Science.gov

Sample records for postsegregational killer loci

  1. Isolation and characterization of 8 microsatellite loci for the "killer shrimp'', an invasive Ponto-Caspian amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Rewicz, Tomasz; Wattier, Rémi A; Rigaud, Thierry; Bacela-Spychalska, Karolina; Grabowski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Dikerogammarus villosus is a freshwater amphipod of the Ponto-Caspian origin recognized as one of the 100 worst alien species in Europe, having negative impact on biodiversity and functioning of the invaded aquatic ecosystems. The species has a wide ecophysiological tolerance and during the last 20 years it has rapidly spread throughout European inland waters. In consequence, it presents a major conservation management problem. We describe eight polymorphic microsatellite loci developed for D. villosus by combining a biotin-enrichment protocol and new generation 454GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing technology. When genotyped in 64 individuals from two locations, the loci exhibited a mean diversity of 4.87 alleles per locus (2-13). The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were, respectively, 0.439 (0.091-0.844) and 0.468 (0.089-0.843). Gametic disequilibrium was not detected for any pair of loci. The microsatellite markers will be a valuable tool in assessing the demographic processes associated with invasion of the killer shrimp from a genetic point of view. PMID:25234651

  2. Post-Slavery? Post-Segregation? Post-Racial? A History of the Impact of Slavery, Segregation, and Racism on the Education of African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Span, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter details how slavery, segregation, and racism impacted the educational experiences of African Americans from the colonial era to the present. It argues that America has yet to be a truly post-slavery and post-segregation society, let alone a post-racial society.

  3. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  4. The Violence of Collection: "Indian Killer"'s Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Janet

    2008-01-01

    At the close of Sherman Alexie's "Indian Killer," in a final chapter titled "Creation Story," a killer carries a backpack containing, among other things, "dozens of owl feathers, a scrapbook, and two bloody scalps in a plastic bag." Readers schooled in the psychopathologies of real and fictional serial killers will be familiar with the detail:…

  5. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Weedoff poisoning; Roundup poisoning ... Glyphosate is the poisonous ingredient in some weed killers. ... Glyphosate is in weed killers with these brand names: Roundup Bronco Glifonox Kleen-up Rodeo Weedoff Other ...

  6. Biology Myth-Killers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2014-01-01

    "Biology Myth-Killers" is an activity designed to identify and correct common misconceptions for high school and college introductory biology courses. Students identify common myths, which double as biology misconceptions, and use appropriate sources to share the "truth" about the myths. This learner-centered activity is a fun…

  7. Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    This young adult author claims his most enjoyable task as a writer is "intellectual danger, getting into other people's trouble." He asks his readers not to trust him, and then, as evidence, tempts us with a look at a chapter from "Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer."

  8. Suppressing the killer instinct.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kerry S

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells that have adopted activating and inhibitory signaling mechanisms enabling them to be tolerant of normal cells but to distinguish and eliminate tumor cells and virus-infected cells. In this issue of Science Signaling, Matalon et al show how inhibitory receptors disrupt NK cell activation by stimulating dephosphorylation of the adaptor protein LAT (linker of activated T cells) and phospholipase C-γ by the phosphatase SHP-1 [Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1], as well as ubiquitylation of LAT by Cbl family E3 ubiquitin ligases. PMID:27221707

  9. Arsenic: The Silent Killer

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrea

    2006-02-28

    Andrea Foster uses x-rays to determine the forms of potentially toxic elements in environmentally-important matrices such as water, sediments, plants, and microorganisms. In this free public lecture, Foster will discuss her research on arsenic, which is called the silent killer because dissolved in water, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet consumption of relatively small doses of this element in its most toxic forms can cause rapid and violent death. Arsenic is a well-known poison, and has been used as such since ancient times. Less well known is the fact that much lower doses of the element, consumed over years, can lead to a variety of skin and internal cancers that can also be fatal. Currently, what has been called the largest mass poisoning in history is occurring in Bangladesh, where most people are by necessity drinking ground water that is contaminated with arsenic far in excess of the maximum amounts determined to be safe by the World Health Organization. This presentation will review the long and complicated history with arsenic, describe how x-rays have helped explain the high yet spatially variable arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh, discuss the ways in which land use in Bangladesh may be exacerbating the problem, and summarize the impact of this silent killer on drinking water systems worldwide.

  10. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  11. Immunobiology of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book combines research from many disciplines into a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volumes include: Volume I: Assays for NK Cell Cytotoxicity; Their Values and Pitfalls. Separation and Characterization of Phenotypically Distinct Subsets of NK Cells. Ultrastructure and Cytochemistry of the Human Large Granular Lymphocytes. Phylogeny and Ontogeny of NK Cells. Tissue and Organ distribution of NK Cells. Genetic Control of NK Cell Activity in Rodents. Phenotype, Functional Heterogeneity, and Lineage of Natural Killer Cells. Target Cell Structures, Recognition Sites, and the Mechanism of NK Cytotoxicity. Natural Killer Cytotoxic Factors (NKCF) Role in Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity. Characteristics of Cultured NK Cells. Lectin-Dependent Killer Cells. MLC-Induced Cytotoxicity as a Model for the Development and Regulation of NK Cytotoxicity. LGL Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Man and Experimental Animals: The Characteristics of These Cells and Their Potential Experimental Uses. Index.

  12. Geographic patterns of genetic differentiation among killer whales in the northern North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Kim M; Durban, John W; Burdin, Alexander M; Burkanov, Vladimir N; Pitman, Robert L; Barlow, Jay; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G; LeDuc, Richard G; Robertson, Kelly M; Matkin, Craig O; Wade, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The difficulties associated with detecting population boundaries have long constrained the conservation and management of highly mobile, wide-ranging marine species, such as killer whales (Orcinus orca). In this study, we use data from 26 nuclear microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA sequences (988bp) to test a priori hypotheses about population subdivisions generated from a decade of killer whale surveys across the northern North Pacific. A total of 462 remote skin biopsies were collected from wild killer whales primarily between 2001 and 2010 from the northern Gulf of Alaska to the Sea of Okhotsk, representing both the piscivorous "resident" and the mammal-eating "transient" (or Bigg's) killer whales. Divergence of the 2 ecotypes was supported by both mtDNA and microsatellites. Geographic patterns of genetic differentiation were supported by significant regions of genetic discontinuity, providing evidence of population structuring within both ecotypes and corroborating direct observations of restricted movements of individual whales. In the Aleutian Islands (Alaska), subpopulations, or groups with significantly different mtDNA and microsatellite allele frequencies, were largely delimited by major oceanographic boundaries for resident killer whales. Although Amchitka Pass represented a major subdivision for transient killer whales between the central and western Aleutian Islands, several smaller subpopulations were evident throughout the eastern Aleutians and Bering Sea. Support for seasonally sympatric transient subpopulations around Unimak Island suggests isolating mechanisms other than geographic distance within this highly mobile top predator. PMID:23846984

  13. Natural killer cells: remembrances of things past.

    PubMed

    Raulet, David H

    2009-04-14

    Recent work has revealed that natural killer cells exhibit a form of memory, previously considered an exclusive property of adaptive immunity. While protective, natural killer cell memory is probably hazier and more fleeting than T cell memory. PMID:19368874

  14. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  15. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  16. Phototoxic effects of lysosome-associated genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Boulina, Maria E.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Bogdanova, Ekaterina A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2014-07-01

    KillerRed is a unique phototoxic red fluorescent protein that can be used to induce local oxidative stress by green-orange light illumination. Here we studied phototoxicity of KillerRed targeted to cytoplasmic surface of lysosomes via fusion with Rab7, a small GTPase that is known to be attached to membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. It was found that lysosome-associated KillerRed ensures efficient light-induced cell death similar to previously reported mitochondria- and plasma membrane-localized KillerRed. Inhibitory analysis demonstrated that lysosomal cathepsins play an important role in the manifestation of KillerRed-Rab7 phototoxicity. Time-lapse monitoring of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and nuclei shape allowed us to conclude that KillerRed-Rab7-mediated cell death occurs via necrosis at high light intensity or via apoptosis at lower light intensity. Potentially, KillerRed-Rab7 can be used as an optogenetic tool to direct target cell populations to either apoptosis or necrosis.

  17. Turning Cancer Cells into Cancer Killers.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have changed leukemia cells into natural killer cells by adding a specific antibody to bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The induced natural killer cells killed leukemia cells in culture. The antibody does not trigger the same conversion in bone marrow from healthy patients. PMID:26621762

  18. Structural Basis for Phototoxicity of the Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Chudakov, Dmitri M.; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Popov, Vladimir O.; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir

    2009-11-23

    KillerRed is the only known fluorescent protein that demonstrates notable phototoxicity, exceeding that of the other green and red fluorescent proteins by at least 1,000-fold. KillerRed could serve as an instrument to inactivate target proteins or to kill cell populations in photodynamic therapy. However, the nature of KillerRed phototoxicity has remained unclear, impeding the development of more phototoxic variants. Here we present the results of a high resolution crystallographic study of KillerRed in the active fluorescent and in the photobleached non-fluorescent states. A unique and striking feature of the structure is a water-filled channel reaching the chromophore area from the end cap of the {beta}-barrel that is probably one of the key structural features responsible for phototoxicity. A study of the structure-function relationship of KillerRed, supported by structure-based, site-directed mutagenesis, has also revealed the key residues most likely responsible for the phototoxic effect. In particular, Glu68 and Ser119, located adjacent to the chromophore, have been assigned as the primary trigger of the reaction chain.

  19. Persistence in the shadow of killers.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Killing is perhaps the most definite form of communication possible. Microbes such as yeasts and gut bacteria have been shown to exhibit killer phenotypes. The killer strains are able to kill other microbes occupying the same ecological niche, and do so with impunity. It would therefore be expected that, wherever a killer phenotype has arisen, all members of the population would soon be killers or dead. Surprisingly, (1) one can find both killer and sensitive strains in coexistence, both in the wild and in in vitro experiments, and (2) the absolute fitness cost of the killer phenotype often seems to be very small. We present an explicit model of such coexistence in a fragmented or discrete environment. A killer strain may kill all sensitive cells in one patch (one piece of rotting fruit, one cave or one human gut, for example), allowing sensitives to exist only in the absence of killer strains on the same patch. In our model, populations spread easily between patches, but in a stochastic manner: one can imagine spores borne by the wind over a field of untended apple trees, or enteric disease transmission in a region in which travel is effectively unrestricted. What we show is that coexistence is not only possible, but that it is possible even if the absolute fitness advantage of the sensitive strain over the killer strain is arbitrarily small. We do this by performing a specifically targeted mathematical analysis on our model, rather than via simulations. Our model does not assume large population densities, and may thus be useful in the context of understanding the ecology of extreme environments. PMID:25071753

  20. Persistence in the shadow of killers

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Killing is perhaps the most definite form of communication possible. Microbes such as yeasts and gut bacteria have been shown to exhibit killer phenotypes. The killer strains are able to kill other microbes occupying the same ecological niche, and do so with impunity. It would therefore be expected that, wherever a killer phenotype has arisen, all members of the population would soon be killers or dead. Surprisingly, (1) one can find both killer and sensitive strains in coexistence, both in the wild and in in vitro experiments, and (2) the absolute fitness cost of the killer phenotype often seems to be very small. We present an explicit model of such coexistence in a fragmented or discrete environment. A killer strain may kill all sensitive cells in one patch (one piece of rotting fruit, one cave or one human gut, for example), allowing sensitives to exist only in the absence of killer strains on the same patch. In our model, populations spread easily between patches, but in a stochastic manner: one can imagine spores borne by the wind over a field of untended apple trees, or enteric disease transmission in a region in which travel is effectively unrestricted. What we show is that coexistence is not only possible, but that it is possible even if the absolute fitness advantage of the sensitive strain over the killer strain is arbitrarily small. We do this by performing a specifically targeted mathematical analysis on our model, rather than via simulations. Our model does not assume large population densities, and may thus be useful in the context of understanding the ecology of extreme environments. PMID:25071753

  1. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  2. Natural killer cell activity during measles.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, D E; Ward, B J; Jauregui, E; Johnson, R T; Vaisberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer cells are postulated to play an important role in host anti-viral defences. We measured natural killer cell activity in 30 individuals with acute measles (73 +/- 21 lytic units (LU)/10(7) cells) and 16 individuals with other infectious diseases (149 +/- 95 LU) and found it reduced compared with values for adults (375 +/- 70 LU; P less than 0.001) or children (300 +/- 73 LU, P less than 0.01) without infection. Reduced natural killer cell activity was found in measles patients with (84 +/- 30 LU) and without (55 +/- 18 LU) complications and was present for at least 3 weeks after the onset of the rash. Activity was increased by in vitro exposure of cells to interleukin-2. Depressed natural killer cell activity parallels in time the suppression of other parameters of cell-mediated immunity that occurs during measles. PMID:1696863

  3. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales. PMID:17148221

  4. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    PubMed

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa. PMID:27407298

  5. Nuclear and mitochondrial patterns of population structure in North Pacific false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens).

    PubMed

    Martien, Karen K; Chivers, Susan J; Baird, Robin W; Archer, Frederick I; Gorgone, Antoinette M; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany L; Mattila, David; McSweeney, Daniel J; Oleson, Erin M; Palmer, Carol; Pease, Victoria L; Robertson, Kelly M; Schorr, Gregory S; Schultz, Mark B; Webster, Daniel L; Taylor, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    False killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) are large delphinids typically found in deep water far offshore. However, in the Hawaiian Archipelago, there are 2 resident island-associated populations of false killer whales, one in the waters around the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) and one in the waters around the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). We use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences and genotypes from 16 nuclear DNA (nucDNA) microsatellite loci from 206 individuals to examine levels of differentiation among the 2 island-associated populations and offshore animals from the central and eastern North Pacific. Both mtDNA and nucDNA exhibit highly significant differentiation between populations, confirming limited gene flow in both sexes. The mtDNA haplotypes exhibit a strong pattern of phylogeographic concordance, with island-associated populations sharing 3 closely related haplotypes not found elsewhere in the Pacific. However, nucDNA data suggest that NWHI animals are at least as differentiated from MHI animals as they are from offshore animals. The patterns of differentiation revealed by the 2 marker types suggest that the island-associated false killer whale populations likely share a common colonization history, but have limited contemporary gene flow. PMID:24831238

  6. Cancer on Course to Become Top Killer of Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160601.html Cancer on Course to Become Top Killer of Americans Report shows it will probably eclipse ... in on heart disease as America's number one killer, a new government study shows. Heart disease has ...

  7. Population genomics of the killer whale indicates ecotype evolution in sympatry involving both selection and drift.

    PubMed

    Moura, Andre E; Kenny, John G; Chaudhuri, Roy; Hughes, Margaret A; J Welch, Andreanna; Reisinger, Ryan R; de Bruyn, P J Nico; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Hall, Neil; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of diversity in the marine ecosystem is poorly understood, given the relatively high potential for connectivity, especially for highly mobile species such as whales and dolphins. The killer whale (Orcinus orca) has a worldwide distribution, and individual social groups travel over a wide geographic range. Even so, regional populations have been shown to be genetically differentiated, including among different foraging specialists (ecotypes) in sympatry. Given the strong matrifocal social structure of this species together with strong resource specializations, understanding the process of differentiation will require an understanding of the relative importance of both genetic drift and local adaptation. Here we provide a high-resolution analysis based on nuclear single-nucleotide polymorphic markers and inference about differentiation at both neutral loci and those potentially under selection. We find that all population comparisons, within or among foraging ecotypes, show significant differentiation, including populations in parapatry and sympatry. Loci putatively under selection show a different pattern of structure compared to neutral loci and are associated with gene ontology terms reflecting physiologically relevant functions (e.g. related to digestion). The pattern of differentiation for one ecotype in the North Pacific suggests local adaptation and shows some fixed differences among sympatric ecotypes. We suggest that differential habitat use and resource specializations have promoted sufficient isolation to allow differential evolution at neutral and functional loci, but that the process is recent and dependent on both selection and drift. PMID:25244680

  8. Population genomics of the killer whale indicates ecotype evolution in sympatry involving both selection and drift

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Andre E; Kenny, John G; Chaudhuri, Roy; Hughes, Margaret A; J Welch, Andreanna; Reisinger, Ryan R; de Bruyn, P J Nico; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Hall, Neil; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of diversity in the marine ecosystem is poorly understood, given the relatively high potential for connectivity, especially for highly mobile species such as whales and dolphins. The killer whale (Orcinus orca) has a worldwide distribution, and individual social groups travel over a wide geographic range. Even so, regional populations have been shown to be genetically differentiated, including among different foraging specialists (ecotypes) in sympatry. Given the strong matrifocal social structure of this species together with strong resource specializations, understanding the process of differentiation will require an understanding of the relative importance of both genetic drift and local adaptation. Here we provide a high-resolution analysis based on nuclear single-nucleotide polymorphic markers and inference about differentiation at both neutral loci and those potentially under selection. We find that all population comparisons, within or among foraging ecotypes, show significant differentiation, including populations in parapatry and sympatry. Loci putatively under selection show a different pattern of structure compared to neutral loci and are associated with gene ontology terms reflecting physiologically relevant functions (e.g. related to digestion). The pattern of differentiation for one ecotype in the North Pacific suggests local adaptation and shows some fixed differences among sympatric ecotypes. We suggest that differential habitat use and resource specializations have promoted sufficient isolation to allow differential evolution at neutral and functional loci, but that the process is recent and dependent on both selection and drift. PMID:25244680

  9. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  10. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  11. Stochastic modeling of a serial killer.

    PubMed

    Simkin, M V; Roychowdhury, V P

    2014-08-21

    We analyze the time pattern of the activity of a serial killer, who during 12 years had murdered 53 people. The plot of the cumulative number of murders as a function of time is of "Devil's staircase" type. The distribution of the intervals between murders (step length) follows a power law with the exponent of 1.4. We propose a model according to which the serial killer commits murders when neuronal excitation in his brain exceeds certain threshold. We model this neural activity as a branching process, which in turn is approximated by a random walk. As the distribution of the random walk return times is a power law with the exponent 1.5, the distribution of the inter-murder intervals is thus explained. We illustrate analytical results by numerical simulation. Time pattern activity data from two other serial killers further substantiate our analysis. PMID:24721476

  12. Stochastic modeling of a serial killer

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, M.V.; Roychowdhury, V.P.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the time pattern of the activity of a serial killer, who during twelve years had murdered 53 people. The plot of the cumulative number of murders as a function of time is of “Devil’s staircase” type. The distribution of the intervals between murders (step length) follows a power law with the exponent of 1.4. We propose a model according to which the serial killer commits murders when neuronal excitation in his brain exceeds certain threshold. We model this neural activity as a branching process, which in turn is approximated by a random walk. As the distribution of the random walk return times is a power law with the exponent 1.5, the distribution of the inter-murder intervals is thus explained. We illustrate analytical results by numerical simulation. Time pattern activity data from two other serial killers further substantiate our analysis. PMID:24721476

  13. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) produce ultrasonic whistles.

    PubMed

    Samarra, Filipa I P; Deecke, Volker B; Vinding, Katja; Rasmussen, Marianne H; Swift, René J; Miller, Patrick J O

    2010-11-01

    This study reports that killer whales, the largest dolphin, produce whistles with the highest fundamental frequencies ever reported in a delphinid. Using wide-band acoustic sampling from both animal-attached (Dtag) and remotely deployed hydrophone arrays, ultrasonic whistles were detected in three Northeast Atlantic populations but not in two Northeast Pacific populations. These results are inconsistent with analyses suggesting a correlation of maximum frequency of whistles with body size in delphinids, indicate substantial intraspecific variation in whistle production in killer whales, and highlight the importance of appropriate acoustic sampling techniques when conducting comparative analyses of sound repertoires. PMID:21110527

  14. Genetic differentiation among North Atlantic killer whale populations.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Vilstrup, Julia T; De Stephanis, Renaud; Verborgh, Philippe; Abel Nielsen, Sandra C; Deaville, Robert; Kleivane, Lars; Martín, Vidal; Miller, Patrick J O; Oien, Nils; Pérez-Gil, Monica; Rasmussen, Morten; Reid, Robert J; Robertson, Kelly M; Rogan, Emer; Similä, Tiu; Tejedor, Maria L; Vester, Heike; Víkingsson, Gísli A; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Piertney, Stuart B

    2011-02-01

    Population genetic structure of North Atlantic killer whale samples was resolved from differences in allele frequencies of 17 microsatellite loci, mtDNA control region haplotype frequencies and for a subset of samples, using complete mitogenome sequences. Three significantly differentiated populations were identified. Differentiation based on microsatellite allele frequencies was greater between the two allopatric populations than between the two pairs of partially sympatric populations. Spatial clustering of individuals within each of these populations overlaps with the distribution of particular prey resources: herring, mackerel and tuna, which each population has been seen predating. Phylogenetic analyses using complete mitogenomes suggested two populations could have resulted from single founding events and subsequent matrilineal expansion. The third population, which was sampled at lower latitudes and lower density, consisted of maternal lineages from three highly divergent clades. Pairwise population differentiation was greater for estimates based on mtDNA control region haplotype frequencies than for estimates based on microsatellite allele frequencies, and there were no mitogenome haplotypes shared among populations. This suggests low or no female migration and that gene flow was primarily male mediated when populations spatially and temporally overlap. These results demonstrate that genetic differentiation can arise through resource specialization in the absence of physical barriers to gene flow. PMID:21241391

  15. Using multiplex PCR amplification and typing kits for the analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case.

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Eisenberg, A; Borer, U V; Dirnhofer, R

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case was performed using the AmpliType HLA-DQ alpha-, AmpliType PM-, and the GenePrint STR Multiplex System PCR Amplification Kits. In addition, a sex typing procedure using the X-Y homologous gene amelogenin was carried out. DNA profiles from a single hair with attached sheath material, recovered from underneath the seat cover of the suspect's car seat were compared with DNA profiles derived from reference head hairs from a homicide victim. From the evidentiary sample only 9 ng of human DNA could be recovered. In a sample, where the quantity of DNA becomes a critical issue a powerful route is the simultaneous amplification of several loci (multiplex PCR). This is the first report where commercially available multiplex PCR amplification and typing kits have been introduced for the analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case and the analysis has been admitted in court. PMID:8934718

  16. Killer toxin from a novel killer yeast Pichia kudriavzevii RY55 with idiosyncratic antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Bijender Kumar; Raina, Sandeepu; Singh, Satbir

    2013-08-01

    The killer phenomenon of yeast may have technological implications in many areas like beverage fermentation, food technology, biological control in agriculture, and in medicine. In the present study the killer phenomenon in Pichia kudriavzevii (P. kudriavzevii RY55) is being reported for the first time. The P. kudriavzevii RY55 toxin exhibited excellent antibacterial activity against several pathogens of human health significance such as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas alcaligenes. Killer toxin was purified to homogeneity by using ammonium sulphate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography and characterized for few properties. P. kudriavzevii RY55 killer toxin may be of vast significance in the development of novel antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, new bio-based safer candidates for food preservation and biocontrol, and starter cultures for fermentation industries. PMID:22961241

  17. Chasing Killer Statements From The Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Marianne

    1975-01-01

    This teacher discusses techniques she uses to rid the classroom of "killer statements", which are negative statements that express some kind of anger or distress and are unthinking outgrowths of the desire to get back at the world when feeling needy or deprived.

  18. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  19. The School: A Killer of Giftedness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Walt, J. L.

    Criticisms of the school as a killer of giftedness in children are cited. After defining giftedness and talent, the problem of educating the gifted child is raised, and opinions of "new left" educational theorists are presented. Accusations against the school, based on its failure to meet the individual needs and the mental or cognitive…

  20. Young Killers: The Challenge of Juvenile Homicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heide, Kathleen M.

    This book assembles and synthesizes some of the latest available information, research findings, and informed opinions regarding the parameters of homicide by youths and concerning the nature of young killers themselves. It provides a framework for understanding youths who kill, for moving forward with treatment, and for reducing violence in…

  1. Are natural killer cells superior CAR drivers?

    PubMed Central

    Klingemann, Hans

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocytes engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are being celebrated as a major breakthrough of anticancer immunotherapy. Natural killer cells have not received similar attention as CAR effectors, although the use of these relatively short-lived cytotoxic cells is associated with several advantages. PMID:25340009

  2. Travel from a supercomputer to killer micros

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, N.E.

    1991-03-01

    I describe my effort to convert a Fortran application that runs on a parallel supercomputer (Cray Y/MP) to run on a set of BBN TC2000 killer micros. I used both shared memory parallel processing options available at MPCI for the BBN TC2000, the Parallel Fortran Preprocessor (PFP) and the Uniform System extended Fortran compiler (US). I describe how I used the BBN Xtra programming tools for analysis and debugging during this conversion process. My ultimate goal for this hands on experiment was to gain insight into the type of tools that might be helpful for porting existing programs from a supercomputer environment to a killer micro environment. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  3. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  4. Representation of the serial killer on the Italian Internet.

    PubMed

    Villano, P; Bastianoni, P; Melotti, G

    2001-10-01

    The representation of serial killers was examined from the analysis of 317 Web pages in the Italian language to study how the psychological profiles of serial killers are described on the Italian Internet. The correspondence analysis of the content of these Web pages shows that in Italy the serial killer is associated with words such as "monster" and "horror," which suggest and imply psychological perversion and aberrant acts. These traits are peculiar for the Italian scenario. PMID:11783573

  5. Natural killer cell regulation - beyond the receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urlaub, Doris; Fasbender, Frank; Claus, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that are important for early and effective immune responses against infections and cancer. In the last 40 years, many receptors, their corresponding ligands and signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions have been identified. However, we now know that additional processes, such as NK cell education, differentiation and also the formation of NK cell memory, have a great impact on the reactivity of these cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about these modulatory processes. PMID:25374665

  6. Fighting back against male-killers.

    PubMed

    Jaenike, John

    2007-04-01

    Male-killing endosymbionts create a genetic black hole into which host nuclear genes vanish. In a recent paper, Hornett et al. transferred male-killing Wolbachia between different strains of the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina through hybridization and backcrossing. Their results provide unambiguous evidence of genetic variation for resistance to male-killers. A possible consequence of such variation is that male-killing might appear and disappear quickly on an evolutionary timescale. PMID:17276538

  7. Is killer whale dialect evolution random?

    PubMed

    Filatova, Olga A; Burdin, Alexandr M; Hoyt, Erich

    2013-10-01

    The killer whale is among the few species in which cultural change accumulates over many generations, leading to cumulative cultural evolution. Killer whales have group-specific vocal repertoires which are thought to be learned rather than being genetically coded. It is supposed that divergence between vocal repertoires of sister groups increases gradually over time due to random learning mistakes and innovations. In this case, the similarity of calls across groups must be correlated with pod relatedness and, consequently, with each other. In this study we tested this prediction by comparing the patterns of call similarity between matrilines of resident killer whales from Eastern Kamchatka. We calculated the similarity of seven components from three call types across 14 matrilines. In contrast to the theoretical predictions, matrilines formed different clusters on the dendrograms made by different calls and even by different components of the same call. We suggest three possible explanations for this phenomenon. First, the lack of agreement between similarity patterns of different components may be the result of constraints in the call structure. Second, it is possible that call components change in time with different speed and/or in different directions. Third, horizontal cultural transmission of call features may occur between matrilines. PMID:23796775

  8. The structure of stereotyped calls reflects kinship and social affiliation in resident killer whales ( Orcinus orca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deecke, Volker B.; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G.; Spong, Paul; Ford, John K. B.

    2010-05-01

    A few species of mammals produce group-specific vocalisations that are passed on by learning, but the function of learned vocal variation remains poorly understood. Resident killer whales live in stable matrilineal groups with repertoires of seven to 17 stereotyped call types. Some types are shared among matrilines, but their structure typically shows matriline-specific differences. Our objective was to analyse calls of nine killer whale matrilines in British Columbia to test whether call similarity primarily reflects social or genetic relationships. Recordings were made in 1985-1995 in the presence of focal matrilines that were either alone or with groups with non-overlapping repertoires. We used neural network discrimination performance to measure the similarity of call types produced by different matrilines and determined matriline association rates from 757 encounters with one or more focal matrilines. Relatedness was measured by comparing variation at 11 microsatellite loci for the oldest female in each group. Call similarity was positively correlated with association rates for two of the three call types analysed. Similarity of the N4 call type was also correlated with matriarch relatedness. No relationship between relatedness and association frequency was detected. These results show that call structure reflects relatedness and social affiliation, but not because related groups spend more time together. Instead, call structure appears to play a role in kin recognition and shapes the association behaviour of killer whale groups. Our results therefore support the hypothesis that increasing social complexity plays a role in the evolution of learned vocalisations in some mammalian species.

  9. The structure of stereotyped calls reflects kinship and social affiliation in resident killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Deecke, Volker B; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G; Spong, Paul; Ford, John K B

    2010-05-01

    A few species of mammals produce group-specific vocalisations that are passed on by learning, but the function of learned vocal variation remains poorly understood. Resident killer whales live in stable matrilineal groups with repertoires of seven to 17 stereotyped call types. Some types are shared among matrilines, but their structure typically shows matriline-specific differences. Our objective was to analyse calls of nine killer whale matrilines in British Columbia to test whether call similarity primarily reflects social or genetic relationships. Recordings were made in 1985-1995 in the presence of focal matrilines that were either alone or with groups with non-overlapping repertoires. We used neural network discrimination performance to measure the similarity of call types produced by different matrilines and determined matriline association rates from 757 encounters with one or more focal matrilines. Relatedness was measured by comparing variation at 11 microsatellite loci for the oldest female in each group. Call similarity was positively correlated with association rates for two of the three call types analysed. Similarity of the N4 call type was also correlated with matriarch relatedness. No relationship between relatedness and association frequency was detected. These results show that call structure reflects relatedness and social affiliation, but not because related groups spend more time together. Instead, call structure appears to play a role in kin recognition and shapes the association behaviour of killer whale groups. Our results therefore support the hypothesis that increasing social complexity plays a role in the evolution of learned vocalisations in some mammalian species. PMID:20213302

  10. Metabolic imaging of the tumor treated by KillerRed fluorescent protein-based photodynamic therapy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Qin, Lingsong; Wang, Anle; Liu, Zheng; Yang, Fei; Jin, Honglin; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-02-01

    KillerRed is a unique red fluorescent protein exhibiting excellent phototoxic properties. It has the ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), for killing tumor cells in vitro upon laser irradiation and has the potential to act as a photosensitizer in the application of tumor therapy. Here, we investigated the effects of KillerRed-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) on tumor growth in vivo and examined the subsequent tumor metabolic states including the changes of pyridine nucleotide (PN) and flavoprotein (Fp), two important metabolic coenzymes of tumor cells. Results showed that the tumor was scabbed in response to 561 nm laser irradiation at 80 mV for 3 min, and the tumor growth had been significantly inhibited by KillerRed-based PDT treatment compared to control groups. More importantly, a home-made cryo-imaging redox scanner was used to measure intrinsic fluorescence and exogenous KillerRed fluorescence signals in tumors. The flavoprotein was remarkable elevated and the PN was seldom increased with concomitant photobleaching of KillerRed fluorescence after irradiation, suggesting that flavoprotein and PN were oxidized in the course of KillerRed-based PDT.

  11. The virally encoded killer proteins from Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several strains of Ustilago maydis, a causal agent of corn smut disease, exhibit a 'killer' phenotype that is due to persistent infection by double-stranded RNA Totiviruses. These viruses produce potent killer proteins that are secreted by the host. This is a rare example of virus/host symbiosis in ...

  12. Natural Killer Cell Reduction and Uteroplacental Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Golic, Michaela; Haase, Nadine; Herse, Florian; Wehner, Anika; Vercruysse, Lisbeth; Pijnenborg, Robert; Balogh, Andras; Saether, Per Christian; Dissen, Erik; Luft, Friedrich C; Przybyl, Lukasz; Park, Joon-Keun; Alnaes-Katjavivi, Patji; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Verlohren, Stefan; Henrich, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    Uterine natural killer cells are important for uteroplacental development and pregnancy maintenance. Their role in pregnancy disorders, such as preeclampsia, is unknown. We reduced the number of natural killer cells by administering rabbit anti-asialo GM1 antiserum in an established rat preeclamptic model (female human angiotensinogen×male human renin) and evaluated the effects at the end of pregnancy (day 21), compared with preeclamptic control rats receiving normal rabbit serum. In 100% of the antiserum-treated, preeclamptic rats (7/7), we observed highly degenerated vessel cross sections in the mesometrial triangle at the end of pregnancy. This maternal uterine vasculopathy was characterized by a total absence of nucleated/living cells in the vessel wall and perivascularly and prominent presence of fibrosis. Furthermore, there were no endovascular trophoblast cells within the vessel lumen. In the control, normal rabbit serum-treated, preeclamptic rats, only 20% (1/5) of the animals displayed such vasculopathy. We confirmed the results in healthy pregnant wild-type rats: after anti-asialo GM1 treatment, 67% of maternal rats displayed vasculopathy at the end of pregnancy compared with 0% in rabbit serum-treated control rats. This vasculopathy was associated with a significantly lower fetal weight in wild-type rats and deterioration of fetal brain/liver weight ratio in preeclamptic rats. Anti-asialo GM1 application had no influence on maternal hypertension and albuminuria during pregnancy. Our results show a new role of natural killer cells during hypertensive pregnancy in maintaining vascular integrity. In normotensive pregnancy, this integrity seems important for fetal growth. PMID:27550919

  13. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  14. From Pichia anomala killer toxin through killer antibodies to killer peptides for a comprehensive anti-infective strategy.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, Luciano; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    "Antibiobodies", antibodies (Abs) with antibiotic activity, internal image of a Pichia anomala killer toxin (PaKT) characterized by microbicidal activity against microorganisms expressing β-glucans cell-wall receptors (PaKTRs), were produced by idiotypic vaccination with a PaKT-neutralizing monoclonal Ab (PaKT-like Abs) or induced by a protein-conjugated β-glucan. Human natural PaKT-like Abs (PaKTAbs) were found in the vaginal fluid of women infected with KT-sensitive microorganisms. Monoclonal and recombinant PaKT-like Abs, and PaKTAbs proved to be protective against experimental candidiasis, cryptococcosis and aspergillosis. A killer decapeptide (KP), synthesized from the sequence of a recombinant PaKT-like Ab or produced in transgenic plants, showed a microbicidal activity in vitro, neutralized by β-glucans, a therapeutic effect in vivo, against experimental mucosal and systemic mycoses, and a prophylactic role in planta, against phytopathogenic microorganisms, respectively. KP showed fungicidal properties against all the defective mutants of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae library, inclusive of strains recognized to be resistant to conventional antifungal drugs. KP inhibited in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo HIV-1 and Influenza A virus replication, owing to down-regulation of CCR5 co-receptors, physical block of the gp120-receptor interaction and reduction in the synthesis of glycoproteins, HA and M1 in particular. KP modulated the expression of costimulatory and MHC molecules on murine dendritic cells, improving their capacity to induce lymphocyte proliferation. KP, proven to be devoid of cytotoxicity on human cells, showed self-assembly-releasing hydrogel-like properties, catalyzed by β 1,3 glucan. PaKT's biotechnological derivatives may represent the prototypes of novel antifungal vaccines and anti-infective drugs characterized by different mechanisms of action. PMID:20714805

  15. Natural Killer Cells and Antifungal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Tramsen, Lars; Koehl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    As a result of improved experimental methodologies and a better understanding of the immune system, there is increasing insight into the antifungal activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Murine and human NK cells are able to damage fungi of different genera and species in vitro, and they exert both direct and indirect antifungal activity through cytotoxic molecules such as perforin and through cytokines and interferons, respectively. On the other hand, recent data suggest that fungi exhibit immunosuppressive effects on NK cells. Whereas clear in vivo data are lacking in humans, the importance of NK cells in the host response against fungi has been demonstrated in animal models. Further knowledge of the interaction of NK cells with fungi might help to better understand the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections and to improve treatment strategies. PMID:23365210

  16. Radiology: "killer app" for next generation networks?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Kevin M

    2004-03-01

    The core principles of digital radiology were well developed by the end of the 1980 s. During the following decade tremendous improvements in computer technology enabled realization of those principles at an affordable cost. In this decade work can focus on highly distributed radiology in the context of the integrated health care enterprise. Over the same period computer networking has evolved from a relatively obscure field used by a small number of researchers across low-speed serial links to a pervasive technology that affects nearly all facets of society. Development directions in network technology will ultimately provide end-to-end data paths with speeds that match or exceed the speeds of data paths within the local network and even within workstations. This article describes key developments in Next Generation Networks, potential obstacles, and scenarios in which digital radiology can become a "killer app" that helps to drive deployment of new network infrastructure. PMID:15255516

  17. Targeting natural killer cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Huntington, Nicholas D; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-08-19

    Alteration in the expression of cell-surface proteins is a common consequence of malignant transformation. Natural killer (NK) cells use an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that scan for altered protein-expression patterns, but tumor evasion of detection by the immune system is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. NK cells display rapid and potent immunity to metastasis or hematological cancers, and major efforts are now being undertaken to fully exploit NK cell anti-tumor properties in the clinic. Diverse approaches encompass the development of large-scale NK cell-expansion protocols for adoptive transfer, the establishment of a microenvironment favorable to NK cell activity, the redirection of NK cell activity against tumor cells and the release of inhibitory signals that limit NK cell function. In this Review we detail recent advances in NK cell-based immunotherapies and discuss the advantages and limitations of these strategies. PMID:27540992

  18. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  19. Development and maturation of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Theresa L; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are critical for host protection against pathogens and cancer due to their ability to rapidly release inflammatory cytokines and kill infected or transformed cells. In the 40 years since their initial discovery, much has been learned about how this important cellular lineage develops and functions. We now know that NK cells are the founding members of an expanded family of lymphocyte known as innate lymphoid cells (ILC). Furthermore, we have recently discovered that NK cells can possess features of adaptive immunity such as antigen specificity and long-lived memory responses. Here we will review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving development of NK cells from the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP) to mature NK cells, and from activated effectors to long-lived memory NK cells. PMID:26845614

  20. Positive selection on the killer whale mitogenome.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Morin, Phillip A; Durban, John W; Pitman, Robert L; Wade, Paul; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2011-02-23

    Mitochondria produce up to 95 per cent of the eukaryotic cell's energy. The coding genes of the mitochondrial DNA may therefore evolve under selection owing to metabolic requirements. The killer whale, Orcinus orca, is polymorphic, has a global distribution and occupies a range of ecological niches. It is therefore a suitable organism for testing this hypothesis. We compared a global dataset of the complete mitochondrial genomes of 139 individuals for amino acid changes that were associated with radical physico-chemical property changes and were influenced by positive selection. Two such selected non-synonymous amino acid changes were found; one in each of two ecotypes that inhabit the Antarctic pack ice. Both substitutions were associated with changes in local polarity, increased steric constraints and α-helical tendencies that could influence overall metabolic performance, suggesting a functional change. PMID:20810427

  1. The eyeball killer: serial killings with postmortem globe enucleation.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Julie; Ross, Karen F; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Peacock, Elizabeth; Linch, Charles A; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    Although serial killings are relatively rare, they can be the cause of a great deal of anxiety while the killer remains at-large. Despite the fact that the motivations for serial killings are typically quite complex, the psychological analysis of a serial killer can provide valuable insight into how and why certain individuals become serial killers. Such knowledge may be instrumental in preventing future serial killings or in solving ongoing cases. In certain serial killings, the various incidents have a variety of similar features. Identification of similarities between separate homicidal incidents is necessary to recognize that a serial killer may be actively killing. In this report, the authors present a group of serial killings involving three prostitutes who were shot to death over a 3-month period. Scene and autopsy findings, including the unusual finding of postmortem enucleation of the eyes, led investigators to recognize the serial nature of the homicides. PMID:25682709

  2. Fewer Drugs in Pipeline to Treat World's No. 1 Killer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160676.html Fewer Drugs in Pipeline to Treat World's No. 1 Killer While number of cancer drugs ... 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease remains the world's leading cause of death, but development of drugs ...

  3. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Shirmanova, Marina; Yuzhakova, Diana; Snopova, Ludmila; Perelman, Gregory; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina; Lukyanov, Konstantin; Turchin, Ilya; Subochev, Pavel; Lukyanov, Sergey; Kamensky, Vladislav; Zagaynova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm) and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns) modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation. PMID:26657001

  4. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Shirmanova, Marina; Yuzhakova, Diana; Snopova, Ludmila; Perelman, Gregory; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina; Lukyanov, Konstantin; Turchin, Ilya; Subochev, Pavel; Lukyanov, Sergey; Kamensky, Vladislav; Zagaynova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm) and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns) modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation. PMID:26657001

  5. Killer whale ecotypes: is there a global model?

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, P J N; Tosh, Cheryl A; Terauds, Aleks

    2013-02-01

    Killer whales, Orcinus orca, are top predators occupying key ecological roles in a variety of ecosystems and are one of the most widely distributed mammals on the planet. In consequence, there has been significant interest in understanding their basic biology and ecology. Long-term studies of Northern Hemisphere killer whales, particularly in the eastern North Pacific (ENP), have identified three ecologically distinct communities or ecotypes in that region. The success of these prominent ENP studies has led to similar efforts at clarifying the role of killer whale ecology in other regions, including Antarctica. In the Southern Hemisphere, killer whales present a range of behavioural, social and morphological characteristics to biologists, who often interpret this as evidence to categorize individuals or groups, and draw general ecological conclusions about these super-predators. Morphologically distinct forms (Type A, B, C, and D) occur in the Southern Ocean and studies of these different forms are often presented in conjunction with evidence for specialised ecology and behaviours. Here we review current knowledge of killer whale ecology and ecotyping globally and present a synthesis of existing knowledge. In particular, we highlight the complexity of killer whale ecology in the Southern Hemisphere and examine this in the context of comparatively well-studied Northern Hemisphere populations. We suggest that assigning erroneous or prefatory ecotypic status in the Southern Hemisphere could be detrimental to subsequent killer whale studies, because unsubstantiated characteristics may be assumed as a result of such classification. On this basis, we also recommend that ecotypic status classification for Southern Ocean killer whale morphotypes be reserved until more evidence-based ecological and taxonomic data are obtained. PMID:22882545

  6. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors genes in the Italian Caucasian population

    PubMed Central

    Bontadini, A; Testi, M; Cuccia, MC; Martinetti, M; Carcassi, C; Chiesa, A; Cosentini, E; Dametto, E; Frison, S; Iannone, AM; Lombardo, C; Malagoli, A; Mariani, M; Mariotti, L; Mascaretti, L; Mele, L; Miotti, V; Nesci, S; Ozzella, G; Piancatelli, D; Romeo, G; Tagliaferri, C; Vatta, S; Andreani, M; Conte, R

    2006-01-01

    Background Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of inhibitory and activatory receptors that are expressed by most natural killer (NK) cells. The KIR gene family is polymorphic: genomic diversity is achieved through differences in gene content and allelic polymorphism. The number of KIR loci has been reported to vary among individuals, resulting in different KIR haplotypes. In this study we report the genotypic structure of KIRs in 217 unrelated healthy Italian individuals from 22 immunogenetics laboratories, located in the northern, central and southern regions of Italy. Methods Two hundred and seventeen DNA samples were studied by a low resolution PCR-SSP kit designed to identify all KIR genes. Results All 17 KIR genes were observed in the population with different frequencies than other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations; framework genes KIR3DL3, KIR3DP1, KIR2DL4 and KIR3DL2 were present in all individuals. Sixty-five different profiles were found in this Italian population study. Haplotype A remains the most prevalent and genotype 1, with a frequency of 28.5%, is the most commonly observed in the Italian population. Conclusion The Italian Caucasian population shows polymorphism of the KIR gene family like other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Although 64 genotypes have been observed, genotype 1 remains the most frequent as already observed in other populations. Such knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in populations is very useful in the study of associations with diseases and in selection of donors for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation. PMID:17069649

  7. KillerOrange, a Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer Activated by Blue and Green Light

    PubMed Central

    Bozhanova, Nina G.; Sharonov, George V.; Staroverov, Dmitriy B.; Egorov, Evgeny S.; Ryabova, Anastasia V.; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded photosensitizers, proteins that produce reactive oxygen species when illuminated with visible light, are increasingly used as optogenetic tools. Their applications range from ablation of specific cell populations to precise optical inactivation of cellular proteins. Here, we report an orange mutant of red fluorescent protein KillerRed that becomes toxic when illuminated with blue or green light. This new protein, KillerOrange, carries a tryptophan-based chromophore that is novel for photosensitizers. We show that KillerOrange can be used simultaneously and independently from KillerRed in both bacterial and mammalian cells offering chromatic orthogonality for light-activated toxicity. PMID:26679300

  8. Ten microsatellite loci from Zamia integrifolia (Zamiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten microsatellite loci isolated from Zamia integrifolia are described. All 10 are polymorphic, with three to ten alleles across 36 members of a single population from South Florida. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.067 to 1. Two loci depart significantly from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium, and exhibit het...

  9. KillerRed and miniSOG as genetically encoded photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirmanova, Marina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Ignatova, Nadezhda I.; Klementieva, Natalia V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-06-01

    Despite of the success of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer treatment, the problems of low selective accumulation of a photosensitizer in a tumor and skin phototoxicity have not resolved yet. The idea of encoding of a photosensitizer in genome of cancer cells is attractive, particularly because it can provide highly selective light induced cell killing. This work is aimed at the development of new approach to PDT of cancer, namely to using genetically encoded photosensitizers. A phototoxicity of red fluorescent GFP-like protein KillerRed and FMN-binding protein miniSOG was investigated on HeLa tumor xenografts in nude mice. The tumors were generated by subcutaneous injection of HeLa cells stably expressing the phototoxic proteins. The tumors were irradiated with 594 nm or 473 nm laser at 150 mW/cm2 for 20 or 30 min, repeatedly. Fluorescence intensity of the tumors was measured in vivo before and after each treatment procedure. Detailed pathomorphological analysis was performed 24 h after the therapy. On the epi-fluorescence images in vivo photobleaching of both proteins was observed indicating photodynamic reaction. Substantial pathomorphological abnormalities were found in the treated KillerRed-expressing tumor tissue, such as vacuolization of cytoplasm, cellular and nuclear membrane destruction, activation of apoptosis. In contrast, miniSOG-expressing tumors displayed no reaction to PDT, presumably due to the lack of FMN cofactor needed for fluorescence recovery of the flavoprotein. The results are of interest for photodynamic therapy as a proof of possibility to induce photodamages in cancer cells in vivo using genetically encoded photosensitizers.

