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1

Postoperative wound infections complicating adult spine surgery.  

PubMed

A review of 19 consecutive patients treated for deep wound infections after spinal surgery was performed. Patients were analyzed for preoperative risk factors, original diagnosis requiring surgery, onset of infection, presentation, treatment, and outcome. These patients (10 men, nine women), with a mean age of 44 years (range 18-74) were treated for 13 deep and six subcutaneous infections: 16 spine infections and nine graft site infections (six with both). All 19 presented with draining wounds on an average of 17 days after surgery (range 4-86). Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 14. Patients were treated with i.v. antibiotics for an average of 3 weeks (range 0-14) followed by oral antibiotics for an average of 6 weeks (range 2-12). Surgical treatment included an average of 1.8 debridements (range 0-5), primary closure in two, delayed primary closure in seven, and healing by secondary intent in 10. All but three patients were noted to be malnourished at the onset of their infection, with a total lymphocyte count of less than 2,000. Three patients required removal of their hardware. Eighteen of 19 healed or their infections were stabilized, 17 of 18 arthrodeses fused, and no patient had neurological deterioration secondary to the infection. The treatment outlined produced satisfactory results in all but one patient. We conclude that postoperative spine infections are frequently associated with poor nutrition. Although definitive diagnosis is determined by the culture, clinical exam is helpful in establishing a presumptive diagnosis and, thus, earlier institution of surgical and antibiotic treatment. PMID:1520986

Stambough, J L; Beringer, D

1992-09-01

2

Vacuum-assisted closure therapy in patients with large postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas  

PubMed Central

Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a widely acknowledged method for chronic and traumatic wound healing. The feasibility of VAC therapy used for the treatment of intestinal fistulas is still a subject of debate. Complex postoperative wounds pose significant therapeutic problems, especially when there are several fistula openings in the wound area and other sites, usually at the site of previous drains. This paper describes the treatment of three patients in a critical condition, with complex postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy was based on effective drainage of the biggest fistula opening and ensuring conditions promoting the healing process of other fistulas and the wound. A considerable improvement in general condition and wound healing was noted within 2-4 weeks and both the number of fistulas and the volume of excreted contents decreased. After 5-7 weeks a significant improvement in wound healing was observed in all patients. Once the general condition of all patients was considered satisfactory (2-6 months), they underwent surgery aimed at restoration of the digestive tract continuity.In our opinion, VAC therapy used for the treatment of postoperative wounds with multiple fistulas in the wound area and other sites should aim mainly at the improvement of patients’ general condition, limitation of the number of fistulas as well as accelerated wound healing. This may lead to formation of one stoma-type fistula, which can be dressed and cared for by patients until the continuity of the digestive tract has been surgically restored.

Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Meissner, Wiktor; Malinger, Stanislaw; Szmeja, Jacek; Koscinski, Tomasz; Ratajczak, Andrzej; Drews, Michal

2011-01-01

3

[Electrostimulation therapy--a new method of preventing postoperative wound complications in abdominal surgery].  

PubMed

Experimental investigations have shown that chemotaxic activity of microorganisms in the parietal peritoneum and abdominal organ tissues is inhibited when they are treated with impulse electric discharges preventing the process of infecting the tissues. Results of the experiments underlay the development of a new method of prophylactics of postoperative complications in abdominal surgery based on the electroimpulsive treatment of the operation wound. Clinical approbation of the method showed its effectiveness, simplicity and safety. PMID:12528613

Lokhvitski?, S V; Turgunov, E M; Azizov, I S; Kozhamberdin, K E

2002-01-01

4

Endoscopic Versus Open Saphenous Vein Harvest: A Comparison of Postoperative Wound Complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Wound complications associated with long incisions used to harvest the greater saphenous vein are well documented. Recent reports suggest that tech- niques of endoscopic vein harvest may result in de- creased wound complications. A prospective, nonran- domized study was developed to compare outcomes of open versus endoscopic vein harvest procedures. Methods. There were 106 patients in the open vein

Jerene M. Bitondo; Willard M. Daggett; David F. Torchiana; Cary W. Akins; Alan D. Hilgenberg; Gus J. Vlahakes; Joren C. Madsen; Thomas E. MacGillivray; Arvind K. Agnihotri

2010-01-01

5

Endoscopic versus open saphenous vein harvest: a comparison of postoperative wound complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Wound complications associated with long incisions used to harvest the greater saphenous vein are well documented. Recent reports suggest that techniques of endoscopic vein harvest may result in decreased wound complications. A prospective, nonrandomized study was developed to compare outcomes of open versus endoscopic vein harvest procedures.Methods. There were 106 patients in the open vein harvest group, and 154

Jerene M Bitondo; Willard M Daggett; David F Torchiana; Cary W Akins; Alan D Hilgenberg; Gus J Vlahakes; Joren C Madsen; Thomas E MacGillivray; Arvind K Agnihotri

2002-01-01

6

Relations between Long-term Glycemic Control and Postoperative Wound and Infectious Complications after Total Knee Arthroplasty in Type 2 Diabetics  

PubMed Central

Background The authors examined whether poor preoperative glucose control, as indicated by the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of more than 8%, is associated with postoperative wound and infectious complications in diabetic patients that have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods One hundred and sixty-seven TKAs performed in 115 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, from January 2001 through March 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. Logistic regression was used to identify the variables that had a significant effect on the risk of wound complications or early deep infection. The variables considered were age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, operation time, antibiotic-impregnated cement use, amount of blood transfusion, close suction drain use, duration of diabetes, method of diabetes treatment, diabetes complications, and preoperative HbA1c level. Results The overall incidence of wound complications was 6.6% (n = 11) and there were seven cases (4.2%) of early postoperative deep infection. Logistic regression revealed that the independent risk factors of wound complications were preoperative HbA1C ? 8% (odds ratio [OR], 6.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 33.0) and operation time (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.03). No variable examined was found to be significantly associated with the risk of early postoperative deep infection. Conclusions Poorly controlled hyperglycemia before surgery may increase the incidence of wound complications among diabetic patients after TKA.

Han, Hyuk-Soo

2013-01-01

7

Endometrial ablation: postoperative complications.  

PubMed

Endometrial ablation as a treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding has evolved considerably over the past several decades. Postoperative complications include the following: (1) pregnancy after endometrial ablation; (2) pain-related obstructed menses (hematometra, postablation tubal sterilization syndrome); (3) failure to control menses (repeat ablation, hysterectomy); (4) risk from preexisting conditions (endometrial neoplasia, cesarean section); and (5) infection. Physicians performing endometrial ablation should be aware of postoperative complications and be able to diagnose and provide treatment for these conditions. PMID:22541856

Sharp, Howard T

2012-10-01

8

Hepatic transplantation: postoperative complications.  

PubMed

Advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppression have made orthotopic liver transplantation a first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. The early detection and treatment of postoperative complications has contributed significantly to improved graft and patient survival with imaging playing a critical role in detection. Complications that can lead to graft failure or patient mortality include vascular abnormalities, biliary abnormalities, allograft rejection, and recurrent or post-transplant malignancy. Vascular abnormalities include stenosis and thrombosis of the hepatic artery, portal vein, and inferior vena cava, as well as hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and celiac stenosis. Biliary abnormalities include strictures, bile leak, obstruction, recurrent disease, and infection. While imaging is not used to diagnose allograft rejection, it plays an important role in identifying complications that can mimic rejection. Ultrasound is routinely performed as the initial imaging modality for the detection and follow-up of both early and delayed complications. Cholangiography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are used to characterize biliary complications and computed tomography is used to confirm abnormal findings on ultrasound or for the evaluation of postoperative collections. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the imaging appearances and management of complications associated with liver transplantation. PMID:23644931

Itri, Jason N; Heller, Matthew T; Tublin, Mitchell E

2013-12-01

9

[Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].  

PubMed

Plastic surgery covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions in the areas of reconstructive surgery, hand, burn and aesthetic surgery. Besides acquired defects or malformations an increasing number of patients are being treated for surgical or multimodal complications. In a considerable number of patients plastic and reconstructive surgery remains the only therapeutic alternative after other therapy has failed. Therefore complication management in plastic surgery is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. In addition patient expectations in the results of plastic surgery as a discipline of invention and problem solving are steadily increasing. This challenge is reflected in clinical patient management by intensive research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Patients in plastic surgery are recruited from all age groups of either gender, involving traumatic and oncologic as well as congenital and aesthetic disorders. The demographics of aging, multimorbidity and obesity pose new challenges to plastic surgery. Although age over 70 years is not an independent risk factor per se for complications in plastic surgery, e.g. for complex free flap transfer, medical problems are present at a higher rate, which is to be expected in this age group. Risk factors such as alcoholism and coronary heart diseases seem to be independent predictors of perioperative complications. Therefore older patients can also benefit from plastic surgery and recurrent operations by the corresponding risk and complication management. Complication management necessitates careful patient selection, estimation of operative risks and patient-adapted selection of procedures. In addition to expertise in plastic surgery a thorough knowledge of non-surgical and surgical back-up procedures for technical incidents as well as vascular circulatory and wound healing disorders is required to deal successfully with complications in plastic surgery. This article presents these specific aspects of postoperative complication management in plastic surgery. PMID:19669715

Vogt, P M

2009-09-01

10

Management of postoperative complications: general approach.  

PubMed

The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible. PMID:24721365

Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

2014-05-01

11

Maternal postoperative complications after nonobstetric antenatal surgery  

PubMed Central

Objective Our primary objective is to estimate the occurrence of major maternal 30 day postoperative complications after nonobstetric antenatal surgery. Methods We analyzed the 2005-2009 data files from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to assess outcomes for pregnant women undergoing nonobstetric antenatal surgery during any trimester of pregnancy as classified by CPT-4 codes. T-tests, ?2, logistic regression and other tests were used to calculate composite 30-day major postoperative complications and associations of preoperative predictors with 30 day postoperative morbidity. Results The most common non-obstetric antenatal surgical procedure among the 1,969 included women was appendectomy (44.0%). The prevalence of composite 30-day major postoperative complications was 5.8% (n=115). This included (not exclusive categories): return to the surgical operating room within 30 days of surgery 3.6%, infectious morbidity 2.0%, wound morbidity 1.4%, 30 day respiratory morbidity 2.0%, venous thromboembolic event morbidity 0.5%, postoperative blood transfusion 0.2%, and maternal mortality 0.25%. Conclusion Major maternal postoperative complications following nonobstetric antenatal surgery were low (5.8%). Maternal postoperative mortality was rare (0.25%).

Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Brousseau, E. Christine; Dick, Madeline A.; Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Lockwood, Charles J.; Pettker, Christian M.

2013-01-01

12

Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy  

PubMed Central

Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer. Abbreviations: PRS- Piver Rutledge-Smith, II- class II, III- class III

Marin, F; Plesca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlanescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolaescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

2014-01-01

13

Treatment of Early Post-op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Postoperative infection is one of the most prevalent and challenging complications faced by orthopaedic surgeons and patients in both the military and civilian populations. The wounds are contaminated or colonized at the time of injury, during the course ...

W. Obremskey

2013-01-01

14

Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1995-08-01

15

Common post-operative complications in children  

PubMed Central

The exact incidence of common post-operative complications in children is not known. Most common one is post-operative nausea and vomiting followed by respiratory complications leading to hypoxia. Cardiac complications are less in children without associated congenital cardiac anomaly. Post-operative shivering, agitation and delirium are seen more often in children anaesthetised with newer inhalational agents like sevoflurane and desflurane. Urinary retention in the post-operative period could be influenced by anaesthetic drugs and regional blocks. The purpose of this article is to review the literature and present to the postgraduate students comprehensive information about the current understanding and practice pattern on various common complications in the post-operative period. Extensive literature was searched with key words of various complications from Pubmed, Google scholar and specific journal, namely paediatric anaesthesia. The relevant articles, review article meta-analysis and editorials were the primary source of information for this article.

Pawar, Dilip

2012-01-01

16

Postoperative Follow-Up and Complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter discusses the postoperative follow-up and surgical complications after ICD implantation. Postoperative electrophysiologic\\u000a testing is covered in the previous chapter and general complications of ICD therapy are addressed in the chapters entitled\\u000a “ICD Lead System Dysfunction, Diagnosis and Therapy” and “Rhythm-related Complications and Adverse Events in Patients with\\u000a Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators”.

Antonio Pacifico; Philip D. Henry

17

Application of wound dressing Molndal technique in clean and potentially contamined postoperative wounds--initial comparative study.  

PubMed

Because of a possible delayed wound healing, critical colonization and infection of wounds present a problem for surgeons, particularly in patients with compromised immune system or in case where the wound is heavy contaminated or poorly perfused. Molndal technique of wound dressing has proven to be effective in prevention of infection. In our study we wanted to describe the benefits of the application of Molndal technique wound dressing compared to traditional wound dressing technique at potentially contaminated and clean postoperative wounds. We examined postoperative wound after radical excision of pilonidal sinus and after implantation of partial endoprosthesis in hip fracture. Molndal technique consisted of wound dressing with Aquacel Ag - Hydrofiber. Traditional technique was performed using gauze compresses and hypoallergic adhesives. We analyzed the results of 50 patients after radical excision of pilonidal sinus. 25 patients were treated by Molndal technique and 25 patients by the traditional technique of wound dressing. In the group treated by Molndal technique only 1 (4%) patient has revealed a wound infection, proven by positive microbiological examination and suppuration. In the traditional technique group 4 (16%) patients developed wound infection as inflammation and secretion as a sign of superficial infection. In the other group we analyzed the results of 50 patients after implantation of partial endoprosthesis after hip fracture. 20 patients were treated by Molndal technique and 30 patients by the traditional technique of wound dressing. In the group treated by Molndal technique no patient has revealed a wound infection (0%). In the traditional technique group 4 (13%) patients developed wound infection. All complication in both group were superficial incisional surgical infection (according to HPSC). There was no deep incisional surgical site infection or organ/space surgical site infection. Our results are clearly showing that Molndal technique is effective in preventing the postoperative wound infection. PMID:22220414

Marinovi?, Marin; Cicvari?, Tedi; Grzalja, Nikola; Baci?, Giordano; Radovi?, Endi

2011-09-01

18

Improvement of Post-Operative Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Wound Infection Rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

ISSUE: A devastating complication of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is post-operative surgical site wound infections. In 2001, Baptist Medical Center (BMC) experienced a post-operative CABG surgical wound infection rate that was above the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NISS) rate.PROJECT: A multidisciplinary performance improvement team, consisting of the chiefs of Cardiovascular

J. Kilts; K. S. Meyer; R. J. Still; K. Walsh

2004-01-01

19

Laparoscopic Versus Open Appendectomy: the Risk of Postoperative Infectious Complications  

PubMed Central

Background: Despite the reported advantages of laparoscopic appendectomy (LA), ongoing debate exists about a possible increase in postoperative infectious complication rates especially intraabdominal infections and wound infection, unless wound protection is utilized. Methods: All consecutive appendicectomies (open and laparoscopic) performed over 4 months were included in this prospective study. Demographic details, operative time, time to conversion, infective postoperative complications, and delay in discharge were recorded. The patients were divided into 2 groups, laparoscopic (LA) and open appendectomy (OA). Results: A total of 134 appendicectomies were performed, 80 in the LA group and 54 in the OA group. Twenty-six (19.4%) appendices were perforated at the time of operation. The median patient age was 24 years (range, 7 to 63). Patients included 71 females and 63 males. Operating time in the LA group was longer with a median duration of 51.3 minutes (range, 35 to 100) compared with 40.6 minutes (range, 30 to 95) in the OA group. An extraction bag was used in 59/71 (83%) LA patients. Wound infection was recorded in 6 patients (5/54 in OA and 1/80 in LA). The site of wound infection was the port of specimen extraction in the laparoscopic group, and an extraction bag was not used. Wound infection delayed hospital discharge by an average of 2 days. Intraabdominal abscess formation complicated the outcome in 2 patients (1 in the LA group and 1 in the OA group). Conclusion: Wound infection is less common in LA than in OA, and an extraction bag is recommended. Intraabdominal infection rates do not appear to be increased, though the numbers in this study are relatively small. The longer operating time is minimal given the better results, and LA is the optimal approach to the diagnosis and management of acute appendicitis.

Fayyad, Tony; Cecil, Tom D.; Moran, Brendan J.

2007-01-01

20

PREVENTING POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN THE ELDERLY  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Postoperative complications are directly related to poor surgical outcomes in the elderly. This review outlines evidence based quality initiatives focused on decreasing neurologic, cardiac, and pulmonary complications in the elderly surgical patient. Delirium is the most common neurologic complication in the elderly. Important anesthesia quality initiatives for prevention of delirium in elderly surgical patients include use of structured clinical protocols focused on delirium risk factor modification, avoiding meperidine when managing postoperative pain, and careful selection and titration of drugs when sedation is required. There are few age-specific quality measures aimed at prevention of cardiac and pulmonary complications. However, some recommendations for adults such as avoidance of long acting muscle relaxants and perioperative use of statins and beta blockers in high risk patients can be applied to the geriatric surgical population. In the future, process measures may provide a more global assessment of quality in the elderly surgical population.

Sieber, Frederick E.; Barnett, Sheila Ryan

2011-01-01

21

Prediction factors for breast reconstruction postoperative complications  

PubMed Central

Abstract Breast cancer is a major health problem that requires multiple forms of treatment, including surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy and more recently, reconstructive surgery. The aim of this study is to determine the factors that can predict the chances of a patient having postoperative complications after breast reconstruction.

Chiru, MR; Lascar, I

2013-01-01

22

Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

2014-02-26

23

Noninfectious Wound Complications in Clean Surgery: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Association with Antibiotic Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Noninfectious wound complications are frequent and often are confused with and treated as infection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We assessed the epidemiology, impact, risk factors, and associations with antibiotic use of noninfectious wound complications\\u000a in clean orthopedic and trauma surgery. We report a single-center, prospective, observational study in an orthopedic department.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Among 1,073 adult patients, 630 (59%) revealed clinically relevant postoperative noninfectious wound complications,

Ilker UckayAmerico; Americo Agostinho; Wilson Belaieff; Laurence Toutous-Trellu; Saja Scherer-Pietramaggiori; Axel Andres; Louis Bernard; Hubert Vuagnat; Pierre Hoffmeyer; Blaise Wyssa

2011-01-01

24

Postoperative complications after surgery for typhoid perforation in children in Ghana.  

PubMed

One of the most severe complications of typhoid fever is perforation of the ileum (TPI); it is also a cause of high morbidity and mortality in endemic areas. After surgery for TPI, other complications may set in postoperatively, compounding the problem. A prospective study of 121 children who were operated upon for TPI to identify the postoperative complications showed that the most common was wound infection. The most serious were: mechanical intestinal obstruction, abdominal dehiscence, and enterocutaneous fistulae. Physicians caring for such children should be aware of these complications and their mode of presentation so as to quickly and decisively manage them to prevent more deaths. PMID:9880697

Abantanga, F A; Wiafe-Addai, B B

1998-11-01

25

Wound complications of adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas  

SciTech Connect

Adjuvant radiation therapy by the brachytherapy technique has been suggested by us to diminish local recurrence following resection of extremity and superficial truncal soft-tissue sarcoma. However, loading of the catheters with radioactive sources on the first through the fifth postoperative days results in a 48% significant wound-complication rate. Our previous animal experiments would suggest that delay of application of radiation to one week after wounding is accompanied by significant improvement in wound-breaking strength, new H3 hydroxyproline accumulation, and improved force-tension curves. As part of our ongoing prospective randomized trial of the effects of brachytherapy on local control, one change was made: the catheters were loaded five or more days after operation. Wound complications were then reviewed in 50 patients following this single change in brachytherapy delivery. Of the 21 patients receiving brachytherapy, 14% had significant wound complications; 10% of the 29 patients who did not receive radiation had wound complications of similar severity. This decrease in wound complications represents a major improvement over our prior experience and suggests that the timing of radioactive source loading in the postoperative period is a major factor in radiation-induced wound-healing delay.

Ormsby, M.V.; Hilaris, B.S.; Nori, D.; Brennan, M.F.

1989-07-01

26

Wound complications following operative fixation of calcaneal fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of our study was to find the incidence of wound complications following operative fixation of fractured calcanea and identify the risk factors contributing to them. We retrospectively reviewed the results of operative treatment of 33 calcaneal fractures in 30 patients over a 4-year period. We report an overall wound complication rate of 18.1%. Wound infection, haematoma, dehiscence and

M Al-Mudhaffar; C. V. R Prasad; A Mofidi

2000-01-01

27

Incident of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-Operative Wound Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary aim of this study was to determine the incidents of pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection and its sensitivity pattern to commonly used antibiotics. During a period of six months between February to December, 2005, 115 specimens were collected from King Abdullah University Hospital, Princess Basma Hospital, Princess Badea and Princess Rahma Hospitals. Samples were obtained from the

Hani A. Masaadeh; Adnan S. Jaran

2009-01-01

28

Factors affecting the incidence of postoperative wound infection.  

PubMed

A prospective study of postoperative wounds was carried out in West Dorset to determine the incidence of infection, describe the time distribution of presentation before and after discharge from hospital and identify possible contributory factors. There were 702 consecutive patients admitted to the study (600 in-patients and 102 day cases). Fifty one became infected (47 in-patients and 4 day cases), corresponding to an overall infection rate of 7.3%. Over 50% of infections presented during the first week after operation, and almost 90% were diagnosed within 2 weeks of surgery Twenty-eight (55%) wounds that became infected presented after hospital discharge. Of 23 specific aetiological variables studied, four (age, preoperative stay, shaving and the surgeon) were shown to have a statistically significant association with the development of wound infection. A strong association between the individual surgeon and the development of a wound infection was demonstrated and this supports the need for routine surgical audit. PMID:1979572

Mishriki, S F; Law, D J; Jeffery, P J

1990-10-01

29

[Postoperative infectious-inflammatory complications of endoscopic surgery for urolithiasis].  

PubMed

Retrospective analysis of 1027 percutaneous radioendoscopic surgeries for upper urinary tract stones was performed. Postoperative acute pyelonephritis was the most common complication (11.2%), the frequency of which was significantly dependent on the presence of source of infection in the urinary tract, and the frequency of intra- and postoperative complications. When performing PPN, patients with urolithiasis and with the presence of the initial infection in the urinary tract, intra- and postoperative complications should be referred to the group of patients with a high risk of postoperative infectious and inflammatory complications. The analysis showed that the development of acute pyelonephritis after PPN increases the cost of treatment by 25%. PMID:23662504

Akilov, F A; Mukhtarov, Sh T; Giiasov, Sh I; Mirkhamidov, D Kh; Nasirov, F R; Muratova, N B

2013-01-01

30

Wound breakdown after middle cranial fossa craniotomy: an unusual complication after rhytidectomy.  

PubMed

Wound complications after middle cranial fossa craniotomy are rare. We describe a patient who underwent a left middle fossa craniotomy for resection of a small internal auditory canal tumor with subsequent development of wound breakdown and infection 1 week postoperatively. Prompting of the patient elicited a history of bilateral rhytidectomies. Wound debridement, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, dermal regeneration template placement, and prolonged antibiotic treatment were performed. Complete secondary intention healing occurred with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Prior rhytidectomy scars must be identified and incorporated into the surgical planning prior to performing middle fossa craniotomy incisions. PMID:24150991

Moberly, Aaron C; Tweel, Benjamin C; Welling, D Bradley

2014-02-01

31

Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain  

PubMed Central

An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment.

Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Smietanski, Maciej

2011-01-01

32

Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications of Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: To determine the perioperative complications and morbidity of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and to analyze risk factors for observed complications. Materials and Methods: Data of 1,000 patients undergoing RRP and pelvic lymphadenectomy (pLA) performed by different surgeons of the same hospital were collected. Uni- and multivariate analysis was performed to detect associations between intra- and postoperative complications and specific

Virgilijus Klevecka; Luise Burmester; Michael Musch; Ulla Roggenbuck; Darko Kroepfl

2007-01-01

33

Risk Factors for Perineal Wound Complications Following Abdominoperineal Resection  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE  Perineal wound complications are common following abdominoperineal resection. This study investigates the factors contributing to these complications.METHODS  Patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection at our institution from June 1997 to May 2003 were reviewed. Significant predictors associated with minor (separation 2 cm of separation, reoperation required, or readmission) wound complications were ascertained.RESULTS  Of 153 patients, there were 22 major (14 percent) and 32 minor

Caprice K. Christian; Mary R. Kwaan; Rebecca A. Betensky; Elizabeth M. Breen; Michael J. Zinner; Ronald Bleday

2005-01-01

34

Postoperative wound care after dermatologic procedures: a comparison of 2 commonly used petrolatum-based ointments.  

PubMed

An appropriate selection of topical agents for wound care is important to promote uncomplicated healing. Petrolatum-based ointments, such as Aquaphor Healing Ointment (AHO) and white petroleum jelly, are commonly employed to keep wounds moist postoperatively. While they have beneficial properties for wound healing, they also may cause wound redness and swelling. We decided to evaluate for wound reactivity postoperatively for these 2 commonly used petrolatum-based ointments. We found that surgical wounds treated with AHO had a higher incidence of wound redness (52%) than those treated with plain white petrolatum (12%). PMID:23377388

Morales-Burgos, Adisbeth; Loosemore, Michael P; Goldberg, Leonard H

2013-02-01

35

Risk Factors for Complications after Reconstructive Surgery for Sternal Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Although the utility of flaps for the treatment of sternal wound infections following median sternotomy has been reported for 30 years, there have been few reports on the risk factors for complications after reconstruction. The objective of this investigation was to identify factors related to complications after the reconstruction of sternal wound infections. Methods A retrospective analysis of 74 patients with reconstructive surgery after sternal wound infection over a 5-year period was performed. Clinical data including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, bacterial culture, previous cardiac surgery, wound depth, mortality rate, type of reconstructive procedure, and complication rate were collected. Results The patients' BMI ranged from 15.2 to 33.6 kg/m2 (mean, 23.1±3.74 kg/m2). Wound closure complications after reconstructive surgery were observed in 36.5% of the cases. The mortality rate was 2.7%. Diabetes mellitus significantly affected the rate of wound closure complications (P=0.041). A significant difference in the number of complications was seen between Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (P=0.011). There was a correlation between harvesting of the internal thoracic artery and postoperative complications (P=0.048). The complication rates of the pectoralis major flap, rectus abdominis flap, omentum flap, a combination of pectoralis major flap and rectus abdominis flap, and direct closure were 23.3%, 33.3%, 100%, 37.5%, and 35.7%, respectively. Conclusions Diabetes mellitus, S. aureus, harvesting of the internal thoracic artery, and omentum flap were significant factors for complications after reconstruction. The omentum flap volume may be related to the complications associated with the omentum flap transfer in the present study.

Takaku, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Shinji; Abe, Yoshiro; Harada, Hiroshi; Nagae, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Yusuke; Anraku, Kuniaki; Inagawa, Kiichi; Nakanishi, Hideki

2014-01-01

36

Laparoscopic drainage of postoperative complicated intra-abdominal abscesses.  

PubMed

Intra-abdominal abscess, which carries significant rates of death and complications, may complicate the postoperative course. Treatment options include percutaneous needle aspiration, placement of an external drain under ultrasonic guidance, or surgical drainage, depending on the size, site, and nature (simple or complicated) of the abscess. Laparoscopic drainage may be a treatment option. A retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic drainage of postoperative complicated intra-abdominal abscesses at the authors' institution from January 1997 to July 1999 was performed. Seven patients had complicated intra-abdominal abscesses 7 to 17 (mean 11) days after their initial operation. All abscesses were successfully drained by laparoscopy. The mean operative time was 64 minutes. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The postoperative analgesic requirement was minimal. The suction drain was removed on average 5 days after laparoscopy, and the mean hospital stay was 6 days. There was no recurrence of symptoms at a mean follow-up of 23 months. Laparoscopic drainage, in combination with systemic antibiotics, is a safe and effective treatment option in patients with postoperative complicated intra-abdominal abscesses. PMID:11083215

Kok, K Y; Yapp, S K

2000-10-01

37

Relation of anthropometric and dynamometric variables to serious postoperative complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prediction of serious postoperative complications by using standard anthropometric and biochemical nutritional variables was attempted in 225 patients admitted for major abdominal surgery. In 102 of the patients hand-grip dynamometry was also measured, and this proved the most sensitive test, predicting complications in 48 of the 55 patients (87%) who developed them (p < 0.001). Arm muscle circumference and forearm

A M Klidjian; K J Foster; R M Kammerling; A Cooper; S J Karran

1980-01-01

38

Value of preoperative spirometry to predict postoperative pulmonary complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to determine the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (POPC) and the value of preoperative spirometry to predict pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery, 24 women and 36 men (total 60 patients) were studied prospectively (mean age 48·3 years). On the day before the operation and for 15 days after the operation, each patients's respiratory status was assessed by

A. Kocabas; K. Kara; G. Özgür; H. Sönmez; R. Burgut

1996-01-01

39

Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: a guide to postoperative anatomy and complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

:  The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the surgical technique, postoperative anatomy, and potential complications\\u000a of the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. As the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy becomes an increasingly popular bariatric surgery,\\u000a it is important for radiologists to familiarize themselves with the procedure and possible complications.

David P. Katz; Stephen R. Lee; Arun C. Nachiappan; Marc H. Willis; Collin D. Bray; Carlos A. Farinas; Cliff J. Whigham; Felix Spiegel

40

Procalcitonin in Early Detection of Postoperative Complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A prospective clinical study was performed to assess the accuracy of procalcitonin in 70 patients with elective colorectal or aortal surgery and to compare it with inflammatory mediators. Also the early prediction of complications and the outcome of these patients was taken into account. Methods: Laboratory variables and cytokine determination were obtained preoperatively, on the day of operation and

H. Bernd Reith; Ulrich Mittelkötter; E. Sebastian Debus; Claudia Küssner; Arnulf Thiede

1998-01-01

41

Wound complications after median sternotomy: a single-centre study†  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Sternal wound complications following median sternotomy remain a challenge in cardiac surgery. Changes in both patient profile and type of operations have been observed in recent years. Therefore, we analysed current wound healing complications after median sternotomy at our centre. METHODS All adult patients undergoing a median sternotomy between January 2009 and April 2011 were included in this retrospective analysis. Transplants and assist devices implantations were omitted. We assessed outcome, prognostic factors and microbiological results of standardized wound swabs. RESULTS In total, 1297 patients with an average age of 67.0 ± 12.7 years were analysed. Operation types included 598 solitary coronary artery bypass grafts (CABGs), 213 solitary valve procedures, 105 CABGs with aortic valve replacement and 116 solitary aortic operations or conduit implantations. Furthermore, 255 of the remaining 265 were combined or otherwise complex procedures. Superficial healing disorders occurred in 43 patients (3.3%), while 33 (2.5%) developed deep wound complications. Six patients with sternal wound complications (7.9%) died in-hospital. In 7 patients, no pathogen was identified and the wound appeared uninfected (21% of all deep complications or 0.05% of all patients). These healing disorders were considered deep dehiscences. Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, BMI of >40 kg/m2 and who underwent reoperation were prone to superficial infections. Risk factors for all deep sternal wound complications were insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, COPD and reoperation. Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed ‘emergency’ as an independent prognostic factor for all sternal wound complications. Microbial swabs of the sternal wound were taken in 82 of the 1297 patients (6.6%). Pathogens of the normal skin flora represented the majority of pathogens in both superficial and deep wound complications. Eight patients with deep, but only 2 patients with superficial complications suffered from polymicrobial infections. All deep polymicrobial infections involved coagulase-negative Staphylococci. CONCLUSIONS Wound complications following median sternotomy remain a challenge to cardiac surgery. Redo and emergency operations are the most important risk factors in this contemporary series. More efforts seem mandatory to decrease this arduous morbidity and the costs of prolonged treatment.

Heilmann, Claudia; Stahl, Rahel; Schneider, Christian; Sukhodolya, Tetyana; Siepe, Matthias; Olschewski, Manfred; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

2013-01-01

42

Negative pressure wound therapy for inguinal lymphatic complications in critically ill patients  

PubMed Central

Purpose In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of regulated negative pressure vacuum-assisted wound therapy for inguinal lymphatic complications in critically ill, liver transplant recipients. Methods The great saphenous vein was harvested for hepatic vein reconstruction during liver transplantation in 599 living-donor liver transplant recipients. Fourteen of the recipients (2.3%) developed postoperative inguinal lymphatic complications and were treated with negative pressure wound therapy, and they were included in this study. Results The average total duration of negative pressure wound therapy was 23 days (range, 11 to 42 days). Complete resolution of the lymphatic complications and wound healing were achieved in all 14 patients, 5 of whom were treated in hospital and 9 as outpatients. There was no clinically detectable infection, bleeding or recurrence after an average follow-up of 27 months (range, 7 to 36 months). Conclusion Negative pressure wound therapy is an effective, readily-available treatment option that is less invasive than exploration and ligation of leaking lymphatics and provides good control of drainage and rapid wound closure in critically ill patients.

Cheong, Yong-Kyu; Jun, Heungman; Song, Gi-Won; Moon, Ki-Myung; Kwon, Tae-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu

2013-01-01

43

Wound-healing complications following biopsy of the irradiated breast.  

PubMed

A retrospective review evaluated results of 38 posttreatment biopsies (with resulting benign pathologic findings) that were performed on 32 irradiated breasts or axillae in 31 of 232 patients who underwent conservation treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Postbiopsy wound-healing complications developed in eight (30%) of 27 patients who were undergoing open biopsies but in none of 11 who underwent only needle biopsies. Wound-healing complications occurred in two of five patients who underwent incisional skin biopsy, three of five who underwent mammographic needle-localized excisional biopsy, and three of 17 who underwent other types of open biopsies. Frequency of wound-healing complications following open biopsy was not related to patient age, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, or use of chemotherapy. Wound-healing complications were related to breast size, developing in four (67%) of six patients with large breasts (brassiere cup size D or DD) as compared with that in only four (19%) of 21 patients with smaller breasts. Significant worsening of cosmetic breast retraction was frequently associated with wound-healing complications, especially wounds that took more than 1 month to heal. PMID:1550480

Pezner, R D; Lorant, J A; Terz, J; Ben-Ezra, J; Odom-Maryon, T; Luk, K H

1992-03-01

44

Prospective Assessment of Postoperative Complications and Associated Costs Following Inguinal Lymph Node Dissection (ILND) in Melanoma Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  We prospectively assessed the incidence, risk factors, and costs associated with wound complications and lymphedema in melanoma\\u000a patients undergoing inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  A total of 53 melanoma patients were accrued to 2 trials (June 2005 to July 2008) that included prospective evaluations of\\u000a postoperative complications; 30-day wound complications included infection, seroma, and\\/or dehiscence. There were 20

Sharon B. Chang; Robert L. Askew; Yan Xing; Storm Weaver; Jeffrey E. Gershenwald; Jeffrey E. Lee; Richard Royal; Anthony Lucci; Merrick I. Ross; Janice N. Cormier

2010-01-01

45

Postoperative Complications of Carotid Patching: Pseudoaneurysm and Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Patch angioplasty after carotid endarterectomy has been advocated to improve results by decreasing the incidence of recurrent\\u000a stenosis and postoperative carotid thrombosis. Aneurysmal and infectious complications may be secondary to use of prosthetic\\u000a materials in arterial reconstruction. We report four patients who developed late operative site complications related to carotid\\u000a patching. All four of our patients had delayed pseudoaneurysms and

Boris H. Borazjani; Samuel E. Wilson; Roy M. Fujitani; Ian Gordon; Mark Mueller; Russell A. Williams

2003-01-01

46

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement: Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications  

PubMed Central

Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a treatment option for patients with symptomatic glenohumeral arthritis and a deficient rotator cuff. The reported complication rates vary from 0% to 68%. Given this variation, our purposes were to (1) determine the learning curve for the procedure, (2) identify complications and surgical pitfalls, and (3) compare our results with those of similar published series. We retrospectively reviewed 20 consecutive patients (mean age, 73 years; range, 45–88 years) who had reverse total shoulder arthroplasty by one surgeon, tabulating intraoperative and postoperative complications. Minimum followup was 3 months (average, 9 months; range, 3–21 months). The intraoperative complication rate for the first 10 patients was higher than that for the second 10 patients. There were 33 complications in 15 patients: 11 patients collectively had 22 intraoperative complications and eight patients collectively had 11 postoperative complications. At radiographic followup, 11 patients had scapular notching and nine patients had heterotopic ossification. Our complication rate was higher than published rates. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Wierks, Carl; Skolasky, Richard L.; Ji, Jong Hun

2008-01-01

47

Management of postoperative complications: cardiovascular disease and volume management.  

PubMed

Postoperative cardiovascular complications are common, predictable, and typically treatable in geriatric patients who have sustained fractures. Although intervention-specific data are sparse, observational evidence from high-performing geriatric fracture centers coupled with an understanding of geriatric principles can serve as a basis for treatment guidelines. Many patients can be safely and effectively managed with close attention to intravascular volume status, heart rate control, and minimization of other physiologic stresses, including pain and delirium. Many chronic cardiovascular therapies may be harmful in the immediate postoperative period, and can usually be safely omitted or attenuated until hemodynamic stability and mobility have been restored. PMID:24721369

Nicholas, Joseph A

2014-05-01

48

Laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer: increasing body mass index does not impact postoperative complications  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the effect of body mass index on postoperative complications and the performance of lymph node dissection in women undergoing laparoscopy or laparotomy for endometrial cancer. Methods Retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing surgery for endometrial cancer between 8/2004 and 12/2008. Complications graded and analyzed using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.03 classification. Results 168 women underwent surgery: laparoscopy n=65, laparotomy n=103. Overall median body mass index 36.2 (range, 18.1 to 72.7) with similar distributions for age, body mass index and performance of lymph node dissection between groups. Following laparoscopy vs. laparotomy the percent rate of overall complications 53.8:73.8 (p=0.01), grade ?3 complications 9.2:34.0 (p<0.01), ?3 wound complications 3.1:22.3 (p<0.01) and ?3 wound infection 3.1:20.4 (p=0.01) were significantly lower after laparoscopy. In a logistic model there was no effect of body mass index (?36 and<36) on complications after laparoscopy in contrast to laparotomy. Para-aortic lymph node dissection was performed by laparoscopy 19/65 (29%): by laparotomy 34/103 (33%) p=0.61 and pelvic lymph node dissection by laparoscopy 21/65 (32.3%): by laparotomy 46/103 (44.7%) p=0.11. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for patients undergoing laparoscopy for stage I disease there was an inverse relationship between the performance of both para-aortic lymph node dissection and pelvic lymph node dissection and increasing body mass index (p=0.03 and p<0.01 respectively) in contrast to the laparotomy group where there was a trend only (p=0.09 and 0.05). Conclusion For patients undergoing laparoscopy, increasing body mass index did not impact postoperative complications but did influence the decision to perform lymph node dissection.

Arumugam, Cibi; Gordinier, Mary E.; Metzinger, Daniel S.; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N.

2011-01-01

49

Risk factors for postoperative complication after spinal fusion and instrumentation in degenerative lumbar scoliosis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Relatively few studies have focused on the major medical complications that are more common in older adults. Furthermore, these studies have generally not reported how accurately a risk factor, or combination of risk factors, can distinguish between those who will have a complication and those who will not. Methods A total of 236 consecutive patients who had undergone surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar scoliosis between June 2008 and June 2012 were included retrospectively in this study. The demographic distribution, medical history, and clinical data were collected to investigate the predictive factors of postoperative complications by logistic regression. Results Among 236 eligible patients, major medical complications occurred in 7.2% of cases and wound complications occurred in 1.7% of cases. Ninety-day mortality rate was 0.4%. Postoperative complications were strongly associated with history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (P = 0.031), dyspnea with minimal exertion (P = 0.041), being at least partially dependent (P = 0.041), smoking within the past year (P = 0.044), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of more than 2 (P = 0.000), diabetes treated with insulin (P = 0.003), and steroid use for chronic condition (P = 0.003). In logistic regressions, operation time (odds ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11–4.78), ASA class (class 3 or 4 vs. class 1 or 2: odds ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.22–3.45), insulin-dependent diabetes (odds ratio 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.18–2.43), and steroid use for chronic condition (odds ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.32) may be reasonable predictors for an individual's likelihood of surgical complications. Conclusions The occurrence of postoperative complications is most likely multifactorial and is related to operation time, ASA class, insulin-dependent diabetes and steroid use for chronic condition.

2014-01-01

50

Severe complications after negative pressure wound therapy in burned wounds: two case reports  

PubMed Central

We present two typical cases of severe complications (sepsis and hemorrhage) after negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in burned patients. Necrotic tissues in some deep burn wounds are difficult to judge correctly and remove thoroughly. An electrically burned blood vessel looks “intact” but can easily break. Necrotic tissue or injured blood vessels when using NPWT are dangerous, both for causing sepsis and hemorrhage. This is the first article that reports the severe complications of NPWT in burned patients. It is imperative to heed indications and avoid contraindications. Proper preparation of wound beds, close observation, and sufficient irrigation are also crucial to avoid these severe complications, and there is an urgent need to substitute the central vacuum system with the low-pressure system.

Ren, Haitao; Li, Yuan

2014-01-01

51

Postoperative pulmonary complications in patients with esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

There are recent reports on postoperative pulmonary complications in patients with esophageal cancer who were treated preoperatively with chemotherapy and irradiation. The Hamburg Esophageal Study Group is currently undertaking a prospective randomized study to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative treatment. Postoperative pulmonary complications and mortality in these patients with either a combined preoperative treatment (group 1, n = 11) or chemotherapy alone (group 2, n = 9) are evaluated in the present paper. Complete remission of the tumor was found more often in group 1 (54.6%) than in group 2 (22.2%). However, postoperatively the patients of group 1 developed adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; 54.6%) more frequently than in group 2 (11.1%), and all patients with ARDS died. Thus, although the combined preoperative treatment is more effective in tumor remission, it is associated with a higher respiratory failure and postoperative mortality. Therefore, the preoperative regime has now been changed by the study group. Since after the clinical manifestation of ARDS no causative clinical therapy is available up to now, attention must be focused on the prevention of respiratory failure. PMID:8471816

Scholz, J; Steinhöfel, U; Dürig, M; Prause, A; Bause, H W; Hamper, K; Schulte am Esch, J

1993-04-01

52

Parotidectomy: the timing of post-operative complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the timing of complications following parotidectomy. We performed a 119-patient retrospective case series analysis\\u000a over a 12-year period (1994–2006) and investigated timing of post-operative complications. 38% of temporary facial nerve palsies\\u000a resolved within 1 month, 78% within 3 months and all recorded resolved within 7 months. Tumour recurrence, ranged from 5 months\\u000a to 9 years post-surgery with a median of 5 years. Salivary fistula

Scott E. Henney; R. Brown; D. E. Phillips

2010-01-01

53

Imaging of bariatric surgery: normal anatomy and postoperative complications.  

PubMed

Obesity is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions in the United States and around the world. During the past 2 decades, bariatric surgery has become an increasingly popular form of treatment for morbid obesity. The most common bariatric procedures performed include laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal examinations and abdominal computed tomography (CT) are the major imaging tests used to evaluate patients after these various forms of bariatric surgery. The purpose of this article is to present the surgical anatomy and normal imaging findings and postoperative complications for these bariatric procedures at fluoroscopic examinations and CT. Complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass include anastomotic leaks and strictures, marginal ulcers, jejunal ischemia, small bowel obstruction, internal hernias, intussusception, and recurrent weight gain. Complications after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding include stomal stenosis, malpositioned bands, pouch dilation, band slippage, perforation, gastric volvulus, intraluminal band erosion, and port- and band-related problems. Finally, complications after sleeve gastrectomy include postoperative leaks and strictures, gastric dilation, and gastroesophageal reflux. The imaging features of these various complications of bariatric surgery are discussed and illustrated. PMID:24471382

Levine, Marc S; Carucci, Laura R

2014-02-01

54

Postoperative Olfactory Results in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyposis According to Wound Healing Status  

PubMed Central

Objectives Postoperative wound healing status has not been considered in earlier studies on olfactory changes after surgery. This may be a factor accounting for the equivocal postoperative olfactory results. The aim of this study was to investigate postoperative olfactory results according to wound healing status. Methods Fifty patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps with smelling disturbance were examined preoperatively, and at 6 months after surgery. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative Lund-Kennedy score: favorable and unfavorable wound healing. Preoperative ostiomeatal unit computed tomography (CT), such as Lund-Mackay score and olfactory cleft opacification score, clinical characteristics and olfactory function tests such as the butanol threshold test and cross-cultural smell identification test, and questionnaire responses were compared between the two groups. Results There were no differences in preoperative clinical characteristics between the favorable and unfavorable wound healing groups. The favorable wound healing group displayed greater improvement of olfactory results after surgery than the unfavorable wound healing group. Postoperative olfactory improvement patterns showed a hierarchy from subjective to objective improvement and from threshold to identification improvement. Patients who had postoperative favorable wound healing but showed no success of olfaction were characterized by more severe preoperative subjective symptoms and higher olfactory cleft opacification, especially in the upper part of olfactory cleft on preoperative CT scan. Conclusion Wound healing status is an apparent risk factor for postoperative olfactory improvement. Moreover, preoperative opacification in the olfactory cleft may predict bad olfactory results after surgery, even in patients with favorable wound healing.

Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Jin-Yong; Kim, Sang-Wook

2013-01-01

55

Non-activated autologous platelet-rich plasma for the prevention of inguinal wound-related complications after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.  

