A recent development is a newly designed ischial weight-bearing prosthesis used postoperatively. We performed a random review of 12 amputee patients retrospectively to determine whether there were any complications with its use. There

Daniel M. Ryan

1998-01-01

289

Spinal cord detethering procedures in children: A 5year retrospective cohort study of the early post-operative course.  

PubMed

Tethered spinal cord can cause neurological, orthopaedic and sphincteric problems in children and detethering surgery may prevent or reverse these problems. This 5year retrospective cohort study aimed to review our experience of detethering surgery at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia, particularly examining the early post-operative complications of this procedure. Between 2007 and 2012, 61 children underwent 63 detethering procedures. The median age at detethering surgery was 1.4years old (interquartile range: 0.7-5.6years). Fifty-five children (90.1%) had lumbosacral procedures, 31 (50.8%) were asymptomatic from tethering, 11 (18.0%) had motor or gait disturbance, 11 (18.0%) sphincteric disturbance, eight (13.1%) lower limb orthopaedic deformities, eight (13.1%) scoliosis, six (9.8%) back or leg pain and two (3.3%) sensory disturbance. The most common tethering pathologies were spinal lipomas in 32 children (52.5%), filum abnormalities in 23 (37.7%), dorsal sinus tracts in eight (13.1%) and diastematomyelia in seven (11.5%). Twenty-six children (42.6%) had either a syrinx or central canal dilatation preoperatively. The most common complications were wound infection and cerebrospinal fluid leak. Six children (9.8%) required reoperation for wound issues and two patients (3.3%) required subsequent reoperation for cord retethering during the study period. There were no deaths and no new neurological deficits. Of the children with the above preoperative deficits, 26.7% were documented to have improvement or resolution of their symptoms post-operatively. The highest rate of improvement occurred in children with motor or gait disturbance (36.4%) or sphincteric disturbance (27.3%). PMID:25818162

Thuy, Matthew; Chaseling, Raymond; Fowler, Adam

2015-05-01

290

[Toilet of chronic wound].  

PubMed

Chronic wound toilet, with appropriate care of the surrounding skin, is one of the basic steps that must be performed in the treatment of patients with chronic wound. On wound cleaning and bandaging, it is of utmost importance to choose an appropriate technique of cleansing, select an appropriate solution for leaching and choose an appropriate wound dressing. In this way, the wound is protected from dirt from the environment and microorganisms, while protecting the surrounding tissue from the wound exudate, providing optimal conditions for better and faster wound healing and contributing to improved patient quality of life. The frequency of dressing change is individual and must be tailored to each patient in correlation with the psychosocial status of the patient, the type of the wound, the amount and type of wound exudate, as well as what is to be put on the wound. One of the most important elements in wound toilet is appropriate care for the surrounding skin. Basic guidelines for skin care must meet three basic criteria: adequate washing and cleansing of the skin, maintain the physiological balance of the skin and protect the skin from external damage. PMID:24371977

Strok, Nevenka; Huljev, Dubravko

2013-10-01

291

Biofilm in wound care.  

PubMed

A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial. PMID:25757387

Rajpaul, Kumal

2015-03-01

292

Reconstruction option of abdominal wounds with large tissue defects  

PubMed Central

Background Abdominal wall defects result from trauma, abdominal wall tumors, necrotizing infections or complications of previous abdominal surgeries. Apart from cosmetics, abdominal wall defects have strong negative functional impact on the patients. Many different techniques exist for abdominal wall repair. Most problematic and troublesome are defects, where major part of abdominal wall had to be resected and tissue for transfer or reconstruction is absent. Case presentation Authors of the article present operative technique, in which reconstruction of abdominal wall was managed by composite polypropylene mesh with absorbable collagen film, creation of granulation tissue with use of NPWT (negative pressure wound therapy), and subsequent split skin grafting. Three patients with massive abdominal wall defect were successfully managed and abdominal wall reconstruction was performed by mentioned technique. Functional and cosmetic effect is acceptable and patients have good postoperative quality of life. Conclusions Patients with giant abdominal defects can benefit from described technique. It serves as the only option, with which abdominal wall is fully reconstructed without need for the secondary intervention. PMID:25103782

2014-01-01

293

Modality of wound closure after total knee replacement: are staples as safe as sutures? A retrospective study of 181 patients  

PubMed Central

Background Surgical site wound closure plays a vital role in post-operative success. This effect is magnified in regard to commonly performed elective procedures such as total knee arthroplasty. The use of either sutures or staples for skin re-approximation remains a contested subject, which may have a significant impact on both patient safety and surgical outcome. The literature remains divided on this topic. Methods Two cohorts of patients at a level one trauma and regional referral center were reviewed. Cohorts consisted of consecutive total knee arthroplasties performed by two surgeons who achieved surgical wound re-approximation by either staples or absorbable subcuticular sutures. Outcome variables included time of surgery, wound dehiscence, surgical site infection per Center for Disease Control criteria and repeat procedures for debridement and re-closure. Results 181 patients qualified for study inclusion. Staples were employed in 82 cases (45.3% of total) and sutures in 99 cases (54.7%). The staples group had no complications while the sutures group had 9 (9.1%). These consisted of: 4 infections (2 superficial, one deep, one organ/space); three patients required re-suturing for dehiscence; one allergic type reaction to suture material; and one gout flare resulting in dehiscence. The mean surgical time with sutures was 122.3 minutes (sd = 33.4) and with staples was 114 minutes (sd = 24.4). Conclusion This study demonstrated significantly fewer complications with staple use than with suture use. While all complications found in this study cannot be directly attributed to skin re-approximation method, the need for further prospective, randomized trials is established. PMID:22011354

2011-01-01

294

Extended negative pressure wound therapy-assisted dermatotraction for the closure of large open fasciotomy wounds in necrotizing fasciitis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapid progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue or fascia and may result in large open wounds. The surgical options to cover these wounds are often limited by the patient condition and result in suboptimal functional and cosmetic wound coverage. Dermatotraction can restore the function and appearance of the fasciotomy wound and is less invasive in patients with comorbidities. However, dermatotraction for scarred, stiff NF fasciotomy wounds is often ineffective, resulting in skin necrosis. The authors use extended negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) as an assist in dermatotraction to close open NF fasciotomy wounds. The authors present the clinical results, followed by a discussion of the clinical basis of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction. Methods A retrospective case series of eight patients with NF who underwent open fasciotomy was approved for the study. After serial wound preparation, dermatotraction was applied in a shoelace manner using elastic vessel loops. Next, the extended NPWT was applied over the wound. The sponge was three times wider than the wound width, and the transparent covering drape almost encircled the anatomical wound area. The negative pressure of the NPWT was set at a continuous 100 mmHg by suction barometer. The clinical outcome was assessed based on wound area reduction after treatment and by the achievement of direct wound closure. Results After the first set of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction procedures, the mean wound area was significantly decreased (658.12 cm2 to 29.37 cm2; p?=?0.002), as five out of eight patients achieved direct wound closure. One patient with a chest wall defect underwent latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap coverage, with primary closure of the donor site. Two Fournier’s gangrene patients underwent multiple sets of treatment and finally achieved secondary wound closure with skin grafts. The patients were followed up for 18.3 months on average and showed satisfactory results without wound recurrence. Conclusions Extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction advances scarred, stiff fasciotomy wound margins synergistically in NF and allows direct closure of the wound without complications. This method can be another good treatment option for the NF patient with large open wounds whose general condition is unsuitable for extensive reconstructive surgery. PMID:24731449

2014-01-01

295

Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture  

PubMed Central

Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67?±?0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17?±?1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t?=?1.798, P?Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for reduction of fracture. PMID:25142353

2014-01-01

296

Bio-Conjugated Polycaprolactone Membranes: A Novel Wound Dressing  

PubMed Central

Background The combination of polycaprolactone and hyaluronic acid creates an ideal environment for wound healing. Hyaluronic acid maintains a moist wound environment and accelerates the in-growth of granulation tissue. Polycaprolactone has excellent mechanical strength, limits inflammation and is biocompatible. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of bio-conjugated polycaprolactone membranes (BPM) as a wound dressing. Methods 16 New Zealand white rabbits were sedated and local anaesthesia was administered. Two 3.0×3.0 cm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of each rabbit, between the lowest rib and the pelvic bone. The wounds were dressed with either BPM (n=12) or Mepitel (n=12) (control), a polyamide-silicon wound dressing. These were evaluated macroscopically on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days for granulation, re-epithelialization, infection, and wound size, and histologically for epidermal and dermal regeneration. Results Both groups showed a comparable extent of granulation and re-epithelialization. No signs of infection were observed. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in wound size between the two groups. BPM (n=6): 8.33 cm2, 4.90 cm2, 3.12 cm2, 1.84 cm2; Mepitel (n=6): 10.29 cm2, 5.53 cm2, 3.63 cm2, 2.02 cm2; at the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days. The extents of epidermal and dermal regeneration were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions BPM is comparable to Mepitel as a safe and efficacious wound dressing. PMID:25396174

Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Teo, Erin Yiling; Jing, Lim; Koh, Yun Pei; Qian, Tan Si; Wen, Feng; Lee, James Wai Kit; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Yap, Yan Lin; Lee, Hanjing; Lee, Chuen Neng; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Lim, Jane

2014-01-01

297

Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Edema  

PubMed Central

Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for prevention of this postoperative complication so as to decrease morbidity and mortality. The various search engines for preparation of this manuscript were used which included Entrez (including Pubmed and Pubmed Central), NIH.gov, Medknow.com, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, Scopus, Science Direct, MedHelp.org, yahoo.com and google.com. Manual search was carried out and various text books and journals of anesthesia and critical care medicine were also searched. From the information gathered, it was observed that postoperative cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients with serious cardiovascular diseases is most common followed by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema which can be due to fluid overload in the postoperative period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post-extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure. NPPE carries a good prognosis if promptly diagnosed and appropriately treated with or without mechanical ventilation. PMID:23439791

Bajwa, SJ Singh; Kulshrestha, A

2012-01-01

298

Evaluation of Anti-TGF-2 Antibody as a New Postoperative Anti-scarring Agent in Glaucoma Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE. Postoperative subconjunctival wound healing re- mains the commonest cause of late bleb failure after glaucoma filtration surgery. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes transforming growth factor-2 (CAT-152; lerdelimumab) could be used as a postoperative agent to prevent scarring after glaucoma surgery and compared it with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), to benchmark its potential clinical

Anna L. Mead; Tina T. L. Wong; M. Francesca Cordeiro; Ian K. Anderson; Peng T. Khaw

299

Hydrocephalus communicans after traumatic upper cervical spine injury with a cerebrospinal fluid fistula: a rare complication  

PubMed Central

Secondary hydrocephalus communicans after traumatic upper cervical spine injuries with leakage of cerebrospinal fluid is a rare and hardly described complication. A case of a 75-year-old woman sustained a type II dens axis without other injuries, especially without evidence of a hydrocephalus in the primary CT scan. Dorsal atlanto-axial fusion was performed. Postoperative drainage was prolonged and positive for ?2-transferrin. Wound revision with an attempt to seal the leakage was not successful. Secondary CT scans of the brain were performed due to neurological deterioration and showed a hydrocephalus with typical EEG findings. No anatomical reason for a circulative obstruction was found in the CT scan. After application of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt the neurological status improved and the patient could be discharged to neurological rehabilitation. PMID:22752831

Mica, Ladislav; Neuhaus, Valentin; Pöschmann, Enrico; Könü-Leblebicioglu, Dilek; Schwarz, Urs; Wanner, Guido A; Werner, Clément ML; Simmen, Hans-Peter

2010-01-01

300

Complications in periocular rejuvenation.  