  10. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  11. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  12. Natural Killer Cells and Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasbender, Frank; Widera, Agata; Hengstler, Jan G.; Watzl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In the 40 years since the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue-resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here, we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects. PMID:26858722

  13. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibiting receptors. The best characterized mechanism of NK cell activation is "missing self" detection, i.e., the recognition of virally infected or transformed cells that reduce their MHC expression to evade cytotoxic T cells. To monitor the expression of MHC-I on target cells, NK cells have monomorphic inhibitory receptors which interact with conserved MHC molecules. However, there are other NK cell receptors (NKRs) encoded by gene families showing a remarkable genetic diversity. Thus, NKR haplotypes contain several genes encoding for receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and that vary in gene content and allelic polymorphism. But if missing-self detection can be achieved by a monomorphic NKR system why have these polygenic and polymorphic receptors evolved? Here, we review the expansion of NKR receptor families in different mammal species, and we discuss several hypotheses that possibly underlie the diversification of the NK cell receptor complex, including the evolution of viral decoys, peptide sensitivity, and selective MHC-downregulation. PMID:26392015

  14. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel 'off-the-shelf' product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  15. Natural Killer Cells in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rehermann, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are traditionally regarded as first-line effectors of the innate immune response, but they also have a distinct role in chronic infection. Here, we review the role of NK cells against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), two agents that cause acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Interest in NK cells was initially sparked by genetic studies that demonstrated an association between NK cell–related genes and the outcome of HCV infection. Viral hepatitis also provides a model to study the NK cell response to both endogenous and exogenous type I interferon (IFN). Levels of IFN-stimulated genes increase in both acute and chronic HCV infection and pegylated IFNα has been the mainstay of HCV and HBV treatment for decades. In chronic viral hepatitis, NK cells display decreased production of antiviral cytokines. This phenotype is found in both HCV and HBV infection but is induced by different mechanisms. Potent antivirals now provide the opportunity to study the reversibility of the suppressed cytokine production of NK cells in comparison with the antigen-induced defect in IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor-α production of virus-specific T cells. This has implications for immune reconstitution in other conditions of chronic inflammation and immune exhaustion, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. PMID:26682281

  16. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel ‘off-the-shelf’ product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  17. Natural Killer Cells: Key Players in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvam, Uma; Wingfield, Mary; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2015-10-01

    Endometriosis affects more than 10% of women, causing significant pain and morbidity. It is also a significant cause of infertility. The aetiology of the disease remains an enigma, and the mechanisms responsible for the associated infertility are unclear. A role for immune cells in endometriosis has been postulated, with attention directed towards natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. NK cells kill tumours and infected cells but also have roles in tissue remodelling in several organs including the uterus and are key to successful pregnancy. Here, we explore evidence (from peer-reviewed published articles) of phenotypic and functional abnormalities in NK cell subpopulations of women with endometriosis. It is clear that peripheral blood NK cells and peritoneal NK cells have reduced cytotoxic function in women with endometriosis. Uterine NK cells have a vital role in infertility, but very little research has been carried out in this area. We propose that abnormal u NK cell activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility and that future research should focus on this complex area. PMID:26104509

  18. Natural Killer Cells Modulation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Céline; Fino, Aurore; Sanchez, Carole; Farnault, Laure; Rihet, Pascal; Kahn-Perlès, Brigitte; Costello, Régis T.

    2013-01-01

    Hematological malignancies (HM) treatment improved over the last years resulting in increased achievement of complete or partial remission, but unfortunately high relapse rates are still observed, due to remaining minimal residual disease. Therefore, sustainment of long-term remission is crucial, using either drug maintenance treatment or by boosting or prolonging an immune response. Immune system has a key role in tumor surveillance. Nonetheless, tumor-cells evade the specific T-lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance using many mechanisms but especially by the down-regulation of the expression of HLA class I antigens. In theory, these tumor-cells lacking normal expression of HLA class I molecules should be destroyed by natural killer (NK) cells, according to the missing-self hypothesis. NK cells, at the frontier of innate and adaptive immune system, have a central role in tumor-cells surveillance as demonstrated in the setting of allogenic stem cell transplantation. Nevertheless, tumors develop various mechanisms to escape from NK innate immune pressure. Abnormal NK cytolytic functions have been described in many HM. We present here various mechanisms involved in the escape of HM from NK-cell surveillance, i.e., NK-cells quantitative and qualitative abnormalities. PMID:24391641

  19. REPLICATIVE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Hiroyuki; Kakuda, Harumi; Imai, Chihaya; Mullighan, Charles G.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The replicative potential of human CD56+ CD3− natural killer (NK) cells is unknown. We found that by exposing NK cells to the leukemic cell line K562 genetically modified to express 4-1BB ligand and interleukin 15 (K562-mb15-41BBL), they expanded for up to 30 population doublings, achieving numbers that ranged from 1.6 × 105 to 1.2 × 1011 percent (median, 5.9 × 106 percent; n = 7) of those originally seeded. However, NK cells eventually became unresponsive to stimulation and died. Their demise could be suppressed by enforcing the expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. TERT-overexpressing NK cells continued to proliferate in response to K562-mb15-41BBL stimulation for more than 1 year of culture, while maintaining a normal karyotype and genotype. Long-lived NK cells had high cytotoxicity against myeloid and T-lineage leukemic cells. They remained susceptible to genetic manipulation, becoming highly cytotoxic to B-lineage leukemic cells after expression of anti-CD19 signaling receptors. Thus, human NK cells have a replicative potential similar to that of T lymphocytes and their lifespan can be significantly prolonged by an increase in TERT activity. We suggest that the methods described here should have many applications in studies of NK cell biology and NK cell-based therapies. PMID:19344420

  20. Visualizing compound transgenic zebrafish in development: a tale of green fluorescent protein and KillerRed.

    PubMed

    Korzh, Vladimir; Teh, Cathleen; Kondrychyn, Igor; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Lukyanov, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    Optically translucent embryos of model vertebrates expressing transgenic fluorescent proteins provide a possibility to unravel developmental events, particularly when combined with live imaging. An introduction of transposon-mediated transgenesis resulted in generation of a number of transgenics expressing cytosolic green fluorescent protein in a tissue-specific manner. The recent generation of photodynamic and differentially tagged fluorescent proteins opened a possibility not only to mix-and-match living markers of different color, but also to employ them as powerful experimental tools for studies of cell physiology. Using this approach, transgenic lines expressing membrane-tagged KillerRed (memKR), a genetically encoded photosensitizer, with little or no inducible phototoxicity under confocal imaging were generated. Phototoxicity is only induced by intense green or white light generated by the mercury lamp in a widefield mode. Here, we discuss new ideas born from experimentation using the zebrafish Tol2 transposon-mediated enhancer trap transgenic lines expressing memKR. Because of accumulation on the cell membrane, memKR reveals fine details of cellular morphology. In combination with cytosolic green fluorescent protein, the multicolor in vivo imaging of memKR transgenics reveals complex developmental processes and provides a possibility to manipulate them by regulated generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:21348774

  1. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  2. 50 CFR 229.37 - False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan... § 229.37 False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan. (a) Purpose and scope. The purpose of this section is to implement the False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan to reduce mortality and serious injury of...

  3. Biotyping of Malassezia pachydermatis strains using the killer system.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, S D; Paula, C R

    1998-06-01

    The killer phenomenon has been used as epidemiological marker for Candida albicans, where hundreds of biotypes can be obtained. The objective of this study is to observe the behaviour of 30 strains of Malassezia pachydermatis isolated from dogs with otitis (15) or dermatitis (15) against 9 killer yeasts, which, when grouped in triplets produced a 3 digit code (biotype). The growth inhibition of the 30 strains of M. pachydermatis due to the effect of the killer yeasts used permitted the determination of the following biotypes: 888 (33.3%), 212 (26.7%), 111 (16.7%), 312 (6.7%), 512 (6.7%), 242 (3.3%), 311 (3.3%) and 411 (3.3%). Biotypes 888, 212 and 111 occurred most frequently in both ear canal and skin samples. PMID:17655416

  4. Adaptive prolonged postreproductive life span in killer whales.

    PubMed

    Foster, Emma A; Franks, Daniel W; Mazzi, Sonia; Darden, Safi K; Balcomb, Ken C; Ford, John K B; Croft, Darren P

    2012-09-14

    Prolonged life after reproduction is difficult to explain evolutionarily unless it arises as a physiological side effect of increased longevity or it benefits related individuals (i.e., increases inclusive fitness). There is little evidence that postreproductive life spans are adaptive in nonhuman animals. By using multigenerational records for two killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations in which females can live for decades after their final parturition, we show that postreproductive mothers increase the survival of offspring, particularly their older male offspring. This finding may explain why female killer whales have evolved the longest postreproductive life span of all nonhuman animals. PMID:22984064

  5. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W M; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-29

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27(me3)) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122(+) NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26668377

  6. Natural Killer Cells as Helper Cells in Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pampena, María Betina; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy has generated highly variable clinical results due to differing methods of vaccine preparation and variation in patient populations among other lesser factors. Moreover, these clinical responses do not necessarily correspond with the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. Here, we review the participation of natural killer (NK) cells as alternative immune components that could cooperate in successful vaccination treatment. NK cells have been described as helper cells in dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, but the role in other kinds of vaccination strategies (whole cells, peptide, or DNA-based vaccines) is poorly understood. In this article, we address the following issues regarding the role of NK cells in cancer vaccines: NK cell anti-tumor action sites, and the loci of NK cell interaction with other immune cells; descriptions of new data on the memory characteristics of NK cells described in infectious diseases; and finally phenotypical and functional changes after vaccination measured by immunomonitoring in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:25674087

  7. Inferred Paternity and Male Reproductive Success in a Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Population.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael J; Hanson, M Bradley; Hempelmann, Jennifer A; Ayres, Katherine L; Emmons, Candice K; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W; Balcomb, Kenneth C; Wasser, Samuel K; Parsons, Kim M; Balcomb-Bartok, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    We used data from 78 individuals at 26 microsatellite loci to infer parental and sibling relationships within a community of fish-eating ("resident") eastern North Pacific killer whales (Orcinus orca). Paternity analysis involving 15 mother/calf pairs and 8 potential fathers and whole-pedigree analysis of the entire sample produced consistent results. The variance in male reproductive success was greater than expected by chance and similar to that of other aquatic mammals. Although the number of confirmed paternities was small, reproductive success appeared to increase with male age and size. We found no evidence that males from outside this small population sired any of the sampled individuals. In contrast to previous results in a different population, many offspring were the result of matings within the same "pod" (long-term social group). Despite this pattern of breeding within social groups, we found no evidence of offspring produced by matings between close relatives, and the average internal relatedness of individuals was significantly less than expected if mating were random. The population's estimated effective size was <30 or about 1/3 of the current census size. Patterns of allele frequency variation were consistent with a population bottleneck. PMID:21757487

  8. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W.; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y.; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W. M.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27me3) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122+ NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26668377

  9. Five Hundred Microsatellite Loci for Peromyscus

    PubMed Central

    WEBER, JESSE N.; PETERS, MAUREEN B; TSYUSKO, OLGA V.; LINNEN, CATHERINE R.; HAGEN, CRIS; SCHABLE, NANCY A.; TUBERVILLE, TRACEY D.; MCKEE, ANNA M.; LANCE, STACEY L.; JONES, KENNETH L.; FISHER, HEIDI S.; DEWEY, MICHAEL J.; HOEKSTRA, HOPI E.; GLENN, TRAVIS C.

    2009-01-01

    Mice of the genus Peromyscus, including several endangered subspecies, occur throughout North America and have been important models for conservation research. We describe 526 primer pairs that amplify microsatellite DNA loci for P. maniculatus bairdii, 467 of which also amplify in P. polionotus subgriseus. For 12 of these loci, we report diversity data from a natural population. These markers will be an important resource for future genomic studies of Peromyscus evolution and mammalian conservation. PMID:20563244

  10. Loci-STREAM Version 0.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Jeffrey; Thakur, Siddharth

    2006-01-01

    Loci-STREAM is an evolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software tool for simulating possibly chemically reacting, possibly unsteady flows in diverse settings, including rocket engines, turbomachines, oil refineries, etc. Loci-STREAM implements a pressure- based flow-solving algorithm that utilizes unstructured grids. (The benefit of low memory usage by pressure-based algorithms is well recognized by experts in the field.) The algorithm is robust for flows at all speeds from zero to hypersonic. The flexibility of arbitrary polyhedral grids enables accurate, efficient simulation of flows in complex geometries, including those of plume-impingement problems. The present version - Loci-STREAM version 0.9 - includes an interface with the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library for access to enhanced linear-equation-solving programs therein that accelerate convergence toward a solution. The name "Loci" reflects the creation of this software within the Loci computational framework, which was developed at Mississippi State University for the primary purpose of simplifying the writing of complex multidisciplinary application programs to run in distributed-memory computing environments including clusters of personal computers. Loci has been designed to relieve application programmers of the details of programming for distributed-memory computers.

  11. Effect of different levels of alcohol consumption on natural killer and lymphokine activated killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, L.W.; DeVasure, J.M.; Lemley-Gillespie, S.D.; Thiele, G.M. Omaha VA Hospital, NE )

    1991-03-11

    The effect of alcohol consumption on natural killer (NK) cell activity is controversial as both increased and decreased levels have been reported. It was the purpose of this study to determine the effects of feeding BDF1 mice different levels of alcohol on NK and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell activity. After four-six weeks of chronic alcohol feeding, mice were sacrificed, spleen cells obtained and assayed for NK and IL-2 boosted NK activity against YAC-1 cells in a traditional {sup 51}chromium release assay. Cells were also cultured in the presence of IL-2 for five days and tested for cytolytic activity using P815 cells as targets. Cells from each group were passed over a nylon wool column and the adherent (AD) and nonadherent (NAD) populations collected and tested as above. Increased NK, 24 hour IL-2 boosted NK and 5 day LAK activity were observed only in the spleen cells obtained from mice on 20% alcohol. Also, NAD populations had a 2-4 fold higher lytic unit values (LU{sub 20}) at all levels of alcohol consumption and in all assays, as compared with the unseparated spleen cells. Analysis of cell surface markers on these three populations of cells show that there were differences in MAC-2, Asialo GM-1, Thy 1.2, B220 and NK 1.1 that may correlate with the differences observed in the cytolytic assays. These data suggest that different levels of alcohol affect the cytolytic activity of NK and LAK cells and may result from alterations in the cell subset populations.

  12. Ultrasonic whistles of killer whales (Orcinus orca) recorded in the North Pacific (L).

    PubMed

    Filatova, Olga A; Ford, John K B; Matkin, Craig O; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G; Burdin, Alexander M; Hoyt, Erich

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasonic whistles were previously found in North Atlantic killer whales and were suggested to occur in eastern North Pacific killer whales based on the data from autonomous recorders. In this study ultrasonic whistles were found in the recordings from two encounters with the eastern North Pacific offshore ecotype killer whales and one encounter with the western North Pacific killer whales of unknown ecotype. All ultrasonic whistles were highly stereotyped and all but two had downsweep contours. These results demonstrate that specific sound categories can be shared by killer whales from different ocean basins. PMID:23231094

  13. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D.; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R.; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The MHC class I Dk molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds Dk, are required to control viral spread. The extent of Dk-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust Dk-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen. PMID:26845690

  14. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Ligand Matching and Outcomes after Unrelated Cord Blood Transplantation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Vanderson; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Tao; Sobecks, Ronald; Locatelli, Franco; Askar, Medhat; Michel, Gerard; Arcese, William; Iori, Anna Paola; Purtill, Duncan; Danby, Robert; Sanz, Guillermo F; Gluckman, Eliane; Eapen, Mary

    2016-07-01

    The effect of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-ligand matching on outcomes after unrelated cord blood (CB) transplantation was studied in 461 patients with acute myeloid leukemia, categorizing KIR ligand for HLA-C groups C1 and C2 and Bw4. Donor-recipient HLA matching considered allele-level matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Separate analyses were conducted for 6-7/8 HLA-matched and 3-5/8 HLA-matched transplants because HLA matching confounded KIR-ligand matching (ie, KIR-ligand mismatching was less likely with better HLA matching). All patients received single CB unit and myeloablative conditioning. There were no significant differences in nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse, and overall mortality by KIR-ligand match status. However, among recipients of 3-5/8 HLA-matched transplants, NRM (HR, 2.26; P = .008) and overall mortality (HR, 1.78; P = .008) but not relapse were higher with KIR-ligand mismatched (host-versus-graft direction) compared with KIR-ligand matched transplants. These data do not support selecting CB units based on KIR-ligand match status for transplants mismatched at 1 or 2 HLA loci. Although transplants mismatched at 3 or more HLA loci are not recommended, avoiding KIR-ligand mismatching in this setting lowers mortality risks. PMID:27090957

  15. Expression of Meiotic Drive Elements Spore Killer-2 and Spore Killer-3 in Asci of Neurospora Tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Raju, N. B.; Perkins, D. D.

    1991-01-01

    It was shown previously that when a chromosomal Spore killer factor is heterozygous in Neurospora species with eight-spored asci, the four sensitive ascospores in each ascus die and the four survivors are all killers. Sk-2(K) and Sk-3(K) are nonrecombining haplotypes that segregate with the centromere of linkage group III. No killing occurs when either one of these killers is homozygous, but each is sensitive to killing by the other in crosses of Sk-2(K) X Sk-3(K). In the present study, Sk-2(K) and Sk-3(K) were transferred by recurrent backcrosses from the eight-spored species Neurospora crassa into Neurospora tetrasperma, a pseudohomothallic species which normally makes asci with four large spores, each heterokaryotic for mating type and for any other centromere-linked genes that are heterozygous in the cross. The action of Sk-2(K) and Sk-3(K) in N. tetrasperma is that predicted from their behavior in eight-spored species. A sensitive nucleus is protected from killing if it is enclosed in the same ascospore with a killer nucleus. Crosses of Sk-2(K) X Sk-2(S), Sk-3(K) X Sk-3(S), and Sk-2(K) X Sk-3(K) all produce four-spored asci that are wild type in appearance, with the ascospores heterokaryotic and viable. The Eight-spore gene E, which shows variable penetrance, was used to obtain N. tetrasperma asci in which two to eight spores are small and homokaryotic. When killer and sensitive alleles are segregating in the presence of E, only those ascospores that contain a killer allele survive. Half of the small ascospores are killed. In crosses of Sk-2(K) X Sk-3(K) (with E heterozygous), effectively all small ascospores are killed. The ability of N. tetrasperma to carry killer elements in cryptic condition suggests a possible role for Spore killers in the origin of pseudohomothallism, with adoption of the four-spored mode restoring ascospore viability of crosses in which killing would otherwise occur. PMID:1834522

  16. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R.; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm3 blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56bright cells. The residual CD56dim cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A−KIR− subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance. PMID:25682594

  17. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm(3) blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56(bright) cells. The residual CD56(dim) cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A(-)KIR(-) subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance. PMID:25682594

  18. Lewy Bodies: A Spectator or Salient Killer?

    PubMed

    Sian-Hulsmann, Jeswinder; Monoranu, Camelia; Strobel, S; Riederer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Lewy bodies (LBs) are characteristic hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, their role in the pathology of PD is not established yet. Are they primary events in the neurodegenerative process or only secondary phenomena? Are they signs of protecting neurons from toxicity or are they toxic per se? How are they are formed? Are LBs targets for therapeutic strategies? Addressing these questions may be of pivotal importance to unravel the basic mechanisms of neurodegeneration in PD. On the basis of current evidence, we intend to elucidate the possible role of LBs as triggers and/or markers of disease progression in PD. We present evidence for the morphogenesis of brain stem and cortical LBs, the role in neuronal cell death mechanisms, which seem to be correlated with the adhesion of LBs to and finally disruption of their inner neuronal membrane. Taken as such, LBs would be salient killers of nerve cells. However, they may also play a neuroprotective role in the early phases of neuronal pathology (LBs as a spectator), yet harmful to neuronal stability in later stages of LB development. Generation of LB pathology in the periphery (early subclinical Braak stage) might be due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to (chronic) bacteria-induced and/or otherwise intestinal inflammation, both leading to alpha-synuclein structural changes, oligomerization, seeding and propagation in a prion-like mechanism. If so, LB generation is a secondary process following ROS/inflammation pathology. Therapeutic implication based on LB pathology include drug development to inhibit protein misfolding, templating and transmission or vaccination against LBs, neuron regeneration strategies, anti-inflammatory and anti-biotic drugs as well as nutritional specialities to prevent intestine intoxications. In conclusion, evidence suggests LBs to be secondary hallmarks of PD pathology, induced by ROS/inflammation or other pathological triggers able to modify protein (alpha-synuclein) steric

  19. AUGMENTATION OF MURINE NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity of spleen cells from male CBA/J mice was augmented by a single parenteral injection of MnCl2 administered 1 day prior to testing by in vitro and in vivo isotope release assays. Increased cytotoxic activity was observed in vitro against both NK-se...

  20. Life history evolution: what does a menopausal killer whale do?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Hal

    2015-03-16

    Menopause evolved in humans and whales, presumably because older females can help their kin. But how do they help? New research shows that post-menopausal female killer whales lead foraging groups. This leadership is most significant when food is scarce. PMID:25784039

  1. West Nile virus infection in killer whale, Texas, USA, 2007.

    PubMed

    St Leger, Judy; Wu, Guang; Anderson, Mark; Dalton, Les; Nilson, Erika; Wang, David

    2011-08-01

    In 2007, nonsuppurative encephalitis was identified in a killer whale at a Texas, USA, marine park. Panviral DNA microarray of brain tissue suggested West Nile virus (WNV); WNV was confirmed by reverse transcription PCR and sequencing. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated WNV antigen within neurons. WNV should be considered in cases of encephalitis in cetaceans. PMID:21801643

  2. IMMUNOSUPPRESSION OF PULMONARY NATURAL KILLER ACTIVITY BY EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. ulmonary atural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity...

  3. Whistle sequences in wild killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Ford, John K B; Thomsen, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Combining different stereotyped vocal signals into specific sequences increases the range of information that can be transferred between individuals. The temporal emission pattern and the behavioral context of vocal sequences have been described in detail for a variety of birds and mammals. Yet, in cetaceans, the study of vocal sequences is just in its infancy. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of sequences of stereotyped whistles in killer whales off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A total of 1140 whistle transitions in 192 whistle sequences recorded from resident killer whales were analyzed using common spectrographic analysis techniques. In addition to the stereotyped whistles described by Riesch et al., [(2006). "Stability and group specificity of stereotyped whistles in resident killer whales, Orcinus orca, off British Columbia," Anim. Behav. 71, 79-91.] We found a new and rare stereotyped whistle (W7) as well as two whistle elements, which are closely linked to whistle sequences: (1) stammers and (2) bridge elements. Furthermore, the frequency of occurrence of 12 different stereotyped whistle types within the sequences was not randomly distributed and the transition patterns between whistles were also nonrandom. Finally, whistle sequences were closely tied to close-range behavioral interactions (in particular among males). Hence, we conclude that whistle sequences in wild killer whales are complex signal series and propose that they are most likely emitted by single individuals. PMID:19045672

  4. EFFECT OF NICKEL AND MANGANESE ON NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of NiCl2 causes a suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity, while a single injection of MnCl2 enhances NK activity. When injected together Mn preempts the suppressive effect of Ni on NK activity.

  5. Genetic Analysis of the Pathogenic Molecular Sub-phenotype Interferon Alpha Identifies Multiple Novel Loci Involved in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Ghodke-Puranik, Yogita; Dorschner, Jessica M.; Chrabot, Beverly S.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Tsao, Betty P.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Skol, Andrew D.; Niewold, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation of multiple organ systems and dysregulated interferon responses. SLE is both genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous, greatly reducing the power of case-control studies in SLE. Elevated circulating interferon alpha (IFN-α) is a stable, heritable trait in SLE, which has been implicated in primary disease pathogenesis. 40–50% of patients have high IFN-α, and high levels correspond with clinical differences. To study genetic heterogeneity in SLE, we performed a case-case study comparing patients with high vs. low IFN-α in over 1550 SLE cases, including GWAS and replication cohorts. In meta-analysis, the top associations in European ancestry were PRKG1 rs7897633 (PMeta=2.75 × 10−8) and PNP rs1049564 (PMeta=1.24 × 10−7). We also found evidence for cross-ancestral background associations with the ANKRD44 and PLEKHF2 loci. These loci have not been previously identified in case-control SLE genetic studies. Bioinformatic analyses implicated these loci functionally in dendritic cells and natural killer cells, both of which are involved in IFN-α production in SLE. As case-control studies of heterogeneous diseases reach a limit of feasibility with respect to subject number and detectable effect size, the study of informative pathogenic subphenotypes becomes an attractive strategy for genetic discovery in complex disease. PMID:25338677

  6. Natural and Sexual Selection on Many Loci

    PubMed Central

    Barton, N. H.; Turelli, M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed that describes the effects on an arbitrary number of autosomal loci of selection on haploid and diploid stages, of nonrandom mating between haploid individuals, and of recombination. We provide exact recursions for the dynamics of allele frequencies and linkage disequilibria (nonrandom associations of alleles across loci). When selection is weak relative to recombination, our recursions provide simple approximations for the linkage disequilibria among arbitrary combinations of loci. We show how previous models of sex-independent natural selection on diploids, assortative mating between haploids, and sexual selection on haploids can be analyzed in this framework. Using our weak-selection approximations, we derive new results concerning the coevolution of male traits and female preferences under natural and sexual selection. In particular, we provide general expressions for the intensity of linkage-disequilibrium induced selection experienced by loci that contribute to female preferences for specific male traits. Our general results support the previous observation that these indirect selection forces are so weak that they are unlikely to dominate the evolution of preference-producing loci. PMID:2016044

  7. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  8. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  9. Invariant natural killer T cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: killer choice for natural suppression.

    PubMed

    Guan, P; Bassiri, H; Patel, N P; Nichols, K E; Das, R

    2016-05-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs) are innate-like lipid-reactive T lymphocytes that express an invariant T-cell receptor (TCR). Following engagement of the iTCR, iNKTs rapidly secrete copious amounts of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and promote the functions of several immune cells including NK, T, B and dendritic cells. Accordingly, iNKTs bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses and modulate susceptibility to autoimmunity, infection, allergy and cancer. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of the most effective treatments for patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the beneficial graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by the conventional T cells contained within the allograft is often hampered by the concurrent occurrence of graft versus host disease (GvHD). Thus, developing strategies that can dissociate GvHD from GvL remain clinically challenging. Several preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that iNKTs significantly attenuate GvHD without abrogating the GvL effect. Besides preserving the GvL activity of the donor graft, iNKTs themselves exert antitumor immune responses via direct and indirect mechanisms. Herein, we review the various mechanisms by which iNKTs provide antitumor immunity and discuss their roles in GvHD suppression. We also highlight the opportunities and obstacles in manipulating iNKTs for use in the cellular therapy of hematologic malignancies. PMID:26878658

  10. Sounds produced by Norwegian killer whales, Orcinus orca, during capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Parijs, Sofie M.; Leyssen, Teo; Similä, Tiu

    2004-07-01

    To date very little is still known about the acoustic behavior of Norwegian killer whales, in particular that of individual whales. In this study a unique opportunity was presented to document the sounds produced by five captured killer whales in the Vestfjord area, northern Norway. Individuals produced 14 discrete and 7 compound calls. Two call types were used both by individuals 16178 and 23365 suggesting that they may belong to the same pod. Comparisons with calls documented in Strager (1993) showed that none of the call types used by the captured individuals were present. The lack of these calls in the available literature suggests that call variability within individuals is likely to be large. This short note adds to our knowledge of the vocal repertoire of this population and demonstrates the need for further studies to provide behavioural context to these sounds.

  11. Killer-sensitive coexistence in metapopulations of micro-organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czárán, Tamás L; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2003-01-01

    Many micro-organisms are known to produce efficient toxic substances against conspecifics and closely related species. The widespread coexistence of killer (toxin producer) and sensitive (non-producer) strains is a puzzle calling for a theoretical explanation. Based on stochastic cellular automaton simulations and the corresponding semi-analytical configuration-field approximation models, we suggest that metapopulation dynamics offers a plausible rationale for the maintenance of polymorphism in killer-sensitive systems. A slight trade-off between toxin production and population growth rate is sufficient to maintain the regional coexistence of toxic and sensitive strains, if toxic killing is a local phenomenon restricted to small habitat patches and local populations regularly go extinct and are renewed via recolonizations from neighbouring patches. Pattern formation on the regional scale does not play a decisive part in this mechanism, but the local manner of interactions is essential. PMID:12965028

  12. Phylogenomics of the killer whale indicates ecotype divergence in sympatry.

    PubMed

    Moura, A E; Kenny, J G; Chaudhuri, R R; Hughes, M A; Reisinger, R R; de Bruyn, P J N; Dahlheim, M E; Hall, N; Hoelzel, A R

    2015-01-01

    For many highly mobile species, the marine environment presents few obvious barriers to gene flow. Even so, there is considerable diversity within and among species, referred to by some as the 'marine speciation paradox'. The recent and diverse radiation of delphinid cetaceans (dolphins) represents a good example of this. Delphinids are capable of extensive dispersion and yet many show fine-scale genetic differentiation among populations. Proposed mechanisms include the division and isolation of populations based on habitat dependence and resource specializations, and habitat release or changing dispersal corridors during glacial cycles. Here we use a phylogenomic approach to investigate the origin of differentiated sympatric populations of killer whales (Orcinus orca). Killer whales show strong specialization on prey choice in populations of stable matrifocal social groups (ecotypes), associated with genetic and phenotypic differentiation. Our data suggest evolution in sympatry among populations of resource specialists. PMID:25052415

  13. Martyrdom redefined: self-destructive killers and vulnerable narcissism.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Leonardo

    2014-08-01

    Lankford shows that suicide terrorists have much in common with maladjusted persons who die by suicide. However, what differentiates suicidal killers from those who "only" commit suicide? A key element may be vulnerable narcissism. Narcissism has been simultaneously linked to interpersonal aggression, achievement, and depression. These traits may explain the paradoxical picture of a person who may appear "normal" in some aspects, and yet hate himself and others so intensely as to seek mutual destruction. PMID:25162842

  14. Can self-destructive killers be classified so easily?

    PubMed

    Egan, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Lankford makes many useful points regarding the myths and shibboleths underlying our understanding of self-destructive killers and suicide bombers. He has collated an impressive data set on such offenders. However, his classification scheme is not built on sufficient evidence to support his proposed discrete categories of conventional, coerced, escapist, and indirect suicide terrorists. It would be straightforward to analyse the data, but it is unlikely that the resulting model would reflect that anticipated. PMID:25162843

  15. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  16. Effect of spaceflight on natural killer cell activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rykova, Marina P.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lesniak, A. T.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Meshkov, Dimitrii O.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Medvedev, Andrei E.; Berry, Wallace D.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Konstantinova, Irina V.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on immune cell function were determined in rats flown on Cosmos 2044. Control groups included vivarium, synchronous, and antiorthostatically suspended rats. The ability of natural killer cells to lyse two different target cell lines was determined. Spleen and bone marrow cells obtained from flight rats showed significantly inhibited cytotoxicity for YAC-1 target cells compared with cells from synchronous control rats. This could have been due to exposure of the rats to microgravity. Antiorthostatic suspension did not affect the level of cytotoxicity from spleen cells of suspended rats for YAC-1 cells. On the other hand, cells from rats flown in space showed no significant differences from vivarium and synchronous control rats in cytotoxicity for K-562 target cells. Binding of natural killer cells to K-562 target cells was unaffected by spaceflight. Antiorthostatic suspension resulted in higher levels of cytotoxicity from spleen cells for Cr-51-labeled K-562 cells. The results indicate differential effects of spaceflight on function of natural killer cells. This shows that spaceflight has selective effects on the immune response.

  17. Offshore killer whale tracking using multiple hydrophone arrays.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Martin; Henderson, E Elizabeth; Wiggins, Sean M; Roch, Marie A; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    To study delphinid near surface movements and behavior, two L-shaped hydrophone arrays and one vertical hydrophone line array were deployed at shallow depths (<125 m) from the floating instrument platform R/P FLIP, moored northwest of San Clemente Island in the Southern California Bight. A three-dimensional propagation-model based passive acoustic tracking method was developed and used to track a group of five offshore killer whales (Orcinus orca) using their emitted clicks. In addition, killer whale pulsed calls and high-frequency modulated (HFM) signals were localized using other standard techniques. Based on these tracks sound source levels for the killer whales were estimated. The peak to peak source levels for echolocation clicks vary between 170-205 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, for HFM calls between 185-193 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, and for pulsed calls between 146-158 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m. PMID:24180762

  18. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant based insect repellents/killers pertinent articles published in journals and authentic books were reviewed. The World Wide Web and the Extension Toxicity Network database (IPCS-ITOX) were also searched for toxicology data and other pertinent information. Repellents do not all share a single mode of action and surprisingly little is known about how repellents act on their target insects. Moreover, different mosquito species may react differently to the same repellent. After analysis of available data and information on the ingredient, of the product in relation to medicinal uses, acute and chronic toxicity of the selected medicinal plants, it can be concluded that the ingredients included in the herbal product can be used as active agents against mosquitoes. If the product which contains the powder of the above said plants is applied with care and safety, it is suitable fo use as a mosquito repellent/killer. PMID:23554562

  19. Experimental evidence for action imitation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Abramson, José Z; Hernández-Lloreda, Victoria; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Comparative experimental studies of imitative learning have focused mainly on primates and birds. However, cetaceans are promising candidates to display imitative learning as they have evolved in socioecological settings that have selected for large brains, complex sociality, and coordinated predatory tactics. Here we tested imitative learning in killer whales, Orcinus orca. We used a 'do-as-other-does' paradigm in which 3 subjects witnessed a conspecific demonstrator's performance that included 15 familiar and 4 novel behaviours. The three subjects (1) learned the copy command signal 'Do that' very quickly, that is, 20 trials on average; (2) copied 100 % of the demonstrator's familiar and novel actions; (3) achieved full matches in the first attempt for 8-13 familiar behaviours (out of 15) and for the 2 novel behaviours (out of 2) in one subject; and (4) took no longer than 8 trials to accurately copy any familiar behaviour, and no longer than 16 trials to copy any novel behaviour. This study provides experimental evidence for body imitation, including production imitation, in killer whales that is comparable to that observed in dolphins tested under similar conditions. These findings suggest that imitative learning may underpin some of the group-specific traditions reported in killer whales in the field. PMID:22875725

  20. Divergence of a stereotyped call in northern resident killer whales.

    PubMed

    Grebner, Dawn M; Parks, Susan E; Bradley, David L; Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Capone, Dean E; Ford, John K B

    2011-02-01

    Northern resident killer whale pods (Orcinus orca) have distinctive stereotyped pulsed call repertoires that can be used to distinguish groups acoustically. Repertoires are generally stable, with the same call types comprising the repertoire of a given pod over a period of years to decades. Previous studies have shown that some discrete pulsed calls can be subdivided into variants or subtypes. This study suggests that new stereotyped calls may result from the gradual modification of existing call types through subtypes. Vocalizations of individuals and small groups of killer whales were collected using a bottom-mounted hydrophone array in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia in 2006 and 2007. Discriminant analysis of slope variations of a predominant call type, N4, revealed the presence of four distinct call subtypes. Similar to previous studies, there was a divergence of the N4 call between members of different matrilines of the same pod. However, this study reveals that individual killer whales produced multiple subtypes of the N4 call, indicating that divergence in the N4 call is not the result of individual differences, but rather may indicate the gradual evolution of a new stereotyped call. PMID:21361462

  1. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant based insect repellents/killers pertinent articles published in journals and authentic books were reviewed. The World Wide Web and the Extension Toxicity Network database (IPCS-ITOX) were also searched for toxicology data and other pertinent information. Repellents do not all share a single mode of action and surprisingly little is known about how repellents act on their target insects. Moreover, different mosquito species may react differently to the same repellent. After analysis of available data and information on the ingredient, of the product in relation to medicinal uses, acute and chronic toxicity of the selected medicinal plants, it can be concluded that the ingredients included in the herbal product can be used as active agents against mosquitoes. If the product which contains the powder of the above said plants is applied with care and safety, it is suitable fo use as a mosquito repellent/killer. PMID:23554562

  2. Present and Future of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Okjae; Jung, Mi Young; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions. PMID:26089823

  3. Destructive hostility: the Jeffrey Dahmer case. A psychiatric and forensic study of a serial killer.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, J; Palermo, G; Johnson, L T; Ho, K C; Stormo, K A; Teggatz, J

    1994-12-01

    We were involved as forensic experts in the case of the serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer. We discuss the scene and victim autopsy findings, with a brief consideration of the basic emotion of hostility. These findings support the thesis that at the basis of this serial killer's behavior were primary unconscious feelings of hate that he had channeled into a sadistic programmed destruction of 17 young men. The interview of the serial killer, the photographic scene documentation, and the autopsy findings stress the ambivalent homosexuality of the killer, his sexual sadism, his obsessive fetishism, and his possible cannibalism and necrophilia. PMID:7879770

  4. Opioid peptides mediate the suppressive effect of stress on natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shavit, Y; Lewis, J W; Terman, G W; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-01-13

    The cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells was investigated in rats subjected to one of two inescapable footshock stress paradigms, both of which induce analgesia, but only one via activation of opioid mechanisms. Splenic natural killer cell activity was suppressed by the opioid, but not the nonopioid, form of stress. This suppression was blocked by the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Similar suppression of natural killer activity was induced by high doses of morphine. These results suggest that endogenous opioid peptides mediate the suppressive effect of certain forms of stress on natural killer cell cytotoxicity. PMID:6691146

  5. Involvement of cell wall beta-glucan in the action of HM-1 killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, S; Ben Inoue, S; Mio, T; Yamada, T; Nakajima, T; Ichishima, E; Furuichi, Y; Yamada, H

    1994-07-01

    HM-1 killer toxin secreted from Hansenula mrakii inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells by interfering with beta-1,3-glucan synthesis. We found that HM-1 killer toxin killed intact cells but not protoplasts. In addition, cells lacking the functional KRE6 allele (kre6 delta) became resistant to higher concentration of HM-1 killer toxin. As reported by Roemer and Bussey [(1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 88 11295-11299], cells lacking functional KRE6 had a reduced level of the cell wall beta-1,6-glucan compared to that in cells harboring the normal KRE6. These results suggest that the cell wall beta-glucan is involved in the action of HM-1 killer toxin. Addition of HM-1 killer toxin with several kinds of oligosaccharides revealed that either beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucan blocked the cytocidal action of HM-1 killer toxin whereas alpha-1,4-glucan and chitin did not. Mannan also interfered with HM-1 killer toxin action, but this inhibitory effect was much weaker than that observed with beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucans. Thus, it appears that the cell wall beta-glucan interacts with HM-1 killer toxin, and that this toxin-beta-glucan commitment is required for the action of HM-1 killer toxin. PMID:8026578

  6. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  7. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  8. Fine mapping of eight psoriasis susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayantan; Stuart, Philip E; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Li, Yanming; Tsoi, Lam C; Chandran, Vinod; Fischer, Judith; Helms, Cynthia; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Voorhees, John J; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Lathrop, G Mark; Nair, Rajan P; Rahman, Proton; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have identified 41 independent genome-wide significant psoriasis susceptibility loci. After our first psoriasis genome-wide association study, we designed a custom genotyping array to fine-map eight genome-wide significant susceptibility loci known at that time (IL23R, IL13, IL12B, TNIP1, MHC, TNFAIP3, IL23A and RNF114) enabling genotyping of 2269 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the eight loci for 2699 psoriasis cases and 2107 unaffected controls of European ancestry. We imputed these data using the latest 1000 Genome reference haplotypes, which included both indels and SNPs, to increase the marker density of the eight loci to 49 239 genetic variants. Using stepwise conditional association analysis, we identified nine independent signals distributed across six of the eight loci. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, we detected three independent signals at rs114255771 (P = 2.94 × 10(-74)), rs6924962 (P = 3.21 × 10(-19)) and rs892666 (P = 1.11 × 10(-10)). Near IL12B we detected two independent signals at rs62377586 (P = 7.42 × 10(-16)) and rs918518 (P = 3.22 × 10(-11)). Only one signal was observed in each of the TNIP1 (rs17728338; P = 4.15 × 10(-13)), IL13 (rs1295685; P = 1.65 × 10(-7)), IL23A (rs61937678; P = 1.82 × 10(-7)) and TNFAIP3 (rs642627; P = 5.90 × 10(-7)) regions. We also imputed variants for eight HLA genes and found that SNP rs114255771 yielded a more significant association than any HLA allele or amino-acid residue. Further analysis revealed that the HLA-C*06-B*57 haplotype tagged by this SNP had a significantly higher odds ratio than other HLA-C*06-bearing haplotypes. The results demonstrate allelic heterogeneity at IL12B and identify a high-risk MHC class I haplotype, consistent with the existence of multiple psoriasis effectors in the MHC. PMID:25182136

  9. Fine mapping of eight psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayantan; Stuart, Philip E; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Li, Yanming; Tsoi, Lam C; Chandran, Vinod; Fischer, Judith; Helms, Cynthia; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Voorhees, John J; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Lathrop, G Mark; Nair, Rajan P; Rahman, Proton; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified 41 independent genome-wide significant psoriasis susceptibility loci. After our first psoriasis genome-wide association study, we designed a custom genotyping array to fine-map eight genome-wide significant susceptibility loci known at that time (IL23R, IL13, IL12B, TNIP1, MHC, TNFAIP3, IL23A and RNF114) enabling genotyping of 2269 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the eight loci for 2699 psoriasis cases and 2107 unaffected controls of European ancestry. We imputed these data using the latest 1000 Genome reference haplotypes, which included both indels and SNPs, to increase the marker density of the eight loci to 49 239 genetic variants. Using stepwise conditional association analysis, we identified nine independent signals distributed across six of the eight loci. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, we detected three independent signals at rs114255771 (P=2.94 × 10−74), rs6924962 (P=3.21 × 10−19) and rs892666 (P=1.11 × 10−10). Near IL12B we detected two independent signals at rs62377586 (P=7.42 × 10−16) and rs918518 (P=3.22 × 10−11). Only one signal was observed in each of the TNIP1 (rs17728338; P=4.15 × 10−13), IL13 (rs1295685; P=1.65 × 10−7), IL23A (rs61937678; P=1.82 × 10−7) and TNFAIP3 (rs642627; P=5.90 × 10−7) regions. We also imputed variants for eight HLA genes and found that SNP rs114255771 yielded a more significant association than any HLA allele or amino-acid residue. Further analysis revealed that the HLA-C*06-B*57 haplotype tagged by this SNP had a significantly higher odds ratio than other HLA-C*06-bearing haplotypes. The results demonstrate allelic heterogeneity at IL12B and identify a high-risk MHC class I haplotype, consistent with the existence of multiple psoriasis effectors in the MHC. PMID:25182136

  10. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern Resident... CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section. The...

  11. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern Resident... CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section. The...

  12. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern... DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section....

  13. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern... DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section....

  14. Antigen-Addicted T Cell Reserves Trickle Charge the Frontline Killers.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vandana; Sarkar, Surojit

    2016-07-19

    Highly active killer T cells mediate a stable standoff during controlled persistent infections. In this issue of Immunity, Robey and colleagues describe a unique antigen-addicted T cell population bearing characteristics of both effector and memory CD8(+) T cells that provides a continuous supply of potent killer T cells to curb Toxoplasma gondii growth during latency. PMID:27438762

  15. Two chromosomal genes required for killing expression in killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wickner, R B; Leibowitz, M J

    1976-03-25

    The killer character of yeast is determined by a 1.4 X 10(6) molecular weight double-stranded RNA plasmid and at least 12 chromosomal genes. Wild-type strains of yeast that carry this plasmid (killers) secret a toxin which is lethal only to strains not carrying this plasmid (sensitives).--We have isolated 28 independent recessive chromosomal mutants of a killer strain that have lost the ability to secrete an active toxin but remain resistant to the effects of the toxin and continue to carry the complete cytoplasmic killer genome. These mutants define two complementation groups, kex1 and kex2. Kex1 is located on chromosome VII between ade5 and lys5. Kex2 is located on chromosome XIV, but it does not show meiotic linkage to any gene previously located on this chromosome.--When the killer plasmid of kex1 or kex2 strains is eliminated by curing with heat or cycloheximide, the strains become sensitive to killing. The mutant phenotype reappears among the meiotic segregants in a cross with a normal killer. Thus, the kex phenotype does not require an alteration of the killer plasmid.--Kex1 and kex2 strains each contain near-normal levels of the 1.4 x 10(6) molecular weight double-stranded RNA, whose presence is correlated with the presence of the killer genome. PMID:773743

  16. One-Year Prediction of Pain Killer Use among At-Risk Older Teens and Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Steve; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Barnett, Elizabeth; Lisha, Nadra; Sun, Ping

    2012-01-01

    The leading substance of misuse among teens after tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana is the use of pain killers. Very few longitudinal studies on prediction of pain killer use have been conducted among teens. This study examined the 1-year prediction of self-reported last 30-day pain killer use controlling for baseline 30-day painkiller use among…

  17. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism. PMID:26679162

  18. Isolation and identification of normal killer cells from Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Matveeva, V.A.; Klyuchareva, T.E.

    1986-09-01

    This paper gives data on isolation of normal killer cells from the blood and various tissues of Syrian hamsters in a Percoll density gradient and their identification on the basis of morphologic criteria and cytotoxic activity (CTA). CTA of the isolated cells was studied in the cytotoxic test with target cells of a human MOLT-4 thymoma cell labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Isolation of large granular lymphocytes from blood, spleen, and bone marrow of Syrian hamsters in Percoll density gradient is shown in the results of five experiments used for cells of each type.

  19. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Organ-specific features of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; La Cava, Antonio; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can be swiftly mobilized by danger signals and are among the earliest arrivals at target organs of disease. However, the role of NK cells in mounting inflammatory responses is often complex and sometimes paradoxical. Here, we examine the divergent phenotypic and functional features of NK cells, as deduced largely from experimental mouse models of pathophysiological responses in the liver, mucosal tissues, uterus, pancreas, joints and brain. Moreover, we discuss how organ-specific factors, the local microenvironment and unique cellular interactions may influence the organ-specific properties of NK cells. PMID:21941294

  1. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci. PMID:21542922

  2. Expression quantitative trait loci: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Nica, Alexandra C.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2013-01-01

    The last few years have seen the development of large efforts for the analysis of genome function, especially in the context of genome variation. One of the most prominent directions has been the extensive set of studies on expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), namely, the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Such studies have offered promise not just for the characterization of functional sequence variation but also for the understanding of basic processes of gene regulation and interpretation of genome-wide association studies. In this review, we discuss some of the key directions of eQTL research and its implications. PMID:23650636

  3. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  4. Use of natural killer cells as immunotherapy for leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Bartosz; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells potentially play a significant role in eradicating residual disease following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation, and have been explored as tools for adoptive immunotherapy for chemotherapy-refractory patients. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by multiple activating and inhibitory receptors that maintain a balance between self-tolerance and providing surveillance against pathogens and malignant transformation. The functional characteristics of NK cells are dictated by the strength of inhibitory receptor signalling. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-specific inhibitory receptor acquisition occurs sequentially during NK cell development, and is determined by the nature of immunological reconstitution after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Polymorphisms of inhibitory receptors [killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)] and their ligands (MHC) contribute to interindividual variability. As a result, the functional NK cell repertoire of individual donors has variable potential for graft-vs-leukaemia reactions. Models predicting NK cell alloreactivity, including KIR ligand mismatch and missing KIR ligand strategies, are discussed as algorithms for optimal NK cell donor selection. Future modifications to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signalling are being explored. PMID:18790450

  5. Natural killer T cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lan; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that share surface markers and functional characteristics with both conventional T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Most NKT cells express a semiinvariant T cell receptor that reacts with glycolipid antigens presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-related protein CD1d on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. NKT cells become activated during a variety of infections and inflammatory conditions, rapidly producing large amounts of immunomodulatory cytokines. NKT cells can influence the activation state and functional properties of multiple other cell types in the immune system and, thus, modulate immune responses against infectious agents, autoantigens, tumors, tissue grafts and allergens. One attractive aspect of NKT cells is that their immunomodulatory activities can be readily harnessed with cognate glycolipid antigens, such as the marine sponge-derived glycosphingolipid alpha-galactosylceramide. These properties of NKT cells are being exploited for therapeutic intervention to prevent or treat cancer, infections, and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:21196373

  6. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  7. Immunosuppression of pulmonary natural killer activity by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.; Keyes, L.L.; Stutzman, J.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity of continuous ozone exposure. Continuous ozone exposures at 1.0 ppm were performed for 23.5 hours per day for either 1, 5, 7, or 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary immune function was assessed by measuring natural killer (NK) activity from whole-lung homogenates of male Fischer-344 rats. Results of this study indicated that continuous ozone exposure for 1, 5, or 7 days resulted in a significant decrease in pulmonary NK activity. This suppressed pulmonary NK activity returned to control levels after continuous exposure to ozone for 10 days. The suppressed pulmonary NK response was thus attenuated and returned to normal values in the continued presence of ozone gas. This attenuation process is dynamic, complex, and doubtless involves several cell types and/or products of these cells. Pulmonary NK activity was also suppressed at 0.5 ppm ozone, but not at 0.1 ppm ozone, following 23.5 hours of exposure. NK activity is important for defense against viral, bacterial, and neoplastic disease. The depressed NK activity resulting from continuous ozone exposure could therefore result in a compromised ability to defend against pulmonary diseases.