PubMed

The endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) usually involves the surgical exposure and catheterization of the femoral arteries. Several inguinal surgical wound-related complications have been reported postoperatively. The aim of this report was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intraoperative application of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the prevention of wound-related complications in AAA EVAR. The authors conducted a patient- and assessor-blinded controlled trial involving 100 subjects undergoing EVAR of an AAA. PRP was produced using an autologous platelet separator and was applied, without prior thrombin activation, in 50 patients eligible for inclusion. The results were compared with a control group of 50 patients who underwent AAA EVAR within the same time period. The primary outcome was the difference in postoperative hospital stay. Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of wound healing and wound-related complications. Age, sex, and other comorbidities related to wound healing were not significantly different between cases and controls. One patient treated with PRP developed a unilateral wound infection with lymphorrhea, and two patients developed a bi-lateral superficial infection. Twelve patients within the control group developed a wound-related complication. The postoperative hospitalization was significantly lower in the PRP group. The overall surgical wound-related complications rate was also significantly lower in the PRP group. Application of non-thrombin-activated PRP seems to prevent major postoperative wound-related complications (p = .026) and shorten postoperative hospital stay duration after femoral artery exposure and catheterization for AAA EVAR (mean, 4.48 +/- 0.48 vs. 6.14 +/- 0.39 days). PMID:18389665

Saratzis, Nikolaos; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

2008-03-01

56

Retropubic Versus Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparative Study of Postoperative Complications  

PubMed Central

Purpose To compare the complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) with those of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) performed by a single surgeon for the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The postoperative complications of 341 patients who underwent RRP and 524 patients who underwent RALP for prostate cancer at the Asan Medical Center between July 2007 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and compared. Complications were classified according to the modified Clavien classification system. Results RALP was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay (mean, 7.9 days vs. 10.1 days, p<0.001) and duration of urethral catheterization (6.2 days vs. 7.5 days, p<0.001) than RRP. Major complications (Clavien grade III-IV) were less common in the RALP group than in the RRP group (3.4% vs. 7.6%, p=0.006). There were no significant differences in medical complications between procedures. Considering surgical complications, urinary retention (7.0% vs. 2.7%, p=0.002) and wound repair (4.1% vs. 0.2%, p<0.001) were more common after RRP than after RALP. Extravasation of contrast medium during cystography was more common in the RRP group than in the RALP group (10.0% vs. 2.1%, p<0.001). Conclusions RALP is associated with a lower complication rate than RRP.

Ryu, Jeman; Kwon, Taekmin; Kyung, Yoon Soo; Hong, Sungwoo; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab

2013-01-01

57

Exploring the Frontier of Electronic Health Record Surveillance: The Case of Post-Operative Complications  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to build electronic algorithms using a combination of structured data and natural language processing (NLP) of text notes for potential safety surveillance of nine post-operative complications. Methods Post-operative complications from six medical centers in the Southeastern United States were obtained from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) registry. Development and test datasets were constructed using stratification by facility and date of procedure for patients with and without complication. Algorithms were developed from VASQIP outcome definitions using NLP coded concepts, regular expressions, and structured data. The VASQIP nurse reviewer served as the reference standard for evaluating sensitivity and specificity. The algorithms were designed in the development and evaluated in the test dataset. Results Sensitivity and specificity in the test set were 85% and 92% for acute renal failure, 80% and 93% for sepsis, 56% and 94% for deep vein thrombosis, 80% and 97% for pulmonary embolism, 88% and 89% for acute myocardial infarction, 88% and 92% for cardiac arrest, 80% and 90% for pneumonia, 95% and 80% for urinary tract infection, and 80% and 93% for wound infection, respectively. A third of the complications occurred outside of the hospital setting. Conclusions Computer algorithms on data extracted from the electronic health record produced respectable sensitivity and specificity across a large sample of patients seen in six different medical centers. This study demonstrates the utility of combining natural language processing with structured data for mining the information contained within the electronic health record.

FitzHenry, Fern; Murff, Harvey J.; Matheny, Michael E.; Gentry, Nancy; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Brown, Steven H; Reeves, Ruth M; Aronsky, Dominik; Elkin, Peter L.; Messina, Vincent P.; Speroff, Theodore

2013-01-01

58

[Treatment of pediatric cataracts. Part 2: IOL implantation, postoperative complications, aphakia management and postoperative development].  

PubMed

There is a lot of uncertainty concerning intraocular lens (IOL) implantation for pediatric cataracts. The appropriate age which ocular abnormalities are contraindications and according to which formula IOL should be calculated are controversial. In addition to the imperative of identifying postoperative complications, such as secondary cataract formation and secondary glaucoma in a sufficiently timely manner, a modern management of aphakia with refractive compensation and occlusion is necessary. Some easy rules can help prevent pitfalls. PMID:23392839

Hager, T; Schirra, F; Seitz, B; Käsmann-Kellner, B

2013-02-01

59

Postoperative Complications Associated With Perioperative Sirolimus Prior to Pediatric Cardiac Retransplantation  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Sirolimus has been used in pediatric cardiac transplantation for the past decade for chronic renal dysfunction, recurrent rejection, and/or coronary allograft vasculopathy. There has been concern regarding the effect of sirolimus on wound healing and other postoperative complications. To date, the pediatric literature on its use is limited and has not specifically addressed its use in the perioperative period following repeat cardiac transplantation. METHODS We compared the patients in our institution who received sirolimus before repeat cardiac transplantation to those in the same era who did not receive sirolimus. RESULTS Of the 5 patients in the study group, 5 (100%) developed pleural effusions vs 1 (17%) in the control group (p=0.013). There was no increase in mortality in the sirolimus group, and there were no significant differences in renal dysfunction, serious bacterial infection, rejection, or postoperative length of stay. CONCLUSIONS In this small data set, there was a statistically significant increase in pleural effusions in patients on sirolimus. Further study is needed to develop an appropriate strategy to avoid postoperative complications in this patient population.

Goldberg, Jason F.; Jeewa, Aamir; Dreyer, William J.; Adams, Gerald J.; Cabrera, Antonio G.; Price, Jack F.; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Denfield, Susan W.

2014-01-01

60

Proper care of early wounds to optimize healing and prevent complications.  

PubMed

Proper wound care has broad applications for all clinicians. Much of the future direction for enhancing wound repair focuses on key cells and growth factors, which is why possessing a strong understanding of the basic physiology of wound healing is imperative. This article first provides a thorough review of the phases of wound healing followed by a discussion on the latest wound management strategies. Wound conditions and surgical techniques are important components for optimizing wound healing and preventing complications. Special consideration has been given to the unique settings of contaminated wounds, open wounds, or avulsed tissue. PMID:21856537

Pitzer, Geoffrey B; Patel, Krishna G

2011-08-01

61

An analysis of postoperative complications and efficacy of 3-D miniplates in fixation of mandibular fractures  

PubMed Central

Background: Recently, various modifications in transorally placed miniplates for direct fixation of the mandibular fracture are gaining popularity. The modifications have various advantages like more rigidity, less foreign material, less time in application, etc. Among the various modifications of miniplates, three-dimensional (3-D) plating system is also gaining popularity. Thus, in the present study, we tried to evaluate the efficacy and postoperative complications of 3-D titanium miniplates in the treatment of mandibular fractures. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 40 patients with non-comminuted mandibular fractures. They were treated using a 2-mm 3-D titanium miniplate through intraoral approach. All patients were systematically monitored 6 months postoperatively. Outcome parameters like infection, hardware failure, wound dehiscence, sensory disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve, occlusion, and 3-D plate stability were recorded. The statistical tests used in study were mean, standard deviation, and Chi-square test. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant and values less than 0.001 were considered very highly significant. Results: Two patients had a postoperative infection with no consequences. All patients had normal sensory function 3 months after surgery. Plate fracture had not occurred in any patient. Occlusal was normal and wound dehiscence was not reported. 3-D plate was stable in all the patients. Conclusions: It was seen that 3-D titanium miniplates were effective in the treatment of mandibular fractures and overall complication rates were lesser. In symphysis and parasymphysis regions, 3-D plating system uses lesser foreign material than the conventional miniplates using Champy's principle.

Gokkulakrishnan, Sadhasivam; Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Ashish; Shahi, Ashish Kumar

2012-01-01

62

[Analysis of postoperative complications following acute surgery for colorectal cancer].  

PubMed

Our aim was to improve the outcome of emergency surgeries for colorectal cancer (CRC). Authors compared two periods: 2004-2006 and 2007-2011. Targeted cases were emergency admissions, in which the diagnosis of colorectal cancer is only revealed during work-up or during surgery. No other exclusion criteria were set. Analyzed main endpoints were anastomotic leak, postoperative mortality, resecability. ASA classification and TNM stages were assessed in order to learn morbidity and general condition prior to acute surgery. Considering the experience gained in prior period, in 2007, authors have made a change in treatment strategy. In following years leakage ratio became ten times lower and mortality was reduced by 5%. There is a great chance that fast work-up and preparation for surgery may decrease complications and mortality. The aim would be for CRC patients, is to reach surgery in an early stage of disease as possible, at least before complications develop. PMID:24873766

Kári, Dániel; Korsós, Diána; Kecskédi, Bence; Lovay, Zoltán; Ecsedy, Gábor; Lontai, Péter; Ender, Ferenc; Vörös, Attila

2014-06-01

63

Chronic postoperative wound infection caused by Myocobacterium fortuitum complex.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium fortuitum in a rapidly growing atypical mycobacteia, sometimes associated with nosocomial infections in human. These infections are often difficult to identify; and treat even after indentification. We report here a case of chronic post operative wound infection due to M. fortuitum. PMID:18697600

Verghese, Susan; Madhusudhan, B; Senthil, M S; Thabitha, C; Leelavathy, S; Padmaja, P; Madhusudhan, K

2007-12-01

64

Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds  

PubMed Central

After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account.

Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

2010-01-01

65

Postoperative complications of carotid patching: pseudoaneurysm and infection.  

PubMed

Patch angioplasty after carotid endarterectomy has been advocated to improve results by decreasing the incidence of recurrent stenosis and postoperative carotid thrombosis. Aneurysmal and infectious complications may be secondary to use of prosthetic materials in arterial reconstruction. We report four patients who developed late operative site complications related to carotid patching. All four of our patients had delayed pseudoaneurysms and three had infection related to the Dacron patch. In a typical case, a 57-year-old who had a right carotid endarterectomy in 1994 presented with a 1-month history of an enlarging right neck mass 7 years later. Imaging revealed a 6 x 4 cm pseudoaneurysm originating from an opening between the patch graft and the old endarterectomized carotid wall. Analysis of the literature disclosed an additional 45 patients who had pseudoaneurysms and/or infection related to carotid patching, most frequently with Dacron. We postulate that a low-grade Staphylococcus epidermidis infection of the foreign body patch may be the etiology. Autogenous saphenous vein interposition graft and antimicrobials effective against gram-positive organisms corrected the pseudoaneurysm. Although the benefits of routine carotid patching may include a decrease in restenosis, this advantage must be weighed against the risk of late pseudoaneurysm and/or infection when a prosthetic patch is used to closed the endarterectomy site. PMID:12616349

Borazjani, Boris H; Wilson, Samuel E; Fujitani, Roy M; Gordon, Ian; Mueller, Mark; Williams, Russell A

2003-03-01

66

Open versus endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting: wound complications and vein quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The saphenous vein is an important conduit for coronary artery bypass grafting. Wound complications from traditional open vein harvesting occur often. Minimally invasive endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting may decrease wound complications. Vein quality may be an issue with endoscopic harvesting.Methods. We reviewed 568 patients who had bypass grafting and saphenous vein harvesting either endoscopic (group A, n = 180)

John D Crouch; Daniel P O’Hair; James P Keuler; Thomas P Barragry; Paul H Werner; Leonard H Kleinman

1999-01-01

67

Superficial and deep sternal wound complications: incidence, risk factors and mortality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Sternal wound complications often have a late onset and are detected after patients are discharged from the hospital. In an effort to catch all sternal wound complications, different postdischarge surveillance methods have to be used. Together with this long-term follow-up an analysis of risk factors may help to identify patients at risk and can lead to more effective preventive

Lisa Ridderstolpe; Hans Gill; Hans Granfeldt; Hans Åhlfeldt; Hans Rutberg

2001-01-01

68

Post-thoracotomy wound separation (DEHISCENCE): A disturbing complication  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: We described the treatment of dehiscence of thoracotomy incisions in patients who underwent thoracic surgery in the present study. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with either partial or complete dehiscence of their thoracotomy incisions were included in the study from 2005 to 2010. The patients were evaluated regarding their age, sex, indication for thoracotomy, and surgical approaches. We also described our method of re-closure. RESULTS: The male/female ratio was 17/7. The youngest and oldest patients were 15 and 75 years old, respectively, and the mean age was 43 years. Among the indications for thoracotomy, empyema was the most common reason (determined in eight [33%] patients), followed by vertebral surgery (determined in six [25%] patients). Bacterial growth was detected in the wound site cultures from 13 (54%) patients. For the patients with dehiscence of their thoracotomy incisions, an en block approximation technique with debridement was performed under general or local anesthesia in 16 (66%) and eight (33%) of the cases, respectively. Three patients exhibited an open thorax with dehiscence of the thoracotomy incision. Thoracoplasty was required in two patients. Using this method, successful closure was obtained in 91.7% (n?=?22) of the patients with dehiscence of their thoracotomy incisions. CONCLUSION: Dehiscence of the thoracotomy incision is an important complication that causes concern in patients and their thoracic surgeons and strongly affects the success of the surgery. An en block approximation technique with significant debridement that enables removal of the necrotic tissues from the wound site can successfully be applied to patients with dehiscence of their thoracotomy incisions.

Nadir, Aydin; Kaptanoglu, Melih; Sahin, Ekber; Sarzep, Hakan

2013-01-01

69

Postoperative complications after surgery for typhoid perforation in children in Ghana  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most severe complications of typhoid fever is perforation of the ileum (TPI); it is also a cause of high morbidity\\u000a and mortality in endemic areas. After surgery for TPI, other complications may set in postoperatively, compounding the problem.\\u000a A prospective study of 121 children who were operated upon for TPI to identify the postoperative complications showed that

F. A. Abantanga; B. B. Wiafe-Addai

1998-01-01

70

Role of Muscle Free Flap in the Salvage of Complicated Scalp Wounds and Infected Prosthetic Dura  

PubMed Central

Background The prosthetic dura is an essential element in the protection of the cranial parenchyma and prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Although prosthetic dura are widely used in neurosurgery, they occasionally provoke infection, which can be a major concern after neurosurgical treatment. However, removal of the prosthetic dura carries a risk of brain parenchyma injury and cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The salvage of infected prosthetic dural material has not been adequately addressed in the literature. In this study, we demonstrate the value of the combination of a meticulous surgical debridement of necrotic tissue and simultaneous muscle free flap for intractable postoperative epidural abscess without removal of the infected prosthetic dura. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, we reviewed the data of 11 patients with persistent infection on the prosthetic dura. The epidural infections each occurred after a neurosurgical procedure, and there was soft tissue necrosis with the disclosure of the underlying prosthetic dura and dead bone around the scalp wound. To salvage the infected prosthetic dura, meticulous debridement and a muscle free flap were performed. Results All 11 patients experienced complete recovery from the complicated wound problem without the need for further surgical intervention. No signs of prosthetic dural infection were observed during the mean follow-up period of 11 months. Conclusions The combination of a meticulous surgical debridement and coverage with a muscle free flap is an effective treatment for salvage of infected prosthetic dura.

Han, Dae Hee; Park, Myong Chul; Park, Dong Ha; Song, Hyunsuk

2013-01-01

71

Efficacy of Postoperative Continuous Wound Infiltration With Local Anesthesia After Open Hepatectomy  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Local anesthetic wound infiltration is widely used as an effective adjunct during multimodal postoperative pain management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine in postoperative pain relief, opioid sparing, incidence of nausea and vomiting, and bowel and liver function improvement in patients undergoing open hepatectomy. Methods: Forty patients undergoing open hepatectomy were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the 0.9% saline continuous infusion group (the control group; n=20) and the ropivacaine continuous infusion group (the Ropi group; n=20). Outcomes measured postoperatively were pain score at rest and on movement, sufentanil consumption, incidence of nausea and vomiting, and sedation score across 48 postoperative hours. Time to bowel recovery, liver function change, mean length of hospitalization, patient satisfaction, and other data after 48 postoperative hours were collected until hospital discharge. Results: Pain scores at rest were lower for the ropivacaine group and reached significance after 8 and 16 hours (P<0.01). Sufentanil consumption (41.50±21.80 vs. 89.70±35.22 ?g; P<0.01) after 48 hours, time to bowel recovery (1.80±0.70 vs. 3.15±1.04 d; P<0.01), incidence of nausea and vomiting (1.75±0.72 vs. 2.40±0.68; P<0.05), and mean length of hospitalization (5.6±2.44 vs. 7.35±2.85 d; P<0.01) were significantly reduced, and the sedation score and liver function change were also comparable between the 2 groups. There was no difference with respect to pain scores on movement, nor with respect to patient satisfaction. Conclusions: Surgical wound infusion with ropivacaine after hepatectomy can improve pain relief at rest and accelerate recovery and discharge.

Hong, Yu; Yong, Li Zhe

2014-01-01

72

Postoperative pancreatitis as a complication of biliary surgery.  

PubMed

Forty patients who underwent biliary surgery were investigated for postoperative pancreatic disturbance as measured by the amylase creatinine clearance ration (ACCR). Its relevance to preoperative pancreatitis, exploration of the common bile duct, and operative cholangiography were examined. The results suggested that a recent clinically proven episode of pancreatitis did not predispose to a postoperative recurrence following biliary surgery. Similarly, cholecystectomy alone did not produce a postoperative pancreatic disturbance. However, exploration of the common bile duct did frequently cause a postoperative elevated ACCR, and hence we recommend that duct exploration should be performed as carefully and as atraumatically as possible. The small number of patients who did not have operative cholangiograms prevented statistical evaluation of the effect of this procedure on the pancreas. However, information from elsewhere suggests that the plasma amylase level is not likely to be raised by cholangiography. PMID:291412

Ingram, D M; House, A K; Garcia-Webb, P

1979-08-01

73

Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

Rosenberg, Lewis A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Esther, Robert J. [Department of Orthopedics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Orthopedics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Erfanian, Kamil [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Green, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tepper, Joel E., E-mail: tepper@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

2013-02-01

74

Severe wound traction-blisters after inadequate dressing application following laparoscopic cholecystectomy: case report of a preventable complication  

PubMed Central

Background The inadequate application of postoperative dressings can lead to significant complications, including skin injuries, compartment syndromes, and potential limb loss. To our knowledge, the occurrence of post laparoscopic cholecystectomy related skin complications have not yet been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. Case Presentation Following laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease, a seventy eight year old healthy white male broke out in painful erythema on either side of his epigastric port site. Vesicles akin to a partial thickness burns were revealed upon removal of dressings. An unusual indentation created by the dressing, and skin traction by the dressing's adhesive edges were implicated, raising questions about technique of its application. Conclusion Incorrect application of wound dressings can disrupt skin architecture, causing painful blistering. This complication should not occur to patients, as it is theoretically 100% preventable. Avoidance of stretching adhesive dressings, and careful adherence to relevant manufacturers' instructions are recommended.

2011-01-01

75

"It's good to talk"--an audit of the communication of post-operative thromboembolic complications.  

PubMed

The risk of venous thromboembolism after surgery, with its associated morbidity and mortality, is an important component of obtaining informed consent for a surgical procedure. This risk of thromboembolic complications extends beyond the post-operative hospital stay; patients suffering such complications after discharge are generally not re-admitted under the care of the operating surgeon. A retrospective opening loop audit was undertaken to investigate the communication of post-operative thromboembolic complications between specialties in a large district general hospital. The operating surgeon was unaware of 87% of cases of pulmonary embolism and 20% of cases of deep vein thrombosis affecting patients in their post-operative period. The inter-specialty communication of post-operative complications is important to maintain a high standard of patient care and allow surgeons to make informed decisions about clinical practice. PMID:12500486

Brinsden, M D; Mercer, S J; Rawlings, I D

2002-01-01

76

Perfluorocarbon liquids as postoperative short-term vitreous substitutes in complicated retinal detachment  

Microsoft Academic Search

To avoid postoperative “compartmentalization” of the vitreous cavity, which can potentially accelerate the recurrence of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), 32 eyes of 32 selected patients with complicated retinal detachment were managed with lensectomy, vitrectomy, 5-day internal tamponade with perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCL) and postoperative supine positioning until PFCL removal. Intraoperatively, 19 eyes had grade C3 or greater PVR; 10 eyes exhibited ocular

Ferdinando Bottoni; Maurizio Sborgia; Paolo Arpa; Nino De Casa; Emanuela Bertazzi; Marzio Monticelli; Vito De Molfetta

1993-01-01

77

Postoperative Complications of Thyroid Cancer in a Single Center Experience  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to investigate the complications following surgical treatment of thyroid cancer and the association between the extent of surgery and complication rates. A total of 2,636 patients who underwent surgery due to thyroid cancer were retrospectively reviewed to identify surgical complications. Complication rates were assessed according to the extent of surgery, which was classified as follows; less-than-total thyroidectomy with central compartment node dissection (CCND) (Group I, n=636), total thyroidectomy with CCND (Group II, n=1,390), total thyroidectomy plus ipsilateral neck dissection (Group III, n=513), and total thyroidectomy plus bilateral neck dissection (Group IV, n=97). The most common surgical complication was symptomatic hypoparathyroidism, of which 28.4% of cases were transient and 0.3% permanent. The other surgical complications included vocal cord palsy (0.7% transient, and 0.2% permanent), hematoma (0.5%), seroma (4.7%), chyle fistula (1.8%), and Horner's syndrome (0.2%). The complication rates increased significantly with increasing the extent of surgery from Group I to Group IV. The more extensive surgery makes more complications, such as hypoparathyroidism, seroma, and others.

Lee, Yong Sang; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Chung, Woong Youn; Park, Cheong Soo

2010-01-01

78

Risk factors for postoperative respiratory complications in adult liver transplant recipients.  

PubMed

To determine the types and the incidence of as well as risk factors for early postoperative (<30 days) respiratory complications in adult liver transplant (LT) recipients, we reviewed The data of 44 consecutive adult LT recipients who received their grafts from January 1995 through December 2002. The data included demographic features; primary diagnosis; number of intraoperative transfusions; preoperative and postoperative laboratory values; intraoperative and postoperative characteristics; and early postoperative (<30 days) mortality. Pulmonary atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, respiratory failure, and pulmonary edema were the respiratory complications investigated. Twenty-six patients (59.1%) developed at least one respiratory complication during the early postoperative period. The most frequent complication was pleural effusion (n = 18, 40.9%), followed by atelectasis (n = 13, 29.5%), pneumonia (n = 10, 22.7%), acute respiratory failure (n = 5, 11.4%), pulmonary edema (n = 3, 6.8%), and pneumothorax (n = 2, 4.5%). Compared to the patients who did not develop these problems, the affected cohort was significantly older (27 +/- 12 years vs 36 +/- 14 years, respectively; P =.039) and required more intraoperative transfusions (P =.005). Among the overall mortality rate of 15.9%, patients who developed pneumonia showed a significantly higher mortality (40.0% vs 8.8%, respectively; P =.037). Pleural effusion, atelectasis, and pneumonia are the main respriatory complications that occur in adult LT recipients. Patient age and intraoperative transfusion requirements are important predictors of early postoperative complications. Pneumonia is associated with a poor prognosis in this patient group. PMID:15013351

Pirat, A; Ozgur, S; Torgay, A; Candan, S; Zeynelo?lu, P; Arslan, G

2004-01-01

79

Open Versus Endoscopic Saphenous Vein Harvesting: Wound Complications and Vein Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The saphenous vein is an important con- duit for coronary artery bypass grafting. Wound compli- cations from traditional open vein harvesting occur often. Minimally invasive endoscopic saphenous vein harvest- ing may decrease wound complications. Vein quality may be an issue with endoscopic harvesting. Methods. We reviewed 568 patients who had bypass grafting and saphenous vein harvesting either endo- scopic

John D. Crouch; Daniel P. O'Hair; James P. Keuler; Thomas P. Barragry; Paul H. Werner; Leonard H. Kleinman

2010-01-01

80

Superficial and deep sternal wound complications: incidence risk factors and mortality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Objectives: Sternal wound,complications,often have a late onset and are detected after patients are discharged from the hospital. In an effort to catch all sternal wound complications, different postdischarge surveillance methods have to be used. Together with this long-term follow-up an analysis of risk factors may,help to identify patients at risk and can lead to more effective preventive and control

Lisa Ridderstolpe; Hans Gill; Hans Granfeldt; Hans A Hlfeldt; Hans Rutberg

2010-01-01

81

Omental Herniation: A Rare Complication of Vacuum-Assisted Closure of Infected Sternotomy Wound  

PubMed Central

Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) has recently been adopted as an acceptable modality for management of sternotomy wound infections. Although generally efficacious, the use of negative pressure devices has been associated with complications such as bleeding, retention of sponge, and empyema. We report the first case of greater omental hernia as a rare complication of vacuum-assisted closure of sternal wound infection following coronary artery bypass grafting.

Gukop, Philemon; Kuppuswamy, Madhan Kumar; Kourliouros, Antonios; Chandrasekaran, Venkatachalam

2012-01-01

82

Caring for the postoperative patient with complications presenting to the emergency department.  

PubMed

The purpose of the article was to understand that the variations in common surgical procedures, physical, laboratory, and radiographic examinations that are typical in the postoperative patient can help direct treatment options. Nurse practitioners in outpatient settings need to quickly identify and treat postoperative complications. This article discusses three postoperative patients who presented to the emergency department. Data sources included personal health records and review of literature. Various factors that decrease hospital readmission rates include proper discharge education regarding signs and symptoms of infection, importance of medication compliance, and appropriate follow-up care. In addition, the outpatient nurse practitioners' knowledge of the surgical patient and common postoperative ailments will aid in more effective treatment and communication between the nurse practitioner and the surgeon if necessary. Nurse practitioners who have a better understanding of potential postoperative complications will be better equipped to care for this patient population when encountered in a nonsurgical, outpatient setting. PMID:24785667

Gadler, Tracie; Gardiner, Anna; Martinez, Nicole

2014-04-01

83

Silicone oil removal. II. Operative and postoperative complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective study of the effects of silicone oil removal was carried out on 85 patients who had undergone pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil exchange for giant retinal tears or proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Silicone oil was removed either as part of the treatment of anterior segment complications such as glaucoma and keratopathy (25 patients) or in order to prevent these

A G Casswell; Z J Gregor

1987-01-01

84

Fatal pulmonary embolism complicating a postoperative chylothorax despite adequate thromboprophylaxis.  

PubMed

Chylothorax is a recognized complication of intrathoracic surgery, but its occurrence after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is very rare. We report a case of a fatal pulmonary embolism as a complication of chylothorax following CABG. The patient was an 82-year-old woman who presented with increasing chest pain 2 weeks after discharge after an uncomplicated CABG. A computerized tomography (CT) scan with contrast angiogram showed a left-sided pleural effusion and no concurrent pulmonary embolus. Analysis of the pleural effusion revealed a chylothorax, which was treated with chest tube drainage and total parenteral nutrition followed by an oral medium-chain fatty acid diet. The patient improved steadily but, on day 6, she developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and shock. A CT angiogram revealed a massive pulmonary embolus and, despite thrombolysis, the patient died. Autopsy confirmed an acute saddle embolus in the pulmonary trunk. The patient had received appropriate venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with subcutaneous unfractionated heparin during her hospital course. This is the first reported case of a fatal pulmonary embolism that occurred in the setting of a post-CABG chylothorax in adults. The occurrence of this complication despite unfractionated heparin thromboprophylaxis may suggest a role for other, more effective medications, such as low molecular weight heparin or fondaparinux in patients with chylothorax. PMID:23751608

Hoskote, Sumedh S; Devarapally, Santhosh R; Dasgupta, Rajkumar; Pang, Yinghua; Shapiro, Janet M

2013-12-01

85

Wound botulism complicating internal fixation of a complex radial fracture.  

PubMed

Botulism developed in a patient following surgical repair of an open radial fracture. Symptoms resolved after treatment with antitoxin and antibiotics, and hardware excision was deferred. Subsequent osteomyelitis necessitated hardware exchange, and wound cultures grew Clostridium argentinense. This case highlights the management of botulism associated with orthopedic hardware. PMID:20007390

Taylor, Steve M; Wolfe, Cameron R; Dixon, Terry C; Ruch, David S; Cox, Gary M

2010-02-01

86

Risk of post-operative complications associated with anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease  

PubMed Central

There have been increasing concerns regarding the safety of perioperative anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) ? agents. We performed a literature review to evaluate the post-operative complications associated with perioperative anti-TNF use in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive review was performed with a literature search utilizing Pub Med, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases according to published guidelines. To date, there are only data for infliximab. There are three published studies which have assessed post-operative complications with perioperative infliximab use in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), four studies in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and one study on both CD and UC patients. Two out of the three studies in CD patients showed no increased post-operative complications associated with perioperative infliximab. Two out of four studies in UC patients also did not show an increase in post-operative complications, and the combined study with CD and UC patients did not show an increased risk as well. Study results could not be combined secondary to significant differences in study designs, patient population and definition of their endpoints. There appears to be a risk of post-operative complications associated with TNF therapy in some patients. Based on these data, careful patient selection and prospective data collection should be performed.

Ali, Tauseef; Yun, Laura; Rubin, David T

2012-01-01

87

Postoperative complications and survival of elderly breast cancer patients: a FOCUS study analysis.  

PubMed

Old age is associated with comorbidity and decreased functioning which influences treatment decisions in elderly breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for complications after breast cancer surgery in elderly patients, and to assess mortality in patients with postoperative complications. The FOCUS cohort is a detailed retrospective cohort of all breast cancer patients aged 65 years and older who were diagnosed between 1997 and 2004 in the South-West of the Netherlands. Risk factors for postoperative complications were assessed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. One-year survival and overall survival were calculated using univariable and multivariable Cox Regression models, and relative survival was calculated according to the Ederer II method. 3179 patients received surgery, of whom 19 % (n = 618) developed 1 or more postoperative complication(s). The odds ratio of having postoperative complications increased with age [OR 1.85 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.50, p = 0.001) in patients >85 years] and number of concomitant diseases [OR 1.71 (95 % CI 1.30-2.24, p ? 0.001) for 4 or more concomitant diseases]. One-year overall survival, overall survival, and relative survival were worse in patients with postoperative complications [multivariable HR 1.49 (95 % CI 1.05-2.11), p = 0.025. HR 1.21, (95 % CI 1.07-1.36), p = 0.002 and RER 1.19 (95 % CI 1.05-1.34), p = 0.006 respectively]. Stratified for comorbidity, relative survival was lower in patients without comorbidity only. Increasing number of concomitant disease increased the risk of postoperative complications. Although elderly patients with comorbidity did have a higher risk of postoperative complications, relative mortality was not higher in this group. This suggests that postoperative complications in itself did not lead to higher relative mortality, but that the high relative mortality was most likely due to geriatric parameters such as comorbidity or poor physical function. PMID:23446810

de Glas, N A; Kiderlen, M; Bastiaannet, E; de Craen, A J M; van de Water, W; van de Velde, C J H; Liefers, G J

2013-04-01

88

[B2 microglobulin in the diagnosis and prognosis of postoperative infectious complications in the pulmonary surgery].  

PubMed

The radioimmunoassay was used to study blood serum B2-M levels in 56 patients with pulmonary diseases (lung carcinoma in 20, chronic suppurative lung disease in 20, and benign lung disease in 16 patients) before the operation and in the early postoperative period. The control group was formed of 21 practically healthy individuals. A direct correlation between the character of the course of the postoperative period in patients with benign and chronic pulmonary diseases and the dynamics of changes of immunoreactivity (IR) was found. A favorable course of the postoperative period was marked by an increase of IR, in postoperative infectious complications IR did not change. Dynamics of IR was not revealed in patients with lung carcinoma, irrespective of the course of the postoperative period. PMID:7715137

Vinnitski?, L I; Egorova, I S; Bronskaia, L K

1994-11-01

89

Laser applications in oculoplastic surgery and their postoperative complications.  

PubMed

Laser surgery for oculoplastic or dermatological indications--whether incisional work, removal of pigmented or vascular lesions, removal of hair, or resurfacing--necessitates that the practitioner have appropriate training in and understanding of not only the techniques but also of their advantages and disadvantages. Understanding laser safety and how to handle complications is critical to appropriate management of laser-assisted surgery. Long-term results are limited at this time, but current information regarding the use of lasers in aesthetic oculoplastic surgery appears promising. New approaches to such operations include combining more than one type of laser or combining traditional cutting blades and lasers in an effort to reduce side effects and improve outcome. PMID:10713911

Tayani, R; Rubin, P A

2000-01-01

90

Early postoperative complications of pediatric liver transplantation: experience at one center.  

PubMed

To evaluate the postoperative complications within the first month among 20 pediatric liver transplant recipients between April 1990 and March 2003 we retrospectively studied their medical charts to gather demographic data; primary diagnosis; operative duration; perioperative transfusions; time to extubation; length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay; mortality; perioperative laboratory values; and postoperative complications including respiratory, infections, renal, neurological, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) complications. Ten male and ten female patients of mean age 8 +/- 4 years had a mean operative duration, time to extubation, and length of stay in the ICU of 12.1 +/- 2.3 hours, 11.1 +/- 15.0 hours, and 7.2 +/- 5.5 days, respectively. The most frequent postoperative complication was respiratory (n = 14, 70%), followed by infections (n = 13, 65%), renal (n = 8, 40%), neurological (n = 7, 35%), cardiovascular (n = 4, 20%), and GIT (n = 4, 20%) infections. The overall mortality rate was 25% (n = 5). Compared with patients who survived, those who died displayed significantly lower perioperative platelet counts (P <.05), as well as a significantly higher incidence of postoperative neurological disorders (P =.031), and cardiovascular complications (P =.032). PMID:15013350

Araz, C; Pirat, A; Torgay, A; Zeyneloglu, P; Arslan, G

2004-01-01

91

A prospective cohort study of postoperative complications in the management of perforated peptic ulcer  

PubMed Central

Background With dwindling rates of postoperative mortality in perforated peptic ulcer that is attributable to H2-receptor blocker usage, there is a need to shift the focus towards the prevention of postoperative morbidity. Further, the simultaneous contribution of several putative clinical predictors to this postoperative morbidity is not fully appreciated. Our objective was to assess the predictors of the risk, rate and number of postoperative complications in surgically treated patients of perforated peptic ulcer. Methods In a prospective cohort study of 96 subjects presenting as perforated peptic ulcer and treated using Graham's omentoplatsy patch or gastrojejunostomy (with total truncal vagotomy), we assessed the association of clinical predictors with three domains of postoperative complications: the risk of developing a complication, the rate of developing the first complication and the risk of developing higher number of complications. We used multiple regression methods – logistic regression, Cox proportional hazards regression and Poisson regression, respectively – to examine the association of the predictors with these three domains. Results We observed that the risk of developing a postoperative complication was significantly influenced by the presence of a concomitant medical illness [odds ratio (OR) = 8.9, p = 0.001], abdominal distension (3.8, 0.048) and a need of blood transfusion (OR = 8.2, p = 0.027). Using Poisson regression, it was observed that the risk for a higher number of complications was influenced by the same three factors [relative risk (RR) = 2.6, p = 0.015; RR = 4.6, p < 0.001; and RR = 2.4, p = 0.002; respectively]. However, the rate of development of complications was influenced by a history suggestive of shock [relative hazards (RH) = 3.4, p = 0.002] and A- blood group (RH = 4.7, p = 0.04). Conclusion Abdominal distension, presence of a concomitant medical illness and a history suggestive of shock at the time of admission warrant a closer and alacritous postoperative management in patients of perforated peptic ulcer.

Sharma, Smita S; Mamtani, Manju R; Sharma, Mamta S; Kulkarni, Hemant

2006-01-01

92

[Results of treatment of lung cancer complicated by postoperative pleural empyema].  

PubMed

An evaluation of the literature and our own experience with surgical and combined treatment of lung cancer complicated by postoperative pleural empyema established the following incidence rates in 2.4% of patients: postpneumonectomy (4.2%), particularly on the side (57.4%), and in tumor stage III cases (70.6%). Bronchal stump failure (89.7%) was the main cause of postoperative pleural empyema while the risk doubled (4.5-6.0%; p < or = 0.05) after neoadjuvant therapy. Both immediate and end results were worse in postoperative pleural empyema than in similar uncomplicated cases: 12 month survival--43.8% vs. 71.1%; 3-year--18.8-36.8%; 5-year--10.4-26.3%. Also, postoperative pleural empyema patients stayed in hospital longer. PMID:20210012

Arsen'ev, A I; Barchuk, A S; Aristidov, N Iu; Barchuk, A A; Kulakova, Iu A; Klimov, A S; Tarkov, S A; Nefëdov, A O

2009-01-01

93

The temporary use of allograft for complicated wounds in plastic surgery.  

PubMed

A retrospective analysis was performed on the use of glycerol-preserved allografts (GPA) in the preparation of complicated wounds for secondary wound closure. All files from the plastic surgery department in the period 1992-1998 were screened. Thirty-three patients within a total 85 GPA treatments were selected and screened for indication of use of GPA, frequency of GPA changes, duration of treatment and whether or not subsequent autografting was possible. GPA was used as a biological cover for the following indications: problematic wound healing, 13 cases; non-healing burns, 12 cases; carcinoma, 4 cases; unstable scar, 2 cases; shortage of skin, 2 cases. The average frequency of GPA application was 2.6 times, with a mean duration of 5 days per application. In 84 cases (32 patients) the wound was successfully covered with autograft. In conclusion, GPA was used with good results as a temporary cover for complicated wounds. We postulate that angiogenic effects of this biological dressing may have contributed to the improved healing conditions and successful secondary wound closure. PMID:12237058

Moerman, E; Middelkoop, E; Mackie, D; Groenevelt, F

2002-10-01

94

Staged Concept for Treatment of Severe Postsaphenectomy Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

The saphenous vein remains the most commonly used conduit in coronary artery bypass surgery. Vein harvest is a critical component with significant morbidity associated with leg wounds from open technique. Occurring complications are hematoma, postoperative pain, skin changes, neuropathy, and septic or nonseptic wound complications. Within the context of a recent case, we present our approach to postsaphenectomy wound management.

Schroeter, Thomas; Subramanian, Sreekumar; Borger, Michael A.; Mohr, Friedrich W.

2011-01-01

95

Cytomegalovirus infection and postoperative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis undergoing colectomy.  

PubMed

Abstract Background. Ulcerative colitis (UC) can be complicated by reactivation of cytomegalovirus (CMV). CMV reactivation may change the course of UC and may require antiviral treatment. Some risk factors of CMV reactivation have previously been identified, whereas the association between CMV reactivation and postoperative complications has not been examined systematically. Methods. Patients with UC operated with colectomy due to active UC were studied (n = 77). Patient and disease characteristics, as well as postoperative complications were recorded and CMV was detected by immunohistochemical examination of multiple sections from the colectomy specimen. Results. CMV was found in nine (11.7%) colectomy specimens. CMV-positive patients received significantly higher doses of corticosteroids at colectomy than CMV-negative patients (61.1 ± 23 vs 32.5 ± 32 mg/day, p = 0.01). CMV-positive patients were also older, had a higher risk of severe complications, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, longer preoperative stay, and a higher rate of acute surgery. Complications occurred in 30 (39%) patients after surgery, 8(10.4%) of whom were serious. Two CMV-positive patients (2.6%) died in-hospital after the colectomy. High ASA score was associated with the occurrence of serious complications. Conclusion. A relatively small proportion of patients with UC operated by colectomy were CMV positive. CMV positivity was associated with old age, high dose of corticosteroids at operation, high ASA score, acute surgery, and severe postoperative complications. Patients with such characteristics may be at risk of CMV infection and may require special management. PMID:24947587

Olaisen, Maya; Rydning, Astrid; Martinsen, Tom Christian; Nordrum, Ivar Skjåk; Mjønes, Patricia; Fossmark, Reidar

2014-07-01

96

Effects of Suppository Acetaminophen, Bupivacaine Wound Infiltration, and Caudal Block With Bupivacaine on Postoperative Pain in Pediatric Inguinal Herniorrhaphy  

PubMed Central

Background: The control of postoperative pain is important in children, and poor pain control leads to organ dysfunction and behavioral problems. Objectives: We compared the analgesic effects of suppository acetaminophen, bupivacaine wound infiltration, and caudal block with bupivacaine on postoperative pain in pediatric inguinal herniorrhaphy. Patients and Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial, 90 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I-II, aged between 3 months and 7 years, and scheduled for elective unilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy under general anesthesia were assigned to three equal groups. Patients in the first group received 20 mg/kg of suppository acetaminophen. In the second group, 2 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine was infiltrated in the incisional site, and in the third group, a caudal block was performed with 0.75 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) pain scale was applied 30 minutes after operation. Thereafter, the FLACC score was obtained every hour during the next 6 hours. If the FLACC score was 4 or over, we administered 0.5 mg/kg of intravenous meperidine. The data was transferred to SPSS-10 software and analyzed statistically with chi-square and analysis of variance tests. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean analgesic duration in the acetaminophen, bupivacaine infiltration, and caudal block groups was 4.07, 5.40, and 5.37 hours, respectively. Significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.9), but the differences between the bupivacaine infiltration and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.034) and the caudal block and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.039) were significant. With regard to meperidine administration, significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.848), but significant differences were observed between these two groups and the acetaminophen group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients in the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups had less postoperative pain than those in the acetaminophen group and received lower amount of meperidine. We concluded that in children, bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block with bupivacaine produce better analgesia than suppository acetaminophen. It seems that bupivacaine infiltration is better than caudal block because of its simplicity, lower incidence of complications, and failure rate.

Hosseini Jahromi, Seyed Abbas; Sadeghi poor, Sadegh; Hosseini Valami, Seyedeh Masoumeh; Javadi, Amir

2012-01-01

97

Patients' satisfaction and wound-site complications after radial artery harvesting for coronary artery bypass  

PubMed Central

The aim of the study was to establish patients' satisfaction and the incidence of wound-site complications after radial artery (RA) harvesting for bypass surgery. A telephonic quality of life questionnaire was performed in 306 consecutive patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting with the use of RA with the open technique. A psychometric Likert scale was used to define the degree of patients' satisfaction. The questionnaire concerned arm pain, cosmesis and mobility, sensory and neurological complications, and patients' general health state. The median values and the modal scores achieved the maximal value of satisfaction for all site-related complications and the mean scores were >4 out of 5. The median patients' general health state was 4. Cosmetic result of the wound was considered at least acceptable by 98% of patients. The incidence of impairing peripheral neurological complications was 16.7%. The degree of patients' satisfaction after RA harvesting was more than satisfactory and the incidence of wound-site complications was acceptable. The incidence of neurological injuries was lower than previously described.

Arrigoni, Sara C.; Halbersma, Wouter B.; Grandjean, Jan G.; Mariani, Massimo A.

2012-01-01

98

The role of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in treating postoperative complications in bariatric surgery  

PubMed Central

There are an estimated 500 million obese individuals worldwide. Currently, bariatric surgery has been shown to result in clinically significant weight loss. With increasing demand for bariatric surgery, endoscopic techniques used intra and postoperatively continue to evolve. Endoscopic evaluation of anastomotic integrity following RYGB allows for early detection of anastomotic leaks. Furthermore, endoscopy is a valuable tool to diagnose and treat RYGB postoperative surgical complications such as anastomotic leakage, hemorrhage and stricture formation. Early evidence suggests that endoscopic management of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage following RYGB is effective. In addition, endoscopic balloon dilatation is able to effectively treat obstruction in the setting of gastrojejunal anastomotic strictures. With successful endoscopic management of these complications, bariatric patients may avoid more invasive surgical procedures.

Gill, Richdeep S; Whitlock, Kevin A; Mohamed, Rachid; Sarkhosh, Koroush; Birch, Daniel W

2012-01-01

99

Preoperative staging and early postoperative complications in radical prostatectomy. Experiences in 35 cases.  

PubMed

It is already a textbook item that in patients with prostatic cancer stage T1-T2 N0M0 radical prostatectomy is the only curative treatment. Radical prostatectomy is indicated also for patients in stage T3 N0M0 who underwent antiandrogenic (Fugerel) treatment for 3 months with the aim of reducing tumour volume. In the following 35 cases will be scrutinized, with special regard to preoperative staging and early postoperative complications. PMID:8026924

Romics, I; Bach, D; Widmann, T

1994-01-01

100

Prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications through respiratory rehabilitation: A controlled clinical study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of respiratory rehabilitation in preventing postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) and to define which patients can benefit.Design: A randomized clinical trial.Setting: A public hospital.Patients: Eighty-one patients who had upper abdominal surgery were distributed into two homogeneous groups: control (n = 41) and rehabilitation (n = 40).Intervention: Breathing exercises in the rehabilitation group.Main Outcome Measures: Preoperative and

Soledad Chumillas; José L. Ponce; Fernando Delgado; Vicente Viciano; Miguel Mateu

1998-01-01

101

Apophyseolysis of the fourth lumbar vertebra: an early postoperative complication following kyphectomy in myelomeningocele  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a report of a young girl with congenital kyphosis at the thoracolumbar spine in association with myelomeningocele.\\u000a Kyphectomy and posterior stabilisation extending from the eighth thoracic to the fourth lumbar vertebra was done. Apophyseolysis\\u000a occurred as an early postoperative complication at the level of the L4-L5 disc. This failure mode was treated by extending\\u000a the fusion to the

H. Böhm; Hesham ElSaghir

2000-01-01

102

Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-operative Wound Infection in a Referral Hospital in Haryana, India  

PubMed Central

Background: The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the isolates of postoperative wound and its susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics. Materials and Methods: During a 2-year period, specimens were received as postoperative wound swabs in Microbiology Laboratory, Maharaja Agrasen Medical College, Agroha (Hisar), Haryana, India. Result: Of the 300 bacterial isolates, 89 (29.6%) were P. aeruginosa, followed by Escherichia coli (61, 20.3%), Klebsiella spp. (50, 16.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (43, 14.3%), Proteus spp. (19, 6.3%), Acinetobacter spp. (9, 3.0%), and Citrobacter freundii (2, 0.6%). There was no growth in 27 (9.0%) specimens. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa isolation was higher in male patients and most common in the age group of 21-40 years. The susceptibility pattern showed the organism to be most commonly susceptible to imipenem, followed by meropenem, cefoperazone/sulbactam, ticarcillin/clavulanate, and amikacin.