PubMed

Thorough preoperative evaluation with meticulous surgical planning to achieve facial aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface is imperative to avoid or decrease potential functional and/or cosmetic complications in cosmetic periocular surgery. Before performing surgery, the physician should be aware of the patient's history of dry eyes, previous facial trauma, previous injection of Botox Cosmetic, history of previous laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and past facial surgery. A full evaluation should be performed on the upper eyelid/brow region to assess for the presence of brow ptosis, brow/eyelid asymmetry, dermatochalasis/pseudodermatochalasis, eyelid ptosis, and deep superior sulcus. On the lower eyelid/cheek examination, special attention should be directed to the diagnosis of underlying negative vector, dry eyes, prominent eyes, lower lid retraction, ectropion, lateral canthal dystopia, lower eyelid laxity, scleral show, and lagophthalmos, with a rejuvenation goal that focuses on obtaining a youthful fullness through repositioning and reinforcing efforts to avoid the negative effects of hollowness. Intraoperative and postoperative medical and surgical management of cosmetic periocular surgery complications focus on decreasing the risk of postoperative ptosis, lagophthalmos, lid retraction, and lid asymmetry, with special attention to limiting the risk of visual loss secondary to orbital hemorrhage. PMID:20659676

Mack, William P

2010-08-01

301

The Impact of Hepatitis C Status on Postoperative Outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection on the postoperative complication rate is unknown. We identi- fied a population of surgical patients (n 2457) for whom the HCV antibody (anti-HCV) had been measured and compared after surgical complications and mortality be- tween those who were positive (17.9%) versus negative. The complication rates were 10% in the anti-HCV positive

Ramsey C. Cheung; Frank Hsieh; Yajie Wang; John B. Pollard

2003-01-01

302

Surgical complications after kidney transplantation: different impacts of immunosuppression, graft function, patient variables, and surgical performance.  

PubMed

The population of kidney transplant (KTx) recipients often has complex medical and immunological conditions. Surgical complications (SCs) contribute to the increasing morbidity and costs in these patients. We analyzed the risk factors for SC in 405 KTx patients treated using defined immunosuppressive regimens according to their clinical and immunological risk profile: (1) standard immunosuppression (SIS) with IL-2 receptor mAb, CNI, and (a) mycophenolic acid (MPA) or (b) mTOR inhibitor; and (2) more intense immunosuppression (IIS) with (a) ATG or (b) the additional use of plasma exchange and B- and T-cell-depleting agents. In a mixed effects logistic regression model, we identified the following risk factors for SC: male gender, diabetes, and post-operative dialysis. No difference was found between the patients who received SIS with MPA and those who received mTOR inhibitors. The risk of suffering complications with IIS increases with age. In addition to IIS, diabetes was a risk for wound healing disorders. Therapeutic anticoagulation and a third or subsequent retransplantation increased the rate of bleeding. We did not identify immunosuppression or patient demographics as risk factors for lymphoceles or ureter complications; however, we demonstrated that the surgeon had a significant impact on severe complications, especially those of the ureter. PMID:25598053

Koch, Martina; Kantas, Alexandros; Ramcke, Katja; Drabik, Anna I; Nashan, Björn

2015-03-01

303

Complications of interval laparoscopic tubal sterilization: findings from the United States collaborative review of sterilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To estimate the risk of intraoperative or postoperative complications for interval laparoscopic tubal sterilizations.Methods: We used a prospective, multicenter cohort study of 9475 women who had interval laparoscopic tubal sterilization to calculate the rates of intraoperative or postoperative complications. The relative safety of various methods was assessed by calculating overall complication rates for each major method of tubal occlusion.

Denise J. Jamieson; Susan D. Hillis; Ann Duerr; Polly A. Marchbanks; Caroline Costello; Herbert B. Peterson

2000-01-01

304

Compromised wounds in Canada.  

PubMed

Wounds are a serious healthcare issue with profound personal, clinical and economic implications. Using a working definition of compromised wounds, this study examines the prevalence of wounds by type and by healthcare setting using data from hospitals, home care, hospital-based continuing care and long-term care facilities within fiscal year 2011-2012 in Canada. It also evaluates several risk factors associated with wounds, such as diabetes, circulatory disease and age. Compromised wounds were reported in almost 4% of in-patient acute hospitalizations and in more than 7% of home care clients, almost 10% of long-term care clients and almost 30% of hospital-based continuing care clients. Patients with diabetes were much more likely to have a compromised wound than were patients without the disease. PMID:24844713

Denny, Keith; Lawand, Christina; Perry, Sheril D

2014-01-01

305

Negative pressure wound therapy to prevent seromas and treat surgical incisions after total hip arthroplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) to improve wound healing after\\u000a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and its influence on the development of postoperative seromas in the wound area.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials  The study is a prospective randomised evaluation of NPWT in patients with large surgical wounds after THA, randomising patients\\u000a to either a

Milena Pachowsky; Johannes Gusinde; Andrea Klein; Siegfried Lehrl; Stefan Schulz-Drost; Philipp Schlechtweg; Johannes Pauser; Kolja Gelse; Matthias H. Brem

306

The relative roles of aggressive wound care versus revascularization in salvage of the threatened lower extremity in the renal failure diabetic patient.  

PubMed

Current literature indicates poor survival and limb salvage rates in renal failure diabetic patients who present with ulcerated or gangrenous lower extremities. Even in those limbs that were successfully revascularized, the amputation rate was as high as 37 percent. This has led some to advocate immediate amputation when treating the threatened limb of a renal failure diabetic patient. The authors reviewed all renal failure diabetic patients in their wound registry to determine whether such pessimism was warranted. The authors then analyzed the relative roles of revascularization and aggressive wound care on long-term limb salvage. Forty-five consecutive renal failure diabetic patients with 71 wounds in 54 limbs were identified. Twenty-seven patients had chronic renal insufficiency, 15 patients had end-stage renal disease, and three patients received kidney transplants. The revascularization procedures (46 percent of all limbs) included angioplasty, femoral-popliteal, femoral-distal, and popliteal-distal bypasses. Forty-three amputations in combination with 67 soft-tissue repairs (delayed primary wound closure, skin grafts, local flaps, pedicled flaps, and free flaps) were necessary to close the defects. After a mean follow-up of over 3 years, the data indicate that 79 percent of wounds healed, 89 percent of all limbs were salvaged, and 49 percent of patients survived. Revascularization improved the threatened limb's salvage rate from negligible to a level similar to that of the adequately vascularized limb. Fifteen out of 71 wounds did not heal because of the patient's early postoperative death, ischemia not amenable to revascularization, or noncompliance. Six below-knee amputations were performed (one despite a patent bypass and five in adequately vascularized patients). The average time for wounds to heal in the revascularized patients was 79 days versus 71 days in adequately vascularized patients. There was an overall 43 percent complication rate. Of the patients who were alive after the 3-year follow-up, 73 percent were independently ambulating, whereas 27 percent were bound to wheelchair or bed. Eighty-two percent of patients were very satisfied with the salvage attempt, 18 percent were moderately satisfied, and all patients said they would go through the process again. The authors believe that salvaging the threatened extremity in the renal failure diabetic patient is justified whether or not the limb requires revascularization. Revascularization improved the limb salvage rate, patient survival, and days for wounds to heal to a level comparable to that of the adequately vascularized limb. The key to subsequently achieving high salvage rates is the quality of perioperative wound care (e.g., serial debridements, antibiotics, dressings) and the timing and selection of appropriate soft-tissue coverage. PMID:11964979

Attinger, Christopher E; Ducic, Ivica; Neville, Richard F; Abbruzzese, Mark R; Gomes, Mario; Sidawy, Anton N

2002-04-01

307

Telemedicine for wound management  

PubMed Central

The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process. PMID:23162242

Chittoria, Ravi K.

2012-01-01

308

[Pelvic lymph node dissection. Complication management].  