  8. Energy Security: From Deal Killers to Game Changers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Charlie

    2010-03-01

    Five energy security ``deal killers" are identified: 1) Global warming and CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion; 2) Intermittent energy sources (wind, solar) and the presence and stability of the grid; 3) Penetration of plant defenses to produce transportation fuels from biomass; 4) Mimicking nature: artificial photosynthesis for solar energy to fuels; and 5) Spent fuel from nuclear power reactors. Transformational basic research is required to successfully change the ground rules, to transform these ``deal killers" into ``game changers." T hey are: 1) Offsetting carbon capture and storage costs through enhanced oil recovery and methane generation from high temperature geothermal saline aquifers; 2) Electrical energy storage, through batteries and super-capacitors; 3) Genetic modification of plant cell walls, and catalytic methods for transforming plant sugars into fuels; 4) Separation of solar-induced electrons from holes, and catalysis to produce fuels; and 5) Closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Basic research can revolutionize our approach to carbon-free energy by enhancing nature to achieve energy security.

  9. Echolocation signals of foraging killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Ford, John K. B.; Allman, Kelly A.

    2002-05-01

    Fish eating resident killer whales that frequent the coastal waters of Vancouver Island, Canada have a strong preference for chinook salmon. The whales in Johnston Strait often forage along the steep cliffs that extend into the water, echolocating their prey. Echolocation signals were measured with a four hydrophone symmetrical star array and the signals were simultaneous digitized at a sample rate of 500 kHz using a lunch-box PC. A portable VCR recorded the images from an underwater camera located close to the array center. Only signals emanated from close to the beam axis (1185 total) were chosen for a detailed analysis. Killer whales project very broad band echolocation signals (Q 1.3 to 1.5) that tend to have a bimodal frequency structure. Ninety seven percent of the signals had center frequencies between 45 and 80 kHz with a band-width between 35 and 50 kHz. The peak-to-peak source level of the echolocation signal decreased as a function of the one way transmission loss to the array. Source levels varied between 200 and 225 dB re 1 μPa. Using a model of target strength for chinook salmons, the echo levels from the echolocation signals are estimated for different ranges between whale and salmon.

  10. Disseminated mycosis in a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Abdo, Walied; Kawachi, Takeshi; Sakai, Hiroki; Fukushi, Hideto; Kano, Rui; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Shirouzu, Hiroshi; Kakizoe, Yuko; Tuji, Hajime; Yanai, Tokuma

    2012-01-01

    Hematological findings in a female killer whale (Orcinus orca) undergoing rehabilitation after sudden severe anorexia revealed continuing increases in serum lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase activities as well as fibrinogen concentration. Serologic evidence of herpesvirus infection and skin vesicles were detected 2 weeks into the treatment regimen of antibiotics and corticosteroids. The whale showed signs of improvement after treatment with anti-herpesvirus drugs, but sudden severe anorexia reappeared, along with marked elevation of fibrinogen concentration that continued until the death. Postmortem examination revealed multiple light tan foci of necrosis in the skeletal and cardiac muscles, and lung consolidation. Microscopic findings indicated disseminated fungal granulomas in the skeletal and cardiac muscles, as well as myocarditis, mycotic embolic thromboarteritis of cardiac blood vessels, and bronchopneumonia with numerous typical Aspergillus-like fungi. Mucor-like structures in granulomas in the heart and skeletal muscle and Aspergillus-like fungi in the lungs were identified using periodic acid-Schiff, Gomori methenamine silver stain, and immunohistochemistry. The present case involves dual infection with Mucor and Aspergillus species in a killer whale with concurrent herpesvirus. PMID:22362957

  11. Stable isotopes of captive cetaceans (killer whales and bottlenose dolphins).

    PubMed

    Caut, Stéphane; Laran, Sophie; Garcia-Hartmann, Emmanuel; Das, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    There is currently a great deal of interest in using stable isotope methods to investigate diet, trophic level and migration in wild cetaceans. In order to correctly interpret the results stemming from these methods, it is crucial to understand how diet isotopic values are reflected in consumer tissues. In this study, we investigated patterns of isotopic discrimination between diet and blood constituents of two species of cetaceans (killer whale, Orcinus orca, and bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus) fed controlled diets over 308 and 312 days, respectively. Diet discrimination factors (Δ; mean ± s.d.) for plasma were estimated to Δ(13)C=2.3±0.6‰ and Δ(15)N=1.8±0.3‰, respectively, for both species and to Δ(13)C=2.7±0.3‰ and Δ(15)N=0.5±0.1‰ for red blood cells. Delipidation did not have a significant effect on carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of blood constituents, confirming that cetacean blood does not serve as a reservoir of lipids. In contrast, carbon isotopic values were higher in delipidated samples of blubber, liver and muscle from killer whales. The potential for conflict between fisheries and cetaceans has heightened the need for trophic information about these taxa. These results provide the first published stable isotope incorporation data for cetaceans, which are essential if conclusions are to be drawn on issues concerning trophic structures, carbon sources and diet reconstruction. PMID:21270301

  12. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  13. Killer toxin from several food-derived Debaryomyces hansenii strains effective against pathogenic Candida yeasts.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Nabaraj; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2016-04-01

    Candida yeasts are the dominant fungi in the healthy human microbiome, but are well-known for causing disease following a variety of perturbations. Evaluation of fungal populations from the healthy human gut revealed a significant negative correlation between the foodborne yeast, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Candida species. D. hansenii is reported to produce killer toxins (mycocins) effective against other yeast species. In order to better understand this phenomenon, a collection of 42 D. hansenii isolates was obtained from 22 cheeses and evaluated for killer activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis over a range of temperatures and pH values. Twenty three strains demonstrated killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis, which was pH- and temperature-dependent, with no killer activity observed for any strain at pH6.5 or higher, or at ≥35°C (physiological conditions in the human gastrointestinal tract). A cell-free mycocin preparation showed transient killer activity against C. albicans at 35°C and a cheese sample containing a killer D. hansenii strain demonstrated sustained killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Together, these observations raise the possibility that D. hansenii could influence Candida populations in the gut. PMID:26828815

  14. Low-frequency signals produced by Northeast Atlantic killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Samarra, Filipa I P; Deecke, Volker B; Miller, Patrick J O

    2016-03-01

    Killer whale acoustic behavior has been extensively investigated; however, most studies have focused on pulsed calls and whistles. This study reports the production of low-frequency signals by killer whales at frequencies below 300 Hz. Recordings were made in Iceland and Norway when killer whales were observed feeding on herring and no other marine mammal species were nearby. Low-frequency sounds were identified in Iceland and ranged in duration between 0.14 and 2.77 s and in frequency between 50 and 270 Hz, well below the previously reported lower limit for killer whale tonal sounds of 500 Hz. Low-frequency sounds appeared to be produced close in time to tail slaps, which are indicative of feeding attempts, suggesting that these sounds may be related to a feeding context. However, their precise function is unknown, and they could be the by-product of a non-vocal behavior rather than a vocal signal deliberately produced by the whales. Although killer whales in Norway exhibit similar feeding behavior, this sound has not been detected in recordings from Norway to date. This study suggests that, like other delphinids, killer whales produce low-frequency sounds, but further studies will be required to understand whether similar sounds exist in other killer whale populations. PMID:27036251

  15. Positioning Effects of KillerRed inside of Cells correlate with DNA Strand Breaks after Activation with Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Mueller, Gabriele; Wiessler, Manfred; Tóth, Katalin; Braun, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are established tools for new applications, not-restricted to the cell biological research. They could also be ideal in surgery enhancing the precision to differentiate between the target tissue and the surrounding healthy tissue. FPs like the KillerRed (KRED), used here, can be activated by excitation with visible day-light for emitting active electrons which produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in photokilling processes. It is a given that the extent of the KRED's cell toxicity depends on its subcellular localization. Evidences are documented that the nuclear lamina as well as especially the chromatin are critical targets for KRED-mediated ROS-based DNA damaging. Here we investigated the damaging effects of the KRED protein fused to the nuclear lamina and to the histone H2A DNA-binding protein. We detected a frequency of DNA strand breaks, dependent first on the illumination time, and second on the spatial distance between the localization at the chromatin and the site of ROS production. As a consequence we could identify defined DNA bands with 200, 400 and (600) bps as most prominent degradation products, presumably representing an internucleosomal DNA cleavage induced by KRED. These findings are not restricted to the detection of programmed cell death processes in the therapeutic field like PDT, but they can also contribute to a better understanding of the structure-function relations in the epigenomic world. PMID:21278894

  16. [Nasal type natural killer/T cell lymphoma: case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Düzlü, Mehmet; Ant, Ayça; Tutar, Hakan; Karamert, Recep; Şahin, Melih; Sayar, Erolcan; Cesur, Nesibe

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma is a rare type of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma which originates from nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Exact diagnosis of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, which is a rapidly progressive clinical condition, may be established by immunohistochemical analysis on biopsy material after clinical suspicion. In this article, we report four cases of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma who were followed-up in our clinic and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in light of the literature data. PMID:27405082

  17. Speaking up: Killer whales (Orcinus orca) increase their call amplitude in response to vessel noise.

    PubMed

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Veirs, Val; Emmons, Candice K; Veirs, Scott

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of anthropogenic sound exposure on the vocal behavior of free-ranging killer whales. Endangered Southern Resident killer whales inhabit areas including the urban coastal waters of Puget Sound near Seattle, WA, where anthropogenic sounds are ubiquitous, particularly those from motorized vessels. A calibrated recording system was used to measure killer whale call source levels and background noise levels (1-40 kHz). Results show that whales increased their call amplitude by 1 dB for every 1 dB increase in background noise levels. Furthermore, nearby vessel counts were positively correlated with these observed background noise levels. PMID:19173379

  18. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry; Hofer, Erhard

    2012-11-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56(dim) NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy. PMID:22571679

  19. Circulating natural killer cells in retired asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Froom, P; Lahat, N; Kristal-Boneh, E; Cohen, C; Lerman, Y; Ribak, J

    2000-01-01

    The effect of past exposure to asbestos on natural killer (NK) cell number and activity is uncertain. We measured NK cell number and activity in 1052 retired asbestos workers without symptomatic lung disease, lung cancer, or mesothelioma and with a long latency period from exposure; results were compared with those for 100 healthy age-matched controls. The exposed workers showed a decreased NK cell activity and increased NK cell number, yielding a 10.8 higher odds ratio for low NK activity per cell compared with controls (95% confidence interval 6.4 to 18.4), which was due to both a decrease in NK cell activity and an increase in NK cell number. Asbestos exposure of 10 years or more increased the risk of low NK activity per cell. We conclude that exposure to asbestos is associated with diminished effectiveness of NK cells and a concomitant increase in the number of NK circulating cells. PMID:10652684

  20. Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking of Human Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the defense against viral infections and tumor development. NK cell function is primarily regulated by the sum of signals from a broad array of activation and inhibitory receptors. Key to generating the input level of either activating or inhibitory signals is the maintenance of receptor expression levels on the cell surface. Although the mechanisms of endocytosis and trafficking for some cell surface receptors, such as transferrin receptor, and certain immune receptors, are very well known, that is not the situation for receptors expressed by NK cells. Recent studies have uncovered that endocytosis and trafficking routes characteristic for specific activation and inhibitory receptors can regulate the functional responses of NK cells. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of receptor endocytosis and trafficking, and integrate this with our current understanding of NK cell receptor trafficking. PMID:19719476

  1. Production of EUV mask blanks with low killer defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antohe, Alin O.; Kearney, Patrick; Godwin, Milton; He, Long; John Kadaksham, Arun; Goodwin, Frank; Weaver, Al; Hayes, Alan; Trigg, Steve

    2014-04-01

    For full commercialization, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology requires the availability of EUV mask blanks that are free of defects. This remains one of the main impediments to the implementation of EUV at the 22 nm node and beyond. Consensus is building that a few small defects can be mitigated during mask patterning, but defects over 100 nm (SiO2 equivalent) in size are considered potential "killer" defects or defects large enough that the mask blank would not be usable. The current defect performance of the ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) tool will be discussed and the progress achieved to date in the reduction of large size defects will be summarized, including a description of the main sources of defects and their composition.

  2. Prolonged treatment response in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Del Giudice, I; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2005-05-01

    We describe a case of natural killer (NK) cell leukemia with acute presentation, systemic symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. The uniform and aberrant phenotype of NK cells with infiltration of bone marrow and spleen was in keeping with a malignant diagnosis. Aggressive presentation was demonstrated by marked constitutional symptoms and significant tumor burden (liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow). The subsequent clinical course has been indolent, but this may have been influenced by treatment. Treatment consisted sequentially of splenectomy, intravenous pentostatin and the combination of cyclosporine A and recombinant human erythropoietin and has resulted in survival of over 48 months. We discuss the difficulties in the diagnosis of this condition, explore possible causes of cytopenia(s), and highlight the role of immunosuppression in controlling disease manifestations in large granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders. PMID:16019515

  3. Novel targets for natural killer/T-cell lymphoma immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kumai, Takumi; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTL) is a rare but highly aggressive Epstein-Barr virus-related malignancy, which mainly occurs in nasopharyngeal and nasal/paranasal areas. In addition to its high prevalence in Asian, Central American and South American populations, its incidence rate has been gradually increasing in Western countries. The current mainstay of treatment is a combination of multiple chemotherapies and irradiation. Although chemoradiotherapy can cure NKTL, it often causes severe and fatal adverse events. Because a growing body of evidence suggests that immunotherapy is effective against hematological malignancies, this treatment could provide an alternative to chemoradiotherapy for treatment of NKTL. In this review, we focus on how recent findings could be used to develop efficient immunotherapies against NKTL. PMID:26642249

  4. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-16

    In this paper, we describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. From the results obtained here, it appears that, at least for this application, a production machine based on the TC2000 architecture with more powerful processors and a commensurate increase in switch speed could yield a significant gain in our design capability. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Energy Security: From Deal Killers to Game Changers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, Raymond L.

    2010-03-01

    Five ``deal killers'' for achieving energy security will be addressed: 1) Global warming and CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion, 2) Intermittent energy sources (wind, solar) and the presence and stability of the grid, 3) Penetration of plant defenses to produce transportation fuels from biomass, 4) Mimicking nature: artificial photosynthesis for solar energy-to-fuels, and 5) Spent fuel from nuclear power reactors. Basic research can lead to ``game changers'' for these five fields: 1) Carbon capture and storage through enhanced oil and gas recovery, 2) Electrical energy storage for base-load electricity through batteries and supercapacitors, 3) Genetic modification of the plant cell wall, and catalytic methods for conversion of plant sugars to fuels, 4) Separation of solar-induced electrons from holes, and catalysis to produce fuels, and 5) Closing the nuclear fuel cycle. The present state for each of these game changers will be summarized, and future research opportunities discussed.

  6. Vulnerability of a killer whale social network to disease outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Paulo R., Jr.; de Menezes, Márcio Argollo; Baird, Robin W.; Lusseau, David; Guimarães, Paulo; Dos Reis, Sérgio F.

    2007-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are among the main threats to conservation of biological diversity. A crucial task facing epidemiologists is to predict the vulnerability of populations of endangered animals to disease outbreaks. In this context, the network structure of social interactions within animal populations may affect disease spreading. However, endangered animal populations are often small and to investigate the dynamics of small networks is a difficult task. Using network theory, we show that the social structure of an endangered population of mammal-eating killer whales is vulnerable to disease outbreaks. This feature was found to be a consequence of the combined effects of the topology and strength of social links among individuals. Our results uncover a serious challenge for conservation of the species and its ecosystem. In addition, this study shows that the network approach can be useful to study dynamical processes in very small networks.

  7. Natural killer cells: walking three paths down memory lane.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hendricks, Deborah W; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L

    2013-06-01

    Immunological memory has traditionally been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response, mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. All other hematopoietic cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, are classified as innate immune cells, which have been considered short-lived but can respond rapidly against pathogens in a manner not thought to be driven by antigen. Interestingly, NK cells have recently been shown to survive long term after antigen exposure and subsequently mediate antigen-specific recall responses. In this review, we address the similarities between, and the controversies surrounding, three major viewpoints of NK memory that have arisen from these recent studies: (i) mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-induced memory; (ii) cytokine-induced memory; and (iii) liver-restricted memory cells. PMID:23499559

  8. The role of natural killer cells in viral infections.

    PubMed

    See, D M; Khemka, P; Sahl, L; Bui, T; Tilles, J G

    1997-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors for the lysis of both neoplastic and virus-infected cells. Lectin-like receptors on human NK cells, such as NKR-PIA and CD94, bind to target cell carbohydrate ligands and initiate the lytic process. In addition, P58 and P70 bind to major histocompatibility class I antigens on targets and mediate negative signals. Models using NK cell-deficient mice have proven useful in elaborating the role of NK cells in the immune defence against multiple viral agents. In addition, studies in humans have suggested a vital role of NK cells in the host defence against human immunodeficiency virus, herpesviruses, hepatitis B and C and other viruses. Several genetic disorders, chronic illnesses and infections have been associated with decreased NK function. PMID:9315107

  9. Operational Performance Analysis of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Killer Whales

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Sun, Yannan; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-09-30

    For the planned tidal turbine site in Puget Sound, WA, the main concern is to protect Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) due to their Endangered Species Act status. A passive acoustic monitoring system is proposed because the whales emit vocalizations that can be detected by a passive system. The algorithm for detection is implemented in two stages. The first stage is an energy detector designed to detect candidate signals. The second stage is a spectral classifier that is designed to reduce false alarms. The evaluation presented here of the detection algorithm incorporates behavioral models of the species of interest, environmental models of noise levels and potential false alarm sources to provide a realistic characterization of expected operational performance.

  10. Cytotoxic and natural killer cell stimulatory constituents of Phyllanthus songboiensis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yulin; Yuan, Chunhua; Deng, Youcai; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Tu, Vuong Tan; Chai, Hee-Byung; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Fuchs, James R.; Yalowich, Jack C.; Yu, Jianhua; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    A dichapetalin-type triterpenoid and a dibenzylbutyrolactone-type lignan, together with five known lignans, a known aromatic diterpenoid, and a known acylated phytosterol, were isolated from the aerial parts of Phyllanthus songboiensis, collected in Vietnam. Their structures were determined by interpretation of the spectroscopic data, and the inhibitory activity toward the HT-29 human colon cancer cells of all isolates was evaluated by a cytotoxicity assay. The known arylnaphthalene lignan, (+)-acutissimalignan A, was highly cytotoxic toward HT-29 cells, with an IC50 value of 19 nM, but this compound was inactive as a DNA topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) poison. The known phytosterol, (−)-β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-(6-O-palmitoyl)glucopyranoside, was found to stimulate natural killer (NK) cells at a concentration of 10 μM in the presence of interleukin 12 (IL-12). PMID:25596805

  11. Killer B lymphocytes: the evidence and the potential

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immune regulation plays a critical role in controlling potentially dangerous inflammation and maintaining health. The Fas ligand/Fas receptor axis has been studied extensively as a mechanism of killing T cells and other cells during infections, autoimmunity, and cancer. FasL expression has been primarily attributed to activated T cells and NK cells. Evidence has emerged that B lymphocytes can express FasL and other death-inducing ligands, and can mediate cell death under many circumstances. Among B cell subsets, the expression of both Fas ligand and IL-10 is highest on the CD5+ B cell population, suggesting that CD5+ B cells may have a specialized regulatory function. The relevance of killer B cells to normal immune regulation, disease pathogenesis, and inflammation is discussed. PMID:19262989

  12. Quantitation of natural killer cell precursors in man.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghian, Ahmad; Haque, K M Gausul; Truman, Carol; Newman, John; Bradley, Benjamin A

    2002-02-01

    A technique was developed to measure the frequency of natural killer cell precursors (NKpf) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples. Functional maturity of NK cells was reflected in their ability to lyse target cells from the K562 cell line. During the development of the technique, venous blood was taken from one healthy adult and assayed at different times to avoid individual variation. The technique was based on the principle of limiting dilution analysis. The NKpf assay was set up with a range of cell dilutions from 40,000 to 625 per 100 microl/well in 96-well culture plates. At the end of the culture period, the K562 cell line labelled with europium (Eu-K562) was added and the Eu-release was measured in culture supernatants using time-resolved fluorometry. The NKpf value differed between individuals and was influenced by the length of time in culture, being maximal at day 5. Maturation of NKp required the continuous presence of recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), or rIL-15, both being equally effective. In the absence of cytokines, the functional NK cells declined rapidly beyond 24 h in culture. Irradiated allogeneic cells appeared to substitute in part for cytokines, but the numbers of allo-activated NKpf were lower than those observed when allo-activated NKpf were cultured with rIL-2. This suggested selective activation by the allogeneic stimulus of subsets of NKp or rIL-2-rescue of NKp subsets destined for apoptotic cell death. Alternatively, the increased frequency could have been attributable to activation of precursors of natural killer-T cells (NK-Tp). This assay is suitable for estimating the total number of precursors of functional NK cells in the blood of patients. PMID:11792377

  13. On the communicative significance of whistles in wild killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Frank; Franck, Dierk; Ford, John

    2002-08-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) use pulsed calls and whistles in underwater communication. Unlike pulsed calls, whistles have received little study and thus their function is poorly known. In this study, whistle activities of groups of individually known killer whales were compared quantitatively across behavioural categories. Acoustic recordings and simultaneous behavioural observations were made of northern resident killer whales off Vancouver Island in 1996 and 1997. Whistles were produced at greater rates than discrete calls during close-range behavioural activities than during long-range activities. They were the predominant sound-type recorded during socializing. The number of whistles per animal per minute was significantly higher during close-range behavioural activities than during long-range activities. Evidently, whistles play an important role in the close-range acoustic communication in northern resident killer whales.

  14. Hepatitis C Now Leading Infectious Disease Killer in U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158651.html Hepatitis C Now Leading Infectious Disease Killer in U.S. ... May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of hepatitis C-linked deaths in the United States reached ...

  15. Hepatitis C Now Leading Infectious Disease Killer in U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158651.html Hepatitis C Now Leading Infectious Disease Killer in U.S. CDC ... 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of hepatitis C-linked deaths in the United States reached a ...

  16. Killers in the Brain - Essays in Science and Technology from the Royal Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Peter

    1999-09-01

    This fascinating and diverse selection of essays from the Royal Institution provides a glimpse of some of the most current and exciting scientific research, ranging from the global increase in asthma and allergies to neurodegenerative diseases known as "brain killers."

  17. Hungarian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Woller, J; Koons, B W; Furedi, S; Errera, J D; Padar, Z

    1996-07-01

    Hungarian population data for the loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1, and D1S80 were generated. The genotype frequency distributions for the loci do not deviate from Hardy Weinberg expectations. Furthermore, there was little evidence for departures from expectations of independence between the loci. Using a test for homogeneity all the loci were similar between two Hungarian population samples and only the HLA-DQA1 locus was statistically different between Hungarians and US Caucasians. There generally would be little forensic differences, whether a Hungarian or a US Caucasian database was used, for estimating multiple locus profile frequencies for the seven PCR-based loci. PMID:8754580

  18. Development of eighteen microsatellite loci in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Stott, Wendy; Springmann, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for walleye (Sander vitreus) from 454 pyrosequencing data. Eighteen of the 50 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 35 walleye from two lakes on Isle Royale, Lake Superior: Chickenbone Lake and Whittlesey Lake. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 35.8 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring as individuals assigned back to their population of origin. Cross-species amplification within S. canadensis (sauger) was successful for 15 loci, and 11 loci were diagnostic to species. The loci characterized here will be useful for detecting fine-scale spatial structuring, resolving the taxonomic status of Sander species and sub-species, and detecting walleye/sauger hybrids.

  19. Target Strength of Southern Resident Killer Whales (Orcinus orca): Measurement and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Moore, Brian

    2012-04-04

    A major criterion for tidal power licensing in Washington’s Puget Sound is the management of the risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades. An active monitoring system is being proposed for killer whale detection, tracking, and alerting that links to and triggers temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision. Target strength (TS) modeling of the killer whale is critical to the design and application of any active monitoring system. A 1996 study performed a high-resolution measurement of acoustic reflectivity as a function of frequency of a female bottlenose dolphin (2.2 m length) at broadside aspect and TS as a function of incident angle at 67 kHz frequency. Assuming that killer whales share similar morphology structure with the bottlenose dolphin, we extrapolated the TS of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at 67 kHz frequency with -8 dB at broadside aspect and -28 dB at tail side. The backscattering data from three Southern Resident killer whales were analyzed to obtain the TS measurement. These data were collected at Lime Kiln State Park using a split-beam system deployed from a boat. The TS of the killer whale at higher frequency (200 kHz) was estimated based on a three-layer model for plane wave reflection from the lung of the whale. The TS data of killer whales were in good agreement with our model. In this paper, we also discuss and explain possible causes for measurement estimation error.

  20. Competing Conservation Objectives for Predators and Prey: Estimating Killer Whale Prey Requirements for Chinook Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rob; Krkošek, Martin; Ashe, Erin; Branch, Trevor A.; Clark, Steve; Hammond, Philip S.; Hoyt, Erich; Noren, Dawn P.; Rosen, David; Winship, Arliss

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) of marine resources attempts to conserve interacting species. In contrast to single-species fisheries management, EBM aims to identify and resolve conflicting objectives for different species. Such a conflict may be emerging in the northeastern Pacific for southern resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) and their primary prey, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Both species have at-risk conservation status and transboundary (Canada–US) ranges. We modeled individual killer whale prey requirements from feeding and growth records of captive killer whales and morphometric data from historic live-capture fishery and whaling records worldwide. The models, combined with caloric value of salmon, and demographic and diet data for wild killer whales, allow us to predict salmon quantities needed to maintain and recover this killer whale population, which numbered 87 individuals in 2009. Our analyses provide new information on cost of lactation and new parameter estimates for other killer whale populations globally. Prey requirements of southern resident killer whales are difficult to reconcile with fisheries and conservation objectives for Chinook salmon, because the number of fish required is large relative to annual returns and fishery catches. For instance, a U.S. recovery goal (2.3% annual population growth of killer whales over 28 years) implies a 75% increase in energetic requirements. Reducing salmon fisheries may serve as a temporary mitigation measure to allow time for management actions to improve salmon productivity to take effect. As ecosystem-based fishery management becomes more prevalent, trade-offs between conservation objectives for predators and prey will become increasingly necessary. Our approach offers scenarios to compare relative influence of various sources of uncertainty on the resulting consumption estimates to prioritise future research efforts, and a general approach for assessing the extent of conflict

  1. Competing conservation objectives for predators and prey: estimating killer whale prey requirements for Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Krkošek, Martin; Ashe, Erin; Branch, Trevor A; Clark, Steve; Hammond, Philip S; Hoyt, Erich; Noren, Dawn P; Rosen, David; Winship, Arliss

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) of marine resources attempts to conserve interacting species. In contrast to single-species fisheries management, EBM aims to identify and resolve conflicting objectives for different species. Such a conflict may be emerging in the northeastern Pacific for southern resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) and their primary prey, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Both species have at-risk conservation status and transboundary (Canada-US) ranges. We modeled individual killer whale prey requirements from feeding and growth records of captive killer whales and morphometric data from historic live-capture fishery and whaling records worldwide. The models, combined with caloric value of salmon, and demographic and diet data for wild killer whales, allow us to predict salmon quantities needed to maintain and recover this killer whale population, which numbered 87 individuals in 2009. Our analyses provide new information on cost of lactation and new parameter estimates for other killer whale populations globally. Prey requirements of southern resident killer whales are difficult to reconcile with fisheries and conservation objectives for Chinook salmon, because the number of fish required is large relative to annual returns and fishery catches. For instance, a U.S. recovery goal (2.3% annual population growth of killer whales over 28 years) implies a 75% increase in energetic requirements. Reducing salmon fisheries may serve as a temporary mitigation measure to allow time for management actions to improve salmon productivity to take effect. As ecosystem-based fishery management becomes more prevalent, trade-offs between conservation objectives for predators and prey will become increasingly necessary. Our approach offers scenarios to compare relative influence of various sources of uncertainty on the resulting consumption estimates to prioritise future research efforts, and a general approach for assessing the extent of conflict

  2. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS. Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS–S24–S35) for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK). We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK–S35 and EFS–S24 in indica–japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes. PMID:27172610

  3. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS-S24-S35) for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK). We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK-S35 and EFS-S24 in indica-japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes. PMID:27172610

  4. Habitat-based PCB environmental quality criteria for the protection of endangered killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Alava, Juan José; Ross, Peter S; Lachmuth, Cara; Ford, John K B; Hickie, Brendan E; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2012-11-20

    The development of an area-based polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) food-web bioaccumulation model enabled a critical evaluation of the efficacy of sediment quality criteria and prey tissue residue guidelines in protecting fish-eating resident killer whales of British Columbia and adjacent waters. Model-predicted and observed PCB concentrations in resident killer whales and Chinook salmon were in good agreement, supporting the model's application for risk assessment and criteria development. Model application shows that PCB concentrations in the sediments from the resident killer whale's Critical Habitats and entire foraging range leads to PCB concentrations in most killer whales that exceed PCB toxicity threshold concentrations reported for marine mammals. Results further indicate that current PCB sediment quality and prey tissue residue criteria for fish-eating wildlife are not protective of killer whales and are not appropriate for assessing risks of PCB-contaminated sediments to high trophic level biota. We present a novel methodology for deriving sediment quality criteria and tissue residue guidelines that protect biota of high trophic levels under various PCB management scenarios. PCB concentrations in sediments and in prey that are deemed protective of resident killer whale health are much lower than current criteria values, underscoring the extreme vulnerability of high trophic level marine mammals to persistent and bioaccumulative contaminants. PMID:23098163

  5. K2 killer toxin-induced physiological changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Orentaite, Irma; Poranen, Minna M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Daugelavicius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce killer toxins, such as K1, K2 and K28, that can modulate the growth of other yeasts giving advantage for the killer strains. Here we focused on the physiological changes induced by K2 toxin on a non-toxin-producing yeast strain as well as K1, K2 and K28 killer strains. Potentiometric measurements were adjusted to observe that K2 toxin immediately acts on the sensitive cells leading to membrane permeability. This correlated with reduced respiration activity, lowered intracellular ATP content and decrease in cell viability. However, we did not detect any significant ATP leakage from the cells treated by killer toxin K2. Strains producing heterologous toxins K1 and K28 were less sensitive to K2 than the non-toxin producing one suggesting partial cross-protection between the different killer systems. This phenomenon may be connected to the observed differences in respiratory activities of the killer strains and the non-toxin-producing strain at low pH. This might also have practical consequences in wine industry; both as beneficial ones in controlling contaminating yeasts and non-beneficial ones causing sluggish fermentation. PMID:26818855

  6. Differences in acoustic features of vocalizations produced by killer whales cross-socialized with bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Musser, Whitney B; Bowles, Ann E; Grebner, Dawn M; Crance, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    Limited previous evidence suggests that killer whales (Orcinus orca) are capable of vocal production learning. However, vocal contextual learning has not been studied, nor the factors promoting learning. Vocalizations were collected from three killer whales with a history of exposure to bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and compared with data from seven killer whales held with conspecifics and nine bottlenose dolphins. The three whales' repertoires were distinguishable by a higher proportion of click trains and whistles. Time-domain features of click trains were intermediate between those of whales held with conspecifics and dolphins. These differences provided evidence for contextual learning. One killer whale spontaneously learned to produce artificial chirps taught to dolphins; acoustic features fell within the range of inter-individual differences among the dolphins. This whale also produced whistles similar to a stereotyped whistle produced by one dolphin. Thus, results provide further support for vocal production learning and show that killer whales are capable of contextual learning. That killer whales produce similar repertoires when associated with another species suggests substantial vocal plasticity and motivation for vocal conformity with social associates. PMID:25324098

  7. Spare PRELI Gene Loci: Failsafe Chromosome Insurance?

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Roberto; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Blackburn, Michael R.; Martinez-Valdez, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins encode conserved N-terminal mitochondrial signal domains and C-terminal (A/TAEKAK) motif repeats, long-presumed to confer cell resistance to stress and death cues. This prompted the hypothesis that LEA proteins are central to mitochondria mechanisms that connect bioenergetics with cell responses to stress and death signaling. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian LEA protein PRELI can act as a biochemical hub, which upholds mitochondria energy metabolism, while concomitantly promoting B cell resistance to stress and induced death. Hence, it is important to define in vivo the physiological relevance of PRELI expression. Methods and Findings Given the ubiquitous PRELI expression during mouse development, embryo lethality could be anticipated. Thus, conditional gene targeting was engineered by insertion of flanking loxP (flox)/Cre recognition sites on PRELI chromosome 13 (Chr 13) locus to abort its expression in a tissue-specific manner. After obtaining mouse lines with homozygous PRELI floxed alleles (PRELIf/f), the animals were crossed with CD19-driven Cre-recombinase transgenic mice to investigate whether PRELI inactivation could affect B-lymphocyte physiology and survival. Mice with homozygous B cell-specific PRELI deletion (CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI−/−) bred normally and did not show any signs of morbidity. Histopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed that cell lineage identity, morphology, and viability were indistinguishable between wild type CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI+/+ and CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI−/− deficient mice. Furthermore, B cell PRELI gene expression seemed unaffected by Chr13 PRELI gene targeting. However, identification of additional PRELI loci in mouse Chr1 and Chr5 provided an explanation for the paradox between LEA-dependent cytoprotection and the seemingly futile consequences of Chr 13 PRELI gene inactivation. Importantly, PRELI expression from spare

  8. Contrasting evolutionary histories among tightly linked HLA loci.

    PubMed Central

    Klitz, W; Thomson, G; Baur, M P

    1986-01-01

    Genes comprising the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a central role in governing the immune response of vertebrates. A great deal of information has been revealed on the molecular biology and physiology of these loci, but three features-the high polymorphism, tight linkage among the loci, and the nonrandom association of alleles-make the system of particular interest from the perspective of population genetics. Information on the dynamic evolutionary forces that have acted on a locus can be inferred from the number and distribution of alleles that it carries. Ten loci from the HLA region of the human MHC, each sampled from several different populations, have been examined for departures from the expected value of homozygosity under the condition of selective neutrality. The homozygosities of five class I and II loci that code for membrane glycoproteins, HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ, and of glyoxylase I (GLO) were significantly less than the neutrality expectations. This suggests the presence of some form of balancing selection. In spite of being closely linked, in fact, located between the class I and class II histocompatibility loci, the homozygosities of the four class III or complement loci C2, Bf, C4A, and C4B, which are detected by electrophoresis, were indistinguishable from, or exceeded, that expected under neutrality. Although this conforms to the suggestion that, in general, electrophoretic variants are neutral, because of the tight linkage to loci demonstrating a history of selection, it is possible that the mechanism for generating variation in the class III loci may be different from that of the class I and class II loci. PMID:3766540

  9. Naturally segregating loci exhibit epistasis for fitness

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which gene interaction or epistasis contributes to fitness variation within populations remains poorly understood, despite its importance to a myriad of evolutionary questions. Here, we report a multi-year field study estimating fitness of Mimulus guttatus genetic lines in which pairs of naturally segregating loci exist in an otherwise uniform background. An allele at QTL x5b—a locus originally mapped for its effect on flower size—positively affects survival if combined with one genotype at quantitative trait locus x10a (aa) but has negative effects when combined with the other genotypes (Aa and AA). The viability differences between genotypes parallel phenotypic differences for the time and node at which a plant flowers. Viability is negatively correlated with fecundity across genotypes, indicating antagonistic pleiotropy for fitness components. This trade-off reduces the genetic variance for total fitness relative to the individual fitness components and thus may serve to maintain variation. Additionally, we find that the effects of each locus and their interaction often vary with the environment. PMID:26246336

  10. Mapping Environment-Specific Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Zhao, Fuping; Xu, Shizhong

    2010-01-01

    Environment-specific quantitative trait loci (QTL) refer to QTL that express differently in different environments, a phenomenon called QTL-by-environment (Q × E) interaction. Q × E interaction is a difficult problem extended from traditional QTL mapping. The mixture model maximum-likelihood method is commonly adopted for interval mapping of QTL, but the method is not optimal in handling QTL interacting with environments. We partitioned QTL effects into main and interaction effects. The main effects are represented by the means of QTL effects in all environments and the interaction effects are represented by the variances of the QTL effects across environments. We used the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) implemented Bayesian method to estimate both the main and the interaction effects. The residual error covariance matrix was modeled using the factor analytic covariance structure. A simulation study showed that the factor analytic structure is robust and can handle other structures as special cases. The method was also applied to Q × E interaction mapping for the yield trait of barley. Eight markers showed significant main effects and 18 markers showed significant Q × E interaction. The 18 interacting markers were distributed across all seven chromosomes of the entire genome. Only 1 marker had both the main and the Q × E interaction effects. Each of the other markers had either a main effect or a Q × E interaction effect but not both. PMID:20805558

  11. Alu insertion loci and platyrrhine primate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Ray, David A; Xing, Jinchuan; Hedges, Dale J; Hall, Michael A; Laborde, Meredith E; Anders, Bridget A; White, Brittany R; Stoilova, Nadica; Fowlkes, Justin D; Landry, Kate E; Chemnick, Leona G; Ryder, Oliver A; Batzer, Mark A

    2005-04-01

    Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) make very useful phylogenetic markers because the integration of a particular element at a location in the genome is irreversible and of known polarity. These attributes make analysis of SINEs as phylogenetic characters an essentially homoplasy-free affair. Alu elements are primate-specific SINEs that make up a large portion of the human genome and are also widespread in other primates. Using a combination wet-bench and computational approach we recovered 190 Alu insertions, 183 of which are specific to the genomes of nine New World primates. We used these loci to investigate branching order and have produced a cladogram that supports a sister relationship between Atelidae (spider, woolly, and howler monkeys) and Cebidae (marmosets, tamarins, and owl monkeys) and then the joining of this two family clade to Pitheciidae (titi and saki monkeys). The data support these relationships with a homoplasy index of 0.00. In this study, we report one of the largest applications of SINE elements to phylogenetic analysis to date, and the results provide a robust molecular phylogeny for platyrrhine primates. PMID:15737586

  12. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  13. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Kysela, R.F.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Primers for 15 microsatellite loci were developed for Mountain Plover, a species whose distribution and abundance have been reduced drastically in the past 30 years. In a screen of 126 individuals collected from four breeding locales across the species' range, levels of polymorphism ranged from two to 13 alleles per locus. No two loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci can be used in population genetic studies, ultimately aiding in management efforts for Mountain Plover. Additionally, these markers can potentially be used in studies investigating the mating system of Mountain Plover. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Quercus fabri (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z Z; Chen, W W; Bao, W; Wang, R; Li, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Quercus fabri is a pioneer species of secondary succession in evergreen broadleaved forests in China. In this study, we isolated and developed 12 polymorphic and 2 monomorphic microsatellite loci for Q. fabri using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. We characterized 12 polymorphic loci in 52 individuals from two populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 23. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus were 0.033-0.773 and 0.138-0.924, respectively. These microsatellite loci will facilitate the studies on genetic variation, mating system, and gene flow of Q. fabri. PMID:27420954

  15. Hypothalamic modulation of splenic natural killer cell activity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Katafuchi, T; Ichijo, T; Take, S; Hori, T

    1993-01-01

    1. The cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer cells measured by a standard chromium release assay in urethane and alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized rats was significantly suppressed 20 min after bilateral ablation of the medial part of the preoptic hypothalamus (MPO). The suppression was completely blocked by prior splenic denervation. The splenic natural killer cell activity of MPO sham-lesioned rats or thalamus-lesioned rats, both having an intact splenic innervation, were not different from that of a non-treated control group. 2. Electrical stimulation of the bilateral MPO (0.1 ms, 0.1-0.3 mA, 5-100 Hz) suppressed the efferent activity of the splenic nerve in all six rats examined. The reduction of the nerve activity was accompanied by a transient fall in blood pressure. An I.V. injection of phenylephrine (3 micrograms/0.3 ml) also evoked a suppression of the nerve activity, which was accompanied by transient hypertension, suggesting that the suppressive effect of the MPO stimulation was independent of changes in blood pressure. On the other hand, a bilateral lesion of the MPO resulted in a sustained increase in the electrical activity of the splenic sympathetic nerve filaments which lasted for more than 2 h. 3. Microinjection of monosodium-L-glutamate (0.1 and 0.01 M in 0.1 microliters saline) unilaterally into the MPO evoked a transient suppression of the efferent discharge rate of the splenic nerve activity within 1 min, which was also accompanied by a decrease in blood pressure. The injection of saline (0.1 microliter) into the MPO had no effect. The microinjection of recombinant human interferon-alpha (200 and 2000 U in 0.1 microliter saline) into the MPO dose dependently increased the splenic nerve activity without any change in blood pressure. 4. In contrast, microinjection of interferon-alpha into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) had no effect on splenic nerve activity, although an injection of glutamate increased the nerve

  16. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify “insults” and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The

  17. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  18. Design and operation specifications of an active monitoring system for detecting southern resident killer whales

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Myers, Joshua R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Before final approval is given to the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 for deploying the first tidal power devices in the United States in an open water environment, a system to manage the potential risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades must be demonstrated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with establishing the performance requirements for, constructing, and testing a prototype marine animal alert system for triggering temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision with a killer whale. To develop a system that relies on active sonar two critical areas must be investigated - the target strength of killer whales and the frequency content of commercially available active sonar units. PNNL studied three target strength models: a simple model, the Fourier matching model, and the Kirchoff-ray mode model. Using target strength measurements of bottlenose dolphins obtained by previous researchers and assuming killer whales share similar morphology and structure, PNNL extrapolated the target strength of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at a frequency of 67 kHz. To study the frequency content of a commercially available sonar unit, direct measurements of the signal transmitted by the sonar were obtained by using a hydrophone connected to a data acquisition system in both laboratory and field conditions. The measurements revealed that in addition to the primary frequency of 200 kHz, there is a secondary frequency component at 90 kHz, which is within the hearing range of killer whales. The amplitude of the 90-kHz frequency component is above the hearing threshold of killer whales but below the threshold for potential injuries.

  19. Influence of natural and recombinant interferons on development of antiviral condition and activity of natural killers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Avdeev, G.I.; Vyadro, M.M.; Leikin, Yu.D.; Frolova, I.S.

    1986-03-01

    For the purpose of a preliminary estimate of the therapeutic potential of domestic recombinant alpha/sub 2/-component of human leukocytic interferon (rl) in vitro tests, the authors studied its ability to induce development of antiviral condition in diploid culture of human embryo fibroblasts and to activate the cytolytic effect of natural killers in relation to tumor cells, of the K-562 leukemia line and cells of lung adenocarcinoma. The authors used a medicinal form of rL which was derived by expression of a reconstructed gene in Escherichia coli cells. Part of the tests were conducted with an analogous preparation synthesized using another producer, Pseudomonas sp). The biological effect of both preparations was the same. For comparison, a natural preparation was used in all tests: human leukocytic interferon for injection, II(le). The authors studied activity of natural killers in a fraction of mononuclears isolated from blood of essentially healthy donors and from cancer patients. Cells were incubated for 2 h with various concentrations of interferons, then combined in a ratio of 25-50:1 with target cells labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Cytotoxic reaction was conducted for 4 (4-CTR) or 18 h (18-CTR) at 37/sup 0/C. Natural killers could thus be divided into two subpopulations: killer (4-CTR) and cytotoxic (18-CTR) cells. In preliminary tests, both preparations possessed the ability to active natural killers. The effective concentration for rL was within the limits of 1000-2000 IU/ml, and 50-200 Iu/ml for Le. The data on activation of natural killers in 16 oncological patients (primarily with lung cancer), the authors established that both rL and Le induced activation of natural killers in the overwhelming majority of cases in relation to K-562 target cells and adenocarcinomas of the lung.