Ranjan, K Prabhat; Ranjan, Neelima; Bansal, Satish K; Arora, D R

2010-01-01

103

Progressive Wound Necrosis Associated With Postoperative Thrombocytosis in Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction Surgery: Report of a Case  

PubMed Central

A 37-year-old who underwent splenectomy for motor vehicle accident-related injuries was diagnosed with stage IIA carcinoma of left breast 12 years later. She underwent bilateral mastectomy and bilateral immediate unipedicle TRAM flap reconstruction. Her preoperative platelet counts ranged from 332 to 424 K/cmm. Intraoperative fluorescein confirmed mastectomy flap viability. On postoperative day 1, platelet count was 374 K/cmm and all suture lines appeared benign. The patient was discharged 3 days later with healthy appearing tram flaps and slight epidermolysis in the abdominal region. Over the next 2 weeks, both the mastectomy flaps and the abdominal region underwent progressive necrosis as the platelet count increased to 1390 K/cmm. Aspirin therapy was instituted at this time. The TRAM flaps remained completely viable. Eighteen days later, the patient required wound debridement with secondary closure of the breast wounds. Platelet count peaked at 1689 K/cmm 2 days later (postoperative day 38). The wounds deteriorated again and were managed conservatively. Two months after mastectomy, the first area of spontaneous healing was documented (platelet count 758 K/cmm). Ultimately, wounds healed as platelet count reached its preoperative baseline. We hypothesize that an abnormal secondary thrombocytosis at subdermal plexus level caused problematic healing in this patient's mastectomy and abdominal flaps.

Murphy, Robert X.; Holko, Ginger A.; Khoury, Afifi A.; Bleznak, Aaron D.

2009-01-01

104

Evaluation of Post-operative Complication Rate of Le Fort I Osteotomy: A Retrospective and Prospective Study.  

PubMed

Le Fort I osteotomy has become a routine procedure in elective orthognathic surgery. This procedure is often associated with significant but rare post-operative complications. The study was conducted to evaluate the rate of post-operative complications following conventional Le Fort I osteotomy. Twenty-five healthy adult patients who had to undergo Le Fort I osteotomy without segmentalization of maxilla were included in the study based on indications of surgery. All the patients were followed up for a period of 6 months post-operatively to assess the rate of various post-operative complications such as neurosensory deficit, pulpal sensibility, maxillary sinusitis, vascular complications, aseptic necrosis, unfavourable fractures, ophthalmic complications and instability or non-union of maxilla, etc. The results of our study showed a post-operative complications rate of 4 %. Neurosensory deficit and loss of tooth sensibility were the most common findings during patient evaluation at varying follow-up periods while one patient presented with signs and symptoms of maxillary sinusitis post-operatively. Neurosensory as well as sinusitis recovery took place in almost all the patients within 6 months. It was concluded that thorough understanding of pathophysiological aspects of various complications, careful assessment, treatment planning and the use of proper surgical technique as well as instrumentation may help in further reducing the complication rate. PMID:24822002

Garg, Sandeep; Kaur, Supreet

2014-06-01

105

Complications of anticoagulation for thromboembolism in early postoperative total joint arthroplasty.  

PubMed

In the study reported here, we analyzed the complications associated with anticoagulation in total joint arthroplasty patients treated for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the early postoperative period. Twenty-nine consecutive cases from a 1-year period were identified and retrospectively reviewed. VTE treatment, which in most instances (79%) consisted of a heparin drip, was begun a mean of 2.3 days after surgery. Patients received a mean (SD) of 4.4 (5.0) units of packed red blood cells. There were no differences in bleeding parameters with respect to timing of initiation of anticoagulation. Local and systemic bleeding complications were common. The proportion of patients who were transfused was significantly (P<.0001) higher for VTE patients than for control patients, and transfused VTE patients received significantly (P = .0004) more blood products. In total joint arthroplasty patients, VTE treatment began 2.3 days after surgery and had a high incidence of complications related to bleeding. PMID:22016874

Bloomfield, Michael R; Patterson, Ryan W; Froimson, Mark I

2011-08-01

106

Late Complications After Postoperative Radiotherapy in Endometrial Cancer: Analysis of 317 Consecutive Cases With Application of Linear-Quadratic Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and risk factors for late complications after postoperative radiotherapy in endometrial cancer patients.Methods and Material: We performed a detailed retrospective analysis of 317 endometrial cancer patients given postoperative radiotherapy. A total of 247 patients (78%) received both intracavitary (BRT) and external beam irradiation (XRT); 49 patients (15%) received only BRT, and 21 (7%) only XRT.

Barbara Jereczek-Fossa; Jacek Jassem; Renata Nowak; Andrzej Badzio

1998-01-01

107

Interest in Rhinoplasty and Awareness about its Postoperative Complications Among Female high School Students  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Rhinoplasty is a popular cosmetic surgical procedure. Informal statistics show that Iran has one of the highest rates of rhinoplasty in the world. However, rhinoplasty like any other surgery can have complications. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 320 female students were selected by multistage cluster-stratified sampling from high schools in Kerman, Iran and each completed a questionnaire. Results: More than half of the students said they would like to undergo rhinoplasty. The main reasons for wanting rhinoplasty were beauty and because it is fashionable. However, more than half of the interested students did not know about the possible postoperative complications of rhinoplasty. There was no relation between interest in having rhinoplasty and parents’ education, city of birth or economic status. Conclusion: Many teenagers are interested in having rhinoplasty in Iran. As the number of teenagers and young adults who choose to have cosmetic surgery increases, surgeons should consider their expectations, motivations and awareness of postoperative complications before surgery.

Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Eslami, Mobina; Khanjani, Narges

2012-01-01

108

Use of indocyanine green videoangiography during intracranial aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications.  

PubMed

Microscope-integrated near-infrared indocyanine green videoangiography (ICGVA) has been shown to be a useful adjunct for intracranial aneurysm surgery. That the routine application of this technique reduces the risk of postoperative ischaemic complication, however, has not been reported. We present a retrospective matched-pair comparison of ICGVA guided aneurysm surgery versus historic control surgical cohort treated by the same author. Index patients and controls were matched for aneurysm size, location, patient demographics, risk factors, comorbidities, and surgical treatments. Ninety-one eligible patients with 100 intracranial aneurysms were treated using ICGVA assistance. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of patient age, sex, risk factors, comorbidities and aneurysm characteristics. Of the 100 aneurysms in the ICGVA group, 107 investigations of ICGVA were performed. In 79 aneurysms (79.0%), ICGVA was considered useful but did not affect surgical management. In six patients (6.0%), ICGVA led to a crucial change of intraoperative strategies. In nine patients (9.0%), it was considered critical in assuring patency of small perforators. ICGVA was of no benefit in four patients (4.0%) and was misleading in two (2.0%). Postoperative ischaemic complications occurred in three patients (3.3%) in the ICGVA group compared with seven patients (7.7%) in the control group (p<0.001). Our study supports the use of ICGVA in aneurysm surgery as a safe and effective modality of intraoperative blood flow assessment. With all limitations of a retrospective matched-pair comparison, the use of ICGVA during routine aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications. PMID:24090515

Lai, Leon Tat; Morgan, Michael Kerin

2014-01-01

109

[Postoperative complication in stapedectomy: excessive introduction of the prothesis in the oval window].  

PubMed

Postoperative failures and complications detected in patients who undergo surgery for otosclerotic disease are not uncommon in stapes surgery. Prosthesis displacement and incus necrosis are the most common findings in review stapedectomy. We report the case of a patient who had tinnitus, vertigo, and non-recovery of air conduction thresholds without neurosensorial lesions after stapes surgery. The suspected diagnosis of excessive introduction of the prosthesis in the oval window was confirmed by computed tomography, which showed the radio-opaque image of the McGee metal prosthesis. The prosthesis replacement and literature review are discussed. PMID:10362866

Sancipriano Hernández, J A; Calvo Boizas, E; Diego Pérez, C; Rodríguez Gutiérrez, A; Rincón Esteban, L; Gómez Toranzo, F

1999-04-01

110

Postoperative Ascites of Unknown Origin following Laparoscopic Appendicectomy: An Unusual Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery  

PubMed Central

Postoperative ascites is a very rare complication of laparoscopic surgery. Significant iatrogenic injuries to the bowel, the urinary tract, and the lymphatic system should be excluded promptly to avoid devastating results for the patient. In some cases, in spite of investigating patients extensively, no definitive causative factor for the accumulation of fluid can be identified. In such cases, idiopathic allergic or inflammatory reaction of the peritoneum may be responsible for the development of ascites. We present a case of ascites of an unknown origin in a young female patient following a laparoscopic appendicectomy.

Feretis, M.; Boyd-Carson, H.; Karim, A.

2014-01-01

111

[Laser in the prevention of early postoperative complications in the surgical treatment of obesity].  

PubMed

The results of conduction of operative interventions in 37 patients with alimentary-costitutional obesity are adduced. In 22 of them having the obesity of III-IV stages the small stomach 100-150 ml in volume was constructed puuling in it too tight with a synthetic ribbon. In 1-1.5 years after the operation patient loses 70-80% of excessive body mass, and severe metabolic disturbances never occur. In 15 patients cutaneo-subcutaneous aprons on the abdomen were excised. Intravascular blood irradiation with the help of helium-neon laser for the prophylaxis of early postoperative complications occurrence was conducted. The stimulating action of laserotherapy on the cell and humoral immunity groups, alike central and peripheral hemodynamics improvement, moderate hypocoagulating and analgetic effect, lowering of the purulent-septical and thromboembolic complications in 1.5-2 times was noted. PMID:7707639

Grubnik, V V; Dotsenko, S A; Chuev, P N; Basenko, I L; Salamekh, A

1994-01-01

112

Postoperative Pain Relief Using Wound Infiltration With 0.5% Bupivacaine in Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for an Appendectomy  

PubMed Central

Purpose Recently, single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been popular for minimally invasive surgery and cosmetic improvement. However, some papers have reported that SILS for an appendectomy (SILS-A) has had the more postoperative complaints of pain. We investigated postoperative pain relief using wound infiltration with 0.5% bupivacaine in SILS-A and compared the result with that for conventional SILS-A. Methods Between July 2010 and September 2012, 75 patients who underwent SILS-A were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: conventional SILS-A group (C-SILS-A) or wound infiltrated with 0.5% bupivacaine in SILS-A group (W-SILS-A). Forty-five patients were in the C-SILS-A, and 30 patients were in the W-SILS-A. Patients with perforated appendicitis were excluded. The clinical outcomes were compared between the groups by using the verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS). Results Clinical outcomes were similar in both study groups except for the pain score. The W-SILS-A group showed significantly lower numbers of additional pain killers and lower VNRS scores 1, 6, and 12 hours after surgery than the C-SILS-A group. Conclusion W-SILS-A is a technically simple and effective method of reducing early postoperative pain. It may be applicable in SILS-A for pain control system.

Ahn, So Ra; Lee, Cheol; Park, Won Cheol; Lee, Jeong Kyun

2013-01-01

113

[Prevention and treatment of intra- and post-operative complications in thyroid surgery].  

PubMed

Frequency of complications in thyroid surgery is evaluated in a series of patients treated during a recent period lasting one year (1997). The records of 455 patients consecutively operated on were analyzed: 396 patients were affected by benign disorders and 59 by thyroid carcinoma. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 158 cases, near subtotal thyroidectomy in 94, thyroid totalization for recurrent disease in 21 and lobectomy in 182 ones. Post-operative haemorrhage, such to require surgical re-exploration of the thyroid bed, occurred in 2 patients (0.4%), both after total thyroidectomy for hyperfunctioning goiter. Recurrent laryngeal lesion has been observed in 2 patients (0.4% of all patients), both after total thyroidectomy for cervico-mediastinal goiter. Transient hypoparathyroidism occurred in 48 patients (10.5%), while definitive one in 9 (1.9%), of which 5 after total thyroidectomy, 2 after subtotal thyroidectomy and 2 after reoperation. Haemorrhage nearly always occurs in the first postoperative hours and gravity is conditioned by tracheal compression exercised by the haematoma. An aspirative drainage located in thyroid bed and a not hermetic closure of the middle line help a precocious diagnosis and sometimes avoid a surgical re-exploration. Some technical surgical devices permit to reduce the risk of inferior laryngeal nerve palsy. Hypoparathyroidism, often transient, is a complication of bilateral thyroid surgery, but unavoidable when more extensive thyroid surgery is required. PMID:11765343

Pelizzo, M R; Toniato, A; Piotto, A; Bernante, P; Pagetta, C; Bernardi, C

2001-01-01

114

Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap  

PubMed Central

Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect. Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture, cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week after operation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds did not resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation wound and dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa's fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath and muscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially so that the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction. Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation, no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in terms of function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery. Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic and functional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, it enabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

Bae, Sung Kyu; Kang, Seok Joo; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Young Hwan

2013-01-01

115

Abdominal dermolipectomies: early postoperative complications and long-term unfavorable results.  

PubMed

A retrospective study was done on a population of 258 women who had undergone surgery for abdominal dermolipectomy between January of 1991 and May of 1996. The postoperative complications and flaws seen at long-term follow-up are discussed. The surgical techniques used, with or without lipoaspiration, were the infraumbilical plasty and full plasties with horizontal or inverted T scars. Six types of postoperative complications were noted: hemorrhage in 1.2 percent, lymphorrhea in 10.9 percent, infection in 7 percent, skin necrosis in 6.6 percent, secondary dehiscence of the scar in 2.3 percent, and thromboembolic accidents in 1.2 percent. No significant difference was found in the rate of necrosis development between patients who did and did not undergo lipoaspiration. However, a statistically significant difference was seen in the rate of skin necrosis between the T-type plasty (35.5 percent) and the other two procedures (1.43 percent for infraumbilical plasties and 4.60 percent for full plasties with horizontal scar). With regard to the flaws found at long-term follow-up, the rate of above-scar fat folds and/or dog-ears was 27.9 percent, and the rate of defective scars was 26 percent. No significant difference was found with regard to the rate of flaws. The rate of all secondary surgical procedures was 29.1 percent, but performance of secondary procedures depended on the willingness of the patient and on the surgeon's judgment. Abdominoplasty procedures involve a high risk of early complications. The rate of skin necrosis is clearly augmented in cases of T-type plasty. The need for secondary surgical correction is frequent, and the patient should be reminded of this possibility during preoperative consultation. PMID:11129195

Chaouat, M; Levan, P; Lalanne, B; Buisson, T; Nicolau, P; Mimoun, M

2000-12-01

116

Evaluation of postoperative complications following elective surgeries of dogs and cats at private practices using computer records.  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to determine the frequency of postoperative complications following elective surgeries (castration, ovariohysterectomy, onychectomy) of dogs and cats from private practices and to evaluate the use of electronic medical records for this type of research. All elective surgeries performed during the study period at 5 private practices were included. The surgical techniques and materials used for each procedure were similar across practices, but the interpretation of "complication," the amount of detail recorded on the primary medical record, and the intensity of follow-up varied. The frequencies and types of complications varied by species and procedure. The postoperative complication frequencies ranged from 1% to 24% for all complications and 1% to 4% for severe complications. The results of this study describe populations of elective-surgery patients at private practices, provide data for educating clients about the risks associated with these procedures, and demonstrate how computerized records can be used to collect practice-specific medical information.

Pollari, F L; Bonnett, B N

1996-01-01

117

Risk factors for post-operative pulmonary complications after gastrectomy for gastric cancer.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) negatively affect patients' quality of life and can be life-threatening. Predictors of PPCs have been evaluated in patients who underwent various operations, but few studies have specifically focused on gastrectomy. Methods: We retrospectively studied 1,053 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent radical gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy in our hospital between 1999 and 2011. Post-operative pulmonary complications were defined as conditions such as pneumonia, macroscopic atelectasis, pneumothorax, and acute respiratory distress syndrome that developed within 30?d after surgery. We evaluated the relations between PPCs and pre-operative or intra-operative factors and assessed risk factors for PPCs after gastrectomy. Result: A total of 49 (4.7%) patients had PPCs. On univariate analysis, PPCs were significantly associated with male gender (p=0.024), predicted vital capacity (VC) (p=0.020), a lower pre-operative serum albumin concentration (p=0.023), open surgery (p=0.007), total gastrectomy (p<0.001), combined resection of another organ (p=0.001), extended operating time (p<0.001), higher operative bleeding volume (p<0.001), intra-operative or post-operative blood transfusion (p=0.009), and pathologic tumor stage (p=0.003). On multivariable analysis, extended operating time (odds ratio [OR], 3.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-7.07; p=0.004), total gastrectomy (OR, 2.65, 95% CI 1.25-5.59; p=0.011) and predicted VC (OR, 2.42, 95% CI 1.01-5.85; p=0.049) were independent risk factors. These three factors also were independent risk factors for post-operative pneumonia (total gastrectomy OR, 2.64, 95% CI 1.32-5.30; p=0.006); extended operating time OR, 2.54, 95% CI 1.24-5.19; p=0.011; and predicted VC OR, 2.41, 95% CI 1.01-5.75; p=0.048). Conclusion: Extended operating time, total gastrectomy, and predicted VC were independent predictors of PPCs, particularly pneumonia, in patients with gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy. In patients with restrictive pulmonary dysfunction who are scheduled to undergo total gastrectomy, reduced lymphadenectomy or the avoidance of combined resection should be considered to shorten the operating time. PMID:24796353

Inokuchi, Mikito; Kojima, Kazuyuki; Kato, Keiji; Sugita, Hirofumi; Sugihara, Kenichi

2014-06-01

118

Analysis of the relationship between postoperative ophthalmic complications and dialysis time of pre-kidney transplantation  

PubMed Central

AIM To determine the influence of the dialysis time before kidney transplantation on postoperative ophthalmic complications. METHODS One hundred and eighty three patients who were given the follow-up after kidney transplantation were selected, including 124 males and 59 females. The dialysis time before kidney transplantation was (2.9±2.1) years. Among them, there were 93 cases having cadaveric renal transplantation and 90 cases having living relative renal transplantation. The conditions of ophthalmic complications in all the patients after kidney transplantation were investigated and the incidence rate on ophthalmic complications having different dialysis time before kidney transplantation was given Chi-square test and Chi-square linear trend test. RESULTS Among 183 patients with kidney transplantation, 95 patients (51.9%) had at least one ophthalmic complication and the rest 88 patients (48.1%) had no significant abnormality at the eye region. The most common ophthalmic complications were pinguecula/conjunctival degeneration (31 cases), the following was caligo lentis (24 cases). The main manifestations were grayish white granule and plaque turbidity occurred in posterior capsule at the posterior pole of crystaline lens. The angulus iridocornealis of 5 patients (5.3%) with cataract and glaucoma were all open-angle through the detection by gonioscope. Through visual field examination, there were 2 patients with paracentral scotoma, 2 patients with arcuate scotoma and one case with nasal step. CONCLUSION The experiments verify that the incidence of glaucomawas relates to the dialysis time before kidney transplantation, and the incidence rate might be higher if the dialysis time is longer.

Wang, Yao-Lei; Qi, Fan; Xie, Jin-Liang; Qi, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Zhu, Xiang-Rong; Ding, Xiang; Yang, Bo; Jin, Peng

2012-01-01

119

Effect of comorbidities and postoperative complications on mortality after hip fracture in elderly people: prospective observational cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate postoperative medical complications and the association between these complications and mortality at 30 days and one year after surgery for hip fracture and to examine the association between preoperative comorbidity and the risk of postoperative complications and mortality. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting University teaching hospital. Participants 2448 consecutive patients admitted with an acute hip fracture over a four year period. We excluded 358 patients: all those aged < 60; those with periprosthetic fractures, pathological fractures, and fractures treated without surgery; and patients who died before surgery. Interventions Routine care for hip fractures. Main outcome measures Postoperative complications and mortality at 30 days and one year. Results Mortality was 9.6% at 30 days and 33% at one year. The most common postoperative complications were chest infection (9%) and heart failure (5%). In patients who developed postoperative heart failure mortality was 65% at 30 days (hazard ratio 16.1, 95% confidence interval 12.2 to 21.3). Of these patients, 92% were dead by one year (11.3, 9.1 to 14.0). In patients who developed a postoperative chest infection mortality at 30 days was 43% (8.5, 6.6 to 11.1). Significant preoperative variables for increased mortality at 30 days included the presence of three or more comorbidities (2.5, 1.6 to 3.9), respiratory disease (1.8, 1.3 to 2.5), and malignancy (1.5, 1.01 to 2.3). Conclusions In elderly people with hip fracture, the presence of three or more comorbidities is the strongest preoperative risk factor. Chest infection and heart failure are the most common postoperative complications and lead to increased mortality. These groups offer a clear target for specialist medical assessment.

Roche, J J W; Wenn, R T; Sahota, O; Moran, C G

2005-01-01

120

[Logistic, technic and postoperative complications of lung and heart-lung transplantations].  

PubMed

In France, the "Agence de la biomédecine" distributes lung grafts. "Ideal" criteria for lung donor selection are not always respected, driven by the scarcity of suitable donor lungs (10% deaths while waiting). In single lung transplantation, three anastomoses are performed (bronchus near the lobar carina, pulmonary artery, left atrium). For double lung transplantation (twice as frequent around the world), two single lung transplantations are successively performed through two separate anterolateral thoracotomies, often without cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart lung transplantations are now rare (2% around the world). Postoperative mortality has improved (between 10 and 15%): less severe primary graft dysfunctions, treatable with ECMO, fewer bronchial complications, improvement in the diagnosis of hyperacute humoral rejection, improvement in antiviral prophylaxis. PMID:21353969

Bonnette, P

2010-02-01

121

Preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations are associated with a risk of postoperative complications after cardiac surgery.  

PubMed

This study aimed to assess whether preoperative oxidative stress levels can predict postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Ninety-five cardiac surgery patients received an assessment of preoperative oxidative stress by measurement of hydroperoxide values in blood via the d-Rom test. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and also multivariate logistic regression were used to evaluate the prognostic significance of preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations in predicting the occurrence of major organ morbidity and mortality (MOMM). MOMM included death, deep sternal infection, reoperation, stroke, renal failure requiring haemodialysis and prolonged ventilation (>48 hours). The ability of preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations to predict MOMM was not significantly different from that of the European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.822 versus 0.821 respectively, P=0.983). The optimal threshold value of hydroperoxide concentration to differentiate between patients with and without MOMM was 450 UCarr (sensitivity, 87.0%; specificity, 81.9%). Duration of intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation time and hospital stay were significantly longer in patients with preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations ?450 UCarr (H group) compared to those patients with preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations <450 UCarr (L group). An increase in preoperative hydroperoxide concentrations remained associated with an increased risk of MOMM (odds ratios: 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00 to 1.03) and prolonged intensive care unit stay (odds ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00 to 1.02), after adjusting for age, gender and EuroSCORE. In conclusion, an increased hydroperoxide concentration before cardiac surgery is an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications. PMID:24967764

Suehiro, K; Tanaka, K; Matsuura, T; Funao, T; Yamada, T; Mori, T; Tsuchiya, M; Nishikawa, K

2014-07-01

122

The effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on airway colonization and postoperative respiratory complications in patients undergoing oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer†  

PubMed Central

Respiratory complication is one of the important postoperative complications of oesophageal cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery is effective for postoperative respiratory complications. In this study, patients with oesophageal cancer were divided into two group: one with neoadjuvant therapy and the other without neoadjuvant therapy. Before surgery, they all underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage. We evaluated respiratory complications and the effects of preoperative neoadjuvant therapy. Forty patients (M/F = 23/17 and mean age 61 years) were enrolled in this study. Twenty-two cases had cancer in the middle part and 18 in the lower part of the oesophagus. Significant correlation was observed between the number of positive micro-organism and difficulty in weaning and receiving neoadjuvant therapy. But no significant correlation was found between neoadjuvant therapy and respiratory complications.

Bagheri, Reza; RajabiMashhadi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghazvini, Kiyarash; Asnaashari, Amir; Zahediyan, Ali; Sahebi, Mehdi Abasi

2012-01-01

123

Disinfection by antiseptics in management of postoperative surgical wounds in urologic operations.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to confirm that frequent disinfection by antiseptics is unnecessary on surgical wounds of urologic operations. Patients who received urologic operations were divided into 3 groups that had the same surgical dressings but different frequencies of disinfection and different antiseptics used. Surgical wounds were evaluated clinically and bacteriologically for the period until removal of sutures. Of the 97 patients randomly recruited for the study, 3 developed surgical-site infection (SSI). There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSI among the 3 groups. Bacterial counts of surgical wounds increased over time after operation, to similar extents in the 3 groups. The major isolate was Staphylococcus epidermidis, one of the normal florae on the skin. This strain was found at almost equal frequencies in all groups. In conclusion, our study suggested that covering with the surgical dressing without frequent disinfection by antiseptics was effective for prevention of SSI. Thus, traditional frequent disinfection should be abandoned. PMID:16541760

Takahashi, Satoshi; Takeyama, Koh; Hashimoto, Kohei; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Hirobe, Megumi; Takei, Fumiyasu; Furuya, Ryoji; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Hotta, Hiroshi; Matsukawa, Masanori; Hirose, Takaoki; Tsukamoto, Taiji

2006-02-01

124

Anesthetic complications including two cases of postoperative respiratory depression in living liver donor surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Living liver donation is becoming a more common means to treat patients with liver failure because of a shortage of cadaveric organs and tissues. There is a potential for morbidity and mortality, however, in patients who donate a portion of their liver. The purpose of this study is to identify anesthetic complications and morbidity resulting from living liver donor surgery. Patients and Methods: The anesthetic records of all patients who donated a segment of their liver between January 1997 and January 2006 at University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical and anesthesia time, blood loss, hospitalization length, complications, morbidity, and mortality were recorded. Data were reported as absolute values, mean ± SD, or percentage. Significance (P < 0.05) was determined using Student's paired t tests. Results: Seventy-four patients (34 male, 40 female, mean age = 35.5 ± 9.8 years) donated a portion of their liver and were reviewed in the study. Fifty-seven patients (77%) donated the right hepatic lobe, while 17 (23%) donated a left hepatic segment. The average surgical time for all patients was 7.8 ± 1.5 hours, the anesthesia time was 9.0 ± 1.3 hours, and the blood loss was 423 ± 253 ml. Forty-six patients (62.2%) received autologous blood either from a cell saver or at the end of surgery following acute, normovolemic hemodilution, but none required an allogenic transfusion. Two patients were admitted to the intensive care unit due to respiratory depression. Both patients donated their right hepatic lobe. One required reintubation in the recovery room and remained intubated overnight. The other was extubated but required observation in the intensive care unit for a low respiratory rate. Twelve patients (16.2%) had complaints of nausea, and two reported nausea with vomiting during their hospital stay. There were four patients who developed complications related to positioning during the surgery: Two patients complained of numbness and tingling in the hands which resolved within two days, one patient reported a blister on the hand, and one patient complained of right elbow pain that resolved quickly. Postoperative hospitalization averaged 7.4 ± 1.5 days. There was no patient mortality. Discussion: Living liver donation can be performed with low morbidity. However, postoperative respiratory depression is a concern and is perhaps due to altered metabolism of administered narcotics and anesthetic agents.

Beebe, David; Singh, Harpreet; Jochman, John; Luikart, Paul; Gruessner, Ranier; Gruessner, Angelica; Belani, Kumar

2011-01-01

125

Predictors of postoperative pulmonary complications after liver resection: Results from a tertiary care intensive care unit  

PubMed Central

Background: Postoperative pulmonary complication (PPC) is a serious complication after liver surgery and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the intensive care unit (ICU). Therefore, the early identification of risk factors of PPCs may help to reduce the adverse outcomes. Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the predictors of PPCs in patients undergoing hepatic resection. Design: Retrospective, observational. Methods: The patients admitted after hepatic resection in the gastrosurgical ICU of our institute between October 2009 and June 2013 was identified. The ICU charts were retrieved from the database to identify patients who developed PPCs. A comparison of risk factors was made between the patients who developed PPC (PPC group) against the patients who did not (no-PPC group). Results: Of 117 patients with hepatic resection, 28 patients developed PPCs. Among these, pneumonia accounted for 12 (42.8%) followed by atelectasis in 8 (28.5%) and pleural effusion in 3 (10.7%). Among the patients developing PPCs, 16 patients were over a 70-year-old (57.1%), 21 patients were smokers (75%) and 8 patients (28.5%) had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The requirement for blood transfusion and duration of mechanical ventilation were greater in the patients developing PPC (2000 ± 340 vs. 1000 ± 210 ml; 10 ± 4.5 vs. 3 ± 1.3 days). Conclusion: Old age, chronic smoking, COPD, increased blood product transfusion, increased duration of mechanical ventilation and increased length of ICU stay increased the relative risk of PPC, presence of diabetes and occurrence of surgical complications (leak, dehiscence, etc.) were independent predictive variables for the development of PPC.

Choudhuri, Anirban Hom; Chandra, Som; Aggarwal, Garima; Uppal, Rajeev

2014-01-01

126

Relationship between Postoperative Infectious Complications and Glycemic Control for Diabetic Patients in an Orthopedic Hospital in Kuwait  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the relationship between postoperative infectious complications and glycemic control for diabetic patients in an orthopedic hospital in Kuwait. Subjects and Methods: Patients who underwent surgical orthopedic procedures between 2006 and 2007 were identified to provide demographic and clinical informations including age, gender, type of surgery, length of operation, HbA1c values, nature of specimens and species of the

S. M. Lamloum; L. A. Mobasher; A. H. Karar; L. Basiony; T. H. Abdallah; A. I. Al-Saleh; N. A. Al-Shamali

2009-01-01

127

Wound Complications of the Retroperitoneal Approach for the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair--An Evaluation of Abdominal Bulge Formation--  

PubMed Central

Objective: To evaluate the incidence of wound complications after the retroperitoneal approach for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, and to ascertain the cause of abdominal bulge (AB). Subjects and Methods: Forty-three patients with AAA repair via the retroperitoneal space were retrospectively investigated. Wound complications and their incidence were studied by chart review. The thickness of the abdominal wall muscle was measured by follow-up computed tomography films. Compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) of the abdominal rectus muscle were examined for three bulge patients and three non-bulge patients. Results: Wound hypoesthesia (30%), wound numbness (21%), AB (7%), and wound pain (2%) were found in these patients. The thickness of the abdominal wall muscle was reduced in the incision side. CMAP of abdominal rectus muscle in the incision side disappeared only in AB patients. Conclusions: (1) Wound hypoesthesia and numbness displayed a high incidence. (2) Atrophy of the abdominal wall muscle in the incision side was found in these patients. (3) The cause of AB is considered to be muscle atrophy induced by denervation injury of an 11th intercostal nerve. (4) To avoid an eleventh intercostal nerve injury must be deemed the most effective method for preventing AB.

2014-01-01

128

[The role of intensive care medicine in early postoperative complications. Is surgical expertise in danger?].  

PubMed

Intensive care medicine is the backbone of surgery. We describe a profile of parameters which has to be repeatedly evaluated to allow early detection of postoperative complications. Complex surgical diseases are analyzed to underscore that only a surgeon experienced in intensive care medicine is able to interpret abnormalities in correlation with the intra-operative findings resulting in appropriate decisions with respect to diagnostic measures and reintervention. An increasing lack of motivation compromises the necessary training of young surgeons. Work hour limits already prolong education in the operative core competence thus making residents decline a necessary extension of ICU training beyond the compulsory 6 months. Identification of young surgeons with intensive care medicine is further hampered by the establishment of interdisciplinary operative ICUs excluding surgeons from the leadership. Our current survey of 38 university departments of general and gastro-intestinal surgery in Germany shows that a cooperative ICU steering structure of anesthesiologists and surgeons exists in only 19%. The imminent deficit of training in surgical intensive care medicine can only be counteracted by equal leadership structures. PMID:19707724

Klar, E; Püschel, A; Schiffmann, L; Pertschy, A

2009-09-01

129

[Transdrainage closed ultrasonic cleansing of the abdominal cavity in the prevention and treatment of infectious complications in abdominal gunshot wounds].  

PubMed

Under analysis were results of treatment of 112 wounded with gunshot injuries of the abdomen. The flowing-irrigating aspiration dialysis followed by the closed transdrainage ultrasonic sanitation in combination with a medicinal composition (dioxidine, gentamycine, tripsin) and simultaneous intramuscular injection of solcoseryl and thymalin were used for prophylactics and treatment of infectious complications in the abdominal cavity and in the wound of the abdominal wall. The method of treatment was found to result in less amount of pyo-inflammatory complications (from 34.8 to 2.6%), shorter terms of cleansing the wound from pyo-necrotic formations and liquidation of the perifocal inflammatory reaction, shorter duration of the stationary treatment. PMID:10368889

Ibishov, K G

1999-01-01

130

Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis: a complication of gunshot wound injuries to the brain.  

PubMed

Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) is a rare complication of non-penetrating brain injuries. However, this is not an uncommon event in those patients who have suffered a gun shot wound (GSW) to the head. Disturbances in blood flow, lead to development of SST, endothelial injury and clotting abnormalities. Complications include increased weakness, mental status changes, seizures and potential mortality. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate three cases of SSST and the need to be alert for this entity. Our cases involve three young female patients each of whom suffered a GSW to the head, with resultant severe brain injury. In each case, severe disability ensued and imaging studies revealed the presence of the superior sagittal sinus syndrome. The cases demonstrate three different presentations and time courses of this entity, along with the appropriate treatment choices. This condition may appear in the immediate post-injury period, in the post-acute rehabilitation period or even at distant follow-up; therefore, patients with TBI secondary to GSW need to be monitored for an extended time interval for clinical signs which may be indicative of SSST. PMID:24525817

Zafonte, R; Black, K; Mann, N; Nepa, S; Watanabe, T

1998-01-01

131

A prospective two-armed trial assessing the efficacy and performance of a silver dressing used postoperatively on high-risk, clean surgical wounds.  

PubMed

Surgical site infections (SSI) are a known complication of surgery. Silver-containing wound treatments are popular, despite the lack of evidence of SSI reduction. A two-armed study was conducted between July 2007 and November 2008 to evaluate the efficacy and ease of use of a postoperative silver dressing. In the first arm of the study, patients undergoing clean general, vascular, orthopedic, and neurosurgical procedures were allocated to receive a postoperative silver dressing (POSD) or a standard dressing of nonstick gauze under a fluid occlusive dressing. Outcome variables included the incidence of antibiotic initiation for SSI, clinical signs of infection, and leukocyte counts. The second arm of the study was a prospective case series designed to evaluate the performance and handling characteristics of the POSD. Onehundred- ninety-nine (199) patients (mean age 59.2 [range 21-94] years) were enrolled in the first arm of the study. Three out of 99 (3%) patients in the POSD and six out of 100 (6%) control group patients received antibiotic therapy for SSI (P = 0.498). Differences in the percentage of patients with clinical signs of infection following surgery also were not statistically significant (POSD: n = 24, 24.2%; control: n = 30, 30%; P = 0.426). In the second arm, 34 out of 36 patients rated the study dressing easy to apply in (94%), and no pain on removal was noted in 38 out of 57 (66.7%) assessments. No patients in the dressing performance cohort developed an SSI. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies with large sample sizes are warranted to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the POSD. PMID:24706401

Schwartz, Jamie; Goss, Selena; Facchin, Federico; Manizate, Fotini; Gendics, Cynthia; Braitman, Elissa; Lantis, John

2014-04-01

132

Does physiotherapy reduce the incidence of postoperative complications in patients following pulmonary resection via thoracotomy? a protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Postoperative pulmonary and shoulder complications are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. While physiotherapy aims to prevent or minimise these complications, currently there are no randomised controlled trials to support or refute effectiveness of physiotherapy in this setting. METHODS\\/DESIGN: This single blind randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 184 patients following lung resection via open thoracotomy. All subjects

Julie C Reeve; Kristine Nicol; Kathy Stiller; Kathryn M McPherson; Linda Denehy

2008-01-01

133

May Renal Resistive Index Be an Early Predictive Tool of Postoperative Complications in Major Surgery? Preliminary Results  

PubMed Central

Background. Patients who undergo high-risk surgery represent a large amount of post-operative ICU-admissions. These patients are at high risk of experiencing postoperative complications. Renal Resistive Index was found to be related with renal dysfunction, hypertension, and posttraumatic hemorrhagic shock, probably due to vasoconstriction. We explored whether Renal Resistive Index (RRI), measured after awakening from general anesthesia, could have any relationship with postoperative complications. Methods. In our observational, stratified dual-center trial, we enrolled patients who underwent general anesthesia for high-risk major surgery. After awakening in recovery room (or during awakening period in subjects submitted to cardiac surgery) we measured RRI by echo-color-Doppler method. Primary endpoint was the association of altered RRI (>0.70) and outcome during the first postoperative week. Results. 205 patients were enrolled: 60 (29.3%) showed RRI > 0.70. The total rate of adverse event was 27 (18.6%) in RRI ? 0.7 group and 19 (31.7%) in RRI > 0.7 group (P = 0.042). Significant correlation between RRI > 0.70 and complications resulted in pneumonia (P = 0.016), septic shock (P = 0.003), and acute renal failure (P = 0.001) subgroups. Patients with RRI > 0.7 showed longer ICU stay (P = 0.001) and lasting of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.004). These results were confirmed in cardiothoracic surgery subgroup. RRI > 0.7 duplicates triplicates the risk of complications, both in general (OR 2.03 93 95% CI 1.02–4.02, P = 0.044) and in cardiothoracic (OR 2.62 95% CI 1.11–6.16, P = 0.027) population. Furthermore, we found RRI > 0.70 was associated with a triplicate risk of postoperative septic shock (OR 3.04, CI 95% 1.5–7.01; P = 0.002).

Meco, Massimo; Ruggieri, Nadia; Cosseta, Daniele; Cirri, Silvia; Zito, Paola Cosma; Gollo, Yari; Raimondi, Ferdinando

2014-01-01

134

May renal resistive index be an early predictive tool of postoperative complications in major surgery? Preliminary results.  

PubMed

Background. Patients who undergo high-risk surgery represent a large amount of post-operative ICU-admissions. These patients are at high risk of experiencing postoperative complications. Renal Resistive Index was found to be related with renal dysfunction, hypertension, and posttraumatic hemorrhagic shock, probably due to vasoconstriction. We explored whether Renal Resistive Index (RRI), measured after awakening from general anesthesia, could have any relationship with postoperative complications. Methods. In our observational, stratified dual-center trial, we enrolled patients who underwent general anesthesia for high-risk major surgery. After awakening in recovery room (or during awakening period in subjects submitted to cardiac surgery) we measured RRI by echo-color-Doppler method. Primary endpoint was the association of altered RRI (>0.70) and outcome during the first postoperative week. Results. 205 patients were enrolled: 60 (29.3%) showed RRI > 0.70. The total rate of adverse event was 27 (18.6%) in RRI ? 0.7 group and 19 (31.7%) in RRI > 0.7 group (P = 0.042). Significant correlation between RRI > 0.70 and complications resulted in pneumonia (P = 0.016), septic shock (P = 0.003), and acute renal failure (P = 0.001) subgroups. Patients with RRI > 0.7 showed longer ICU stay (P = 0.001) and lasting of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.004). These results were confirmed in cardiothoracic surgery subgroup. RRI > 0.7 duplicates triplicates the risk of complications, both in general (OR 2.03 93 95% CI 1.02-4.02, P = 0.044) and in cardiothoracic (OR 2.62 95% CI 1.11-6.16, P = 0.027) population. Furthermore, we found RRI > 0.70 was associated with a triplicate risk of postoperative septic shock (OR 3.04, CI 95% 1.5-7.01; P = 0.002). PMID:24967414

Giustiniano, Enrico; Meco, Massimo; Morenghi, Emanuela; Ruggieri, Nadia; Cosseta, Daniele; Cirri, Silvia; Difrancesco, Orazio; Zito, Paola Cosma; Gollo, Yari; Raimondi, Ferdinando

2014-01-01

135

Transcutaenous electrical nerve stimulation to manage a lower extremity wound complicated by peripheral arterial disease: a case report.  

PubMed

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is used to alleviate muscle pain, and there is some evidence it may affect healing in chronic wounds. An 80-year-old male patient with a chronic left lower extremity wound and a history of peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer presented for treatment. Previous protocols of care, mainly consisting of sharp debridement and daily dressing changes, had not resulted in a decrease in wound size. The patient had right and left iliac artery stenosis - not amenable to surgical intervention - and an ankle brachial index (ABI) of 0.63 on the left and 0.59 on the right lower extremities. On presentation, the wound measured 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm with a depth of 0.3 cm and a 0.5-cm tract at the 5 o'clock position. Treatment was changed to application of an ionic silver-containing Hydrofiber™ dressing and low-frequency TENS. Electrodes were applied 2 cm superior and inferior to the wound margin at a frequency of 2 Hz with a pulse width of 250 microseconds and amplitude of 33 mA. Treatment time was 45 minutes, twice daily, for 3 months, performed at home by the patient and his caregiver. After 4 weeks, wound dimensions decreased by 1.51% per day, and the wound was completely healed (100% epithelialized) after 12 weeks. At that time, the ABI of the left (treated) leg had increased to 0.71. Research is needed to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of low-frequency TENS to help clinicians provide evidenced-based treatment for wounds complicated by decreased blood flow. PMID:25019248

Yarboro, Douglas D; Smith, Robert

2014-07-01

136

The arterial supply of the cervical and thoracic spinal muscles and overlying skin: Anatomical study with implications for surgical wound complications.  

PubMed

Postoperative spinal wound dehiscence is a significant complication following the posterior midline approach. It is postulated that this approach disrupts the vasculature supplying the paraspinal muscles and overlying skin. Although the spinal vasculature has been investigated previously, the smaller arterioles have not been described in the context of the posterior midline approach. Eight cadaveric neck and posterior torso specimens were dissected after injection with a radio-opaque lead oxide mixture and subsequent radiographs taken were analyzed. The deep cervical, vertebral, superficial cervical, and occipital arteries consistently supplied the cervical paraspinal muscles. The latter two arteries also vascularized the overlying skin. The deep cervical arteries were found to be located lateral to the C3 to C6 vertebrae, vulnerable to damage with the posterior approach. In the thoracic region, the superior and posterior intercostal arteries consistently supplied the spinal muscles. In all specimens, two small anastomotic vessels posterior to the laminae were found connecting the intercostal artery perforators. Both the arterial perforators and their anastomotic channels were situated in the surgical field and susceptible to damage with the posterior approach. It is likely that the disruption in spinal vasculature contributes to the multifactorial problem of wound dehiscence with the posterior midline approach. PMID:22887027

Yue, Brian Yin Ting; le Roux, Cara Michelle; Corlett, Russell; De La Harpe, David; Richardson, Martin; Ashton, Mark

2013-07-01

137

Association between self reported snoring, STOP questionnaire and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients submitted to ortophaedic surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase perioperative complications. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship among postoperative pulmonary complication, snoring and STOP questionnaire in patients with ortophaedic surgery. Methods 1,406 consecutive records of patients who had undergone elective ortophaedic surgery during the period January 2005-December 2008 were investigated retrospectively. Demographic information, sleep symptoms, STOP questionnaire, comorbidities and outcome data were collected. Results There were 289 (20.5%) snorers and 1,117 (79.5%) non-snorers in the study group. There was no significant difference between snorer and non-snorer patients (p > 0.05) in the prevalence of pneumonia and respiratory failure. But in snorer patients the rate of postoperative atelectasis was significantly higher than in non-snorer group (p < 0.0001). The STOP Questionnaire was given to 1,406 patients and 147 (10.4%) out of them were classified at high risk of OSA. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of pneumonia and respiratory failure between low and high risk group (p > 0.05). However, in high risk patients the occurrence of postoperative atelectasis was significantly higher than in low risk group (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Postoperative atelectasis was significantly more prevalent in the high risk group according to STOP questionnaire.