PubMed

Extended pelvic lymph node dissection allows exact lymph node staging and has the potential to improve prognosis. In addition to these advantages, there are some perioperative and postoperative complications. In case of transection of the obturator nerve, a microsurgical end-to-end anastomosis should be performed. The most frequent postoperative complication is (symptomatic) lymphocele which is predominantly diagnosed after extraperitoneal surgery. Meticulous lymph node dissection with clipping of lymphatic vessels, sparing the lateral wall of the external iliac artery from dissection, sufficient postoperative drainage, and application of low molecular weight heparin in the upper arm may reduce their incidence. Instillation of sclerosing agents and sufficient drainage are normally successful. If not, laparoscopic fenestration of lymphocele should be performed. Regular ultrasound examinations are necessary to diagnose and treat postoperative lymphocele in a timely manner. PMID:24705476

Weckermann, D

2014-07-01

309

Prognostic Significance of Complications after Laparoscopic Colectomy for Colon Cancer  

PubMed Central

Aims This study sought to evaluate the prognostic significance of postoperative complications for colon cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Methods From May 2006 to May 2009, a total 224 patients who underwent laparoscopic curative resection (R0) for colon cancer were included in our retrospective study. Postoperative complications were evaluated according to a standardized grading system. The main outcome measurements of our study were overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS), which were then compared between the no complication and complication groups. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the correlation between complications and prognosis. Results Fifty-nine postoperative complications occurred in 43 patients. The overall morbidity rate was 26.3%. The 5-year OS in the complication group was 41.4% compared with 78.5% in the no complication group (P<0.001). The cumulative incidence of relapse was also more aggressive in patients with complications (5-year RFS: complication group 40.9% vs. no complication group 82.1%, P<0.001). Multivariate analysis identified complications as a significant factor increasing the risk for both OS (RR 2.737; 95% CI 1.512–4.952; P?=?0.001) and RFS (RR 4.247; 95% CI 2.291–7.876; P<0.001). Conclusion Postoperative complications could pose a significant adverse impact not only on OS but also on RFS in patients with colon cancer even when laparoscopic R0 resection is available. PMID:25299478

Xia, Xiang; Wu, Weidong; Zhang, Kundong; Cen, Gang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Huang, Kejian; Huang, Chen; Qiu, Zhengjun

2014-01-01

310

WOUND-HEALING PROPERTIES OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ? (TGF-?) INDUCIBLE EARLY GENE 1 (TIEG1) KNOCKOUT MICE  

PubMed Central

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) has a broad effect on wound healing, but many questions remain about the regulation of TGF-? during the healing process. TGF-? inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) is a primary response gene for TGF-? that controls the activities of the TGF-?/Smad pathway, the primary TGF-? signaling pathway. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of TIEG1 in cutaneous wound healing using TIEG1 knockout mice. The wound healing in TIEG1 knockout mice and wild-type controls was evaluated by wound breaking strength, Western blot, and histology at postoperative days 3, 7, and 14. Although re-epithelialization of both groups was similarly complete at day 7, the TIEG1 knockout mice had a significantly lower wound breaking strength than the controls at postoperative day 14. These results suggest that TIEG1 expression may be an important factor involved in the initiation and support of normal cutaneous wound healing. PMID:20016760

Taguchi, Manabu; Moran, Steven L.; Zobitz, Mark E.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Amadio, Peter C.

2009-01-01

311

Pregnancy Complications  

MedlinePLUS

Home > Pregnancy > You're pregnant: Now what? Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en español ) Pregnancy complications Health problems before pregnancy Pregnancy related problems Infections during pregnancy When to call the doctor ...

312

Delayed incidental diagnosis of postoperative extradural hematoma following ventriculoperitoneal shunt  

PubMed Central

Ventriculo peritoneal (VP) shunt uncommonly complicates as intracranial hematomas which can still occur in patients with a functioning VP shunt leading to a delay in the diagnosis which can be extremely dangerous and lead to adverse outcomes. We report a case of an incidental diagnosis of delayed post-operative EDH following VP shunt in an young adult patient with a right cerebellar lesion and highlight the need for meticulous post-operative neurological examination. PMID:25552861

Byrappa, Vinay; Redhu, Shruti; Varadarajan, Bhadrinarayan

2015-01-01

313

Are there independent predisposing factors for postoperative infections following open heart surgery?  

PubMed Central

Background Nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery represent serious complications associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and economic burden. This study was undertaken to evaluate the frequency, characteristics, and risk factors of microbiologically documented nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery in a Cardio-Vascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU). Methods All patients who underwent open heart surgery between May 2006 and March 2008 were enrolled in this prospective study. Pre-, intra- and postoperative variables were collected and examined as possible risk factors for development of nosocomial infections. The diagnosis of infection was always microbiologically confirmed. Results Infection occurred in 24 of 172 patients (13.95%). Out of 172 patients, 8 patients (4.65%) had superficial wound infection at the sternotomy site, 5 patients (2.9%) had central venous catheter infection, 4 patients (2.32%) had pneumonia, 9 patients (5.23%) had bacteremia, one patient (0.58%) had mediastinitis, one (0.58%) had harvest surgical site infection, one (0.58%) had urinary tract infection, and another one patient (0.58%) had other major infection. The mortality rate was 25% among the patients with infection and 3.48% among all patients who underwent cardiac surgery compared with 5.4% of patients who did not develop early postoperative infection after cardiac surgery. Culture results demonstrated equal frequencies of gram-positive cocci and gram-negative bacteria. A backward stepwise multivariable logistic regression model analysis identified diabetes mellitus (OR 5.92, CI 1.56 to 22.42, p = 0.009), duration of mechanical ventilation (OR 1.30, CI 1.005 to 1.69, p = 0.046), development of severe complications in the CICU (OR 18.66, CI 3.36 to 103.61, p = 0.001) and re-admission to the CVICU (OR 8.59, CI 2.02 to 36.45, p = 0.004) as independent risk factors associated with development of nosocomial infection after cardiac surgery. Conclusions We concluded that diabetes mellitus, the duration of mechanical ventilation, the presence of complications irrelevant to the infection during CVICU stay and CVICU re-admission are independent risk factors for the development of postoperative infection in cardiac surgery patients. PMID:22082355

2011-01-01

314

Histometric analysis of rat alveolar wound healing.  

PubMed

The chronology of alveolar wound healing was analyzed by a standard stereological method (point-counting volumetry) in normal rats. The upper right incisors were extracted and the animals were killed 1, 2, 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively. A light camera was used to determine the volume fraction of histologic components in the apical, middle and cervical thirds of the alveolus. Progressive bone neoformation was quantified, in parallel to a decrease in percent volume of connective tissue. A significantly smaller volume fraction of bone trabeculae in the cervical third of the socket was observed at all periods except the 6th week. The present histometric data show that bone neoformation continued to proceed beyond the 3rd postoperative week. PMID:9485631

Carvalho, T L; Bombonato, K F; Brentegani, L G

1997-01-01

315

Vaginal Evisceration: An Unexpected Complication of Conization  

PubMed Central

Background. Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) is routinely performed for the management of high grade intracervical neoplasia (CIN). Several uncommon complications have been described, including postoperative peritonitis, pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery, and bowel fistula. We report a unique case of postoperative vaginal evisceration and the subsequent management. Case. A 73-years-old woman underwent LLETZ for high grade CIN. On postoperative day 3, she was admitted for small bowel evisceration through the vagina. Surgical management was based on combined laparoscopic and transvaginal approach and consisted in bowel inspection and reinstatement, peritoneal washing, and dehiscence repair. Conclusions. Vaginal evisceration is a rare but potentially serious complication of pelvic surgery. This case report is to make clinicians aware of such complication following LLETZ and its management. PMID:25506010

Ghassani, Ali; Andre, Benoit; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Tanguy le Gac, Yann; Martinez, Alejandra; Vidal, Fabien

2014-01-01

316

Biomechanics and Wound Healing in the Cornea  

PubMed Central

The biomechanical and wound healing properties of the cornea undermine the predictability and stability of refractive surgery and contribute to discrepancies between attempted and achieved visual outcomes after LASIK, surface ablation and other keratorefractive procedures. Furthermore, patients predisposed to biomechanical failure or abnormal wound healing can experience serious complications such as keratectasia or clinically significant corneal haze, and more effective means for the identification of such patients prior to surgery are needed. In this review, we describe the cornea as a complex structural composite material with pronounced anisotropy and heterogeneity, summarize current understanding of major biomechanical and reparative pathways that contribute to the corneal response to laser vision correction, and review the role of these processes in ectasia, intraocular pressure measurement artifact, diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and corneal haze. The current understanding of differences in the corneal response after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), LASIK and femtosecond-assisted LASIK are reviewed. Surgical and disease models that integrate corneal geometric data, substructural anatomy, elastic and viscoelastic material properties and wound healing behavior have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and minimize complications but depend on the identification of preoperative predictors of biomechanical and wound healing responses in individual patients. PMID:16720023

Dupps, William J.; Wilson, Steven E.

2009-01-01

317

Wound-Periderm Formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Herbivores, and particularly chewing insects, cause substantial damage to the plant. In addition to lost tissue, there are great concerns of pathogen invasion and water loss at the site of the attack. One of the plant’s defense strategies is the formation of wound periderm at the boundaries of the invaded or damaged region to isolate it from non-wounded healthy tissue.

Idit Ginzberg

318

Wound repair and regeneration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The repair of wounds is one of the most complex biological processes that occur during human life. After an injury, multiple biological pathways immediately become activated and are synchronized to respond. In human adults, the wound repair process commonly leads to a non-functioning mass of fibrotic tissue known as a scar. By contrast, early in gestation, injured fetal tissues can

Geoffrey C. Gurtner; Sabine Werner; Yann Barrandon; Michael T. Longaker

2008-01-01

319

Evidence-based Management Strategies for Treatment of Chronic Wounds  

PubMed Central

The care and management of patients with chronic wounds and their far-reaching effects challenge both the patient and the practitioner. Further complicating this situation is the paucity of evidence-based treatment strategies for chronic wound care. After searching both MEDLINE and Cochrane databases, we reviewed currently available articles concerning chronic wound care. Utilizing this information, we have outlined a review of current, evidence-based concepts as they pertain to the treatment of chronic wounds, focusing on fundamental treatment principles for the management of venous, arterial, diabetic, and pressure ulcers. Individualized treatment options as well as general wound management principles applicable to all varieties of chronic wounds are described. Classification and treatment guidelines as well as the adoption of the TIME acronym facilitate an organized conceptional approach to wound care. In so doing, individual aspects of generalized wound care such as debridement, infection, and moisture control as well as attention to the qualities of the wound edge are comprehensively evaluated, communicated, and addressed. Effective adjuvant agents for the therapy of chronic wounds including nutritional and social support measures are listed, as is a brief review of strategies helpful for preventing recurrence. An appreciation of evidence-based treatment pathways and an understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic wounds are important elements in the management of patients with chronic wounds. To achieve effective and long-lasting results, a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, focused on the education and coordination of patient, family as well as medical and support staff can prove invaluable. PMID:19578487

Werdin, Frank; Tennenhaus, Mayer; Schaller, Hans-Eberhardt; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

2009-01-01

320

POTENCY, CONTINENCE AND COMPLICATION RATES IN 1,870 CONSECUTIVE RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeWe update results in a series of consecutive patients treated with anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy regarding recovery of erections, urinary continence and postoperative complications.