  20. Involvement of LSECtin in the hepatic natural killer cell response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juntao; Wang, He; Wang, Min; Liu, Biao; Xu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Zhao, Dianyuan; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Na; Wang, Junyi; Liu, Di; Tang, Li; He, Fuchu

    2016-07-15

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that natural killer cells (NK cells) play an important role in immune responses generated in the liver. However, the underlying molecular basis for local immune regulation is poorly understood. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) at a dose of 20 mg/kg body wt. The percentage and absolute number of NK cells in the liver were analysed with flow cytometry. LSECtin knockout mice and LSECtin cDNA plasmids were used for analyze the role of LSECtin in hepatic NK cell regulation in vivo. Here, we show that the C-type lectin LSECtin, a member of the DC-SIGN family, is a novel liver regulator for NK cells. LSECtin could bind to NK cells in a carbohydrate-dependent manner and could regulate the number of hepatic NK cells. In the NK cell-mediated acute liver injury model induced with PolyI:C, the exogenous expression of LSECtin accelerated NK cell-induced liver injury, whereas the absence of LSECtin ameliorated this condition. Our results reveal that LSECtin is a novel, liver-specific NK cell regulator that may be a target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases in the liver. PMID:27184407

  1. Multiplicity and plasticity of natural killer cell signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Sabrina; Mingueneau, Michael; Fuseri, Nicolas; Malissen, Bernard; Raulet, David H.; Malissen, Marie; Vivier, Eric; Tomasello, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express an array of activating receptors that associate with DAP12 (KARAP), CD3ζ, and/or FcRγ ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif)–bearing signaling subunits. In T and mast cells, ITAM-dependent signals are integrated by critical scaffolding elements such as LAT (linker for activation of T cells) and NTAL (non–T-cell activation linker). Using mice that are deficient for ITAM-bearing molecules, LAT or NTAL, we show that NK cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ secretion are initiated by ITAM-dependent and -independent as well as LAT/NTAL-dependent and -independent pathways. The role of these various signaling circuits depends on the target cell as well as on the activation status of the NK cell. The multiplicity and the plasticity of the pathways that initiate NK cell effector functions contrast with the situation in T cells and B cells and provide an explanation for the resiliency of NK cell effector functions to various pharmacologic inhibitors and genetic mutations in signaling molecules. PMID:16291591

  2. Clinical production and therapeutic applications of alloreactive natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    McKenna, David H; Kadidlo, Diane M; Cooley, Sarah; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances have improved our understanding of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated alloreactivity after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) or with adoptive transfer. NK cells contribute to a graft-versus-leukemia effect and may play a role in preventing graft-versus-host disease or controlling infectious diseases after allogeneic HCT. New discoveries in NK cell biology, including characterization of NK cell receptors and their interactions with self-HLA molecules and a better understanding of the mechanism of NK cell education have led to the development of novel strategies to exploit NK cell alloreactivity against tumors. While early studies using autologous NK cells lacked efficacy, the use of adoptively transferred NK cells to treat hematopoietic malignancies has been expanding. The production of allogeneic donor NK cells requires efficient removal of T- and B cells from clinical-scale leukapheresis collections. The goal of this chapter is to review NK cell biology, NK cell receptors, the use of NK cells as therapy and then to discuss the clinical decisions resulting in our current good manufacturing practices processing and activation of human NK cells for therapeutic use. PMID:22665252

  3. Insights into the paracrine effects of uterine natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    GONG, XIN; LIU, YANXIA; CHEN, ZHENZHEN; XU, CAI; LU, QIUDAN; JIN, ZHE

    2014-01-01

    Uterine natural killer (uNK) cells are recruited into the uterus during establishment of the implantation and placentation of the embryo, and are hypothesized to regulate uterine spiral artery remodeling and angiogenesis during the initial stages of pregnancy. Failures in uNK cell activation are linked to diseases associated with pregnancy. However, the manner in which these cells interact with the endometrium remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the paracrine effects of uNK cells on the gene expression profile of an endometrial epithelial and stromal cell co-culture system in vitro, using a microarray analysis. Results from reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments showed that soluble factors from uNK cells significantly alter endometrial gene expression. In conclusion, this study suggests that paracrine effects of uNK cells guide uNK cell proliferation, trophoblast migration, endometrial decidualization and angiogenesis, and maintain non-cytotoxicity of uNK cells. PMID:25310696

  4. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease. PMID:26324348

  5. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy enhances radiosensitivity through natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chau-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Shan; Yang, Chieh-Han; Chi, Kwan-Hwa

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment have a radiosensitization effect. The radiosensitization effect of combined CpG and Herceptin((R)) (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) (CpG/Herceptin), given before or after radiation, was evaluated by using a murine colon cancer cell line overexpressing human HER2/neu, CT26HER2/neu. In vitro radiosensitization effects were investigated by coculture of CT26HER2/neu with splenocytes, CpG, and Herceptin before applying radiation. Tumor cells, cocultured with CpG-pretreated splenocytes and Herceptin, were more vulnerable to radiation damage. In BALB/c mice injected with CT26HER2/neu, CpG/Herceptin administered before radiotherapy was associated with a better retardation of tumor growth than when administered after radiotherapy. The radiosensitization effect was significantly abrogated by NK-cell depletion, indicating that NK cells play an essential role in it. Further, surviving mice treated with CpG or CpG/Herceptin and reverse transcriptase were resistant to renewed tumor challenge, suggesting the presence of an induced immune response to the tumor. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy with CpG/Herceptin may improve response to radiotherapy of HER2/neu-expressing tumors. PMID:20187795

  6. Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Domogala, Anna; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural killer (NK) cells to target numerous malignancies in vitro has been well documented; however, only limited success has been seen in the clinic. Although NK cells prove non-toxic and safe regardless of the cell numbers injected, there is often little persistence and expansion observed in a patient, which is vital for mounting an effective cellular response. NK cells can be isolated directly from peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, or bone marrow, expanded in vitro using cytokines or differentiated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells. Drugs that support NK cell function such as lenalidomide and bortezomib have also been studied in the clinic, however, the optimum combination, which can vary among different malignancies, is yet to be identified. NK cell proliferation, persistence, and function can further be improved by various activation techniques such as priming and cytokine addition though whether stimulation pre- or post-injection is more favorable is another obstacle to be tackled. Here, we review the various methods of obtaining and activating NK cells for use in the clinic while considering the ideal product and drug complement for the most successful cellular therapy. PMID:26089820

  7. Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Domogala, Anna; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural killer (NK) cells to target numerous malignancies in vitro has been well documented; however, only limited success has been seen in the clinic. Although NK cells prove non-toxic and safe regardless of the cell numbers injected, there is often little persistence and expansion observed in a patient, which is vital for mounting an effective cellular response. NK cells can be isolated directly from peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, or bone marrow, expanded in vitro using cytokines or differentiated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells. Drugs that support NK cell function such as lenalidomide and bortezomib have also been studied in the clinic, however, the optimum combination, which can vary among different malignancies, is yet to be identified. NK cell proliferation, persistence, and function can further be improved by various activation techniques such as priming and cytokine addition though whether stimulation pre- or post-injection is more favorable is another obstacle to be tackled. Here, we review the various methods of obtaining and activating NK cells for use in the clinic while considering the ideal product and drug complement for the most successful cellular therapy. PMID:26089820

  8. Antitumor Responses of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Jennie B.; Benavides, Adriana D.; Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that were first described in the late 1980s. Since their initial description, numerous studies have collectively shed light on their development and effector function. These studies have highlighted the unique requirements for the activation of these lymphocytes and the functional responses that distinguish these cells from other effector lymphocyte populations such as conventional T cells and NK cells. This body of literature suggests that NKT cells play diverse nonredundant roles in a number of disease processes, including the initiation and propagation of airway hyperreactivity, protection against a variety of pathogens, development of autoimmunity, and mediation of allograft responses. In this review, however, we focus on the role of a specific lineage of NKT cells in antitumor immunity. Specifically, we describe the development of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and the factors that are critical for their acquisition of effector function. Next, we delineate the mechanisms by which iNKT cells influence and modulate the activity of other immune cells to directly or indirectly affect tumor growth. Finally, we review the successes and failures of clinical trials employing iNKT cell-based immunotherapies and explore the future prospects for the use of such strategies. PMID:26543874

  9. Extranodal Natural-Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Liang, Raymond H. S.; Tse, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification recognizes 2 main categories of natural killer (NK) cell-derived neoplasms, namely, extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, and aggressive NK-cell leukaemia. Extranodal nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma is more frequent in the Far East and Latin America. Histopathological and immunophenotypical hallmarks include angiocentricity, angiodestruction, expression of cytoplasmic CD3 epsilon (ε), CD56, and cytotoxic molecules and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Early stage disease, in particular for localized lesion in the nasal region, is treated with chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy. On the other hand, multiagent chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced or disseminated disease. L-asparaginase-containing regimens have shown promise in treating this condition. The role of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is yet to be clearly defined. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with the putative graft-versus-lymphoma effect, offers a potentially curative option in patients with advanced disease. PMID:21234094

  10. Aggressive mature natural killer cell neoplasms: from epidemiology to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mature natural killer (NK) cell neoplasms are classified by the World Health Organization into NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTCL), aggressive NK-cell leukemia (ANKCL) and chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK-cells, the latter being considered provisionally. NKTCL and ANKCL are rare diseases, with higher prevalence in Asia, Central and South America. Most NKTCL present extranodal, as a destructive tumor affecting the nose and upper aerodigestive tract (nasal NKTCL) or any organ or tissue (extranasal NKTCL) whereas ANKCL manifests as a systemic disease with multiorgan involvement and naturally evolutes to death in a few weeks. The histopathological hallmark of these aggressive NK-cell tumors is a polymorphic neoplastic infiltrate with angiocentricity, angiodestruction and tissue necrosis. The tumor cells have cytoplasmatic azurophilic granules and usually show a CD45+bright, CD2+, sCD3-, cytCD3epsilon+, CD56+bright, CD16−/+, cytotoxic granules molecules+ phenotype. T-cell receptor genes are in germ-line configuration. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -encoded membrane proteins and early region EBV RNA are usually detected on lymphoma cells, with a pattern suggestive of a latent viral infection type II. Complex chromosomal abnormalities are frequent and loss of chromosomes 6q, 11q, 13q, and 17p are recurrent aberrations. The rarity of the NK-cell tumors limits our ability to standardize the procedures for the diagnosis and clinical management and efforts should be made to encourage multi-institutional registries. PMID:23816348

  11. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer. PMID:27013447

  12. Advantages and applications of CAR-expressing natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Esser, Ruth; Priesner, Christoph; Suerth, Julia D.; Schambach, Axel; Wels, Winfried S.; Grez, Manuel; Kloess, Stephan; Arseniev, Lubomir; Koehl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:25729364

  13. Id2 regulates hyporesponsive invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Stradner, Martin H; Cheung, Kitty P; Lasorella, Anna; Goldrath, Ananda W; D'Cruz, Louise M

    2016-08-01

    While the invariant natural killer T (iNKT)-cell response to primary stimulation with the glycolipid, α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), is robust, the secondary response to this stimulus is muted resulting in a hyporesponsive state characterized by anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production and high expression of programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and neuropilin 1 (NRP1). The E protein transcription factors and their negative regulators, the Id proteins, have previously been shown to regulate iNKT cell thymic development, subset differentiation and peripheral survival. Here, we provide evidence that the expression of the transcriptional regulator Id2 is downregulated upon stimulation of iNKT cells with their cognate antigen. Moreover, loss of Id2 expression by iNKT cells resulted in a hyporesponsive state, with splenic Id2-deficient iNKT cells expressing low levels of TBET, high levels of PD1 and NRP1 and production of IL-10 upon stimulation. We propose that downregulation of Id2 expression is an essential component of induction of the anti-inflammatory, hyporesponsive state in iNKT cells. PMID:26880074

  14. Invariant natural killer T cells: bridging innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Wu, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system interact with pathogens via conserved pattern-recognition receptors, whereas cells of the adaptive immune system recognize pathogens through diverse, antigen-specific receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. Although iNKT cells express T cell receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement, these receptors are semi-invariant and interact with a limited set of lipid and glycolipid antigens, thus resembling the pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Functionally, iNKT cells most closely resemble cells of the innate immune system, as they rapidly elicit their effector functions following activation, and fail to develop immunological memory. iNKT cells can become activated in response to a variety of stimuli and participate in the regulation of various immune responses. Activated iNKT cells produce several cytokines with the capacity to jump-start and modulate an adaptive immune response. A variety of glycolipid antigens that can differentially elicit distinct effector functions in iNKT cells have been identified. These reagents have been employed to test the hypothesis that iNKT cells can be harnessed for therapeutic purposes in human diseases. Here, we review the innate-like properties and functions of iNKT cells and discuss their interactions with other cell types of the immune system. PMID:20734065

  15. Stimulation of Natural Killer T Cells by Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian L.; Teyton, Luc; Bendelac, Albert; Savage, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d protein. The initial discovery of immunostimulatory glycolipids from a marine sponge and the T cells that respond to the compounds has led to extensive research by chemists and immunologists to understand how glycolipids are recognized, possible responses by NKT cells, and the structural features of glycolipids necessary for stimulatory activity. The presence of this cell type in humans and most mammals suggests that it plays critical roles in antigen recognition and the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Both endogenous and exogenous natural antigens for NKT cells have been identified, and it is likely that glycolipid antigens remain to be discovered. Multiple series of structurally varied glycolipids have been synthesized and tested for stimulatory activity. The structural features of glycolipids necessary for NKT cell stimulation are moderately well understood, and designed compounds have proven to be much more potent antigens than their natural counterparts. Nevertheless, control over NKT cell responses by designed glycolipids has not been optimized, and further research will be required to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of this cell type. PMID:24352021

  16. Regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by natural killer (NK) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Yamamura, T; Kondo, T; Fujiwara, M; Tabira, T

    1997-11-17

    In this report, we establish a regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-mediated disease. Active sensitization of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide induces a mild form of monophasic EAE. When mice were deprived of NK cells by antibody treatment before immunization, they developed a more serious form of EAE associated with relapse. Aggravation of EAE by NK cell deletion was also seen in beta 2-microglobulin-/- (beta 2m-/-) mice, indicating that NK cells can play a regulatory role in a manner independent of CD8+ T cells or NK1.1+ T cells (NK-T cells). The disease enhancement was associated with augmentation of T cell proliferation and production of Th1 cytokines in response to MOG35-55. EAE passively induced by the MOG35-55-specific T cell line was also enhanced by NK cell deletion in B6, beta 2m-/-, and recombination activation gene 2 (RAG-2)-/- mice, indicating that the regulation by NK cells can be independent of T, B, or NK-T cells. We further showed that NK cells inhibit T cell proliferation triggered by antigen or cytokine stimulation. Taken together, we conclude that NK cells are an important regulator for EAE in both induction and effector phases. PMID:9362528

  17. rRNA fragmentation induced by a yeast killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Kast, Alene; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    Virus like dsDNA elements (VLE) in yeast were previously shown to encode the killer toxins PaT and zymocin, which target distinct tRNA species via specific anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities. Here, we characterize a third member of the VLE-encoded toxins, PiT from Pichia inositovora, and identify PiOrf4 as the cytotoxic subunit by conditional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the tRNA targeting toxins, however, neither a change of the wobble uridine modification status by introduction of elp3 or trm9 mutations nor tRNA overexpression rescued from PiOrf4 toxicity. Consistent with a distinct RNA target, expression of PiOrf4 causes specific fragmentation of the 25S and 18S rRNA. A stable cleavage product comprising the first ∼ 130 nucleotides of the 18S rRNA was purified and characterized by linker ligation and subsequent reverse transcription; 3'-termini were mapped to nucleotide 131 and 132 of the 18S rRNA sequence, a region showing some similarity to the anticodon loop of tRNA(Glu)(UUC), the zymocin target. PiOrf4 residues Glu9 and His214, corresponding to catalytic sites Glu9 and His209 in the ACNase subunit of zymocin are essential for in vivo toxicity and rRNA fragmentation, raising the possibility of functionally conserved RNase modules in both proteins. PMID:24308908

  18. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  19. Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for their relevance as gate keepers in some hematopoietic malignancies, the role of NK cells against progression and dissemination of solid tumors remains questionable. Hence, many studies pointed out the functional defects of the rare NK cell infiltrates found in tumor beds and the lack of efficacy of adoptively transferred NK cells in patients. However, several preclinical evidences suggest their anti-metastatic role in a variety of mouse tumor models. In the present review, we discuss NK cell functions according to their maturation stage and environmental milieu, the receptor/ligand interactions dictating tumor cell recognition and recapitulate translational studies aimed at deciphering their prognostic or predictive role against human solid malignancies. PMID:23269924

  20. Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for their relevance as gate keepers in some hematopoietic malignancies, the role of NK cells against progression and dissemination of solid tumors remains questionable. Hence, many studies pointed out the functional defects of the rare NK cell infiltrates found in tumor beds and the lack of efficacy of adoptively transferred NK cells in patients. However, several preclinical evidences suggest their anti-metastatic role in a variety of mouse tumor models. In the present review, we discuss NK cell functions according to their maturation stage and environmental milieu, the receptor/ligand interactions dictating tumor cell recognition and recapitulate translational studies aimed at deciphering their prognostic or predictive role against human solid malignancies. PMID:23269924

  1. Determination of natural killer cell function by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, K L; Ashton, F A; Schmitz, J L; Folds, J D

    1996-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are a subset of peripheral blood lymphocytes that mediate non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity of foreign target cells. The "gold standard" assay for NK cell activity has been the chromium release assay. This method is not easily performed in the clinical laboratory because of difficulties with disposal of radioactive and hazardous materials, short reagent half-lives, expense, and difficulties with assay standardization. We describe a flow cytometric assay for the clinical measurement of NK cell activity. This study compared the chromium release assay and the flow cytometric assay by using clinically relevant specimens. There were no significant differences between the two assays in the measurement of lytic activity for 17 peripheral blood specimens or in reproducibility in repeated samplings of healthy individuals. We also established a normal range of values for NK activity in healthy adults and identified a small cluster of individuals who have exceptionally high or low levels of NK activity. The flow cytometric assay was validated by testing specimens from subjects expected to have abnormally low levels of NK activity (pregnant women) and specimens from healthy individuals in whom the activity of NK cells was enhanced by exposure to interleukin-2 or alpha interferon. Treatment with these agents was associated with a significant increase in NK activity. These results confirm and extend those of others, showing that the flow cytometric assay is a viable alternative to the chromium release assay for measuring NK cell activity. PMID:8705672

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-dependent fusion, promotes the release of the lytic granule contents into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process. PMID:24478771

  3. Reprogramming microbes to be pathogen-seeking killers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Young; Tan, Mui Hua; Koh, Elvin; Ho, Chun Loong; Poh, Chueh Loo; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2014-04-18

    Recent examples of new genetic circuits that enable cells to acquire biosynthetic capabilities, such as specific pathogen killing, present an attractive therapeutic application of synthetic biology. Herein, we demonstrate a novel genetic circuit that reprograms Escherichia coli to specifically recognize, migrate toward, and eradicate both dispersed and biofilm-encased pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The reprogrammed E. coli degraded the mature biofilm matrix and killed the latent cells encapsulated within by expressing and secreting the antimicrobial peptide microcin S and the nuclease DNaseI upon the detection of quorum sensing molecules naturally secreted by P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the reprogrammed E. coli exhibited directed motility toward the pathogen through regulated expression of CheZ in response to the quorum sensing molecules. By integrating the pathogen-directed motility with the dual antimicrobial activity in E. coli, we achieved signifincantly improved killing activity against planktonic and mature biofilm cells due to target localization, thus creating an active pathogen seeking killer E. coli. PMID:24020906

  4. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  5. Analyzing Antigen Recognition by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeissig, Sebastian; Olszak, Torsten; Melum, Espen; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that recognize a wide variety of lipid antigens presented by CD1 molecules. NKT cells exhibit rapid activation after recognition of cognate antigens, secrete abundant amounts of T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines within hours of activation and shape the immune response through subsequent activation of dendritic, NK, T and B cells. NKT cells therefore play central roles in antimicrobial and anticancer immunity and in modulation of various autoimmune disorders. Consequently, recent research has focused on the discovery of microbial and self-antigens involved in NKT cell activation. In this chapter, we discuss different strategies for studying antigen recognition by NKT cells including CD1d tetramer-based approaches and in vitro assays characterizing NKT cell activation in response to lipid antigen presentation. While toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists and cytokines such as IL-12 are critical for NKT cell activation in vivo, particularly in the context of microbial infection, methods for detection of TLR- and cytokine-dependent NKT cell activation will not be discussed in this section. PMID:23329514

  6. Id2 regulates hyporesponsive invariant natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradner, Martin H; Cheung, Kitty P; Lasorella, Anna; Goldrath, Ananda W; D’Cruz, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    While the invariant natural killer T (iNKT)-cell response to primary stimulation with the glycolipid, α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), is robust, the secondary response to this stimulus is muted resulting in a hyporesponsive state characterized by anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production and high expression of programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and neuropilin 1 (NRP1). The E protein transcription factors and their negative regulators, the Id proteins, have previously been shown to regulate iNKT cell thymic development, subset differentiation and peripheral survival. Here, we provide evidence that the expression of the transcriptional regulator Id2 is downregulated upon stimulation of iNKT cells with their cognate antigen. Moreover, loss of Id2 expression by iNKT cells resulted in a hyporesponsive state, with splenic Id2-deficient iNKT cells expressing low levels of TBET, high levels of PD1 and NRP1 and production of IL-10 upon stimulation. We propose that downregulation of Id2 expression is an essential component of induction of the anti-inflammatory, hyporesponsive state in iNKT cells. PMID:26880074

  7. Understanding of molecular mechanisms in natural killer cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells and the immune system are closely related and thus influence each other. Although immune cells can suppress cancer cell growth, cancer cells can evade immune cell attack via immune escape mechanisms. Natural killer (NK) cells kill cancer cells by secreting perforins and granzymes. Upon contact with cancer cells, NK cells form immune synapses to deliver the lethal hit. Mature NK cells are differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. They move to lymph nodes, where they are activated through interactions with dendritic cells. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a key molecule that activates mature NK cells. The adoptive transfer of NK cells to treat incurable cancer is an attractive approach. A certain number of activated NK cells are required for adoptive NK cell therapy. To prepare these NK cells, mature NK cells can be amplified to obtain sufficient numbers of NK cells. Alternatively, NK cells can be differentiated and amplified from hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, the selection of donors is important to achieve maximal efficacy. In this review, we discuss the overall procedures and strategies of NK cell therapy against cancer. PMID:25676064

  8. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  9. Type I natural killer T cells: naturally born for fighting

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jin-quan; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Lan; He, Yu-ling

    2010-01-01

    Type І natural killer T cells (NKT cells), a subset of CD1d-restricted T cells with invariant Vαβ TCR, are characterized by prompt production of large amounts of Th1 and/or Th2 cytokines upon primary stimulation through the TCR complex. The rapid release of cytokines implies that type І NKT cells may play a critical role in modulating the upcoming immune responses, such as anti-tumor response, protection against infection, and autoimmunity. As a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, type І NKT cells differentiate and mature upon stimulations to achieve and maintain a homeostasis. Orchestrating with other arms of adaptive immunity, type І NKT cells show strong cytotoxic effects in response to various tumors in a direct and/or indirect manner(s). This review will focus primarily on type І NKT cell development, homeostasis, and effector functions, especially in anti-tumor immunity, and followed by their potential applications in treatment of cancers. PMID:20694020

  10. Variation in call pitch among killer whale ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Nystuen, Jeffrey A

    2008-03-01

    Vocal structure can vary between populations due to variation in ecology-dependent selection pressures, such as masking by background noise and the presence of eavesdroppers. Signalers can overcome these obstacles to effective communication by avoiding frequencies that overlap with background noise or the audible range of eavesdroppers. In the Northeastern Pacific three "ecotypes" of killer whale coexist in sympatry, but differ from one another in their diet and habitat use. The minimum frequency (F(min)) and the frequency containing the peak energy between 0 and 10 kHz (F(peak)) of a random sample of calls produced by a population of each ecotype was measured. The offshore ecotype produced calls with a significantly higher F(min) than the other ecotypes, which could be a strategy to avoid masking by low frequency chronic bandlimited wind noise found in the offshore environment. The resident ecotype produced calls with a significantly higher F(min) and F(peak) than the transient ecotype. This could be to reduce detection by their salmonid prey, which has a narrow band, low frequency auditory range. PMID:18345862

  11. Natural killer cells in hepatitis C: Current progress

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joo Chun; Yang, Chang Mo; Song, Youkyong; Lee, Jae Myun

    2016-01-01

    Patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by a high incidence of chronic infection, which results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The functional impairment of HCV-specific T cells is associated with the evolution of an acute infection to chronic hepatitis. While T cells are the important effector cells in adaptive immunity, natural killer (NK) cells are the critical effector cells in innate immunity to virus infections. The findings of recent studies on NK cells in hepatitis C suggest that NK cell responses are indeed important in each phase of HCV infection. In the early phase, NK cells are involved in protective immunity to HCV. The immune evasion strategies used by HCV may target NK cells and might contribute to the progression to chronic hepatitis C. NK cells may control HCV replication and modulate hepatic fibrosis in the chronic phase. Further investigations are, however, needed, because a considerable number of studies observed functional impairment of NK cells in chronic HCV infection. Interestingly, the enhanced NK cell responses during interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C indicate successful treatment. In spite of the advances in research on NK cells in hepatitis C, establishment of more physiological HCV infection model systems is needed to settle unsolved controversies over the role and functional status of NK cells in HCV infection. PMID:26819513

  12. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  13. Pulmonary Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma (Nasal Type)

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Wang; Xiaohong, Wang; Hong, Zhu; Bei, He

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An 83-year-old woman presented with intermittent fever for 2 weeks. Chest radiography and computed tomography images showed multiple nodules and masses scattered in both lung fields. Tissue samples obtained by computed tomography-guided needle biopsy revealed extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL). The lung is the major site of involvement and the skin may be the primary site. The radiological imaging of this case is different from the cases reported before. Besides, we reviewed the medical records of our hospital and searched the Pubmed database and found 12 cases altogether (include the case presented), which were diagnosed with pulmonary ENKL, and the features of chest images were studied. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the chest imaging features of pulmonary ENKL were reviewed. We conclude that if the radiographic manifestations are multiple patchy consolidations or multiple nodules and masses in both lungs with or without bilateral pleural effusions, the diagnostic considerations should include ENKL. PMID:26402808

  14. The nature and identification of quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This white paper by eighty members of the Complex Trait Consortium presents a community’s view on the approaches and statistical analyses that are needed for the identification of genetic loci that determine quantitative traits. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) can be identified in several ways, but is there a definitive test of whether a candidate locus actually corresponds to a specific QTL? PMID:14634638

  15. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position. PMID:27332118

  16. Discovery and Refinement of Loci Associated with Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Ingi Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable, risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,578 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5×10−8, including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipids are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index. Our results illustrate the value of genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestries and provide insights into biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological, and therapeutic research. PMID:24097068

  17. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-11-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10(-8), including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipid levels are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index. Our results demonstrate the value of using genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestry and provide insights into the biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological and therapeutic research. PMID:24097068

  18. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    PubMed

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion. PMID:26789757

  19. The direct effects of male killer infection on fitness of ladybird hosts (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, S; Majerus, M E N; Gardener, M; Lawson Handley, L-J

    2013-08-01

    Male killing bacteria are common in insects and are thought to persist in host populations primarily by indirect fitness benefits to infected females, whereas direct fitness effects are generally assumed to be neutral or deleterious. Here, we estimated the effect of male killer infection on direct fitness (number of eggs laid, as a measure of fecundity, together with survival) and other life-history traits (development time and body size) in seven ladybird host/male killer combinations. Effects of male killers on fecundity ranged, as expected, from costly to neutral; however, we found evidence of reduced development time and increased survival and body size in infected strains. Greater body size in Spiroplasma-infected Harmonia axyridis corresponded to greater ovariole number and therefore higher potential fecundity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of direct benefits of male killer infection after explicitly controlling for indirect fitness effects. Neutral or deleterious fitness effects of male killer infection should not therefore be automatically assumed. PMID:23869568

  20. Killer whale call frequency is similar across the oceans, but varies across sympatric ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Filatova, Olga A; Miller, Patrick J O; Yurk, Harald; Samarra, Filipa I P; Hoyt, Erich; Ford, John K B; Matkin, Craig O; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G

    2015-07-01

    Killer whale populations may differ in genetics, morphology, ecology, and behavior. In the North Pacific, two sympatric populations ("resident" and "transient") specialize on different prey (fish and marine mammals) and retain reproductive isolation. In the eastern North Atlantic, whales from the same populations have been observed feeding on both fish and marine mammals. Fish-eating North Pacific "residents" are more genetically related to eastern North Atlantic killer whales than to sympatric mammal-eating "transients." In this paper, a comparison of frequency variables in killer whale calls recorded from four North Pacific resident, two North Pacific transient, and two eastern North Atlantic populations is reported to assess which factors drive the large-scale changes in call structure. Both low-frequency and high-frequency components of North Pacific transient killer whale calls have significantly lower frequencies than those of the North Pacific resident and North Atlantic populations. The difference in frequencies could be related to ecological specialization or to the phylogenetic history of these populations. North Pacific transient killer whales may have genetically inherited predisposition toward lower frequencies that may shape their learned repertoires. PMID:26233024

  1. Linking killer whale survival and prey abundance: food limitation in the oceans' apex predator?

    PubMed

    Ford, John K B; Ellis, Graeme M; Olesiuk, Peter F; Balcomb, Kenneth C

    2010-02-23

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are large predators that occupy the top trophic position in the world's oceans and as such may have important roles in marine ecosystem dynamics. Although the possible top-down effects of killer whale predation on populations of their prey have received much recent attention, little is known of how the abundance of these predators may be limited by bottom-up processes. Here we show, using 25 years of demographic data from two populations of fish-eating killer whales in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, that population trends are driven largely by changes in survival, and that survival rates are strongly correlated with the availability of their principal prey species, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Our results suggest that, although these killer whales may consume a variety of fish species, they are highly specialized and dependent on this single salmonid species to an extent that it is a limiting factor in their population dynamics. Other ecologically specialized killer whale populations may be similarly constrained to a narrow range of prey species by culturally inherited foraging strategies, and thus are limited in their ability to adapt rapidly to changing prey availability. PMID:19755531

  2. P-LOCI: a computer program for choosing the most efficient set of loci for parentage assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining which and how many codominant marker loci are required for accurate parentage assignment is not straightforward because levels of marker polymorphism and linkage, allelic distributions among potential parents and other factors produce differences in the discriminatory power of individual...

  3. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  4. Functional impairment of natural killer cells in active ulcerative colitis: reversion of the defective natural killer activity by interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, L; Alvarez-Mon, M; Abreu, L; Antonio Vargas, J; de la Morena, E; Corugedo, F; Duràntez, A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the functional characteristics and clinical importance of the natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from patients with ulcerative colitis. Normal NK activity was observed in PBMNC from patients with inactive disease, but a pronounced decrease was found in those with active disease. Clinical change from active to inactive disease was associated with enhancement of the depressed NK activity. The impairment of NK cytotoxicity found in patients with active disese could not be ascribed to a deficient number of NK cells as the amounts of HNK-1+, CD16+ (Leu 11), and CD11b (OKM1) cells in PBMNC were within normal ranges. This defective cytotoxic PBMNC activity was normalised by short term (18 hour) incubation with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2). Moreover, long term (5 day) incubation of these effector cells with rIL-2 induced strong cytotoxic activity against NK resistant and NK sensitive target cells in patients with active and inactive disease. We also found that both precursors and effectors of cytotoxic activity promoted by short term and long term incubation with rIL-2 of PBMNC from the patients showed the phenotype of NK cells (CD16+, CD3-). Taken together, these results show that active ulcerative colitis is associated with a defective function of NK cells that is found to be normal in the inactive stage of the disease. The possible pathogenic and therapeutic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1541421

  5. The Cmv1 host resistance locus is closely linked to the Ly49 multigene family within the natural killer cell gene complex on mouse chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, C.A.; Shellam, G.R.; Scalzo, A.A.

    1997-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in controlling tumor cells and against a range of infectious organisms. Recent studies of mouse NK cell surface receptors, which may be involved in the specificity of NK cells, have shown that many of these molecules are encoded by the Ly49 and Ly55 (Nkrp1) multigene families that map to distal mouse chromosome 6. Also mapping to this NK cell gene complex (NKC) is the resistance locus, Cmv1, which is involved in genetically determined resistance to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). The aim of this study was to localize Cmv1 more precisely in relation to other NKC loci by generating a high-resolution genetic map of the region. We have analyzed 1250 backcross mice comprising panels of 700 (BALB/c x C57BL/6J)F{sub 1} X BALB/c and 550 (A/J X C57BL/6J)F{sub 1} X A/J progeny. A total of 25 polymorphic genes or microsatellite markers were analyzed over a region of 10 map units from D6Mit134 to D6Mit59. The Cmv1 phenotypes of mice recombinant in this interval were tested by infection with MCMV. The results obtained indicate that the functionally important NKC region is a tightly linked cluster of loci spanning at least 0.4 map units. Furthermore, Cmv1 maps distal to, but very closely linked to, the Ly49 multigene family (< 0.2 map units), suggesting that MCMV resistance may be conferred by MHC class I-specific NK cell receptors. 49 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Environmental isolates of fungi from aquarium pools housing killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Kohata, Erina; Kano, Rui; Akune, Yuichiro; Ohno, Yoshito; Soichi, Makoto; Yanai, Tokuma; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Systemic mycoses in killer whales (Orcinus orca) are rare diseases, but have been reported. Two killer whales died by fungal infections at the Port of Nagoya Public Aquarium in Japan. In this study, the fungal flora of the pool environment at the aquarium was characterized. Alternaria spp., Aspergillus spp. (A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. versicolor), Fusarium spp. and Penicillium spp. were isolated from the air and the pool surroundings. The other isolates were identified as fungal species non-pathogenic for mammals. However, the species of fungi isolated from the environmental samples in this study were not the same as those isolated from the cases of disease in killer whales previously reported. PMID:24045935

  7. Making the giant leap with augmented cognition technologies : what will be the first %22killer app?'.

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, James Chris

    2007-08-01

    This paper highlights key topic areas to be discussed the authors in a panel format during the Augmented Cognition thematic area paper session: 'Augmented Cognition Lessons Learned and Future Directions for Enabling 'Anyone, Anytime, Anywhere' Applications'. The term 'killer app' has been part of the vernacular in the commercial computer software and electronic devices industry to refer to breakthrough technologies [2]. A 'killer app' generally emerges with the development of related technologies that extends over some time and involves numerous variations on a basic concept. Hypotheses may be offered with respect to the conditions that will be needed to enable a similar situation with augmented cognition technologies. This paper and resulting panel session will address the numerous concepts that have emerged from the augmented cognition field to date and postulate how and when this field's first 'killer app' may emerge (e.g., 5, 10, 15, or more years from now).

  8. Multiple Loci Associated with Renal Function in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Daniel; Herbert, Alan; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Erdos, Michael R.; Chen, Guanjie; Gerry, Norman P.; Christman, Michael F.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans. PMID:23028791

  9. Multiple loci associated with renal function in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Daniel; Herbert, Alan; Doumatey, Ayo P; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Erdos, Michael R; Chen, Guanjie; Gerry, Norman P; Christman, Michael F; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans. PMID:23028791

  10. Relationship between uterine natural killer cells and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Farghali, Mohamed M.; El-kholy, Abdel-Latif G.; Swidan, Khaled H.; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A.; Rashed, Ahmed R.; El-Sobky, Ezzat; Goma, Mostafa F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relation between uterine killer (uK) cells and unexplained repeated miscarriage (RM). Material and Methods Eighty women with unexplained repeated miscarriage and missed miscarriage of current pregnancy were studied. Fetal viability and gestational age of the current pregnancy were confirmed by ultrasound, followed by suction evacuation to collect abortion specimens and uterine wall curettage to collect decidua specimens. Abortion specimens were collected for long-term monolayer cell culture and subsequent chromosome analysis using conventional G-banding. Decidua specimens were subjected to immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies specific to CD56+ and CD16+ expressed by uK cells. Results CD56+ CD16+ uK cells were found in 85% [68/80] of the studied decidua specimens of women with unexplained repeated miscarriage; 88.5% [54/61] had normal abortion karyotyping and 73.7% [14/19] had abnormal abortion karyotyping. Moreover, 73.75% [59/80] of the studied women with a past history of early miscarriage had CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in their decidua specimens, and 66.25% [53/80] of studied women with a past history of late miscarriage had CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in their decidua specimens; the association between early and late miscarriage and CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in decidua specimens was significant. Conclusion CD56+CD16+ uK cells were predominant in the decidua specimens of the studied women with repeated miscarriage. A significant association was found between the presence of CD56+ CD16+ uK cells in the studied decidua specimens and unexplained repeated miscarriage. PMID:26692771

  11. Human natural killer cells: origin, receptors, function, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Del Zotto, Genny; Moretta, Francesca; Merli, Pietro; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors playing a relevant role in innate immunity, primarily in tumor surveillance and in defenses against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA class I molecules through surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A) that inhibit NK cell function and kill target cells that have lost (or underexpress) HLA class I molecules as it occurs in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell activation is mediated by an array of activating receptors and co-receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. In vivo anti-tumor NK cell activity may be suppressed by tumor or tumor-associated cells. Alloreactive NK cells (i.e. those that are not inhibited by the HLA class I alleles of the patient) derived from HSC of haploidentical donors play a major role in the cure of high-risk leukemia, by killing leukemia blasts and patient's DC, thus preventing tumor relapses and graft-versus-host disease. The expression of the HLA-C2-specific activating KIR2DS1 may also contribute to NK alloreactivity in patients expressing C2 alleles. A clear correlation has been proven between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Recently, haplo-HSCT has been further improved with the direct infusion, together with HSC, of donor-derived, mature alloreactive NK cells and TCRγδ(+) T cells - both contributing to a prompt anti-leukemia effect together with an efficient defense against pathogens during the 6- to 8-week interval required for the generation of alloreactive NK cells from HSC. PMID:25323661

  12. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3.

    PubMed

    Cacalano, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of "immune surveillance." Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27148255

  13. Dyson Dots & Geoengineering: The Killer App Ad Astra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, R. G.; Hughes, Eric; Roy, Kenneth I.; Fields, David E.

    No study of coping with climate change is complete without considering geoengineering. A "Dyson Dot" is one or more large (area ~700 K km2, >200 megatonne) lightsail(s) in a radiation-levitated non-Keplerian orbit(s) just sunward of the Sun-Earth Lagrange-1 point. The purpose of this syncretic concept is twofold: (I) As a parasol, it would reduce insolation on Earth by at least one-quarter of a percent (-3.4 W m-2), same as what caused 1.5°C drop during the "Little Ice Age" (~1550-1850) and same as the IPCC Third Report's mid-range value for global warming by 2050. The parasol transforms the "solar constant" to a controlled solar variable. (II) Hosting a ~50K km2 photovoltaic power station on its sunny side and relaying beamed power via maser to rectennas on a circumpolar Dymaxion grid, the system could displace over 300 EJ/a (~100 trillion kWh/yr) of fossil-fired power (total global demand for electricity forecast by 2050), while providing USD trillions in revenue from cheap clean energy sales (@1-3¢/kWh) to amortize the scheme. Total system efficiency compares favorably to automobiles; total system power density is comparable to nuclear power. This approach -- self-funding, "pay-as-you-go", minimally intrusive, scalable, complementary with a portfolio of other measures and above all reversible is not precluded by international treaty. Indeed geoengineering may be the best "killer app" to bootstrap orbital industry and humanity ad astra, because the terawattscale product is comparable to the power required for interstellar travel. If Tellurian spacefaring civilization bootstraps its exponential growth with multi-terawatt maser beams from such lightsails, there might eventually be enough of them to have a detectable effect on Sol's apparent luminosity at certain wavelengths, as seen from far away, similar to the eponymous Dyson Sphere, hence the moniker.

  14. A Killer Asteroids Research Project for Undergraduate Non-Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, Andrew W.; Rector, T. A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a progress report on the development and testing of our Killer Asteroids Research Project, which enables the assessment of asteroid impact risk in the undergraduate classroom. This is part of an NSF CCLI grant to develop Research Based Science Education (RBSE) curricula for non-majors. Our curricula include six projects covering astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic techniques, which are being tested at multiple schools of varying sizes around the country. We report on the second semester of testing this project with undergraduates at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Students use our Polaris Plugin for ImageJ to perform both astrometry and aperture photometry on research-grade astronomical images. The output is fed into Find_Orb, which uses a Monte Carlo method to compute orbital elements for thousands of possible orbits. The resulting orbit database is then fed into a planetarium program, which allows students to visualize the uncertainty region and to observe how that region changes with time and/or additional data. For potentially hazardous asteroids, impact risk is assessed by counting the number of "clone” orbits that strike a planet's surface. Alternatively, the output from our plugin can be used directly to measure the lightcurves of minor planets, leading to an improved understanding of their shapes. This plugin is the first FITS reader to produce correct time-stamps for minor planet observations found in the SDSS, which observes in drift-scan mode. Recent progress is promising. We are in dialogue with software engineers behind both Starry Night and Guide, helping to improve these planetarium programs as research tools. We are also constantly improving the Polaris Plugin, most recently to make it compatible with the astrometry format used by the websites NeoDys and AstDys.

  15. A false killer whale adjusts its hearing when it echolocates.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Y

    2008-06-01

    The use of auditory evoked potential (AEP) measurements has added considerably to knowledge of the hearing mechanisms of marine mammals. We have recently measured the hearing of a stranded infant Risso's dolphin, the audiograms of white-beaked dolphins temporarily caught and released, and the hearing of anaesthetized polar bears. Most small toothed whales echolocate and hear very high frequency sounds underwater. While much has previously been learned about the echolocation performance and characteristics of the outgoing signals of echolocating dolphins and small whales, the hearing processes occurring while these animals actively echolocate have not previously been examined. Working with a well-trained echolocating false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) wearing latex surface suction cup electrodes, we have measured echolocation hearing AEPs in response to outgoing echolocation clicks, returning echoes, and comparable simulated whale clicks and echoes in a variety of situations. We have found that: (1) the whale may hear her loud outgoing clicks and much quieter returning echoes at comparable levels, (2) the whale has protective mechanisms that dampen the intensity of her outgoing signals - she hears her outgoing signals at a level about 40 dB lower than similar signals presented directly in front of her, (3) when echo return levels are lowered either by making the targets smaller or by placing the targets farther away - without changing the levels of her outgoing signals - the hearing of these echoes remains at almost the same level, (4) if targets are made much smaller and harder to echolocate, the animal will modify what she hears of her outgoing signal - as if to heighten overall hearing sensitivity to keep the echo level hearable, (5) the animal has an active 'automatic gain control' mechanism in her hearing based on both forward masking that balances outgoing pulse intensity and time between pulse and echo, and active hearing control. Overall, hearing

  16. Decidual Cell Regulation of Natural Killer Cell–Recruiting Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.; Huang, S. Joseph; Chen, Chie-Pein; Huang, Yingqun; Xu, Jie; Faramarzi, Saeed; Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit; Koopman, Louise; Smedts, Dineke; Buchwalder, Lynn F.; Schatz, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    First trimester human decidua is composed of decidual cells, CD56brightCD16− decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, and macrophages. Decidual cells incubated with NK cell–derived IFN-γ and either macrophage-derived TNF-α or IL-1β synergistically enhanced mRNA and protein expression of IP-10 and I-TAC. Both chemokines recruit CXCR3-expressing NK cells. This synergy required IFN-γ receptor 1 and 2 mediation via JAK/STAT and NFκB signaling pathways. However, synergy was not observed on neutrophil, monocyte, and NK cell–recruiting chemokines. Immunostaining of first trimester decidua localized IP-10, I-TAC, IFN-γR1, and -R2 to vimentin-positive decidual cells versus cytokeratin-positive interstitial trophoblasts. Flow cytometry identified high CXCR3 levels on dNK cells and minority peripheral CD56brightCD16− pNK cells and intermediate CXCR3 levels on the majority of CD56dimCD16+ pNK cells. Incubation of pNK cells with either IP-10 or I-TAC elicited concentration-dependent enhanced CXCR3 levels and migration of both pNK cell subsets that peaked at 10 ng/mL, whereas each chemokine at a concentration of 50 ng/mL inhibited CXCR3 expression and pNK cell migration. Deciduae from women with preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, displayed significantly lower dNK cell numbers and higher IP-10 and I-TAC levels versus gestational age–matched controls. Significantly elevated IP-10 levels in first trimester sera from women eventually developing preeclampsia compared with controls, identifying IP-10 as a novel, robust early predictor of preeclampsia. PMID:23973270

  17. Emerging role of Natural killer cells in oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rauf; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a subtype of lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses against tumors and virus-infected cells. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or to produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. Therapies with NK cells involve activation of endogenous NK cells and/or exogenous transfer by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation/adoptive cell therapy. To exploit the diverse functional abilities of NK cells for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand NK cell biology and the underlying regulatory mechanisms. The state of immune suppression prevalent in malignancies creates the need for innovative therapies. Oncolytic viruses are novel anticancer agents showing selective tropism for tumor cells and lacking pathogenicity in humans, but the use of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT) presents multiple challenges. An increasing body of evidence suggests that the host immune response may critically influence the outcome of OVT. Classically, the immune system is thought to limit the efficacy of therapy through virus clearance mediated by innate immune effectors or through adaptive antiviral immune responses eliminating infected cells. Effective strategies do need to be designed in OVT to circumvent the early antiviral activity of NK cells and to augment late NK-cell-mediated antitumor responses. The intrinsic immunostimulating capacity of oncolytic viruses and the possibility of engineering them to express heterologous immunostimulatory molecules (eg, cytokines) support the use of these agents to enhance antitumor immune responses besides inducing direct oncolytic effects. OVT has indeed shown promising therapeutic outcomes in various clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of NK cells, strategies involving NK cells for achieving cancer therapy, and, more particularly, the emerging role of NK cells in OVT.

  18. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell–cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of “immune surveillance.” Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27148255

  19. Psychosocial resources, aging, and natural killer cell terminal maturity.

    PubMed

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Lutz, Charles T

    2012-12-01

    Psychosocial factors may influence aspects of immunological aging. The present study tested the hypothesis that psychosocial resources correlate with the expression of the cell surface maker CD57 on natural killer (NK) immune cells. CD57 is a marker of terminal maturation and senescence in this cell subset. The study further tested the relative contribution of specific resources in the social, psychological, financial, and status-skill domains, given the potential differential value of different resources for younger and older adults, and the contribution of relative versus absolute resources. Younger (n = 38) and older (n = 34) women completed measures of relative and absolute resources and had blood drawn. Examined both between groups and within the older women, older age and fewer total relative resources were associated with more CD57 expression on NK cells. One SD in resources was the equivalent of 5 years of aging among the older women. Among the specific resource types, a preponderance of financial resources, both relative and absolute, was associated with less CD57 expression on NK cells, and these relationships did not significantly vary between younger and older women. There was no evidence that depressive symptoms mediated the effects of resources on CD57 expression on NK cells. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that the sense that one has substantial resources, particularly with regard to finances and possessions, may retard age-associated aspects of the microenvironment in which NK cells develop and mature, independent of effects on distress, and this process may begin in younger adulthood. PMID:22708535

  20. Decreased non-MHC-restricted (CD56+) killer cell cytotoxicity after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Grimm, E. A.; Smid, C.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity of non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted (CD56+) (NMHC) killer cells and cell surface marker expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined before and after spaceflight. Ten astronauts (9 men, 1 woman) from two space shuttle missions (9- and 10-day duration) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected 10 days before launch, within 3 h after landing, and 3 days after landing. All peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations were cryopreserved and analyzed simultaneously in a 4-h cytotoxicity (51)Cr release assay using K562 target cells. NMHC killer cell lytic activity was normalized per 1,000 CD56+ cells. When all 10 subjects were considered as one study group, NMHC killer cell numbers did not change significantly during the three sampling periods, but at landing lytic activity had decreased by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) from preflight values. Nine of ten astronauts had decreased lytic activity immediately after flight. NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity of only three astronauts returned toward preflight values by 3 days after landing. Consistent with decreased NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity, urinary cortisol significantly increased after landing compared with preflight levels. Plasma cortisol and ACTH levels at landing were not significantly different from preflight values. No correlation of changes in NMHC killer cell function or hormone levels with factors such as age, gender, mission, or spaceflight experience was found. After landing, expression of the major lymphocyte surface markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD16, CD56), as determined by flow cytometric analysis, did not show any consistent changes from measurements made before flight.