2013-01-01

138

Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors for Postoperative Complications in Benign Goiter Surgery: Prospective Multicenter Study in Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Risk factors for postoperative complications of benign goiter surgery have not been investigated systematically. To this\\u000a end, a prospective multicenter study (January 1 through December 31, 1998) was conducted involving 7266 patients with surgery\\u000a for benign goiter from 45 East German hospitals. High-volume providers (>150 operations per year) performed 69% (5042\\/7266),\\u000a intermediate-volume providers 27% (50–150), and low-volume providers 4%

Oliver Thomusch; Andreas Machens; Carsten Sekulla; Jörg Ukkat; Hans Lippert; Ingo Gastinger; Henning Dralle

2000-01-01

139

Post-operative complications after removal of sporadic vestibular schwannoma via retrosigmoid-suboccipital approach: current diagnosis and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The retrosigmoid (suboccipital) approach is one of four surgical approaches for the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (acoustic\\u000a neuromas). It is increasingly used by otologic surgeons, and in experienced hands is associated with improved results and\\u000a more limited complications. Mortality rates are minimal and often zero, while postoperative sequelae, on the other hand, are\\u000a not rare. In order to not only

Stylianos Charalampakis; Dimitrios Koutsimpelas; Haralampos Gouveris; Wolf Mann

2011-01-01

140

Postoperative Cervical Haematoma Complicated by Ipsilateral Carotid Thrombosis and Aphasia after Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Hematoma alone is the most common vascular complication reported after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). We present this case to report the occurrence of postoperative cervical hematoma complicated by ipsilateral carotid thrombosis and aphasia after an uncomplicated C4–6 ACDF. This is a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent revision fusions of the C4-5 and C6-7 levels complicated by postoperative cervical hematoma and carotid thrombosis. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. The revision fusions were performed and deemed routine. Approximately eight hours later 200?mL of blood was evacuated from a postoperative cervical hematoma. The patient became unresponsive and disoriented a few hours after evacuating the hematoma. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were normal, but magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated total occlusion of the left carotid artery. Thrombectomy was performed and the patient was discharged without residual deficits. At the latest followup she is fully functional and asymptomatic in her neck. We suggest, after evacuating a cervical hematoma, an evaluation of the carotids be made with MRA or cerebral angiography, as this may demonstrate a clot before the patient develops symptoms.

Chin, Kingsley R.; Seale, Jason; Butron, Veronica

2013-01-01

141

Postoperative Serratia marcescens wound infections traced to an out-of-hospital source.  

PubMed

From 25 August to 28 September 1994, 7 cardiovascular surgery (CVS) patients at a California hospital acquired postoperative Serratia marcescens infections, and 1 died. To identify the outbreak source, a cohort study was done of all 55 adults who underwent CVS at the hospital during the outbreak. Specimens from the hospital environment and from hands of selected staff were cultured. S. marcescens isolates were compared using restriction-endonuclease analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Several risk factors for S. marcescens infection were identified, but hospital and hand cultures were negative. In October, a patient exposed to scrub nurse A (who wore artificial fingernails) and to another nurse-but not to other identified risk factors-became infected with the outbreak strain. Subsequent cultures from nurse A's home identified the strain in a jar of exfoliant cream. Removal of the cream ended the outbreak. S. marcescens does not normally colonize human skin, but artificial nails may have facilitated transmission via nurse A's hands. PMID:9086167

Passaro, D J; Waring, L; Armstrong, R; Bolding, F; Bouvier, B; Rosenberg, J; Reingold, A W; McQuitty, M; Philpott, S M; Jarvis, W R; Werner, S B; Tompkins, L S; Vugia, D J

1997-04-01

142

Evaluation of the degree of effectiveness of biobeam low level narrow band light on the treatment of skin ulcers and delayed postoperative wound healing.  

PubMed

Twenty-one patients with 31 postoperative delayed open wounds resistant to conventional therapy were randomly allocated to three groups. Group 1 was treated with red low level narrow band (LLNB) light (660 nm); group 2 was treated with infrared LLNB light (940 nm); and group 3 was treated with a placebo such as the Biobeam machine (no light irradiation). Group 1 showed a significant improvement compared to groups 2 and 3 (t-test). PMID:1437861

Iusim, M; Kimchy, J; Pillar, T; Mendes, D G

1992-09-01

143

Plasma catecholamine levels in the postoperative period in complication-free and "paralytic" ileus patients.  

PubMed

Plasma catecholamine concentrations were compared in a group of postoperative "paralytic" ileus patients and in another group of patients, who had undergone medium-size abdominal operations followed by uneventful recovery. The plasma epinephrine level was significantly in the former group, whereas no such difference was observed in the norepinephrine concentration. The data appear to confirm that the epinephrine released from the adrenal medulla appreciably contributes to the development of "paralytic" ileus. The therapeutically effective major tranquillizer and alpha-receptor blocking drug, trifluperidol, was found to reduce both epinephrine and norepinephrine levels in "paralytic" ileus patients. The decrease of the plasma epinephrine level was the higher, the greater its initial concentration. These findings seem to support the decisive role of increased catecholamine release in the development of postoperative motor inhibition ("postoperative" ileus) and also explain the success of sympatholytic treatment in such cases, i.e. the return of normal peristalsis. PMID:3434085

Tárnoky, K; Szenohradszky, J; Petri, G

1987-01-01

144

Evaluation of the role of antibiotics in preventing postoperative complication after routine periodontal surgery: A comparative clinical study  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Aim of this randomly controlled clinical study was to evaluate the role of antibiotics to prevent postoperative complications after routine periodontal surgery and also to determine whether their administration improved the surgical outcome. Materials and Methods: Forty-five systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis requiring flap surgery were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, and control groups. Surgical procedures were carried out with complete asepsis as per the protocol. Postoperative assessment of patient variables like swelling, pain, temperature, infection, ulceration, necrosis, and trismus was performed at intervals of 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 3 months. Changes in clinical parameters such as gingival index, plaque index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were also recorded. Results: There was no incidence of postoperative infection in any of the patients. Patient variables were comparable in all the three groups. Though there was significant improvement in the periodontal parameters in all the groups, no statistically significant result was observed for any group over the others. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that when periodontal surgical procedures were performed following strict asepsis, the incidence of clinical infection was not significant among all the three groups, and also that antibiotic administration did not influence the outcome of surgery. Therefore, prophylactic antibiotics for patients who are otherwise healthy administered following routine periodontal surgery to prevent postoperative infection are unnecessary and have no demonstrable additional benefits.

Mohan, Rosh Radhika; Doraswamy, Dwarakanath Chinni; Hussain, Ahad M.; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Jayaprakash, Deepika

2014-01-01

145

Morphine Spinal Block Anesthesia in Patients Who Undergo an Open Hemorrhoidectomy: A Prospective Analysis of Pain Control and Postoperative Complications  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study evaluated the use of adding morphine to bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia for pain control in patients who underwent an open hemorrhoidectomy. Methods Forty patients were prospectively selected for an open hemorrhoidectomy at the same institution and were randomized into two groups of 20 patients each: group 1 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with 80 µg of morphine (0.2 mg/mL). Group 2 had a spinal with 7 mg of heavy bupivacaine associated with distilled water, achieving the same volume of spinal infusion as that of group 1. Both groups were prescribed the same pain control medicine during the postoperative period. Pain scores were evaluated at the anesthetic recovery room and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Postoperative complications, including pruritus, nausea, headaches, and urinary retention, were also recorded. Results There were no anthropometric statistical differences between the two groups. Pain in the anesthetic recovery room and 3 hours after surgery was similar for both groups. However, pain was better controlled in group 1 at 6 and 12 hours after surgery. Although pain was better controlled for group 1 after 24 hours of surgery, the difference between the groups didn't achieved statistical significance. Complications were more common in group 1. Six patients (6/20) presented coetaneous pruritus and 3 with (3/20) urinary retention. Conclusion A hemorrhoidectomy under a spinal with morphine provides better pain control between 6 and 12 hours after surgery. However, postoperative complications, including cutaneous pruritus (30%) and urinary retention (15%), should be considered as a negative side of this procedure.

Moreira, Jose PT; Isaac, Raniere R; Alves-Neto, Onofre; Moreira, Thiago AC; Vieira, Tiago HM; Brasil, Andressa MS

2014-01-01

146

Severe wound traction-blisters after inadequate dressing application following laparoscopic cholecystectomy: case report of a preventable complication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The inadequate application of postoperative dressings can lead to significant complications, including skin injuries, compartment\\u000a syndromes, and potential limb loss. To our knowledge, the occurrence of post laparoscopic cholecystectomy related skin complications\\u000a have not yet been reported in the peer-reviewed literature.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Case Presentation  Following laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease, a seventy eight year old healthy white male broke\\u000a out in

Abayomi L Sanusi

2011-01-01

147

Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after septoplasty: A potential complication of occult anterior skull base encephalocele  

PubMed Central

Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea after septoplasty is a known entity resulting from errors in surgical technique and improper handling of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. When these occur, urgent management is necessary to prevent deleterious sequelae such as meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. Encephaloceles are rare occurrences characterized by herniation of intracranial contents through a skull base defect that can predispose patients to CSF rhinorrhea. In this report, we present a case of CSF rhinorrhea occurring 2 weeks after septoplasty likely from manipulation of an occult anterior skull base encephalocele. To our knowledge, no previous similar case has been reported in the literature. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of occult encephaloceles while performing septoplasties because minimal manipulation of these entities may potentially result in postoperative CSF leakage.

Soni, Resha S.; Choudhry, Osamah J.; Liu, James K.

2013-01-01

148

Postoperative mesenteric venous thrombosis: Potential complication related to minimal access surgery in a patient with undiagnosed hypercoagulability  

PubMed Central

Context: Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially fatal complication associated with laparoscopy which has now become common practice and gold standard for many procedures in general surgery. There are only few scattered case reports in the literature describing this postoperative thrombotic event. Case Report: In the present study, we describe a patient presenting with severe abdominal pain at 25 days following an uneventful laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair and nissen fundoplication. Exploratory laparotomy revealed an extensive small bowel ischemia requiring bowel resection followed by a second look laparotomy. Retrospectively performed hematologic workup revealed a genetic mutation associated with hyperhomocysteinemia in addition to her hyperfibrinogenemia. Previously published data were collected and discussed. Conclusions: Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially serious complication after laparoscopic surgery especially in patients with underlying hypercoagulability. High index of suspicion is important in early diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

Sucandy, Iswanto; Gabrielsen, Jon D; Petrick, Anthony T

2010-01-01

149

Mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by perioperative complications in veterans undergoing elective surgery: data from Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP)--a cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by postoperative complications. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Using data from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Surgical Quality Improvement Programme, a quality assurance programme for major surgical procedures in the VA healthcare system, we assessed the association of current smoking at the time of the surgery with 6-month and 1-year mortality. Primary and secondary outcome measures Using mediation analyses, we calculated the relative contribution of each smoking-associated complication to smoking-associated postoperative mortality, both unadjusted and adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, work relative value unit of the operation, surgeon specialty, American Society of Anesthesiologists class and year of surgery. Smoking-associated complications included surgical site infection (SSI), cardiovascular complications (myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest and/or stroke) and pulmonary complications (pneumonia, failure to wean and/or reintubation). Results There were 186?632 never smokers and 135?741 current smokers. The association of smoking and mortality was mediated by smoking-related complications with varying effects. In unadjusted analyses, the proportions of mediation of smoking to 6-month mortality explained by the complications were as follows: SSIs 22%, cardiovascular complications 12% and pulmonary complications 89%. In adjusted analyses, the per cents mediated by each complication were as follows: SSIs 2%, cardiovascular complications 4% and pulmonary complications 22%. In adjusted analyses for 1-year mortality, respective per cents mediated were 2%, 3% and 16%. Conclusions Pulmonary complications, followed by cardiovascular complications and SSIs were mediators of smoking-associated 6-month and 1-year mortality. Interventions targeting smoking cessation and prevention and early treatment of pulmonary complications has the likelihood of reducing postoperative mortality after elective surgery.

Singh, Jasvinder A; Hawn, Mary; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Henderson, William G; Richman, Joshua; Houston, Thomas K

2013-01-01

150

The Factors Related with Postoperative Complications in Benign Nodular Thyroid Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thyroid gland is an important endocrine organ because of its functions. Although the morbidity and mortality of thyroid surgery\\u000a have decreased markedly, serious complications may still occur. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify the factors\\u000a influencing the complications in benign nodular thyroid surgery. A total of 332 patients who underwent thyroid surgery between\\u000a April 2004 and May

Aysun Simsek Celik; Hasan Erdem; Deniz Guzey; Fatih Celebi; Atilla Celik; Selim Birol; Rafet Kaplan

2011-01-01

151

Health-related quality of life after cardiac surgery - the effects of age, preoperative conditions and postoperative complications  

PubMed Central

Background Factors influencing the postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after cardiac surgery have not been well described yet, mainly in the older people. The study’s aim was to explore differences in clinical conditions and HRQOL of patients before and after cardiac surgery taking into account the influence of age and to describe factors influencing changes of HRQOL in the postoperative period. Methods This was a prospective consecutive observational study with two measurements using the SF-36 questionnaire before surgery and 1 year after surgery. It considered main clinical characteristics of participants prior to surgery as well as postoperative complications. Results At baseline assessment the study considered 310 patients, predominantly male (69%). Mean age was 65 (SD 10.4) years and 101 patients (33%), who were older than 70, constituted the older group. This older group showed greater comorbidity, higher cardiac operative risk and lower HRQOL in the preoperative period as well as a higher prevalence of postoperative complications than the younger group. Thirty-day mortality was 1.4% in the younger group and 6.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). One year mortality was 3.3% in the younger group and 10.9% in the older group (p < 0.001). There was a significant improvement in all 8 health domains of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.001) in the overall sample. There was no significant difference in change in a majority of HRQOL domains between the younger and the older group (p > 0.05). Logistic multivariate analysis identified a higher values of preoperative PCS (Physical component summary) scores (OR 1.03, CI 1.00 – 1.05, p = 0.0187) and MCS (Mental component summary) scores (OR 1.02, CI 0.997 – 1.00, p = 0.0846) as the only risk factors for potential non-improvement of HRQOL after cardiac surgery after correction for age, gender and type of surgery. Conclusions Older patients with higher operative risk have lower preoperative HRQOL but show a similar improvement in a majority of HRQOL domains after cardiac surgery as compared with younger patients. The multivariate analysis has shown the higher preoperative HRQOL status as a only significant factor of potential non-improvement of postoperative HRQOL.

2014-01-01

152

Retained Descemet's membrane following penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy: a case report of a post-operative complication  

PubMed Central

Purpose To report a case of retained Descemet’s membrane following penetrating keratoplasty in a patient suffering from Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy. The use of confocal microscopy, histopathological tissue analysis, and treatment options are discussed. Methods Case report of an 85-year-old man with a past ophthalmic history of atrophic macular degeneration, underwent a penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy. Postoperative review revealed a retained retrocorneal membrane within the anterior chamber. Further surgery was performed to excise the membrane, with a subjective and objective postoperative improvement in visual acuity and without subsequent complications of the corneal graft. Results Histopathological assessment confirmed the clinical suspicion of a retained Descemet’s membrane, marrying with the initial histology from the corneal button excised during the penetrating keratoplasty, which showed only a very thin Descemet’s layer. Conclusion Retention of the Descemet’s membrane following penetrating keratoplasty is a rare but potential complication of this surgery, particularly in cases of Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy due to the thickened and abnormal histological nature of the endothelium and high index of suspicion is required.

McVeigh, Katherine; Cornish, Kurt Spiteri; Reddy, Aravind R; Vakros, Georgios

2013-01-01

153

Comparison of postoperative complication between Laryngeal Mask Airway and endotracheal tube during low-flow anesthesia with controlled ventilation  

PubMed Central

Objective: To compare the postoperative complications between Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) and endotracheal tube (ETT) during low-flow anesthesia with controlled ventilation. Methodology: Eighty adult Patients with ASA class I or II were randomly allocated into two forty-patient groups (ETT or LMA). Cuff pressure was monitored during anesthesia. After high uptake period, fresh gas flow (FGF) was decreased to 1 lit/min and isoflurane set to 1%. Monitoring during anesthesia included non-invasive blood pressure, ECG, ETCO2 and pulse oximetry. System leakage (>100 ml/min), rebreathing and any attempt to increase FGF to overcome the leak were monitored during anesthesia. Later, patients were extubated and transferred to Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). In PACU, the incidence of sore throat, cough, difficulty in swallowing and shivering was monitored for all patients. Results: Leakage was observed in two and three cases in ETT and LMA groups respectively (P>0.05). Postoperative cough, sore throat and difficulty in swallowing were significantly less in LMA than ETT group. No significant difference was observed regarding ETCo2 values between 2 groups. Conclusion: If careful measures regarding insertion techniques, correct LMA position and routine monitoring of LMA cuff pressure are taken, LMA can be used as a safe alternative with lower incidence of post operation complication compared with ETT during low-flow controlled anesthesia with modern anesthetic machines.

Peirovifar, Ali; Eydi, Mahmood; Mirinejhad, Mir Mousa; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Mohammadi, Afsaneh; EJ Golzari, Samad

2013-01-01

154

Postoperative complications do not influence the pattern of early lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer in patients at risk  

PubMed Central

Background The pattern and factors influencing the lung function recovery in the first postoperative days are still not fully elucidated, especially in patients at increased risk. Methods Prospective study on 60 patients at increased risk, who underwent a lung resection for primary lung cancer. Inclusion criteria: complete resection and one or more known risk factors in form of COPD, cardiovascular disorders, advanced age or other comorbidities. Previous myocardial infarction, myocardial revascularization or stenting, cardiac rhythm disorders, arterial hypertension and myocardiopathy determined the increased cardiac risk. The severity of COPD was graded according to GOLD criteria. The trend of the postoperative lung function recovery was assessed by performing spirometry with a portable spirometer. Results Cardiac comorbidity existed in 55%, mild and moderate COPD in 20% and 35% of patients respectively. Measured values of FVC% and FEV1% on postoperative days one, three and seven, showed continuous improvement, with significant difference between the days of measurement, especially between days three and seven. There was no difference in the trend of the lung function recovery between patients with and without postoperative complications. Whilst pO2 was decreasing during the first three days in a roughly parallel fashion in patients with respiratory, surgical complications and in patients without complications, a slight hypercapnia registered on the first postoperative day was gradually abolished in all groups except in patients with cardiac complications. Conclusion Extent of the lung resection and postoperative complications do not significantly influence the trend of the lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer.

2014-01-01

155

[Reduction of the recurrences and postoperative complications rate in surgical treatment of hepatic echinococcosis].  

PubMed

Results of examination and treatment of 326 patients, suffering hepatic echinococcosis, in whom 449 surgical interventions were performed, were analyzed. In 123 of them the disease recurrence was diagnosed, and laparoscopic, laparotomy and puncture interventions were applied. Conduction of active screening examination of population in the regions, endemic for echinococcosis, application of effective intraoperative methods for prophylaxis of abdominal dissemination of invasive material, usage of antiparasitic chemical and thermal processing of cystic contents and its walls, left after echinococcectomy performance, postoperative prophylactic application of antiparasitic medicinal therapy have had permitted to lower the hepatic echinococcosis recurrence rate (down to 1.3% in last 5 yrs). PMID:24923114

2014-02-01

156

Early enteral feeding, compared with parenteral, reduces postoperative septic complications. The results of a meta-analysis.  

PubMed Central

This two-part meta-analysis combined data from eight prospective randomized trials designed to compare the nutritional efficacy of early enteral (TEN) and parenteral (TPN) nutrition in high-risk surgical patients. The combined data gave sufficient patient numbers (TEN, n = 118; TPN, n = 112) to adequately address whether route of substrate delivery affected septic complication incidence. Phase I (dropouts excluded) meta-analysis confirmed data homogeneity across study sites, that TEN and TPN groups were comparable, and that significantly fewer TEN patients experienced septic complications (TEN, 18%; TPN, 35%; p = 0.01). Phase II meta-analysis, an intent-to-treat analysis (dropouts included), confirmed that fewer TEN patients developed septic complications. Further breakdown by patient type showed that all trauma and blunt trauma subgroups had the most significant reduction in septic complications when fed enterally. In conclusion, this meta-analysis attests to the feasibility of early postoperative TEN in high-risk surgical patients and that these patients have reduced septic morbidity rates compared with those administered TPN.

Moore, F A; Feliciano, D V; Andrassy, R J; McArdle, A H; Booth, F V; Morgenstein-Wagner, T B; Kellum, J M; Welling, R E; Moore, E E

1992-01-01

157

Post-operative neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio predicts complications following colorectal surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionThe neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR) correlates with serial organ dysfunction scores in colorectal surgical patients in critical care units. We hypothesised that the NLR on the first day after an elective colorectal resection would identify patients at increased risk of subsequent complications.

Emily J. Cook; Stewart R. Walsh; Naheed Farooq; Justin C. Alberts; Timothy A. Justin; Neil J. Keeling

2007-01-01

158

Impact of preoperative patient education on prevention of postoperative complications after major visceral surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (PEDUCAT trial)  

PubMed Central

Background In line with the growing number of surgical procedures being performed worldwide, postoperative complications are also increasing proportionately. Prevention of these postoperative complications is a high medical priority. Preoperative education of patients, including provision of preparatory information about the correct behavior after surgery, could improve the postoperative outcome, but the evidence for this is inconclusive. The aim of the PEDUCAT trial is to evaluate the feasibility and the impact of preoperative patient education on postoperative morbidity, mortality and quality of life in patients scheduled for elective major visceral surgery. Methods/design PEDUCAT is designed as a cluster-randomized controlled pilot study. The experimental group will visit a standardized preoperative seminar to learn how best to behave after surgery in addition to being given a standard information brochure, whereas the control group will only receive the information brochure. Outcome measures such as postoperative morbidity, postoperative pain, postoperative anxiety and depression, patient satisfaction, quality of life, length of hospital stay and postoperative mortality will be evaluated. Statistical analysis will be based on the intention-to-treat population. Analysis of covariance will be applied for the intervention group comparison, adjusting for age, center and quality of life before surgery. This is a pilot study to show the feasibility of the concept. Nevertheless, the planned sample size of n = 204 is large enough to show an effect with power of 90% and a significance level of 5%. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Register number: DRKS00004226.

2013-01-01

159

Management of gunshot wounds  

SciTech Connect

Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

1987-01-01

160

Complications from supervised mask use in post-operative surgical patients during the Gulf War.  

PubMed

This is a report of three patients in a surgical ward of a hospital who developed complications seemingly related to the use of full-face-fitting masks associated with the first Scud Missile attack on Israel during the Gulf War. Patient 1 developed atrial fibrillation with an uncontrolled ventricular rate; Patient 2 redeveloped a gastrointestinal hemorrhage; and Patient 3 developed a severe anxiety attack. Each of the three was severely ill prior to the event. Special attention should be given to severely ill patients during such events. PMID:10558314

Rivkind, A I; Eid, A; Weingart, E; Izhar, U; Barach, P; Richter, E D; Belzberg, H

1999-01-01

161

Treatment and prevention of postoperative complications in hip fracture patients: infections and delirium.  

PubMed

The course of older patients with hip fractures is often complicated by infections and delirium. Accurate care and high suspicion for these complications are essential, since these conditions are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay and nursing home placement, poorer mobility, and functional decline. Because of immunosenescence and higher infection rates, older patients need specific care, immediate diagnosis, and treatment of infections. Numerous guidelines of various medical societies outline the management of nosocomial infections, but there is a need of an individualized treatment plan because of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Hygiene measures have first priority to reduce the rate of infections. Treatment of geriatric syndromes like malnutrition, exsiccosis, gait disorders, falls, delirium, urine incontinence, and organ insufficiency are as important as immunization against pneumococci and influenza. Advanced age, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, peripheral vascular disease, prior delirium episodes, sight disorders, and polypharmacy are established risk factors for delirium; thus, older people with several chronic diseases are prone to delirium. A multifactorial approach, comprising standardized screening, oxygen support, intravenous fluid administration and augmented nutrition, monitoring of vital signs, pain treatment, optimized medication, and modification in perioperative management, significantly reduces delirium incidence during hospitalization for hip fracture. An interdisciplinary approach between surgeons and geriatricians may warrant optimized satisfaction of patients' needs. PMID:23949565

Dovjak, Peter; Iglseder, Bernhard; Mikosch, Peter; Gosch, Markus; Müller, Ernst; Pinter, Georg; Pils, Katharina; Gerstofer, Inge; Thaler, Heinrich; Zmaritz, Michaela; Weissenberger-Leduc, Monique; Müller, Walter

2013-10-01

162

Preoperative inspiratory muscle training to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection (PREPARE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Esophageal resection is associated with a high incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Respiratory complications account for almost half of the readmissions to the critical care unit. Postoperative complications can result in prolonged hospital stay and consequently increase healthcare costs. In cardiac surgery a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program has shown to prevent postoperative pneumonia and reduce length of hospital stay. While in some surgical centers inspiratory muscle training is already used in the preoperative phase in patients undergoing esophageal resection, the added value of this intervention on the reduction of pulmonary complications has not yet been investigated in large surgical populations other than cardiac surgery in a randomized and controlled study design. Methods/Design The effect of a preoperative inspiratory muscle training program on the incidence of postoperative pneumonia in patients undergoing esophageal resection will be studied in a single blind multicenter randomized controlled trial (the PREPARE study). In total 248 patients (age >18 years) undergoing esophageal resection for esophageal cancer will be included in this study. They are randomized to either usual care or usual care with an additional inspiratory muscle training intervention according to a high-intensity protocol which is performed with a tapered flow resistive inspiratory loading device. Patients have to complete 30 dynamic inspiratory efforts twice daily for 7 days a week until surgery with a minimum of 2 weeks. The starting training load will be aimed to be 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure and will be increased based on the rate of perceived exertion. The main study endpoint is the incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Secondary objectives are to evaluate the effect of preoperative inspiratory muscle training on length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, incidence of other postoperative (pulmonary) complications, quality of life, and on postoperative respiratory muscle function and lung function. Discussion The PREPARE study is the first multicenter randomized controlled trial to evaluate the hypothesis that preoperative inspiratory muscle training leads to decreased pulmonary complications in patients undergoing esophageal resection. Trial registration NCT01893008.

2014-01-01

163

Peri-operative levels of s-100 protein in serum: marker for surgical manipulation and postoperative complications.  

PubMed

Although minimally invasive neurosurgical techniques are highly sophisticated nowadays, almost any operative procedure causes an inevitable surgical trauma to the brain. As a consequence unfavorable functional outcomes are not rare. Intraoperative biochemical monitoring can be helpful first to detect but also to prevent brain damage. We investigated if serum S-100 protein (S-100) levels are a reliable marker for the extent of acute cerebral damage caused by surgical trauma or postoperative complication. S-100 is present in the cytosol of glial cells. This protein leaks into the extracellular space after cell damage and can be detected both in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. To determine S-100 protein levels, serum samples from 20 patients with various intracranial tumors were collected before surgery, and at one day, as well as at seven days after surgery. It was hypothesised that the size of the tumor-brain contact surface (TBCS) was closely related to the dimension of the surgical trauma. TBCS was measured from radiological imaging. The pre- and postoperative (day 1 and day 7) clinical condition of each patient was assessed. The S-100 levels were correlated with the TBCS and the clinical condition. Levels of S-100 on day 1 and day 7 were significantly higher as compared with levels on day 0 ( p = 0.02, respectively p = 0.01). There was a significant relationship between rise of S-100 level and worsening of clinical condition between day 0 and day 1 ( p = 0.001). Also a significant positive relationship between TBCS and the level of S-100 could be found on day 1 and on day 7 ( R = 0.71, p = 0.0009, respectively R = 0.73, p = 0.004). Furthermore, a significant relationship between the rise of S-100 level between day 0 and day 1, as well as between day 0 and day 7, and TBCS could be documented ( R = 0.61, p = 0.01, respectively R = 0.64, p = 0.005). In conclusion, serum S-100 levels are a reliable marker for acute or recent CNS damage caused by neurosurgical manipulation or as a result of secondary postoperative complications. Therefore, intraoperative monitoring of serum S-100 levels seems very promising. In such a setting the negative effects of surgical manipulation can be measured instantaneously, which should bring the neurosurgeon to change his strategy. As a consequence the surgical trauma can be minimized and functional outcome can be optimized. PMID:12640581

De Vries, J; Snels, S E A; Menovsky, T; Lemmens, W A J G; De Reus, H; Lamers, K J B; Grotenhuis, J A

2003-02-01

164

Aorta-Left Renal Vein Fistula Complicating an Aortic Aneurysm: Preoperative and Postoperative Multislice CT Findings  

SciTech Connect

Fistulas complicating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are rare, and fistulas involving the left renal vein are particularly uncommon. We highlight here a fistula between an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a retroaortic left renal vein, revealed by left flank pain associated with hematuria and acute renal failure. The multislice CT angiography performed in this 68-year-old patient revealed communication and equal enhancement between the aorta and the left gonadic vein, suggesting the presence of a fistula. The three-dimensional VRT reconstructions presented in this case were of great value in the preoperative planning, enabling immediate visualization of this unusual feature. Alternative diagnoses to consider when encountering this clinical presentation are reviewed.

Barrier, Pierre, E-mail: p.barrier@gmail.com; Otal, Philippe [Hopital de Rangueil CHU de Toulouse, Department of Radiology (France); Garcia, Olivier; Vahdat, Olivier; Domenech, Brice [Clinique Pasteur, Department of Radiology (France); Lannareix, Valerie; Joffre, Francis; Rousseau, Herve [Hopital de Rangueil CHU de Toulouse, Department of Radiology (France)

2007-06-15

165

Dietician-delivered intensive nutritional support is associated with a decrease in severe postoperative complications after surgery in patients with esophageal cancer.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietician-delivered intensive nutritional support (INS) on postoperative outcome in patients with esophageal cancer. Approximately 50-80% of patients with esophageal cancer are malnourished at the time of diagnosis. Malnutrition enhances the risk of postoperative complications, resulting in delay of postoperative recovery and impairment of quality of life. Sixty-five patients with esophageal cancer were included. All patients who received surgery (n = 28) in the time frame between March 2009 and April 2010, the first year after the start of INS, were included in the INS intervention group. The control group (n = 37) consisted of patients who received surgery during the 3 years before the start of INS. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare differences in severity of postoperative complications using the Dindo classification. Linear regression was applied to evaluate differences in preoperative weight change. The adjusted odds ratio for developing serious complications after surgery of INS compared with the control group was 0.23 (95% confidence interval: 0.053-0.97; P = 0.045). Benefit was mainly observed in patients who received neoadjuvant therapy before esophagectomy (n = 35). The INS program furthermore resulted in a relative preoperative weight gain in comparison with the control group of +4.8% (P = 0.009, adjusted) in these neoadjuvant-treated patients. This study shows that dietician-delivered INS preserves preoperative weight and decreases severe postoperative complications in patients with esophageal cancer. PMID:23237356

Ligthart-Melis, G C; Weijs, P J M; te Boveldt, N D; Buskermolen, S; Earthman, C P; Verheul, H M W; de Lange-de Klerk, E S M; van Weyenberg, S J B; van der Peet, D L

2013-08-01

166

Incidence and risk factors for post-operative complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy : a comparison with other neuromuscular conditions.  

PubMed

We report the incidence of and risk factors for complications after scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and compare them with those of other neuromuscular conditions. We identified 110 (64 males, 46 females) consecutive patients with a neuromuscular disorder who underwent correction of the scoliosis at a mean age of 14 years (7 to 19) and had a minimum two-year follow-up. We recorded demographic and peri-operative data, including complications and re-operations. There were 60 patients with cerebral palsy (54.5%) and 26 with DMD (23.6%). The overall complication rate was 22% (24 patients), the most common of which were deep wound infection (9, 8.1%), gastrointestinal complications (5, 4.5%) and hepatotoxicity (4, 3.6%). The complication rate was higher in patients with DMD (10/26, 38.5%) than in those with other neuromuscular conditions (14/84, 16.7% (p = 0.019). All hepatotoxicity occurred in patients with DMD (p = 0.003), who also had an increased rate of deep wound infection (19% vs 5%) (p = 0.033). In the DMD group, no peri-operative factors were significantly associated with the rate of overall complications or deep wound infection. Increased intra-operative blood loss was associated with hepatotoxicity (p = 0.036). In our series, correction of a neuromuscular scoliosis had an acceptable rate of complications: patients with DMD had an increased overall rate compared with those with other neuromuscular conditions. These included deep wound infection and hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was unique to DMD patients, and we recommend peri-operative vigilance after correction of a scoliosis in this group. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014; 96-B:943-9. PMID:24986949

Duckworth, A D; Mitchell, M J; Tsirikos, A I

2014-07-01

167

Microsurgical penile replantation facilitated by postoperative HBO treatment.  

PubMed

Successful microsurgical replantation of a penis amputated at the level of the pubis is a rare occurrence worldwide. Moreover, the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) for a postoperative replant Pseudomonas wound infection has not been reported. There is also disagreement regarding the importance of microsurgical repair of only the dorsal arteries or only the profundi arteries of the penis. A case is reported of penile replantation with a postoperative Pseudomonas wound infection treated with HBO to prevent potential replant loss, with a worldwide literature review. At 1-year postoperative follow-up, the patient has normal urinary flow and reports spontaneous erection, with the ability for intromission and a sensate glans. HBO facilitated the success of a penile replantation complicated by postoperative Pseudomonas wound infection. In addition, a literature review supports the microsurgical repair of at least a single isolated dorsal penile artery, but not a single or multiple profundi arteries. PMID:14748025

Landström, Jerone T; Schuyler, Robert W; Macris, George P

2004-01-01

168

Could routine saphenous vein ultrasound mapping reduce leg wound complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting?†  

PubMed Central

A best evidence topic was written in cardiothoracic surgery based on a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether ultrasound mapping of the long saphenous vein (LSV) might reduce leg wound complications by reducing unnecessary leg incisions due to poor quality veins. Altogether, 32 abstracts were identified from the search, from which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Surgical site infections can be extremely distressing for patients, and it is estimated that treating a surgical wound can cost up to £1554 each. Ultrasound mapping of the LSV has been reported to be an accurate way of assessing vein quality preoperatively, reducing unnecessary surgical dissection, theatre time and cost to both the patient and the health service. We identified four studies that showed that ultrasound scanning preoperatively could accurately predict the anatomy and quality of the LSV (correlation coefficient 0.87). One paper showed that ultrasound scanning reduced length of incision (P = 0.005), harvest time (P = 0.04) and hospital stay and reduced morbidity (although not statistically significant). However, one study found that it could not accurately predict vein wall changes. Evidence from the papers supports the use of preoperative ultrasound assessment of the saphenous vein. Benefits to the patient include a smaller scar, reduced harvest time and minimizing unnecessary incisions.

Broughton, Jonathan David; Asopa, Sanjay; Goodwin, Andrew Timothy; Gildersleeve, Sue

2013-01-01

169

Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5 values, and absolute and relative V5 values in male vs. female patients. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine correlations between dosimetric factors. Results: Eighteen (16.4%) of the 110 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications. Two of these died of progressive pneumonia. Hospitalizations were significantly longer for patients with postoperative pulmonary complications than for those without (median, 15 days vs. 11 days, p = 0.003). On univariate analysis, female gender (p = 0.017), higher mean lung dose (p = 0.036), higher relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy (V5) (p = 0.023), and smaller volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5-35 Gy (VS5-VS35) (p < 0.05) were all significantly associated with an increased incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. No other clinical factors were significantly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort. On multivariate analysis, the volume of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5) was the only significant independent factor associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Dosimetric factors but not clinical factors were found to be strongly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation plus surgery. The volume of the lung spared from doses of {>=}5 Gy was the only independent dosimetric factor in multivariate analysis. This suggests that ensuring an adequate volume of lung unexposed to radiation might reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications.

Wang Shulian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu, Helen [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Swisher, Stephen [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology and Digestive Disease, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2006-03-01

170

Complications  

MedlinePLUS

... Eye Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

171

Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

Isohashi, Fumiaki, E-mail: isohashi@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mabuchi, Seiji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Division of Medical Physics, Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Maruoka, Shintaroh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Tadashi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

2013-03-01

172

Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also

Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Ara A. Vaporciyan; Susan L. Tucker; Helen Liu; Wei Xiong; Stephen Swisher; Jaffer A. Ajani; James D. Cox; Ritsuko Komaki

2006-01-01

173

[Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography findings and postoperative neurological complications in 93 cases of CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass].  

PubMed

Between February 1994 and January 1997, 102 of the 146 patients treated by coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had undergone magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the brain and neck before the operation, and arterial stenosis or occlusion had been detected in 38 (36.9%) of them. Two of these patients had complicating severe calcification of the ascending aorta, and CABG was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Seven patients without stenotic lesions on MRA were also treated by CABG without CPB for other complications. In addition to the 102 patients one patient had been found to have occlusion of the left common carotid artery and poor enhancement of the distal portion, and as a result we switched from CABG to percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA). We enrolled 93 patients in this study excluding these 10 patients. The patients were distributed into the three groups according to the MRA findings. Group C = no stenotic lesions (58 patients). Group S = stenosis of < 70% (26 patients), Group SS = stenosis of > or = 70% (9 patients). Enhancement distal to the stenotic or occlusive lesions was good in all patients in group S and SS. We then examined them for the incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There were no significant differences among the three groups in regard to age, male/female ratio, or incidence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. In Group S, the incidence of diabetes was significantly higher than in the other Groups. The incidence of prior stroke was significantly higher and the number of coronary arteries affected was significantly larger in group SS than the other groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups with regard to intraoperative variables. The lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was 44.3 +/- 7.4 mmHg, 48.0 +/- 8.8 mmHg, 46.3 +/- 7.8 mmHg in Group C, S, and SS, respectively, In all groups the lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was below 50 mmHg. There were no significant differences among the three groups with regard to time to awaken and time to extubation. Two patients experienced transient conciousness disturbance after CABG, one in Group C, the other in Group SS, but no new lesions were detected by brain CT. Only one patient, in Group C. suffered a stroke and had a new lesion on brain CT a month after the operation. No strokes occurred in the perioperative period. In nine patients with good enhancement distal to the severe stenotic or occlusive lesion on MRA of the brain and neck the lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was below 50 mmHg, but there was no postoperative neurological complications due to the low perfusion pressure on CPB. The results of this study suggested that CABG with CPB can be performed safely in patients with good enhancement distal to the stenotic or occlusive lesions on MRA of the brain and neck. PMID:10037831

Koyama, T; Mochizuki, T; Mitsui, N; Marui, A

1998-12-01

174

Effect of Antibiotic Prophylaxis with Cefuroxime on Bacteriologic Quality of Intra- and Postoperatively Processed Wound Blood in Hip Joint Arthroplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryObjective: Investigation of the bacteriological quality of processed wound blood in orthopedic hip surgery depending on antibiotic prophylaxis or not. Design: Prospective randomized study after approval of the Ethics Committee. Setting: Operation theatre\\/intensive care unit of an Orthopedic University Clinic. Patients: 40 patients underwent first hip arthroplasty under regional anesthesia. 20 received as antibiotic prophylaxis cefuroxime 1.5 g single shot,

K. H. Wollinsky; M. Büchele; M. Oethinger; P. Kluger; H.-H. Mehrkens; R. Marre; W. Puhl

1996-01-01

175

Stan scheller: the forerunner of clinical studies on using propolis for poor and chronic nonhealing wounds.  

PubMed

For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds. PMID:23710220

Kucharzewski, M; Kubacka, S; Urbanek, T; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K; Morawiec, T

2013-01-01

176

Stan Scheller: The Forerunner of Clinical Studies on Using Propolis for Poor and Chronic Nonhealing Wounds  

PubMed Central

For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds.

Kucharzewski, M.; Kubacka, S.; Urbanek, T.; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K.; Morawiec, T.

2013-01-01

177

Female gender and oral anticoagulants are associated with wound complications in lower extremity vein bypass: An analysis of 1404 operations for critical limb ischemia  

PubMed Central

Background Infrainguinal bypass (IB) surgery is an effective means of improving arterial circulation to the lower extremity for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). However, wound complications (WC) of the surgical incision following IB can impart significant morbidity. Methods A retrospective analysis of WC from the 1404 patients enrolled in a multicenter clinical trial of vein bypass grafting for CLI was performed. Univariate and multivariable regression models were used to determine WC predictors and associated outcomes, including graft patency, limb salvage, quality of life (QoL), resource utilization (RU), and mortality. Results A total of 543 (39%) patients developed a reported WC within 30 days of surgery, with infections (284, 52%) and hematoma/hemorrhage (121, 22%) being the most common type. Postoperative anticoagulation (odds ratio [OR], 1.554; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.202 to 2.009; P = .0008) and female gender (OR, 1.376; 95% CI, 1.076 to 1.757; P = .0108) were independent factors associated with WC. Primary, primary-assisted, and secondary graft patency rates were not influenced by the presence of WC; though, patients with WC were at increased risk for limb loss (hazard ratio [HR], 1.511; 95% CI 1.096 to 2.079; P = .0116) and higher mortality (HR, 1.449; 95% CI 1.098 to 1.912; P = .0089). WC was not significantly associated with lower QoL at 3 months (4.67 vs 4.79, P = .1947) and 12 months (5.02 vs 5.13, P = .2806). However, the subset of patients with serious WC (SWC) demonstrated significantly lower QoL at 3 months compared with patients without WC, (4.43 vs 4.79, respectively, P = .0166), though this difference was not seen at 12 months (4.94 vs 5.13, P = .2411). Patients with WC had higher RU than patients who did not have WC. Mean index length of hospital stay (LOS) was 2.3 days longer, mean cumulative 1-year LOS was 8.1 days longer, and mean number of hospitalizations was 0.5 occurrences greater for patients with WC compared with patients without WC (all P < .0001). Conclusions WC is a frequent complication of IB for CLI, associated with increased risk for major amputation, mortality, and greater RU. Further detailed investigation into the link between female gender and oral anticoagulation use with WC may help identify causes of WC and perhaps prevent or lessen their occurrence.

Nguyen, Louis L.; Brahmanandam, Soma; Bandyk, Dennis F.; Belkin, Michael; Clowes, Alexander W.; Moneta, Gregory L.; Conte, Michael S.

2010-01-01

178

Elevated Circulation Levels of an Antiangiogenic SERPIN in Patients with Diabetic Microvascular Complications Impair Wound Healing through Suppression of Wnt Signaling.  

PubMed

Wound healing, angiogenesis, and hair follicle maintenance are often impaired in the skin of diabetic patients, but the pathogenesis has not been well understood. Here, we report that circulation levels of kallistatin, a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (SERPIN) superfamily with antiangiogenic activities, were elevated in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic vascular complications. To test the hypothesis that elevated kallistatin levels could contribute to a wound-healing deficiency via the inhibition of Wnt/?-catenin signaling, we generated kallistatin-transgenic (KS-TG) mice. KS-TG mice had reduced cutaneous hair-follicle density, microvascular density, and panniculus adiposus layer thickness, as well as altered skin microvascular hemodynamics and delayed cutaneous wound healing. Using Wnt reporter mice, our results showed that Wnt/?-catenin signaling is suppressed in the dermal endothelium and hair follicles in KS-TG mice. Lithium, a known activator of ?-catenin via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3?, reversed the inhibition of Wnt/?-catenin signaling by kallistatin and rescued the wound-healing deficiency in KS-TG mice. These observations suggest that elevated circulating antiangiogenic serpins in diabetic patients may contribute to impaired wound healing through inhibition of Wnt/?-catenin signaling. Activation of Wnt/?-catenin signaling, at a level downstream of Wnt receptors, may ameliorate the wound-healing deficiency in diabetic patients. PMID:24463424

McBride, Jeffrey D; Jenkins, Alicia J; Liu, Xiaochen; Zhang, Bin; Lee, Kyungwon; Berry, William L; Janknecht, Ralf; Griffin, Courtney T; Aston, Christopher E; Lyons, Timothy J; Tomasek, James J; Ma, Jian-Xing

2014-06-01

179

Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT.

Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

2013-01-01

180

Anesthesia duration as an independent risk factor for postoperative complications in free flap surgery: a review of 1,305 surgical cases.  

PubMed

Surgical dogma and objective data support the relationship between increased operative times and perioperative complications. However, there has been no large-scale, multi-institutional study that evaluates the impact of increased anesthesia duration on microvascular free tissue transfer. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was retrospectively reviewed to identify all free-flap patients between 2006 and 2011. Included patients were subdivided into quintiles of anesthesia time. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess its impact on 30-day postoperative complications. The mean anesthesia duration for all patients was 603 ± 222 minutes. In univariate analysis, 30-day overall/medical complications, reoperation, and free flap loss demonstrated statistically significant increases as anesthesia duration increased (p<0.05). However, in multivariate analyses, these trends and significances were abolished, with exception of the utilization of postoperative transfusions. Of interest, increasing anesthesia duration did not predict flap failure on multivariate analysis. We found that increased anesthesia time correlates with increased postoperative transfusions in free flap patients. As a result, limiting blood loss and avoiding prolonged anesthesia times should be goals for the microvascular surgeon. This is the largest multidisciplinary study to investigate the ongoing debate that longer anesthesia times impart greater risk. PMID:24163224

Kim, Bobby D; Ver Halen, Jon P; Grant, David W; Kim, John Y S

2014-05-01

181

Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Shulian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2006-11-01

182

POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM  

PubMed Central

Delirium is an unfortunately common complication seen during the postoperative course. Because of its significant association with physical and cognitive morbidity, clinicians should be aware of evidence-based practices relating to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of postoperative delirium. Here, we review selected recent literature pertaining to the epidemiology and impact of the condition, perioperative risk factors for its development and/or exacerbation, and strategies for management of delirium, with additional attention to the intensive care unit population.

Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Vannucci, Andrea; Avidan, Michael S.

2013-01-01

183

Postoperative care following skull base reconstruction.  