WILLIAM J. CATALONA; GUSTAVO F. CARVALHAL; DOUGLAS E. MAGER; DEBORAH S. SMITH

1999-01-01

321

Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. This suggests that preoperative biliary drainage should be avoided whenever possible in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Such a change in current preoperative management may improve patient outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:10450725

Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

1999-01-01

322

The use of postoperative suction drainage in total knee arthroplasty.  

PubMed

A retrospective review of 299 total knee arthroplasties performed between 1973 and 1983 revealed 170 knees in which postoperative suction drainage was used and 129 knees in which drains were not used. Comparison between these two groups revealed no statistically significant difference in wound problems, postoperative temperatures, or resulting range of motion. However, blood transfusions were given more than twice as often to the patients whose knees were drained (39% compared to 16%, p less than .01). The drained group also had a greater decrease in hemoglobin than the nondrained group (3.1 gm compared to 2.6 gm, p less than .01). In a review of these patients, no advantage was found for the use of postoperative suction drainage in the uncomplicated total knee arthroplasty. PMID:3720129

Reilly, T J; Gradisar, I A; Pakan, W; Reilly, M

1986-07-01

323

The role of postoperative prophylactic antibiotics in the treatment of facial fractures: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical study. Part 2: Mandibular fractures in 59 patients.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference between a 5-day and a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotic on the incidence of infection after mandibular fractures involving the alveolus. Sixty-two patients with fractures of the mandible involving the dentoalveolar region were randomly assigned to 2 groups, both of which were given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 1.2 g intravenously every 8 h from admission until 24 h postoperatively. The 5-day group were then given amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 625 mg orally every 8 h for another 4 days. The 1-day group was given an oral placebo at the same intervals. Follow-up appointments were 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Development of an infection was the primary end point. Fifty-nine of the 62 patients completed this study. Six of the 30 patients in the 5-day group (20%) and 6 out of the 29 in the 1-day group (21%) developed local wound infections. Three of the 6 in the 1-day group developed purulent discharge and swelling. One patient in the 5-day group developed a rash on the trunk. There were no significant differences in the incidence of infection or side effects between the groups. In fractures of the mandible involving the alveolus, a 1-day postoperative course of antibiotic is as effective in preventing infective complications as a 5-day regimen. PMID:24012053

Schaller, Benoit; Soong, Poh Luon; Zix, Jürgen; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Lieger, Olivier

2013-12-01

324

The advantages of cyanoacrylate wound closure in circumcision  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To compare 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate (2-octyl-CA) glue with polyglytone 6211 sutures in circumcision wound closure on the basis\\u000a of operative time, safeness, postoperative pain and cosmesis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  The boys who would undergo circumcision in 18-month period (n = 137) were grouped into two. In Group 1 (n = 64), 6\\/0 polyglytone 6211 sutures, and in Group 2 (n = 73), 2-octyl-CA glue were used for wound closure.

Levent ElemenTulay; Tulay Hosten Seyidov; Melih Tugay

2011-01-01

325

Negative-pressure wound therapy in the management of diabetic Charcot foot and ankle wounds  

PubMed Central

As the prevalence of diabetes mellitus continues to rise, innovative medical and surgical treatment options have increased dramatically to address diabetic-related foot and ankle complications. Among the most challenging clinical case scenarios is Charcot neuroarthropathy associated with soft tissue loss and/or osteomyelitis. In this review article, the authors present a review of the most common utilizations of negative-pressure wound therapy as an adjunctive therapy or combined with plastic surgery as it relates to the surgical management of diabetic Charcot foot and ankle wounds. PMID:24069526

Ramanujam, Crystal L.; Stapleton, John J.; Zgonis, Thomas

2013-01-01

326

Genetic and epigenetic events in diabetic wound healing.  

PubMed

The prevalence of the chronic metabolic disorder, diabetes mellitus, is expected to increase in the coming years and worldwide pandemic levels are predicted. Inevitably, this will be accompanied by an increase in the prevalence of diabetic complications, including diabetic foot ulcers. At present, treatment options for diabetic foot ulcers are in many cases insufficient, and progression of the condition results in the requirement for limb amputation in a proportion of patients. To improve therapy, an increase in our understanding of the pathobiology of diabetic complications such as impaired wound healing is necessary. In this review, recent advances in molecular aspects of normal and impaired diabetic wound healing are discussed. Furthermore, investigations of the role of epigenetic processes in the pathogenesis of impaired diabetic wound healing are now emerging. Indeed, epigenetic changes have already been identified as key factors in diabetes and related complications and these are overviewed in this review. PMID:21159125

Rafehi, Haloom; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

2011-02-01

327

Introduction Complications  

E-print Network

Rapidity Gaps Between Jets Matthew Beckingham DIS 2002, Cracow 30 April ­ 4 May 2002 Contents: . Introduction . Complications and Gap Definition . Models . Dijet Cross sections . Gap Fractions #12; Rapidity Gaps Between Jets, Matthew Beckingham Rapidity Gaps Between Jets Dh t g e e' x p x g w jet jet P

328

Emergency Open Incarcerated Hernia Repair with a Biological Mesh in a Patient with Colorectal Liver Metastasis Receiving Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab Uncomplicated Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), often used in combinational chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastases. However adverse events have been attributed to the use of bevacizumab including gastrointestinal perforations, thrombotic events, hypertension, bleeding, and wound healing complications. 53-year-old male, with a history of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis, receiving a combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy (FOLFIRI, irinotecan with fluorouracil and folinic acid) with bevacizumab presented as an emergency with an incarcerated incisional hernia. The last administration of chemotherapy and bevacizumab had taken place 2 weeks prior to this presentation. As the risk of strangulation of the bowel was increased, a decision was made to take the patient to theatre, although the hazard with respect to wound healing, haemorrhage, and infection risk was high due to the recent administration of chemotherapy with bevacizumab. The patient underwent an open repair of the incarcerated recurrent incisional hernia with placement of a biological mesh, and the postoperative recovery was uncomplicated with no wound healing or bleeding problems. PMID:25614840

Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Morrison, Dawn; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios

2014-01-01

329

Complications and subsequent removal of retained shunt hardware after endoscopic third ventriculostomy: case series.  

PubMed

This case series highlights multiple complications and subsequent removal of retained shunt hardware in pediatric patients after successful endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). Removal or retention of existing shunt hardware following ETV represents an important dilemma. Prior studies have reported infections and organ perforation related to nonfunctioning shunts but none in the context of successful ETV. Data obtained in 3 children with hydrocephalus treated at the authors' institution were retrospectively reviewed after the patients experienced complications due to retained shunt hardware following ETV. Etiologies of hydrocephalus included tectal glioma and intraventricular hemorrhage. All 3 patients had a history of multiple shunt revisions and underwent urgent ETV in the setting of a shunt malfunction. In each case, the entire shunt system was left in situ, but it became the source of subsequent complications. Two of the 3 patients presented with the shunt infected by gram-negative bacilli 10 days and 4.5 months postoperatively, respectively. The remaining patient experienced wound dehiscence over the shunt valve 4.5 months after ETV. In all patients, the complications were managed successfully by removing the shunt hardware. None of the patients required repeat shunt insertion from the time of removal throughout the follow-up period (mean 24 months, range 9-36 months). During the study period, a total of 6 patients with indwelling shunt hardware underwent ETV with the expectation of being shunt independent. Among these 6 patients, 3 experienced no complications from the retained hardware whereas 3 patients (50%) ultimately experienced adverse consequences related to retained hardware. This case series illustrates complications involving retained shunt hardware after successful ETV. These examples support consideration of shunt removal at the time of ETV in the appropriate context. PMID:23560795

Pindrik, Jonathan; Jallo, George I; Ahn, Edward S

2013-06-01

330

Nip it in the bud. Controlling wound infection with preoperative shaving.  

PubMed

1. Postoperative wound sepsis can double the normal patient hospital stay and significantly add to the cost of hospitalization. Close skin shaving prior to surgery (especially if done the night prior to surgery) is a contributing factor to postoperative wound sepsis rates. 2. This problem can be managed by selecting a preoperative shaving technique that rids the skin surface of hair, soils, and microorganisms, but still leaves the epidermal layer intact as a natural barrier against opportunistic microorganisms. 3. Hair removal at the surgical site is not the cause of postoperative wound sepsis. Preoperative techniques that remove hair shafts and not epidermal layers are important in managing this problem in the operating room. PMID:2219242

Kovach, T

1990-09-01

331

Postoperative Vision Loss after Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

We report a case which highlights the rare but devastating complication of postoperative vision loss (POVL) in orthopaedic surgery. Though documented previously, it has not been reported in shoulder arthroplasty surgery of which we present the first case. The aetiology of POVL is difficult to elucidate due to its elusive nature. We explain the risks associated with regional blocks used for such surgery and how this may be related to POVL. We must be vigilant of the possible causes of POVL as curative treatment is often not possible and hence must take preventative measures which we have recommended. Fortunately, the patient fully recovered at 10 months postoperatively with excellent function of her reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:25610682

Scadden, John

2014-01-01

332

Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.  

PubMed

Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

2013-05-01

333

Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery  

PubMed Central

Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

2013-01-01

334

Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy  

PubMed Central

Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing. PMID:24511283

Houreld, Nicolette N.

2014-01-01

335

Perspectives on the importance of postoperative ileus.  