  1. Killer Whale Depredation and Associated Costs to Alaskan Sablefish, Pacific Halibut and Greenland Turbot Longliners

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Megan J.; Mueter, Franz; Criddle, Keith; Haynie, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Killer whale (Orcinus orca) depredation (whales stealing or damaging fish caught on fishing gear) adversely impacts demersal longline fisheries for sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria), Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and Greenland turbot (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) in the Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands and Western Gulf of Alaska. These interactions increase direct costs and opportunity costs associated with catching fish and reduce the profitability of longline fishing in western Alaska. This study synthesizes National Marine Fisheries Service observer data, National Marine Fisheries Service sablefish longline survey and fishermen-collected depredation data to: 1) estimate the frequency of killer whale depredation on longline fisheries in Alaska; 2) estimate depredation-related catch per unit effort reductions; and 3) assess direct costs and opportunity costs incurred by longliners in western Alaska as a result of killer whale interactions. The percentage of commercial fishery sets affected by killer whales was highest in the Bering Sea fisheries for: sablefish (21.4%), Greenland turbot (9.9%), and Pacific halibut (6.9%). Average catch per unit effort reductions on depredated sets ranged from 35.1–69.3% for the observed longline fleet in all three management areas from 1998–2012 (p<0.001). To compensate for depredation, fishermen set additional gear to catch the same amount of fish, and this increased fuel costs by an additional 82% per depredated set (average $433 additional fuel per depredated set). In a separate analysis with six longline vessels in 2011and 2012, killer whale depredation avoidance measures resulted in an average additional cost of $494 per depredated vessel-day for fuel and crew food. Opportunity costs of time lost by fishermen averaged $522 per additional vessel-day on the grounds. This assessment of killer whale depredation costs represents the most extensive economic evaluation of this issue in Alaska to date and will help longline

  2. Killer whale depredation and associated costs to Alaskan sablefish, Pacific halibut and Greenland turbot longliners.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Megan J; Mueter, Franz; Criddle, Keith; Haynie, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    Killer whale (Orcinus orca) depredation (whales stealing or damaging fish caught on fishing gear) adversely impacts demersal longline fisheries for sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria), Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and Greenland turbot (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) in the Bering Sea, Aleutian Islands and Western Gulf of Alaska. These interactions increase direct costs and opportunity costs associated with catching fish and reduce the profitability of longline fishing in western Alaska. This study synthesizes National Marine Fisheries Service observer data, National Marine Fisheries Service sablefish longline survey and fishermen-collected depredation data to: 1) estimate the frequency of killer whale depredation on longline fisheries in Alaska; 2) estimate depredation-related catch per unit effort reductions; and 3) assess direct costs and opportunity costs incurred by longliners in western Alaska as a result of killer whale interactions. The percentage of commercial fishery sets affected by killer whales was highest in the Bering Sea fisheries for: sablefish (21.4%), Greenland turbot (9.9%), and Pacific halibut (6.9%). Average catch per unit effort reductions on depredated sets ranged from 35.1-69.3% for the observed longline fleet in all three management areas from 1998-2012 (p<0.001). To compensate for depredation, fishermen set additional gear to catch the same amount of fish, and this increased fuel costs by an additional 82% per depredated set (average $433 additional fuel per depredated set). In a separate analysis with six longline vessels in 2011 and 2012, killer whale depredation avoidance measures resulted in an average additional cost of $494 per depredated vessel-day for fuel and crew food. Opportunity costs of time lost by fishermen averaged $522 per additional vessel-day on the grounds. This assessment of killer whale depredation costs represents the most extensive economic evaluation of this issue in Alaska to date and will help longline

  3. Molecular characterization of a novel gammaretrovirus in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Lamere, Sarah A; St Leger, Judy A; Schrenzel, Mark D; Anthony, Simon J; Rideout, Bruce A; Salomon, Daniel R

    2009-12-01

    There are currently no published data documenting the presence of retroviruses in cetaceans, though the occurrences of cancers and immunodeficiency states suggest the potential. We examined tissues from adult killer whales and detected a novel gammaretrovirus by degenerate PCR. Reverse transcription-PCR also demonstrated tissue and serum expression of retroviral mRNA. The full-length sequence of the provirus was obtained by PCR, and a TaqMan-based copy number assay did not demonstrate evidence of productive infection. PCR on blood samples from 11 healthy captive killer whales and tissues from 3 free-ranging animals detected the proviral DNA in all tissues examined from all animals. A survey of multiple cetacean species by PCR for gag, pol, and env sequences showed homologs of this virus in the DNA of eight species of delphinids, pygmy and dwarf sperm whales, and harbor porpoises, but not in beluga or fin whales. Analysis of the bottlenose dolphin genome revealed two full-length proviral sequences with 97.4% and 96.9% nucleotide identity to the killer whale gammaretrovirus. The results of single-cell PCR on killer whale sperm and Southern blotting are also consistent with the conclusion that the provirus is endogenous. We suggest that this gammaretrovirus entered the delphinoid ancestor's genome before the divergence of modern dolphins or that an exogenous variant existed following divergence that was ultimately endogenized. However, the transcriptional activity demonstrated in tissues and the nearly intact viral genome suggest a more recent integration into the killer whale genome, favoring the latter hypothesis. The proposed name for this retrovirus is killer whale endogenous retrovirus. PMID:19812152

  4. Killer whale (Orcinus orca) whistles from the western South Atlantic Ocean include high frequency signals.

    PubMed

    Andriolo, Artur; Reis, Sarah S; Amorim, Thiago O S; Sucunza, Federico; de Castro, Franciele R; Maia, Ygor Geyer; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Bortolotto, Guilherme A; Dalla Rosa, Luciano

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic parameters of killer whale (Orcinus orca) whistles were described for the western South Atlantic Ocean and highlight the occurrence of high frequency whistles. Killer whale signals were recorded on December of 2012, when a pod of four individuals was observed harassing a group of sperm whales. The high frequency whistles were highly stereotyped and were modulated mostly at ultrasonic frequencies. Compared to other contour types, the high frequency whistles are characterized by higher bandwidths, shorter durations, fewer harmonics, and higher sweep rates. The results add to the knowledge of vocal behavior of this species. PMID:26428807

  5. Salmonella Newport omphaloarteritis in a stranded killer whale (Orcinus orca) neonate.

    PubMed

    Colegrove, Kathleen M; St Leger, Judy A; Raverty, Stephen; Jang, Spencer; Berman-Kowalewski, Michelle; Gaydos, Joseph K

    2010-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (Salmonella Newport) was isolated from multiple tissues in a neonate killer whale (Orcinus orca) that stranded dead in 2005 along the central coast of California, USA. Necrotizing omphaloarteritis and omphalophlebitis was observed on histologic examination suggesting umbilical infection was the route of entry. Genetic analysis of skin samples indicated that the neonate had an offshore haplotype. Salmonellosis has rarely been identified in free-ranging marine mammals and the significance of Salmonella Newport infection to the health of free-ranging killer whales is currently unknown. PMID:20966284

  6. A Mutational Analysis of Killer Toxin Resistance in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Identifies New Genes Involved in Cell Wall (1 -> 6)-β-Glucan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. L.; Kossaczka, Z.; Jiang, B.; Bussey, H.

    1993-01-01

    Recessive mutations leading to killer resistance identify the KRE9, KRE10 and KRE11 genes. Mutations in both the KRE9 and KRE11 genes lead to reduced levels of (1 -> 6)-β-glucan in the yeast cell wall. The KRE11 gene encodes a putative 63-kD cytoplasmic protein, and disruption of the KRE11 locus leads to a 50% reduced level of cell wall (1 -> 6)-glucan. Structural analysis of the (1 -> 6)-β-glucan remaining in a kre11 mutant indicates a polymer smaller in size than wild type, but containing a similar proportion of (1 -> 6)- and (1 -> 3)-linkages. Genetic interactions among cells harboring mutations at the KRE11, KRE6 and KRE1 loci indicate lethality of kre11 kre6 double mutants and that kre11 is epistatic to kre1, with both gene products required to produce the mature glucan polymer at wild-type levels. Analysis of these KRE genes should extend knowledge of the β-glucan biosynthetic pathway, and of cell wall synthesis in yeast. PMID:8462845

  7. Identifying causal variants at loci with multiple signals of association.

    PubMed

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Kostem, Emrah; Kang, Eun Yong; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-10-01

    Although genome-wide association studies have successfully identified thousands of risk loci for complex traits, only a handful of the biologically causal variants, responsible for association at these loci, have been successfully identified. Current statistical methods for identifying causal variants at risk loci either use the strength of the association signal in an iterative conditioning framework or estimate probabilities for variants to be causal. A main drawback of existing methods is that they rely on the simplifying assumption of a single causal variant at each risk locus, which is typically invalid at many risk loci. In this work, we propose a new statistical framework that allows for the possibility of an arbitrary number of causal variants when estimating the posterior probability of a variant being causal. A direct benefit of our approach is that we predict a set of variants for each locus that under reasonable assumptions will contain all of the true causal variants with a high confidence level (e.g., 95%) even when the locus contains multiple causal variants. We use simulations to show that our approach provides 20-50% improvement in our ability to identify the causal variants compared to the existing methods at loci harboring multiple causal variants. We validate our approach using empirical data from an expression QTL study of CHI3L2 to identify new causal variants that affect gene expression at this locus. CAVIAR is publicly available online at http://genetics.cs.ucla.edu/caviar/. PMID:25104515

  8. Identifying Causal Variants at Loci with Multiple Signals of Association

    PubMed Central

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Kostem, Emrah; Kang, Eun Yong; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies have successfully identified thousands of risk loci for complex traits, only a handful of the biologically causal variants, responsible for association at these loci, have been successfully identified. Current statistical methods for identifying causal variants at risk loci either use the strength of the association signal in an iterative conditioning framework or estimate probabilities for variants to be causal. A main drawback of existing methods is that they rely on the simplifying assumption of a single causal variant at each risk locus, which is typically invalid at many risk loci. In this work, we propose a new statistical framework that allows for the possibility of an arbitrary number of causal variants when estimating the posterior probability of a variant being causal. A direct benefit of our approach is that we predict a set of variants for each locus that under reasonable assumptions will contain all of the true causal variants with a high confidence level (e.g., 95%) even when the locus contains multiple causal variants. We use simulations to show that our approach provides 20–50% improvement in our ability to identify the causal variants compared to the existing methods at loci harboring multiple causal variants. We validate our approach using empirical data from an expression QTL study of CHI3L2 to identify new causal variants that affect gene expression at this locus. CAVIAR is publicly available online at http://genetics.cs.ucla.edu/caviar/. PMID:25104515

  9. Ancient conservation of trinucleotide microsatellite loci in polistine wasps.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, V O; Peters, J M; Zhu, Y; Arévalo, E; Hastings, M D; Seppä, P; Pedersen, J S; Zacchi, F; Queller, D C; Strassmann, J E

    1998-10-01

    Microsatellites have proven to be very useful genetic markers for studies of kinship, parentage, and gene mapping. If microsatellites are conserved among species, then those developed for one species can be used on related species, which would save the time and effort of developing new loci. We evaluated conservation of 27 trinucleotide loci that were derived from 2 species of Polistes wasps in cross-species applications on 27 species chosen from the major lineages of the Vespidae, which diverged as much as 144 million years ago. We further investigated cross-species polymorphism levels for 18 of the loci. There was a clear relationship between cladistic distance and both conservation of the priming sites and heterozygosity. However the loci derived from P. bellicosus were much more widely conserved and polymorphic than were those derived from P. annularis. The disparity in cross-species utility between these sets of loci means that caution should be used in generalizing from conservation rates derived from single species. We found no relationship between locus conservation or heterozygosity and GC content of flanks, repeat motif, repeat length, or heterozygosity in the original species, which suggests that generalizations from other studies reporting such patterns are premature. PMID:9878228

  10. Killing defect of natural killer cells with the absence of natural killer cytotoxic factors in a child with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Komiyama, A.; Kawai, H.; Yamada, S.; Kato, M.; Yanagisawa, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1987-06-01

    A killing defect of natural killer (NK) cells in the absence of NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF) was first demonstrated in a child with Hodgkin's disease. The patient lacked detectable NK cell activity in every phase of the disease as measured by a four-hour /sup 51/Cr-release assay using K562 cells as a target. The percent lysis at a 40:1 effector:target ratio by the patient's lymphocytes was persistently below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 46.2% +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SD). NK cell activity was not detectable at effector:target ratios of 10:1 to 80:1 and by prolongation of the incubation time, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by lymphocyte stimulation with polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid, interferon (IFN)-alpha, or interleukin 2 (IL 2). The numbers of Leu-7+ cells and Leu-11+ cells were normal as counted by flow cytometry. A single cell-in-agarose assay demonstrated normal numbers of target binding cells (TBCs), and they showed the morphology of large granular lymphocytes. However, there were no TBCs with dead targets. These results indicated that the patient's lymphocytes contained normal numbers of NK cells that were capable of recognizing and binding to a target but were incapable of killing the bound target cell. The patient's lymphocytes were then studied for their release of NKCF upon interaction with K562 cells. The patient's cells did not release NKCF, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by stimulation of the cells with IFN or IL 2. It is suggested that the deficient release of NKCF may have been related to the killing defect of the NK cells in this patient.

  11. Assessment of human natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell cytotoxicity against Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites and brain cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dannemann, B.R.; Morris, V.A.; Araujo, F.G.; Remington, J.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Because previous work has suggested that NK cells may be important in host resistance against the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii we examined whether human NK cells and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells have activity against trophozoites and cysts of this organism in vitro. A method to radiolabel Toxoplasma trophozoites with 51Cr was developed and direct cytotoxic activity was determined by using modifications of the standard 51Cr release assay. Viability of 51Cr-labeled trophozoites assessed by both methylene blue staining and trypan blue exclusion was greater than 90%. Significantly more 51Cr was released by anti-Toxoplasma antibody and C than by antibody in the absence of C. Incubation of trophozoites with freshly isolated human NK cells or NK cells activated with either rIL-2 or rIFN-alpha did not result in significant release of 51Cr (specific lysis was 0 to 2.3%). In contrast, the average specific lysis of radiolabeled trophozoites by LAK cells was significant. In a series of separate experiments, preincubation of radiolabeled trophozoites with heat-inactivated normal or Toxoplasma antibody-positive human serum increased the cytotoxicity of LAK cells from a mean specific lysis of 15% +/- 4.5 to 39% +/- 8.5, respectively, as assessed by 51Cr release. Because previous work has shown that radioisotope release from parasites may be nonspecific, separate experiments were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of LAK cells against antibody-coated trophozoites by using ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining to assess effector cell damage. LAK cells had a mean specific lysis of 51% against antibody-coated trophozoites by ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining. Preincubation with heat-inactivated Toxoplasma-antibody positive human serum did not increase activity of rIL-2-activated NK cells against 51CR-labeled trophozoites.

  12. Microsatellite loci analysis for individual identification in Shiba Inu.

    PubMed

    Arata, Sayaka; Asahi, Ai; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Eighteen autosomal microsatellite loci were examined using 275 Shiba Inus in Japan. Eighteen dogs representing eight trios were obtained from four breeders to calculate mutation rates, and 257 dogs kept by owners were collected through veterinary clinics throughout Japan to calculate population genetic parameters and estimate discrimination power. After two loci (INU005 and AHTk253) were excluded, average expected heterozygosity (He), polymorphic information content (PIC) and fixation index (F) were 0.665, 0.623 and 0.046, respectively. The combined power of discrimination over the 16 microsatellite markers was more than 0.9999. Therefore, it is suggested that these 16 microsatellite loci recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) are applicable for individual identification and parentage testing of domestic Shiba Inu in Japan. PMID:26537551

  13. Microsatellite loci analysis for individual identification in Shiba Inu

    PubMed Central

    ARATA, Sayaka; ASAHI, Ai; TAKEUCHI, Yukari; MORI, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen autosomal microsatellite loci were examined using 275 Shiba Inus in Japan. Eighteen dogs representing eight trios were obtained from four breeders to calculate mutation rates, and 257 dogs kept by owners were collected through veterinary clinics throughout Japan to calculate population genetic parameters and estimate discrimination power. After two loci (INU005 and AHTk253) were excluded, average expected heterozygosity (He), polymorphic information content (PIC) and fixation index (F) were 0.665, 0.623 and 0.046, respectively. The combined power of discrimination over the 16 microsatellite markers was more than 0.9999. Therefore, it is suggested that these 16 microsatellite loci recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) are applicable for individual identification and parentage testing of domestic Shiba Inu in Japan. PMID:26537551

  14. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Willa S.; Oswald, Karl M.

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instruction to reduce proactive interference as compared with other personal spontaneous strategies. The implications of this study are that top-down proactive strategies such as the method of loci can significantly reduce proactive interference, and that the use of image and sequence or location are especially useful in this regard. PMID:25157300

  15. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci.

    PubMed

    Bass, Willa S; Oswald, Karl M

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instruction to reduce proactive interference as compared with other personal spontaneous strategies. The implications of this study are that top-down proactive strategies such as the method of loci can significantly reduce proactive interference, and that the use of image and sequence or location are especially useful in this regard. PMID:25157300

  16. Genome-Wide Significant Loci: How Important Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Dudley, Joel T.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extensively used to study common complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), revealing 153 suggestive CAD loci, of which at least 46 have been validated as having genome-wide significance. However, these loci collectively explain <10% of the genetic variance in CAD. Thus, we must address the key question of what factors constitute the remaining 90% of CAD heritability. We review possible limitations of GWAS, and contextually consider some candidate CAD loci identified by this method. Looking ahead, we propose systems genetics as a complementary approach to unlocking the CAD heritability and etiology. Systems genetics builds network models of relevant molecular processes by combining genetic and genomic datasets to ultimately identify key “drivers” of disease. By leveraging systems-based genetic approaches, we can help reveal the full genetic basis of common complex disorders, enabling novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25720628

  17. Multiple loci affect genetic predisposition to hepatocarcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Manenti, G.; Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.

    1994-09-01

    The C3H/He mouse represents a good experimental model of genetic predispositoin to hepatocellular tumor development. We analyzed an interspecific test-cross population of 106 urethane-treated male (C3H/He x Mus spretus) x C57BL/6J mice, typed with 222 genetic markers to locate precisely the hepatocellular tumor susceptibility (Hcs) loci. Three regions, on chromosomes 2, 5, and 19, showed a significant linkage with hepatocellular tumor development, as indicated by different quantitative indexes estimating liver tumor size. Liver tumor frequency was not genetically controlled. These loci are different from three other Hcs loci that we have previously mapped in an F2 progeny of the C3H/He mouse crossed with the resistant laboratory strain A/J. The present result indicates a multigenic model of inheritance for hepatocellular tumor susceptibility.

  18. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Keaton, Jacob M; Hellwege, Jacklyn N; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pankow, James S; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Rich, Stephen S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10-6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  19. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Keaton, Jacob M.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pankow, James S.; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10−6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  20. Sequence variation in the human T-cell receptor loci.

    PubMed

    Mackelprang, Rachel; Carlson, Christopher S; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Livingston, Robert J; Eberle, Michael A; Nickerson, Deborah A

    2002-12-01

    Identifying common sequence variations known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human populations is one of the current objectives of the human genome project. Nearly 3 million SNPs have been identified. Analysis of the relative allele frequency of these markers in human populations and the genetic associations between these markers, known as linkage disequilibrium, is now underway to generate a high-density genetic map. Because of the central role T cells play in immune reactivity, the T-cell receptor (TCR) loci have long been considered important candidates for common disease susceptibility within the immune system (e.g., asthma, atopy and autoimmunity). Over the past two decades, hundreds of SNPs in the TCR loci have been identified. Most studies have focused on defining SNPs in the variable gene segments which are involved in antigenic recognition. On average, the coding sequence of each TCR variable gene segment contains two SNPs, with many more found in the 5', 3' and intronic sequences of these segments. Therefore, a potentially large repertoire of functional variants exists in these loci. Association between SNPs (linkage disequilibrium) extends approximately 30 kb in the TCR loci, although a few larger regions of disequilibrium have been identified. Therefore, the SNPs found in one variable gene segment may or may not be associated with SNPs in other surrounding variable gene segments. This suggests that meaningful association studies in the TCR loci will require the analysis and typing of large marker sets to fully evaluate the role of TCR loci in common disease susceptibility in human populations. PMID:12493004

  1. The ribosomal protein genes and Minute loci of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marygold, Steven J; Roote, John; Reuter, Gunter; Lambertsson, Andrew; Ashburner, Michael; Millburn, Gillian H; Harrison, Paul M; Yu, Zhan; Kenmochi, Naoya; Kaufman, Thomas C; Leevers, Sally J; Cook, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to cause an array of cellular and developmental defects in a variety of organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, disruption of RP genes can result in the 'Minute' syndrome of dominant, haploinsufficient phenotypes, which include prolonged development, short and thin bristles, and poor fertility and viability. While more than 50 Minute loci have been defined genetically, only 15 have so far been characterized molecularly and shown to correspond to RP genes. Results We combined bioinformatic and genetic approaches to conduct a systematic analysis of the relationship between RP genes and Minute loci. First, we identified 88 genes encoding 79 different cytoplasmic RPs (CRPs) and 75 genes encoding distinct mitochondrial RPs (MRPs). Interestingly, nine CRP genes are present as duplicates and, while all appear to be functional, one member of each gene pair has relatively limited expression. Next, we defined 65 discrete Minute loci by genetic criteria. Of these, 64 correspond to, or very likely correspond to, CRP genes; the single non-CRP-encoding Minute gene encodes a translation initiation factor subunit. Significantly, MRP genes and more than 20 CRP genes do not correspond to Minute loci. Conclusion This work answers a longstanding question about the molecular nature of Minute loci and suggests that Minute phenotypes arise from suboptimal protein synthesis resulting from reduced levels of cytoribosomes. Furthermore, by identifying the majority of haplolethal and haplosterile loci at the molecular level, our data will directly benefit efforts to attain complete deletion coverage of the D. melanogaster genome. PMID:17927810

  2. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  3. Invariant Natural Killer T cells in children with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jyonouchi, Soma; Smith, Cara Lea; Saretta, Francesca; Abraham, Valsamma; Ruymann, Kathryn R; Modayur-Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Cianferoni, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an atopic disease characterized by eosinophilic inflammation in which dietary antigens (in particular, milk) play a major role. EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction in which over-expression of Th2 cytokines, particularly IL-13, play a major role; however, the cells responsible for IL-13 over-expression remain elusive. Th2-cytokines are secreted following the ligation of invariant natural killer T cell receptors to sphingolipids (SL). Sphingolipids (SL) are presented via the CD1d molecule on the INKT cell surface. Cow’s milk-derived SL has been shown to activate iNKTs from children with IgE-mediated food allergies to milk (FA-MA) to produce Th2 cytokines. The role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE pathogenesis is currently unknown. Objective To investigate the role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 children with active EoE (EoE-A), 10 children with controlled EoE (EoE-C), and 16 healthy controls (Non-EoE) were measured ex-vivo and then incubated with α-galactosylceramide (αGal) and milk-SL. INKTs from peripheral blood (PB) and esophageal biopsies were studied. Results EoE-A-children had significantly fewer peripheral blood iNKTs with a greater Th2-response to αGal and milk-SM compared to iNKTs of EoE-C and Non-EoE children. Additionally, EoE-A children had increased iNKT levels in esophageal biopsies compared to EoE-C children. Conclusion Milk-SLs are able to activate peripheral blood iNKTs in EoE-A children to produce Th2 cytokines. Additionally, iNKT levels are higher at the site of active esophageal eosinophilic inflammation. Clinical Relevance This study suggests that sphingolipids (SL) contained in milk may drive the development of EoE by promoting an iNKT cell-mediated Th2-type cytokine response that facilitates eosinophil-mediated allergic inflammation. PMID:24118614

  4. Generalization of adiposity genetic loci to US Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    Graff, M; Fernández-Rhodes, L; Liu, S; Carlson, C; Wassertheil-Smoller, S; Neuhouser, M; Reiner, A; Kooperberg, C; Rampersaud, E; Manson, J E; Kuller, L H; Howard, B V; Ochs-Balcom, H M; Johnson, K C; Vitolins, M Z; Sucheston, L; Monda, K; North, K E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a public health concern. Yet the identification of adiposity-related genetic variants among United States (US) Hispanics, which is the largest US minority group, remains largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: To interrogate an a priori list of 47 (32 overall body mass and 15 central adiposity) index single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously studied in individuals of European descent among 3494 US Hispanic women in the Women's Health Initiative SNP Health Association Resource (WHI SHARe). DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of measured body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were inverse normally transformed after adjusting for age, smoking, center and global ancestry. WC and WHR models were also adjusted for BMI. Genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 array. In the absence of an a priori selected SNP, a proxy was selected (r2⩾0.8 in CEU). RESULTS: Six BMI loci (TMEM18, NUDT3/HMGA1, FAIM2, FTO, MC4R and KCTD15) and two WC/WHR loci (VEGFA and ITPR2-SSPN) were nominally significant (P<0.05) at the index or proxy SNP in the corresponding BMI and WC/WHR models. To account for distinct linkage disequilibrium patterns in Hispanics and further assess generalization of genetic effects at each locus, we interrogated the evidence for association at the 47 surrounding loci within 1 Mb region of the index or proxy SNP. Three additional BMI loci (FANCL, TFAP2B and ETV5) and five WC/WHR loci (DNM3-PIGC, GRB14, ADAMTS9, LY86 and MSRA) displayed Bonferroni-corrected significant associations with BMI and WC/WHR. Conditional analyses of each index SNP (or its proxy) and the most significant SNP within the 1 Mb region supported the possible presence of index-independent signals at each of these eight loci as well as at KCTD15. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence for the generalization of nine BMI and seven central adiposity loci in Hispanic women. This study expands the current knowledge of common adiposity

  5. 77 FR 71259 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; False Killer Whale Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... wire diameter regulation. We understand, based on public comment (see comment/response 33), that there... regulations have been promulgated. 3. Main Hawaiian Islands Longline Fishing Prohibited Area An existing... necessary for false killer whales. See comments/responses 3-5 and 38-41 ] below for more detail on...

  6. Natural killer cell dysfunction during acute infection with foot-and-mouth diseaase virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural killer cells (NK) provide one of the initial barriers of cellular host defense against pathogens, in particular intracellular pathogens. The role of these cells in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection is unknown. Previously, we characterized the phenotype and function of NK cells fr...

  7. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). 226.206 Section 226.206 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206...

  8. Rapid multiple-level coevolution in experimental populations of yeast killer and nonkiller strains.

    PubMed

    Pieczynska, Magdalena D; Wloch-Salamon, Dominika; Korona, Ryszard; de Visser, J Arjan G M

    2016-06-01

    Coevolution between different biological entities is considered an important evolutionary mechanism at all levels of biological organization. Here, we provide evidence for coevolution of a yeast killer strain (K) carrying cytoplasmic dsRNA viruses coding for anti-competitor toxins and an isogenic toxin-sensitive strain (S) during 500 generations of laboratory propagation. Signatures of coevolution developed at two levels. One of them was coadaptation of K and S. Killing ability of K first increased quickly and was followed by the rapid invasion of toxin-resistant mutants derived from S, after which killing ability declined. High killing ability was shown to be advantageous when sensitive cells were present but costly when they were absent. Toxin resistance evolved via a two-step process, presumably involving the fitness-enhancing loss of one chromosome followed by selection of a recessive resistant mutation on the haploid chromosome. The other level of coevolution occurred between cell and killer virus. By swapping the killer viruses between ancestral and evolved strains, we could demonstrate that changes observed in both host and virus were beneficial only when combined, suggesting that they involved reciprocal changes. Together, our results show that the yeast killer system shows a remarkable potential for rapid multiple-level coevolution. PMID:27168531

  9. ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY AND INTERFERON PRODUCTION BY MANGANESE IN YOUNG MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect that MnCl2 has on murine splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity was investigated in infant (10 days old), pre-weanling (18 days old) and weanling (24 days old) C57BL/6J mice. Both MnCl2 and Poly I:C caused elevations in serum interferon levels. Time-course studies r...

  10. IN VITRO AUGMENTATION OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The in vitro cultivation of murine spleen cells with MnCl2 resulted in the enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity as measured in a 4-h (51)Cr-release assay. Optimal enhancement of NK activity was observed at concentrations of 10-20 micrograms MnCl2 culture (72-144 micro...

  11. INHIBITION OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY FOLLOWING IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we have examined the effect of in vitro ozone exposure on human peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cell activity measured against K562 tumor cells. he data showed that NK activity was nhibited in a time dependent manner with marked suppression observed after 6 hou...

  12. Natural killer T cells: innate lymphocytes positioned as a bridge between acute and chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lisa; Hegde, Subramanya

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T cells are an innate population of T lymphocytes that recognize antigens derived from host lipids and glycolipids. In this review, we focus on how these unique T cells are positioned to influence both acute and chronic inflammatory processes through their early recruitment to sites of inflammation, interactions with myeloid antigen presenting cells, and recognition of lipids associated with inflammation. PMID:20850561

  13. IMMUNOLOGIC EFFECTS OF NICKEL: 2. SUPPRESSION OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (18.3 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction in murine splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity. This reduction in NK activity was not associated with a significant reduction in spleen cellularity nor in the production of suppre...

  14. TdKT, a new killer toxin produced by Torulaspora delbrueckii effective against wine spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Villalba, María Leticia; Susana Sáez, Julieta; Del Monaco, Silvana; Lopes, Christian Ariel; Sangorrín, Marcela Paula

    2016-01-18

    Microbiological spoilage is a major concern throughout the wine industry, and control tools are limited. This paper addresses the identification and partial characterization of a new killer toxin from Torulaspora delbrueckii with potential biocontrol activity of Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Pichia guilliermondii, Pichia manshurica and Pichia membranifaciens wine spoilage. A panel of 18 different wine strains of T. delbrueckii killer yeasts was analysed, and the strain T. delbrueckii NPCC 1033 (TdKT producer) showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of all different spoilage yeasts evaluated. The TdKT toxin was then subjected to a partial biochemical characterization. Its estimated molecular weight was N30 kDa and it showed glucanase and chitinase enzymatic activities. The killer activity was stable between pH 4.2 and 4.8 and inactivated at temperature above 40 °C. Pustulan and chitin — but not other cell wall polysaccharides — prevented sensitive yeast cells from being killed by TdKT, suggesting that those may be the first toxin targets in the cell wall. TdKT provoked an increase in necrosis cell death after 3 h treatment and apoptotic cell death after 24 h showing time dependence in its mechanisms of action. Killer toxin extracts were active at oenological conditions, confirming their potential use as a biocontrol tool in winemaking. PMID:26513248

  15. Motherlove is a Killer: "Sula,""Beloved," and the Deadly Trinity of Motherlove.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delancey, Dayle B.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the view of motherhood and the concept of mother love as a killer in Toni Morrison's novels "Sula" (1973) and "Beloved" (1987). The triple nature of mother love as destructive materially, emotionally, and literally is examined in the context of African-American women's struggles. (SLD)

  16. Sipping Coffee with a Serial Killer: On Conducting Life History Interviews with a Criminal Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleson, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of my Ph.D. research on criminal genius, I conducted 44 semi-structured interviews. One of the 44 subjects, in particular, stood out. This noteworthy individual claimed that he had killed 15 people. His story was particularly interesting because--unlike most social research involving serial killers--he claimed that he had never been…

  17. "The Killer Angels": A Case Study of Historical Fiction in the Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilof, Edwin G.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary instructional unit using the historical novel "The Killer Angels" to teach about the Civil War. Writing assignments focused on character analysis from the novel bolstered by outside historical research. Student response was overwhelmingly positive. Includes suggested guidelines for developing an interdisciplinary…

  18. Information Literacy, Collaboration, and "Killer Apps": New Challenges for Media Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georges, Fitzgerald

    2004-01-01

    Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. Some of the few strategies that could be adopted for instilling the school's information literacy programming with killer applications such as Public…

  19. Conceptual Change and Killer Whales: Constructing Ecological Values for Animals at the Vancouver Aquarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Elin

    1991-01-01

    Examines how the aquarium has attempted to move from a transfer view of knowledge to a constructivist approach in its most popular general public program--the killer whale presentation. The process of change that staff underwent is similar to conceptual change processes among learners of science. Describes constructivist strategies of conceptual…

  20. JEFX 10 demonstration of Cooperative Hunter Killer UAS and upstream data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Brian K.; Castelli, Jonathan C.; Watkins, Adam S.; McCubbin, Christopher B.; Marshall, Steven J.; Barton, Jeffrey D.; Newman, Andrew J.; Peterson, Cammy K.; DeSena, Jonathan T.; Dutrow, Daniel A.; Rodriguez, Pedro A.

    2011-05-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory deployed and demonstrated a prototype Cooperative Hunter Killer (CHK) Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) capability and a prototype Upstream Data Fusion (UDF) capability as participants in the Joint Expeditionary Force Experiment 2010 in April 2010. The CHK capability was deployed at the Nevada Test and Training Range to prosecute a convoy protection operational thread. It used mission-level autonomy (MLA) software applied to a networked swarm of three Raven hunter UAS and a Procerus Miracle surrogate killer UAS, all equipped with full motion video (FMV). The MLA software provides the capability for the hunter-killer swarm to autonomously search an area or road network, divide the search area, deconflict flight paths, and maintain line of sight communications with mobile ground stations. It also provides an interface for an operator to designate a threat and initiate automatic engagement of the target by the killer UAS. The UDF prototype was deployed at the Maritime Operations Center at Commander Second Fleet, Naval Station Norfolk to provide intelligence analysts and the ISR commander with a common fused track picture from the available FMV sources. It consisted of a video exploitation component that automatically detected moving objects, a multiple hypothesis tracker that fused all of the detection data to produce a common track picture, and a display and user interface component that visualized the common track picture along with appropriate geospatial information such as maps and terrain as well as target coordinates and the source video.

  1. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES MURINE CELL-MEDIATED CYTOTOXICITY: EFFECTS ON NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of mice given a single injection of manganese chloride (MnCl2) was significantly enhanced as measured in a 4-hr in vitro 51Cr release assay. Enhanced activity persisted for several days after injection. This cytotoxic activity was associated with...

  2. Promoting natural killer cell functions by recombinant immunoligands mimicking an induced self phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Christian; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Immunoligands for stimulatory natural killer (NK)-cell receptors can be targeted to the surface of malignant cells by fusing them to antibody fragments. Mimicking an “induced-self” phenotype, such recombinant immunoligands signal danger, trigger NK-cell cytotoxicity and synergistically enhance antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. These findings may be translated into novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:23894708

  3. A stay of execution: type I interferons pardon T cells from death by natural killers.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Shannon M; Zajac, Allan J

    2014-06-19

    In this issue of Immunity, Crouse et al., (2014) and Xu et al., (2014), show that by modulating the expression of natural killer (NK) cell receptor ligands, type I interferons protect responding T cells against culling by NK cells. PMID:24950208

  4. Acute leukaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Timonen, T T; Palva, I P

    1980-01-01

    Acute leukaemia is known to develop in many cases of benzene-induced pancytopenia [1]. This is a report of the development of acute leukaemia in a patient who had apparently recovered from pancytopenia after chronic exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid. PMID:6769284

  5. Genes encoding putative natural killer cell C-type lectin receptors in teleostean fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akie; Mayer, Werner E.; Overath, Peter; Klein, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that express receptors specific for MHC class I molecules. The NK cell receptors belong to two structurally unrelated families, the killer cell Ig-like receptors and the killer cell C-type lectin receptors. We describe a cDNA clone derived from the bony (cichlid) fish Paralabidochromis chilotes and show that it encodes a protein related to the CD94/NK cell group 2 (NKG2) subfamily of the killer cell C-type lectin receptors. The gene encoding this receptor in a related species, Oreochromis niloticus, has a similar structure to the human CD94/NKG2 genes and is a member of a multigene cluster that resembles the mammalian NK cell gene complex. Thus, the CD94/NKG2 subfamily of NK cell receptors must have arisen before the divergence of fish and tetrapods and may have retained its function (possibly monitoring the expression of MHC class I molecules) for >400 million years. PMID:12802013

  6. Microsatellite loci discovery from next-generation sequencing data and loci characterization in the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    Zardus, John D.; Wares, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite markers remain an important tool for ecological and evolutionary research, but are unavailable for many non-model organisms. One such organism with rare ecological and evolutionary features is the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758). Chelonibia testudinaria appears to be a host generalist, and has an unusual sexual system, androdioecy. Genetic studies on host specificity and mating behavior are impeded by the lack of fine-scale, highly variable markers, such as microsatellite markers. In the present study, we discovered thousands of new microsatellite loci from next-generation sequencing data, and characterized 12 loci thoroughly. We conclude that 11 of these loci will be useful markers in future ecological and evolutionary studies on C. testudinaria. PMID:27231653

  7. Isolation and characterization of eight novel microsatellite loci in the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Dacey; Haig, Susan; Mullins, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). Genetic variability was assessed using 60 individuals from three populations. All loci were variable with the number of alleles ranging from two to 17 per locus, and observed heterozygosity varying from 0.05 to 0.89. No loci showed signs of linkage disequilibrium and all loci conformed to Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium frequencies. Further, all loci amplified and were polymorphic in two related Phalacrocorax species. These loci should prove useful for population genetic studies of the double-crested cormorant and other pelecaniform species.

  8. Vocalisations of Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in the Bremer Canyon, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Wellard, Rebecca; Erbe, Christine; Fouda, Leila; Blewitt, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    To date, there has been no dedicated study in Australian waters on the acoustics of killer whales. Hence no information has been published on the sounds produced by killer whales from this region. Here we present the first acoustical analysis of recordings collected off the Western Australian coast. Underwater sounds produced by Australian killer whales were recorded during the months of February and March 2014 and 2015 in the Bremer Canyon in Western Australia. Vocalisations recorded included echolocation clicks, burst-pulse sounds and whistles. A total of 28 hours and 29 minutes were recorded and analysed, with 2376 killer whale calls (whistles and burst-pulse sounds) detected. Recordings of poor quality or signal-to-noise ratio were excluded from analysis, resulting in 142 whistles and burst-pulse vocalisations suitable for analysis and categorisation. These were grouped based on their spectrographic features into nine Bremer Canyon (BC) "call types". The frequency of the fundamental contours of all call types ranged from 600 Hz to 29 kHz. Calls ranged from 0.05 to 11.3 seconds in duration. Biosonar clicks were also recorded, but not studied further. Surface behaviours noted during acoustic recordings were categorised as either travelling or social behaviour. A detailed description of the acoustic characteristics is necessary for species acoustic identification and for the development of passive acoustic tools for population monitoring, including assessments of population status, habitat usage, migration patterns, behaviour and acoustic ecology. This study provides the first quantitative assessment and report on the acoustic features of killer whales vocalisations in Australian waters, and presents an opportunity to further investigate this little-known population. PMID:26352429

  9. Vocalisations of Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in the Bremer Canyon, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Rebecca; Erbe, Christine; Fouda, Leila; Blewitt, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    To date, there has been no dedicated study in Australian waters on the acoustics of killer whales. Hence no information has been published on the sounds produced by killer whales from this region. Here we present the first acoustical analysis of recordings collected off the Western Australian coast. Underwater sounds produced by Australian killer whales were recorded during the months of February and March 2014 and 2015 in the Bremer Canyon in Western Australia. Vocalisations recorded included echolocation clicks, burst-pulse sounds and whistles. A total of 28 hours and 29 minutes were recorded and analysed, with 2376 killer whale calls (whistles and burst-pulse sounds) detected. Recordings of poor quality or signal-to-noise ratio were excluded from analysis, resulting in 142 whistles and burst-pulse vocalisations suitable for analysis and categorisation. These were grouped based on their spectrographic features into nine Bremer Canyon (BC) “call types”. The frequency of the fundamental contours of all call types ranged from 600 Hz to 29 kHz. Calls ranged from 0.05 to 11.3 seconds in duration. Biosonar clicks were also recorded, but not studied further. Surface behaviours noted during acoustic recordings were categorised as either travelling or social behaviour. A detailed description of the acoustic characteristics is necessary for species acoustic identification and for the development of passive acoustic tools for population monitoring, including assessments of population status, habitat usage, migration patterns, behaviour and acoustic ecology. This study provides the first quantitative assessment and report on the acoustic features of killer whales vocalisations in Australian waters, and presents an opportunity to further investigate this little-known population. PMID:26352429

  10. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, Giovanni F.; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S.; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL+ blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL+ blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL+, are worth pursuing further. PMID:24658822

  11. Homothetic Transformations and Geometric Loci: Properties of Triangles and Quadrilaterals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammana, Maria Flavia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we use geometric transformations to find some interesting properties related with geometric loci. In particular, given a triangle or a cyclic quadrilateral, the locus generated by the centroid or by the orthocentre (for triangles) or by the anticentre (for cyclic quadrilaterals) when one vertex moves on the circumcircle of the…

  12. Evolutionary genomics of immunoglobulin-encoding Loci in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; Tako, Rea; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2012-04-01

    Immunoglobulins (or antibodies) are an essential element of the jawed vertebrate adaptive immune response system. These molecules have evolved over the past 500 million years and generated highly specialized proteins that recognize an extraordinarily large number of diverse substances, collectively known as antigens. During vertebrate evolution the diversification of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci resulted in differences in the genomic organization, gene content, and ratio of functional genes and pseudogenes. The tinkering process in the immunoglobulin-encoding loci often gave rise to lineage-specific characteristics that were formed by selection to increase species adaptation and fitness. Immunoglobulin loci and their encoded antibodies have been shaped repeatedly by contrasting evolutionary forces, either to conserve the prototypic structure and mechanism of action or to generate alternative and diversified structures and modes of function. Moreover, evolution favored the development of multiple mechanisms of primary and secondary antibody diversification, which are used by different species to effectively generate an almost infinite collection of diverse antibody types. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the genomics and evolution of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci and their protein products in jawed vertebrates. PMID:23024601

  13. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Rice Blast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring resistance to rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, have been under-explored. In the present study, composite interval mapping was used to identify the QTLs that condition resistance to the six out of the twelve common races IB1, IB45, IB49, IB54, IC17,...

  14. Testing independence of fragment lengths within VNTR loci

    SciTech Connect

    Geisser, S. ); Johnson, W. )

    1993-11-01

    Methods that were devised to test independence of the bivariate fragment lengths obtained from VNTR loci are applied to several population databases. It is shown that for many of the probes independence (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium) cannot be sustained. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. The IQ Quantitative Trait Loci Project: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David

    1998-01-01

    Describes the IQ Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) project, an attempt to identify genes underlying IQ score variations using maps from the Human Genome Project. The essay argues against funding the IQ QTL project because it will end the debates about the genetic basis of intelligence and may lead directly to eugenic programs of genetic testing. (SLD)

  16. Microsatellite loci for the invasive colonial hydrozoan Cordylophora caspia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cordylophora caspia, a colonial hydrozoan native to the Ponto-Caspian region, has become a common invader of both fresh and brackish water ecosystems of North America and Europe. Here we describe 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci for this species. Preliminary analyses indicate ...

  17. Seven new loci associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Chen, Wei; Schu, Matthew; Yaspan, Brian L; Yu, Yi; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zack, Donald J; Arakawa, Satoshi; Cipriani, Valentina; Ripke, Stephan; Igo, Robert P; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Sim, Xueling; Weeks, Daniel E; Guymer, Robyn H; Merriam, Joanna E; Francis, Peter J; Hannum, Gregory; Agarwal, Anita; Armbrecht, Ana Maria; Audo, Isabelle; Aung, Tin; Barile, Gaetano R; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Bird, Alan C; Bishop, Paul N; Branham, Kari E; Brooks, Matthew; Brucker, Alexander J; Cade, William H; Cain, Melinda S; Campochiaro, Peter A; Chan, Chi-Chao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Emily Y; Chin, Kimberly A; Chowers, Itay; Clayton, David G; Cojocaru, Radu; Conley, Yvette P; Cornes, Belinda K; Daly, Mark J; Dhillon, Baljean; Edwards, Albert O; Evangelou, Evangelos; Fagerness, Jesen; Ferreyra, Henry A; Friedman, James S; Geirsdottir, Asbjorg; George, Ronnie J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Neel; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Harding, Simon P; Haritoglou, Christos; Heckenlively, John R; Holz, Frank G; Hughes, Guy; Ioannidis, John P A; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Joseph, Peronne; Jun, Gyungah; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Katsanis, Nicholas; N Keilhauer, Claudia; Khan, Jane C; Kim, Ivana K; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Kozak, Igor; Lee, Clara J; Lee, Kristine E; Lichtner, Peter; Lotery, Andrew J; Meitinger, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Moore, Anthony T; Morgan, Denise J; Morrison, Margaux A; Myers, Chelsea E; Naj, Adam C; Nakamura, Yusuke; Okada, Yukinori; Orlin, Anton; Ortube, M Carolina; Othman, Mohammad I; Pappas, Chris; Park, Kyu Hyung; Pauer, Gayle J T; Peachey, Neal S; Poch, Olivier; Priya, Rinki Ratna; Reynolds, Robyn; Richardson, Andrea J; Ripp, Raymond; Rudolph, Guenther; Ryu, Euijung; Sahel, José-Alain; Schaumberg, Debra A; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Schwartz, Stephen G; Scott, William K; Shahid, Humma; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Silvestri, Giuliana; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Smith, R Theodore; Sobrin, Lucia; Souied, Eric H; Stambolian, Dwight E; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sturgill-Short, Gwen M; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Truitt, Barbara J; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vijaya, Lingam; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vithana, Eranga N; Webster, Andrew R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Winkler, Thomas W; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Alan F; Zelenika, Diana; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Kang; Klein, Michael L; Hageman, Gregory S; Lathrop, G Mark; Stefansson, Kari; Allikmets, Rando; Baird, Paul N; Gorin, Michael B; Wang, Jie Jin; Klaver, Caroline C W; Seddon, Johanna M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Iyengar, Sudha K; Yates, John R W; Swaroop, Anand; Weber, Bernhard H F; Kubo, Michiaki; Deangelis, Margaret M; Léveillard, Thierry; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Heid, Iris M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10(-8). These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10(-8) for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  18. Chromosomal localization of microsatellite loci in Drosophila mediopunctata.

    PubMed

    Cavasini, Renato; Batista, Marcos Roberto Dias; Klaczko, Louis Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Drosophila mediopunctata has been used as a model organism for genetics and evolutionary studies in the last three decades. A linkage map with 48 microsatellite loci recently published for this species showed five syntenic groups, which had their homology determined to Drosophila melanogaster chromosomes. Then, by inference, each of the groups was associated with one of the five major chromosomes of D. mediopunctata. Our objective was to carry out a genetic (chromosomal) analysis to increase the number of available loci with known chromosomal location. We made a simultaneous analysis of visible mutant phenotypes and microsatellite genotypes in a backcross of a standard strain and a mutant strain, which had each major autosome marked. Hence, we could establish the chromosomal location of seventeen loci; including one from each of the five major linkage groups previously published, and twelve new loci. Our results were congruent with the previous location and they open new possibilities to future work integrating microsatellites, chromosomal inversions, and genetic determinants of physiological and morphological variation. PMID:25983625

  19. Relatedness calculations for linked loci incorporating subpopulation effects.

    PubMed

    Bright, Jo-Anne; Curran, James M; Buckleton, John S

    2013-05-01

    Often the loci in forensic multiplexes are selected to avoid linked loci. However linked loci have occurred in some recent commercially available multiplexes. Previously formulae have been given for both joint and conditional match probabilities for some relationships that did not account for subpopulation effects. In this paper we extend these works to include a subpopulation correction of the form first suggested by Balding and Nichols. We extend the work to grandparent/grandchild, first cousin, uncle/nephew and half uncle/nephew relationships and apply these to two different populations and STR multiplexes. Our model assumes that the two people have no relationship other that the one specified. That is, we assume their parents are neither related nor themselves inbred. The multiplications inherent in these formulae also assume that there is no linkage disequilibrium at the subpopulation level for these loci. We found that when taking into account linkage the match statistic decreases for all relationships, with siblings having the greatest effect. However, the effect was less than a factor of two decrease in match statistic. PMID:23537755

  20. Educational Software for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, T. C.; Doetkott, C.

    2007-01-01

    This educational software was developed to aid teachers and students in their understanding of how the process of identifying the most likely quantitative trait loci (QTL) position is determined between two flanking DNA markers. The objective of the software that we developed was to: (1) show how a QTL is mapped to a position on a chromosome using…

  1. Molecularly tagged genes and quantitative trait loci in cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the release of the cucumber draft genome, significant progress has been made in molecular mapping, tagging or cloning of horticulturally important genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in cucumber, which provides the foundation for practicing marker-assisted selection in cucumber breeding. ...