PubMed

Postoperative care following skull base surgery and reconstruction is critical for achieving optimal outcomes and patient satisfaction. The choice of reconstructive technique and grafting materials may significantly influence the postoperative planning and monitoring for each patient. The overarching goals of postoperative management include avoidance and early recognition of complications, facilitation of wound healing at the surgical site(s), and quick recovery for the patient. Planning for postoperative care is initiated in the preoperative and intraoperative settings. Throughout the reconstruction, the surgical team must actively and meticulously evaluate the potential effects of each maneuver in regard to the subsequent clinical course. During the immediate postoperative period, it is helpful to have clinical protocols in place that address potential surgical complications, allow for early detection of neurological or hormonal dysfunction, and maximize patient safety and comfort. Longer-term postoperative follow-up continues until symptoms resolve and the endoscopic examination is normal. During this time period, well-defined goals and issues of concern should be clearly provided to the patient. In addition, disease-dependent schedules of surveillance are critical for patients with potentially recurrent pathology. This chapter will address decision-making for such topics during postoperative care following skull base reconstruction. PMID:23257560

Ramakrishnan, Vijay R; Waziri, Allen

2013-01-01

184

Association between preoperative statin therapy and postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Infectious complications of cardiac surgery are often severe and life threatening. Statins having both immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects were intuitively thought to influence the development of postsurgical infections. We sought to systematically examine whether any association exists between statin use and risk of infectious complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Thomson Scientific Web of Science, and Elsevier Scopus from inception through February 2011 for comparative studies examining the association between statin use and risk of postoperative infections in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We contacted a study's author for missing information. We conducted a random-effects meta-analysis of individual studies' odds ratios (adjusted for potential confounders). We identified 6 cohort studies for inclusion, 3 of which were conducted in Canada and 3 of which were conducted in the United States. Four were single-center studies, and 2 were population based. Exposure ascertainment was based on a review of admission medication list or prescription databases. Infectious outcomes were heterogeneous and included surgical site infections within 30 days, serious infections (sepsis), or any other postoperative infection. Statin use in the preoperative period was associated with a trend toward reduction in the incidence of postoperative infections in patients who underwent cardiac surgery (odds ratio, 0.81 [95% confidence interval, 0.64-1.01]; [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]). Heterogeneity was explained by country effect. Studies performed in Canada showed weaker associations than studies performed in the United States. This difference could not be attributed to study quality alone. We did not find good evidence to support an association between statin use and postoperative infectious complications. However, the trend toward statistical significance for this association indicates that further investigation is warranted. PMID:23041814

Tleyjeh, Imad M; Alasmari, Faisal A; Bin Abdulhak, Aref A; Riaz, Muhammad; Garbati, Musa A; Erwin, Patricia J; Kashour, Tarek; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Baddour, Larry M

2012-11-01

185

The Relationship between PreOperative Lung Function Test Results and Post-Operative Complications in Carcinoma of the Bronchus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of lung function tests on 81 patients who subsequently developed cardiopulmonary complications after thoracotomy for carcinoma of the bronchus were compared with those from the same number of similar patients who suffered no complications. Simple statistical analysis showed that there was a correlation between the occurrence of the complications and abnormality in the test results. By comparing the

P. Lockwood

1973-01-01

186

Examining the relationship between processes of care and selected AHRQ patient safety indicators postoperative wound dehiscence and accidental puncture or laceration using the VA electronic medical record.  

PubMed

This study examines whether Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) Postoperative Wound Dehiscence (PWD) and Accidental Puncture or Laceration (APL) events reflect problems with hospital processes of care (POC). The authors randomly selected 112 PSI-flagged PWD/APL discharges from 2002-2007 VA administrative data, identified true cases using chart review, and matched cases with controls. This yielded a total of 95 case-control pairs per PSI. Patient information and clinical processes on each case-control pair were abstracted from the electronic medical record (EMR). Although PWD cases and controls differed on incision and closure types, APL cases and controls were comparable in examined processes. Further exploration of the process differences between PWD cases and controls indicated that they were primarily caused by patients' underlying surgical problems rather than quality of care shortfalls. Documentation of POC was frequently missing in EMRs. Future studies should combine EMR review with alternative approaches, such as direct observation, to better assess POC. PMID:23007377

Chen, Qi; Borzecki, Ann M; Cevasco, Marisa; Shin, Marlena H; Shwartz, Michael; Itani, Kamal M F; Rosen, Amy K

2013-01-01

187

Sternal wound complications—incidence, microbiology and risk factors 1 Presented at the 10th Annual Meeting of the European Association for Cardio-thoraic Surgery, Prague, Czech Republic, 6–9 October 1996. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Sternal wound complications, i.e. instability and\\/or infection (mediastinitis), are important causes of morbidity in patients undergoing cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. Coagulase negative staphylococci, a normal inhabitant of the skin, have evolved as a cause of sternal wound infections. Since these opportunistic pathogens often are multiresistant, they can cause therapeutic problems. Methods: From 1980 through 1995 open heart surgery,

Elisabeth Ståhle; A Tammelin; R Bergström; A Hambreus; S. O Nyström; H. E Hansson

1997-01-01

188

Chyloptysis with right middle lobe syndrome complicated postoperatively by chylothorax: An unusual cause of right middle lobe syndrome  

PubMed Central

Chyloptysis, in the context of middle lobe syndrome, and chylothorax are rare clinical entities. They are reported in the medical literature mostly as case reports, but never together in the same patient. The present report describes the case of a 34-year-old woman who presented with chyloptysis associated with recurrent right middle lobe syndrome since she was 20 years of age, and eventually underwent right middle lobectomy. A few weeks postoperatively, she developed a right-sided chylothorax, which was refractory to medical therapy, and was successfully treated with thoracic duct ligation. She has been symptom-free for two years postsurgery.

Illamperuma, Chamani; Reid, John; Kanthan, Rani

2009-01-01

189

In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Objective To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Methods Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. Results With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. Conclusions It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated.

Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

2012-01-01

190

Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography findings and postoperative neurological complications in 93 cases of CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between February 1994 and January 1997, 102 of the 146 patients treated by coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had undergone\\u000a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the brain and neck before the operation, and arterial stenosis or occlusion had been\\u000a detected in 38 (36.9%) of them. Two of these patients had complicating severe calcification of the ascending aorta, and CABG\\u000a was

Tadaaki Koyama; Takaaki Mochizuki; Norimasa Mitsui; Akira Marui

1998-01-01

191

Complications in the management of large glomus jugulare tumors.  

PubMed

This study analyzes the complications encountered in the surgical treatment of 17 patients with large glomus jugulare tumors. All 17 patients sustained either new cranial nerve palsies or exacerbation of preexisting palsies. These involved, in descending order of frequency, the facial nerve, the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves, and the hypoglossal nerve. Postoperative palsies of the facial nerve involved 17 patients, as compared to 5 preoperatively. Fifteen patients had postoperative partial or complete paralysis of the vagus nerve as compared to eight preoperatively. Ten patients had postoperative palsies of the hypoglossal nerve as compared to six preoperatively. Other complications included CSF leak, meningitis, and wound infection. Aspiration and dysphagia were encountered postoperatively in 13 patients. Teflon injection of paretic vocal cords and cricopharyngeal myotomy effectively improved the ability to swallow and the quality of the voice. Prompt recognition and treatment of complications is essential for effective surgical management of large glomus jugulare tumors. PMID:3027478

Cece, J A; Lawson, W; Biller, H F; Eden, A R; Parisier, S C

1987-02-01

192

Postoperative vascular complications in unrecognised Obstructive Sleep apnoea (POSA) study protocol: an observational cohort study in moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Introduction Emerging epidemiological data suggest that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general surgical population. Unfortunately, the majority of these patients are unrecognised and untreated at the time of surgery. There is substantial biological rationale to indicate that patients with unrecognised OSA are at a higher risk of postoperative vascular events. However, the extent of this morbidity is currently unknown. We have initated the postoperative vascular complications in the unrecognised obstructive sleep apnoea (POSA) study to determine the associations between OSA, nocturnal hypoxia and major postoperative vascular events in 1200 moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis The POSA study is an international prospective observational cohort study. Using a type 3 portable sleep monitoring device and ambulatory oximetry, we will quantify the severity of OSA. The primary outcome is a composite of vascular death, myocardial infarction; non-fatal cardiac arrest; stroke; pulmonary embolism; congestive heart failure and new arrhythmia within 30?days of surgery. As of November 2013, we have recruited over 700 patients from nine centres in six countries. The mean age is 68?years, the mean body mass index is 27?kg/m2 and 55% of patients are men. 27.9% of patients have known coronary artery disease, over 76% have diabetes. The majority of patients underwent orthopaedic surgery (28%) and colorectal resection (18.5%). Ethics and dissemination The POSA study has received ethics approval from all study sites before patient recruitment. Informed consent will be obtained from all patients. The POSA study will determine the risk of unrecognised OSA in major non-cardiac surgery. We will publish these findings in peer-reviewed journals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01494181

Chan, Matthew T V; Wang, Chew-Yin; Seet, Edwin; Tam, Stanley; Lai, Hou-Yee; Walker, Stuart; Short, Timothy G; Halliwell, Richard; Chung, Frances

2014-01-01

193

Application of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with wound dehiscence after abdominal open surgery: a single center experience  

PubMed Central

Purpose Since the 1990's, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been used to treat soft tissue defects, burn wounds, and to achieve skin graft fixation. In the field of abdominal surgery, the application of NPWT is increasing in cases with an open abdominal wound requiring temporary wound closure and a second look operation. In the present study, the authors analyzed patients that underwent NPWT for postoperative wound dehiscence. Methods The computerized records of patients that had undergone an abdominal operation from November 2009 to May 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results The number of total enrolled patients was 50, and 30 patients (60%) underwent an emergency operation. Diagnoses were as follows: panperitonitis or intra-abdominal abscess (24 cases, 48%), intestinal obstruction (10 cases, 20%), cancer (7 cases, 14%), mesentery ischemia (3 cases, 6%), and hemoperitoneum (1 case, 2%). NPWT was applied at a mean of 12.9 ± 8.2 days after surgery and mean NPWT duration was 17.9 days (2 to 96 days). The 11 patients (22%) with unsuccessful wound closure had a deeper and more complex wound than the other 39 patients (78%) (90.9% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.005). There were two complication cases (4%) due to delayed wound healing. Conclusion Most patients recovered well due to granulation formation and suturing. NPWT was found to be convenient and safe, but a prospective comparative study is needed to confirm the usefulness of NPWT in patients whose wounds are dehisced.

Jang, Ji Young; Shim, Hongjin; Lee, Yun Jin; Lee, Seung Hwan

2013-01-01

194

Effect of protective ventilation on postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anaesthesia: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether anaesthetised patients undergoing surgery could benefit from intraoperative protective ventilation strategies. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched up to February 2014. Eligible studies evaluated protective ventilation versus conventional ventilation in anaesthetised patients without lung injury at the onset of mechanical ventilation. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Included studies must report at least one of the following end points: the incidence of atelectasis or acute lung injury or pulmonary infections. Results Four studies (594 patients) were included. Meta-analysis using a random effects model showed a significant decrease in the incidence of atelectasis (OR=0.36; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.60; p<0.0001; I2=0%) and pulmonary infections (OR=0.30; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.68; p=0.004; I2=20%) in patients receiving protective ventilation. Ventilation with protective strategies did not reduce the incidence of acute lung injury (OR=0.40; 95% CI 0.07 to 2.15; p=0.28; I2=12%), all-cause mortality (OR=0.77; 95% CI 0.33 to 1.79; p=0.54; I2=0%), length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference (WMD)=?0.52?day, 95% CI ?4.53 to 3.48?day; p=0.80; I2=63%) or length of intensive care unit stay (WMD=?0.55?day, 95% CI ?2.19 to 1.09?day; p=0.51; I2=39%). Conclusions Intraoperative use of protective ventilation strategies has the potential to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anaesthesia. Prospective, well-designed clinical trials are warranted to confirm the beneficial effects of protective ventilation strategies in surgical patients.

Tao, Tianzhu; Bo, Lulong; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qun; Zou, Yun; Hu, Baoji; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

2014-01-01

195

Effects of pyrolytic carbon on postoperative adhesion formation in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Peritoneal adhesion is a consequence of wound healing that sometimes causes severe postoperative complications. Despite all\\u000a the preventive measures and agents, adhesions have still not been eliminated completely. The aim of this study was to evaluate\\u000a the effects of pyrolytic carbon on the development of postoperative peritoneal and uterine tube adhesions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Material and method  Twenty female Wistar–Albino type rats were used

Suzi Demirbag; Cuneyt Atabek; Ahmet Guven; Emin Oztas; ?lhami Surer; Haluk Ozturk; Narter Yesildaglar

2009-01-01

196

Two-dimensional and color Doppler echocardiographic diagnosis of penetrating missile wounds of the heart: chronic complications from intracardiac course of a bullet.  

PubMed

Two-dimensional echocardiography has gained a role in the management of the acute complications of penetrating cardiac trauma and in precisely localizing retained bullet fragments within the heart. We report the case of an 8-year-old boy with chronic symptoms after a bullet wound. In this case, traumatic mitral regurgitation caused by mitral leaflet perforation and retention of the bullet in the tricuspid annulus occurred because of an unusual intracardiac course of the projectile. The diagnosis was made by transthoracic echocardiography. The ability of two-dimensional echocardiography to delineate the true location of the foreign body within the heart and Doppler ultrasound to identify mitral valve perforation helped guide a prompt, efficient, and successful surgical procedure. PMID:1739476

Xie, S W; Picard, M H

1992-01-01

197

Association Between Endoscopic vs. Open Vein Harvesting and Mortality, Wound Complications, and Cardiovascular Events in Patient Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery  

PubMed Central

Context The safety and durability of endoscopic vein harvest (EVH) in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) has recently been called into question. Objective To compare the long-term outcomes of endoscopic versus open vein graft harvesting for Medicare patients undergoing CABG surgery in the United States of America. Design, Setting, and Patients This is an observational study of 235,394 Medicare patients undergoing isolated CABG from 2003 to 2008 at 934 surgical centers participating in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) national database. STS records were linked to Medicare files to allow longitudinal assessment (median follow-up 3 years) through December 2009. Main Outcome Measure Primary: death; Secondary: wound complications and the composite of myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularization. Results Based on Medicare Part B coding, 52% of patients received EVH during CABG, less often in females than males (but <2% difference). After propensity score adjustment for clinical characteristics, there were no significant differences between long-term mortality (12,429/122,899 [13.2%] vs. 13,096/112,495 [13.4%]) and the composite of death, MI and revascularization (18,419/122,899 [19.5%] vs. 19,232/112,495 [19.7%])for those receiving EVH vs. open, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97, 1.04) for mortality and 1.0 (95% CI 0.98, 1.05) for the composite outcome. EVH was associated with lower harvest site wound complications relative to open procedure (3,654/122,899 [2.97%] vs. 4,047/112,495 [3.6%]), adjusted HR 0.83 (95 % CI 0.77, 0.89; p<0.0001). Conclusions Among patients undergoing CABG, the use of endoscopic vein-graft harvest compared with open vein graft harvest was not associated with increased mortality.

Williams, Judson B.; Peterson, Eric D.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Sedrakyan, Art; Tavris, Dale; Alexander, John H.; Lopes, Renato D.; Dokholyan, Rachel S.; Zhao, Yue; O'Brien, Sean M.; Michler, Robert E.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Edwards, Fred H.; Duggirala, Hesha; Gross, Thomas; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Smith, Peter K.

2013-01-01

198

Effects of Concomitant Surgeries during Mid-Urethral Slings (MUS) on Post-operative Complications, Voiding Dysfunction, Continence Outcomes, and Urodynamic Variables  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine whether concomitant surgeries affected outcomes in a randomized trial comparing retropubic (RMUS) versus transobturator midurethral slings (TOMUS). Methods Subjects (n=597) were stratified into 4 groups based on type of concomitant surgeries: Group I had anterior/apical with or without posterior repairs (n=79, 13%), Group II had posterior repairs or perineorrhaphy only (n=38, 6%), Group III had non-prolapse procedures (n=34, 6%) and Group IV had no concomitant surgeries (n=446, 75%). Complication rates, voiding dysfunction, objective and subjective surgical failure rates and changes in urodynamic (UDS) values (post-op minus pre-op) were assessed and compared in these 4 groups. Results There were no differences in complications, voiding dysfunction and subjective failure outcomes between these 4 groups. Group I had lower odds ratio (OR) of objective surgical failure compared to Group IV (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.18–0.81, p=0.05). The OR of failure of all undergoing concomitant surgeries (Groups I–III) was lower than Group IV (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35–0.95, p=0.03). The change in Pdet@Qmax (from pressure-flow) was significantly higher in Group III versus IV (p=0.01). The change in Qmax (from uroflowmetry) was significantly less in Group I and II versus Group IV (p=0.046 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusions Concomitant surgeries did not increase complications. Subjects who underwent certain concomitant surgeries had lower failure rates than those undergoing slings only. These data support safety and efficacy of performing concomitant surgery at the time of mid-urethral slings.

Chai, Toby C.; Kenton, Kimberly; Xu, Yan; Sirls, Larry; Zyczynski, Halina; Wilson, Tracey S.; Rahn, David D.; Whitcomb, Emily L.; Hsu, Yvonne; Gormley, Elizabeth A.

2012-01-01

199

Alcoholic Chlorhexidine or Alcoholic Iodine Skin Antisepsis (ACAISA): protocol for cluster randomised controlled trial of surgical skin preparation for the prevention of superficial wound complications in prosthetic hip and knee replacement surgery  

PubMed Central

Introduction Wound complications following arthroplasty are associated with significant impact on the patient and healthcare system. Skin cleansing prior to surgical incision is a simple and effective method to prevent wound complications however, the question of which agent is superior for surgical skin antisepsis is unresolved. Methods and analysis This cluster randomised controlled trial aims to compare the incidence of superficial wound complications in patients undergoing elective prosthetic hip or knee replacement surgery receiving surgical skin antisepsis with either: 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone in 70% alcohol. The trial will be conducted at an Australian tertiary, university affiliated hospital over a 3-year period involving 750 participants. Participants will be drawn from the surgical waiting list. Consent for this study will be ‘opt-out’ consent. On a given day, all eligible participants will have skin preparation either with 0.5% chlorhexidine in 70% alcohol or 10% povidone iodine in 70% alcohol. The primary outcome is superficial wound complications (comprised of superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSI) and/or prolonged wound ooze) in the first 30?days following prosthetic joint replacement surgery. Secondary outcomes will include the incidence of wound complications according to the joint replaced, assessment of the causative agents of SSI and cost-effectiveness analysis. The primary analysis is an intention-to-treat analysis including all participants who undergo randomisation and will be performed at the individual level taking into account the clustering effect. Ethics and dissemination The study design and protocol was reviewed and approved by the St Vincent's Hospital Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC-A 016/14 10/3/2014). Study findings will be disseminated in the printed media, and learned forums. A written lay summary will be available to study participants on request. Trial registration number The trial has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000177651.

Peel, T N; Cheng, A C; Buising, K L; Dowsey, M M; Choong, P F M

2014-01-01

200

Wide Topical Negative Pressure Wound Dressing Treatment for Patients Undergoing Abdominal Dermolipectomy Following Massive Weight Loss  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postbariatric plastic surgery is considered to be a high-risk procedure, which entails such frequent minor complications as\\u000a postoperative seroma, bleeding and wound dehiscence. These occur with a high incidence, especially, following postbariatric\\u000a abdominal dermolipectomy. In order to reduce these complication rates, a new type of dressing with wide abdominal topical\\u000a negative pressure (TNP) application was applied. We performed abdominal dermolipectomy

Adrian Dragu; Stefan Schnürer; Frank Unglaub; Maya B. Wolf; Justus P. Beier; Ulrich Kneser; Raymund E. Horch

201

Amnion-Derived Multipotent Progenitor Cells Increase Gain of Incisional Breaking Strength and Decrease Incidence and Severity of Acute Wound Failure  

PubMed Central

Objective: Acute wound failure is a common complication following surgical procedures and trauma. Laparotomy wound failure leads to abdominal dehiscence and incisional hernia formation. Delayed recovery of wound-breaking strength is one mechanism for laparotomy wound failure. Early fascial wounds are relatively acellular, and there is a delay in the appearance of acute wound growth factors and cytokines. The objective of this study was to accelerate and improve laparotomy wound healing using amnion-derived multipotent cells (AMPs). AMPs' nonimmunogenic phenotype and relative abundance support its role as a cell therapy. Methods: AMPs were injected into the load-bearing layer of rat abdominal walls prior to laparotomy, and cell viability was confirmed. Wound mechanical properties were measured over 28 days. The incidence and severity of laparotomy wound failure was measured in an incisional hernia model. Results: AMP cells were viable in laparotomy wounds for at least 28 days and did not migrate to other tissues. Laparotomy wound-breaking strength was increased by postoperative day 7 following AMP therapy. AMP therapy reduced the incidence of hernia formation and the size of hernia defects. Histology suggested stimulated wound fibroplasia and angiogenesis. Conclusions: AMP cell therapy reduces the incidence of laparotomy wound failure by accelerating the recovery of wound-breaking strength. This results in fewer incisional hernias and smaller hernia defects.

Xing, Liyu; Franz, Michael G.; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Smith, Charlotte A.; Marshall, Vivienne S.; Robson, Martin C.

2007-01-01

202

The postoperative spine.  

PubMed

Potential complications following spinal surgery include neural compression due to hematoma, recurrent disk herniation, epidural fibrosis, dural tear with pseudomeningocele formation, and infection. Specific complications relate to the use of spinal instrumentation that include incorrectly positioned instrumentation and failure of spinal fusion leading to instrumentation loosening or breakage. To interpret the postoperative imaging correctly, it is necessary to understand the nature of the surgical procedure that has been performed and the normal postoperative appearances. Magnetic resonance imaging is the mainstay in the evaluation of the postoperative spine. Radiographs and computed tomography continue to have a major role in assessing fusion and in the assessment of complications related to instrumentation. PMID:24896745

Rankine, James J

2014-07-01

203

Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.  

PubMed

Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes. PMID:24572884

Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

2014-03-01

204

The Value of Suction Wound Drain after Carotid and Femoral Artery Surgery: A Randomised Trial Using Duplex Assessment of the Volume of Post-operative Haematoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe use of vacuum suction drains after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and groin dissection for arterial reconstruction surgery remains controversial. A large multicentre prospective randomised trial would be needed to show any difference if clinical end points (infection and haematoma) are used. Therefore, we conducted a study to evaluate the value of wound drainage using accurate duplex measurement of haematoma expecting

F. Youssef; M. P. Jenkins; K. J. Dawson; L. Berger; F. Myint

2005-01-01

205

A Single Dose of Amoxicillin and Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Complications in Third Molar Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a single prophylactic dose of amoxicillin and/or dexamethasone in preventing postoperative complications (PC) after a surgical removal of a single mandibular third molar (M3). Methods This study is a randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial. Four groups were included: Group 1 (G1) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of dexamethasone; Group 2 (G2) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of placebo; Group 3 (G3) included a prophylactic dose of 8 mg of dexamethasone and 2 g of placebo and; Group 4 (G4) placebo. Results Fifty patients were included. It was observed one case of alveolar infection (2%) and two of alveolar osteitis (4%) resulting in three PC (6%). No statistical differences were observed between therapeutic groups for development of PC, trismus, pain and edema. The use of antibiotics showed an absolute risk reduction (ARR) for PC development of 3.52% and the number needed to treat (NNT) was 29. Conclusion Prophylactic antibiotics and corticoid in a single dose regimen did not bring any benefit on M3 surgeries.

Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Capella, Diogo Lenzi; Barbieri, Tharzon; Pagliarini, Micheli; Cavalieri, Talita; Manfro, Rafael

2013-01-01

206

Perioperative goal-directed hemodynamic therapy based on radial arterial pulse pressure variation and continuous cardiac index trending reduces postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery: a multi-center, prospective, randomized study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Several single-center studies and meta-analyses have shown that perioperative goal-directed therapy may significantly improve outcomes in general surgical patients. We hypothesized that using a treatment algorithm based on pulse pressure variation, cardiac index trending by radial artery pulse contour analysis, and mean arterial pressure in a study group (SG), would result in reduced complications, reduced length of hospital stay and quicker return of bowel movement postoperatively in abdominal surgical patients, when compared to a control group (CG). Methods 160 patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery were randomized to the SG (79 patients) or to the CG (81 patients). In the SG hemodynamic therapy was guided by pulse pressure variation, cardiac index trending and mean arterial pressure. In the CG hemodynamic therapy was performed at the discretion of the treating anesthesiologist. Outcome data were recorded up to 28 days postoperatively. Results The total number of complications was significantly lower in the SG (72 vs. 52 complications, p = 0.038). In particular, infection complications were significantly reduced (SG: 13 vs. CG: 26 complications, p = 0.023). There were no significant differences between the two groups for return of bowel movement (SG: 3 vs. CG: 2 days postoperatively, p = 0.316), duration of post anesthesia care unit stay (SG: 180 vs. CG: 180 minutes, p = 0.516) or length of hospital stay (SG: 11 vs. CG: 10 days, p = 0.929). Conclusions This multi-center study demonstrates that hemodynamic goal-directed therapy using pulse pressure variation, cardiac index trending and mean arterial pressure as the key parameters leads to a decrease in postoperative complications in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov, NCT01401283.

2013-01-01

207

High Complication Rate With Anterior Total Hip Arthroplasties on a Fracture Table  

PubMed Central

Background Recent attention in THA has focused on minimally invasive techniques and their short-term outcomes. Despite much debate over the outcomes and complications of the two-incision and the mini-lateral and mini-posterior approaches, complications arising from use of the anterior THA on a fracture table are not well documented. Questions/purposes We determined the intraoperative and postoperative complications with the anterior approach to THA through an extended single-surgeon patient series. Methods We reviewed 800 primary THAs performed anteriorly with the aid of a fracture table over 5 years and recorded all intraoperative and postoperative complications up to latest followup (average, 1.8 years; range, 0–5 years). Patients with severe acetabular deformity or severe flexion contractures were excluded and those surgeries were performed with a lateral approach during the time period of this study. Results Intraoperative complications included 19 trochanteric fractures, three femoral perforations, one femoral fracture, one acetabular fracture, one bleeding complication, and one case of cardiovascular collapse. There were no ankle fractures. Postoperative complications included seven patients with dislocations; seven with deep infections; one with delayed femur fracture; 37 with wound complications, among which 13 had reoperation for local débridement; 14 with deep venous thrombosis; and two with pulmonary embolism; and 31 other nonfatal medical complications. Conclusions The main intraoperative complications of trochanteric fractures and perforations occurred mostly early in the series, while the main postoperative complications related to wound healing were prevalent throughout the entire series. Despite potential advantages of use of a fracture table, surgeons should be aware of the potential complications of trochanteric fractures, perforations, and wound-healing problems associated with this technique. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Collis, Dennis K.

2010-01-01

208

The nutritional risk is a independent factor for postoperative morbidity in surgery for colorectal cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose The authors evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition and its effect on the postoperative morbidity of patients after surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods Three hundred fifty-two patients were enrolled prospectively. Nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS 2002) score was calculated through interview with patient on admission. Clinical characteristics, tumor status and surgical procedure were recorded. Results The prevalence of patients at nutritional risk was 28.1 per cent according to the NRS 2002. The rate of postoperative complication was 27%. There was a significant difference in postoperative complication rates between patients at nutritional risk and those not at risk (37.4% vs. 22.9%, P = 0.006). Nutritional risk was identified as an independent predictor of postoperative complications (odds ratio, 3.05; P = 0.045). Nutritional risk increased the rate of anastomotic leakage (P = 0.027) and wound infection (P = 0.01). Conclusion NRS may be a prognostic factor for postoperative complication after surgery for colorectal cancer. A large scaled prospective study is needed to confirm whether supplementing nutritional deficits reduces postoperative complication rates.

Kwag, Seung-Jin; Kim, Jun-Gi; Kang, Won-Kyung; Lee, Jin-Kwon

2014-01-01

209

A simple device for closure of a colocutaneous fistula within the laparotomy wound: a case report.  

PubMed

Colocutaneous fistulas within laparotomy wounds are rare and difficult to treat. Surgical repair may be contraindicated or not desired and negative pressure wound therapy may not be successful. A simple device made from a silicone, flexi-aid hand exerciser was used to close a colocutaneous fistula within the laparotomy wound of a 50-year old man following surgery of an esophageal carcinoma and a surgical history of Whipple's procedure for adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. His wound developed 9 days postoperatively, measured 8 cm x 3 cm x 2 cm, and was contaminated with fecal material. Initial efforts involving cleansing and the use of negative pressure wound therapy were unsuccessful and the patient refused additional surgery. In this patient, a silicone occlusion device, used in conjunction with a silver hydrofiber dressing, prevented fecal soiling and facilitated closure of the colocutaneous fistula and the laparotomy wound. He was discharged on postop day 22 and healed by postop day 64. This was the first time this approach was used. Studies to optimize nonsurgical management approaches of these complicated conditions are needed. PMID:19864693

Wu, Ming-Ho; Wu, Han-Yun

2009-10-15

210

The impact of a restrictive transfusion trigger on post-operative complication rate and well-being following elective orthopaedic surgery: a post-hoc analysis of a randomised study  

PubMed Central

Background Peri-operative red blood cell transfusions have been associated with post-operative complications in patients undergoing elective orthopaedic hip or knee replacement surgery. Materials and methods We performed a post-hoc analysis of data extracted from a randomised study on transfusion triggers using pre-storage leucocyte-depleted red blood cells. Patients who were assigned to the most restrictive transfusion policy ("restrictive group") were compared with patients who were assigned to the most liberal policy ("liberal group"). End-points were red blood cell use, hospital stay, haemoglobin levels, post-operative complications and quality of life scores. Results Of 603 patients, 26.4% patients in the restrictive group and 39.1% in the liberal group were transfused (P =0.001). The rate of post-operative infections was lower, although not statistically significantly so, in the restrictive group than in the liberal group (5.4% vs 10.2%, respectively) as was the rate of respiratory complications (1.7% vs 4.9%, respectively), whereas hospital stay, cardiovascular complications and mortality rate were not different in the two groups. Quality of life scores were not associated with type of transfusion policy, the number of red blood cell transfusions or the transfusion status. Discussion A restrictive transfusion protocol was not associated with worse outcome and resulted in a lower transfusion rate compared to the liberal policy. Well-being (quality of life) was not associated with transfusion policy or with red blood cell transfusions.

So-Osman, Cynthia; Nelissen, Rob; Brand, Ronald; Faber, Frank; Slaa, Ron Te; Stiggelbout, Anne; Brand, Anneke

2013-01-01

211

Enzymatic Wound Disinfectants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Wound infection and tissue damage are common and sever complications of injuries and burns sustained in baffle. The surgical excision of dead and devitalized tissue, antibiotics, and the removal of foreign matter are the mainstay of current therapies. Pre...

S. L. Hazen

2002-01-01

212

Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs.

Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

2014-01-01

213

Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds.  

PubMed

Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

2014-01-01

214

Effects of intra-operative end-tidal carbon dioxide levels on the rates of post-operative complications in adults undergoing general anesthesia for percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background: A retrospective study has shown lesser days of hospital stay in patients with increased levels of intra-operative end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2). It is probable that hypercapnia may exert its beneficial effects on patients’ outcome through optimization of global hemodynamic and tissue oxygenation, leading to a lower rate of post-operative complications. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that higher values of intra-operative ETCO2 decrease the rate of post-operative complications. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 78 adult patients scheduled for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) were prospectively enrolled and randomly divided into three groups. ETCO2 was set and maintained throughout the procedure at 31-33, 37-39 and 43-45 mmHg in the hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia groups, respectively. The rates of post-operative complications were compared among the three groups. Results: Seventy-five patients completed the study (52 male and 23 female). Ten (38.5%), four (16%) and two (8.3%) patients developed post-operative vomiting in the hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia groups, respectively (P = 0.025). The nausea score was significantly lower in the hypercapnic group compared with the other groups (3.9 ± 1.8, 3.2 ± 2.1 and 1.3 ± 1.8 in the hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia groups, respectively; P = 0.000). Time to return of spontaneous respiration and awakening were significantly decreased in the hypercapnia group compared with the other groups (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Mild intra-operative hypercapnia has a protecting effect against the development of post-operative nausea and vomiting and decreases the duration of emergence and recovery from general anesthesia.

Saghaei, Mahmoud; Matin, Gholamreza; Golparvar, Mohammad

2014-01-01

215

miRNA in Diabetic Wound Healing  

Cancer.gov

Impairment of dermal wound healing is a debilitating complication commonly encountered during diabetes mellitus. Dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenesis phases are key players in the impairment of diabetic wound healing. Emerging studies indicate that miRNAs play a key role in regulating several hubs that orchestrate the wound inflammation and angiogenesis processes. Our laboratory first reported dysfunction in wound macrophage efferocytosis function leading to impaired resolution of wound inflammation in diabetic wounds.

216

Airway Compromise Due to Wound Hematoma Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery  

PubMed Central

One of the most serious adverse events associated with anterior cervical spine surgery is wound hematoma resulting in airway compromise. The reported incidence of this postoperative complication has varied from 0.2% to 1.9%. Obstruction of the airway secondary to bleeding presents a challenging clinical scenario given the rapidity of onset, distorted anatomy of the upper respiratory tract, urgent need to act and potential for catastrophic consequences. This high-risk, life-threatening clinical scenario requires specialized knowledge and a well-designed treatment protocol to achieve a positive outcome. In this review, we report a case of airway compromise secondary to wound hematoma following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, followed by a review of relevant literature, anatomy, etiologic factors and diagnostic considerations. We also propose guidelines for the prevention and management of postoperative airway obstruction due to wound hematoma.

Palumbo, Mark A; Aidlen, Jessica Pelow; Daniels, Alan H; Thakur, Nikhil A; Caiati, Joseph

2012-01-01

217

Sterile microenvironment in prevention of wound infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective controlled trial was carried out to assess the effect of using a wound isolator on reducing postoperative infection. A total of 291 patients undergoing hip pinning for fractures of the neck of femur entered the trial and were allocated at random to have their wound contained in a wound isolator (study group) or dressed with a standard gamma-irradiated

J M Scott; James McLauchlan; H G Smylie

1982-01-01

218

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as traditional or conventional therapy in the literature, although they typically are not the first line of treatment in Ontario. Modern moist interactive dressings are foams, calcium alginates, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, and films. Topical antibacterial agents—antiseptics, topical antibiotics, and newer antimicrobial dressings—are used to treat infection. The Technology Being Reviewed Negative pressure wound therapy is not a new concept in wound therapy. It is also called subatmospheric pressure therapy, vacuum sealing, vacuum pack therapy, and sealing aspirative therapy. The aim of the procedure is to use negative pressure to create suction, which drains the wound of exudate (i.e., fluid, cells, and cellular waste that has escaped from blood vessels and seeped into tissue) and influences the shape and growth of the surface tissues in a way that helps healing. During the procedure, a piece of foam is placed over the wound, and a drain tube is placed over the foam. A large piece of transparent tape is placed over the whole area, including the healthy tissue, to secure the foam and drain the wound. The tube is connected to a vacuum source, and fluid is drawn from the wound through the foam into a disposable canister. Thus, the entire wound area is subjected to negative pressure. The device can be programmed to provide varying degrees of pressure either continuously or intermittently. It has an alarm to alert the provider or patient if the pressure seal breaks or the canister is full. Negative pressure wound therapy may be used for patients with chronic and acute wounds; subacute wounds (dehisced incisions); chronic, diabetic wounds or pressure ulcers; meshed grafts (before and after); or flaps. It should not be used for patients with fistulae to organs/body cavities, necrotic tissue that has not been debrided, untreated osteomyelitis, wound malignancy, wounds that require hemostasis, or for patients who are taking anticoagulants. Review Strategy The inclusion criteria were as follows: Randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a sample size of 20 or more Human s

2006-01-01

219

Obesity and Surgical Wound Healing: A Current Review  

PubMed Central

Objective. The correlation between obesity and deficient wound healing has long been established. This review examines the current literature on the mechanisms involved in obesity-related perioperative morbidity. Methods. A literature search was performed using Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Internet searches. Keywords used include obesity, wound healing, adipose healing, and bariatric and surgical complications. Results. Substantial evidence exists demonstrating that obesity is associated with a number of postoperative complications. Specifically in relation to wound healing, explanations include inherent anatomic features of adipose tissue, vascular insufficiencies, cellular and composition modifications, oxidative stress, alterations in immune mediators, and nutritional deficiencies. Most recently, advances made in the field of gene array have allowed researchers to determine a few plausible alterations and deficiencies in obese individuals that contribute to their increased risk of morbidity and mortality, especially wound complications. Conclusion. While the literature discusses how obesity may negatively affect health on various of medical fronts, there is yet to be a comprehensive study detailing all the mechanisms involved in obesity-related morbidities in their entirety. Improved knowledge and understanding of obesity-induced physiological, cellular, molecular, and chemical changes will facilitate better assessments of surgical risks and outcomes and create efficient treatment protocols for improved patient care of the obese patient population.

Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Dinh, Trish Phuong; Salas, R. Emerick; Johnson, Erika L.; Wright, Terry G.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

2014-01-01

220

Post-operative spondylodiscitis.  

PubMed

Postoperative spine infections (PSIs) are a frequent and dreaded complication of spine surgery. Although different studies have been published, the prevalence of PSIs is thought to be about 5% for most spine surgical procedures. Different risk factors have been identified for PSIs. Among the others, extensive soft tissue dissection, longer operative time, soft tissue devitalization, and use of surgical instrumentation have been associated with higher risks of infection. Direct inoculation during surgery is the common infection route for PSIs. Gram-positive cocci (such as Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and beta-hemolytic streptococci) are the most common pathogens. Gram-negative bacteria also play a role in PSIs and may be associated with systemic illness and multisystem organ failure. A high level of suspicion is of paramount importance in early diagnosis of PSIs. Clinical symptoms of PSIs may be subtle and the infection may become apparent only in its late stages. Early diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor for PSIs. Although blood tests (i.e. ESR, CRP, and white blood cell count) and imaging studies (most commonly MRI) can be useful, it must be clear to the clinician that diagnostic modalities, either tissue biopsy or blood cultures, are of the utmost importance for diagnosing PSIs and devising a correct antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic therapy with early bracing (or bed rest) is the most commonly used treatment method for PSIs. Nevertheless, a more aggressive surgical treatment may be required in some patients. The goals of surgical treatment are to help the eradication of the infection, provide an adequate wound closure, and maintain spine column mechanical stability. PMID:22655483

Nasto, L A; Colangelo, D; Rossi, B; Fantoni, M; Pola, E

2012-04-01

221

Puncture Wounds  

MedlinePLUS

... into the wound during a puncture, along with dirt and debris from the object. All puncture wounds ... object, such as a rusty nail, the more dirt and debris are dragged into the wound, increasing ...

222

Wound Healing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studies of wound healing, regeneration and wound infection aimed at improving care of severly injured soldiers are underway in the following areas: (1). Adverse effects of severe injury on wound healing; attempts to improve healing in the severely injured...

S. M. Levenson

1977-01-01

223

Wound Healing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wound is defined as any physical break in tissue continuity. Wounds differ depending on the type and severity, mechanism\\u000a of wounding, location, and desired outcome. The act of wounding or injury disrupts anatomical continuity, tissue function,\\u000a and cellular integrity 1. Alterations in wound healing may result in impaired or delayed healing. Impaired wound healing often occurs in the presence

Marion F. Winkler; Suzanne Makowski

224

Outbreak of Staphylococcal Infections in Postoperative Primates.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In late October 1974, a Staphylococcus aureus postoperative wound infection was recorded in a primate which had recently undergone surgery at the Veterinary Sciences Division, Brooks AFB, Texas. A second case was noted approximately two weeks later, follo...

L. E. Blouse R. M. Brockett P. J. Homme E. F. Jones

1975-01-01

225

Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions  

PubMed Central

Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

2011-01-01

226

[Use of Permacol in complicated incisional hernia].  

PubMed

Polypropylene mesh repair is the gold standard for primary inguinal hernia and incisional hernia. Wound infection and small bowel fistulas are contraindications to polypropylene mesh repair. In addition, synthetic meshes are known to cause severe peritoneal adhesions and enteric fistulas if located close to the bowel. Porcine intestinal submucosa has been used successfully in experimental studies in dogs and rats to repair large abdominal wall defects. A new porcine dermal collagen graft has been used in man for groin hernia repair, incisional hernia repair and other surgical procedures without complications. We describe 6 cases of complicated incisional hernia operated in emergency using porcine dermal collagen grafts. In one woman the incisional hernia was associated with an enterovaginal fistula. Three cases presented severe wound infections, two of which related to a previous polypropylene mesh repair, while another had an irreducible recurrent incisional hernia and one woman presented complete evisceration. None of the patients had postoperative or porcine-graft-related complications. Over a follow-up period of 3-24 months we have had no recurrence or wound infection. The results of these few cases confirm the safety and efficacy of the porcine dermal collagen mesh also in incisional hernia repair. PMID:17069192

Armellino, Mariano Fortunato; De Stefano, Guglielmo; Scardi, Francesco; Forner, Anna Lucia; Ambrosino, Francesco; Bellotti, Roberto; Robustelli, Umberto; De Stefano, Giovanni

2006-01-01

227

Postoperative Bowel Perforation due to Heterotopic Ossification (Myositis Ossificans Traumatica): A Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the ectopic development of normal bone within soft tissue that can occur after traumatic injury. It is uncommon and may be missed or misdiagnosed, which can lead to complications. We report the case of an 84-year-old male with a previous history of a laparotomy who underwent resection of an intra-abdominal tumor through a midline incision. On postoperative day six, the patient was taken to the operating room, as succus was draining from the incision. Upon re-exploration, sharp bone-like material was found in the wound directly adjacent to an enterotomy. Pathology confirmed mature lamellar bone and the diagnosis of HO. This is the first report of postoperative intestinal perforation secondary to HO in a midline wound. We report this case to encourage accurate reporting of HO and its morbidity and complications for the benefit of appropriate surgical planning and epidemiologic tracking of outcomes.

Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Lao, Oliver B.; Figueredo, Edgar

2011-01-01

228

Probiotic use in preventing postoperative infection in liver transplant patients  

PubMed Central

Background Although liver transplantation has been widely practised, post-operative bacterial infection is still a frequent complication which contributed to an increased risk of fatality. There were studies on preoperative use of probiotics for liver transplant patients and acquired reduction in postoperative sepsis and wound infection, but the relevant clinical experience with pre- and probiotics is still limited. Objectives This study is to assess fibre and probiotic use aimed at preventing bacterial sepsis and wound complications in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Study methods There were a total of sixty-seven adult patients scheduled for liver transplantation were included in a public teaching hospital. From January to December 2011, 34 continuous patients following liver transplantation were put on fibre + probiotics. In retrospectively, from January to December 2010, 33 continuous patients were collected as a control group and they were only received fibre post operation. The incidence of bacterial infections was compared in patients receiving either fibre and lactobacillus or fibre only. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 15. The t test, fisher’s and chi- square test was used to compare discrete variables. Results In summary, in the analysis of 67 liver transplant recipients, 8.8% group A patients developed infections compared to 30.3% group B patients. The difference between groups A and B was statistically significant in both cases. In addition, the duration of antibiotic therapy was significantly shorter in the lactobacillus-group. Wound infection was the most frequent infections and enterococci the most frequently isolated bacteria. Fibre and lactobacilli were well tolerated in most cases. The operating time, amount of intra- and post-operatively transfused units of blood, fresh frozen plasma and albumin did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusions Combined fibre and probiotics could lower the incidence of bacterial infections and shorten the duration of antibiotic therapy following liver transplantation in comparison to conventional nutrition. In contrast to antibiotics, it is relatively cheap and does not cause resistant strains or serious side effects.

Chen, Jim; Wu, Jinshan; Chalson, Helen; Merigan, Lynn; Mitchell, Andrew

2013-01-01

229

Use of Monogen for pediatric postoperative chylothorax  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPostoperative chylothorax is a potentially serious complication of pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to report the use of Monogen enteral formula for the management of pediatric postoperative chylothorax.

Barbara E Cormack; Nigel J Wilson; Kirsten Finucane; Teena M West

2004-01-01

230

Postoperative Outcome of Colectomy for Pediatric Patients With Ulcerative Colitis  

PubMed Central

Background Few studies have reported on the surgical outcomes of colectomy in pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of all pediatric patients diagnosed with UC who underwent colectomy at UCSF between 1980 and 2005 to identify early (within 30 days) and later complications of surgery. Results Complete medical records were available for 31 patients [12.4 ± 3.3 (range 6–19) years] with UC who underwent colectomy at UCSF Children’s Hospital. Total colectomy with ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) was performed in 21 of the 31 patients (12 without diverting ileostomy). Five of the 31 patients had an initial colectomy with IPAA and J-pouch performed later; 4 had an initial subtotal colectomy for urgent indications. Only one of 31 had IPAA with S-pouch. The median number of early postoperative complications was 1.0; 4 required additional surgery to treat complications. The most common early complications were small intestinal obstruction in 6 (19%) and wound infection in 4 (13%). Preoperative medications included corticosteroids in 25 (81%), 6-mercaptopurine/azathioprine in 10 (32%), and 5-aminosalicylates in 19 (61%). Medication exposure was not related to postoperative complications. Late complications included pouchitis in 12 (39%), anastomotic, anal, or rectal strictures in 5 (16%), and fistulas in 5 (16%); 1 (3%) was subsequently diagnosed as having Crohn disease. Conclusions Postcolectomy morbidity is common among pediatric patients with UC. Preoperative medications were not associated with postoperative complications. Investigations to determine preoperative factors affecting surgical outcomes and long-term satisfaction following this surgery in a large pediatric cohort are needed.

Patton, Dana; Gupta, Neera; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Garnett, Elizabeth A.; Nobuhara, Kerilyn; Heyman, Melvin B.

2011-01-01

231

[Surgical strategy for the liver injury and developed abdominal complications].  