PubMed

Post-operative ileus (POI) is a common condition after surgery. Failure to restore adequate bowel function after surgery generates a series of complications and it is associated to patients frustration and discomfort, worsening their perioperative experience. Even mild POI can be source of anxiety and could be perceived as a drop out from the "straight-forward" pathway. Enhanced recovery programmes have emphasized the importance of early commencement of oral diet, avoiding the ancient dogmata of prolonged gastric decompression and fasting. These protocols with early oral feeding and mobilization have led to improved perioperative management and have decreased hospital length of stay, ameliorating patient's postoperative experience as well. Nonetheless, the incidence of POI is still high especially after major open abdominal surgery. In order to decrease the incidence of POI, minimally-invasive surgical approaches and minimization of surgical manipulation have been suggested. From a pharmacological perspective, a meta-analysis of pro-kinetics showed beneficial results with alvimopan, although its use has been limited by the augmented risk of myocardial infarction and the high costs. A more simple approach based on the postoperative use of chewing-gum has provided some benefits in restoring bowel function. From an anaesthesiological perspective, epidural anaesthesia/analgesia does not only reduce the postoperative consumption of systemic opioids but directly improve gastrointestinal function and should be considered where possible, at least for open surgical procedures. POI represents a common and debilitating complication that should be challenged with multi-disciplinary approach. Prospective research is warranted on this field and should focus also on patient s reported outcomes. PMID:25753356

Sanfilippo, Filippo; Spoletini, Gabriele

2015-04-01

336

Der postoperative Schmerz  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract  A short survey about the different methods available for producing postoperative analgesia is given, the goal being to make\\u000a it clear to the clinician that there are quite a number of techniques to be used although the everyday clinical practice often\\u000a sticks to simple and not too effective methods of pain treatment following surgery. Initially presenting short informations\\u000a about the

H. Bergmann

1987-01-01

337

[Hernia surgery: minimization of complications by selection of the "correct mesh"].  

PubMed

The risk for developing postoperative complications increases with the degree of surgical trauma, an altered wound healing capability of the patient due to comorbidities and environmental conditions and the selection of an inadequate implant material, the latter offering options for improvement at least in some patients. In general a mesh with large pores made of monofilaments provides a reduced surface area and causes less scarring and inflammation than those with small pores and thereby reduces the rate of scar contraction, pain and the challenge to explant a mesh from a scar bed. When placing the mesh in the abdominal cavity an additional surface coating of polypropylene should prevent the formation of a fistula between mesh and bowel. The risk of recurrence mainly depends on the extent of overlap; however, the flexibility of some meshes may increase the technical difficulties of some implants. In cases of bacterial contamination of the wound there is an increased risk for late onset mesh infection and monofilament meshes offer the best option for complete healing by conservative means. An impaired function of the spermatic cord because of the material, apart from the consequences of the surgical trauma, has not been confirmed in experimental and clinical studies. Revision of mesh sites always is a surgical challenge but could be much easier with implants which are visible in computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. PMID:24435829

Klinge, U; Weyhe, D

2014-02-01

338

Thirty-day complications after laparoscopic or open cholecystectomy: a population-based cohort study in Italy  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of the study is to evaluate short-term complications after laparoscopic (LC) or open cholecystectomy (OC) in patients with gallstones by using linked hospital discharge data. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Data were obtained from the Regional Hospital Discharge Registry Lazio Region in Central Italy (around 5 million inhabitants) in 2007–2008. Participants All patients admitted to hospitals of Lazio with symptomatic gallstones (International Classification of disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM)=574) who underwent LC (ICD-9-CM 51.23) or OC (ICD-9-CM 51.22). Outcome measures (1)‘30-day surgical-related complications’ defined as any complication of the biliary tract (including postoperative infection, haemorrhage or haematoma or seroma complicating a procedure, persistent postoperative fistula, perforation of bile duct and disruption of wound). (2) ‘30-day systemic complications’ defined as any complications of other organs (including sepsis, infections from other organs, major cardiovascular events and selected adverse events). Results 13?651 patients were included; 86.1% had LC, 13.9% OC. 2.0% experienced surgical-related complications (SRC), 2.1% systemic complications (SC). The OR of complications after LC versus OC was 0.60 (p<0.001) for SRC and 0.52 (p<0.001) for SC. In relation to SRC, the advantage of LC was consistent across age categories, severity of gallstones and previous upper abdominal surgery, whereas there was no advantage among people with emergency admission (OR=0.94, p=0.764). For SC, no significant advantage of LC was seen among very old people (OR=0.99, p=0.975) and among those with previous upper abdominal surgery (OR=0.86, p=0.905). Conclusions This large observational study confirms that LC is more effective than OC with respect to 30-day complications. Population-based linkage of administrative datasets can enlarge evidence of treatment benefits in clinical practice. PMID:23408075

Agabiti, Nera; Stafoggia, Massimo; Davoli, Marina; Fusco, Danilo; Barone, Anna Patrizia; Perucci, Carlo Alberto

2013-01-01

339

In vitro electrical-stimulated wound-healing chip for studying electric field-assisted wound-healing process  

PubMed Central

The wound-healing assay is an easy and economical way to quantify cell migration under diverse stimuli. Traditional assays such as scratch assays and barrier assays are widely and commonly used, but neither of them can represent the complicated condition when a wound occurs. It has been suggested that wound-healing is related to electric fields, which were found to regulate wound re-epithelialization. As a wound occurs, the disruption of epithelial barrier short-circuits the trans-epithelial potential and then a lateral endogenous electric field is created. This field has been proved invitro as an important cue for guiding the migration of fibroblasts, macrophages, and keratinocytes, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, we report a microfluidic electrical-stimulated wound-healing chip (ESWHC) integrating electric field with a modified barrier assay. This chip was used to study the migration of fibroblasts under different conditions such as serum, electric field, and wound-healing-promoting drugs. We successfully demonstrate the feasibility of ESWHC to effectively and quantitatively study cell migration during wound-healing process, and therefore this chip could be useful in drug discovery and drug safety tests. PMID:24009651

Sun, Yung-Shin; Peng, Shih-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Yen

2012-01-01

340

Management of radiation wounds  

SciTech Connect

Radiation wounds caused by newer high-voltage radiotherapy techniques are very difficult to manage. Recent developments in flap design and transfer aid the surgeon in successfully treating these difficult problems.

Reinisch, J.F.; Puckett, C.L.

1984-08-01

341

Bacterial Wound Culture  

MedlinePLUS

... include: A wound that is slow to heal Heat, redness and swelling at the site Tenderness at ... 08. (2008 May 13, Updated). Fact Sheet: Trauma, Shock, Burn, and Injury: Facts, Figures, and Resources. National ...

342

[Respiratory complications after oesophagectomy for cancer].  

PubMed

Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for resectable tumours of the oesophagus. Recent advances of surgical techniques and anaesthesiology have led to a substantial decrease in mortality and morbidity. Respiratory complications affect about 30% of patients after oesophagectomy and 80% of these complications occur within the first five days. Respiratory complications include sputum retention, pneumonia and ARDS. They are the major cause of morbidity and mortality after oesophageal resection and numerous studies have identified the factors associated with these complications. The mechanisms are not very different from those observed after pulmonary resection. Nevertheless, there is an important lack of definition, and evaluation of the incidence is particularly difficult. Furthermore, respiratory complications are related to many factors. Careful medical history, physical examination and pulmonary function testing help to identify the risk factors and provide strategies to reduce the risk of pulmonary complications. Standardized postoperative management and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pulmonary complications are necessary to reduce hospital mortality. This article discusses preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors affecting respiratory complications and strategies to reduce the incidence of these complications after oesophagectomy. PMID:18772826

D'journo, X-B; Michelet, P; Avaro, J-P; Trousse, D; Giudicelli, R; Fuentes, P; Doddoli, C; Thomas, P

2008-06-01

343

Complications in pediatric cochlear implant surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a retrospective analysis we evaluated the intra- and postoperative complications in children who underwent cochlear implantation\\u000a between 1984 and 1993 at the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover. The data and records of 366 children were collected and analyzed.\\u000a Relevant parameters were major complications such as significant infection, intraoperative bleeding, facial nerve injury,\\u000a implant loss and device failure, as well as lesser

H.-G. Kempf; K. Johann; T. Lenarz

1999-01-01

344

Wound healing of scleral self-sealing incision: a comparison of ultrasound biomicroscopy and histology findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

· Purpose: The goal of this study was to compare the morphologic findings of wound healing in scleral self-sealing incisions\\u000a using ultrasound biomicroscopy and histology.?· Methods: Using a slit-knife, we made a scleral self-sealing incision in the\\u000a rabbit eye. At various time points postoperatively, ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed to evaluate wound healing; the\\u000a eyes then were enucleated and studied histologically.

Taiichi Hikichi; Akitoshi Yoshida; Tomoki Hasegawa; Michihiro Ohnishi; Toshihiro Sato; Syunji Muraoka

1998-01-01

345

Glucose Control Lowers the Risk of Wound Infection in Diabetics After Open Heart Operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Elevated blood glucose levels in the postoperative period are associated with an increased risk of deep wound infection in diabetic individuals undergoing open heart operations at Providence St. Vincent Hospital.Methods. Of 8,910 patients who underwent cardiac operations between 1987 and 1993, 1,585 (18%) were diabetic. The rate of deep sternal wound infections in diabetic patients was 1.7%, versus 0.4%

1997-01-01

346

The use of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) in wound healing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hyperspectral imaging system (HsI), described previously, was utilized to evaluate and monitor wounds and their healing surgery and post-operatively. Briefly, the system consists of a DLP® based spectral light modulator providing active spectral illumination that is synchronized with a digital focal plan array for collecting spectroscopic images that are processed for mapping the percentage of oxyhemoglobin at each detector pixel non-invasively and at near video rates ~8 chemically encode images per second.

La Fontaine, Javier; Lavery, Lawrence; Zuzak, Karel

2014-03-01

347

Measuring the 3D-Position of Cementless Hip Implants using Pre and Postoperative CT Images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative measurement of the location of cementless hip implants postoperatively not only explains subsequent common complications,\\u000a such as impingement and loosening, but can also predict postoperative subject-specific primary stability, if combined with\\u000a the finite element method. However, the metal artifacts on the postoperative computed tomography (CT) image make it difficult\\u000a to estimate the threedimensional (3D) alignment, implant shape, bone geometry,

G. Yamako; T. Hiura; K. Nakata; G. Omori; Y. Dohmae; M. Oda; T. Hara

348

Management of postoperative spinal infections.  