  2. Novel loci and pathways significantly associated with longevity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Nie, Chao; Min, Junxia; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Mengmeng; Chen, Huashuai; Xu, Hanshi; Wang, Mingbang; Ni, Ting; Li, Yang; Yan, Han; Zhang, Jin-Pei; Song, Chun; Chi, Li-Qing; Wang, Han-Ming; Dong, Jie; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Lin, Li; Qian, Feng; Qi, Yanwei; Liu, Xiao; Cao, Hongzhi; Wang, Yinghao; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Zhaochun; Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Yan; Lu, Jiehua; Li, Jianxin; Qi, Ming; Bolund, Lars; Yashin, Anatoliy; Land, Kenneth C; Gregory, Simon; Yang, Ze; Gottschalk, William; Tao, Wei; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xun; Bae, Harold; Nygaard, Marianne; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Franceschi, Claudio; Lutz, Michael W; Gu, Jun; Tan, Qihua; Perls, Thomas; Sebastiani, Paola; Deelen, Joris; Slagboom, Eline; Hauser, Elizabeth; Xu, Huji; Tian, Xiao-Li; Yang, Huanming; Vaupel, James W

    2016-01-01

    Only two genome-wide significant loci associated with longevity have been identified so far, probably because of insufficient sample sizes of centenarians, whose genomes may harbor genetic variants associated with health and longevity. Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Han Chinese with a sample size 2.7 times the largest previously published GWAS on centenarians. We identified 11 independent loci associated with longevity replicated in Southern-Northern regions of China, including two novel loci (rs2069837-IL6; rs2440012-ANKRD20A9P) with genome-wide significance and the rest with suggestive significance (P < 3.65 × 10(-5)). Eight independent SNPs overlapped across Han Chinese, European and U.S. populations, and APOE and 5q33.3 were replicated as longevity loci. Integrated analysis indicates four pathways (starch, sucrose and xenobiotic metabolism; immune response and inflammation; MAPK; calcium signaling) highly associated with longevity (P ≤ 0.006) in Han Chinese. The association with longevity of three of these four pathways (MAPK; immunity; calcium signaling) is supported by findings in other human cohorts. Our novel finding on the association of starch, sucrose and xenobiotic metabolism pathway with longevity is consistent with the previous results from Drosophilia. This study suggests protective mechanisms including immunity and nutrient metabolism and their interactions with environmental stress play key roles in human longevity. PMID:26912274

  3. Novel loci and pathways significantly associated with longevity

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yi; Nie, Chao; Min, Junxia; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Mengmeng; Chen, Huashuai; Xu, Hanshi; Wang, Mingbang; Ni, Ting; Li, Yang; Yan, Han; Zhang, Jin-Pei; Song, Chun; Chi, Li-Qing; Wang, Han-Ming; Dong, Jie; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Lin, Li; Qian, Feng; Qi, Yanwei; Liu, Xiao; Cao, Hongzhi; Wang, Yinghao; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Zhaochun; Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Yan; Lu, Jiehua; Li, Jianxin; Qi, Ming; Bolund, Lars; Yashin, Anatoliy; Land, Kenneth C.; Gregory, Simon; Yang, Ze; Gottschalk, William; Tao, Wei; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xun; Bae, Harold; Nygaard, Marianne; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Franceschi, Claudio; Lutz, Michael W.; Gu, Jun; Tan, Qihua; Perls, Thomas; Sebastiani, Paola; Deelen, Joris; Slagboom, Eline; Hauser, Elizabeth; Xu, Huji; Tian, Xiao-Li; Yang, Huanming; Vaupel, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Only two genome-wide significant loci associated with longevity have been identified so far, probably because of insufficient sample sizes of centenarians, whose genomes may harbor genetic variants associated with health and longevity. Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Han Chinese with a sample size 2.7 times the largest previously published GWAS on centenarians. We identified 11 independent loci associated with longevity replicated in Southern-Northern regions of China, including two novel loci (rs2069837-IL6; rs2440012-ANKRD20A9P) with genome-wide significance and the rest with suggestive significance (P < 3.65 × 10−5). Eight independent SNPs overlapped across Han Chinese, European and U.S. populations, and APOE and 5q33.3 were replicated as longevity loci. Integrated analysis indicates four pathways (starch, sucrose and xenobiotic metabolism; immune response and inflammation; MAPK; calcium signaling) highly associated with longevity (P ≤ 0.006) in Han Chinese. The association with longevity of three of these four pathways (MAPK; immunity; calcium signaling) is supported by findings in other human cohorts. Our novel finding on the association of starch, sucrose and xenobiotic metabolism pathway with longevity is consistent with the previous results from Drosophilia. This study suggests protective mechanisms including immunity and nutrient metabolism and their interactions with environmental stress play key roles in human longevity. PMID:26912274

  4. Does the evolutionary conservation of microsatellite loci imply function?

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, M.D.; Deka, R.; Ferrell, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic tandem arrays of short (1-6 bp) sequence motifs which have been found widely distributed in the genomes of all eukaryotes. We have analyzed allele frequency data on 16 microsatellite loci typed in the great apes (human, chimp, orangutan, and gorilla). The majority of these loci (13) were isolated from human genomic libraries; three were cloned from chimpanzee genomic DNA. Most of these loci are not only present in all apes species, but are polymorphic with comparable levels of heterozygosity and have alleles which overlap in size. The extent of divergence of allele frequencies among these four species were studies using the stepwise-weighted genetic distance (Dsw), which was previously shown to conform to linearity with evolutionary time since divergence for loci where mutations exist in a stepwise fashion. The phylogenetic tree of the great apes constructed from this distance matrix was consistent with the expected topology, with a high bootstrap confidence (82%) for the human/chimp clade. However, the allele frequency distributions of these species are 10 times more similar to each other than expected when they were calibrated with a conservative estimate of the time since separation of humans and the apes. These results are in agreement with sequence-based surveys of microsatellites which have demonstrated that they are highly (90%) conserved over short periods of evolutionary time (< 10 million years) and moderately (30%) conserved over long periods of evolutionary time (> 60-80 million years). This evolutionary conservation has prompted some authors to speculate that there are functional constraints on microsatellite loci. In contrast, the presence of directional bias of mutations with constraints and/or selection against aberrant sized alleles can explain these results.

  5. Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Profiles Are not Associated with Risk of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate-Induced Liver Injury in Spanish Patients.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Camilla; Moreno-Casares, Antonia; López-Nevot, Miguel-Ángel; García-Cortés, Miren; Medina-Cáliz, Inmaculada; Hallal, Hacibe; Soriano, German; Roman, Eva; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Romero-Gomez, Manuel; Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are an integral part of the immune system and represent a large proportion of the lymphocyte population in the liver. The activity of these cells is regulated by various cell surface receptors, such as killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands on the target cell. The composition of KIR receptors has been suggested to influence the development of specific diseases, in particularly autoimmune diseases, cancer and reproductive diseases. The role played in idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is currently unknown. In this study, we examined KIR gene profiles and HLA class I polymorphisms in amoxicillin-clavulanate (AC) DILI patients in search for potential risk associations. One hundred and two AC DILI patients and 226 controls were genotyped for the presence or absence of 16 KIR loci, including the two pseudogenes 2DP1 and 3DP1. No significant differences were found in the distribution of individual KIRs between patients and controls, which were comparable to previously reported KIR data from ethnically similar cohorts. The 21.6 and 21.2% of the patients and controls, respectively, were homozygous haplotype A carriers, while 78.4 and 78.8%, respectively, contained at least one B haplotype (Bx). The genotypes translated into 27 (AC DILI) and 46 (controls) different gene profiles, with 19 being present in both groups. The most frequent Bx gene profile containing KIRs 2DS2, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DP1, 2DL1, 3DL1, 2DS4, 3DL2, 3DL3, 2DL4, and 3PD1 was present in 16% of the DILI patients and 14% of the controls. The distribution of HLA class I epitopes did not differ significantly between AC DILI patients and controls. The most frequent receptor-ligand combinations in the DILI patients were 2DL3 + epitope C1 (67%) and 3DL1 + Bw4 motif (67%), while 2DL1 + epitope C2 (69%) and 3DL1 + Bw4 motif (69%) predominated in the controls. This is to our knowledge the first analysis of KIR receptor-HLA ligand

  6. Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Profiles Are not Associated with Risk of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate–Induced Liver Injury in Spanish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Camilla; Moreno-Casares, Antonia; López-Nevot, Miguel-Ángel; García-Cortés, Miren; Medina-Cáliz, Inmaculada; Hallal, Hacibe; Soriano, German; Roman, Eva; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Romero-Gomez, Manuel; Lucena, M. Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are an integral part of the immune system and represent a large proportion of the lymphocyte population in the liver. The activity of these cells is regulated by various cell surface receptors, such as killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands on the target cell. The composition of KIR receptors has been suggested to influence the development of specific diseases, in particularly autoimmune diseases, cancer and reproductive diseases. The role played in idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is currently unknown. In this study, we examined KIR gene profiles and HLA class I polymorphisms in amoxicillin-clavulanate (AC) DILI patients in search for potential risk associations. One hundred and two AC DILI patients and 226 controls were genotyped for the presence or absence of 16 KIR loci, including the two pseudogenes 2DP1 and 3DP1. No significant differences were found in the distribution of individual KIRs between patients and controls, which were comparable to previously reported KIR data from ethnically similar cohorts. The 21.6 and 21.2% of the patients and controls, respectively, were homozygous haplotype A carriers, while 78.4 and 78.8%, respectively, contained at least one B haplotype (Bx). The genotypes translated into 27 (AC DILI) and 46 (controls) different gene profiles, with 19 being present in both groups. The most frequent Bx gene profile containing KIRs 2DS2, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DP1, 2DL1, 3DL1, 2DS4, 3DL2, 3DL3, 2DL4, and 3PD1 was present in 16% of the DILI patients and 14% of the controls. The distribution of HLA class I epitopes did not differ significantly between AC DILI patients and controls. The most frequent receptor-ligand combinations in the DILI patients were 2DL3 + epitope C1 (67%) and 3DL1 + Bw4 motif (67%), while 2DL1 + epitope C2 (69%) and 3DL1 + Bw4 motif (69%) predominated in the controls. This is to our knowledge the first analysis of KIR receptor-HLA ligand

  7. Food Web Bioaccumulation Model for Resident Killer Whales from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean as a Tool for the Derivation of PBDE-Sediment Quality Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Alava, Juan José; Ross, Peter S; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2016-01-01

    Resident killer whale populations in the NE Pacific Ocean are at risk due to the accumulation of pollutants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). To assess the impact of PBDEs in water and sediments in killer whale critical habitat, we developed a food web bioaccumulation model. The model was designed to estimate PBDE concentrations in killer whales based on PBDE concentrations in sediments and the water column throughout a lifetime of exposure. Calculated and observed PBDE concentrations exceeded the only toxicity reference value available for PBDEs in marine mammals (1500 μg/kg lipid) in southern resident killer whales but not in northern resident killer whales. Temporal trends (1993-2006) for PBDEs observed in southern resident killer whales showed a doubling time of ≈5 years. If current sediment quality guidelines available in Canada for polychlorinated biphenyls are applied to PBDEs, it can be expected that PBDE concentrations in killer whales will exceed available toxicity reference values by a large margin. Model calculations suggest that a PBDE concentration in sediments of approximately 1.0 μg/kg dw produces PBDE concentrations in resident killer whales that are below the current toxicity reference value for 95 % of the population, with this value serving as a precautionary benchmark for a management-based approach to reducing PBDE health risks to killer whales. The food web bioaccumulation model may be a useful risk management tool in support of regulatory protection for killer whales. PMID:26289814

  8. [Genetic linkage of blood group, egg and serum protein and plumage color loci in chickens].

    PubMed

    Gintovt, V E; Novik, I E; Moiseeva, I G; Tolokoniikova, E V

    1976-01-01

    Genetic relationship of six blood group (A, B, C, D, E, x5), three egg (G2, G3, Ov) and one serum (Alb) protein loci and two plumage colour (I-dominant white, E-extended black) loci were investigated. 3250 gametes have been analysed for 21 loci combinations, 11 from them have never been studied on linkage. Blood group loci A, B, C, D, E, x5 segregated independently on egg protein loci G2, G3, and Ov, serum protein locus Alb and plumage colour locus E. No linkage was observed between blood group locus B and dominant white locus I. Close linkage for two egg protein loci G3 and Ov is confirmed. Independent segregation of investigated blood group, egg and serum protein loci suggests their localization on different autosomes in the chicken genome. The recent literature and the authors' data on genetic relationship between blood group, polymorphic protein loci and morphological traits are reviewed. PMID:1010323

  9. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake (Micrurus fulvius) and variability of select loci across populations and related species

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, Todd A.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Meik, Jesse M.; Ingrasci, Matthew J.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A.P. Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A.; Parkinson, Christopher L.; Smith, Eric N.; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in non-model organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (~7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). PMID:22938699

  10. A study of the psychosexual characteristics of sex killers: can we identify them before it is too late?

    PubMed

    Langevin, Ron

    2003-08-01

    Thirty-three sex killers were compared to 80 sexual aggressives, 23 sadists, and 611 general sex offenders on sexual history and preferences, substance abuse crime, violence, mental illness, personality, neurological and endocrine abnormalities. Compared to other groups, sex killers started their criminal careers earlier, more often had been to reform school, were members of criminal gangs, set fires, and were cruel to animals. They tended so show more sadism, fetishism, and voyeurism. They more often collected pornography, but they did not use it in their offenses. They more often abused drugs and some suffered from drug induced psychoses. Their most common diagnosis was antisocial personality disorder, but only 15.2% met criteria for psychopathy. Sex killers showed most signs of neuropsychological impairment, grades failure, and learning disabilities. Results suggest that greater emphasis be placed on studying adolescent sex offenders and conduct disordered children which may help identify potential sex killers. PMID:12971179

  11. Loss-of-function mutations in a glutathione S-transferase suppress the prune-Killer of prune lethal interaction.

    PubMed

    Provost, Elayne; Hersperger, Grafton; Timmons, Lisa; Ho, Wen Qi; Hersperger, Evelyn; Alcazar, Rosa; Shearn, Allen

    2006-01-01

    The prune gene of Drosophila melanogaster is predicted to encode a phosphodiesterase. Null alleles of prune are viable but cause an eye-color phenotype. The abnormal wing discs gene encodes a nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Killer of prune is a missense mutation in the abnormal wing discs gene. Although it has no phenotype by itself even when homozygous, Killer of prune when heterozygous causes lethality in the absence of prune gene function. A screen for suppressors of transgenic Killer of prune led to the recovery of three mutations, all of which are in the same gene. As heterozygotes these mutations are dominant suppressors of the prune-Killer of prune lethal interaction; as homozygotes these mutations cause early larval lethality and the absence of imaginal discs. These alleles are loss-of-function mutations in CG10065, a gene that is predicted to encode a protein with several zinc finger domains and glutathione S-transferase activity. PMID:16143620

  12. PCR primers for microsatellite loci in the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii, Testudinidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, T.; Goldberg, C.S.; Kaplan, M.E.; Schwalbe, C.R.; Swann, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    The desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii, is a threatened species native to the North American desert southwest and is recognized as having distinct Mojave and Sonoran populations. We identified six polymorphic microsatellite loci in the desert tortoise. All six loci were polymorphic in Sonoran samples. Five of the loci were variable in Mojave samples with varying degrees of amplification success. Two of the loci exhibited low allelic variation (2-3 alleles) while four were highly variable (8-27 alleles).

  13. Individual killer whale vocal variation during intra-group behavioral dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebner, Dawn M.

    The scientific goal of this dissertation was to carefully study the signal structure of killer whale communications and vocal complexity and link them to behavioral circumstances. The overall objective of this research sought to provide insight into killer whale call content and usage which may be conveying information to conspecifics in order to maintain group cohesion. Data were collected in the summers of 2006 and 2007 in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia. For both individuals and small groups, vocalizations were isolated using a triangular hydrophone array and the behavioral movement patterns were captured by a theodolite and video camera positioned on a cliff overlooking the hyrophone locations. This dissertation is divided into four analysis chapters. In Chapter 3, discriminant analysis was used to validate the four N04 call subtypes which were originally parsed due to variations in slope segments. The first two functions of the discriminant analysis explained 97% of the variability. Most of the variability for the N04 call was found in the front convex and the terminal portions of the call, while very little variability was found in the center region of the call. This research revealed that individual killer whales produced multiple subtypes of the N04 call. No correlations of behaviors to acoustic parameters obtained were found. The aim of the Chapter 4 was to determine if killer whale calling behavior varied prior to and after the animals had joined. Pulsed call rates were found to be greater pre- compared to post-joining events. Two-way vocal exchanges were more common occurring 74% of the time during pre-joining events. In Chapter 5, initiated and first response to calls varied between age/sex class groups when mothers were separated from an offspring. Solo mothers and calves initiated pulsed calls more often than they responded. Most of the no vocal responses were due to mothers who were foraging. Finally, observations of the frequency split in N04

  14. Natural killer cell killing of acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor-negative natural killer cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; McGlave, Philip B; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2010-05-01

    Although the study of natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53% +/- 13% and 36% +/- 18% of normal NK cells, respectively, play roles in the NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR(-) cells, which compose nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibit tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia targets were rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR(-) NK cells when inhibitory receptor-major histocompatibility class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies, demonstrating that these cells are functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slightly increased killing, whereas combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR(-) NK cells, demonstrating that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR(-) NK cells is mediated by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemias. PMID:20139023

  15. Prey items and predation behavior of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in Nunavut, Canada based on Inuit hunter interviews

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are the most widely distributed cetacean, occurring in all oceans worldwide, and within ocean regions different ecotypes are defined based on prey preferences. Prey items are largely unknown in the eastern Canadian Arctic and therefore we conducted a survey of Inuit Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) to provide information on the feeding ecology of killer whales. We compiled Inuit observations on killer whales and their prey items via 105 semi-directed interviews conducted in 11 eastern Nunavut communities (Kivalliq and Qikiqtaaluk regions) from 2007-2010. Results Results detail local knowledge of killer whale prey items, hunting behaviour, prey responses, distribution of predation events, and prey capture techniques. Inuit TEK and published literature agree that killer whales at times eat only certain parts of prey, particularly of large whales, that attacks on large whales entail relatively small groups of killer whales, and that they hunt cooperatively. Inuit observations suggest that there is little prey specialization beyond marine mammals and there are no definitive observations of fish in the diet. Inuit hunters and elders also documented the use of sea ice and shallow water as prey refugia. Conclusions By combining TEK and scientific approaches we provide a more holistic view of killer whale predation in the eastern Canadian Arctic relevant to management and policy. Continuing the long-term relationship between scientists and hunters will provide for successful knowledge integration and has resulted in considerable improvement in understanding of killer whale ecology relevant to management of prey species. Combining scientists and Inuit knowledge will assist in northerners adapting to the restructuring of the Arctic marine ecosystem associated with warming and loss of sea ice. PMID:22520955

  16. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten novel microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from the soybean aphid, APHIS GLYCINES, a serious invasive pest of soybeans in North America. The isolated loci were polymorphic, with two to 19 alleles in 48 wild individuals collected from Korea, Japan, and the United States. All loci ...

  17. Development of microsatellite loci for the endangered species Pityopsis ruthii (Asteraceae)1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the endangered species Pityopsis ruthii and will permit genetic and conservation studies of the species. Methods and Results:A microsatellite enriched library was used to develop 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for P. ruthii. The loci ...

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite Loci for Cornus sanguniea (Cornaceae) 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for Cornus sanguinea and will permit genetic and conservation studies of the species. Methods and Results: A microsatellite-enriched library was used to develop 16 polymorphic microsatellite loci for C. sanguinea. The loci amplified 5-11 allel...

  19. New Sporulation Loci in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Ryding, N. Jamie; Bibb, Maureen J.; Molle, Virginie; Findlay, Kim C.; Chater, Keith F.; Buttner, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Sporulation mutants of Streptomyces coelicolor appear white because they are defective in the synthesis of the grey polyketide spore pigment, and such white (whi) mutants had been used to define eight sporulation loci, whiA, whiB, whiD, whiE, whiG, whiH, whiI, and whiJ (K. F. Chater, J. Gen. Microbiol. 72:9–28, 1972; N. J. Ryding, Ph.D. thesis, University of East Anglia, 1995). In an attempt to identify new whi loci, we mutagenized S. coelicolor M145 spores with nitrosoguanidine and identified 770 mutants with colonies ranging from white to medium grey. After excluding unstable strains, we examined the isolates by phase-contrast microscopy and chose 115 whi mutants with clear morphological phenotypes for further study. To exclude mutants representing cloned whi genes, self-transmissible SCP2*-derived plasmids carrying whiA, whiB, whiG, whiH, or whiJ (but not whiD, whiE, or whiI) were introduced into each mutant by conjugation, and strains in which the wild-type phenotype was restored either partially or completely by any of these plasmids were excluded from further analysis. In an attempt to complement some of the remaining 31 whi mutants, an SCP2* library of wild-type S. coelicolor chromosomal DNA was introduced into 19 of the mutants by conjugation. Clones restoring the wild-type phenotype to 12 of the 19 strains were isolated and found to represent five distinct loci, designated whiK, whiL, whiM, whiN, and whiO. Each of the five loci was located on the ordered cosmid library: whiL, whiM, whiN, and whiO occupied positions distinct from previously cloned whi genes; whiK was located on the same cosmid overlap as whiD, but the two loci were shown by complementation to be distinct. The phenotypes resulting from mutations at each of these new loci are described. PMID:10464216

  20. Use of chemical tracers in assessing the diet and foraging regions of eastern North Pacific killer whales.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Margaret M; Herman, David P; Matkin, Craig O; Durban, John W; Barrett-Lennard, Lance; Burrows, Douglas G; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Black, Nancy; LeDuc, Richard G; Wade, Paul R

    2007-03-01

    Top predators in the marine environment integrate chemical signals acquired from their prey that reflect both the species consumed and the regions from which the prey were taken. These chemical tracers-stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen; persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations, patterns and ratios; and fatty acid profiles-were measured in blubber biopsy samples from North Pacific killer whales (Orcinus orca) (n=84) and were used to provide further insight into their diet, particularly for the offshore group, about which little dietary information is available. The offshore killer whales were shown to consume prey species that were distinctly different from those of sympatric resident and transient killer whales. In addition, it was confirmed that the offshores forage as far south as California. Thus, these results provide evidence that the offshores belong to a third killer whale ecotype. Resident killer whale populations showed a gradient in stable isotope profiles from west (central Aleutians) to east (Gulf of Alaska) that, in part, can be attributed to a shift from off-shelf to continental shelf-based prey. Finally, stable isotope ratio results, supported by field observations, showed that the diet in spring and summer of eastern Aleutian Island transient killer whales is apparently not composed exclusively of Steller sea lions. PMID:16934324

  1. Call types of Bigg's killer whales (Orcinus orca) in western Alaska: Using vocal dialects to assess population structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Deborah Lynn

    Apex predators are important indicators of ecosystem health, but little is known about the population structure of Bigg's killer whales ( Orcinus orca; i.e. 'transient' ecotype) in western Alaska. Currently, all Bigg's killer whales in western Alaska are ascribed to a single broad stock for management under the US Marine Mammal Protection Act. However, recent nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses indicate that this stock is likely comprised of genetically distinct sub-populations. In accordance with what is known about killer whale vocal dialects in other locations, I sought to evaluate Bigg's killer whale population structure by examining the spatial distribution of group-specific call types in western Alaska. Digital audio recordings were collected from 33 encounters with Bigg's killer whales throughout the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands in the summers of 2001-2007 and 2009-2010. Recorded calls were perceptually classified into discrete types and then quantitatively described using 12 structural and time-frequency measures. Resulting call categories were objectively validated using a random forest approach. A total of 36 call types and subtypes were identified across the entire study area, and regional patterns of call type usage revealed three distinct dialects, each of which corresponding to proposed genetic delineations. I suggest that at least three acoustically and genetically distinct subpopulations are present in western Alaska, and put forth an initial catalog for this area describing the regional vocal repertoires of Bigg's killer whale call types.

  2. Loss of Arctic sea ice causing punctuated change in sightings of killer whales (Orcinus orca) over the past century.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Jeff W; Ferguson, Steven H

    2009-07-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are major predators that may reshape marine ecosystems via top-down forcing. Climate change models predict major reductions in sea ice with the subsequent expectation for readjustments of species' distribution and abundance. Here, we measure changes in killer whale distribution in the Hudson Bay region with decreasing sea ice as an example of global readjustments occurring with climate change. We summarize records of killer whales in Hudson Bay, Hudson Strait, and Foxe Basin in the eastern Canadian Arctic and relate them to an historical sea ice data set while accounting for spatial and temporal autocorrelation in the data. We find evidence for "choke points," where sea ice inhibits killer whale movement, thereby creating restrictions to their Arctic distribution. We hypothesize that a threshold exists in seasonal sea ice concentration within these choke points that results in pulses in advancements in distribution of an ice-avoiding predator. Hudson Strait appears to have been a significant sea ice choke point that opened up .approximately 50 years ago allowing for an initial punctuated appearance of killer whales followed by a gradual advancing distribution within the entire Hudson Bay region. Killer whale sightings have increased exponentially and are now reported in the Hudson Bay region every summer. We predict that other choke points will soon open up with continued sea ice melt producing punctuated predator-prey trophic cascades across the Arctic. PMID:19688941

  3. Hematological and serum biochemical analytes reflect physiological challenges during gestation and lactation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Robeck, Todd R; Nollens, Hendrik H

    2013-01-01

    Gestation and lactation result in metabolic alterations of the dam because of varying demands of the fetus and offspring during the different stages of development. Despite killer whales (Orcinus orca) having one of the longest gestations and highest birth weights of all mammals in human care, these metabolic alterations, and their impact on the physiology of the dam have not been measured. The objectives of this analysis were to determine if physiologic demands on the killer whale during pregnancy and lactation have measurable effects on hematology and biochemical analytes and if detectable, to compare these changes to those which are observed in other mammalian species. Forty hematologic and biochemical analytes from seven female killer whales (22 pregnancies, 1,507 samples) were compared between the following stages: (1) non-pregnant or lactating (control); (2) gestation; and (3) the first 12 months of lactation. Decreased hematocrit, hemoglobin, and red blood cell counts were indicative of plasma volume expansion during mid and late gestation. The killer whales exhibited a progressively increasing physiologic inflammatory state leading up to parturition. Gestation and lactation caused significant shifts in the serum lipid profiles. Gestation and lactation cause significant physiologic changes in the killer whale dam. The last 12 months of gestation had greater physiological impact than lactation, but changes associated with and immediately following parturition were the most dramatic. During this period, killer whales may experience increased susceptibility to illness, and anthropogenic and environmental disturbances. PMID:23813680

  4. A biodegradable killer microparticle to selectively deplete antigen-specific T cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Kun; Li, Miao-Chen; Chang, Di; Shahzad, Khawar Ali; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Ning; Shen, Chuan-Lai

    2016-01-01

    The specific eradication of pathogenic T cells for the treatment of allograft rejections and autoimmune disorders without impairment of overall immune function is a fundamental goal. Here, cell-sized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles (PLGA MPs) were prepared as a scaffold to co-display the peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC, target antigen) and anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (apoptosis-inducing molecule) for the generation of biodegradable killer MPs. Ovalbumin (OVA) antigen-targeted killer MPs significantly depleted OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner, both in vitro and in OT-1 mice. After intravenous administration, the killer MPs predominantly accumulated in the liver, lungs, and gut of OT-1 mice with a retention time of up to 48 hours. The killing effects exerted by killer MPs persisted for 4 days after two injections. Moreover, the H-2Kb alloantigen-targeted killer MPs were able to eliminate low-frequency alloreactive T cells and prolong alloskin graft survival for 41.5 days in bm1 mice. Our data indicate that PLGA-based killer MPs are capable of specifically depleting pathogenic T cells, which highlights their therapeutic potential for treating allograft rejection and autoimmune disorders. PMID:26910923

  5. Association of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene 2DL1 and its HLA-C2 ligand with family history of cancer in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anupam; Saikia, Nabajyoti; Phookan, Jyotirmoy; Baruah, Munindra Narayan; Baruah, Shashi

    2014-08-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are involved in regulating natural killer cell activation through recognition of their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands. We conducted a case-control study with 169 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients and 177 healthy participants to study the genomic diversity of KIR and HLA loci and KIR gene expression in context of family history of cancer (FHC) in OSCC. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequence-specific priming approach was used to type 16 KIR genes in individuals. SSP-real-time PCR was used for HLA class I ligand genotyping and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR was used to determine the expression of KIR gene. KIR2DL1(+)-HLA-C2(+) genotype was higher and positively associated with OSCC. Notably, all KIR2DL1(+)-HLA-C2(+) genotypes occurred exclusively in patients with FHC, showing a strong positive association of KIR2DL1(+)-HLA-C2(+) genotype with FHC. In addition, all younger age group patients (<55 years) with FHC were positive for KIR2DL1(+)-HLA-C2(+) genotype suggesting association of the genotype with early onset of disease. RNA transcript abundance of inhibitory KIR2DL1 in FHC patients, particularly of lower age groups (<45 and 45-54 years), supports the contention. Further, KIR2DL3(+)-HLA-C(+) genotype was negatively associated with OSCC. Our findings suggest KIR2DL1(+)-HLA-C2(+) genotype as heritable risk factor in OSCC predisposing to OSCC at younger age. Interestingly, KIR2DL3(+)-HLA-C(+) genotype was seen to be protective in OSCC. This study may be useful towards cancer surveillance and early detection of oral cancer in patients with FHC. PMID:24818561

  6. Fine scale association mapping of disease loci using simplex families.

    PubMed

    Morris, A P; Whittaker, J C

    2000-05-01

    We present a new method for the fine scale mapping of disease loci based on samples of simplex families, each containing an affected child. The method is based on a generalisation of a single locus allele transmission model to multiple marker loci. The model is developed under the assumption of a single ancestral mutation and allows for the calculation of posterior probabilities that each allele at a particular marker was present on the founder chromosome. We illustrate the method using simulated family data for cystic fibrosis and Huntingtons disease, for which the locations of mutations in the disease genes are now known. For both diseases, our new method provides good estimates of the location of the mutations. PMID:11246474

  7. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22922229

  8. Properties of multivariable root loci. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagle, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Various properties of multivariable root loci are analyzed from a frequency domain point of view by using the technique of Newton polygons, and some generalizations of the SISO root locus rules to the multivariable case are pointed out. The behavior of the angles of arrival and departure is related to the Smith-MacMillan form of G(s) and explicit equations for these angles are obtained. After specializing to first order and a restricted class of higher order poles and zeros, some simple equations for these angles that are direct generalizations of the SISO equations are found. The unusual behavior of root loci on the real axis at branch points is studied. The SISO root locus rules for break-in and break-out points are shown to generalize directly to the multivariable case. Some methods for computing both types of points are presented.

  9. Effects of OK-432 on murine bone marrow and the production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Rosse, C.

    1985-01-01

    The streptococcal preparation, OK-432, which augments anti-tumor responses in humans and mice, has been shown to be a potent immunomodulator. Among its effects is a pronounced augmentation of natural killer (NK) activity. The hypothesis that OK-432 alters the rates of production and maturation of NK cells in the bone marrow was tested. Studies to determine the kinetic parameters of NK cell production in normal C57BL/6J mice using tritiated thymidine, /sup 3/H-TdR, as a DNA marker are described. We are now extending those studies to determine the effect of OK-432 on the bone marrow and on the production of NK cells in the marrow. Initial observations are reported which indicate that OK-432 has profound effects on the cellularity and mitotic activity of the bone marrow, and in particular, on cells with the characteristics of natural killer cells within the marrow. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. The production and confinement of runaway electrons with impurity killer pellets in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Whyte, D.G.

    1998-12-01

    Prompt runaway electron bursts, generated by rapidly cooling DIII-D plasmas with argon killer pellets, are used to test a recent knock-on avalanche theory describing the growth of multi-MeV runaway electron currents during disruptions in tokamaks. Runaway current amplitudes, observed during some but not all DIII-D current quenches, are consistent with growth rates predicted by the theory assuming a pre-current quench runaway electron density of approximately 10{sup 15} m{sup {minus}3}. Argon killer pellet modeling yields runaway densities of between 10{sup 15}--10{sup 16} m{sup {minus}3} in these discharges. Although knock-on avalanching appears to agree rather well with the measurements, relatively small avalanche amplification factors combined with uncertainties in the spatial distribution of pellet mass and cooling rates make it difficult to unambiguously confirm the proposed theory with existing data.

  11. Severity of killer whale behavioral responses to ship noise: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Erbe, Christine; Ashe, Erin; Beerman, Amber; Smith, Jodi

    2014-02-15

    Critical habitats of at-risk populations of northeast Pacific "resident" killer whales can be heavily trafficked by large ships, with transits occurring on average once every hour in busy shipping lanes. We modeled behavioral responses of killer whales to ship transits during 35 "natural experiments" as a dose-response function of estimated received noise levels in both broadband and audiogram-weighted terms. Interpreting effects is contingent on a subjective and seemingly arbitrary decision about severity threshold indicating a response. Subtle responses were observed around broadband received levels of 130 dB re 1 μPa (rms); more severe responses are hypothesized to occur at received levels beyond 150 dB re 1 μPa, where our study lacked data. Avoidance responses are expected to carry minor energetic costs in terms of increased energy expenditure, but future research must assess the potential for reduced prey acquisition, and potential population consequences, under these noise levels. PMID:24373666

  12. Stratifying primary Sjögren's syndrome: killers in the balance?

    PubMed

    Bowman, Simon J; Fisher, Benjamin A

    2015-01-01

    The article by Seror et al. in Arthritis Research & Therapy reports data from the 15 French patients in the open-label BELISS (Efficacy and Safety of Belimumab in Subjects With Primary Sjögren's Syndrome, NCT01160666) study of belimumab in primary Sjögren's syndrome. The study identifies that higher baseline levels of natural killer cells in the peripheral blood and salivary glands are associated with non-response to belimumab therapy. Although caution is required given the open-label nature of the trial, this study adds to data already suggesting a role for natural killer cells in primary Sjögren's syndrome and, importantly, indicates a need for therapeutic stratification. PMID:26639390

  13. Unnatural killer cells to prevent bloodborne metastasis: inspiration from biology and engineering.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths. Many types of cancer metastasize via the bloodstream, where circulating tumor cells (CTCs) originating from the primary tumor can undergo selectin-mediated adhesion with the blood vessel wall and subsequently transmigrate to anatomically distant organs. In an effort to neutralize CTCs with the potential to form metastases, a new therapeutic approach has been developed in which circulating leukocytes are functionalized to target and kill cancer cells in the bloodstream. This approach mimics the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells and the chemical engineering concept of a fluidized bed reactor, which increases the surface area for surface-catalyzed reactions. The resulting 'unnatural killer cells', proven effective in vitro with human blood and also in the living mouse, holds promise in neutralizing CTCs to interrupt the metastasis process. PMID:24791860

  14. High-frequency modulated signals of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in the North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Simonis, Anne E; Baumann-Pickering, Simone; Oleson, Erin; Melcón, Mariana L; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-04-01

    Killer whales in the North Pacific, similar to Atlantic populations, produce high-frequency modulated signals, based on acoustic recordings from ship-based hydrophone arrays and autonomous recorders at multiple locations. The median peak frequency of these signals ranged from 19.6-36.1 kHz and median duration ranged from 50-163 ms. Source levels were 185-193 dB peak-to-peak re: 1 μPa at 1 m. These uniform, repetitive, down-swept signals are similar to bat echolocation signals and possibly could have echolocation functionality. A large geographic range of occurrence suggests that different killer whale ecotypes may utilize these signals. PMID:22502484

  15. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Poles.

    PubMed

    Majorczyk, E; Łuszczek, W; Nowak, I; Pawlik, A; Wiśniewski, A; Jasek, M; Kuśnierczyk, P

    2008-08-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) present on natural killer cells and minor subpopulations of T cells recognize class I human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules on the surface of target cells. Humans differ by the presence or absence of some KIR genes on their chromosomes. As KIRs are important for the outcome of tissue transplantation (particularly for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation) and possibly for pregnancy and autoimmune diseases, knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in a given human population is of practical value. Therefore, we tested 363 healthy individuals from Western Poland for the presence or absence of KIR genes. Results are compared with those published for other human populations. KIR gene frequencies in Poles are close to these in other Caucasoids but different from those in Asian and African populations, and particularly distant from those in Australian Aborigines. PMID:18976447

  16. Intrachromosomal mapping of seven biochemical loci in barley, Hordeum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Liu, C J; Heun, M; Gale, M D

    1993-10-01

    Seven biochemical loci, AmpA, Amy1, Amy2, Est-H5, Hor1, Hor2, and Wsp-H1, have been intrachromosomally mapped in the barley genome using a previously published RFLP-based genetic map. In all cases, the map locations confirmed prior chromosome assignments and agreed closely with the map positions of their homoeoloci in hexaploid wheat. PMID:24190199

  17. [Principle of genetic equilibrium for two gene loci].

    PubMed

    Pan, Shen-Yuan; Qu, Ai; Hui, Peng; Li, Ai-Ling

    2004-03-01

    Because linkage equilibrium is introduced by directly quoting the conclusions or imprecise mathematical reasoning in most of textbooks, many students are puzzled with the problem of linkage equilibrium when they learn population genetics. Based on the radical conditions of genetic equilibrium, the principle of linkage equilibrium condition and process, for two gene loci is introduced by precise mathematical reasoning. The article may provide reference to teachers and students in the teaching and learning of population genetics. PMID:15639991

  18. CD33 modulates TREM2: convergence of Alzheimer loci.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gail; White, Charles C; Winn, Phoebe A; Cimpean, Maria; Replogle, Joseph M; Glick, Laura R; Cuerdon, Nicole E; Ryan, Katie J; Johnson, Keith A; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Chibnik, Lori B; Sperling, Reisa A; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; De Jager, Philip L

    2015-11-01

    We used a protein quantitative trait analysis in monocytes from 226 individuals to evaluate cross-talk between Alzheimer loci. The NME8 locus influenced PTK2B and the CD33 risk allele led to greater TREM2 expression. There was also a decreased TREM1/TREM2 ratio with a TREM1 risk allele, decreased TREM2 expression with CD33 suppression and elevated cortical TREM2 mRNA expression with amyloid pathology. PMID:26414614

  19. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 15 MICROSATELLITE LOCI FOR Ophicephalus argus Cantor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, M; Xia, H; Bao, F

    2015-10-01

    The isolation and development of 15 polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite loci were described for Ophicephalus argus from the Huaihe River. All loci were polymorphic in the 30 individuals tested. The number of alleles per variable locus ranged from nine to seventeen, with a mean of 12.00. These novel microsatellite loci showed high level of polymorphism. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.793 to 0.929 and from 0.841 to 0.952, respectively. Two loci were found deviated from HWE in the sampled population after Bonferroni correction. These microsatellite loci will be useful for revealing population structure, genetic diversity, and phylogeography of Ophicephalus argus. PMID:27169238

  20. Isolation and characterization of 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the Japanese dace (Tribolodon hakonensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koizumi, Noriyuki; Quinn, Thomas W.; Park, Myeongsoo; Fike, Jennifer A.; Nishida, Kazuya; Takemura, Takeshi; Watabe, Keiji; Mori, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Twenty one polymorphic microsatellite loci for the Japanese dace (Tribolodon hakonensis) were isolated and characterized. The number of observed alleles per locus in 32 individuals ranged from 3 to 30. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.125 to 0.969 and from 0.175 to 0.973, respectively. All loci conformed to Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, no linkage disequilibrium was observed between pairs of loci and no loci showed evidence of null alleles. These microsatellite loci will be useful for investigating the intraspecific genetic variation and population structure of this species.

  1. Characterization of 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula (Turdidae, AVES).

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Michelle; Dawson, Deborah A; Gentle, Louise K; Coiffait, Lisette; Wolff, Kirsten; Evans, Karl L; Gaston, Kevin J; Hatchwell, Ben J

    2009-11-01

    We characterized 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula. Thirty-seven loci were identified by testing 242 loci that had been originally isolated in other avian species. One additional locus was isolated from a European blackbird genomic library. All loci were characterized in 20-29 blackbirds from a population in the Czech Republic and displayed between two and 16 alleles, with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.04 to 1.00. Thirty-seven loci could be assigned a chromosome location in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome based on sequence homology. PMID:21564948

  2. Population genetic data of 15 STR loci in Gansu Han population from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mao; Zhang, XiaoNan; Wu, Dan; Shen, Qi; Wu, YuanMing

    2015-07-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci included in the AmpFISTR Sinofiler™ kit were evaluated in 547 healthy unrelated Han individuals from Gansu, China. All of the loci reached the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after the Bonferroni correction (p > 0.0033). These loci were examined to determine allele frequencies and forensic statistical parameters. The combined discrimination power and probability of excluding paternity of the 15 STR loci were 0.999999 and 0.995097, respectively. Results suggested that the 15 STR loci are highly polymorphic, which is suitable for forensic personal identification and paternity testing. PMID:25504110

  3. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  4. Application of Mass Cytometry (CyTOF) for Functional and Phenotypic Analysis of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kay, Alexander W; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Blish, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Mass cytometry is a novel platform for high-dimensional phenotypic and functional analysis of single cells. This system uses elemental metal isotopes conjugated to monoclonal antibodies to evaluate up to 42 parameters simultaneously on individual cells with minimal overlap between channels. The platform can be customized for analysis of both phenotypic and functional markers. Here, we will describe methods to stain, collect, and analyze intracellular functional markers and surface phenotypic markers on natural killer cells. PMID:27177653

  5. An agent-based model of dialect evolution in killer whales.

    PubMed

    Filatova, Olga A; Miller, Patrick J O

    2015-05-21

    The killer whale is one of the few animal species with vocal dialects that arise from socially learned group-specific call repertoires. We describe a new agent-based model of killer whale populations and test a set of vocal-learning rules to assess which mechanisms may lead to the formation of dialect groupings observed in the wild. We tested a null model with genetic transmission and no learning, and ten models with learning rules that differ by template source (mother or matriline), variation type (random errors or innovations) and type of call change (no divergence from kin vs. divergence from kin). The null model without vocal learning did not produce the pattern of group-specific call repertoires we observe in nature. Learning from either mother alone or the entire matriline with calls changing by random errors produced a graded distribution of the call phenotype, without the discrete call types observed in nature. Introducing occasional innovation or random error proportional to matriline variance yielded more or less discrete and stable call types. A tendency to diverge from the calls of related matrilines provided fast divergence of loose call clusters. A pattern resembling the dialect diversity observed in the wild arose only when rules were applied in combinations and similar outputs could arise from different learning rules and their combinations. Our results emphasize the lack of information on quantitative features of wild killer whale dialects and reveal a set of testable questions that can draw insights into the cultural evolution of killer whale dialects. PMID:25817037

  6. Ecological knowledge, leadership, and the evolution of menopause in killer whales.

    PubMed

    Brent, Lauren J N; Franks, Daniel W; Foster, Emma A; Balcomb, Kenneth C; Cant, Michael A; Croft, Darren P

    2015-03-16

    Classic life-history theory predicts that menopause should not occur because there should be no selection for survival after the cessation of reproduction [1]. Yet, human females routinely live 30 years after they have stopped reproducing [2]. Only two other species-killer whales (Orcinus orca) and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) [3, 4]-have comparable postreproductive lifespans. In theory, menopause can evolve via inclusive fitness benefits [5, 6], but the mechanisms by which postreproductive females help their kin remain enigmatic. One hypothesis is that postreproductive females act as repositories of ecological knowledge and thereby buffer kin against environmental hardships [7, 8]. We provide the first test of this hypothesis using a unique long-term dataset on wild resident killer whales. We show three key results. First, postreproductively aged females lead groups during collective movement in salmon foraging grounds. Second, leadership by postreproductively aged females is especially prominent in difficult years when salmon abundance is low. This finding is critical because salmon abundance drives both mortality and reproductive success in resident killer whales [9, 10]. Third, females are more likely to lead their sons than they are to lead their daughters, supporting predictions of recent models [5] of the evolution of menopause based on kinship dynamics. Our results show that postreproductive females may boost the fitness of kin through the transfer of ecological knowledge. The value gained from the wisdom of elders can help explain why female resident killer whales and humans continue to live long after they have stopped reproducing. PMID:25754636

  7. Sadism linked to loneliness: psychodynamic dimensions of the sadistic serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer.

    PubMed

    Martens, Willem H J

    2011-08-01

    In this article the psychodynamic link between loneliness and sadism is examined on basis of a case report of the sadistic and cannibalistic serial killer Jeffery Dahmer. Envy, shame/rage mechanism, a disturbed oral-sadistic development, castration fear and severe feelings of inferiority, the conviction of being unlovable and unacceptable, need to diminish tension, powerful and sadistic fantasies as a consequence of inadequate and frustrated parenting, and reality distortion appear to be involved in sadistic etiology. PMID:21864144

  8. STAT5 Loss Awakens the Dark Force in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jing; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are commonly considered to be potent antitumor effector cells. The study by Gotthardt and colleagues challenges this concept and reveals that STAT5-deficient/inhibited NK cells induce angiogenesis and promote tumor progression. These unexpected findings shed new light on potential adverse effects of JAK-STAT inhibitors in the clinics.Cancer Discov; 6(4); 347-9. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Gotthardt et al., p. 414. PMID:27045017

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Philip E.; Nair, Rajan P.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Li, Yun; Weidinger, Stephan; Eberlein, Bernadette; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H. Erich; Kunz, Manfred; Ike, Robert; Krueger, Gerald G.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Mroweitz, Ulrich; Lim, Henry W.; Voorhees, John J.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Weichenthal, Michael; Franke, Andre; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D.; Elder, James T.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel psoriasis susceptibility loci, we carried out a meta-analysis of two recent genome-wide association studies 1,2, yielding a discovery sample of 1,831 cases and 2,546 controls. 102 of the most promising loci in the discovery analysis were followed up in a three-stage replication study using 4,064 cases and 4,685 controls from Michigan, Toronto, Newfoundland, and Germany. Association at a genome-wide level of significance for the combined discovery and replication samples was found for three genomic regions. One contains NOS2 (rs4795067, p = 4 × 10−11), another contains FBXL19 (rs10782001, p = 9 × 10−10), and a third contains PSMA6 and NFKBIA (rs12586317, p = 2 × 10−8). All three loci were also strongly associated with the subphenotypes of psoriatic arthritis and purely cutaneous psoriasis. Finally, we confirmed a recently identified3 association signal near RNF114. PMID:20953189

  11. Evolution of V genes from the TRV loci of mammals.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Gambón-Cerdá, Santiago; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Information concerning the evolution of T lymphocyte receptors (TCR) can be deciphered from that part of the molecule that recognizes antigen presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), namely the variable (V) regions. The genes that code for these variable regions are found within the TCR loci. Here, we describe a study of the evolutionary origin of V genes that code for the α and β chains of the TCR loci of mammals. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the 35 TRAV and 25 TRBV conserved genes found in Primates are also found in other Eutheria, while in Marsupials, Monotremes, and Reptiles, these genes diversified in a different manner. We also show that in mammals, all TRAV genes are derived from five ancestral genes, while all TRBV genes originate from four such genes. In Reptiles, the five TRAV and three out of the four TRBV ancestral genes exist, as well as other V genes not found in mammals. We also studied the TRGV and TRDV loci from all mammals, and we show a relationship of the TRDV to the TRAV locus throughout evolutionary time. PMID:26024913

  12. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI)

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Katherine M.; Gardner, Grant E.; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty. PMID:27252300

  13. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  14. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Andlauer, Till F. M.; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A.; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G.; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H.; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K.; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O.; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M.; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M.; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  15. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Pathogen selection drives nonoverlapping associations between HLA loci

    PubMed Central

    Penman, Bridget S.; Ashby, Ben; Buckee, Caroline O.; Gupta, Sunetra

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen-mediated selection is commonly invoked as an explanation for the exceptional polymorphism of the HLA gene cluster, but its role in generating and maintaining linkage disequilibrium between HLA loci is unclear. Here we show that pathogen-mediated selection can promote nonrandom associations between HLA loci. These associations may be distinguished from linkage disequilibrium generated by other population genetic processes by virtue of being nonoverlapping as well as nonrandom. Within our framework, immune selection forces the pathogen population to exist as a set of antigenically discrete strains; this then drives nonoverlapping associations between the HLA loci through which recognition of these antigens is mediated. We demonstrate that this signature of pathogen-driven selection can be observed in existing data, and propose that analyses of HLA population structure can be combined with laboratory studies to help us uncover the functional relationships between HLA alleles. In a wider coevolutionary context, our framework also shows that the inclusion of memory immunity can lead to robust cyclical dynamics across a range of host–pathogen systems. PMID:24225852

  17. Homology of Melanoma-Inducing Loci in the Genus Xiphophorus

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, M.