PubMed

The authors have analyzed results of treatment of 641 patients with the liver injury: blunt injury--209, penetrating--432. Surgical strategy depends on the condition of the patient on admission, severity of the liver injury and combined trauma. Suturing the rupture (wound) of the liver was the method of choice in the I-II degrees of the liver injury. If it was impossible to achieve hemostasis in the bottom of the wound in the III-IV degrees of the liver injury, package with gauze drain (7) and ligation of the hepatic artery (3) were used. Resection of the liver was performed in 22 patients. In the postoperative period the main complications were: peritonitis (22), subphrenic abscesses (13), hemobilia (7), subhepatic abscesses (6) and liver abscesses (5). Embolization of the hepatic artery branches was preferable in hemobilia. The mortality rate in blunt injuries of the liver was 28.2%, gunshot wounds--27.6% and knife injury--4%. PMID:19663285

Urman, M G; Subbotin, A V

2009-01-01

232

Detachment and dislocation of thermoreactive clips from sternum in late postoperative period due to misuse.  

PubMed

Median sternotomy is the most common method of access to the heart and great vessels in cardiac surgical procedures. However, particularly in obese and diabetic patients, complications such as dehiscence, osteomyelitis, mediastinitis and superficial wound infection or fistula formation may be encountered. To overcome these complications, some alternative surgical techniques and surgical equipment are designed for sternal closure. 'Nitinol thermoreactive clips' is one of them. In this study, we report a patient with detachment of thermoreactive clips from sternum in the late postoperative period due to wrong measurement of distance between intercostal spaces. PMID:22279118

Tavlasoglu, Murat; Kurkluoglu, Mustafa; Arslan, Zekeriya; Durukan, Ahmet Baris

2012-04-01

233

Laparoscopic appendectomy is recommended for the treatment of complicated appendicitis in children.  

PubMed

Laparoscopic appendectomy in children is well accepted for the treatment of non complicated appendicitis. An increased risk of postoperative intraabdominal abcess formation has been reported in complicated appendicitis. The puropose of this study was to compare open (OA) versus laparoscopic appendectomies (LA) in complicated appendicitis in children and to assess the safety and feasibility of LA. The hospital records of 118 consecutive patients who underwent appendectomy for complicated appendicitis (perforated/gangrenous) from 2000 to 2006 were retrospectively analysed. Fifty-four patients had LA and 64 underwent OA. There were 74 males and 44 females. The length of hospital stay ranged from 4 to 12 days in the LA group and 4 to 17 days in the OA group. Five patients (9.2%) in the LA group had post operative complications; intraabdominal collections in 3 and wound infections in 2. Ten patients (15.6%) had postoperative complications in the OA group; intraabdominal collections in 5, wound infection in 3, pleural effusion in 1 and prolonged ileus in 1. In complicated appendicitis the complication rate is lower for LA as compared to OA. We recommend laparoscopic approach to all children presenting with complicated appendicitis. PMID:18204846

Menezes, Maria; Das, Laxman; Alagtal, Mohammed; Haroun, Juliana; Puri, Prem

2008-03-01

234

[Wounds and dermatoses].  

PubMed

Wounds are a hallmark of various skin diseases. Most patients with wounds suffer from chronic venous insufficiency or other vascular diseases. Autoimmune, infective, metabolic, malignant, some psychiatric and diseases caused by environmental factors like radiation, present with skin and mucosal erosions and ulcerations. Lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Kaposi sarcoma, genodermatoses like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease belong to different dermatological entities, they have different etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation, but at some stage ulcerations and erosions dominate through the disease course as a result of complications of untreated disease or as part of a complex clinical presentation. Wounds demand a different multidisciplinary therapeutic approach, sometimes even in intensive care unit, where special care is available. Most patients are followed-up to avoid fatal complications like sepsis, as well as a potential malignant transformation of cells in the environment of chronic inflammation. Wounds are found in female genital lichen planus and lichen sclerosus. Oral lichen planus has a potential for malignant transformation and is considered a precancerous disease. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a life threatening disease similar to burns. Wounds cover most of the body surface as well as mucosa. The high mortality rate is due to complications like sepsis, loss of thermoregulation, electrolyte and fluid disbalance and shock. Chronic wounds are also a hallmark of skin tumors and other skin malignancies like Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The primary treatment goal in genodermatoses like epidermolysis bullosa is wound care, and to a less extent in other inherited skin diseases like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease wound healing is important for sustaining a good quality of life in affected individuals. PMID:23193818

Buli?, Suzana Ozani?; Kotrulja, Lena; Sjerobabski-Masnec, Ines

2012-10-01

235

[Wound dressings in chronic wounds].  

PubMed

Hydroactive wound dressings retain exsudate in the wound region or incorporate wound exsudate by gel formation. They create the local environment for moist wound healing which is experimentally and clinically characterized by accelerated reepithelialization, inflammatory reaction and angiogenesis as well as reduced wound pain and wound infection rates. Clinically relevant product groups of hydroactive wound dressings (hydrocolloids and hydropolymers, semipermeable films, calcium alginates) are distinct as to chemical structure, physical properties and functional characteristics in local wound treatment. Between the product groups, there are considerable differences with respect to inflammatory reactions at the wound bottom, absorption of exsudate, occlusion properties, wound edge adherence, adaptability to the wound shape and material integrity of wound dressings. Experimental and clinical results of moist wound treatment by hydroactive wound dressings such as hydrocolloids and hydropolymers, semipermeable films or calcium alginates reveal a wide range of local response on the different types of dressings. They offer the opportunity of therapeutic differentiation. To elucidate the differential indication for different product groups of hydroactive wound dressings in local treatment of chronic wounds, additional experimental and clinical research is required. PMID:10436530

Mohr, V D; Spelter, H; Schmidt, J; Zirngibl, H

1999-01-01

236

Perioperative Hyperglycemia and Postoperative Infection after Lower Limb Arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

Background One of the most serious complications after major orthopedic surgery is deep wound or periprosthetic joint infection. Various risk factors for infection after hip and knee replacement surgery have been reported, including patients' comorbidities and surgical technique factors. We investigated whether hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with infection that requires surgical intervention after total hip and knee arthroplasty. Methods We reviewed our computerized database for elective primary total hip and knee arthroplasty from 2000 to 2008. Demographic information, past medical history of patients, perioperative biochemistry, and postoperative complications were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: infected group (101 patients who had surgical intervention for infection at our institution within 2 years after primary surgery) and noninfected group (1847 patients with no intervention with a minimum of one year follow-up. The data were analyzed using t, chi-squared, and Fisher's exact tests. Results There were significantly more diabetes patients in the infected group compared with the noninfected group (22% versus 9%, p < .001). Infected patients had significantly higher perioperative blood glucose (BG) values: preoperative BG (112 ± 36 versus 105 ± 31 mg/dl, p = .043) and postoperative day (POD) 1 BG (154 ± 37 versus 138 ± 31 mg/dl, p < .001). Postoperative morning hyperglycemia (BG >200 mg/dl) increased the risk for the infection more than two-fold. Non-DM patients were three times more likely to develop the infection if their morning BG was >140 mg/dl on POD 1, p = .001. Male gender, higher body mass index, knee arthroplasty, longer operative time and hospital stay, higher comorbidity index, history of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and renal insufficiency were also associated with the infection. Conclusions Diabetes mellitus and morning postoperative hyperglycemia were predictors for postoperative infection following total joint arthroplasty. Even patients without a diagnosis of DM who developed postoperative hyperglycemia had a significantly increased risk for the infection.

Mraovic, Boris; Suh, Donghun; Jacovides, Christina; Parvizi, Javad

2011-01-01

237

Reduction of Postoperative Complication Rate with the Use of Early Oral Feeding in Gynecologic Oncologic Patients Undergoing a Major Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  A randomized controlled trial was performed to assess the outcome of early oral postoperative feeding (EOF) compared with\\u000a traditional oral feeding (TOF) in gynecologic oncology patients undergoing a complex laparotomy, including upper abdominal\\u000a surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Patients aged 18–75 years, undergoing an elective laparotomy and with a preoperative suspicion of gynecologic malignancy,\\u000a were eligible. Exclusion criteria included infectious conditions, intestinal obstruction, severe malnutrition,

Lucas Minig; Roberto Biffi; Vanna Zanagnolo; Anna Attanasio; Carmen Beltrami; Luca Bocciolone; Edoardo Botteri; Nicoletta Colombo; Simona Iodice; Fabio Landoni; Michele Peiretti; Giovanni Roviglione; Angelo Maggioni

2009-01-01

238

A simple postoperative umbilical negative-pressure dressing.  

PubMed

Application of umbilical wound dressings is challenging because of the shape and depth of the navel. Dressing changes and umbilical wound cleaning as practiced by many surgeons are painful procedures. The authors describe a simple and durable postoperative umbilical vacuum dressing, providing the advantages of topical negative-pressure wound therapy. PMID:23263397

Seifarth, Federico G; Knight, Colin G

2013-01-01

239

Free-flap reconstruction of traumatic lower extremity wounds.  

PubMed

A retrospective review of 20 free-tissue transfers for reconstruction of traumatic lower extremity wounds was undertaken. The wounds consisted of Gustilo type IIIb injuries resulting from motor vehicle accidents, falls, motorcycle and four-wheel, all-terrain vehicle accidents, and a laceration from a lawnmower blade. Fifty percent of the procedures were for open tibia fractures. The most common flap used was the rectus abdominis, followed by the latissimus dorsi, serratus anterior, and radial forearm. There were two major complications resulting in flap loss. Adequate and multiple debridements, selection of the appropriate flap, meticulous surgical technique, and postoperative care continue to be the essentials of free-flap coverage. With a motivated patient, limb salvage and return to function can be achieved after most high-energy injuries. PMID:11011776

Hammert, W C; Minarchek, J; Trzeciak, M A

2000-09-01

240

Burn Wound.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Wound care is the central theme of burn patient management after successful resuscitation. Burn wound care has been revolutionized during the past four decades. The development of effective topical chemo-therapy, the timely surgical removal of burned tiss...

B. A. Pruitt

1995-01-01

241

Chronic wounds.  

PubMed

Chronic wounds are a challenge to treat for the clinician. We present a current overview of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the development chronic nonhealing wounds. Solutions to some of these difficult problems are presented. PMID:15814118

Izadi, Kouros; Ganchi, Parham

2005-04-01

242

Alterations in plasma soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (sFlt-1) concentrations during coronary artery bypass graft surgery: relationships with post-operative complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Plasma concentrations of sFlt-1, the soluble form of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF), markedly increase during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery with extracorporeal circulation (ECC). We investigated if plasma sFlt-1 values might be related to the occurrence of surgical complications after CABG. METHODS: Plasma samples were collected from the radial artery catheter before vascular cannulation and

Yves Denizot; Alexandre Leguyader; Elisabeth Cornu; Marc Laskar; Isabelle Orsel; Christelle Vincent; Nathalie Nathan

2008-01-01

243

Postoperative management after hepatic resection  

PubMed Central

Hepatic resection has become the mainstay of treatment for both primary and certain secondary malignancies. Outcomes after hepatic resection have significantly improved with advances in surgical and anesthetic techniques and perioperative care. Metabolic and functional changes after hepatic resection are unique and cause significant challenges in management. In-depth understanding of hepatic physiology is essential to properly address the postoperative issues. Strategies implemented in the postoperative period to improve outcomes include adequate nutritional support, proper glycemic control, and interventions to reduce postoperative infectious complications among several others. This review article focuses on the major postoperative issues after hepatic resection and presents the current management.

Wrighton, Lindsay J.; O'Bosky, Karen R.; Namm, Jukes P.

2012-01-01

244

Acute postoperative cardiac herniation.  

PubMed

Acute herniation of the heart is an uncommon complication in patients undergoing pneumonectomy with associated pericardial resection. We report the case of a postoperative cardiac herniation after a right extrapleural pneumonectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma. After surgery the patient was completely asymptomatic, but a postoperative chest X-ray revealed unexpected massive dextrocardia. The patient was immediately brought back to the operating room: a cardiac herniation was found to be caused by a partial dehiscence of the pericardial prosthesis suture. The defect was repaired without consequences. PMID:20940166

Kawamukai, Kenji; Antonacci, Filippo; Di Saverio, Salomone; Boaron, Maurizio

2011-01-01

245

Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds  

SciTech Connect

The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

1983-10-01

246

Conservative management of postoperative chylothorax using somatostatin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chylothorax is a rare but serious postoperative complication of thoracic surgical procedures. We report the case of a 77-year-old man who underwent a coronary artery bypass procedure using a left internal mammary artery pedicle graft. A permanent pacemaker was required postoperatively. A persistent postoperative chylothorax developed necessitating continuous drainage and conservative management. Somatostatin was instituted when after 1 week this

Rosemary F Kelly; Sara J Shumway

2000-01-01

247

Postoperative Oral and Intravenous Nutrition  

PubMed Central

Oral and intravenous high calorie-amino acid nutritional therapy postoperatively resulted in significant weight gain, improved colonic wound healing and maintenance of normal intravascular albumin levels. Provision of caloric needs without amino acids minimized weight loss postoperatively. However, infusion of hypertonic dextrose solutions resulted in severe generalized hepatic fatty infiltration and marked hypoalbuminemia. Protein and calorie deprivation by administration of 5% dextrose and water resulted in the greatest postoperative weight loss, reduced intravascular albumin levels and decreased colonic anastomotic strength. Comparison of oral and intravenous diet administration demonstrated that hypertonic dextrose infusion was markedly deleterious to hepatic morphology and serum protein metabolism in normal rats. Further clinical investigation appears indicated in previously well-nourished patients undergoing extensive surgery who will not be able to ingest adequate nutrients in the postoperative period. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.

Daly, J. M.; Steiger, E.; Vars, H. M.; Dudrick, S. J.

1974-01-01

248

Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery  

PubMed Central

Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials – one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery – show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:276–84.

Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

2013-01-01

249

Rate of conversion and complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Problems during laparoscopic cholecystectomy include bile duct injury, conversion to open operation, and other postoperative complications. We retrospectively evaluated the causes for conversion and the rate of conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy and assessed the postoperative complications. METHODS: Of 340 patients who presented with symptomatic gall bladder disease over a 2-year period, 290 (85%) patients were evaluated on an elective basis and scheduled for surgery, while the remaining 50 (14.7%) patients were admitted emergently with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 41.9 (12.6) years. Conversion to laparotomy occurred in 17 patients (5%). The incidence of complications was 3.2%. The most common complication was postoperative transient pyrexia, which was seen in four patients (1.2%) followed by postoperative wound infection in three patients (0.9%), postoperative fluid collection and bile duct injury in two patients each (0.6%). CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains the ‘gold standard’ by which all other treatment modalities are judged. Conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy should be based on the sound clinical judgment of the surgeon and not be due to a lack of individual expertise.

Ghnnam, Wagih; Malek, Jawid; Shebl, Emad; Elbeshry, Turky; Ibrahim, Ahmad

2010-01-01

250

Modern wound care - practical aspects of non-interventional topical treatment of patients with chronic wounds.  

PubMed

The treatment of patients with chronic wounds is becoming increasingly complex. It was therefore the aim of the members of the working group for wound healing (AGW) of the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) to report on the currently relevant aspects of non-interventional, topical wound treatment for daily practice. -Beside necessary procedures, such as wound cleansing and débridement, we describe commonly used wound dressings, their indications and practical use. Modern antiseptics, which are currently used in wound therapy, usually contain polyhexanide or octenidine. Physical methods, such as negative-pressure treatment, are also interesting options. It is always important to objectify and adequately treat pain symptoms which often affect these patients. Modern moist wound therapy may promote healing, reduce complications, and improve the quality of life in patients with chronic wounds. Together with the improvement of the underlying causes, modern wound therapy is an important aspect in the overall treatment regime for patients with chronic wounds. PMID:24813380

Dissemond, Joachim; Augustin, Matthias; Eming, Sabine A; Goerge, Tobias; Horn, Thomas; Karrer, Sigrid; Schumann, Hauke; Stücker, Markus

2014-07-01

251

Delayed postoperative neurological complication in a patient with congenital kyphoscoliosis: recovered by revision of the 4-rod instrumentation technique: case report.  

PubMed

The authors report a case of progressive congenital kyphoscoliosis in which the patient, a boy, originally underwent combined anterior and instrumented posterior spinal fusion at the age of 7 years and 3 months. Early proximal junctional kyphosis and implant failure mandated proximal extension of implants with 2 new rods connected to the old caudad short rods. At the 3-year follow-up, clinical and CT assessment revealed a thoracolumbar pseudarthrosis for which the patient underwent a 2-stage procedure without complication. Recordings of somatosensory evoked potentials intraoperatively were normal. Twelve hours after surgery, his neurological status started to progressively deteriorate. The patient was brought to the operating room, and the initially achieved correction was reversed by an apex-only exposure of the 4-rod system. After surgery the patient started to show progressive improvement in his neurological function. A final myelography was performed and showed free passage of the dye without evidence of obstruction. Clinically, the patient continued to improve and at his 3-month follow-up had near-complete resolution of his neurological deficits. Findings on his physical examination were normal at the final 12-year follow-up. Despite normal findings on intraoperative neuromonitoring, a delayed neurological deficit can occur after complex spine reconstruction. Preoperative risk assessment, surgical approach, and instrumentation deserve careful attention. Advantages of a 4-rod construct are discussed in this case. PMID:24053377

Javidan, Pooya; Kabirian, Nima; Mundis, Gregory M; Akbarnia, Behrooz A

2013-11-01

252

Periarticular Injection with Bupivacaine for Postoperative Pain Control in Total Knee Replacement: A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background. Local periarticular injection with bupivacaine alone in TKA has not been studied. Thus, we aimed to examine the effectiveness of local periarticular injection with bupivacaine for post-operative pain control in TKA. Method. Sixty patients undergoing TKA by a single surgeon were randomly assigned into two groups in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In the injection group, patients received periarticular injections with 0.25% bupivacaine before wound closure; in the control group, patients received a 0.9% normal saline injection. Both groups received the same anesthetic procedure, post-operative pain control, and rehabilitation protocol. Results. There was a significant reduction in post-operative morphine consumption in the first six hours after the operation (mean 0.9?mg and 2.43?mg, P = 0.01), but there was no significant difference in post-operative morphine consumption between six hours and ninety-six hours after the operation, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, morphine side effects during the first 96 hours, length of hospital stay, or complications from morphine consumption. Conclusion. Local periarticular injection with bupivacaine alone before wound closer was shown to be an effective method to improve pain control after TKA with a few complications and ease of use.

Yuenyongviwat, Varah; Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Chinachoti, Thitima; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

2012-01-01

253

Wound healing.  

PubMed Central

An account is given of the methods used and the results obtained in a series of experimental studies, carried out over the past 15 years, of the effects of various factors on the healing of abdominal wounds in animals. The factors examined include uraemia, jaundice, infections, and the technique of wound closure. The preliminary findings in a comparison now in progress of the results of one- and two-layer closure of laparotomy wounds in human patients are also given. The relative neglect of the study of wound healing in the past is emphasized and some aspects that are in urgent need of further investigation are mentioned.

Ellis, H.

1977-01-01

254

Investigating the relationship between intra-operative electrolyte abnormalities (sodium and potassium) with post-operative complications of coronary artery bypass surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Generally, the electrolyte abnormalities are seen in many hospitalized patients, and this problem increases in ones with heart diseases. The purpose of this study is determination of the prevalence of electrolyte abnormalities during the coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) and detecting the relationship between these abnormalities with the complications after the surgeries. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, which is done in Chamran hospital, the medical and educational center of Isfahan, Iran, in 2011. The target population included the patients who have undergone CABG in this hospital. In this study, 100 patients who had been candidates for CABG were selected, and we extracted their recorded intra-operative electrolyte information. The collected data was entered into the computer and analyzed by SPSS software. The Chi-square and t student tests were used for data analysis. Results: The mean ± SD of sodium during CABG was 137.95 ± 4.6 (range 127-152) mg\\dl. Also, the mean ± SD of potassium was 4.65 ± 0.9 (range: 2.9-7.4). According to these results, 48 patients (48% of all) had electrolyte imbalance and 52 patients (52% of all) were normal. Sodium level in 71% of patients was normal, and in 29% of them was abnormal. Potassium level in 73% of individuals was normal, and in 27% of them was abnormal. Conclusion: Giving an attention to electrolyte abnormalities in patients who have undergone CABG surgery is a considerable necessity for them, and sufficient arrangements are needed to prevent such abnormalities.

Bagheri, Kaivan; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Kashefi, Parviz; Ghasemi, Marziye; Mohammadinia, Leila

2013-01-01

255

Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen  

PubMed Central

The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising.

Sen, Chandan K.

2009-01-01

256

Diabetic foot wounds: the value of negative pressure wound therapy with instillation.  

PubMed

Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot wounds are a tremendous burden to the health care system and often require a multidisciplinary approach to prevent amputations. Advanced technologies such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and bioengineered tissues have been successfully used in the treatment of these types of complex wounds. However, the introduction of NPWT with instillation (NPWTi) has provided an alternative treatment for treating complex and difficult-to-heal wounds. This article provides an overview of NPWT and the new NPWTi system and describes preliminary experience using NPWTi on patients with complicated infected diabetic foot wounds after surgical debridement and in a multidisciplinary setting. PMID:24251841

Dalla Paola, Luca

2013-12-01

257

Complication Rates of the 720 Video-Assisted Minilaparotomy Living Donor Nephrectomies: Supplementing Clavien Classification  

PubMed Central

Purpose Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN) has been reported to be as safe and effective as open surgery. We systematically evaluated the safety of video-assisted minilaparotomy surgery-living donor nephrectomy (VAMS-LDN) with use of the modified Clavien classification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed complications in 720 cases of VAMS-LDN conducted in our institute from 2003 to 2010 by use of the modified Clavien classification of surgical complications. Results The mean age of the donors was 39.3 years (range, 16 to 66 years) and their mean body mass index was 23.3 kg/m2 (range, 15.8 to 36.4 kg/m2). A total of 67 complications occurred (9.3%). Based on the modified Clavien classification, grade 1, 2a, and 2b complications occurred in 49 (6.8%), 16 (2.2%), and 2 (0.3%) of the donors, respectively. Most grade 1 complications involved mild vascular injuries that were immediately repaired with polypropylene sutures during the surgery. These did not cause any postoperative problems. The other grade 1 complications were wound dehiscence, not requiring secondary closure, and wound site pain in 11 (1.5%) and 5 (0.7%) cases, respectively. Grade 2a complications occurred in 16 (2.2%) cases: 9 (1.3%) involved postoperative transfusions and 1 (0.1%) involved a renal fossa hematoma. One grade 2b complication occurred; it was a lymphocele that resolved with placement of a pigtail catheter. No complications classified as grade 2c or worse occurred. Conclusions According to the present analysis of complications, VAMS-LDN is a safe procedure with complication rates comparable to those of LLDN as evaluated in previous studies.

Jung, Ha Bum; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Yang, Seung Choul

2012-01-01

258

Burn Wound Infections  

PubMed Central

Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices.

Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

2006-01-01

259

Postoperative infections after oesophageal resections: the role of blood transfusions  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Perioperative blood transfusion carries numerous potential risks concerning the transmission of infective diseases and immunodepression that can facilitate the occurrence of postoperative infectious complications. Explanation of connections between perioperative blood transfusion and postoperative septic complication worldwide is not well documented. Many studies have described a correlation between perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative infections. On the contrary, other studies indicate

Francesca Rovera; Gianlorenzo Dionigi; Luigi Boni; Andrea Imperatori; Alessandra Tabacchi; Giulio Carcano; Mario Diurni; Renzo Dionigi

2006-01-01

260

Postoperative chylothorax  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between July 1987 and May 1995, 11,315 patients underwent general thoracic surgical procedures at our institution. In 47 of these patients (0.42%), postoperative chylothorax developed. There were 32 men and 15 women with a median age of 65 years (range 21 to 88 years). Initial operation was for esophageal disease in 27 patients, pulmonary disease in 13, mediastinal mass in

Robert J. Cerfolio; Mark S. Allen; Claude Deschamps; Victor F. Trastek; Peter C. Pairolero

1996-01-01

261

Septic complications after biliary tract stone surgery: a review and report of the European prospective study.  

PubMed

We report a prospective, controlled study of the incidence of septic complications following biliary tract stone surgery. This study included a total of 280 patients operated on in eight hospitals in various European countries. In this study the computer program "Surgery" was used. Of 280 patients, 77 (27.5%) were male and 203 (72.5%) were female. The age ranged from 20 to 92 years (mean 54.8 years); 78.9% of the cases corresponded to clean-contaminated surgery; 85% of the patients received antibiotic prophylaxis with cefazolin. Twenty-one patients developed postoperative septic complications (7.5%) of which 12 (4.3%) were wound infections; five patients (1.8%) had intra-abdominal infections. The wound infection rate was 3.2% in clean-contaminated surgery, 7.7% in contaminated and 20% in dirty (p < 0.02). In laparoscopic cholecystectomy the global rate of septic complications was 3.6% vs. 12.6% in open cholecystectomy (p < 0.01); 2.4% and 6.3% wound infection respectively. The mean age of patients who developed postoperative septic complications was 61.5 years and 54.2 years old who did not develop any complications (p < 0.03). The duration of the postoperative period was 5 days in patients without infection and 13 days in patients with infection (p < 0.0001). Two patients died, one of them (0.4%) caused by sepsis. In addition to the European prospective study, a review of the problems of sepsis in biliary surgery was carried out. PMID:9261583

Cainzos, M; Sayek, I; Wacha, H; Pulay, I; Dominion, L; Aeberhard, P F; Hau, T; Aasen, A O

1997-01-01

262

Facial bite wounds: management update.  

PubMed

Bite wounds are frequently located on the face; injuries inflicted by dogs are most common, especially in children. Bacteriology of infected dog and cat bite wounds includes Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus, viridans streptococci, Capnocytophaga canimorsus, and oral anaerobes. Infected human bites yield a similar spectrum of bacteria except for Pasteurellae and C. canimorsus; instead human bites are frequently complicated by Eikenella corrodens. Antibiotic therapy against these bacteria is indicated both for infected bite wounds and fresh wounds considered at risk for infection. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (and other combinations of extended-spectrum penicillins with beta-lactamase inhibitors) and moxifloxacin offer the best in vitro coverage of the pathogenic flora. Initial wound management consisting in irrigation and debridement is at least equally important with antibiotics for prevention of infection. The need for prophylaxis against systemic infectious complications, particularly tetanus, should also be evaluated. Primary surgical repair is the treatment of choice for most clinically uninfected facial bite wounds, whereas delayed closure should be reserved for certain high risk or already infected wounds. Avulsive injuries with significant tissue loss represent the most difficult cases for definitive management and are also those most likely to require hospitalization. PMID:16053863

Stefanopoulos, P K; Tarantzopoulou, A D

2005-07-01

263

Postoperative Complications Leading to Death after Coagulum Pyelolithotomy in a Tetraplegic Patient: Can We Prevent Prolonged Ileus, Recurrent Intestinal Obstruction due to Adhesions Requiring Laparotomies, Chest Infection Warranting Tracheostomy, and Mechanical Ventilation?  

PubMed Central

A 22-year-old male sustained C-6 tetraplegia in 1992. In 1993, intravenous pyelography revealed normal kidneys. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. He underwent open cystolithotomy in 2004 and 2008. In 2009, computed tomography revealed bilateral renal calculi. Coagulum pyelolithotomy of left kidney was performed. Pleura and peritoneum were opened. Peritoneum could not be closed. Following surgery, he developed pulmonary atelectasis; he required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. He did not tolerate nasogastric feeding. CT of abdomen revealed bilateral renal calculi and features of proximal small bowel obstruction. Laparotomy revealed small bowel obstruction due to dense inflammatory adhesions involving multiple small bowel loops which protruded through the defect in sigmoid mesocolon and fixed posteriorly over the area of previous intervention. All adhesions were divided. The wide defect in mesocolon was not closed. In 2010, this patient again developed vomiting and distension of abdomen. Laparotomy revealed multiple adhesions. He developed chest infection and required ventilatory support again. He developed pressure sores and depression. Later abdominal symptoms recurred. This patient's general condition deteriorated and he expired in 2011. Conclusion. Risk of postoperative complications could have been reduced if minimally invasive surgery had been performed instead of open surgery to remove stones from left kidney. Suprapubic cystostomy predisposed to repeated occurrence of stones in urinary bladder and kidneys. Spinal cord physicians should try to establish intermittent catheterisation regime in tetraplegic patients.

Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter

2013-01-01

264

Preoperative model for end-stage liver disease score as a predictor for posthemihepatectomy complications  

PubMed Central

Background As diagnostic techniques advance and surgical outcomes improve, the rate of utilization of liver hemihepatectomy for various indications will continue to increase. Objectives To explore the preoperative predictors of liver hemihepatectomy postoperative complications. Patients and methods This study included retrospective analysis of the clinical data of patients who underwent either liver hemihepatectomy or extended hemihepatectomy at Georg August University Hospital-Goettingen for the period 2002–2012. The outcomes were either postoperative complications or death of the patient (within 3 months from the end of the operation). Modified classification of surgical complications was adopted in the current study. The preoperative model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, international normalized ratio, and bilirubin in addition to the demographic characteristics of the patients and intraoperative blood loss were analyzed as predictive for postliver hemihepatectomy complications. Results The study included 144 patients who underwent liver hemiheptectomy or extended hemihepatectomy through the study period (2002–2012). Postoperative complications were reported among patients out of 144 (52.1%). The most frequent complications were pleural effusion (26.7%), biliary leakage (21.3%), wound dehiscence (13.3%), ascites, and intra-abdominal abscess (6.7%). Death was reported among six patients of those who developed complications (8%). There were four cases of hepatic cirrhosis (one macroscopic and three microscopic). Two of the microscopic cases had no postoperative complications (grade 1), whereas one case had grade 3a and the macroscopic case had postoperative complication grade 1. Their MELD scores ranged between 6 and 10 preoperatively. The association between preoperative MELD score and development of posthemihepatetomy was statistically significant, P=0.002. Death was reported in six cases, yielding a mortality rate of 4.17%. MELD score preoperatively was the only significant predictor for postoperative complications. Conclusion The rate of complications following hemihepatectomy remains high, with 52.1% of the patients in the current study having at least one complication as all of our patients underwent either hemihepatectomy or extended hemihepatectomy. A 4.17% mortality rate has been reported. A higher preoperative MELD score is the only significant predictor for the development of posthemihepatectomy complications.

Abdel-Fattah, Muataz; Zautner, Andreas; Lorf, Thomas

2014-01-01

265

Pre- or postoperative radiotherapy in rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma. Report from a randomized multicenter trial.  

PubMed Central

Between October 1980 and December 1985, 471 patients with a resectable rectal carcinoma entered a randomized multicenter trial for comparison of pre- and postoperative irradiation. Two hundred thirty-six patients were allocated to receive high-dose fractionated preoperative irradiation (total dosage, 25.5 Gy in five to seven days) and 235 patients to receive postoperative irradiation to a very high dosage level with conventional fractionation (60 Gy in a total 8 weeks). The postoperative treatment was delivered only to a high-risk group of patients (Astler-Coller stages B2, C1, and C2). The preoperative irradiation was well tolerated, with no immediate irradiation-related complications and no increased postoperative mortality (3%, 7 of 217 patients, compared to 5%, 10 of 215 patients in the postoperatively irradiated group). More patients in the preoperative irradiation group had perineal wound sepsis after abdominoperineal resection and this prolonged the stay in hospital after surgery. In 50% of the patients the postoperative treatment could not be commenced until more than 6 weeks after surgery. The postoperative treatment was not as well tolerated as the preoperative one. The local recurrence rate was statistically significantly lower after preoperative than after postoperative radiotherapy (12% versus 21%; p = 0.02). In both groups more patients developed a local recurrence if the bowel was perforated at surgery or if the resection line was microscopically close to the tumor. To date, with a minimum follow-up of 3 years and a mean follow-up of 6 years, there is no difference in survival rates between the two groups.

Pahlman, L; Glimelius, B

1990-01-01

266

Necrotizing postsurgical infection complicating midurethral sling procedure with unrecognized cystotomy.  

PubMed

A 39-year-old woman with stress urinary incontinence underwent a retropubic midurethral sling procedure. On postoperative day 1, she presented with persistent abdominal pain and fever. A computed tomographic scan showed subcutaneous lower abdominal wall edema and gas above the fascia suggesting a necrotizing soft tissue infection. She was surgically debrided twice, which included removal of the mesh sling on postoperative day 4. Cystoscopy suggested unrecognized bladder perforation had occurred during the initial procedure, and record rerevealed untreated bacteriuria before sling placement. The patient required wound vacuum therapy and a later secondary wound closure procedure. Six months after the initial surgery, she was reevaluated for stress urinary incontinence and underwent a transobturator midurethral sling procedure with resolution of these symptoms. Necrotizing postsurgical infection is a rarely described complication of midurethral slings. Treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication includes aggressive surgical debridement, administration of broad-spectrum antibiotic, removal of infected implants, and supportive therapy. Unrecognized bladder injury and preoperative bacteriuria are discussed as potential risk factors for postsling necrotizing infection. PMID:22543774

Mahal, Amandeep Singh; Bradley, Catherine S

2012-01-01

267

Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery. In this study we investigated the incidence of DSWI and effect of re-exploration for bleeding on DSWI mortality. Methods We reviewed 73,700 cases registered in the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD) during the period from 2004 to 2009 and divided them into five groups: 26,597 of isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) cases, 23,136 valvular surgery cases, 17,441 thoracic aortic surgery cases, 4,726 valvular surgery plus CABG cases, and 1,800 thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG cases. We calculated the overall incidence of postoperative DSWI, incidence of postoperative DSWI according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI cases according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI according to whether re-exploration for bleeding, and the intervals between the operation and deaths according to whether re-exploration for bleeding were investigated. Operative mortality is defined as in-hospital or 30-day mortality. Risk factors for DSWI were also examined. Results The overall incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8%. The incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8% after isolated CABG, 1.3% after valve surgery, 2.8% after valve surgery plus CABG, 1.9% after thoracic aortic surgery, and 3.4% after thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG. The 30-day and operative mortality in patients with DSWI was higher after more complicated operative procedures. The incidence of re-exploration for bleeding in DSWI cases was 11.1%. The overall 30-day/operative mortality after DSWI with re-exploration for bleeding was 23.0%/48.0%, and it was significantly higher than in the absence of re-exploration for bleeding (8.1%/22.0%). The difference between the intervals between the operation and death according to whether re-exploration for bleeding had been performed was not significant. Age and cardiogenic shock were significant risk factors related to re-exploration for bleeding, and diabetes control was a significant risk factor related to DSWI for all surgical groups. Previous CABG was a significant risk factor related to both re-exploration for bleeding and DSWI for all surgical groups. Conclusions The incidence of DSWI after cardiac surgery according to the data entered in the JACVSD registry during the period from 2004 to 2009 was 1.8%, and more complicated procedures were followed by higher incidence and mortality. When re-exploration for bleeding was performed, mortality was significantly higher than when it was not performed. Prevention of DSWI and establishment of an effective appropriate treatment for DSWI may improve the outcome of cardiac surgery.

2013-01-01

268

Local skin flap reconstruction for abdominal wound dehiscence after abdominal surgery with a stoma: report of two cases.  

PubMed

Abdominal wound dehiscence is a serious complication of laparotomy, and fascial dehiscence in a patient with a stoma is especially difficult to manage. We describe how we performed local skin flap reconstruction for abdominal wound dehiscence in two patients with stomas. One patient underwent sigmoidectomy with a colostomy for peritonitis caused by perforated diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon. Postoperative fascial dehiscence was repaired by rhomboid flap reconstruction. The other patient underwent total gastrectomy, cholecystectomy, and splenectomy. An ileostomy was performed for digestive tract perforation, which was complicated by abdominal dehiscence with necrosis of the fascia. This was repaired by rotation flap reconstruction. The abdominal walls in both patients were repaired successfully without tension. PMID:21874425

Kakisaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoneyama, Shigehito; Katayama, Tomonari; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Uemura, Kazuhito; Ito, Yoshio; Une, Yoshie

2011-09-01

269

Complications in shoulder arthroscopy.  

PubMed

Shoulder arthroscopy is generally a safe and effective method for treating a wide variety of shoulder pathology. Fortunately, complications following shoulder arthroscopy are rare, with reported rates between 4.6% and 10.6%.¹?? These rates may be underestimated, as underreporting of complications and varying definitions of the term complication are likely. During shoulder arthroscopy, complications may occur at numerous points. The surgeon must be aware of potential problems and take necessary measures to prevent them. This article describes common complications after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Although failure of treatment and postoperative stiffness are undesirable outcomes, they are not described. PMID:20608603

Marecek, Geoffrey S; Saltzman, Matthew D

2010-07-01

270

Antimicrobial and antiseptic strategies in wound management.  

PubMed

Wounds, especially chronic wounds, represent a global problem costing millions of dollars per year in developed countries and are characterised by microbial complications including local or overt infection, delayed healing and spread of multiresistant germs. Therefore, antimicrobial wound management is a major challenge that continues to require new solutions against microbes and their biofilms. As systemic antibiotics can barely penetrate into wound biofilms and topically applied ones can easily lead to sensitisation, antisepsis is the method of choice to treat germs in wounds. This brief review discusses the role of antiseptics in reducing bioburden in chronic wounds. Balancing antimicrobial potency and tolerability of antiseptic procedures is critical in wound therapy. However, antiseptics alone may not be able to achieve wound healing without addressing other factors regarding the patient's general health or the wound's physical environment. Although the precise role of bioburden in chronic wounds remains to be evaluated, planktonic as well as biofilm-bound microbes are indications for antiseptic intervention. Octenidine dihydrochloride and polyhexanide are the most effective, as well as best tolerated, antiseptics in wound management today, and new strategies to reduce bacterial wound burden and support the body's immune response are being developed. PMID:24251838

Daeschlein, Georg

2013-12-01

271

Postoperative urinary retention.  

PubMed

Postoperative urinary retention (PUR) is a common complication of surgery and anesthesia. The risk of retention is especially high after anorectal surgery, hernia repair, and orthopedic surgery and increases with advancing age. Certain anesthetic and analgesic modalities, particularly spinal anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics and epidural analgesia, promote the development of urinary retention. Portable ultrasound provides rapid and accurate assessment of bladder volume and aids in the diagnosis and management of PUR. Catheterization is recommended when bladder volume exceeds 600 mL to prevent the negative sequelae of prolonged bladder overdistention. PMID:19825487

Darrah, Daniela M; Griebling, Tomas L; Silverstein, Jeffrey H

2009-09-01

272

Complications of Groin Hernia Repair: Their Prevention and Management  

PubMed Central

An estimated overall complication rate of approximately ten percent is found in the half million patients who annually undergo groin hernia repair in the United States. Certain features in the operative technique are emphasized which should prevent many of these complications. Intraoperative complications during the groin hernia repair are primarily hemorrhage and injury to the vas deferens, the three nerves in the area, the vascular supply of the testis, and the abdominal and pelvic viscera. Miscellaneous intraoperative complications relate to problems associated with the repair of massive hernias, missed hernia, and the loss of strangulated bowel into the abdominal cavity. Early postoperative complications may be either systemic or local with cardiac and respiratory conditions comprising the former group. The early local complications are primarily wound problems of infection, hematoma formation, and scrotal swelling involving the skin and testis. High ligation in excision of the sac in all hernias, repair of the defect in the plane of its occurrence, and suture of fascia to fascia in the same plane without tension are the basic tenets of inguinal hernia repair which should result in a low incidence of recurrence. The most effective prophylactic measures necessary for the prevention of complications considered are a thorough knowledge of inguinofemoral anatomy, mature surgical judgment, and meticulous surgical technique.

Gaines, Ray D.

1978-01-01

273

Manual lymphatic drainage versus exercise in the early postoperative period for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective: To compare the effect of active exercise and manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) on postoperative wound healing complications, shoulder range of motion (ROM) and upper limb (UL) perimetry in women undergoing radical mastectomy for breast cancer. Methods: Controlled non-randomized clinical trial with 89 women undergoing breast cancer surgery with axillary lymph node dissection (Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: 906). Women were matched for staging, age and body mass index, with 46 women allocated to the exercise group and 43 in the MLD group, receiving 2 weekly sessions during one month. Assessments were performed in the preoperative and 60?d after surgery, including inspection, palpation, goniometry and perimetry. Results: No significant difference existed between groups relative to individual and clinical surgical characteristics. The incidence of seroma, number of punctures performed, dehiscence and infection was similar in both groups. A comparison of shoulder ROM and UL perimetry between groups, obtained in the preoperative and postoperative period, did not show any significant difference. Conclusion: The performance of active exercise or MLD did not demonstrate difference in wound healing complications, shoulder ROM and UL perimetry at 60?d after surgery, suggesting that these techniques may be employed, according to the complaints or symptoms of each woman and physical therapist experience. PMID:24410411

de Oliveira, Mariana Maia Freire; de Rezende, Laura Ferreira; do Amaral, Maria Teresa Pace; Pinto E Silva, Marcela Ponzio; Morais, Sirlei Siani; Costa Gurgel, Maria Salete

2014-08-01

274

Prophylactic Antibiotics and Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Surgical site infections account for 14%-25% of all nosocomial infections. The main aims of this study were to audit the use of prophylactic antibiotic, to quantify the rate of post-operative wound infection, and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in general surgery. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the General Surgery Department in Khartoum Teaching Hospital– Sudan. All Adult patients (age ?18 years) admitted during March 1st to 31st October 2010 were recruited. Multivariable logistic analysis was done to identify wound infection risk factors. Prescriptions were audited against predetermined criteria. Results: A total of 540 patients were recruited; (females73.7% of total ). The performed surgical procedures were 547. The rate of wound infection was 10.9%. Multivariable logistic analysis showed that; ASA score ? 3; (p= <0.001), wound class (p= 0.001), and laparoscopic surgical technique; (p= 0.002) were significantly associated with prevalence of wound infection. Surgical prophylaxis was unnecessarily given to 311 (97.5%) of 319 patients for whom it was not recommended. Prophylaxis was recommended for 221 patients; of them 218 (98.6 %) were given preoperative dose in the operating rooms. Evaluation of prescriptions for those patients showed that; spectrum of antibiotic was adequate for 160 (73.4%) patients, 143 (65.6%) were given accurate doses, only 4 (1.8%) had the first preoperative dose/s in proper time window, and for 186 (85.3%) of them prophylaxis was extended post-operatively. Only 36 (6.7%) prescriptions were found to be complying with the stated criteria. Conclusion: The rate of wound infection was high and prophylactic antibiotics were irrationally used. Multiple interventions are needed to correct the situation.

Elbur, Abubaker Ibrahim; M.A., Yousif; El-Sayed, Ahmed S.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E.

2013-01-01

275

[Garibaldi's wounds].  

PubMed

On the 150th anniversary of the Unification of Italy in 1860, this paper relates the events linked to Giuseppe Garibaldi wounding by fire-arms as well as the difficulties encountered while the famous patient was being treated. The class of physicians, widely represented among the ranks of Garibaldi volunteers, enthusiastically joined the Italian Risorgimento. Its contribution was essential to the immediate treatment of the wounded on battlefields. Garibaldi himself, during his military career, was struck by fire-arms on at least three occasions. In particular, this issue covers the diagnostic and therapeutic problems to be tackled following his wounding by a Bersagliere on Aspromonte in 1862 as well as in the course of fighting against Austrian soldiers on Mount Suello (1866) during the Third War of Independence. PMID:21196825

Sabbatani, Sergio

2010-12-01

276

Predicting hospital costs for first-time coronary artery bypass grafting from preoperative and postoperative variables.  

PubMed

To predict hospital costs after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) from preoperative characteristics and postoperative complications, 4 analyses of the data were used: (1) a univariate analysis of each preoperative and postoperative variable, (2) a multivariate analysis of the preoperative variables (model 1), (3) a multivariate analysis of the postoperative variables (model 2), and (4) a multivariate analysis of pre- and postoperative variables (model 3). Eight-hundred seven patients who underwent a first-time CABG at Emory University during 1990 were analyzed in this study. Using model 1, the determinants of costs were higher angina grade (p = 0.0006), previous myocardial infarction (p = 0.0133), older age (p = 0.0001), congestive heart failure (p = 0.0001), and a higher number of diseased vessels (p = 0.0001). For model 2, the determinants of costs were adult respiratory distress syndrome (p = 0.0073), intraaortic balloon pumping (p < 0.0001), pneumonia (p < 0.0001), septicemia p < 0.0001), major arrhythmia (p < 0.0001), reexploration for bleeding (p < 0.0001), wound infection (p = 0.0632), neurologic event (p = 0.0013), fluid overload (p = 0.0516), and absence of pericarditis (p = 0.0588). For univariate analysis, the determinants of increased costs were similar to those from models 1 and 2. Although there is considerable variance in hospital costs for any number of complications, utilized resources (costs) increase inexorably as patients have more complications after coronary surgery. The mean cost to the hospital for the 382 patients who underwent CABG and experienced no complications was $16,776.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7942547

Mauldin, P D; Weintraub, W S; Becker, E R

1994-10-15

277

The Wound-Healing Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes is on the rise in the United States and the rest of the world, and its complications are even more evident in the\\u000a aging population. Among the most severe complications of diabetes are impaired circulation and wound healing. The former condition,\\u000a together with peripheral neuropathy, contributes to an insensate, poorly vascularized lower extremity that is prone to the\\u000a development

Jeffrey M. Davidson; Luisa DiPietro

278

Perioperative Complications of Total En Bloc Spondylectomy: Adverse Effects of Preoperative Irradiation  

PubMed Central

Background Total en bloc spondylectomy (TES) is associated with a high complication rate because it is technically demanding and involves patients compromised by cancer. Specifically, perioperative complications are more likely to occur in patients receiving preoperative irradiation. We examined the perioperative complications associated with TES in patients receiving preoperative irradiation. Methods Seventy-seven patients underwent TES between May 2010 and April 2013. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data for 50 patients with metastatic tumors of the thoracic spine, excluding patients with primary spinal tumors, lumbar spinal metastasis, and combined anterior and posterior approach TES. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those with preoperative irradiation (RT-TES group, 18 patients) and those without preoperative irradiation (TES group, 32 patients). The following perioperative complications, occurring within 2 months of surgery, were compared between the groups: intraoperative dural injuries, epidural hematomas, deep surgical-site infections, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, wound dehiscence, pleural effusions, and neurological deficits. Results Significant differences in patient characteristics were not observed between the RT-TES and TES groups. Perioperative TES complications occurred in 20/50 patients (40.0%). The complication rate in the RT-TES group was 77.8% (14 out of 18), threefold higher than the 18.8% (6 out of 32) in the TES group (P<0.01). The incidence of complications, including intraoperative dural injuries, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, wound dehiscence, and pleural effusions, was significantly higher in the RT-TES group (P<0.01). Conclusion The perioperative complication rate associated with TES for spinal metastasis was significantly higher among patients receiving preoperative irradiation than among those not receiving preoperative irradiation.