PubMed

Postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after posterior lumbar spine surgery. This review details an approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. Factors contributing to the development of a SSI can be split into three categories: (1) microbiological factors; (2) factors related to the patient and their spinal pathology; and (3) factors relating to the surgical procedure. SSI is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The virulence of the organism causing the SSI can affect its presentation. SSI can be prevented by careful adherence to aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics, avoiding myonecrosis by frequently releasing retractors and preoperatively optimizing modifiable patient factors. Increasing pain is commonly the only symptom of a SSI and can lead to a delay in diagnosis. C-reactive protein and magnetic resonance imaging can help establish the diagnosis. Treatment requires acquiring intra-operative cultures to guide future antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement of all necrotic tissue. A SSI can usually be adequately treated without removing spinal instrumentation. A multidisciplinary approach to SSIs is important. It is useful to involve an infectious disease specialist and use minimum serial bactericidal titers to enhance the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A plastic surgeon should also be involved in those cases of severe infection that require repeat debridement and delayed closure. PMID:23330073

Hegde, Vishal; Meredith, Dennis S; Kepler, Christopher K; Huang, Russel C

2012-11-18

349

[Advances in the research of treating refractory diabetic wounds with stem cells].  

PubMed

With the growth of aging society, China has become the country of population with the highest incidence of diabetes in the world. Diabetes leads to pathological changes in vascular and nervous system, rendering the diabetic skin fragile and hard to heal if wounded; in the end most diabetic wounds tend to become chronic skin ulcers. The refractory diabetic wound is the result of various endogenous and exogenous factors. It is a quite complicated pathophysiologic event which lacks an effective and specific therapeutic method in clinic. The use of stem cells could be a new approach of treating diabetic chronic wounds since they have a potential ability of self-renovation and multi-directional differentiation which will promote angiogenesis and wound healing process, thus be beneficial in the care of ischemia diseases of the lower limb. This article reviews basic theory of treating diabetic wound and the changes in microenvironment, and prompts many successful cases in curing refractory diabetic wounds. PMID:25608790

Gong, Jiahong; Lu, Shuliang

2014-12-01

350

Sutures versus staples for wound closure in orthopaedic surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background In the spectrum of surgical decision-making, wound closure material is often an afterthought. However, the findings of a recent meta-analysis suggest that the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) is increased by using staples to close surgical wounds. Less clear is the effect of closure material on the incidence of non-infectious wound complications. The aim of this study was to compare sutures and staples in terms of: incidence of wound complications to determine the sample size for a definitive trial comparing wound closure methods. Methods Eligible adult orthopaedic patients were randomized to have wounds closed with sutures or staples. Time for skin closure was recorded. Wounds were assessed for complications for six weeks. The incidence of complications was compared using Fisher’s exact test. Time to close and pain with removal of closure material were compared using a Student’s t-test. Results The total number of patients reporting a wound complication was 59 of 148 patients completing six-week followup (41%), with no differennce between sutures and staples (RR = 0.77, CI = 0.52–1.14). The time to close wounds was shorter in the staple group (mean=4.8 min, CI = 2.6–7.1) than the suture group (mean=12 min, CI = 7.9–16). Patients in the staple group (mean=3.7, CI =2.8–4.6) reported more pain with removal than suture group (mean=2.5, CI =1.6–3.4). Conclusions This study suggests that 42% of patients report a wound complication with no difference between sutures and staples. It was demonstrated that suturing skin requires more time and staples are more painful to remove. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01146236 (registered June 14, 2010) PMID:23394586

2013-01-01

351

[Postoperative adhesions, the everlasting topical subject].  

PubMed

Creation of postoperative adhesions is a part of every abdominal operation. The authors analyse 320 patients operated for ileus in last 7 years. 118 patients were operated for adhesive ileus. Most common reoperations for ileus are after radical gynecological operations and inflammatory intraabdominal diseases. The creation of adhesiones depends on preoperative mechanical or chemical damage of tissues and peritoneum, bacterial infection and irradiation. The major complication of intraabdominal adhesions are disturbances of bowel function what leads to subileus or ileus. Authors present therapeutical possibilities and prefer laparoscopic operations. PMID:16689145

Bakos, E; Korcek, J; Dubaj, M; Osuský, M; Bakos, M

2006-03-01

352

Bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts after orthognathic surgery: A case report  

PubMed Central

Postoperative maxillary cysts are locally aggressive lesions, usually developing as delayed complications many years after radical antral surgery. This report describes a case of bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts following orthognathic surgery performed approximately 21 years previously. The patient complained of stinging pain on her right cheek. Radiographic examination revealed low-attenuation lesions on both maxillary sinuses with discontinuously corticated margins without distinct expansion or bone destruction. The cysts were enucleated with the removal of metal plates and screws for pain relief. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of postoperative maxillary cysts lined by ciliated, pseudostratified columnar cells. The patient has remained asymptomatic thus far, and there was no evidence of local recurrence at 21 months of postoperative follow-up. PMID:25473641

Lee, Jung-Hye; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun

2014-01-01

353

Internal sphincterotomy reduces postoperative pain after Milligan Morgan haemorrhoidectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Over the last few years, there has been increasing attention on surgical procedures to treat haemorrhoids. The Milligan-Morgan haemorrhoidectomy is still one of the most popular surgical treatments of haemorrhoids. The aim of the present work is to assess postoperative pain, together with other early and late complications, after Milligan-Morgan haemorrhoidectomy as we could observe in our experience before

Giuseppe Diana; Giovanni Guercio; Bianca Cudia; Calogero Ricotta

2009-01-01

354

ASA classification and perioperative variables as predictors of postoperative outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a prospective study of 6301 surgical patients in a university hospital, we examined the strength of association between ASA physical status classi- fication and perioperative risk factors, and post- operative outcome, using both univariate analysis and calculation of the odds ratio of the risk of developing a postoperative complication by means of a logistic regression model. Univariate analysis showed

U. WOLTERS; T. WOLF; H. STÜTZER; T. SCHRÖDER

1996-01-01

355

Measures of Executive Function and Depression Identify Patients at Risk for Postoperative Delirium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Postoperative delirium is associated with in- creased morbidity and mortality. Preexisting cognitive impair- ment and depression have been frequently cited as important risk factors for this complication. This prospective cohort study was designed to determine whether individuals who perform poorly on preoperative cognitive tests and\\/or exhibited depres- sive symptoms would be at high risk for the development of postoperative

Nathaniel H. Greene; Deborah K. Attix; B. Craig Weldon; Patrick J. Smith; David L. McDonagh; Terri G. Monk

2009-01-01

356

Intra- and Postoperative Predictors of Stroke After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Stroke is a devastating complication of coronary artery bypass graft surgery. An individual's risk of stroke is based in part on preoperative characteristics but also on intra- and postoperative factors. We devel- oped a risk prediction model for stroke based on factors in intra- and postoperative care, after adjusting for a patient's preoperative risk. Methods. We conducted a regional

Donald S. Likosky; Bruce J. Leavitt; Charles A. S. Marrin; David J. Malenka; Alexander G. Reeves; Ronald M. Weintraub; Louis R. Caplan; Yvon R. Baribeau; David C. Charlesworth; Cathy S. Ross; John H. Braxton; Felix Hernandez; Gerald T. O'Connor

2010-01-01

357

Best practice wound care.  

PubMed

This article describes the barriers, changes and achievements related to implementing one element of a wound care programme being best practice care. With the absence of a coordinated approach to wound care, clinical practice within our Area Health Service (AHS) was diverse, inconsistent and sometimes outdated. This was costly and harmful, leading to overuse of unhelpful care, underuse of effective care and errors in execution. The major aim was to improve the outcomes and quality of life for patients with wound care problems within our community. A collaborative across ten sites/services developed, implemented and evaluated policies and guidelines based on evidence-based bundles of care. Key barriers were local resistance and lack of experience in implementing structural and cultural changes. This was addressed by appointing a wound care programme manager, commissioning of a strategic oversight committee and local wound care committees. The techniques of spread and adoption were used, with early adopters making changes observable and allowing local adaption of guidelines, where appropriate. Deployment and improvement results varied across the sites, ranging from activity but no changes in practice to modest improvement in practice. Evaluating implementation of the leg ulcer guideline as an exemplar, it was demonstrated that there was a statistically significant improvement in overall compliance from 26% to 84%. However, only 7·7% of patients received all interventions to which they were entitled. Compliance with the eight individual interventions of the bundle ranged from 26% to 84%. Generic performance was evaluated against the wound assessment, treatment and evaluation plan with an average compliance of 70%. Early results identified that 20% of wounds were healed within the target of 10 days. As more standardised process are implemented, clinical outcomes should continue to improve and costs decrease. PMID:21272244

O'Brien, Melissa L; Lawton, Joanna E; Conn, Chris R; Ganley, Helen E

2011-04-01

358

Cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy: An institutional audit and analysis of factors related to complications  

PubMed Central

Background: Although a relatively simple procedure, cranioplasties have been associated with high complication rates. Keeping this in perspective, we aimed to determine the factors associated with immediate and long-term complications of cranioplasties at our institution. Methods: A retrospective review of patient records was carried out for patients having undergone reconstructive cranioplasties at our institution during the last 10 years (2001-2010). All case notes, records, and investigations were reviewed and the data were recorded in a predesigned questionnaire. Complications were recorded along with existing comorbids and measures taken for their prevention and management. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine possible predictors of complications. Results: A total of 96 patients with a mean age of 33 + 15 years were included in the study. Of the sample, 76% (n = 73) had no comorbids. The leading primary pathology was blunt traumatic brain injuries in 46% (n = 44), followed by cerebrovascular incidents in 24% (n = 23), penetrating traumatic brain injuries in 12% (n = 11), and tumors in 10% (n = 10) of cases, with 41% (n = 39) of patients requiring multiple craniotomies. In a mean follow-up of 386 ± 615 days, complications were noted in 36.5% (n = 35) of the patients. Twenty six percent of patients (n = 25) had minor complications which included breakthrough seizures (15.6%, n = 15), subgaleal collections (3.1%, n = 3), and superficial wound infections (3.1%, n = 3), whereas major complications (10.4% n = 10) included hydrocephalus (3.1%, n = 3), transient neurological deficits (3.1%, n = 3), and osteomyelitis (2.1%, n = 2). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed External Ventricular Drain (EVD) placement and parietal flaps to be associated with complications. This could be explained by the fact that the patients requiring EVD usually have relatively severe head injuries, increasing the possibility of hydrocephalus. Conclusion: We have found a higher risk of complications of cranioplasty in patients who had EVD placement and removal prior to their constructive surgery. We however did not find any association between risks of complications in any other studied variable. We also did not find any association between intraoperative placement of subgaleal drains and postoperative risk of subgaleal fluid collections. Overall, our results are comparable with other reported series on cranioplasties. PMID:22059118

Sobani, Zain A.; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Qadeer, Mohsin; Bilal, Najiha; Murtaza, Syed Ghulam; Enam, Syed Anther; Bari, Muhammad Ehsan

2011-01-01

359

Evaluation of electrical stimulation for ischemic wound therapy: a feasibility study using the lapine wound model.  