    1990-01-01

    Several species of the genus Xiphophorus are polymorphic for specific pigment patterns. Some of these give rise to malignant melanoma following the appropriate crossings. For one of these pattern loci from the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus the melanoma-inducing gene has been cloned and found to encode a novel receptor tyrosine kinase, designated Xmrk. Using molecular probes from this gene in Southern blot analyses on single fish DNA preparations from 600 specimens of different populations of various species of the genus Xiphophorus and their hybrids, either with or without melanoma-predisposing pattern, it was shown that all individuals contain the Xmrk gene as a proto-oncogene. It is located on the sex chromosome. All fish that carry a melanoma-predisposing locus which has been identified by Mendelian genetics contain an additional copy of Xmrk, closely linked to a specific melanophore pattern locus on the sex chromosome. The melanoma-inducing loci of the different species and populations are homologous. The additional copy of Xmrk obviously arose by a gene-duplication event, thereby acquiring the oncogenic potential. The homology of the melanoma-inducing loci points to a similar mechanism of tumor suppression in all feral fish populations of the different species of the genus Xiphophorus. PMID:1981761

  18. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  19. Identification of loci affecting flavour volatile emissions in tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Tieman, Denise M; Zeigler, Michelle; Schmelz, Eric A; Taylor, Mark G; Bliss, Peter; Kirst, Matias; Klee, Harry J

    2006-01-01

    Fresh tomato fruit flavour is the sum of the interaction between sugars, acids, and a set of approximately 30 volatile compounds synthesized from a diverse set of precursors, including amino acids, lipids, and carotenoids. Some of these volatiles impart desirable qualities while others are negatively perceived. As a first step to identify the genes responsible for the synthesis of flavour-related chemicals, an attempt was made to identify loci that influence the chemical composition of ripe fruits. A genetically diverse but well-defined Solanum pennellii IL population was used. Because S. pennellii is a small green-fruited species, this population exhibits great biochemical diversity and is a rich source of genes affecting both fruit development and chemical composition. This population was used to identify multiple loci affecting the composition of chemicals related to flavour. Twenty-five loci were identified that are significantly altered in one or more of 23 different volatiles and four were altered in citric acid content. It was further shown that emissions of carotenoid-derived volatiles were directly correlated with the fruit carotenoid content. Linked molecular markers should be useful for breeding programmes aimed at improving fruit flavour. In the longer term, the genes responsible for controlling the levels of these chemicals will be important tools for understanding the complex interactions that ultimately integrate to provide the unique flavour of a tomato. PMID:16473892

  20. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI).

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Katherine M; Gardner, Grant E; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty. PMID:27252300

  1. The Red Queen lives: Epistasis between linked resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Metzger, César M J A; Luijckx, Pepijn; Bento, Gilberto; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A popular theory explaining the maintenance of genetic recombination (sex) is the Red Queen Theory. This theory revolves around the idea that time-lagged negative frequency-dependent selection by parasites favors rare host genotypes generated through recombination. Although the Red Queen has been studied for decades, one of its key assumptions has remained unsupported. The signature host-parasite specificity underlying the Red Queen, where infection depends on a match between host and parasite genotypes, relies on epistasis between linked resistance loci for which no empirical evidence exists. We performed 13 genetic crosses and tested over 7000 Daphnia magna genotypes for resistance to two strains of the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. Results reveal the presence of strong epistasis between three closely linked resistance loci. One locus masks the expression of the other two, while these two interact to produce a single resistance phenotype. Changing a single allele on one of these interacting loci can reverse resistance against the tested parasites. Such a genetic mechanism is consistent with host and parasite specificity assumed by the Red Queen Theory. These results thus provide evidence for a fundamental assumption of this theory and provide a genetic basis for understanding the Red Queen dynamics in the Daphnia-Pasteuria system. PMID:26763092

  2. Quantitative trait loci influencing honeybee alarm pheromone levels.

    PubMed

    Hunt, G J; Collins, A M; Rivera, R; Page, R E; Guzmán-Novoa, E

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping procedures were used to identify loci that influence the levels of alarm pheromones found in the stinging apparatus of worker honeybees. An F1 queen was produced from a cross between a queen of European origin and a drone descended from an African subspecies. Haploid drones from the hybrid queen were individually backcrossed to European queens to produce 172 colonies. Samples of stings were taken from backcross workers of these colonies. Alarm pheromone levels were determined by gas chromatography. RAPD markers were scored from the haploid drone fathers of these colonies. The multiple-QTL model (MQM) of MapQTL was used to identify QTLs that influence the levels of four alarm pheromone components. Seven independent, potential QTLs were identified with LOD scores greater than two, and one at LOD 1.88. We identified one QTL for n-decyl acetate, three for n-octanol, four for isopentyl acetate, and one for hexyl acetate. One region of linkage group XI shows a strong influence on body size and the levels of three alarm pheromone components. This locus explained 40% of the variance for the amount of n-decyl acetate (LOD 6.57). In general, the QTLs influencing alarm pheromone levels were independent of previously identified loci that influenced the stinging behavior of these colonies. The only exception was a potential locus influencing levels of n-octanol, which was inversely correlated with stinging behavior. PMID:10544503

  3. Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Maureen D; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K; Lee, Annette T; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M; Molitor, Jerry A; Silver, Richard M; Steen, Virginia D; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert A; Fessler, Barri J; Frech, Tracy M; Alkassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  4. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Navarrete, Nuria; García Portales, Rosa; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, María Jesús; Aguirre, María Ángeles; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández de Castro, Mónica; García de la Peña, Paloma; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Rodríguez Carballeira, Mónica; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rubio Rivas, Manel; Ortiz Santamaría, Vera; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Freire, María del Carmen; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernández Sueiro, Luis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Silver, Richard M.; Steen, Virginia D.; Simms, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert A.; Fessler, Barri J.; Frech, Tracy M.; AlKassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  5. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for root hair length in wheat identifies loci that co-locate with loci for yield components.

    PubMed

    Horn, R; Wingen, L U; Snape, J W; Dolan, L

    2016-08-01

    Root hairs are fast growing, ephemeral tubular extensions of the root epidermis. They arise in the unsuberized maturation zone of the root, effectively increasing the root surface area in the region over which nutrient and water uptake occur. Variation in root hair length (RHL) between varieties has been shown to be genetically determined, and could, therefore, have consequences for nutrient capture and yield potential in crops. We describe the development of a medium-to-high throughput screening method for assessing RHL in wheat at the seedling stage. This method was used to screen a number of wheat mapping population parental lines for variation in RHL. Parents of two populations derived from inter-varietal crosses differed for RHL: Spark vs Rialto and Charger vs Badger. We identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for RHL in the populations derived from these crosses. In Spark × Rialto, QTLs on chromosomes 1A, 2A and 6A were associated with variation in RHL, whilst in Charger × Badger, a QTL for RHL was identified on 2BL. The QTLs on 2A and 6A co-localized with previously described QTLs for yield components. Longer root hairs may confer an advantage by exploiting limiting mineral and water resources. This first QTL analysis of root hair length in wheat identifies loci that could usefully be further investigated for their role in tolerance to limiting conditions. PMID:27315832

  6. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for root hair length in wheat identifies loci that co-locate with loci for yield components

    PubMed Central

    Horn, R.; Wingen, L. U.; Snape, J. W.; Dolan, L.

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are fast growing, ephemeral tubular extensions of the root epidermis. They arise in the unsuberized maturation zone of the root, effectively increasing the root surface area in the region over which nutrient and water uptake occur. Variation in root hair length (RHL) between varieties has been shown to be genetically determined, and could, therefore, have consequences for nutrient capture and yield potential in crops. We describe the development of a medium-to-high throughput screening method for assessing RHL in wheat at the seedling stage. This method was used to screen a number of wheat mapping population parental lines for variation in RHL. Parents of two populations derived from inter-varietal crosses differed for RHL: Spark vs Rialto and Charger vs Badger. We identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for RHL in the populations derived from these crosses. In Spark × Rialto, QTLs on chromosomes 1A, 2A and 6A were associated with variation in RHL, whilst in Charger × Badger, a QTL for RHL was identified on 2BL. The QTLs on 2A and 6A co-localized with previously described QTLs for yield components. Longer root hairs may confer an advantage by exploiting limiting mineral and water resources. This first QTL analysis of root hair length in wheat identifies loci that could usefully be further investigated for their role in tolerance to limiting conditions. PMID:27315832

  7. Isolation, identification, and activity in vitro of killer yeasts against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Jaqueline Rabelo; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Brandão, Luciana Rocha; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Viana, Francisco Marto Pinto

    2013-07-01

    A total of 580 yeasts strains, isolated from Ceara State of Brasil, were evaluated for their ability to produce killer toxin. Of these strains, 29 tested positive for the killer phenotype and were further evaluated for their ability to control Colletotrichum gloeosporioides germination in vitro. All yeast strains that expressed the killer phenotype were characterized by sequencing the D1/D2 regions of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Five yeast strains provided a significant reduction in mycelial growth and conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides in vitro, especially Meyerozyma guilliermondii, which was able to reduce the fungal mycelial growth on solid medium (potato dextrose agar (PDA)) by 60% and block 100% of conidia germination in liquid media (potato dextrose broth (PDB)). Filtering and autoclaving the liquid cultures had no effect on the growth of the pathogen. These results indicate the potential use of antagonist yeasts isolated from tropical fruits in the control of anthracnose caused by C. gloeosporioides in papaya. Further elucidation of main mechanisms involved on anthracnose control by these yeasts could be helpful for the development of biocontrol techniques related to the management of this disease in tropical fruits. PMID:22915228

  8. Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Deaths in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1985-1990.

    PubMed

    Fraker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    During 1985-1990, two groups of killer whales in Prince William Sound, Alaska, experienced unusually high rates of mortality, while seven others did not. Those affected were AB pod, part of the southern Alaska population of resident (fish-eating) killer whales, and the AT1 transient (marine mammal-eating) group, a very small, reproductively isolated population that last reproduced in 1984. In 1985-1986, several AB pod members were shot by fishermen defending their catch from depredation, which explains some of the deaths. Understanding the other deaths is complicated by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (March 1989) and uncertainties about the causes and times of the deaths. For AB pod, possible factors involved in the post-spill mortalities are delayed effects of bullet wounds, continued shooting, oil exposure, and consequences of being orphaned. For the AT1 group, possible factors are oil exposure, small population size, old age, and high-contaminant burdens. An analysis of possible effects of inhalation of volatile organic compounds, contact with the oil slick, and ingestion of oil with water or prey did not reveal route(s) of exposure that could explain the mortalities. The cause(s) of the killer whale deaths recorded following the oil spill remain uncertain. PMID:23335844

  9. Pilot Whales Attracted to Killer Whale Sounds: Acoustically-Mediated Interspecific Interactions in Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans’ communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans’ behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways. PMID:23300613

  10. Effects of different analysis techniques and recording duty cycles on passive acoustic monitoring of killer whales.

    PubMed

    Riera, Amalis; Ford, John K; Ross Chapman, N

    2013-09-01

    Killer whales in British Columbia are at risk, and little is known about their winter distribution. Passive acoustic monitoring of their year-round habitat is a valuable supplemental method to traditional visual and photographic surveys. However, long-term acoustic studies of odontocetes have some limitations, including the generation of large amounts of data that require highly time-consuming processing. There is a need to develop tools and protocols to maximize the efficiency of such studies. Here, two types of analysis, real-time and long term spectral averages, were compared to assess their performance at detecting killer whale calls in long-term acoustic recordings. In addition, two different duty cycles, 1/3 and 2/3, were tested. Both the use of long term spectral averages and a lower duty cycle resulted in a decrease in call detection and positive pod identification, leading to underestimations of the amount of time the whales were present. The impact of these limitations should be considered in future killer whale acoustic surveys. A compromise between a lower resolution data processing method and a higher duty cycle is suggested for maximum methodological efficiency. PMID:23968036

  11. Unusual selection on the KIR3DL1/S1 natural killer cell receptor in Africans.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Korbel, Daniel; Gleimer, Michael; Rowley, Don; Bruno, Dan; Carrington, Christine V F; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Fraser, Patricia A; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M; Ramdath, D Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A F; Struik, Siske; Verity, David H; Vaughan, Robert W; Tyan, Dolly; Davis, Ronald W; Riley, Eleanor M; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Interactions of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands diversify natural killer cell responses to infection. By analyzing sequence variation in diverse human populations, we show that the KIR3DL1/S1 locus encodes two lineages of polymorphic inhibitory KIR3DL1 allotypes that recognize Bw4 epitopes of protein">HLA-A and HLA-B and one lineage of conserved activating KIR3DS1 allotypes, also implicated in Bw4 recognition. Balancing selection has maintained these three lineages for over 3 million years. Variation was selected at D1 and D2 domain residues that contact HLA class I and at two sites on D0, the domain that enhances the binding of KIR3D to HLA class I. HLA-B variants that gained Bw4 through interallelic microconversion are also products of selection. A worldwide comparison uncovers unusual KIR3DL1/S1 evolution in modern sub-Saharan Africans. Balancing selection is weak and confined to D0, KIR3DS1 is rare and KIR3DL1 allotypes with similar binding sites predominate. Natural killer cells express the dominant KIR3DL1 at a high frequency and with high surface density, providing strong responses to cells perturbed in Bw4 expression. PMID:17694054

  12. Interactive effects of Na and K in killing by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.C.; MacCoubrey, I.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Contact-mediated lysis by human natural killer cells is inhibited by a number of drugs that block the predominant K channel. In this study the authors have further examined the role of the K channel and the interactions between passive K and Na transport in killing. Low external Na-inhibited killing and inhibition were not due to reduced inward current through the Na channels in the target cell. A role for the Na/H antiport is suggested since amiloride inhibited killing in a dose-dependent manner that was competitive with external Na. Depolarizing the killer cell with elevated external K did not inhibit killing. On the contrary, high K{sub 0} reduced the inhibition caused by low Na{sub 0} and by the K-channel blockers quinidine, verapamil, and retinoic acid. Hyperpolarizing the killer cell with low K{sub 0} or valinomycin inhibited killing. Hence, the primary role of the K channels during killing is not to maintain the negative membrane potential. On the contrary, depolarization may promote killing under conditions where killing is submaximal.

  13. Segmentation of Killer Whale Vocalizations Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Olivier

    2008-12-01

    The study of cetacean vocalizations is usually based on spectrogram analysis. The feature extraction is obtained from 2D methods like the edge detection algorithm. Difficulties appear when signal-to-noise ratios are weak or when more than one vocalization is simultaneously emitted. This is the case for acoustic observations in a natural environment and especially for the killer whales which swim in groups. To resolve this problem, we propose the use of the Hilbert-Huang transform. First, we illustrate how few modes (5) are satisfactory for the analysis of these calls. Then, we detail our approach which consists of combining the modes for extracting the time-varying frequencies of the vocalizations. This combination takes advantage of one of the empirical mode decomposition properties which is that the successive IMFs represent the original data broken down into frequency components from highest to lowest frequency. To evaluate the performance, our method is first applied on the simulated chirp signals. This approach allows us to link one chirp to one mode. Then we apply it on real signals emitted by killer whales. The results confirm that this method is a favorable alternative for the automatic extraction of killer whale vocalizations.

  14. Cross-cultural and cross-ecotype production of a killer whale `excitement' call suggests universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, Nicola; Filatova, Olga A.; Durban, John W.; Foote, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Facial and vocal expressions of emotion have been found in a number of social mammal species and are thought to have evolved to aid social communication. There has been much debate about whether such signals are culturally inherited or are truly biologically innate. Evidence for the innateness of such signals can come from cross-cultural studies. Previous studies have identified a vocalisation (the V4 or `excitement' call) associated with high arousal behaviours in a population of killer whales in British Columbia, Canada. In this study, we compared recordings from three different socially and reproductively isolated ecotypes of killer whales, including five vocal clans of one ecotype, each clan having discrete culturally transmitted vocal traditions. The V4 call was found in recordings of each ecotype and each vocal clan. Nine independent observers reproduced our classification of the V4 call from each population with high inter-observer agreement. Our results suggest the V4 call may be universal in Pacific killer whale populations and that transmission of this call is independent of cultural tradition or ecotype. We argue that such universality is more consistent with an innate vocalisation than one acquired through social learning and may be linked to its apparent function of motivational expression.

  15. MULT1E/mIL-12: a novel bifunctional protein for natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tietje, A; Li, J; Yu, X; Wei, Y

    2014-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to be effective killers of tumor cells. They are governed by inhibitory and activating receptors like NKG2D, whose ligands are normally upregulated in cells that are stressed, like cancer cells. Advanced cancer cells, however, have ways to reduce these ligands' expression, leaving them less detectable by NK cells. Along with these receptors, NK cells also require activating cytokines, like interleukin 12 (IL-12). The goal of this study is to develop a novel bi-functional fusion protein for enhanced NK cell activation. The proposed protein combines the extracellular domain of the NKG2D ligand Mouse UL-16-binding protein-like transcript 1 (MULT1E) and mouse IL-12 (mIL-12). It is hypothesized that when expressed by tumor cells, the protein will activate NK and other killer cells using the NKG2D receptor, and deliver mIL-12 to the NK cells where it can interact with the IL-12R and enhance cytotoxicity. The fusion protein, when expressed by engineered tumor cells, indeed activated NK cells in vitro as assayed by increased production of interferon-γ and cytotoxicity and significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo. Although the study is preliminary, the data suggest that the MULT1E/mIL-12 bi-functional fusion protein is an effective activator of NK cells for cancer treatment. PMID:24572784

  16. Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Deaths in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1985–1990

    PubMed Central

    Fraker, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    During 1985–1990, two groups of killer whales in Prince William Sound, Alaska, experienced unusually high rates of mortality, while seven others did not. Those affected were AB pod, part of the southern Alaska population of resident (fish-eating) killer whales, and the AT1 transient (marine mammal–eating) group, a very small, reproductively isolated population that last reproduced in 1984. In 1985–1986, several AB pod members were shot by fishermen defending their catch from depredation, which explains some of the deaths. Understanding the other deaths is complicated by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (March 1989) and uncertainties about the causes and times of the deaths. For AB pod, possible factors involved in the post-spill mortalities are delayed effects of bullet wounds, continued shooting, oil exposure, and consequences of being orphaned. For the AT1 group, possible factors are oil exposure, small population size, old age, and high-contaminant burdens. An analysis of possible effects of inhalation of volatile organic compounds, contact with the oil slick, and ingestion of oil with water or prey did not reveal route(s) of exposure that could explain the mortalities. The cause(s) of the killer whale deaths recorded following the oil spill remain uncertain. PMID:23335844

  17. Effects of noise levels and call types on the source levels of killer whale calls.

    PubMed

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Emmons, Candice K

    2011-11-01

    Accurate parameter estimates relevant to the vocal behavior of marine mammals are needed to assess potential effects of anthropogenic sound exposure including how masking noise reduces the active space of sounds used for communication. Information about how these animals modify their vocal behavior in response to noise exposure is also needed for such assessment. Prior studies have reported variations in the source levels of killer whale sounds, and a more recent study reported that killer whales compensate for vessel masking noise by increasing their call amplitude. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the source levels of a variety of call types in southern resident killer whales while also considering background noise level as a likely factor related to call source level variability. The source levels of 763 discrete calls along with corresponding background noise were measured over three summer field seasons in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands, WA. Both noise level and call type were significant factors on call source levels (1-40 kHz band, range of 135.0-175.7 dB(rms) re 1 [micro sign]Pa at 1 m). These factors should be considered in models that predict how anthropogenic masking noise reduces vocal communication space in marine mammals. PMID:22087938

  18. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways. PMID:23300613

  19. Mitochondrial sequence divergence among Antarctic killer whale ecotypes is consistent with multiple species.

    PubMed

    LeDuc, Richard G; Robertson, Kelly M; Pitman, Robert L

    2008-08-23

    Recently, three visually distinct forms of killer whales (Orcinus orca) were described from Antarctic waters and designated as types A, B and C. Based on consistent differences in prey selection and habitat preferences, morphological divergence and apparent lack of interbreeding among these broadly sympatric forms, it was suggested that they may represent separate species. To evaluate this hypothesis, we compared complete sequences of the mitochondrial control region from 81 Antarctic killer whale samples, including 9 type A, 18 type B, 47 type C and 7 type-undetermined individuals. We found three fixed differences that separated type A from B and C, and a single fixed difference that separated type C from A and B. These results are consistent with reproductive isolation among the different forms, although caution is needed in drawing further conclusions. Despite dramatic differences in morphology and ecology, the relatively low levels of sequence divergence in Antarctic killer whales indicate that these evolutionary changes occurred relatively rapidly and recently. PMID:18524738

  20. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) face protracted health risks associated with lifetime exposure to PCBs.

    PubMed

    Hickie, Brendan E; Ross, Peter S; Macdonald, Robie W; Ford, John K B

    2007-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations declined rapidly in environmental compartments and most biota following implementation of regulations in the 1970s. However, the metabolic recalcitrance of PCBs may delay responses to such declines in large, long-lived species, such as the endangered and highly PCB-contaminated resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. To investigate the influence of life history on PCB-related health risks, we developed models to estimate PCB concentrations in killer whales during the period from 1930 forward to 2030, both within a lifetime (approximately 50 years) and across generations, and then evaluated these in the context of health effects thresholds established for marine mammals. Modeled PCB concentrations in killer whales responded slowly to changes in loadings to the environment as evidenced by slower accumulation and lower magnitude increases in PCB concentrations relative to prey, and a delayed decline that was particularly evident in adult males. Since PCBs attained peak levels well above the effects threshold (17 mg/kg lipid) in approximately 1969, estimated concentrations in both the northern and the more contaminated southern resident populations have declined gradually. Projections suggest that the northern resident population could largely fall below the threshold concentration by 2030 while the endangered southern residents may not do so until at least 2063. Long-lived aquatic mammals are therefore not protected from PCBs by current dietary residue guidelines. PMID:17948816

  1. Organophosphorus pesticides markedly inhibit the activities of natural killer, cytotoxic T lymphocyte and lymphokine-activated killer: a proposed inhibiting mechanism via granzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidemi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Minami, Masayasu

    2002-04-01

    We have previously found that diisopropyl methylphosphonate, an organophosphorus by-product generated during sarin synthesis in the Tokyo sarin disaster, significantly inhibited natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activities. In the present study, to investigate whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) also affect NK and CTL activities, we firstly examined the effect of five OPs on human NK activity, and then the effect of Dimethyl 2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP), an OP on murine splenic NK, CTL and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK), and human LAK activities in vitro. To explore the underlying mechanism of decreased NK activity, we also investigated the effect of 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride-HCl (p-ABSF), an inhibitor of serine proteases on NK, LAK and CTL activities, and the effect of DDVP on the activity of granzymes (serine proteases). We found that OPs significantly decreased human NK activity in a dose-dependent manner, but the degree of decrease in NK activity differed among the OPs investigated, and that DDVP significantly decreased NK, LAK and CTL activities in a dose-dependent manner, but the degree of decrease in these activities differed. p-ABSF showed a similar inhibitory pattern to DDVP, and had an additive inhibitory effect with DDVP on NK, LAK and CTL activities. We also found that DDVP significantly inhibited granzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate that OPs significantly decrease NK, LAK and CTL activities in vitro via granzyme inhibition. PMID:11893417

  2. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huth, T. K.; Brenu, E. W.; Staines, D. R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results. PMID:27346947

  3. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Huth, T K; Brenu, E W; Staines, D R; Marshall-Gradisnik, S M

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results. PMID:27346947

  4. Nitrogen availability of grape juice limits killer yeast growth and fermentation activity during mixed-culture fermentation with sensitive commercial yeast strains.

    PubMed Central

    Medina, K; Carrau, F M; Gioia, O; Bracesco, N

    1997-01-01

    The competition between selected or commercial killer strains of type K2 and sensitive commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied under various conditions in sterile grape juice fermentations. The focus of this study was the effect of yeast inoculation levels and the role of assimilable nitrogen nutrition on killer activity. A study of the consumption of free amino nitrogen (FAN) by pure and mixed cultures of killer and sensitive cells showed no differences between the profiles of nitrogen assimilation in all cases, and FAN was practically depleted in the first 2 days of fermentation. The effect of the addition of assimilable nitrogen and the size of inoculum was examined in mixed killer and sensitive strain competitions. Stuck and sluggish wine fermentations were observed to depend on nitrogen availability when the ratio of killer to sensitive cells was low (1:10 to 1:100). A relationship between the initial assimilable nitrogen content of must and the proportion of killer cells during fermentation was shown. An indirect relationship was found between inoculum size and the percentage of killer cells: a smaller inoculum resulted in a higher proportion of killer cells in grape juice fermentations. In all cases, wines obtained with pure-culture fermentations were preferred to mixed-culture fermentations by sensory analysis. The reasons why killer cells do not finish fermentation under competitive conditions with sensitive cells are discussed. PMID:9212430

  5. STELLAR LOCI. I. METALLICITY DEPENDENCE AND INTRINSIC WIDTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu E-mail: x.liu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    Stellar loci are widely used for selection of interesting outliers, reddening determinations, and calibrations. However, until now, the dependence of stellar loci on metallicity has not been fully explored, and their intrinsic widths are unclear. In this paper, by combining the spectroscopic and recalibrated imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, we have built a large, clean sample of dwarf stars with accurate colors and well-determined metallicities to investigate the metallicity dependence and intrinsic widths of the SDSS stellar loci. Typically, 1 dex decrease in metallicity causes 0.20 and 0.02 mag decrease in colors u – g and g – r and 0.02 and 0.02 mag increase in colors r – i and i – z, respectively. The variations are larger for metal-rich stars than for metal-poor ones, and larger for F/G/K stars than for A/M ones. Using the sample, we have performed two-dimensional polynomial fitting to the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors as a function of color g – i and metallicity [Fe/H]. The residuals, at the level of 0.029, 0.008, 0.008, and 0.011 mag for the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors, respectively, can be fully accounted for by the photometric errors and metallicity uncertainties, suggesting that the intrinsic widths of the loci are at maximum a few millimagnitudes. The residual distributions are asymmetric, revealing that a significant fraction of stars are binaries. In a companion paper, we will present an unbiased estimate of the binary fraction for field stars. Other potential applications of the metallicity-dependent stellar loci are briefly discussed.

  6. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; MacGregor, Stuart; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Xu, Liang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rochtchina, Elena; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Young, Terri L.; Feng, Sheng; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Metspalu, Andres; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Wojciechowski, Robert; Baird, Paul N.; Schache, Maria; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Höhn, René; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Peng; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Wegner, Aharon; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Pärssinen, Olavi; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Biino, Genevra; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Vitart, Veronique; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Hewitt, Alex W.; Ang, Wei; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hammond, Christopher J.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B.J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  7. Nine loci for ocular axial length identified through genome-wide association studies, including shared loci with refractive error.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M Kamran; Young, Terri L; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; St Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Montgomery, Grant W; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Wilson, James F; Pennell, Craig E; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Iyengar, Sudha K; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily Y; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N

    2013-08-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  8. Effect of a killer toxin of Pichia anomala to Pneumocystis. Perspectives in the control of pneumocystosis.

    PubMed

    Séguy, N; Polonelli, L; Dei-Cas, E; Cailliez, J C

    1998-09-01

    Despite the development of drugs in the prophylaxis of pneumocystosis, Pneumocystis carinii remains a major opportunistic microorganism in immunosuppressed individuals, especially in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Since side effects were frequently observed after administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or pentamidine, the drugs which are mainly used in treating human P. carinii pneumonia (PCP), new therapeutic strategies should be developed. Over the last years, the inhibitory effect of a Pichia anomala killer toxin (PaKT), a molecule with a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, was characterized on P. carinii. The susceptibility of mouse and rat-derived Pneumocystis to PaKT has been demonstrated by in vitro attachment tests and in vivo infectivity assays. Nevertheless, PaKT is strongly antigenic, toxic and could not be used directly as a therapeutic agent. Then, a new strategy using killer toxin-like anti-idiotypic antibodies (KT-antiIds) mimicking the fungal toxin activity has been developed. Different KT-antiIds were obtained by idiotypic immunization with a monoclonal antibody (mabKT4). This mabKT4 neutralized the killer properties of the PaKT. KT-antiIds were produced by immunization against the variable domain (idiotype) of mAbKT4 (internal image of the killer toxin receptor), or they were obtained directly from vaginal fluid of patients affected by recurrent vaginal candidiosis. In this last case, such natural KT-antiIds were immunopurified by affinity-chromatography with mAbKT4 and their anti-P. carinii activity was then evaluated. Our results showed that both the in vitro attachment of rat-derived parasites and their infectivity to nude rats were inhibited by the KT-antiIds. With regard to KT-antiIds obtained by immunization, the antimicrobial activity of a monoclonal KT-antiIds (mAbK10) has been evaluated by using a PCP experimental nude rat model treated by mAbK10 administered by aerosol. The pneumocystosis extension was

  9. The Killer Fly Hunger Games: Target Size and Speed Predict Decision to Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Wardill, Trevor J.; Knowles, Katie; Barlow, Laura; Tapia, Gervasio; Nordström, Karin; Olberg, Robert M.; Gonzalez-Bellido, Paloma T.

    2015-01-01

    Predatory animals have evolved to optimally detect their prey using exquisite sensory systems such as vision, olfaction and hearing. It may not be so surprising that vertebrates, with large central nervous systems, excel at predatory behaviors. More striking is the fact that many tiny insects, with their miniscule brains and scaled down nerve cords, are also ferocious, highly successful predators. For predation, it is important to determine whether a prey is suitable before initiating pursuit. This is paramount since pursuing a prey that is too large to capture, subdue or dispatch will generate a substantial metabolic cost (in the form of muscle output) without any chance of metabolic gain (in the form of food). In addition, during all pursuits, the predator breaks its potential camouflage and thus runs the risk of becoming prey itself. Many insects use their eyes to initially detect and subsequently pursue prey. Dragonflies, which are extremely efficient predators, therefore have huge eyes with relatively high spatial resolution that allow efficient prey size estimation before initiating pursuit. However, much smaller insects, such as killer flies, also visualize and successfully pursue prey. This is an impressive behavior since the small size of the killer fly naturally limits the neural capacity and also the spatial resolution provided by the compound eye. Despite this, we here show that killer flies efficiently pursue natural (Drosophila melanogaster) and artificial (beads) prey. The natural pursuits are initiated at a distance of 7.9 ± 2.9 cm, which we show is too far away to allow for distance estimation using binocular disparities. Moreover, we show that rather than estimating absolute prey size prior to launching the attack, as dragonflies do, killer flies attack with high probability when the ratio of the prey's subtended retinal velocity and retinal size is 0.37. We also show that killer flies will respond to a stimulus of an angular size that is smaller

  10. Positive Selection on Loci Associated with Drug and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Brooke; Haller, Gabe; Edenberg, Howard; Tischfield, Jay; Brooks, Andy; Kramer, John; Schuckit, Marc; Nurnberger, John; Goate, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Much of the evolution of human behavior remains a mystery, including how certain disadvantageous behaviors are so prevalent. Nicotine addiction is one such phenotype. Several loci have been implicated in nicotine related phenotypes including the nicotinic receptor gene clusters (CHRNs) on chromosomes 8 and 15. Here we use 1000 Genomes sequence data from 3 populations (Africans, Asians and Europeans) to examine whether natural selection has occurred at these loci. We used Tajima’s D and the integrated haplotype score (iHS) to test for evidence of natural selection. Our results provide evidence for strong selection in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 8, previously found to be significantly associated with both nicotine and cocaine dependence, as well as evidence selection acting on the region containing the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene on chromosome 15, that is genome wide significant for risk for nicotine dependence. To examine the possibility that this selection is related to memory and learning, we utilized genetic data from the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) to test variants within these regions with three tests of memory and learning, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Block Design, WAIS Digit Symbol and WAIS Information tests. Of the 17 SNPs genotyped in COGA in this region, we find one significantly associated with WAIS digit symbol test results. This test captures aspects of reaction time and memory, suggesting that a phenotype relating to memory and learning may have been the driving force behind selection at these loci. This study could begin to explain why these seemingly deleterious SNPs are present at their current frequencies. PMID:26270548

  11. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N.M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G.M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10−7 study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r2 = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10−7 at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies. PMID:22100073

  12. Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R; Newhouse, Stephen J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G; Whincup, Peter H; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Dobson, Richard J; Howard, Philip J; Mein, Charles A; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Goodall, Alison H; Fowkes, F Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Nelson, Christopher P; Tobin, Martin D; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Hastie, Claire E; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Wells, George A; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2011-12-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies. PMID:22100073

  13. Positive Selection on Loci Associated with Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Brooke; Haller, Gabe; Edenberg, Howard; Tischfield, Jay; Brooks, Andy; Kramer, John; Schuckit, Marc; Nurnberger, John; Goate, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Much of the evolution of human behavior remains a mystery, including how certain disadvantageous behaviors are so prevalent. Nicotine addiction is one such phenotype. Several loci have been implicated in nicotine related phenotypes including the nicotinic receptor gene clusters (CHRNs) on chromosomes 8 and 15. Here we use 1000 Genomes sequence data from 3 populations (Africans, Asians and Europeans) to examine whether natural selection has occurred at these loci. We used Tajima's D and the integrated haplotype score (iHS) to test for evidence of natural selection. Our results provide evidence for strong selection in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 8, previously found to be significantly associated with both nicotine and cocaine dependence, as well as evidence selection acting on the region containing the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene on chromosome 15, that is genome wide significant for risk for nicotine dependence. To examine the possibility that this selection is related to memory and learning, we utilized genetic data from the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) to test variants within these regions with three tests of memory and learning, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Block Design, WAIS Digit Symbol and WAIS Information tests. Of the 17 SNPs genotyped in COGA in this region, we find one significantly associated with WAIS digit symbol test results. This test captures aspects of reaction time and memory, suggesting that a phenotype relating to memory and learning may have been the driving force behind selection at these loci. This study could begin to explain why these seemingly deleterious SNPs are present at their current frequencies. PMID:26270548

  14. Phenotypic associations of genetic susceptibility loci in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Elena; Nadig, Ajay; Richardson, Bruce C; Freedman, Barry I; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Niewold, Timothy B; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Ziegler, Julie T; Langefeld, Carl D; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Brown, Elizabeth E; Kimberly, Robert P; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Merrill, Joan T; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Martin, Javier; Park, So-Yeon; Bang, So-Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Moser, Kathy L; Vyse, Timothy J; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gaffney, Patrick M; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Harley, John B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sawalha, Amr H

    2011-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease. A number of genetic loci that increase lupus susceptibility have been established. This study examines if these genetic loci also contribute to the clinical heterogeneity in lupus. Materials and methods 4001 European-derived, 1547 Hispanic, 1590 African-American and 1191 Asian lupus patients were genotyped for 16 confirmed lupus susceptibility loci. Ancestry informative markers were genotyped to calculate and adjust for admixture. The association between the risk allele in each locus was determined and compared in patients with and without the various clinical manifestations included in the ACR criteria. Results Renal disorder was significantly correlated with the lupus risk allele in ITGAM (p=5.0×10−6, OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.35) and in TNFSF4 (p=0.0013, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.25). Other significant findings include the association between risk alleles in FCGR2A and malar rash (p=0.0031, OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.33), ITGAM and discoid rash (p=0.0020, OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.33), STAT4 and protection from oral ulcers (p=0.0027, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) and IL21 and haematological disorder (p=0.0027, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.22). All these associations are significant with a false discovery rate of <0.05 and pass the significance threshold using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Significant associations were found between lupus clinical manifestations and the FCGR2A, ITGAM, STAT4, TNSF4 and IL21 genes. The findings suggest that genetic profiling might be a useful tool to predict disease manifestations in lupus patients in the future. PMID:21719445

  15. Study of Toll-like receptor gene loci in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, M; Kwiatkowski, R; Albrecht, M; Fischer, A; Hampe, J; Müller-Quernheim, J; Schwinger, E; Schreiber, S

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-factorial systemic disease of granulomatous inflammation. Current concepts of the aetiology include interactions of unknown environmental triggers with an inherited susceptibility. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are main components of innate immunity and therefore TLR genes are candidate susceptibility genes in sarcoidosis. Ten members of the human TLR gene family have been identified and mapped to seven chromosomal segments. The aim of this study was to investigate all known TLR gene loci for genetic linkage with sarcoidosis and to follow positive signals with different methods. We analysed linkage of TLR gene loci to sarcoidosis by use of closely flanking microsatellite markers in 83 families with 180 affected siblings. We found significant linkage between sarcoidosis and markers of the TLR4 gene locus on chromosome 9q (non-parametric linkage score 2·63, P = 0·0043). No linkage was found for the remaining TLR gene loci. We subsequently genotyped 1203 sarcoidosis patients from 997 families, 1084 relatives and 537 control subjects for four single nucleotide polymorphisms of TLR4, including Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile. This genotype data set was studied by case–control comparisons and transmission disequilibrium tests, but showed no significant results. In summary, TLR4 − w ith significant genetic linkage results − appears to be the most promising member of the TLR gene family for further investigation in sarcoidosis. However, our results do not confirm the TLR4 polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile as susceptibility markers. Our results rather point to another as yet unidentified variant within or close to TLR4 that might confer susceptibility to sarcoidosis. PMID:18422738

  16. Using mixed inocula of Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains to improve the quality of traditional sparkling-wine.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, Manuel; Álvarez, María L; Ramírez, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The quality of traditional sparkling-wine depends on the aging process in the presence of dead yeast cells. These cells undergo a slow autolysis process thereby releasing some compounds, mostly colloidal polymers such as polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which influence the wine's foam properties and mouthfeel. Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer yeasts were tested to increase cell death and autolysis during mixed-yeast-inoculated second fermentation and aging. These yeasts killed sensitive strains in killer plate assays done under conditions of low pH and temperature similar to those used in sparkling-wine making, although some strains showed a different killer behaviour during the second fermentation. The fast killer effect improved the foam quality and mouthfeel of the mixed-inoculated wines, while the slow killer effect gave small improvements over single-inoculated wines. The effect was faster under high-pressure than under low-pressure conditions. Wine quality improvement did not correlate with the polysaccharide, protein, mannan, or aromatic compound concentrations, suggesting that the mouthfeel and foaming quality of sparkling wine are very complex properties influenced by other wine compounds and their interactions, as well as probably by the specific chemical composition of a given wine. PMID:27375256

  17. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  18. Thirteen nuclear microsatellite loci for butternut (Juglans cinerea L.).

    PubMed

    Hoban, Sean; Anderson, Robert; McCleary, Tim; Schlarbaum, Scott; Romero-Severson, Jeanne

    2008-05-01

    Butternut (Juglans cinerea L.) is an eastern North American forest tree severely threatened by an exotic fungal pathogen, Sirococcus clavigignenti-juglandacearum. We report here 13 nuclear microsatellites for genetic evaluation of the remaining natural populations. Summary statistics are reported for individuals from a population of butternuts in central Kentucky (N = 63). All markers were polymorphic, with an average of 13.7 alleles per locus observed. Four loci exhibited significantly fewer heterozygotes than expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.05). PMID:21585858

  19. Alpha-globin loci in homozygous beta-thalassemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Triadou, P; Lapoumeroulie, C; Girot, R; Labie, D

    1983-01-01

    Homozygous beta-thalassemia intermediate (TI) differs from thalassemia major (TM) in being less severe clinically. Associated alpha-thalassemia could account for the TI phenotype by reducing the alpha/non-alpha chain imbalance. We have analyzed the alpha loci of 9 TI and 11 TM patients by restriction endonuclease mapping. All the TM and 7 of the TI patients have the normal complement of four alpha-globin genes (alpha alpha/alpha alpha). One TI patient has three alpha-globin genes (alpha alpha/-alpha), and another TI patient has five alpha genes (alpha alpha/alpha alpha alpha). PMID:6305827

  20. Nine microsatellite loci developed from the octocoral, Paragorgia arborea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Paragorgia arborea, or bubblegum coral, occurs in continental slope habitats worldwide, which are increasingly threatened by human activities such as energy development and fisheries practices. From 101 putative loci screened, nine microsatellite markers were developed from samples taken from Baltimore canyon in the western North Atlantic Ocean. The number of alleles ranged from two to thirteen per locus and each displayed equilibrium. These nuclear resources will help further research on population connectivity in threatened coral species where mitochondrial markers are known to lack fine-scale genetic diversity.

  1. High-throughput identification of informative nuclear loci for shallow-scale phylogenetics and phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Alan R; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty

    2012-10-01

    One of the major challenges for researchers studying phylogeography and shallow-scale phylogenetics is the identification of highly variable and informative nuclear loci for the question of interest. Previous approaches to locus identification have generally required extensive testing of anonymous nuclear loci developed from genomic libraries of the target taxon, testing of loci of unknown utility from other systems, or identification of loci from the nearest model organism with genomic resources. Here, we present a fast and economical approach to generating thousands of variable, single-copy nuclear loci for any system using next-generation sequencing. We performed Illumina paired-end sequencing of three reduced-representation libraries (RRLs) in chorus frogs (Pseudacris) to identify orthologous, single-copy loci across libraries and to estimate sequence divergence at multiple taxonomic levels. We also conducted PCR testing of these loci across the genus Pseudacris and outgroups to determine whether loci developed for phylogeography can be extended to deeper phylogenetic levels. Prior to sequencing, we conducted in silico digestion of the most closely related reference genome (Xenopus tropicalis) to generate expectations for the number of loci and degree of coverage for a particular experimental design. Using the RRL approach, we: (i) identified more than 100,000 single-copy nuclear loci, 6339 of which were obtained for divergent conspecifics and 904 of which were obtained for heterospecifics; (ii) estimated average nuclear sequence divergence at 0.1% between alleles within an individual, 1.1% between conspecific individuals that represent two different clades, and 1.8% between species; and (iii) determined from PCR testing that 53% of the loci successfully amplify within-species and also many amplify to the genus-level and deeper in the phylogeny (16%). Our study effectively identified nuclear loci present in the genome that have levels of sequence divergence on

  2. Developing criteria and data to determine best options for expanding the core CODIS loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) Core Loci Working Group established by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) reviewed and recommended changes to the CODIS core loci. The Working Group identified 20 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (composed of the original CODIS core set loci (minus TPOX), four European recommended loci, PentaE, and DYS391) plus the Amelogenin marker as the new core set. Before selecting and finalizing the core loci, some evaluations are needed to provide guidance for the best options of core selection. Method The performance of current and newly proposed CODIS core loci sets were evaluated with simplified analyses for adventitious hit rates in reasonably large datasets under single-source profile comparisons, mixture comparisons and kinship searches, and for international data sharing. Informativeness (for example, match probability, average kinship index (AKI)) and mutation rates of each locus were some of the criteria to consider for loci selection. However, the primary factor was performance with challenged forensic samples. Results The current battery of loci provided in already validated commercial kits meet the needs for single-source profile comparisons and international data sharing, even with relatively large databases. However, the 13 CODIS core loci are not sufficiently powerful for kinship analyses and searching potential contributors of mixtures in larger databases; 19 or more autosomal STR loci perform better. Y-chromosome STR (Y-STR) loci are very useful to trace paternal lineage, deconvolve female and male mixtures, and resolve inconsistencies with Amelogenin typing. The DYS391 locus is of little theoretical or practical use. Combining five or six Y-chromosome STR loci with existing autosomal STR loci can produce better performance than the same number of autosomal loci for kinship analysis and still yield a sufficiently low match probability for single-source profile comparisons. Conclusion A more

  3. Characterization of 19 microsatellite loci in the clonal monkshood Aconitum kusnezoffii (Ranunculaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xing-Yue; Tian, Hao; Liao, Wan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from Aconitum kusnezoffii (Ranunculaceae) to estimate male and female reproductive success and evaluate the effects of clonal growth on sexual reproduction. Methods and Results: A genomic enrichment approach was used to develop microsatellite markers. In three investigated A. kusnezoffii populations, a total of 19 microsatellite loci were successfully amplified, and 13 of these loci were polymorphic. Most of the primer pairs designed for the identified loci also amplified corresponding microsatellite loci in A. barbatum var. puberulum and A. alboviolaceum. Conclusions: The identified microsatellite loci will be useful for quantifying male and female fitness in A. kusnezoffii and evaluating the effects of clonal growth on sexual reproduction. PMID:27347450

  4. Discovery of six new susceptibility loci and analysis of pleiotropic effects in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Irwanto, Astrid; Fu, Xi'an; Yu, Gongqi; Yu, Yongxiang; Sun, Yonghu; Wang, Chuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Okada, Yukinori; Low, Huiqi; Li, Yi; Liany, Herty; Chen, Mingfei; Bao, Fangfang; Li, Jinghui; You, Jiabao; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Jian; Chu, Tongsheng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Wang, Na; Niu, Guiye; Liu, Dianchang; Yu, Xiulu; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Hongqing; Zhou, Guizhi; Rotzschke, Olaf; Chen, Shumin; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the discovery of several susceptibility loci for leprosy with robust evidence, providing biological insight into the role of host genetic factors in mycobacterial infection. However, the identified loci only partially explain disease heritability, and additional genetic risk factors remain to be discovered. We performed a 3-stage GWAS of leprosy in the Chinese population using 8,313 cases and 16,017 controls. Besides confirming all previously published loci, we discovered six new susceptibility loci, and further gene prioritization analysis of these loci implicated BATF3, CCDC88B and CIITA-SOCS1 as new susceptibility genes for leprosy. A systematic evaluation of pleiotropic effects demonstrated a high tendency for leprosy susceptibility loci to show association with autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Further analysis suggests that molecular sensing of infection might have a similar pathogenic role across these diseases, whereas immune responses have discordant roles in infectious and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25642632

  5. Discovery and validation of sub-threshold genome-wide association study loci using epigenomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinchen; Tucker, Nathan R; Rizki, Gizem; Mills, Robert; Krijger, Peter Hl; de Wit, Elzo; Subramanian, Vidya; Bartell, Eric; Nguyen, Xinh-Xinh; Ye, Jiangchuan; Leyton-Mange, Jordan; Dolmatova, Elena V; van der Harst, Pim; de Laat, Wouter; Ellinor, Patrick T; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Milan, David J; Kellis, Manolis; Boyer, Laurie A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a modest proportion of heritability, suggesting that meaningful associations lie 'hidden' below current thresholds. Here, we integrate information from association studies with epigenomic maps to demonstrate that enhancers significantly overlap known loci associated with the cardiac QT interval and QRS duration. We apply functional criteria to identify loci associated with QT interval that do not meet genome-wide significance and are missed by existing studies. We demonstrate that these 'sub-threshold' signals represent novel loci, and that epigenomic maps are effective at discriminating true biological signals from noise. We experimentally validate the molecular, gene-regulatory, cellular and organismal phenotypes of these sub-threshold loci, demonstrating that most sub-threshold loci have regulatory consequences and that genetic perturbation of nearby genes causes cardiac phenotypes in mouse. Our work provides a general approach for improving the detection of novel loci associated with complex human traits. PMID:27162171

  6. Chromosomal localization of the human natural killer cell class I receptor family genes to 19q13.4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; yabe, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the localization of the human natural killer cell I receptor family genes to human chromosome 19q13.4 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. These genes mediate the inhibition of the cytotoxicity of subsets of natural killer cells. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Lymphokine-activated killer cell phenomenon. Lysis of natural killer-resistant fresh solid tumor cells by interleukin 2-activated autologous human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, E.A.; Mazumder, A.; Zhang, H.Z.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1982-06-01

    Activation in lectin-free interleukin 2 (IL-2) containing supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) from cancer patients or normal individuals resulted in expression of cytotoxicity toward 20 of 21 natural killer (NK)-resistant fresh solid tumor cells tested. Fresh solid tumor cells were resistant to NK-mediated lysis in 10 autologous patients' PBL-tumor interactions, and from 17 normal individuals tested against 13 allogeneic fresh tumors. Culture of PBL in IL-2 for 2-3 d was required for the lymphokine activated killers (LAK) to be expressed, and lytic activity toward a variety of NK-resistant fresh and cultured tumor targets developed in parallel. Autologous IL-2 was functional in LAK activation, as well as interferon-depleted IL-2 preparations. Irradiation of responder PBL before culture in IL-2 prevented LAK development. Precursors of LAK were present in PBL depleted of adherent cells and in NK-void thoracic duct lymphocytes, suggesting that the precursor is neither a monocyte nor an NK cell. LAK effectors expressed the serologically defined T cell markers of OKT.3, Leu-1, and 4F2, but did not express the monocyte/NK marker OKM-1. Lysis of autologous fresh solid tumors by LAK from cancer patients' PBL was demonstrated in 85% of the patient-fresh tumor combinations. Our data present evidence that the LAK system is a phenomenon distinct from either NK or CTL systems that probably accounts for a large number of reported nonclassical cytotoxicities. The biological role of LAK cells is not yet known, although it is suggested that these cells may be functional in immune surveillance against human solid tumors.