Yokogawa, Noriaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Igarashi, Takashi; Fang, Xiang; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

2014-01-01

279

Management of Sports-Induced Skin Wounds  

PubMed Central

Skin wounds are common in sports but are rarely documented by the certified athletic trainer. The literature is unclear about wound types, and none of the articles reviewed reported frequencies. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the frequency of common athletic skin wounds and their specific management. Management of skin wounds can sometimes be problematic. Hydrogen peroxide has been used on wounds since 1947, yet some researchers report that hydrogen peroxide and iodophor solution can delay or interfere with wound healing, or cause damage to the wounded area if use is intense and prolonged. Occlusive dressings have been reported to have considerable advantage in maintaining a moist wound bed and in decreasing healing time. Infection rates beneath occlusive dressings, however, are similar to those associated with other types of dressings. Complications to wounds, with or without the use of occlusive dressings, such as keloids and seborrheic dermatitis, occur in low frequencies. Due to a lack of specific information about sports-induced skin wounds and their management, we recommend that standardized documentation for common wounds be developed along with further study of techniques for management.

Foster, Danny T.; Rowedder, Laura J.; Reese, Steven K.

1995-01-01

280

Elastofibroma dorsi: Surgical indications and complications of a rare soft tissue tumor  

PubMed Central

Elastofibroma dorsi (ED) is a tumor that develops in the space between the lower angle of the scapula and the posterior thoracic wall. Due to the rarity of this type of tumor, the number of reported consecutive series is limited. Surgical excision, usually recommended for symptomatic cases to confirm diagnosis and relieve symptoms, has been associated with a high complication rate. To analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of surgical treatment, we retrospectively reviewed 20 consecutive cases of surgically resected ED. Of the 20 patients, 14 (70%) exhibited preoperative symptoms associated with the tumor. The mean diameter of the resected tumors averaged 72 mm (range, 45–110 mm). The surgical outcomes were satisfactory, except for the development of hematoma or seroma in 9 cases (43%), 8 of which achieved a complete resolution with conservative treatment. Age, hypertension, the presence of preoperative tumor-related symptoms and intraoperative bleeding were not found to be significantly associated with the incidence of hematoma. However, tumor diameter and the duration of postoperative drainage were significantly associated with occurrence of hematoma (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). Surgical resection should only be recommended for symptomatic patients, due to the high incidence of postoperative complications. To prevent the development of postoperative hematoma or seroma, careful observation of the wound, with suction drainage for >7 days and additional surgical procedures to facilitate adhesion of the wound margins, are recommended.

NAGANO, SATOSHI; YOKOUCHI, MASAHIRO; SETOYAMA, TAKASHI; SASAKI, HIROMI; SHIMADA, HIROFUMI; KAWAMURA, ICHIRO; ISHIDOU, YASUHIRO; SETOGUCHI, TAKAO; KOMIYA, SETSURO

2014-01-01

281

Testing Intelligent Wound Dressings  

Microsoft Academic Search

While occlusive wound dressings help provide patients with moist wound healing to reduce pain and increase reepithelialization rate, the moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR) of these dressings remains constant even though wound exudate levels may vary with time and from wound to wound. The clinician is therefore faced with exudate buildup in heavily exuding wounds and desiccation in lightly exuding

Shashi Palamand; Andrew M. Reed; Ludwig J. Weimann

1992-01-01

282

Prevention and Management of Nonhealing Perineal Wounds  

PubMed Central

Complex perineal wounds are at risk for nonhealing. High-risk procedures include proctectomy for Crohn disease, anal cancer and radiated distal rectal cancers. A basic understanding of both patient and procedural risk factors is helpful in planning and executing operative procedures for these conditions and to minimize associated wound complications. Diabetes, obesity, and malnutrition may contribute to wound breakdown and failure to heal. Delaying operative intervention, adding nutritional supplementation, and employing intestinal diversion as well as myocutaneous flaps may help optimize conditions for wound healing.

Kamrava, Allen; Mahmoud, Najjia N.

2013-01-01

283

Wounded Warriors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soldiers have been killed and wounded in wars throughout history. With new medical technologies, more soldiers survive their injuries and return home. Unfortunately, those injuries often include permanent disabilities either through loss of limb(s) or brain injury or post-traumatic stress disorder, among other possibilities. Perhaps equally unfortunate is the way that soldiers with disabilities and persons with disabilities generally are

Marilyn Martone

2008-01-01

284

Characterization of a preclinical model of chronic ischemic wound  

PubMed Central

Chronic ischemic wounds presenting at wound clinics are heterogeneous with respect to etiology, age of the wound, and other factors complicating wound healing. In addition, there are ethical challenges associated with collecting repeated biopsies from a patient to develop an understanding of the temporal dynamics of the mechanisms underlying chronic wounds. The need for a preclinical model of ischemic wound is therefore compelling. The porcine model is widely accepted as an excellent preclinical model for human wounds. A full-thickness bipedicle flap approach was adopted to cause skin ischemia. Closure of excisional wounds placed on ischemic tissue was severely impaired resulting in chronic wounds. Histologically, ischemic wounds suffered from impaired re-epithelialization, delayed macrophage recruitment and poorer endothelial cell abundance and organization. Compared with the pair-matched nonischemic wound, unique aspects of the ischemic wound biology were examined on days 3, 7, 14, and 28 by systematic screening of the wound tissue transcriptome using high-density porcine GeneChips. Ischemia markedly potentiated the expression of arginase-1, a cytosolic enzyme that metabolizes the precursor of nitric oxide l-arginine. Ischemia also induced the SOD2 in the wound tissue perhaps as survival response of the challenged tissue. Human chronic wounds also demonstrated elevated expression of SOD2 and arginase-1. This study provides a thorough database that may serve as a valuable reference tool to develop novel hypotheses aiming to elucidate the biology of ischemic chronic wounds in a preclinical setting.

Roy, Sashwati; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Khanna, Savita; Gordillo, Gayle; Bergdall, Valerie; Green, Jeanne; Marsh, Clay B.; Gould, Lisa J.; Sen, Chandan K.

2009-01-01

285

Acceleration of wound healing by topical drug delivery via liposomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Despite intensive research, impaired wound healing remains a considerable complication. Therefore, topically applied liposome-encapsulated\\u000a buflomedil hydrochloride was investigated for its ability to improve wound repair in normal (n=16) and ischemic (n=16) skin tissue. Methods: Experiments were performed using the wound healing model of the ear of hairless mice. Standardized skin wounds (4.25 mm2) were created by circular excision of

Frank Roesken; Eberhard Uhl; Sergio B. Curri; Michael D. Menger; Konrad Messmer

2000-01-01

286

Abdominal gunshot wounds. An urban trauma center's experience with 300 consecutive patients.  

PubMed Central

From July 1983 through December 1987, 300 consecutive patients with penetrating gunshot wounds of the abdomen causing visceral or vascular injuries were treated. Resuscitative thoracotomy was required in 20 patients (6.6%), and only two survived. The most commonly injured organs were the small bowel (60%), colon (41.6%), liver (29.3%), vascular structures (24.6%), stomach (17.3%), and kidney (17.0%). The overall survival rate for the series was 88.3%; however, if only the 226 patients without vascular injuries are considered, the survival rate was 97.3%. In the 35 patients who died, the blood pressure on admission was 51 mmHg, 18 required a resuscitative thoracotomy, four visceral or vascular injuries were present, and the median blood replacement was 18 units. The cause of death was perioperative shock in 30 patients (85.7%), whereas five patients (14.3%) died of sepsis and multiple organ failure. The most common postoperative complication in survivors and patients who died later in the study was an intra-abdominal abscess (3.0%). Rapid conservative operative techniques for civilian gunshot wounds leads to few postoperative complications and an excellent survival rate, especially if vascular injuries are not present.

Feliciano, D V; Burch, J M; Spjut-Patrinely, V; Mattox, K L; Jordan, G L

1988-01-01

287

Usefulness of vascularized galeal frontalis myofascial flap as treatment for postoperative infection in frontal sinus fracture.  

PubMed

Inappropriate treatments of frontal sinus fractures may lead to serious complications, such as mucopyocele, meningitis, and brain abscess. Assessment of nasofrontal duct injury is crucial, and nasofrontal duct injury necessitates sinus obliteration. For sinus obliteration, autogenous fat, muscle, bone, pericranium grafts, and alloplastic materials, such as Surgicel, hydroxyapatite (Bone Source), and methyl methacrylate, are commonly used. However, autogenous tissue grafts and alloplastic materials cannot prevent infection, which is the leading cause of complications of frontal sinus surgery. A good vascular supply is the mainstay of resistance against infection.A 21-year-old man had nasofrontal duct injury and frontal sinus fracture by motorcycle accident. He underwent cranialization and frontal sinus obliteration with autologous bone graft and hydroxyapatite. On 16 days postoperatively, the patient had a high temperature with wound infection in the glabella. Thus, he was treated with sinus obliteration with vascularized galeal frontalis myofascial flap. He was followed up postoperatively for 1 year without infection.The authors experienced a postoperative infection in frontal sinus fracture, which was treated with vascularized galeal frontalis myofascial flap and achieved satisfactory result; thus, we presented our case with reviews of the literature. PMID:21959485

Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Hye-Ri; Jun, Young-Joon; Seo, Byung-Chul

2011-09-01

288

Sutureless closure of scleral wounds in animal models by the use of laser welded biocompatible patches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The common procedures used to seal the scleral or conjunctival injuries are based on the traditional suturing techniques, that may induce foreign body reaction during the follow up, with subsequent inflammation and distress for the patient. In this work we present an experimental study on the laser welding of biocompatible patches onto ocular tissues, for the closure of surgical or trauma wounds. The study was performed ex vivo in animal models (porcine eyes). A penetrating perforation of the ocular tissue was performed with a surgical knife. The wound walls were approximated, and a biocompatible patch was put onto the outer surface of the tissue, in order to completely cover the wound as a plaster. The patches were prepared with a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, showing high mechanical strength, good elasticity, high permeability for vapour and gases and rather low biodegradation. During preparation, Indocyanine Green (ICG) was included in the biopolymeric matrix, so that the films presented high absorption at 810 nm. Effective adhesion of the membranes to the ocular tissues was obtained by using diode laser light emitted from an 810 nm diode laser and delivered by means of a 300 ?m core diameter optical fiber, to produce spots of local film/tissue adhesion, due to the photothermal effect at the interface. The result is an immediate closure of the wound, thus reducing post-operative complications due to inflammation.

Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Menabuoni, Luca; Lenzetti, Ivo; Pini, Roberto

2011-02-01

289

No clear advantage to use of wound drains after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomized, controlled trial.  

PubMed

We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled trial in 100 patients to compare the postoperative use of wound drains with the use of no drains in patients who underwent unilateral primary total knee arthroplasty to determine differences in blood loss, range of motion, wound healing, complications (deep vein thrombosis, wound infection), and need for blood transfusions. The patients, who underwent surgery between February 2006 and February 2007, were randomly divided into 2 groups of 50 each: group A, treated without a drain, and group B, treated with a drain. The between-group difference in total blood loss was significant: 535 ± 295 mL in group A and 853 ± 331 mL in group B. Group A needed comparatively less blood transfused than group B did. Differences in wound infection, incidence of deep vein thrombosis, and range of motion were not statistically significant between groups. We found no clear advantage to the use of wound drains in unilateral total knee arthroplasty. PMID:20634036

Li, Cao; Nijat, Ablimit; Askar, Mamtimin

2011-06-01

290

Surgical wound infection surveillance.  

PubMed

Measuring the frequency of a defined outcome flaw for a series of patients undergoing operative procedures generates information for performance evaluation. Such data influence decisions to improve care if used responsibly. Wound infection (WI), bacterial invasion of the incision, is the most common infectious complication of surgical care and WI prevention has value because the complication affects economic, patient satisfaction, and patient functional status outcomes. WI frequency, one kind of surgical outcome flaw rate, is traditionally used to judge one aspect of surgical care quality. At the author's institution, global WI surveillance was conducted without interruption for 20 years. Results for 85,260 consecutive inpatient operations performed during the period showed that secular changes in infection rates occurred but were not necessarily caused by surgical care quality decrements. PMID:14750065

Lee, J T

2003-12-01

291

Prospective comparative study of single-layer versus double-layer closure of leg wounds after long saphenous vein harvest in coronary artery bypass graft operations  

PubMed Central

Introduction Wound infection is one of the major complication post CABG that leads to prolonged length of stay and cost post surgery. Coronary artery bypass grafting is one of the most commonly performed operations in the world. The long saphenous vein harvested by traditional techniques is still widely used and caries a risk of wound infection. Objective The purpose of this study is to ascertain if a single-layer closure result in better wound healing and functional outcome as compared with the traditional two-layer closure after harvest of saphenous vein. Methods Sixty-seven consecutive patients undergoing CABG were prospectively randomized to have their leg wound closed by either a single-layer technique with a suction drain or double layers without suction drain. All wounds were assessed for the presence of serous discharge, inflammation, edema, purulent exudates, infection of the deep tissues, and pain postoperatively and two weeks after discharge. Results There were trends towards increased rates of wound related outcomes in patients in double layer group when compared with single layer group. Out of 77 patients in our study, 52 patients underwent single layer closure (males, n = 37; females, n= 15) and 25 patients underwent double layer closure (males, n = 21; females, n = 04). There was significant statistical difference between the treatment groups with single layer group having lower average scores (4.038) compared to double layer group (9.467), P- value 0.001. Patients whose legs were closed with the single layer technique had less post operative edema (23.07% vs 53.30) and pain (44.2 vs 73.33) compared with the double layer group. Conclusions Single-layer leg wound closure over a suction drain has shown a better wound outcome compared to traditional double-layer closure. A possible mechanism of better wound healing in the former technique might be through decreased tissue handling and a reduction in leg edema.

Siddiqi, Mohammad Salman; Al Sabti, Hilal; Mukaddirov, Mirdavron; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

2011-01-01

292

Does a continuous local anaesthetic pain treatment after immediate tissue expander reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients more efficiently reduce acute postoperative pain - a prospective randomised study  

PubMed Central

Background Immediate breast reconstruction with an expander is a reasonable option for properly selected patients. After reconstruction, patients have severe postoperative pain, which responds poorly to opioids. Our aim was to evaluate if continuous wound infusion of a local anaesthetic into the surgical wound reduces postoperative pain, consumption of opioids and incidence of chronic pain compared to standard intravenous piritramide after primary breast reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients. Methods Altogether, 60 patients were enrolled in our study; one half in the group with wound infusion of a local anaesthetic, and the other half in the standard (piritramide) group. Parameters measured included: pain intensity (visual analogue scale), drug requirements, alertness, hospitalisation, side-effects and late complications. A p-value of?wound infusion of a local anaesthetic significantly reduces acute pain and enables reduced opioid consumption, resulting in less postoperative sedation and reduced need for antiemetic drugs. Wound infusion of a local anaesthetic reduces chronic pain.

2014-01-01

293

Complications of supraduodenal choledochotomy: a comparison of three methods of management.  

PubMed

The complications of elective choledochotomy in a prospective study of 116 patients with suspected intraduct calculi are reported. Management included T tube drainage (n = 59), primary closure of the bile duct (n = 29) and choledochoduodenostomy (n = 28). Septicaemia occurred in 12 patients (10%), with 1 death, and was unrelated to the type of operation. Thirty patients (26%) developed wound infection; this complication was more common after T tube drainage than the other procedures. Intra-abdominal abscess occurred in 3 patients only. Thrombo-embolism was recorded in 10 patients (9%), 7 of whom had an intraduct drain. Postoperative pancreatitis occurred in 5 patients (4%), with 2 deaths; a third of the patients in whom sphincteroplasty had been combined with supraduodenal choledochotomy developed this complication. Reoperation for stones was required in 3 patients with T tube; 3 patients developed a temporary biliary fistula after choledochoduodenostomy. The hospital stay was 9-5 days after primary closure, 14-0 days after choledochoduodenostomy and 16-8 days after T tube drainage. Wound sepsis (32%) and thrombo-embolism (12%) were more common in patients with bacterbilia than in patients where the bile was sterile at operation (13 and 3% respectively). Furthermore, wound sepsis, septicaemia and thrombo-embolism were reduced in patients who were given effective antibiotic cover. PMID:990695

Keighley, M R; Burdon, D W; Baddeley, R M; Dorricott, N J; Oates, G D; Watts, G T; Alexander-Williams, J

1976-10-01

294

Postoperative fiberoptic choledochoscopy.  

PubMed Central

Twenty-eight patients underwent fiberoptic T-tube tract choledochoscopy for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of filling defects seen on postoperative T-tube cholangiograms. In 22 patients, 59 retained stones were treated by extraction. In six other patients with diagnostic problems arising from cholangiogram defects, the diagnosis was made by direct vision and biopsy specimen examination. There were multiple papillary adenocarcinomas in one patient, and normal mucosal folds in two patients. The procedure was accompanied by a low complication rate, with two patients developing pancreatitis and five patients developing transient fever. The advantages of the procedure are a direct examination of the biliary tree with the facility to remove stones and biopsy lesions under direct vision.

Birkett, D H; Williams, L F

1981-01-01

295

Outcome following deep wound contamination in cemented arthroplasty.  

PubMed

Infection remains a devastating complication of joint replacement surgery causing a significant burden to both patient and surgeon. However, despite exhaustive prophylactic measures, intraoperative contamination still occurs during cemented arthroplasty with current infection rates of 1-2%. A study was undertaken to determine the incidence of perioperative contamination in cemented arthroplasty patients, to identify contaminating organisms, to identify contaminated regions within the operative wound, to identify factors associated with increased contamination, and finally to assess the medium-term clinical outcome in patients with confirmed intraoperative wound contamination. Eighty consecutive patients undergoing hip and knee cemented arthroplasty were prospectively enrolled over a 6-month period. All scrubbed personnel wore total body exhaust isolation suits and procedures were carried out in ultra-clean air theatres. Of 441 samples, contamination was identified at 21 sites (4.8%) representing a cohort of 18 patients (22.5%). Longer duration of surgery predisposed to higher contamination rates while lower contamination rates were significantly related to fewer gowned personnel within the ultra-clean system, and fewer total personnel in theatre during the procedure. None of the patients developed clinical evidence of deep prosthetic infection at follow-up. We noted a high incidence of intraoperative contamination despite standard prophylaxis. However, this was not reflected by a similar rate of postoperative infection. This may be due to a small bacterial inoculum in each case or may be due to the therapeutic effect of perioperative intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:16586132

Byrne, A M; Morris, S; McCarthy, T; Quinlan, W; O'byrne, J M

2007-02-01

296

Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia in febrile patients as early signs of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Sternal wound infection is a devastating complication of cardiothoracic surgery that carries high postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. We explored whether our current program of extensive bacteriological examination including repeat blood cultures may contribute to the early diagnosis of sternal wound infection. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 112 patients who were subjected to our bacteriological examination protocol including within 90 days after cardiothoracic surgery. Univariate and multivariate analyses were made in order to identify risk factors for sternal infection. Results The median patient age was 75 years, and 65 patients were male. In 35 cases (31.2%) the blood cultures showed the presence of bacterial infection with the following frequencies: Staphylococcus aureus, 18 cases; Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 7 cases; other organisms, 10 cases. Eleven patients presented repeat bacteremia on at least 2 different occasions. Twenty patients (17.8%) presented sternal wound infections. There was no difference in operative mortality between the patients with and without sternal wound infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that bilateral mammary artery use (OR, 13.68, 95% CI, 1.09-167.36, p?=?0.043), positive blood culture for Staphylococcus aureus (OR, 19.51, 95% CI, 4.46-104.33, p?wound infection. Conclusion Repeat blood cultures in febrile patients appear to be useful for the early detection of Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia, and these were associated with sternal wound infection. Bilateral internal mammary artery use was another risk factor of sternal wound infection in febrile patients. These factors may identify patients suitable for expeditious radiological examination and aggressive treatments.

2014-01-01

297

Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.  

PubMed

Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely. PMID:22718712

Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

2012-06-01

298

How to Reduce Surgical Complications after Extended Gastric Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complications of extended gastric surgery and their prevention were discussed. To determine the incidence of postoperative complications, 1,114 gastric cancer patients with radical lymph node dissection (D2 or more) were examined. The postoperative complication rate following total gastrectomy (30.9%) was significantly higher than that following distal gastrectomy (14.6%). In total gastrectomy cases, the rate of postoperative complications in D4 dissection

Hiroshi Isozaki; Kunio Okajima

1994-01-01

299

Proper Care for Wounds  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Motor Vehicle Safety En Español About Emergencies Wound Care Proper Care For Wounds Most cuts are minor but it is still important to properly care for them. Wound Care Dr. David Ross, emergency ...

300

Exploring Predictors of Complication in Older Surgical Patients: A Deficit Accumulation Index and the Braden Scale  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES To determine whether readily collected perioperative information might identify older surgical patients at higher risk for complication. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study SETTING Medical chart review at a single academic institution PARTICIPANTS 102 patients aged 65 years and older who underwent abdominal surgery between January 2007 and December 2009. MEASUREMENTS Primary predictor variables were the first postoperative Braden Scale score (within 24 hours of surgery) and a Deficit Accumulation Index (DAI) constructed based on 39 available preoperative variables. The primary outcome was presence or absence of complication within 30 days of surgery date. RESULTS Of 102 patients, 64 experienced at least one complication with wound infection being the most common complication. In models adjusted for age, race, sex, and open vs. laparoscopic surgery, lower Braden Scale scores were predictive of 30-day postoperative complication (OR 1.30 [CI 95%, 1.06, 1.60]), longer length of stay (â = 1.44 (0.25) days; pvalue = ? 0.0001) and discharge to institution rather than home (OR 1.23 [CI 95%, 1.02, 1.48]). The cut-off value for the Braden Score with the highest predictive value for complication was ? 18 (OR 3.63 [CI 95%, 1.43, 9.19]; c statistic of 0.744). The DAI and several traditional surgical risk factors were not significantly associated with 30-day postoperative complications in this cohort. CONCLUSION This is the first study to identify the perioperative score on the Braden Scale, a widely used risk-stratifier for pressure ulcers, as an independent predictor of other adverse outcomes in geriatric surgical patients. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding as well as investigate other utilizations for this tool, which correlates well to phenotypic models of frailty.

Cohen, Rachel-Rose; Lagoo-Deenadayalan, Sandhya A.; Heflin, Mitchell T.; Sloane, Richard; Eisen, Irvin; Thacker, Julie M.; Whitson, Heather E.

2012-01-01

301

Complications of the mini-open anterolateral approach to the thoracolumbar spine.  

PubMed

The mini-open anterolateral approach to the thoracolumbar spine is gaining popularity as a minimally-invasive alternative to traditional open thoracolumbar approaches. Published studies reporting and discussing the complications associated with this minimally invasive approach, however, are limited. We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing the mini-open lateral approach to the thoracolumbar spine for corpectomy/fusion. Intraoperative and postoperative complications are reported and analyzed. Eighty consecutive patients underwent the mini-open lateral approach with corpectomy and fusion for trauma (71%), tumor (26%) and infection (3%). Total complication rate was 12.5% (dural tear 2.5%, intercostal neuralgia 2.5%, deep vein thrombosis 2.5%, pleural effusion 1.3%, wound infection 1.3%, hardware failure 1.3%, hemothorax 1.3%). Two patients needed a re-operation to address the complication (hardware failure, hemothorax). There were no postoperative neurological complications. The mini-open anterolateral approach to the thoracolumbar spine is an appealing alternative to the traditional open approaches. This technique, however, is technically demanding and requires proficiency in the use of minimally invasive spinal surgery instruments and retractors. PMID:22766104

Baaj, Ali A; Dakwar, Elias; Le, Tien V; Smith, Donald A; Ramos, Edwin; Smith, William D; Uribe, Juan S

2012-09-01

302

Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing  

PubMed Central

Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction.

Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

2013-01-01

303

Dermal wound transcriptomic responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model  

PubMed Central

Background Bacterial infections of wounds impair healing and worsen scarring. We hypothesized that transcriptome analysis of wounds infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.p.) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) would indicate host-responses associated with the worse healing of P.a.- than K.p.-infected wounds. Methods Wounds created on post-operative day (POD) 0 were infected during the inflammatory phase of healing on POD3 and were harvested on POD4 for microarray and transcriptome analysis. Other wounds received topical antibiotic after infection for 24 hours to promote biofilm development, and were harvested on POD6 or POD12. Results Wounds infected for 24 hours, relative to uninfected wounds, elevated transcripts of immune-response functions characteristic of infiltrating leukocytes. But P.a.-infected wounds elevated many more transcripts and to higher levels than K.p.-infected wounds. Coincidently, suppressed transcripts of both wounds enriched into stress-response pathways, including EIF2 signaling; however, this was more extensive for P.a.-infected wounds, including many-fold more transcripts enriching in the ‘cell death’ annotation, suggesting resident cutaneous cell toxicity in response to a more damaging P.a. inflammatory milieu. The POD6 wounds were colonized with biofilm but expressed magnitudes fewer immune-response transcripts with no stress-response enrichments. However, elevated transcripts of P.a.-infected wounds were inferred to be regulated by type I interferons, similar to a network unique to P.a.-infected wounds on POD4. On POD12, transcripts that were more elevated in K.p.-infected wounds suggested healing, while transcripts more elevated in P.a.-infected wounds indicated inflammation. Conclusions An extensive inflammatory response of wounds was evident from upregulated transcripts 24 hours after infection with either bacterium, but the response was more intense for P.a.- than K.p.-infected wounds. Coincidently, more extensive down-regulated transcripts of P.a.-infected wounds indicated a stronger “integrated stress response” to the inflammatory milieu that tipped more toward cutaneous cell death. Unique to P.a.-infected wounds on POD4 and POD6 were networks inferred to be regulated by interferons, which may result from intracellular replication of P.a. These data point to specific downregulated transcripts of cells resident to the wound as well as upregulated transcripts characteristic of infiltrating leukocytes that could be useful markers of poorly healing wounds and indicators of wound-specific treatments for improving outcomes.

2014-01-01

304

Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.  

PubMed

Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. PMID:22998924

Shvyrkov, Michael B

2013-01-01

305

The effects of rivaroxaban on the complications of surgery after total hip or knee replacement: results from the RECORD programme.  

PubMed

Post-operative complications after total hip or knee replacement can delay recovery, prolong hospitalisation, increase rates of re-admission and, in the most severe cases, lead to long-term disability or even death. In this analysis of pooled data from four large, randomised, phase III clinical trials that compared the oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban with subcutaneous enoxaparin for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after total hip or knee replacement (n = 12,729), the incidence of complications, including bleeding and adverse events related to surgery (such as wound infection, wound dehiscence and haemarthrosis) are reported. Interventions and procedures relating to surgery are also compared between the groups. Bleeding events, including excessive wound haematoma and surgical-site bleeding, occurred at similar rates in the rivaroxaban and enoxaparin groups. Over the total study duration, adverse surgical events occurred at a similar rate in the rivaroxaban group compared with the enoxaparin group after total knee replacement (2.26% vs. 2.69%, respectively) and total hip replacement (1.48% vs. 1.65%, respectively). Blood loss, wound drainage and transfusion requirements were also similar between the two groups. This analysis shows that the incidence of adverse surgical events with rivaroxaban was similar to enoxaparin. PMID:23109641

Lassen, M R; Gent, M; Kakkar, A K; Eriksson, B I; Homering, M; Berkowitz, S D; Turpie, A G G

2012-11-01

306

The effect of the body mass index on postoperative complications of coronary artery bypass grafting in elderly O efeito do índice de massa corporal sobre as complicações no pós-operatório de cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio em idosos  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of BMI (body mass index) in the postoperative period of elderly patients undergoing CABG. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective study, carried out in academic hospital, with all patients (n=290), aged or above 60 years, undergone CABG, from August 2006 to July 2007. The patients were divided into tertiles of BMI (<22, 22-27,> 27kg\\/m²). The variables included in

Cíntia REIS; Sandra Mari BARBIERO; Luciane RIBAS

2008-01-01

307

O efeito do índice de massa corporal sobre as complicações no pós-operatório de cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio em idosos The effect of the body mass index on postoperative complications of coronary artery bypass grafting in elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of BMI (body mass index) in the postoperative period of elderly patients undergoing CABG. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective study, carried out in academic hospital, with all patients (n=290), aged or above 60 years, undergone CABG, from August 2006 to July 2007. The patients were divided into tertiles of BMI (<22, 22-27,> 27kg \\/m²). The variables included

Cíntia REIS; Sandra Mari BARBIERO; Luciane RIBAS

308

Complications after breast cancer surgery in patients treated with concomitant preoperative chemoradiation: a case–control analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\u000a   Nearly 60% of breast cancer cases in Mexico are in advanced stages. At our institution, concomitant preoperative chemoradiation\\u000a is being used in patients with advanced breast cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the postoperative wound complications\\u000a and risk factors associated.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods\\u000a   The study included breast cancer patients from January 2000 to December 2002 treated with concomitant

Eva Ruvalcaba-Limón; Carlos Robles-Vidal; Adela Poitevin-Chacón; Mariana Chávez-MacGregor; Carlos Gamboa-Vignolle; Diana Vilar-Compte

2006-01-01

309

[Postoperative peritonitis. Patients, causes, therapy, prognosis].  

PubMed

1. The most frequent causes of postoperative peritonitis are circumscribed abscesses, the postoperative ileus and the anastomotic leakage or breakdown of the digestive suture. 2. The mortality is 33%; procedures in upper abdominal surgery are accompanied by higher mortality than in colorectal surgery in cases of postoperative peritonitis. 3. The most frequent cause of death after reoperation is the generalized sepsis. 4. A mixed flora of spores are found in most cases; obligate anaerobic spores are found mostly after colorectal procedures, while typical "hospitalized spores" were present equally after all surgical treatment in abdomen. 5. Method of treatment is: early surgical reintervention, systemic application of antibiotics, peritoneal lavage in generalized peritonitis, sufficient drainage in local peritonitis and the open-wound-treatment of the abdominal cavage in severe forms. PMID:7095686

Altunbay, S; Bleiler, H J; Heil, T

1982-04-01

310

Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management  

PubMed Central

Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development.

Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

2010-01-01

311

Intensified neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for rectal cancer enhances surgical complications  

PubMed Central

Background Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy has proven superior to adjuvant treatment in reducing the rate of local recurrence without impairing cancer related survival or the incidence of distant metastases. The present study aimed at addressing the effects of an intensified protocol of neoadjuvant treatment on the development of postoperative complications. Methods A total of 387 patients underwent oncological resection for rectal cancer in our institution between January 2000 and December 2009. 106 patients received an intensified radiochemotherapy. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were analyzed retrospectively with special attention on complication rates after intensified radio-chemotherapy. Therefore, for each patient subjected to neoadjuvant treatment a patient without neoadjuvant treatment was matched in the following order for tumor height, discontinuous resection/exstirpation, T-category of the TNM-system, dividing stoma and UICC stage. Results Of all patients operated for rectal cancer, 27.4% received an intensified neoadjuvant treatment. Tumor location in the matched patients were in the lower third (55.2%), middle third (41.0%) and upper third (3.8%) of the rectum. Postoperatively, surgical morbidity was higher after intensified neoadjuvant treatment. In the subgroup with low anterior resection (LAR) the anastomosis leakage rate was higher (26.6% vs. 9.7%) and in the subgroup of patients with rectal exstirpations the perineal wound infection rate was increased (42.2% vs. 18.8%) after intensified radiochemotherapy. Conclusions In rectal cancer the decision for an intensified neoadjuvant treatment comes along with an increase of anastomotic leakage and perineal wound infection. Quality of life is often reduced considerably and has to be balanced against the potential benefit of intensifying neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy.

2013-01-01

312

Chronic problem wounds.  

PubMed

Chronic problem wounds can result from both local and systemic factors that impair wound healing. The only way to achieve successful closure of these wounds is by an accurate diagnosis based on a thorough history, careful physical examination, optimal wound care, control of systemic and/or local factors, and correction of hypoxia. With a careful, planned management protocol, most wounds eventually heal. Recurrence of some wounds, such as pressure sores and venous stasis ulcers, is a tougher challenge in some patients. Prevention is a very important step in these patients. Efforts are underway that may improve the management of chronic nonhealing wounds. PMID:9696899

Ramasastry, S S

1998-07-01

313

Wound Healing in PatientsWith Cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective: The treatment of patients with cancer has advanced into a complex, multimodal approach incorporating surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Managing wounds in this population is complicated by tumor biology, the patient's disease state, and additional comorbidities, some of which may be iatrogenic. Radiation therapy, frequently employed for local-regional control of disease following surgical resection, has quantifiable negative healing effects due to local tissue fibrosis and vascular effects. Chemotherapeutic agents, either administered alone or as combination therapy with surgery and radiation, may have detrimental effects on the rapidly dividing tissues of healing wounds. Overall nutritional status, often diminished in patients with cancer, is an important aspect to the ability of patients to heal after surgical procedures and/or treatment regimens. Methods: An extensive literature search was performed to gather pertinent information on the topic of wound healing in patients with cancer. The effects that surgical procedures, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and nutritional deficits play in wound healing in these patients were reviewed and collated. Results: The current knowledge and treatment of these aspects of wound healing in cancer patients are discussed, and observations and recommendations for optimal wound healing results are considered. Conclusion: Although wound healing may proceed in a relatively unimpeded manner for many patients with cancer, there is a potential for wound failure due to the nature and effects of the oncologic disease process and its treatments.

Payne, Wyatt G.; Naidu, Deepak K.; Wheeler, Chad K.; Barkoe, David; Mentis, Marni; Salas, R. Emerick; Smith, David J.; Robson, Martin C.

2008-01-01

314

Incidence, microbiological findings, and clinical presentation of sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery with and without local gentamicin prophylaxis.  

PubMed

Sternal wound infection (SWI) is a serious complication after cardiac surgery. In a previous randomized controlled trial, the addition of local collagen-gentamicin in the sternal wound before wound closure was found to significantly reduce the incidence of postoperative wound infections compared with the routine intravenous prophylaxis of isoxazolyl-penicillin only. The aims of the present study were to analyse the microbiological findings of the SWIs from the previous trial as well as to correlate these findings with the clinical presentation of SWI. Differences in clinical presentation of SWIs, depending on the causative agent, could be identified. Most infections had a late, insidious onset, and the majority of these were caused by staphylococci, predominantly coagulase-negative staphylococci. The clinically most fulminant infections were caused by gram-negative bacteria and presented early after surgery. Local administration of gentamicin reduced the incidence of SWIs caused by all major, clinically important bacterial species. Propionibacterium acnes was identified as a possible cause of SWI and may be linked to instability in the sternal fixation. There was no indication of an increase in the occurrence of gentamicin-resistant bacterial isolates in the treatment group. Furthermore, the addition of local collagen-gentamicin reduced the incidence of SWIs caused by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci. This technique warrants further evaluation as an alternative to prophylactic vancomycin in settings with a high prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:17211605

Friberg, O; Svedjeholm, R; Källman, J; Söderquist, B

2007-02-01

315

Hepatic wound repair  

PubMed Central

Background Human chronic liver diseases (CLDs) with different aetiologies rely on chronic activation of wound healing that represents the driving force for fibrogenesis progression (throughout defined patterns of fibrosis) to the end stage of cirrhosis and liver failure. Issues Fibrogenesis progression has a major worldwide clinical impact due to the high number of patients affected by CLDs, increasing mortality rate, incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and shortage of organ donors for liver transplantation. Basic science advances Liver fibrogenesis is sustained by a heterogeneous population of profibrogenic hepatic myofibroblasts (MFs), the majority being positive for ? smooth muscle actin (?SMA), that may originate from hepatic stellate cells and portal fibroblasts following a process of activation or from bone marrow-derived cells recruited to damaged liver and, in a method still disputed, by a process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) involving cholangiocytes and hepatocytes. Recent experimental and clinical data have identified, at tissue, cellular and molecular level major profibrogenic mechanisms: (a) chronic activation of the wound-healing reaction, (b) oxidative stress and related reactive intermediates, and (c) derangement of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Clinical care relevance Liver fibrosis may regress following specific therapeutic interventions able to downstage or, at least, stabilise fibrosis. In cirrhotic patients, this would lead to a reduction of portal hypertension and of the consequent clinical complications and to an overall improvement of liver function, thus extending the complication-free patient survival time and reducing the need for liver transplantation. Conclusion Emerging mechanisms and concepts related to liver fibrogenesis may significantly contribute to clinical management of patients affected by CLDs.

Parola, Maurizio; Pinzani, Massimo

2009-01-01

316

Prevention and Treatment Options for Postoperative Crohn's Disease  

PubMed Central

The majority of patients with Crohn’s disease require surgery for disease-related complications. Postoperative Crohn’s disease recurrence is common after intestinal resection. The optimal management strategy for postoperative recurrence of Crohn’s disease is controversial. In the absence of universally adopted guidelines, clinicians and patients must discuss and weigh the risks and benefits of postoperative pharmacotherapy. Those patients at low risk of disease recurrence may not require treatment. On the other hand, patients with more aggressive disease and high risk of recurrence may be best treated early in the postoperative period with an immunomodulator or antitumor necrosis factor agents. Ideally, postoperative treatment decisions would be made using predictable, reliable, and reproducible clinical prediction criteria that would guide treatment. This article reviews the data on postoperative Crohn’s disease, including predictors of early recurrence, available options for postoperative monitoring, timing of initiation, and choice of postoperative therapy for prevention and management.

Clarke, Kofi

2009-01-01

317

Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds  

SciTech Connect

The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

Jaing, C

2012-03-19

318

Complications and safety aspects of kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral fractures: a prospective follow-up study in 102 consecutive patients  

PubMed Central

Background Kyphoplasty represents an established minimal-invasive method for correction and augmentation of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Reliable data on perioperative and postoperative complications are lacking in the literature. The present study was designed to evaluate the incidence and patterns of perioperative complications in order to determine the safety of this procedure for patients undergoing kyphoplasty. Patients and Methods We prospectively enrolled 102 consecutive patients (82 women and 20 men; mean age 69) with 135 operatively treated fractured vertebrae who underwent a kyphoplasty between January 2004 to June 2006. Clinical and radiological follow-up was performed for up 6 months after surgery. Results Preoperative pain levels, as determined by the visual analogous scale (VAS) were 7.5 +/- 1.3. Postoperative pain levels were significantly reduced at day 1 after surgery (VAS 2.3 +/- 2.2) and at 6-month follow-up (VAS 1.4 +/- 0.9). Fresh vertebral fractures at adjacent levels were detected radiographically in 8 patients within 6 months. Two patients had a loss of reduction with subsequent sintering of the operated vertebrae and secondary spinal stenosis. Accidental cement extravasation was detected in 7 patients in the intraoperative radiographs. One patient developed a postoperative infected spondylitis at the operated level, which was treated by anterior corporectomy and 360 degrees fusion. Another patient developed a superficial wound infection which required surgical revision. Postoperative bleeding resulting in a subcutaneous haematoma evacuation was seen in one patient. Conclusion The data from the present study imply that percutaneous kyphoplasty can be associated with severe intra- and postoperative complications. This minimal-invasive surgical procedure should therefore be performed exclusively by spine surgeons who have the capability of managing perioperative complications.

Robinson, Yohan; Tschoke, Sven Kevin; Stahel, Philip F; Kayser, Ralph; Heyde, Christoph E

2008-01-01

319

The influence of intestinal flora on wound healing in mice.  

PubMed

The wound healing process was analyzed using male ICR germ-free (Gf) mice and their conventionalized (Cvz) counterparts to determine whether intestinal flora has any influence on the wound healing of a host. A longitudinal skin incision of about 35 mm was made in the dorsum of each mouse, and six interrupted sutures with 5-0 monofilament nylon thread laid for wound closure. Mice from both groups were killed on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th postoperative days, and the tensile strength of the healing wound and hydroxyproline (HP) concentration in the biologically active zone were measured as parameters of wound healing. The daily nitrogen balance and urinary creatinine excretion were also measured for 8 days. The Cvz mice showed greater tensile strength of the wound on the 3rd and 7th postoperative days, and a higher ratio of HP concentration, being wound tissue/control tissue, than their counterparts. The Cvz mice also thrived more prominently than the Gf mice, showing a positive nitrogen balance with limited urinary creatinine excretion. These results suggest the enhancing effect of normal intestinal flora on wound healing, probably through the beneficial nutritional effects supplied by the bacteria. PMID:8038512

Okada, M

1994-01-01

320

Pericardium-6 Acupressure for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are common problems after general anesthesia. Pharmacological advances have reduced the incidence of PONV however; nausea and vomiting remain the most common postoperative complications of anesthesia. Persistent na...

R. M. Woods

1999-01-01

321

Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery  

PubMed Central

The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery.

Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

2014-01-01

322

[Complications of liposuction].  

PubMed

Liposuction is the most frequent aesthetic procedure worldwide for adipose tissue reduction and treatment of lipedema. It is being employed with increasing frequency. In 2010, in the USA more than 200.000 liposuctions were performed. Apart from aesthetic indications, liposuction also is suitable for treatment of benign adipose tissue diseases. This intervention is not a simple procedure but requires extensive knowledge and experience to prevent irreversible medical or aesthetic complications. Severe complications including necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, hemorrhage, perforation of inner organs und pulmonary embolism - some even with lethal outcome - occasionally have been reported. These complications were mostly due to inadequate hygiene measures, inappropriate patient selection, use of excessive local anesthesia during mega-liposuction (tumescent technique) and inadequate post-operative surveillance. The complication rate usually reflects a lack of medical experience as well as technical inadequacies. PMID:23494094

Sattler, G; Eichner, S

2013-03-01

323

Surgical Complications after Kidney Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Surgical complications following renal transplan-tation can occur at any time, and are predominantly related to the transplant\\u000a wound, vascular anastomoses, or other urologic problems. Surgical complications continue to occur in about 10–20% of transplant\\u000a recipients, but fortunately, are rarely the cause of allograft loss. Improvements in surgical technique and meticulous attention\\u000a to both the donor and recipient operations have led

Stuart M. Flechner

324

[Vacuum assisted wound closure --overview of lesson and applications].  

PubMed

The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive actual overview of the Vacuum Assisted Closure therapy (VAC). VAC is new method for wound treatment. VAC is assigned especially for per secundam healed wounds. Open-cell foam is placed into the wound with the evacuation drain. The wound side and foam are then covered with an adhesive drape. The evacuation drain is connected to a computerized vacuum pump. The VAC removes excess fluid, reduces the number of microorganisms and increases temperature in the wound. Mechanical stress causes granulation tissue formation and neoangiogenesis. The most of published studies present positive influence of VAC for wound healing. The newest studies present positive influence for healing of contaminated wounds, wounds after thoracic surgery, traumatic wounds and also for wounds of diabetic patients. The use of VAC for oncology patients is controversial, but there are some studies to present VAC positive effect in these cases, too. However there are a few studies to present negative complications of VAC, especially increase of microorganisms in the wound. For all that VAC is not standard for wound healing treatment now, presented studies point out that VAC can by used in generally surgery. PMID:17091725

Toporcer, T; Radonák, J

2006-01-01

325

Abdominal stab wounds: self-inflicted wounds versus assault wounds.  

PubMed

Intentional penetrating wounds, self inflicted or inflicted by others, are increasingly common. As a result, it can be difficult for the forensic examiner to determine whether the cause is self-inflicted or not. This type of trauma has been studied from a psychological perspective and from a surgical perspective but the literature concerning the forensic perspective is poorer. The objective of this study was to compare the epidemiology of abdominal stab wounds so as to distinguish specific features of each type. This could help the forensic scientist to determine the manner of infliction of the wound. We proposed a retrospective monocentric study that included all patients with an abdominal wound who were managed by the visceral surgery department at Angers University Hospital. Demographic criteria, patient history, circumstances and location of the wound were noted and compared. A comparison was drawn between group 1 (self inflicted wound) and group 2 (assault). This study showed that the only significant differences are represented by the patient's prior history and the circumstances surrounding the wound, i.e. the scene and time of day. In our study, neither the site, nor the injuries sustained reveal significant clues as to the origin of the wound. According to our findings, in order to determine the cause, the forensic examiner should thus carefully study the circumstances and any associated injuries. PMID:23622473

Venara, Aurélien; Jousset, Nathalie; Airagnes, Guillaume; Arnaud, Jean-Pierre; Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde

2013-05-01

326

Salvage of a complicated penis replantation using bipedicled scrotal flap following a prolonged ischaemia time.  