PubMed

Chronic wounds are a major secondary complication for many people with impaired mobility. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been recommended as a adjunctive therapy, however optimal treatment paradigms have not been established. Our group seeks to determine the basic mechanisms underlying ES wound therapy, an area where understanding is currently limited. A feasibility study was carried out to develop the Ahn/Mustoe lapine wound model for systematic investigation of the effects of electrical stimulation on ischemic wound therapy. A standardized surgical procedure incorporated a hybrid stimulation system comprising an implantable mini-stimulator and surface electrodes, with creation of repeatable ischemic wounds. Twenty mature male New Zealand white rabbits (3 kg weight) were employed to evaluate the effects of two empirically selected stimulation paradigms applied continuously for 7-21 days, using each animal as its own control. Outcomes measures included transcutaneous blood gas levels, histology, total RNA content and analysis of alpha2 (I) collagen (COL-I), type IV collagen (COL-IV), alpha1 (V) collagen (COL-V), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression using real-time quantitative PCR. All markers for stimulated wounds showed increased activity relative to non-stimulated control wounds between 7 and 14 days following injury, with peak activity at 14 days. By 21 days post-injury, all activity had returned to near baseline level. VEGF and COL-IV levels were found to be significantly higher for pattern A (110 mus pulse width) compared to pattern B (5 mus pulse width) at 14 days, implying that pattern A may be more effective at promoting angiogenesis. All wounds were fully re-epithelialized by 10 days post-injury. Both COL-I and COL-V showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) increased activity between day 7 and day 14 for pattern A, potentially indicating a continued effect on matrix remodeling. The early closure of all wounds implies that the rabbit ear model may not be valid for chronic wound studies. PMID:19050907

Morris, Kimberly A; McGee, Michael F; Jasper, John J; Bogie, Kath M

2009-04-01

360

Peripheral Surgical Wounding and Age-Dependent Neuroinflammation in Mice  

PubMed Central

Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of ?-amyloid (A?) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent A? accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-?, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

2014-01-01

361

Influence of lidocaine on leukocyte function in the surgical wound.  

PubMed

The inflammatory response of the wound is mediated to a large extent by leukocytes, which play an important role in the wound healing process. Local anesthetics, which are routinely administered before minor skin surgery and for postoperative pain relief, have been shown to have diverse effects on wound healing. Local anesthetics have also been reported to induce potent inhibition of leukocytes in vitro, although their effects on leukocyte activity in the surgical wound have not been elucidated. The present study investigated the in vivo effects of lidocaine on leukocyte function in the surgical wound of rats by sampling leukocytes from hollow titanium implants. The surgical wound was treated with lidocaine or placebo after implantation of the titanium chamber and before skin closure. Leukocyte metabolic activity was measured by chemiluminescence. Cell count was analyzed in a Bürker chamber. Results showed progressive increase in leukocyte counts in the wounds of control animals and significantly lower cell counts in the wounds of lidocaine-treated animals 48 h (P less than 0.05) and 72 h (P less than 0.05) after surgery. A pronounced inhibition of the metabolic response to serum-opsonized zymosan was seen after 8 h in the lidocaine-treated animals versus controls (P less than 0.05). After 24 h, leukocyte metabolic activity decreased dramatically in the control group and remained at a low level until 72 h after surgery. In the lidocaine-treated group, the leukocyte response to zymosan remained constantly low throughout the study. The effects of lidocaine were not a result of impaired leukocyte viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1610012

Eriksson, A S; Sinclair, R; Cassuto, J; Thomsen, P

1992-07-01

362

The role of postoperative factors in surgical site infections: time to take notice.  

PubMed

Surgical site infections (SSIs) continue to occur, in many instances despite high compliance with best practice measures primarily revolving around pre- and intraoperative periods. Postoperative factors have traditionally been considered to play a relatively minor role in the causation of SSIs. An increasing body of evidence, however, suggests that many SSIs occur as a result of pathogens gaining access to surgical wounds either hematogenously, through drains, or through slowly healing wounds due to systemic anticoagulation or other factors, particularly in the setting of high compliance with standard perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Evidence also supports frequent acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during the postoperative period. These findings, coupled with lack of clear efficacy of various pre- and intraoperative interventions such as MRSA decolonization and use of vancomycin for prophylaxis against this organism, should force us to consider the important role that postoperative factors may play in the causation of SSIs in the current era. PMID:25028464

Manian, Farrin A

2014-11-01

363

A rare case of mucormycosis of median sternotomy wound caused by Rhizopus arrhizus.  

PubMed

We describe a case of mucormycosis of median sternotomy wound caused by Rhizopus arrhizus . The patient, a known diabetic and a case of coronary artery disease underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. In the postoperative period, patient developed infection of the median sternotomy wound, from which R. arrhizus was isolated on culture. Patient succumbed in spite of being treated with surgical debridement and amphotericin B. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mucormycosis of median sternotomy wound from India. PMID:18087101

Chawla, R; Sehgal, S; Kumar, S Ravindra; Mishra, B

2007-10-01

364

Survey and management of anaesthesia related complications in PACU  

PubMed Central

It is the first prospective study about anaesthesia related postoperative complications conducted in Hamad General Hospital. Total 1128 adult patients admitted to the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) during a period of three months were surveyed for anaesthesia related complications. Documented complications were found in 48 patients i.e. 4.25% of patients' population. The types of complications were related to the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nausea/vomiting and body temperature in this descending order. Most of the complications happened to healthy ASA I and II patients. Factors that play major role in determining the immediate postoperative complications were the ASA status, the level of anaesthesia seniority attending the patient, the urgency and the nature of procedure. We tried to find other factors that may influence complications in addition, discussed below. PMID:25003043

Faraj, Jafar H.; Vegesna, A.R.R.; Mudali, I.N.; Khairay, M.A.; Nissar, Shaikh; Alfarhan, Muna; Sabir, Kareema; El-imam, Fawkia; Anto, Lucy; Go, Teofila

2012-01-01

365

Uric acid and xanthine oxidoreductase in wound healing.  

PubMed

Chronic wounds are an important health problem because they are difficult to heal and treatment is often complicated, lengthy and expensive. For a majority of sufferers the most common outcomes are long-term immobility, infection and prolonged hospitalisation. There is therefore an urgent need for effective therapeutics that will enhance ulcer healing and patient quality of life, and will reduce healthcare costs. Studies in our laboratory have revealed elevated levels of purine catabolites in wound fluid from patients with venous leg ulcers. In particular, we have discovered that uric acid is elevated in wound fluid, with higher concentrations correlating with increased wound severity. We have also revealed a corresponding depletion in uric acid precursors, including adenosine. Further, we have revealed that xanthine oxidoreductase, the enzyme that catalyses the production of uric acid, is present at elevated levels in wound fluid. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that xanthine oxidoreductase may have a function in the formation or persistence of chronic wounds. Here we describe the potential function of xanthine oxidoreductase and uric acid accumulation in the wound site, and the effect of xanthine oxidoreductase in potentiating the inflammatory response. PMID:24357442

Fernandez, Melissa L; Upton, Zee; Shooter, Gary K

2014-02-01

366

Hyperspectral characterization of an in vitro wound model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wound healing is a complex process not fully understood. There is a need of better methods to evaluate the different stages of healing, and optical characterization is a promising tool in this respect. In this study hyperspectral imaging was employed to characterize an in vitro wound model. The wound model was established by first cutting circular patches of human abdominal skin using an 8mm punch biopsy tool, and then creating dermal wounds in the center of the skin patches using a 5mm tool. The wounds were incubated in medium with 10% serum and antibiotics. Hyperspectral images were collected every three days using a push broom hyper spectral camera (Hyspex VNIR1600). The camera had a spectral resolution of 3.7 nm and was fitted with a close up lens giving a FOV of 2.5 cm and a spatial resolution of 29 micrometer. Samples for histology were collected throughout the measurement period, which was 21 days in total. Data were processed in ENVI and Matlab. A successful classification based on hyperspectral imaging of the implemented model is presented. It was not possible to see the healing zone in the in vitro model with the naked eye without dying. The hyperspectral results showed that newly formed epithelium could be imaged without any additional contrast agents or dyes. It was also possible to detect non-viable tissue. In vitro wound models and hyperspectral imaging can thus be employed to gain further insight in the complicated process of healing in different kinds of wounds.

Randeberg, Lise L.; Hegstad, Janne-Lise; Paluchowski, Lukasz; Milani?, Matija; Pukstad, Brita S.

2014-03-01

367

Prevention and management of complications in body contouring surgery.  

PubMed

This patient safety article discusses strategies to prevent, diagnose, and manage complications from body contouring surgery. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative approaches to avoiding, identifying, and treating complications are addressed. Individual complications, such as hematoma, seroma, infection, dehiscence, suture extrusion, deep venous thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism are discussed and a review of complication rates in the body contouring literature is provided. The article addresses procedure-specific complications and pearls to avoiding complications in these cases. Difficult problems such as skin relaxation and management of the disappointed patient are also discussed. PMID:25283464

Gusenoff, Jeffrey A

2014-10-01

368

Complications of ovariohysterectomy and orchiectomy in companion animals.  