PubMed

Microsurgical replantation is the standard method to treat penile amputation. The loss of variable area of skin is a common complication following penile replantation due to prolonged ischaemia time, postoperative venous congestion, oedema and wound infection. There is limited literature available on the management of complications following replantation. A skin graft is commonly used to resurface the denuded areas after skin necrosis. However, this simple and rapid approach has some inherent disadvantages, including paresthesia, contracture, mismatched skin colour and disfiguring donor site. In this report, we present the salvage of a replanted penis by a bipedicled scrotal flap in which the skin fragment was necrosed due to prolonged ischaemia time. Cosmetic and functional outcomes in the 1-year follow-up period were satisfactory. PMID:20189899

Ching, Wei-Cheng; Liao, Han-Tsung; Ulusal, Betul Gozel; Chen, Chien-Tzung; Lin, Chih-Hung

2010-08-01

327

Unusual complication after genioplasty.  

PubMed

Facial beauty depends on shape, proportion, and harmony between the facial thirds. The chin is one of the most important components of the inferior third and has an important role on the definition of facial aesthetic and harmony in both frontal and lateral views. There are 2 principal therapeutic approaches that one can choose to treat mental deformities, alloplastic implants, and mental basilar ostectomy, also known as genioplasty. The latest is more commonly used because of great versatility in the correction of three-dimensional deformities of the chin and smaller taxes of postoperative complications. Possible transoperative and postoperative complications of genioplasty include mental nerve lesion, bleeding, damage to tooth roots, bone resorption of the mobilized segment, mandibular fracture, ptosis of the lower lip, and failure to stabilize the ostectomized segment. The study presents 2 cases of displacement of the osteotomized segment after genioplasty associated with facial trauma during postoperative orthognathic surgery followed by rare complications with no reports in the literature. PMID:24621765

Avelar, Rafael Linard; Sá, Carlos Diego Lopes; Esses, Diego Felipe Silveira; Becker, Otávio Emmel; Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; de Oliveira, Rogerio Belle

2014-03-01

328

[Postoperative cystitis in children].  

PubMed

Operative intervention on the urinary bladder in children entails postoperative reactive cystitis. Biopsies of urinary bladder mucosa were studied morphologically. Basing on these morphological findings and clinical evidence, three leading variants of the mucosa changes were distinguished: focal squamous cell metaplasia; excess of the lymphoid tissue and lymphangiectasia; hemangiectasia. These morphological changes aggravate the course of postoperative cystitis. UHF-therapy and magnetic-laser radiation beginning postoperative day 4 and 7, respectively, reduce inflammation developing in postoperative cystitis. This indicates effectiveness of the above combined therapy which can be also used for prevention of acute inflammation episodes in postoperative period. PMID:12180061

Pugachev, A G; Kudriavtsev, Iu V; Alferov, S M; Kniaz'kina, O M; Romikh, V V

2002-01-01

329

Risk of complications following gynecological laparoscopic surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the incidence and predictors of risk for operative complications, conversions to laparotomy, and postoperative admissions following laparoscopic procedures.Methods: We obtained demographic information and medical history on all 843 women who underwent laparoscopic procedures at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital between January and December 1994. All major complications following surgery were recorded. Major operative complications were defined as

R. Mirhashemi; B. L. Harlow; E. Ginsberg; L. B. Signorello; R. Berkowitz; S. Feldman

1998-01-01

330

[Pathogenesis of chronic wounds].  

PubMed

Chronic, nonhealing wounds and their therapy are not only a medical problem but a severe economic one as well. Such wounds have a great effect on quality of life. Basic research has enhanced our understanding of the stimulation and inhibition of wound healing and provides the basis for introducing new and innovative treatment methods. This paper reviews the most relevant in- and extrinsic factors that disturb physiologic wound healing to result in chronic nonhealing wounds. In addition, molecular intervention modalities targeting various aspects of wound repair are demonstrated. PMID:18483714

Riedel, K; Ryssel, H; Koellensperger, E; Germann, G; Kremer, T

2008-06-01

331

Laparoscopic tubal sterilization: long-term postoperative follow-up.  

PubMed

93 women who underwent laparoscopic tubal coagulation during 1972-1973 were followed up for periods of 18 months to 3 years. Ages ranged from 17 to 47 years (mean 30.7) and 71% had 2-4 children. 8 requested sterilization prior to conception and 5 had pregnancy previously terminated by abortion. Most common postoperative complaints were tenderness at the incision site and shoulder or neck pain. In the 64 cases in which sterilization alone was performed average blood loss was less than 50 cc. In 8 cases it was associated with diagnositc dilatation and curettage, in 20 with therapeutic abortion, and in 1 with laparotomy. Complications included 1 case each of bleeding mesosalpinx controlled by cautery, wound hematoma, hematoma epiploic appendix, and peritoneal burn. A detailed menstrual history 18-36 months after operation found 73 of the 93 had regular periods with amount of bleeding and length of cycle generally unchanged. Of the 20 with menstrual changes, 2 developed amenorrhea within 1 year and 8 with preoperative menstrual irregularities were unchagned. 10 developed longer periods and/or shorter intervals. 5 related these changes to discontination of oral contraceptives. Of the remaining 1 had an abnormal Pap smear, 2 were 40-45 years of age (1 of whom refused vaginal hysterectomy for stress incontinence), and 2 were 35-40 with no previous history of cesarean sections or pelvic complaints. The majority (77%) of the women were satisfied with the procedure, 16% uncertain, and 5 patients expressed regret. 4 of the 5 who regretted the operation reported gynecological complaints. 5 required subsequent surgery. In 3 of the 5 the indication preexisted the sterilization and a more thorough screening might have prevented 2 surgical procedures. In this series the incidence of postoperative gynecological disease 18-36 months after laparoscopic tubal ligation is significantly lower than that reported in the literature for conventional tubal ligation. PMID:131021

Rubinstein, L M; Lebherz, T B; Kleinkopf, V

1976-05-01

332

Endoscopic versus open saphenous vein harvest: the effect on postoperative outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Endoscopic vein harvest (EVH) has been promoted as a possible solution to the wound complications, incisional pain, and prolonged convalesce associated with open vein harvesting (OVH). The purpose of this study was to objectively compare the two techniques.Methods. One hundred patients were prospectively randomized to EVH or OVH. Primary outcomes were wound complications, pain (Medical Outcomes Study Pain Survey),

Thomas Z Hayward; Lloyd A Hey; Lewis L Newman; Francis G Duhaylongsod; Katharine A Hayward; James E Lowe; Peter K Smith

1999-01-01

333

Postoperative assessment of the patient after transsphenoidal pituitary surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

While most transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is accomplished without complication, monitoring is required postoperatively\\u000a for a set of disorders that are specific to this surgery. Postoperative assessments are tailored to the early and later postoperative\\u000a periods. In the early period, which spans the first few weeks after surgery, both monitoring of anterior and posterior pituitary\\u000a function and managing neurosurgical issues are

John C. Ausiello; Jeffrey N. Bruce; Pamela U. Freda

2008-01-01

334

Enhancement of lysine acetylation accelerates wound repair.  

PubMed

In physiopathological conditions, such as diabetes, wound healing is significantly compromised and chronic complications, including ulcers, may occur. In a mouse model of skin repair, we recently reported that wound treatment with Sirtuin activators and class I HDAC inhibitors induced keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced healing via a nitric oxide (NO) dependent mechanism. We observed an increase in total protein acetylation in the wound area, as determined by acetylation of ?-tubulin and histone H3 Lysine 9. We reasoned that this process activated cell function as well as regulated gene expression to foster tissue repair. We report here that the direct activation of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) by the histone acetylase activator pentadecylidenemalonate 1b (SPV-106) induced Lysine acetylation in the wound area. This intervention was sufficient to enhance repair process by a NO-independent mechanism. Hence, an impairment of PCAF and/or other GCN5 family acetylases may delay skin repair in physiopathological conditions. PMID:24265859

Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Straino, Stefania; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio; Gaetano, Carlo

2013-09-01

335

Enhancement of lysine acetylation accelerates wound repair  

PubMed Central

In physiopathological conditions, such as diabetes, wound healing is significantly compromised and chronic complications, including ulcers, may occur. In a mouse model of skin repair, we recently reported that wound treatment with Sirtuin activators and class I HDAC inhibitors induced keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced healing via a nitric oxide (NO) dependent mechanism. We observed an increase in total protein acetylation in the wound area, as determined by acetylation of ?-tubulin and histone H3 Lysine 9. We reasoned that this process activated cell function as well as regulated gene expression to foster tissue repair. We report here that the direct activation of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) by the histone acetylase activator pentadecylidenemalonate 1b (SPV-106) induced Lysine acetylation in the wound area. This intervention was sufficient to enhance repair process by a NO-independent mechanism. Hence, an impairment of PCAF and/or other GCN5 family acetylases may delay skin repair in physiopathological conditions.

Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Straino, Stefania; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio; Gaetano, Carlo

2013-01-01

336

Wound Healing Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studies directed toward improving wound healing and resistance to wound infection of severely injured soldiers have been carried out aimed at establishing improved prophylactic and therapeutic measures. The studies are based on our view that some of the c...

S. M. Levenson

1981-01-01

337

Diabetic Wound Care  

MedlinePLUS

... skin and tissue, called “debridement” Applying medication or dressings to the ulcer Managing blood glucose and other ... bandaged; cleanse the wound daily, using a wound dressing or bandage; and avoid walking barefoot. For optimum ...

338

Scars and Wounds  

MedlinePLUS

... hands well before and after changing a wound dressing. Never re-use dressings. Always keep the wound clean. Unless you were ... gauze. If possible, use paper tape. Keep your dressing clean and dry. If it gets wet or ...

339

Bacterial Wound Culture  

MedlinePLUS

... Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related tests: Gram Stain , Susceptibility Testing , Blood Culture , Urine Culture , AFB ... growing in the culture. One such test, the gram stain , involves smearing individual colony types onto glass ...

340

Difficult wounds: an update.  

PubMed

The purpose of this collective review is to describe revolutionary advances in the treatment of Gardner's syndrome (GS), pseudofolliculitis barbae, nasal septal perforation, factitious wounds, and hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Gardner's syndrome or familial polyposis has various manifestations that appear to be controlled by a single genetic locus. Apart from the large bowel adenomas, which are always present, a common extracolonic symptom of Gardner's syndrome is the occurrence of epidermal cysts. These cysts can be seen before the intestinal polyps are evident. Because epidermal cysts in patients with Gardner's syndrome are always benign, we excise these cysts using incisions that are commonly used for rhytidectomy. Pseudofolliculitis barbae, a pseudofolliculitis caused by ingrown hairs, effects 85% of blacks who shave their beards. When this disease is allowed to progress to keloid formation, we use a surgical approach that includes excision of the keloidal scar, meticulous debridement of all residual ingrown hairs in the underlying wound, and coverage of the defect with a split-thickness skin graft. More recently, laser therapy has revolutionized the treatment of pseudofolliculitis barbae and has enabled a cure for the first time for those plagued with this disorder and for whom a beardless face is acceptable. Nasal septal perforation is a well recognized complication of septal surgery. Other iatrogenic causes of perforation include cryosurgery, electrocoagulation for epitaxis, nasotracheal intubation, or nose packing. In recent years drugs such as cocaine account for an increasing number of perforations. It has only been with the use of an external approach for the repair of the nasal septal defect that surgical closure has become easier and more reliable. The external approach allows for greater surgical closure and enables the surgeon to use both hands with the aid of binocular vision to mobilize and suture local mucosal advancement flaps and the intraseptal connective tissue grafts. More recently, surgeons have repaired large septal perforations with a radial forearm free flap. Because of its availability and deep emotional significance, the skin is a common site for self-destructive behavior with the development of factitious skin wounds. When suspected, psychiatric care must proceed immediately. Second, the ulcer can then be healed by appropriate techniques and wound repair. It is important to emphasize that the treating physician must first confront the patient, and then a psychiatrist should provide appropriate psychotherapy. Hidradenitis suppurativa is an inflammatory disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that occurs in apocrine-gland-bearing areas distributed in the axilla, mammary nipple areola, mons pubis, groin, scrotum, perineum, perianal region, and umbilicus. The condition has an insidious onset. The susceptibility of women's axillary skin to hidradenitis suppurativa may be related, in part, to the practice of axillary removal of hair with a safety razor. Consequently, the use of safety razors must be avoided and replaced with the use of an electric razor. The method of treatment will vary with the stage of the disease. Treatment of the chronic stage of axillary hidradenitis suppurativa is primarily surgical. More recently, carbon dioxide laser treatment, with healing by secondary intention, is proving to be a rapid, efficient, and economic treatment of this difficult wound. PMID:16022640

Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Drake, David B

2005-01-01

341

CCMR: Wound Dressing Tool and Wound Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of our project is to develop a Wound Dressing Tool (WDT) that in addition to extracting overabundant chemicals like the VAC system does, can also allow for variable rates of mass transfer as well as a way for clinicians to monitor the fluid chemical composition of the wound bed during the healing and treatment processes.

Men, Shannon

2005-08-17

342

[New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].  

PubMed

Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

2013-01-01

343

Complications of Operative Gynecological Laparoscopy  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess the incidence and type of laparoscopic complications. Methods: A series of 2140 operative laparoscopies were reviewed in a retrospective study of patient records. The setting was a tertiary-care university hospital. Operative laparoscopy included minor procedures (minimal adhesiolysis, destruction of minimal endometriosis foci, ovarian biopsy, ovarian puncture, tubal sterilization), major laparoscopic surgery (extended adhesiolysis, tuboplasties, uterine suspension, treatment for ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis, ovarian cyst, moderate and severe endometriosis), and advanced laparoscopic surgery (hysterectomy, myomectomy, bladder neck suspension). Results: Two major vascular complications, 3 intestinal injuries, 1 anesthesiological complication, and 4 urinary tract injuries occurred. Two minor and 5 postoperative complications were noted. The overall complication rate was 17/2140 (0.79%). The major complication rate was 10/2140 (0.46%). Conclusions: This review is useful for helping surgeons reduce the risk of injuries and to inform patients about potential complications. These rates are similar to those that have been previously reported.

Carvajal, Antonio R.

2003-01-01

344

Postoperative cognitive disorders  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review The elderly are the fastest growing segment of the population and undergo 25–30% of all surgical procedures. Postoperative cognitive problems are common in older patients following major surgery. The socioeconomic implications of these cognitive disorders are profound; cognitive decline is associated with a loss of independence, a reduction in the quality of life, and death. This review will focus on the two most common cognitive problems following surgery: postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Recent findings For years, preoperative geriatric consultation/screening was the only intervention proven to decrease postoperative delirium. There are, however, several recent publications indicating that preoperative and postoperative pharmacological and medical (hydration, oxygenation) management can reduce postoperative delirium. Spinal anesthesia with minimal propofol sedation has been shown to decrease the incidence of postoperative delirium in hip-fracture patients. Likewise, dexmedetomidine sedation in mechanically ventilated patients in the ICU is associated with less postoperative delirium and shorter ventilator times. Preoperative levels of education and brain function (cognitive reserve) may predict patients at risk for postoperative cognitive problems. Reduced white matter integrity is reported to place patients at a higher risk for both postoperative delirium and POCD. Summary The etiology of postoperative cognitive problems is unknown, but there is emerging evidence that decreased preoperative cognitive function contributes to the development of postoperative delirium and POCD. There is growing concern that inhalation anesthetics may be neurotoxic to the aging brain, but there are no human data evaluating this hypothesis to date. Randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions to improve long-term cognitive outcomes in elderly patients are urgently needed.

Monk, Terri G.; Price, Catherine C.

2013-01-01

345

Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment  

PubMed Central

Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review.

Topaz, Moris

2012-01-01

346

The Wound Microbiome: Modern Approaches to Examining the Role of Microorganisms in Impaired Chronic Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Significance: Bacterial burden is believed to play a significant role in impaired wound healing of chronic wounds and the development of infection-related complications. The standard of care in the clinic relies upon cultivation-dependent methods to identify microorganisms. These assays are biased toward microorganisms that thrive in isolation under laboratory conditions. Recent Advances: Significant advances in genomic technologies have enabled less-biased, culture-independent approaches to characterize microbial communities, or microbiomes. The aggregate sequencing and analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA genes has demonstrated that cultures under-represent true microbial diversity and load. Critical Issues: Despite recent advances that enable culture-independent analyses of microbiomes, those organisms that are important in impaired healing remain ambiguous. Inconsistent findings across various studies highlight the need to characterize microbiomes of chronic wounds with homogenous etiology to determine differences in microbiomes that may be driven by the wound environment and that may affect wound outcomes. Rigorous analyses of wound microbiomes in light of the three dimensions of bioburden (microbial diversity, microbial load, and pathogenic organisms), clinical metadata, and wound outcomes will be a significant step forward in our quest to understand the role of microorganisms in impaired healing. Future Directions: Longitudinal studies employing serial sampling are needed to appreciate the role of the dynamic microbial community in chronic wound healing. The value of clinical metadata needs to be examined as potential biomarkers of problematic microbiota and wound outcomes. Lastly, better characterization and understanding of wound microbiomes will open avenues for improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the nonhealing wound.

Misic, Ana M.; Gardner, Sue E.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

2014-01-01

347

Chronic Morphine Administration Delays Wound Healing by Inhibiting Immune Cell Recruitment to the Wound Site  

PubMed Central

Patients prescribed morphine for the management of chronic pain, and chronic heroin abusers, often present with complications such as increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and inadequate healing of wounds. We investigated the effect of morphine on wound-healing events in the presence of an infection in an in vivo murine model that mimics the clinical manifestations seen in opioid user and abuser populations. We show for the first time that in the presence of an inflammatory inducer, lipopolysaccharide, chronic morphine treatment results in a marked decrease in wound closure, compromised wound integrity, and increased bacterial sepsis. Morphine treatment resulted in a significant delay and reduction in both neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site. The delay and reduction in neutrophil reduction was attributed to altered early expression of keratinocyte derived cytokine and was independent of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 expression, whereas suppression of macrophage infiltration was attributed to suppressed levels of the potent macrophage chemoattractant monocyte chemotactic protein-1. When the effects of chronic morphine on later wound healing events were investigated, a significant suppression in angiogenesis and myofibroblast recruitment were observed in animals that received chronic morphine administration. Taken together, our findings indicate that morphine treatment results in a delay in the recruitment of cellular events following wounding, resulting in a lack of bacterial clearance and delayed wound closure.

Martin, Josephine L.; Koodie, Lisa; Krishnan, Anitha G.; Charboneau, Richard; Barke, Roderick A.; Roy, Sabita

2010-01-01

348

Management of open wounds: lessons from orthopedic oncology.  

PubMed

The management of complex wounds remains a challenge, and although there have been many promising advances, patients often undergo a morbid and lengthy process to obtain sufficient, satisfactory healing. Sarcoma patients are especially vulnerable to soft tissue wound-healing complications. These patients are often treated with neoadjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy and have compromised local vascularity to healing tissue. The advent and refinement of wound vacuum-assisted closure technology have been shown to have a tremendous impact. This article reviews the benefits of some novel technologies currently undergoing investigation in orthopedic oncology that will likely have applications in wound management from other causes. PMID:24267211

Siegel, Herrick J

2014-01-01

349

Episiotomy and obstetric perineal wound dehiscence: beyond soreness.  

PubMed

Postpartum episiotomy dehiscence is a rare complication of vaginal delivery. Infection rates in episiotomy wounds are surprisingly low; however, it remains the most common cause of wound dehiscence, which may lead to major physical, psychological and social problems if left untreated. Most dehisced perineal wounds are left to heal naturally by secondary intention. This approach often results in a protracted period of significant morbidity for women. There is emerging evidence that early re-suturing closure of broken-down perineal wounds may have a better outcome, but randomised controlled trials are needed to yield evidence-based guidance for this management approach. PMID:24484355

Kamel, A; Khaled, M

2014-04-01

350

Systematic review of the use of honey as a wound dressing  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To investigate topical honey in superficial burns and wounds though a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, reference lists and databases were used to seek randomised controlled trials. Seven randomised trials involved superficial burns, partial thickness burns, moderate to severe burns that included full thickness injury, and infected postoperative wounds. REVIEW METHODS:

Owen A Moore; Lesley A Smith; Fiona Campbell; Kate Seers; Henry J McQuay; R Andrew Moore

2001-01-01

351

Effect of Antibiotics on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Bacteria Causing Orthopedic Wound Infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Despite antibiotic prophylaxis and treatment, the incidence of wound infections in orthopedic surgery is significant. Postoperative wound infection is a multifactorial process, which can be modified by several bacterial factors. Cell surface hydrophobicity of bacteria is a very important physicochemical feature, which has a great influence on the ability of bacteria to adhere to the surface of host cells

Tamás Kustos; Ildikó Kustos; Ferenc Kilár; Gábor Rappai; Béla Kocsis

2003-01-01

352

G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner.  

PubMed

This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure, and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation after Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (3- to 4-month) and aged (18- to 20-month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 ?L per injection) or saline control (50 ?L per injection) 30 min after wound infection. Mice were killed at days 3 and 7 after wound infection, and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation, and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no effect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of postoperative wound infection or chronic nonhealing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

Brubaker, Aleah L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

2013-10-01

353

Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment  

PubMed Central

Background Wounding following whole-body ?-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI) increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co ?-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI) vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in ?-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in ?-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI) included continuously decreased ?-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI) included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined injury and reduce related mortality.

2012-01-01

354

Supplemental Intravenous Crystalloid Administration Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Wound Infection  

PubMed Central

Wound perfusion and oxygenation are important determinants of the development of postoperative wound infections. Supplemental fluid administration significantly increases tissue oxygenation in surrogate wounds in the subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm in perioperative surgical patients. We tested the hypothesis that supplemental fluid administration during and after elective colon resections decreases the incidence of postoperative wound infections. Patients undergoing open colon resection were randomly assigned to small (n=124, 8 mL·kg-1·h-1) or large volume (n=129, 16-18 mL·kg-1·h-1) fluid management. Our major outcomes were two distinct criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections: 1) purulent exudate combined with a culture positive for pathogenic bacteria and 2) Center for Disease Control criteria for diagnosis of surgical wound infections. All wound infections diagnosed using either criterion by a blinded observer in the 15 days following surgery were considered in the analysis. Wound healing was evaluated with the ASEPSIS scoring system. Of the patients given small fluid administration, 14 had surgical wound infections; 11 given large fluid therapy had infections, P=0.46. ASEPSIS wound healing scores were similar in both groups: 7±16 (small volume) vs. 8±14 (large volume), P=0.70. Our results suggest that supplemental hydration in the range tested does not impact wound infection rate.

Kabon, Barbara; Akca, Ozan; Taguchi, Akiko; Nagele, Angelika; Jebadurai, Ratnaraj; Arkilic, Cem F.; Sharma, Neeru; Ahluwalia, Arundhathi; Galandiuk, Susan; Fleshman, James; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

2005-01-01

355

Assessing the complications and effectiveness of open carpal tunnel release in a tertiary care centre in a developing country  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Open surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome is not devoid of complications and its quantitative assessment with the Boston questionnaire in a developing country had not been conducted, where, lack of facilities and surgical technique can influence the outcome. PRESENTATION OF CASE This was a prospective study in which all cases of carpal tunnel syndrome undergoing open release between June 2007 and June 2012 and who returned for follow up were included. Each patient was requested to fill out the Boston questionnaire twice both pre and post op at 3 months. All complications were recorded as well as bio-data of patients and co morbidities. Follow up was at 2 weeks and at 3 months. Those reporting complications at 3 months were further followed up until 6 months. 373 patients were included in the study. Twenty four patients developed complications. Of these, 12 experienced pain resulting from reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Three patients developed wound dehiscence, 2 cases acquired infections, 4 patients developed immediate post-operative haemorrhage and in 3 patients there was late recurrence of median nerve compression. The symptom severity score pre-operatively was 3.30 (±0.60) and it improved to 1.65 (±0.75) post-operatively indicating a significant change (p < 0.0001). The preoperative functional status score was 2.58 (±0.75) and post-op it became 1.60 (±0.80) again implying a good improvement with an effect size of 1.3. DISCUSSION All of the complications produced were well managed. The complication incidence was low. The open release procedure produced good improvement in hand function and in decreasing the symptom severity. CONCLUSION Conducting open release for carpal tunnel syndrome in a tertiary referral centre in a developing country offers a good outcome.

Rahman, Khaleeq ur; Rahman, Shafiq; Khan, Adnan; Khan, Nauman Aman; Khan, Farman Ullah; khan, Rehman Ali; Farooq, Shama; Khan, Hamid

2014-01-01

356

[Prevention of postoperative wound infections. Evidence-based recommendations].  

PubMed

Among all hospitalized patients, surgical site infections (SSI) are the third most frequently hospital-acquired-infection. SSIs remain a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality among surgical patients. This may be partially explained by the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens and the increased numbers of patients who are elderly and/or have a wide variety of chronic, debilitating, or immunocompromising underlying diseases. This is why it is essential to implement SSI prevention measures. In April 1999 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) presented the "Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection". The recommendations represent the consensus of the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) regarding strategies for the prevention of SSIs. Whenever possible, the recommendations are based on data from well-designed scientific studies. This guideline is a major step forward and is also essential to optimize the management of surgical patients in Germany. PMID:11253544

Geffers, C; Gastmeier, P; Daschner, F; Rüden, H

2001-02-01

357

Advances in wound dressings.  

PubMed

Wound dressings have undergone an evolutionary process from natural materials that simply covered and concealed the wound, to materials that focused on moisture management, and more recently, to materials that either deliver active ingredients or interact directly with cells or specific chemicals in the local wound environment. Advances in dressings technology have led to a new proliferation of topical products that do more than just cover and conceal, but that also can facilitate the healing process as well as address specific issues in nonhealing wounds. Dressings may play an important adjunctive role in concert with overall efforts to manage the underlying causes of chronic nonhealing wounds. PMID:17276199

Ovington, Liza G

2007-01-01

358

Risk factors for short- and long-term complications after groin surgery in vulvar cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: The cornerstone of treatment in early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the vulva is surgery, predominantly consisting of wide local excision with elective uni- or bi-lateral inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy. This strategy is associated with a good prognosis, but also with impressive treatment-related morbidity. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for the short-term (wound breakdown, infection and lymphocele) and long-term (lymphoedema and cellulitis/erysipelas) complications after groin surgery as part of the treatment of vulvar SCC. Methods: Between January 1988 and June 2009, 164 consecutive patients underwent an inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy as part of their surgical treatment for vulvar SCC at the Department of Gynaecologic Oncology at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. The clinical and histopathological data were retrospectively analysed. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that older age, diabetes, ‘en bloc' surgery and higher drain production on the last day of drain in situ gave a higher risk of developing short-term complications. Younger age and lymphocele gave higher risk of developing long-term complications. Higher number of lymph nodes dissected seems to protect against developing any long-term complications. Conclusion: Our analysis shows that patient characteristics, extension of surgery and postoperative management influence short- and/or long-term complications after inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy in vulvar SCC patients. Further research of postoperative management is necessary to analyse possibilities to decrease the complication rate of inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy; although the sentinel lymph node procedure appears to be a promising technique, in ?50% of the patients an inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy is still indicated.

Hinten, F; van den Einden, L C G; Hendriks, J C M; van der Zee, A G J; Bulten, J; Massuger, L F A G; van de Nieuwenhof, H P; de Hullu, J A

2011-01-01

359

A prospective, randomized, controlled trial of primary wound closure after lateral internal sphincterotomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundMuch of the lateral internal sphincterotomy (LIS) complications is related to LIS incision. In this study, incisions sutured primarily or left to secondary healing after open LIS procedure are compared regarding the wound healing and complications associated with wounds.

Erhan Aysan; Acar Aren; Erdal Ayar

2004-01-01

360

Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

Wagner, Timothy D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: timothy.wagner@amedd.army.mil; Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Suit, Herman D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S. [Orthopaedic Oncology, Department of Orthopaedics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yoon, Sam S. [Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Gebhardt, Marc C. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Mankin, Henry J. [Orthopaedic Oncology, Department of Orthopaedics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2009-01-01

361

Extended negative pressure wound therapy-assisted dermatotraction for the closure of large open fasciotomy wounds in necrotizing fasciitis patients  

PubMed Central

Background Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapid progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue or fascia and may result in large open wounds. The surgical options to cover these wounds are often limited by the patient condition and result in suboptimal functional and cosmetic wound coverage. Dermatotraction can restore the function and appearance of the fasciotomy wound and is less invasive in patients with comorbidities. However, dermatotraction for scarred, stiff NF fasciotomy wounds is often ineffective, resulting in skin necrosis. The authors use extended negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) as an assist in dermatotraction to close open NF fasciotomy wounds. The authors present the clinical results, followed by a discussion of the clinical basis of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction. Methods A retrospective case series of eight patients with NF who underwent open fasciotomy was approved for the study. After serial wound preparation, dermatotraction was applied in a shoelace manner using elastic vessel loops. Next, the extended NPWT was applied over the wound. The sponge was three times wider than the wound width, and the transparent covering drape almost encircled the anatomical wound area. The negative pressure of the NPWT was set at a continuous 100 mmHg by suction barometer. The clinical outcome was assessed based on wound area reduction after treatment and by the achievement of direct wound closure. Results After the first set of extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction procedures, the mean wound area was significantly decreased (658.12 cm2 to 29.37 cm2; p?=?0.002), as five out of eight patients achieved direct wound closure. One patient with a chest wall defect underwent latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap coverage, with primary closure of the donor site. Two Fournier’s gangrene patients underwent multiple sets of treatment and finally achieved secondary wound closure with skin grafts. The patients were followed up for 18.3 months on average and showed satisfactory results without wound recurrence. Conclusions Extended NPWT-assisted dermatotraction advances scarred, stiff fasciotomy wound margins synergistically in NF and allows direct closure of the wound without complications. This method can be another good treatment option for the NF patient with large open wounds whose general condition is unsuitable for extensive reconstructive surgery.

2014-01-01

362

Wound Chemotherapy by the Use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and Infusion  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Although the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is broadly efficacious, it may foster some potentially adverse complications. This is particularly true in patients with diabetes who have a wound colonized with aerobic organisms. Traditional antiseptics have been proven useful to combat such bacteria but require removal of some NPWT devices to be effective. Methods: In this article, we describe a method of “wound chemotherapy” by combining NPWT and a continuous infusion of Dakins' 0.5% solution either as a standardized technique in one device (ITI Sved) or as a modification of standard technique in another (KCI VAC) NPWT device. The twin goals of both techniques are to effectively reduce bacterial burden and to promote progressive wound healing. Results: We present several representative case examples of our provisional experience with continuous streaming therapy through 2 foam-based negative pressure devices. Discussion: Wound chemotherapy was successfully applied to patients with diabetes, without adverse reactions, complications, or recolonization during the course of treatment. We believe this to be a promising method to derive the benefits of NPWT without the frequent adverse sequela of wound colonization.

Giovinco, Nicholas A.; Bui, Trung D.; Fisher, Timothy; Mills, Joseph L.; Armstrong, David G.

2010-01-01

363

Number of burr holes as independent predictor of postoperative recurrence in chronic subdural haematoma.  

PubMed

Chronic subdural haematoma (cSDH) is one of the most frequent neurosurgical entities. Current treatment options include burr hole craniostomy, twist drill craniostomy or craniotomy. While burr hole craniostomy is the most often used technique, there are no studies analysing the use of one vs. two burr holes in respect to recurrence rates and complications. This retrospective study included 76 (age: 60 +/- 12 years) patients presenting with cSDH admitted in our institution from January 2004 to December 2005. A total of 21 (27%) patients underwent bilateral craniostomy. The patients were assessed using the Markwalder Scale (2 +/- 0.71), Glasgow Coma Scale (14 +/- 1) and measuring the haematoma thickness (1.8 +/- 0.7 cm). The decision to perform one or two burr hole was made according to the personal preference of the treating neurosurgeon. All patients underwent irrigation and placement of closed-system drainage. Out of the 97 haematoma, 63 (65%) haematomas were treated with two burr holes, whereas 34 (35%) were treated with one burr hole. Patients with one burr hole had a statistically significant (p < 0.05) higher recurrence rate (29 vs. 5%), longer average hospitalization length (11 vs. 9 days) and higher wound infection rate (9% vs. 0%). A multivariate regression analysis identified the number of holes as single predictor for postoperative recurrence rate (r(2) = 0.12; p < 0.001). In this study, the treatment of cSDH with one burr hole only is associated with a significantly higher postoperative recurrence rate, longer hospitalization length and higher wound infection rate. PMID:18348026

Taussky, P; Fandino, J; Landolt, H

2008-04-01

364

Is artificial dermis an effective tool in the treatment of tendon-exposed wounds?  

PubMed

As flap surgery remains the main technique to close wounds with tendon exposure, the application of artificial dermis in these complex soft tissue wounds is seldom reported. The purpose of this article is to review our experiences in the treatment of tendon-exposed wounds with artificial dermis. This retrospective study included 23 patients with 33 tendon-exposed wounds treated with artificial dermis from 2004 to 2009. Data including patient demographics, wound type, duration from artificial dermis implantation to split thickness skin grafting, surgical complications, and clinical outcome were obtained by chart review. Successful treatment was defined as the formation of golden-yellow neodermis followed by successful split thickness skin grafting. Among the 33 tendon-exposed wounds, 11 were secondary to chronic ulcers, 16 to acute wounds, and 6 to surgical wounds after hypertrophic scar excision. The mean patient age was 49 years. The overall success rate with the artificial dermis technique was 82%, including 63% in the chronic ulcer group, 88% in the acute wounds, and 100% in the surgical wounds. In the success group, 11% of the wounds required repeated artificial dermis implantations. Within the failure group, two wounds were closed by below knee amputation, two by local flap surgery, and two were allowed spontaneous healing as a result of graft failure. We have demonstrated an overall success rate of 82% for tendon-exposed wound closure by using artificial dermis. The outcome was better in surgical and acute wounds than in chronic wounds. PMID:23292584

Yeong, Eng-Kean; Yu, Yen-Chen; Chan, Zheng-Hoong; Roan, Tyng-Luen

2013-01-01

365

Postoperative analgesia in the cat after ovariohysterectomy by use of carprofen, ketoprofen, meloxicam or tolfenamic acid.  

PubMed

The adequacy of postoperative analgesia was assessed in 40 cats following ovariohysterectomy. At extubation, cats were given one dose of carprofen, ketoprofen, meloxicam or tolfenamic acid. Postoperative analgesia was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring for pain and sedation; measurement of mechanical nociceptive thresholds at the wound; recognition of the requirement for rescue intervention analgesia; and an overall clinical assessment score at 18 hours. VAS pain scores were low throughout the trial, with no significant differences found between the groups. Postoperative mechanical nociceptive thresholds decreased significantly from baseline in all four groups, with no significant differences between the groups. One cat in each of the tolfenamic acid, ketoprofen and meloxicam groups required rescue intervention analgesia. Nine out of 10 cats in all four groups were classified as having desirable overall clinical assessment scores. In summary, all four drugs provided good postoperative analgesia, although none was able to prevent postoperative wound tenderness. PMID:11072912

Slingsby, L S; Waterman-Pearson, A E

2000-10-01

366

Designing Hydrogel Adhesives for Corneal Wound Repair  

PubMed Central

Today, corneal wounds are repaired using nylon sutures. Yet there are a number of complications associated with suturing the cornea, and thus there is interest in an adhesive to replace or supplement sutures in the repair of corneal wounds. We are designing and evaluating corneal adhesives prepared from dendrimers – single molecular weight, highly branched polymers. We have explored two strategies to form these ocular adhesives. The first involves a photocrosslinking reaction and the second uses a peptide ligation reactions to couple the individual dendrimers together to from the adhesive. These adhesives were successfully used to repair corneal perforations, close the flap produced in a LASIK procedure, and secure a corneal transplant.

Grinstaff, Mark W.

2013-01-01

367

Factors Affecting Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds.

Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

2010-01-01

368

VLAP: results immediately post-op  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) has been shown to be as effective with fewer complications than TURP in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Questions have been raised about VLAP regarding prolonged irritative and obstructive voiding symptoms postoperatively. It is postulated that these symptoms are due to the slow slough of necrotic debris following VLAP. In an effort to improve upon the technique of VLAP, patients underwent lasing of the prostate in the routine manner (2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions with sixty watts for sixty seconds) using Nd:YAG free beam energy. A bladder neck incision was then performed using a contact laser fiber. International prostate symptom score assessments were done preoperatively; one week and six weeks postoperatively. Post void residual urine volumes and prostate size were also evaluated. The findings indicate that symptom scores and post void residual urine volumes have significantly improved within ten days postoperatively using this technique.

Cowles, Robert S.

1996-05-01

369

Surgical Site Infection Complicating Breast Cancer Surgery in Kuwait  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives. Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common postoperative complication associated with breast cancer surgery. The present investigation aimed to determine the SSI rate after breast cancer surgeries and the causative microorganisms. Patients and Methods. All patients who underwent breast surgery in Kuwait Cancer Control Center as a treatment for breast cancer from January 2009–December 2010 were prospectively followed for the development of SSI. Indirect detection was used to identify SSIs through medical record to review and discussion with the treating surgeons. Results. The number of operations was 438. Females represented 434 (99.1%) cases while males constituted only 4 (0.9%) cases. SSIs were diagnosed after 10 operations, all for female cases. Most of the SSIs (8 cases; 80%) were detected after patients were discharged, during outpatient followup. Out of those 5/8; (62.5%) were readmitted for management of SSI. Nine patients (90%) received systemic antibiotic therapy for management of their wound infection. The SSI rate was 2.3%. The main causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) which was responsible for 40% of infections. Gram negative bacteria were isolated from 40% of the cases. Conclusion. SSI is an important complication following breast cancer surgery. Microbiological diagnosis is an essential tool for proper management of such patients.

Omar, Abeer A.; Al-Mousa, Haifaa H.

2013-01-01

370

Management of acute wounds.  

PubMed

The acute wound presents a spectrum of issues that prevent its ultimate closure. These issues include host factors, etiology, anatomic location, timing, and surgical techniques to achieve successful wound closure. Basic surgical principles need to be followed to obtain stable, long-term coverage, ultimately restoring form and function. Recent advances in dressings, debridement techniques, and surgical repertoire allow the modern plastic surgeon to address any wound of any complexity. This article discusses these principles that can be applied to any wound. PMID:19465203

Lee, Charles K; Hansen, Scott L

2009-06-01

371

Saliva and wound healing.  

PubMed

Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing. Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation. A synthetic cyclic variant of histatin exhibits a 1,000-fold higher activity than linear histatin, which makes this cyclic variant a promising agent for the development of a new wound healing medication. Conclusively, recognition of the many roles salivary proteins play in wound healing makes saliva a promising source for the development of new drugs involved in tissue regeneration. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:24862594

Brand, Henk S; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Veerman, Enno C I

2014-01-01

372

Telemedicine for wound management  

PubMed Central

The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process.

Chittoria, Ravi K.

2012-01-01

373

Postoperative ileus: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Postoperatively, some patients experience a prolonged inhibition of coordinated bowel activity, which causes accumulation\\u000a of secretions and gas, resulting in nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, and pain. This prolonged inhibition can take days\\u000a or weeks to resolve and often is referred to as postoperative paralytic ileus lasting more than three days after surgery.\\u000a This article reviews the etiology, pathophysiology, and

Mirza K. Baig; Steven D. Wexner

2004-01-01

374

Acute postoperative diverticulitis.  

PubMed

Acute diverticulitis following surgery is a severe condition reported previously only after heart surgery. Four cases of diverticulitis in the early postoperative period are presented, three of them after non-cardiac procedures (tracheostomy, inguinal hernia repair and laminectomy). Advanced age, administration of morphine, treatment with steroids, postoperative constipation and intestinal mucosal ischaemia are discussed as possible aetiological factors leading to diverticular perforation. Although the diagnosis is often difficult, early treatment offers the best chance of survival. PMID:2671209

Badia-Pèrez, J M; Valverde-Sintas, J; Franch-Arcas, G; Pla-Comos, J; Sitges-Serra, A

1989-08-01

375

Postoperative radiotherapy for endometrial cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose To investigate the prognostic factors and effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy alone for endometrial carcinoma. Materials and Methods Sixty four patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer (EC) treated with postoperative radiotherapy alone between January 1989 and December 2008 at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center were chosen for the present study. Typically, total hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy were performed on the patient's pelvis. Total dose from 50.4 Gy to 63 Gy was irradiated at pelvis or extended field. Thirteen patients were treated with Co-60 or Ir-192 intracavitary radiotherapy. Follow-up periods were from 7 to 270 months, with a median of 56 months. Results Five year overall survival (OS) rate was 58.7%, respectively. Five year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 59.2%, respectively. In univariate analysis for OS and DFS, stage, menopausal age, type of operation, serosal invasion, and lymph node involvement were found to be statistically significant. Histologic type was marginally significant. In multivariate analysis for OS and DFS, stage, types of operation, histologic type were also found to be statistically significant. Treatment failure occurred in 14 patients. The main pattern of failure was found to be distant metastasis. Time to distant metastasis was from 3 to 86 months (median, 12 months). There were no grade 3 or 4 complications. Conclusion Stage, types of operation, and histologic type could be the predictive prognostic factors in patients. We contemplated postoperative radiation as effective and safe treatment method for EC. Additional treatment would be needed to reduce distant metastasis.

Choi, Eun Cheol; Kim, Ok Bae; Byun, Sang Jun; Park, Seung Gyu; Kwon, Sang Hoon

2012-01-01

376

Complications of surgical reconstruction of the exstrophy–epispadias complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review of the complications of all methods of modern treatment of bladder exstrophy emphasizes the complexity of reconstruction of the bladder exstrophy spectrum. The main complications of any method of primary bladder exstrophy closure are complete wound dehiscence, bladder prolapse and urethral outlet obstruction; others include bladder and renal calculi. These complications as well as methods to avoid them

David J. Hernandez; Todd Purves; John P. Gearhart

2008-01-01

377

Risks of Complication Following Thyroidectomy  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Because hypoparathyroidism is a serious complication of thyroidectomy, we attempted to elucidate factors determining the risk of this postoperative outcome. SETTING Four tertiary care hospitals in Albuquerque, New Mexico. PATIENTS A retrospective study of 142 patients who underwent total or subtotal thyroidectomy between 1988 and 1995. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Permanent hypoparathyroidism was defined as hypocalcemic symptoms plus a requirement for oral vitamin D or calcium 6 months after thyroidectomy. Factors analyzed to determine their contribution to the risk of persistent postoperative hypoparathyroidism were the indication for thyroidectomy, performance of a preoperative thyroid needle biopsy, type of surgery, postoperative pathology, presence and stage of thyroid carcinoma, resident surgeon involvement, and specialty of the surgeon performing the procedure. Surgical specialty and stage of thyroid carcinoma were independent risk factors for persistent postoperative hypoparathyroidism by multivariate analysis. Nine (29%) of 31 patients who had thyroidectomy by otolaryngologists met criteria for permanent hypoparathyroidism, and 6 (5%) of 111 patients who had thyroidectomy by general surgeons met the same criteria (p < .001). Adjustment for the effect of stage did not eliminate the effect of specialty (p=.006), and adjustment for the effect of specialty did not eliminate the effect of stage (p=.02), on the occurrence of postoperative hypoparathyroidism. CONCLUSIONS We conclude from our data that patients undergoing thyroidectomy by an otolaryngologist may be at a higher risk of permanent postoperative hypoparathyroidism than patients who undergo thyroidectomy by a general surgeon. This may reflect differences in case selection or surgical approach or both.

Burge, Mark R; Zeise, Tanja-Maria; Johnsen, Michael W; Conway, Martin J; Qualls, Clifford R

1998-01-01

378

Benefits of early postoperative jejunal feeding in patients undergoing duodenohemipancreatectomy  

PubMed Central

AIM: To study whether early postoperative enteral nutrition reduces the incidence of complications and/or improves nutritional status following duodenohemipancreatectomy (DHP). METHODS: We studied 39 patients who underwent DHP for a peri-ampullary mass. Twenty-three patients received total parental nutrition and then started to have an oral intake of nutrition between postoperative day (POD) 7 and 14 [late postoperative enteral nutrition (LPEN) group]. Sixteen patients started to have enteral feeding through a jejunostomy catheter the day after the operation [early postoperative enteral nutrition (EPEN) group]. The incidence of complications and laboratory data at the early postoperative stage were studied in comparison between LPEN and EPEN groups. RESULTS: Serum levels of albumin and total protein in the EPEN group were significantly higher than those in the LPEN group. The loss of body mass index was significantly suppressed in the EPEN group as compared to the LPEN group. The lymphocyte count decreased immediately after the operation was restored significantly faster in the EPEN group than in the LPEN group. The EPEN group showed significantly fewer incidences of postoperative pancreatic fistulas, as well as a significantly shorter length of hospitalization than the LPEN group. There were no significant differences in the incidences of other postoperative complications between the two groups, such as delayed gastric emptying, surgical site infection, cholangitis, and small bowel obstruction. CONCLUSION: EPEN is a safe and beneficial opportunity for patients who have undergone DHP for a peri-ampullary mass.

Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Michiya; Nishimori, Isao; Sugimoto, Tekeki; Akimori, Toyokazu; Namikawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Ken; Onishi, Saburo; Araki, Keijiro

2006-01-01

379