PubMed

Complications following elective spay or neuter procedures are particularly feared by new graduates. However, even the most experienced surgeons may encounter surgical or postoperative complications. At best, complications associated with elective procedures can harm the doctor-client relationship. At worst, these can present legal and financial problems. Veterinary surgeons should be aware of the potential complications associated with elective sterilization, these should be communicated to the client, and there should be a clear plan for action when a complication occurs. This article reviews the reported complications encountered in elective sterilization surgery in companion animals, with a special focus on early detection and prevention. PMID:21889699

Adin, Christopher A

2011-09-01

369

Sternal wound infections in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting using bilateral skeletonized internal mammary arteries.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the risks of sternal wound infections in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized internal mammary arteries (IMAs). BACKGROUND: The skeletonized IMA is longer than the pedicled one, thus providing the cardiac surgeon with increased versatility for arterial myocardial revascularization without the use of vein grafts. It is isolated from the chest wall gently with scissors and silver clips, and no cauterization is employed. Preservation of collateral blood supply to the sternum and avoidance of thermal injury enable more rapid healing and decrease the risk of sternal wound infection. METHODS: From April 1996 to August 1997, 545 patients underwent arterial myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized IMAs. The right gastroepiploic artery was used in 100 patients (18%). The average age of the patients was 65 years; 431 (79%) were men and 114 (21%) were women; 179 (33%) were older than 70 years of age; 166 (30%) were diabetics. The average number of grafts was 3.2 per patient. RESULTS: The 30-day operative mortality rate was 2% (n = 11). There were six perioperative infarcts (1.1%) and six strokes (1.1%); 9 patients had sternal infection (1.7%) and 15 (2.8%) had superficial infection. Risk factors for sternal infection were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emergency operation. Superficial sternal wound infections were more common in women and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal failure, or peripheral vascular disease. The 1-year actuarial survival rate was 97%. Two of the six late deaths were not cardiac-related. Late dehiscence occurred in three patients (0.6%). The death rate (early and late) of patients with any sternal complication was higher than that of patients without those complications (33% vs. 2.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Routine arterial myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized IMAs is safe, and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates are low, even in elderly patients and those with diabetes. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emergency operations were found to be associated with an increased risk of sternal infections, and the authors recommend avoiding the use of bilateral skeletonized IMAs in patients with these preoperative risk factors. PMID:10203094

Sofer, D; Gurevitch, J; Shapira, I; Paz, Y; Matsa, M; Kramer, A; Mohr, R

1999-01-01

370

A Randomized Clinical Trial on the Effect of Oral Metronidazole on Wound Healing and Pain after Anal Sphincterotomy and Fissurectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic anal fissure is one of the most common causes of anal pain and surgical therapy is the treatment of choice. There is scarce information regarding the prophylactic effects of oral metronidazole on postoperative complications of anal fissure. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of metronidazole as a prophylactic measure for postoperative anal fissure complications. In

Seyed Vahid Hosseini; Babak Sabet; Mohamoud Nouri; Shahram Bolandparvaz

371

Early respiratory complications after liver transplantation  

PubMed Central

The poor clinical conditions associated with end-stage cirrhosis, pre-existing pulmonary abnormalities, and high comorbidity rates in patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores are all well-recognized factors that increase the risk of pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) surgery. Many intraoperative and postoperative events, such as fluid overload, massive transfusion of blood products, hemodynamic instability, unexpected coagulation abnormalities, renal dysfunction, and serious adverse effects of reperfusion syndrome, are other factors that predispose an individual to postoperative respiratory disorders. Despite advances in surgical techniques and anesthesiological management, the lung may still suffer throughout the perioperative period from various types of injury and ventilatory impairment, with different clinical outcomes. Pulmonary complications after OLT can be classified as infectious or non-infectious. Pleural effusion, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia may contribute considerably to early morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. It is of paramount importance to accurately identify lung disorders because infectious pulmonary complications warrant speedy and aggressive treatment to prevent diffuse lung injury and the risk of evolution into multisystem organ failure. This review discusses the most common perioperative factors that predispose an individual to postoperative pulmonary complications and these complications’ early clinical manifestations after OLT and influence on patient outcome. PMID:24409054

Feltracco, Paolo; Carollo, Cristiana; Barbieri, Stefania; Pettenuzzo, Tommaso; Ori, Carlo

2013-01-01

372

INTRODUCTION Mechanically wounding confluent cell monolayers induces  

E-print Network

INTRODUCTION Mechanically wounding confluent cell monolayers induces movement and proliferation of wounds learn about nearby injury? One perspective suggests that it is simply release from contact in paracrine cell communication during wound healing. Mechanical wounding might remove inhibitory signals

Machen, Terry E.

373

Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage  

SciTech Connect

Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

Rudolph, R.

1982-08-01

374

Analysis of blood flow and local expression of angiogenesis?associated growth factors in infected wounds treated with negative pressure wound therapy.  

PubMed

Angiogenesis is involved in the wound healing process. Increased angiogenesis and blood flow constitute a major mechanism of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), which has been shown to facilitate the healing of infected wounds. However, the effect on the expression of angiogensis?related growth factor remains unknown. The goal of the current study was to investigate the angiogenic factor levels prior to and following NPWT in infected wounds. A total of 20 patients with infected wounds treated with NPWT were included in the study. Patients acted as their own control; the postoperative measurements of patients were considered as the experimental group, while preoperative measurements were considered as the controlled group. Blood flow was recorded prior to and during NPWT. A total of 10 angiogensis?related growth factors were detected using a protein biochip array to analyze the change in protein levels prior to NPWT, and on the third day during NPWT. All wounds were successfully reconstructed by skin grafting or using local flaps following NPWT. NPWT resulted in significantly increased blood flow in the wound. There was a significant increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), EGF, platelet?derived growth factor and angiotesin?2 following NPWT, while basic fibroblast growth factor decreased significantly. NPWT affects the local expression of angiogenesis?associated growth factors, which represents another mechanism to explain how NPWT accelerates wound healing. PMID:24584462

Xia, Cheng-Yan; Yu, Ai-Xi; Qi, Baiwen; Zhou, Min; Li, Zong-Huan; Wang, Wei-Yang

2014-05-01

375

Deep Sternal Wound Infection: Risk Factors and Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a serious complication of cardiac operations performed by median sternotomy. We attempted to define the predictors of DSWI and to describe the outcomes of two treatment strategies used at our institution.Methods. Retrospective review was performed using prospectively gathered data on 12,267 consecutive cardiac surgical patients from 1990 to 1995. Chart review was performed

Michael A Borger; Vivek Rao; Richard D Weisel; Joan Ivanov; Gideon Cohen; Hugh E Scully; Tirone E David

1998-01-01

376

Wound Drainage Culture (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... A A A Text Size What's in this article? What It Is Why It's ... It Is A wound drainage culture is a test to detect germs such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses in an open wound or abscess (boil). Open ...

377

The TopClosure® 3S System, for skin stretching and a secure wound closure.  

PubMed

The principle of stretching wound margins for primary wound closure is commonly practiced and used for various skin defects, leading at times to excessive tension and complications during wound closure. Different surgical techniques, skin stretching devices and tissue expanders have been utilized to address this issue. Previously designed skin stretching devices resulted in considerable morbidity. They were invasive by nature and associated with relatively high localized tissue pressure, frequently leading to necrosis, damage and tearing of skin at the wound margins. To assess the clinical effectiveness and performance and, to determine the safety of TopClosure® for gradual, controlled, temporary, noninvasive and invasive applications for skin stretching and secure wound closing, the TopClosure® device was applied to 20 patients for preoperative skin lesion removal and to secure closure of a variety of wound sizes. TopClosure® was reinforced with adhesives, staples and/or surgical sutures, depending on the circumstances of the wound and the surgeon's judgment. TopClosure® was used prior to, during and/or after surgery to reduce tension across wound edges. No significant complications or adverse events were associated with its use. TopClosure® was effectively used for preoperative skin expansion in preparation for dermal resection (e.g., congenital nevi). It aided closure of large wounds involving significant loss of skin and soft tissue by mobilizing skin and subcutaneous tissue, thus avoiding the need for skin grafts or flaps. Following surgery, it was used to secure closure of wounds under tension, thus improving wound aesthetics. A sample case study will be presented. We designed TopClosure®, an innovative device, to modify the currently practiced concept of wound closure by applying minimal stress to the skin, away from damaged wound edges, with flexible force vectors and versatile methods of attachment to the skin, in a noninvasive or invasive manner. PMID:22719176

Topaz, Moris; Carmel, Narin-Nard; Silberman, Adi; Li, Ming Sen; Li, Yong Zhong

2012-07-01

378

SCALE Wounds: Unavoidable Pressure Injury.  

PubMed

Skin Changes at Life's End (SCALE) wounds include wounds of many underlying etiologies that accompany the dying process. These wounds occur due to unmodifiable intrinsic and extrinsic factors unique to each individual. This article describes the case of a dying patient who sustained a skin tear that deteriorated into a SCALE wound that meets the criteria for a National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel unavoidable pressure injury. PMID:25855852

Krasner, Diane L; Stewart, Thomas P

2015-04-01

379

Wound healing and antibacterial properties of methanolic extract of Pupalia lappacea Juss in rats  

PubMed Central

Background Wound healing is a natural process that enables tissue repair after an injury. To shorten its duration and minimize associated complications, wounds are treated with medications. Currently there is a growing interest in the use of alternative wound dressing agents such as plant extracts. One plant used traditionally in wound treatment is Pupalia lappacea. In view of its use in wound care, we investigated the wound healing activities of 80% methanolic leave extract of Pupalia lappacea using excision, incision and dead space wound models. Also its effects on three common wound contaminants were investigated. Methods Excision wounds were created, contaminated with microbes and treated with ointments (10% and 20% w/w) prepared from Pupalia lappacea. Incision and dead space wounds were also created in rats which were subsequently dosed orally with the extract. The wound healing activities of Pupalia lappacea ointment on excision wound was assessed by rates of wound contraction and epithelialization as well as its antibacterial effects. The effects of Pupalia lappacea on incision and dead-space wounds were determined by the wound breaking strengths and weights of the granuloma tissues formed, respectively. Results Pupalia. lappacea ointments significantly (p?wound healing with 20% ointment having the highest percentage wound contraction and rate of epithelialization. At 4, 7 and 14 days post treatment, mean total viable bacterial count of excision wounds of the extract treated groups were significantly (p?Wound breaking strengths and weights of granuloma tissues formed in the extract treated groups were significantly (p?