  8. Elevated levels of invariant natural killer T-cell and natural killer cell activation correlate with disease progression in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Malone, David F.G.; Buggert, Marcus; Karlsson, Annika C.; Isberg, Per-Erik; Biague, Antonio J.; Norrgren, Hans; Medstrand, Patrik; Moll, Markus; Sandberg, Johan K.; Jansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency and activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and natural killer (NK) cells among HIV-1, HIV-2, or dually HIV-1/HIV-2 (HIV-D)-infected individuals, in relation to markers of disease progression. Design: Whole blood samples were collected from treatment-naive HIV-1 (n = 23), HIV-2 (n = 34), and HIV-D (n = 11) infected individuals, as well as HIV-seronegative controls (n = 25), belonging to an occupational cohort in Guinea-Bissau. Methods: Frequencies and activation levels of iNKT and NK cell subsets were analysed using multicolour flow cytometry, and results were related to HIV-status, CD4+ T-cell levels, viral load, and T-cell activation. Results: HIV-1, HIV-D, and viremic HIV-2 individuals had lower numbers of CD4+ iNKT cells in circulation compared with seronegative controls. Numbers of CD56bright NK cells were also reduced in HIV-infected individuals as compared with control study participants. Notably, iNKT cell and NK cell activation levels, assessed by CD38 expression, were increased in HIV-1 and HIV-2 single, as well as dual, infections. HIV-2 viremia was associated with elevated activation levels in CD4+ iNKT cells, CD56bright, and CD56dim NK cells, as compared with aviremic HIV-2 infection. Additionally, disease markers such as CD4+ T-cell percentages, viral load, and CD4+ T-cell activation were associated with CD38 expression levels of both iNKT and NK cells, which activation levels also correlated with each other. Conclusion: Our data indicate that elevated levels of iNKT-cell and NK-cell activation are associated with viremia and disease progression markers in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. PMID:27163705

  9. Natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF) augments natural killer cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal response against colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M D; Sigal, R K; Williams, N N; Daly, J M

    1991-04-01

    The therapy of colorectal cancer may be improved by biologic response modifiers that enhance natural killer (NK) cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal mechanisms. This study examined the effect of a recently discovered cytokine purified from the supernatant of an Ebstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line (RPMI-8866), natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF), on NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 24 hr in the presence or absence of NKSF (3.6 pM) or interleukin-2 (1 nM). The cultured lymphocytes were analyzed for lytic potential toward chromium-51-labeled colon carcinoma targets SW 1116, 498 LI, and WC 1. ADCC was measured by incubating chromium-51-labeled SW 1116 or WC 1 targets with the monoclonal antibody CO17-1A, an IgG2a antibody reactive with gastrointestinal cancer-associated cell antigen, or control mouse IgG prior to testing NKSF-treated or control PBL effectors in a 6-hr cytotoxicity assay. NKSF significantly enhanced NK cytolysis of colon carcinoma and NK-resistant lymphoma cell lines, and on a molar basis was approximately 300 times more potent than interleukin-2 in generating NK cytotoxicity. Furthermore, NKSF significantly augmented lymphocyte-mediated ADCC against colon carcinoma targets, and the combination of NKSF with the antibody CO17-1A had an additive effect on lymphocyte tumoricidial capacity. Thus, NKSF may have a potential role in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:1673486

  10. Genetics analysis of 38 STR loci in Uygur population from Southern Xinjiang of China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Liu, Haibo; Liao, Qinxiang; Xu, Xu; Chen, Wen; Hao, Shicheng

    2016-05-01

    The allele frequencies and statistical parameters of 38 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci were analyzed in the Uygur population from Southern Xinjiang of China with 290 unrelated individuals. The results show these 38 STR loci have high or medium power of discrimination and probabilities of exclusion. All loci are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The genetic distances between the Uygur population and other Chinese populations were also estimated. PMID:26438047

  11. Lineage analysis by microsatellite loci deep sequencing in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; He, Xionglei; Xing, Ke

    2016-05-01

    Lineage analysis is the identification of all the progeny of a single progenitor cell, and has become particularly useful for studying developmental processes and cancer biology. Here, we propose a novel and effective method for lineage analysis that combines sequence capture and next-generation sequencing technology. Genome-wide mononucleotide and dinucleotide microsatellite loci in eight samples from two mice were identified and used to construct phylogenetic trees based on somatic indel mutations at these loci, which were unique enough to distinguish and parse samples from different mice into different groups along the lineage tree. For example, biopsies from the liver and stomach, which originate from the endoderm, were located in the same clade, while samples in kidney, which originate from the mesoderm, were located in another clade. Yet, tissue with a common developmental origin may still contain cells of a mixed ancestry. This genome-wide approach thus provides a non-invasive lineage analysis method based on mutations that accumulate in the genomes of opaque multicellular organism somatic cells. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 387-391, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26932355

  12. Nucleotide Substitution and Recombination at Orthologous Loci in Staphylococcus aureus†

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.; Friedman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The pattern of nucleotide substitution was examined at 2,129 orthologous loci among five genomes of Staphylococcus aureus, which included two sister pairs of closely related genomes (MW2/MSSA476 and Mu50/N315) and the more distantly related MRSA252. A total of 108 loci were unusual in lacking any synonymous differences among the five genomes; most of these were short genes encoding proteins highly conserved at the amino acid sequence level (including many ribosomal proteins) or unknown predicted genes. In contrast, 45 genes were identified that showed anomalously high divergence at synonymous sites. The latter genes were evidently introduced by homologous recombination from distantly related genomes, and in many cases, the pattern of nucleotide substitution made it possible to reconstruct the most probable recombination event involved. These recombination events introduced genes encoding proteins that differed in amino acid sequence and thus potentially in function. Several of the proteins are known or likely to be involved in pathogenesis (e.g., staphylocoagulase, exotoxin, Ser-Asp fibrinogen-binding bone sialoprotein-binding protein, fibrinogen and keratin-10 binding surface-anchored protein, fibrinogen-binding protein ClfA, and enterotoxin P). Therefore, the results support the hypothesis that exchange of homologous genes among S. aureus genomes can play a role in the evolution of pathogenesis in this species. PMID:15805516

  13. Mutations at 17 STR loci in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiangwei; Liu, Yacheng; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Qingxia; Huo, Zhenyi; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2006-10-16

    Knowledge about mutation rates and the mutational process of short-tandem-repeat (STR) or microsatellite loci used in forensic analysis is crucial for the correct interpretation of resulting genetic profiles. We analysed a total of 19,754 samples from 6532 paternity testing cases at 17 STR loci which are commonly applied to forensics. The parenthood in each of these cases was highly validated (probability>99.99%). We identified 178 mutations. Locus-specific mutation rate estimates varied between 7.0 x 10(-5) and 2.2 x 10(-3), and the overall average mutation rate estimate was 8.4 x 10(-4). The observed mutational features for STRs have important consequences for forensic application such as the definition of criterions for exclusion in paternity testing and the interpretation of DNA profiles in identification analysis. In order to enrich the reference data of STRs mutations which are valuable for forensic application, we suggest the establishment of such database and ask the whole forensic community for data contribution including China. PMID:16857331

  14. Using Environmental Correlations to Identify Loci Underlying Local Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Coop, Graham; Witonsky, David; Di Rienzo, Anna; Pritchard, Jonathan K.

    2010-01-01

    Loci involved in local adaptation can potentially be identified by an unusual correlation between allele frequencies and important ecological variables or by extreme allele frequency differences between geographic regions. However, such comparisons are complicated by differences in sample sizes and the neutral correlation of allele frequencies across populations due to shared history and gene flow. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed a Bayesian method that estimates the empirical pattern of covariance in allele frequencies between populations from a set of markers and then uses this as a null model for a test at individual SNPs. In our model the sample frequencies of an allele across populations are drawn from a set of underlying population frequencies; a transform of these population frequencies is assumed to follow a multivariate normal distribution. We first estimate the covariance matrix of this multivariate normal across loci using a Monte Carlo Markov chain. At each SNP, we then provide a measure of the support, a Bayes factor, for a model where an environmental variable has a linear effect on the transformed allele frequencies compared to a model given by the covariance matrix alone. This test is shown through power simulations to outperform existing correlation tests. We also demonstrate that our method can be used to identify SNPs with unusually large allele frequency differentiation and offers a powerful alternative to tests based on pairwise or global FST. Software is available at http://www.eve.ucdavis.edu/gmcoop/. PMID:20516501

  15. High polymorphism at microsatellite loci in the Chinese donkey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R F; Xie, W M; Zhang, T; Lei, C Z

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds, 415 individuals representing ten breeds were investigated using ten microsatellite markers. The observed number of alleles, mean effective number of alleles (NE), mean expected heterozygosity (HE), and polymorphic information content (PIC) of each breed and polymorphic locus were analyzed. The results showed that seven (HTG7, HTG10, AHT4, HTG6, HMS6, HMS3, and HMS7) of ten microsatellite loci were polymorphic. The mean PIC, HE, and NE of seven polymorphic loci for the ten donkey breeds were 0.7679, 0.8072, and 6.0275, respectively. These results suggest that domestic Chinese donkey breeds possess higher levels of genetic diversity and heterozygosity than foreign donkeys. A neighbor-joining tree based on Nei's standard genetic distance showed that there was close genetic distance among Xinjiang, Qingyang, Xiji, and Guanzhong donkey breeds. In addition, Mongolia and Dezhou donkey breeds were placed in the same category. The phylogenetic tree revealed that the genetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds are consistent with their geographic distribution and breeding history. PMID:27420967

  16. Mapping loci controlling flowering time in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Camargo, L E; Osborn, T C

    1996-04-01

    The timing of the transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is a major determinant of the morphology and value of Brassica oleracea crops. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling flowering time in B. oleracea were mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) loci and flowering data of F3 families derived from a cabbage by broccoli cross. Plants were grown in the field, and a total of 15 surveys were made throughout the experiment at 5-15 day intervals, in which plants were inspected for the presence of flower buds or open flowers. The flowering traits used for data analysis were the proportion of annual plants (PF) within each F3 family at the end of the experiment, and a flowering-time index (FT) that combined both qualitative (annual/biennial) and quantitative (days to flowering) information. Two QTLs on different linkage groups were found associated with both PF and FT and one additional QTL was found associated only with FT. When combined in a multi-locus model, all three QTLs explained 54.1% of the phenotypic variation in FT. Epistasis was found between two genomic regions associated with FT. Comparisons of map positions of QTLs in B. oleracea with those in B. napus and B. rapa provided no evidence for conservation of genomic regions associated with flowering time between these species. PMID:24166330

  17. Making the giant leap with augmented cognition technologies : what will be the first %22killer app?%22.

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, James Chris

    2007-02-01

    This paper highlights key topic areas to be discussed the authors in a panel format during the Augmented Cognition thematic area paper session: 'Augmented Cognition Lessons Learned and Future Directions for Enabling 'Anyone, Anytime, Anywhere' Applications'. The term 'killer app' has been part of the vernacular in the commercial computer software and electronic devices industry to refer to breakthrough technologies [2]. A 'killer app' generally emerges with the development of related technologies that extends over some time and involves numerous variations on a basic concept. Hypotheses may be offered with respect to the conditions that will be needed to enable a similar situation with augmented cognition technologies. This paper and resulting panel session will address the numerous concepts that have emerged from the augmented cognition field to date and postulate how and when this field's first 'killer app' may emerge (e.g., 5, 10, 15, or more years from now).

  18. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    PubMed

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  19. Skin TLR7 triggering promotes accumulation of respiratory dendritic cells and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11b(hi) DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  20. Skin TLR7 Triggering Promotes Accumulation of Respiratory Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11bhi DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  1. Effect of tunicamycin on sialomucin and natural killer susceptibility of rat mammary tumor ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, S; Moriarty, J; Moody, C E; Sherblom, A P

    1990-09-01

    The MAT-B1 and MAT-C1 ascites sublines of the 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma contain a dominant cell surface "complex" consisting of two glycoproteins: ascites sialoglycoprotein (ASGP)-1, a Mr 600,000-700,000 peanut agglutinin-binding sialomucin, and ASGP-2, a Mr 120,000 concancavalin A-binding glycoprotein (Sherblom et al., J. Biol. Chem., 255: 783-790, 1980; Sherblom and Carraway, J. Biol. Chem., 255: 12051-12059, 1980). Although both cell lines are resistant to lysis by natural killer cells, treatments which result in loss of cell surface ASGP-1 render the cells susceptible to natural killer cell lysis (Sherblom and Moody, Cancer Res., 46:4543-4546, 1986). Treatment of the ascites cells with 5 micrograms/ml tunicamycin for 24 h effectively inhibits glycosylation of ASGP-2 without affecting cell viability or total protein synthesis. Under these conditions, expression of ASGP-1 is depressed by at least 50% in both cell lines, as monitored by [3H]glucosamine incorporation and by binding of peanut agglutinin to intact cells. The size distribution of O-linked oligosaccharides in ASGP-1 from tunicamycin-treated versus control MAT-B1 cells is indistinguishable, as determined by Bio-Gel P-4 chromatography following alkaline-borohydride treatment. Complex isolated from either treated or control cells bands at the same density in a CsCl gradient containing Triton X-100 and contains a diffuse band corresponding to ASGP-2 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Tunicamycin-treated cells, consistent with the reduced expression of ASGP-1, are significantly more susceptible to natural killer cell-mediated lysis, when compared to untreated controls. The results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is a prerequisite for sialomucin synthesis and/or complex formation. PMID:2386935

  2. M by Fritz Lang (Germany, 1931) Phenomenology of Evil: a serial killer and his social group.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    In 1931 an unknown murderer of little girls (Peter Lorre) is terrorizing the city of Berlin. We see him entice a new victim, the little Elsie Beckmann, who is coming home from school: whistling a tune by Grieg, he buys her a balloon from a blind beggar. When her corpse is discovered, the police undertake a major mobilization aimed at seeking the serial killer in the criminal underworld; meanwhile, the ever more terrified population starts to see the dangerous murderer in everyone. Since the roundups and incursions into the seediest parts of town disturb the gangsters' activities, the leaders of organized crime, headed by Schränker (Gustav Gründgens), take it upon themselves also to hunt down the solitary child-killer, engaging the community of beggars. Every corner of the city is catalogued and sifted by the dual activity of the police and the gangsters. The 'monster', a former psychiatric patient, mild and harmless in manner, is finally tracked down via two parallel routes: the clue of a cigarette packet enables Inspector Lohmann (Otto Wernicke) to track down the serial killer's address, while the blind beggar recognizes the whistled tune. The murderer is identified by a 'slap' from a young criminal which leaves an M marked in chalk on a shoulder of the man's overcoat. Thus he is caught and undergoes a kind of trial at the hands of the gangsters who tie him up in order to lynch him, but they are interrupted by the arrival of the forces of law and order. PMID:26463110

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome phylogeographic analysis of killer whales (Orcinus orca) indicates multiple species.

    PubMed

    Morin, Phillip A; Archer, Frederick I; Foote, Andrew D; Vilstrup, Julia; Allen, Eric E; Wade, Paul; Durban, John; Parsons, Kim; Pitman, Robert; Li, Lewyn; Bouffard, Pascal; Abel Nielsen, Sandra C; Rasmussen, Morten; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Harkins, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) currently comprise a single, cosmopolitan species with a diverse diet. However, studies over the last 30 yr have revealed populations of sympatric "ecotypes" with discrete prey preferences, morphology, and behaviors. Although these ecotypes avoid social interactions and are not known to interbreed, genetic studies to date have found extremely low levels of diversity in the mitochondrial control region, and few clear phylogeographic patterns worldwide. This low level of diversity is likely due to low mitochondrial mutation rates that are common to cetaceans. Using killer whales as a case study, we have developed a method to readily sequence, assemble, and analyze complete mitochondrial genomes from large numbers of samples to more accurately assess phylogeography and estimate divergence times. This represents an important tool for wildlife management, not only for killer whales but for many marine taxa. We used high-throughput sequencing to survey whole mitochondrial genome variation of 139 samples from the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and southern oceans. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that each of the known ecotypes represents a strongly supported clade with divergence times ranging from approximately 150,000 to 700,000 yr ago. We recommend that three named ecotypes be elevated to full species, and that the remaining types be recognized as subspecies pending additional data. Establishing appropriate taxonomic designations will greatly aid in understanding the ecological impacts and conservation needs of these important marine predators. We predict that phylogeographic mitogenomics will become an important tool for improved statistical phylogeography and more precise estimates of divergence times. PMID:20413674

  4. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    The tiger is one of the most threatened wildlife species since the abundance and distribution of tiger have decreased dramatically in the last century. The wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) only distributed in northeast China, the far east area of Russia and the north Korea and its size of wild population is about 450 in the world and 20 in China. Several hundred captive populations of Amur tigers are the main source to protect gene library of tiger and the source of recovering the wild populations. The Breeding Center for Felidae at Hengdaohezi and Haoerbin Tiger Park in Heilongjiang Province is the biggest captive breeding base in China. How to make clear the genetic pedigree and establish reasonable breeding system is the urgent issues. So we use the microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive technology to research on the genetic diversity of captive Amur tiger in this study. Ten microsatellite loci (Fca005, Fca075, Fca094, Fca152, Fca161, Fca294, Pti002, Pti003, Pti007 and Pti010), highly variable nuclear markers, were studied their genetic diversity in 113 captive Amur tigers. The PCR amplified products of microsatellite loci were detected by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allele numbers, allelic frequency, gene heterozygosity(H(e)), polymorphism information content(PIC) and effective number of allele(N(e)) were calculated. 41 alleles were found and their size were ranged from 110bp to 250bp in ten microsatellite loci, Fca152 had 6 alleles, Fca075, Fca094 and Fca294 had 5 alleles, Fca005 and Pti002 had 4 alleles and the others had 3 alleles in all tiger samples, respectively. The allelic frequencies were from 0.009 to 0.767; The He ranged from 0.385 to 0.707, and Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; the PIC were from 0.353 to 0.658, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; and N(e) were from 1.626 to 3.409, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value, which showed the ten

  5. Analysis of 31 STR loci in the genetic isolate of Carloforte (Sardinia, Italy)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The genotypes of 31 autosomal short tandem repeat loci in the population of Carloforte were analyzed, these representing a linguistic and genetic isolate located on the island of Sardinia (Italy). The markers span the entire length of chromosomes 19, 20, 21 and 22. Allele frequencies and statistical parameters were presented for all loci. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.279 to 0.884, and polymorphism information content from 0.552 to 0.886. All but two loci showed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. The 31 short tandem repeat loci examined in the present work provide additional data on the genetic structure of the Carloforte population. PMID:21637506

  6. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, A.; Graziano, S.L.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the Arctic cisco, Coregonus autumnalis. Loci were evaluated in 21 samples from the Colville River subsistence fishery. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 18. Observed heterozygosity of loci varied from 0.10 to 1.00, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.92. All eight microsatellite markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The loci presented here will be useful in describing population structure and exploring populations of origin for Arctic cisco. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Characterization of ten microsatellite loci in midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus concolor)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Parker, Joshua M.

    2010-01-01

    Primers for 10 microsatellite loci were developed for midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus concolor), a small bodied subspecies of the Western Rattlesnake, which is found in the Colorado Plateau of eastern Utah, western Colorado and southwestern Wyoming. In a screen of 23 individuals from the most northern portion of the subspecies range in southwestern Wyoming, the 10 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from 4 to 11 alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses, which will ultimately aid in management efforts for this rare subspecies of rattlesnake.

  8. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival. PMID:24488563

  9. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-01-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival. PMID:24488563

  10. Differential loss of natural killer cell activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenwen; Zhou, Lin; Wen, Siwan; Duan, Qianglin; Huang, Feifei; Tang, Yu; Liu, Xiaohong; Chai, Yongyan; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the activity of natural killer cells through their inhibitory and activating receptors and quantity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells extracted from patients with acute myocardial infarction, stable angina pectoris and the controls. Methods: 100 patients with myocardial infarction, 100 with stable angina, and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. 20 randomly chosen people per group were examined for the whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the gene expressions of all 40 inhibitory and activating natural killer cell receptors. Flow cytometry analysis was applied to all 200 patients to measure the quantity of natural killer cells. Results: In myocardial infarction group, the mRNA expressions of six inhibitory receptors KIR2DL2, KIR3DL3, CD94, NKG2A, KLRB1, KLRG1, and eight activating receptors KIR2DS3, KIR2DS5, NKp30, NTB-A, CRACC, CD2, CD7 and CD96 were significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) compared with both angina patients and the controls. There was no statistical difference in receptor expressions between angina patients and control group. The quantity of natural killer cells was significantly decreased in both infarction and angina patients compared with normal range (P<0.001). Conclusions: The significant mRNAs down-regulation of several receptors in myocardial infarction group and reduction in the quantity of natural killer cells in both myocardial infarction and angina patients showed a quantitative loss and dysfunction of natural killer cells in myocardial infarction patients. PMID:26823790

  11. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type: A great pretender.

    PubMed

    Spadigam, Anita; Dhupar, Anita; Syed, Shaheen; Saluja, Tajindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTCL) is a rare Epstein-Barr virus associated lymphoma seen predominantly in Asian population with a 5 years survival rate ranging from 10% to 75% depending on the stage of presentation. In this case report, we describe an unusual presentation of ENKTCL, which in its early stages was clinically misdiagnosed as buccal space infection and later on histologically as inflammatory myofibroblastic pseudotumor owing to manifold reasons. Postoperative biopsy specimen showed characteristic feature of ENKTCL both histologically and immunophenotypically. This case report underlines the importance of adequate sampling and the unusual presentation of ENKTCL nasal type with oral manifestations. PMID:26539376

  12. Activation of natural killer cells and cytokine production in humans by bacterial extracts (OM-85 BV).

    PubMed

    Wybran, J; Libin, M; Schandene, L

    1990-01-01

    The influence of Broncho-Vaxom (BV) on different immune parameters was investigated in vitro on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). It was found that BV enhances the natural killer (NK) activity of PBMC and increases their spontaneous and phytohemagglutin (PHA)-induced production of tumor-necrosis factor--alpha and interleukin-2 as well as the PHA-stimulated production of interferon-gamma. These immunostimulating actions of BV on NK activity and cytokine production can contribute to the understanding of the enhancement of the body's defense mechanisms against respiratory tract infections. PMID:2117183

  13. Disproportionate emission of bubble streams with killer whale biphonic calls: perspectives on production and function.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Ann E; Grebner, Dawn M; Musser, Whitney B; Nash, Juliette S; Crance, Jessica L

    2015-02-01

    Stereotyped pulsed calls were attributed to 11 killer whales (Orcinus orca) with and without synchronous bubble streams in three datasets collected from two facilities from 1993 to 2012. Calls with and without synchronous bubble streams and divergent overlapping high frequency components ("biphonic" vs "monophonic") were compared. Subjects produced bubbles significantly more often when calls had divergent high frequency components. However, acoustic features in one biphonic call shared by five subjects provided little evidence for an acoustic effect of synchronous bubble flow. Disproportionate bubbling supported other evidence that biphonic calls form a distinct category, but suggested a function in short-range communication. PMID:25698045

  14. Aplastic anaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Palva, H L; Koivisto, O; Palva, I P

    1975-01-01

    A 64-year-old farmer developed aplastic anaemia after exposure to 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyactic acid while spraying weed killer. Muscular weakness, haemorrhagic gastritis and slight signs of liver damage occurred at the same time. All these symptoms, including blood dyscrasia , are consistent with those described as toxic effects of chlorphenoxyacetic acids in animal experiments. A causal relationship between aplastic anaemia and the 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid thus seems probable. The anaemia was reversible, but the case serves as a warning that careful safety measures are required during the use of chlorphenoxyacetic acids and related compounds. PMID:804793

  15. Natural Killer Cell Diversity in Viral Infection: Why and How Much?

    PubMed Central

    Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a diverse group of innate lymphocytes that are specialized to rapidly respond to cancerous or virus-infected cells. NK cell function is controlled by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory receptors expressed at the cell surface. Variegated expression patterns of these activating and inhibitory receptors at the single cell level leads to a highly diverse NK cell repertoire. Here I review the factors that influence NK cell repertoire diversity and its functional consequences for our ability to fight viruses.

  16. Son-Killer: A Third Extrachromosomal Factor Affecting the Sex Ratio in the Parasitoid Wasp, NASONIA (=MORMONIELLA) VITRIPENNIS

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Samuel Way

    1985-01-01

    An extrachromosomal factor, termed son-killer (sk), affects the sex ratio in a parasitoid wasp, Nasonia (=Mormoniella ) vitripennis. The factor is maternally transmitted and alters the secondary sex ratio of an infected female through mortality of approximately 80% of the male embryos. No effect on the primary (zygotic) sex ratio is observed. Ninety-five percent of the daughters of an infected female inherit son-killer. The factor can also be transmitted contagiously when the progeny of infected and uninfected females develop simultaneously on a single host. In newly infected strains, the sex ratio effects are equivalent to those in the original. PMID:3988039

  17. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  18. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  19. A powerful likelihood method for the analysis of linkage disequilibrium between trait loci and one or more polymorphic marker loci

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, J.D.

    1995-03-01

    Historically, most methods for detecting linkage disequilibrium were designed for use with diallelic marker loci, for which the analysis is straightforward. With the advent of polymorphic markers with many alleles, the normal approach to their analysis has been either to extend the methodology for two-allele systems (leading to an increase in df and to a corresponding loss of power) or to select the allele believed to be associated and then collapse the other alleles, reducing, in a biased way, the locus to a diallelic system. I propose a likelihood-based approach to testing for linkage disequilibrium, an approach that becomes more conservative as the number of alleles increases, and as the number of markers considered jointly increases in a multipoint test for linkage disequilibrium, while maintaining high power. Properties of this method for detecting associations and fine mapping the location of disease traits are investigated. It is found to be, in general, more powerful than conventional methods, and it provides a tractable framework for the fine mapping of new disease loci. Application to the cystic fibrosis data of Kerem et al. is included to illustrate the method. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Coordinated regulation of natural killer receptor expression in the maturing human immune system

    PubMed Central

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Horowitz, Amir; Parham, Peter; Blish, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are responsible for recognizing and killing transformed, stressed, and infected cells. They recognize a set of non-antigen-specific features termed “altered self” through combinatorial signals from activating and inhibitory receptors. These natural killer cell receptors (NKR) are also expressed on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, and monocytes, though a comprehensive inventory of NKR expression patterns across leukocyte lineages has never been performed. Using mass cytometry, we found that NKR expression patterns distinguish cell lineages in human peripheral blood. In individuals with high levels of CD57, indicative of a mature immune repertoire, NKR are more likely to be expressed on non-NK cells, especially CD8+ T cells. Mature NK and CD8+ T cell populations show increased diversity of NKR surface expression patterns, but with distinct determinants: mature NK cells acquire primarily inhibitory receptors, while CD8+ T cells attain a specific subset of both activating and inhibitory receptors, potentially imbuing them with a distinct functional role. Concurrently, monocytes show decreased expression of the generalized inhibitory receptor LILRB1, consistent with an increased activation threshold. Therefore, NKR expression is coordinately regulated as the immune system matures, resulting in the transfer of “altered self” recognition potential among leukocyte lineages. This likely reduces antigen specificity in the mature human immune system, and implies that vaccines and therapeutics that engage both its innate and adaptive branches may be more effective in the settings of aging and chronic infection. PMID:25288567

  1. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and methods Randomized phase II and III trials on CIK cell-based therapy were identified by electronic searches using a combination of "hepatocellular carcinoma" and "cytokine-induced killer cells". Results The analysis showed significant survival benefit (one-year survival, p < 0.001; two-year survival, p < 0.001; median overall survival, p < 0.001) in favor of CIK-based therapy. Comparison of CIK group versus non-CIK group resulted in a significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) (p < 0.01). A favored disease control rate (DCR) and overall response rate (ORR) were also observed in patients receiving CIK cell therapy (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, patients in the CIK group showed better quality of life (QoL), diminished HBV-DNA content and AFP level (p < 0.01). Comparing T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood, the analysis showed the ratio of CD3+, CD4+, CD4+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells significantly increased in the CIK group, compared with the non-CIK group (p < 0.01). Conclusions CIK cell therapy demonstrated a significant superiority in prolonging the median overall survival, PFS, DCR, ORR and QoL of HCC patients. These results support further larger scale randomized controlled trials for HCC patients with or without the combination of other therapeutic methods. PMID:23210562

  2. Activation of natural killer cells and cytokine production in man by bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Wybran, J; Libin, M; Schandene, L

    1989-01-01

    Broncho-Vaxon (OM-85 BV) is a bacterial extract of eight bacterias usually involved in the respiratory tract infections. Since Broncho-Vaxom is clinically active in decreasing the incidence of such infections, its immunological effect was investigated, in vitro, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The experimental data indicate that Broncho-Vaxom can modulate various immune functions. It was shown, using a radioimmunoassay for these cytokines, that Broncho-Vaxom will spontaneously enhance TNF alpha and IL-2 production whereas it has no action on IF gamma production. However, when the PBMC are stimulated with PHA, an increased production for IF gamma, TNF alpha and IL-2 was observed suggesting that, under appropriate conditions, Broncho-Vaxom enhances the production of these cytokines. In other experiments, Broncho-Vaxom was shown to markedly increase the natural killer activity of PBMC. All these results demonstrate that Broncho-Vaxom is an immunomodulator affecting multiple immunological mechanisms including the activation of natural killer cells, of monocytes and of T cells through direct mechanisms or through the cytokine cascade. PMID:2503554

  3. Yeast K1 killer toxin forms ion channels in sensitive yeast spheroplasts and in artificial liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, B; Zhu, H; Kubalski, A; Zhou, X L; Culbertson, M; Bussey, H; Kung, C

    1990-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to examine the plasma membranes of sensitive yeast spheroplasts exposed to partially purified killer toxin preparations. Asolectin liposomes in which the toxin was incorporated were also examined. Excised inside-out patches from these preparations often revealed at 118 pS conductance appearing in pairs. The current through this conductance flickered rapidly among three states: dwelling mostly at the unit-open state, less frequently at the two-unit-open state, and more rarely at the closed state. Membrane voltages from -80 to 80 mV had little influence on the opening probability. The current reversed near the equilibrium potential of K+ in asymmetric KCl solutions and also reversed near O mV at symmetric NaCl vs. KCl solutions. The two levels of the conductance were likely due to the toxin protein, as treatment of spheroplasts or liposomes with extracellular protein preparations from isogenic yeasts deleted for the toxin gene gave no such conductance levels. These results show that in vivo the killer-toxin fraction can form a cation channel that seldom closes regardless of membrane voltage. We suggest that this channel causes the death of sensitive yeast cells. Images PMID:1696721

  4. NKG2A Complexed with CD94 Defines a Novel Inhibitory Natural Killer Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Andrew G.; Posch, Phillip E.; Scorzelli, Christopher J.; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    1997-01-01

    CD94 is a C-type lectin expressed by natural killer (NK) cells and a subset of T cells. Blocking studies using anti-CD94 mAbs have suggested that it is a receptor for human leukocyte antigen class I molecules. CD94 has recently been shown to be a 26-kD protein covalently associated with an unidentified 43-kD protein(s). This report shows that NKG2A, a 43-kD protein, is covalently associated with CD94 on the surface of NK cells. Cell surface expression of NKG2A is dependent on the association with CD94 as glycosylation patterns characteristic of mature proteins are found only in NKG2A that is associated with CD94. Analysis of NK cell clones showed that NKG2A was expressed in all NK cell clones whose CD16-dependent killing was inhibited by cross-linking CD94. The induction of an inhibitory signal is consistent with the presence of two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (V/LXYXXL) on the cytoplasmic domain of NKG2A. Similar motifs are found on Ly49 and killer cell inhibitory receptors, which also transmit negative signals to NK cells. PMID:9034158

  5. Evolution of population structure in a highly social top predator, the killer whale.

    PubMed

    Hoelzel, A Rus; Hey, Jody; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Nicholson, Colin; Burkanov, Vladimir; Black, Nancy

    2007-06-01

    Intraspecific resource partitioning and social affiliations both have the potential to structure populations, though it is rarely possible to directly assess the impact of these mechanisms on genetic diversity and population divergence. Here, we address this for killer whales (Orcinus orca), which specialize on prey species and hunting strategy and have long-term social affiliations involving both males and females. We used genetic markers to assess the structure and demographic history of regional populations and test the hypothesis that known foraging specializations and matrifocal sociality contributed significantly to the evolution of population structure. We find genetic structure in sympatry between populations of foraging specialists (ecotypes) and evidence for isolation by distance within an ecotype. Fitting of an isolation with migration model suggested ongoing, low-level migration between regional populations (within and between ecotypes) and small effective sizes for extant local populations. The founding of local populations by matrifocal social groups was indicated by the pattern of fixed mtDNA haplotypes in regional populations. Simulations indicate that this occurred within the last 20,000 years (after the last glacial maximum). Our data indicate a key role for social and foraging behavior in the evolution of genetic structure among conspecific populations of the killer whale. PMID:17400573

  6. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells. PMID:27175912

  7. Simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell cytotoxicity against each of three different target cell lines.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, K

    1994-02-10

    A time-resolved fluorometric assay for the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against three different lanthanide diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (LaDTPA) labelled target cell lines is described. The target cell line K-562 was labelled with SmDTPA, the cell line Molt with TbDTPA and the cell line Raji with EuDTPA. After co-incubation of the three target cell lines with effector cells the fluorescence of the lanthanides released from the lysed target cells was measured in an enhancer solution in which they formed highly fluorescent complexes. It was possible to differentiate the specific release from the three target cell lines because the emission lines of the europium, samarium and terbium complexes formed in the enhancer solution are well separated from each other. The autofluorescence from culture media supplemented with serum was avoided by the use of time-resolved fluorometry. The results show that applying fluorometry based on the combination of spectral and temporal resolution to natural killer cell assays, makes possible the simultaneous determination of lysis in up to three target cell lines in complex culture medium. PMID:8308301

  8. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of umbilical cord blood and peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2009-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation can be curative for patients with high-risk acute leukaemia. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an increasingly used source of allogeneic stem cells for patients who are in need of a transplant, but do not have a sibling donor. This review highlights the similarities and differences between the natural killer (NK) cells obtained from adult peripheral blood (PB) and UCB. These two cell sources show similar percentages of NK cells, including the major CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) subpopulations. UCB also contains an additional CD56-CD16+ subset, not typically found in PB. In addition, there are a number of progenitor cell populations in UCB that can give rise to NK cells. Some studies showed that UCB NK cells express a relatively higher percentage of inhibitory receptors (CD94/NKG2A and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors) and less adhesion molecules. Resting UCB NK cells also show significantly less cytotoxicity compared to PB NK cells. However, following cytokine stimulation, the cytotoxicity of UCB NK cells can be rapidly increased to levels that are comparable to PB NK cells. Activation and expansion protocols for UCB NK cells are briefly reviewed. Lastly, we outline the early use of UCB NK cells in clinical trials. PMID:19796267

  9. ERAP1 regulates natural killer cell function by controlling the engagement of inhibitory receptors.

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Loredana; Romania, Paolo; Falco, Michela; Lorenzi, Silvia; Meazza, Raffaella; Petrini, Stefania; Andreani, Marco; Pende, Daniela; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1 regulates innate and adaptive immune responses by trimming peptides for presentation by MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules. Herein, we demonstrate that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ERAP1 on human tumor cell lines perturbs their ability to engage several classes of inhibitory receptors by their specific ligands, including killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) by classical MHC-I-peptide (pMHC-I) complexes and the lectin-like receptor CD94-NKG2A by nonclassical pMHC-I complexes, in each case leading to natural killer (NK) cell killing. The protective effect of pMHC-I complexes could be restored in ERAP1-deficient settings by the addition of known high-affinity peptides, suggesting that ERAP1 was needed to positively modify the affinity of natural ligands. Notably, ERAP1 inhibition enhanced the ability of NK cells to kill freshly established human lymphoblastoid cell lines from autologous or allogeneic sources, thereby promoting NK cytotoxic activity against target cells that would not be expected because of KIR-KIR ligand matching. Overall, our results identify ERAP1 as a modifier to leverage immune functions that may improve the efficacy of NK cell-based approaches for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25592150

  10. Human Decidual Natural Killer Cells Are a Unique NK Cell Subset with Immunomodulatory Potential

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Louise A.; Kopcow, Hernan D.; Rybalov, Basya; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Orange, Jordan S.; Schatz, Frederick; Masch, Rachel; Lockwood, Charles J.; Schachter, Asher D.; Park, Peter J.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2003-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute 50–90% of lymphocytes in human uterine decidua in early pregnancy. Here, CD56bright uterine decidual NK (dNK) cells were compared with the CD56bright and CD56dim peripheral NK cell subsets by microarray analysis, with verification of results by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Among the ∼10,000 genes studied, 278 genes showed at least a threefold change with P ≤ 0.001 when comparing the dNK and peripheral NK cell subsets, most displaying increased expression in dNK cells. The largest number of these encoded surface proteins, including the unusual lectinlike receptors NKG2E and Ly-49L, several killer cell Ig-like receptors, the integrin subunits αD, αX, β1, and β5, and multiple tetraspanins (CD9, CD151, CD53, CD63, and TSPAN-5). Additionally, two secreted proteins, galectin-1 and progestagen-associated protein 14, known to have immunomodulatory functions, were selectively expressed in dNK cells. PMID:14568979

  11. Effect of cytokine-induced killer cells on immune function in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    PAN, YANYAN; WU, YUANYUAN; JI, JUN; CAI, HONGJIAO; WANG, HESHUANG; JIANG, YIFAN; SANG, LIMIN; YANG, JIN; GAO, YANYAN; LIU, YING; YIN, LIANGWEI; ZHANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have been used as adoptive immunotherapy in cancer. The present study evaluated the effect of CIK cells on immune function in patients with lung cancer. Patients were divided into three groups, according to the treatment received prior to CIK cell treatment: CIK group (no prior treatment), Che-Sur group (prior chemotherapy and surgery) and Che-Rad group (prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy). Following treatment, the average percentage of cluster of differentiation (CD)3+CD4+, CD3+, natural killer (NK) and NKT cells in peripheral blood was significantly higher than that prior to CIK treatment in the Che-Sur and CIK groups, and the levels of interferon-γ in serum were significantly higher than those prior to CIK treatment in the Che-Sur and CIK groups. On the contrary, the levels of interleukin-10 had decreased in these groups following CIK treatment. Subsequently, patients were divided into three groups according to the percentage of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells that were administered to the patients. The number of NK and NKT cells increased with increasing number of CD3+CD56+ cells. The patients in the CIK and Che-Sur groups were the most benefited ones following CIK treatment, contrarily to those in the Che-Rad group, since the increase in the number of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells in the aforementioned patients enhanced the number of NK cells, which exhibit antitumor activity. PMID:27073559

  12. Assessing the coastal occurrence of endangered killer whales using autonomous passive acoustic recorders.

    PubMed

    Hanson, M Bradley; Emmons, Candice K; Ward, Eric J; Nystuen, Jeffrey A; Lammers, Marc O

    2013-11-01

    Using moored autonomous acoustic recorders to detect and record the vocalizations of social odonotocetes to determine their occurrence patterns is a non-invasive tool in the study of these species in remote locations. Acoustic recorders were deployed in seven locations on the continental shelf of the U.S. west coast from Cape Flattery, WA to Pt. Reyes, CA to detect and record endangered southern resident killer whales between January and June of 2006-2011. Detection rates of these whales were greater in 2009 and 2011 than in 2006-2008, were most common in the month of March, and occurred with the greatest frequency off the Columbia River and Westport, which was likely related to the presence of their most commonly consumed prey, Chinook salmon. The observed patterns of annual and monthly killer whale occurrence may be related to run strength and run timing, respectively, for spring Chinook returning to the Columbia River, the largest run in this region at this time of year. Acoustic recorders provided a unique, long-term, dataset that will be important to inform future consideration of Critical Habitat designation for this U.S. Endangered Species Act listed species. PMID:24180759

  13. Yeast killer plasmid mutations affecting toxin secretion and activity and toxin immunity function

    SciTech Connect

    Bussey, H.; Sacks, W.; Galley, D.; Saville, D.

    1982-04-01

    M double-stranded RNA (MdsRNA) plasmid mutants were obtained by mutagenesis and screening of a diploid killer culture partially heat cured of the plasmid, so that a high proportion of the cells could be expected to have only one M plasmid. Mutants with neutral (K/sup -/), immune (R/sup +/) or suicide (killer (K/sup +/), sensitive (R/sup -/)) phenotypes were examined. All mutants became K/sup -/ R/sup -/ sensitives on heat curing of the MdsRNA plasmid, and showed cytoplasmic inheritance by random spore analysis. In some cases, M plasmid mutations were indicated by altered mobility of the MdsRNA by agarose gel electrophoresis or by altered size of in vitro translation products from denatured dsRNA. Neutral mutants were of two types: nonsecretors of the toxin protein or secretors of an inactive toxin. Of three neutral nonsecretors examined, one (NLP-1), probably a nonsense mutation, made a smaller protoxin precursor in vitro and in vivo, and two made full-size protoxin molecules. The in vivo protoxin of 43,000 molecular weight was unstable in the wild type and kinetically showed a precursor product relationship to the processed, secreted 11,000-molecular-weight toxin. In one nonsecretor (N1), the protoxin appeared more stable in a pulse-chase experiment, and could be altered in a recognition site required for protein processing.

  14. A killer application: Controllable lighting systems as a load management strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, J.F.

    1999-07-01

    What exactly is a Killer Application? Simply put, it is any technological advance that changes the rules of an industry in a positive way, and by extension the lives of that industry`s customers. Under this heading, the use of controlled lighting as a load management strategy quite precisely fills the job description of a Killer APP. Load management is defined as the modification of energy usage patterns in response to external conditions. Historically, it was focused on interruptible loads, e.g., air conditioners, hot water heaters. As such, it was seen by building managers and occupants as inconvenient or uncomfortable. Lighting was never considered. That was then. With the marginal cost of electricity today reaching more than 20 times the cost of electricity at off-peak hours, load management, re-framed as the building-wide application of controlled lighting, has emerged as a dynamic, proven energy strategy. It comprehensively addresses changes in energy costs. By employing leading-edge technologies to reduce lighting energy costs, it reduces, under certain rate structures, the average cost of energy for every kilowatt-hour used throughout the entire facility. It is the first application to make utility deregulation pay off big for businesses.

  15. Indomethacin augments lymphokine-activated killer cell generation by patients with malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, L.S.; Bowman, R.V.; Davis, M.R.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1989-10-01

    Human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell lysis but susceptible to lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from control individuals. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of patients with MM (n = 22) and individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos (the major population at risk of developing this disease, n = 52) to generate LAK cells capable of effectively lysing human mesothelioma cells. Compared to controls (n = 20), both patient groups demonstrated significantly depressed LAK cell activity against mesothelioma tumor cell targets (55 +/- 3% lysis by controls vs 34 +/- 3% lysis by patients with MM, P less than 0.005; and 45 +/- 3% lysis by asbestos-exposed individuals, P less than 0.025). Addition of 10 micrograms/ml indomethacin during LAK cell generation restored normal LAK cell activity for patients with MM (52 +/- 6% lysis of cultured human MM cells, P = NS compared to controls), suggesting that the defective cytolytic cell function observed in some patients with MM is a result of prostaglandin-induced immunosuppression. The ability of indomethacin to restore suppressed LAK cell activity in patients with MM suggests that the concomitant use of this agent in ex vivo LAK cell generation and in patients undergoing interleukin/LAK cell therapy may be beneficial.

  16. Harnessing the killer micros: Applications from LLNL's massively parallel computing initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.F.

    1991-07-01

    Recent developments in microprocessor technology have led to performance on scalar applications exceeding traditional supercomputers. This suggests that coupling hundreds or even thousands of these killer-micros'' (all working on a single physical problem) may lead to performance on vector applications in excess of vector supercomputers. Also, future generation killer-micros are expected to have vector floating point units as well. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the parallel computing environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. However, the perspective is necessarily quite narrow and most of the examples are taken from the author's implementation of a large scale molecular dynamics code on the BBN-TC2000 at LLNL. Parallelism is achieved through a geometric domain decomposition -- each processor is assigned a distinct region of space and all atoms contained therein. As the atomic positions evolve, the processors must exchange ownership of specific atoms. This geometric domain decomposition proves to be quite general and we highlight its application to image processing and hydrodynamics simulations as well. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Support for the beam focusing hypothesis in the false killer whale.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Buck, John R; Smith, Adam B; Supin, Alexander Ya; Gaudette, Jason E; Nachtigall, Paul E

    2015-08-01

    The odontocete sound production system is complex and composed of tissues, air sacs and a fatty melon. Previous studies suggested that the emitted sonar beam might be actively focused, narrowing depending on target distance. In this study, we further tested this beam focusing hypothesis in a false killer whale. Using three linear arrays of hydrophones, we recorded the same emitted click at 2, 4 and 7 m distance and calculated the beamwidth, intensity, center frequency and bandwidth as recorded on each array at every distance. If the whale did not focus her beam, acoustics predicts the intensity would decay with range as a function of spherical spreading and the angular beamwidth would remain constant. On the contrary, our results show that as the distance from the whale to the array increases, the beamwidth is narrower and the received click intensity is higher than that predicted by a spherical spreading function. Each of these measurements is consistent with the animal focusing her beam on a target at a given range. These results support the hypothesis that the false killer whale is 'focusing' its sonar beam, producing a narrower and more intense signal than that predicted by spherical spreading. PMID:26056247

  18. Variations in killer whale food-associated calls produced during different prey behavioural contexts.

    PubMed

    Samarra, Filipa I P

    2015-07-01

    Killer whales produce herding calls to increase herring school density but previous studies suggested that these calls were made only when feeding upon spawning herring. Herring schools less densely when spawning compared to overwintering; therefore, producing herding calls may be advantageous only when feeding upon less dense spawning schools. To investigate if herding calls were produced across different prey behavioural contexts and whether structural variants occurred and correlated with prey behaviour, this study recorded killer whales when feeding upon spawning and overwintering herring. Herding calls were produced by whales feeding on both spawning and overwintering herring, however, calls recorded during overwintering had significantly different duration and peak frequency to those recorded during spawning. Calls recorded in herring overwintering grounds were more variable and sometimes included nonlinear phenomena. Thus, herding calls were not produced exclusively when feeding upon spawning herring, likely because the call increases feeding efficiency regardless of herring school density or behaviour. Variations in herding call structure were observed between prey behavioural contexts and did not appear to be adapted to prey characteristics. Herding call structural variants may be more likely a result of individual or group variation rather than a reflection of properties of the food source. PMID:25934134

  19. Innate immune natural killer cells and their role in HIV and SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Bostik, Pavel; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Mayne, Ann E; Ansari, Aftab A

    2010-01-01

    The findings that early events during HIV-1 and SIV infection of Asian rhesus macaques dictate the levels of viremia and rate of disease progression prior to the establishment of mature and effective adaptive immune responses strongly suggest an important role for innate immune mechanisms. In addition, the fact that the major target of HIV and SIV during this period of acute infection is the gastrointestinal tissue suggests that whatever role the innate immune system plays must either directly and/or indirectly focus on the GI tract. The object of this article is to provide a general overview of the innate immune system with a focus on natural killer (NK) cells and their role in the pathogenesis of lentivirus infection. The studies summarized include our current understanding of the phenotypic heterogeneity, the putative functions ascribed to the subsets, the maturation/differentiation of NK cells, the mechanisms by which their function is mediated and regulated, the studies of these NK-cell subsets, with a focus on killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in nonhuman primates and humans, and finally, how HIV and SIV infection affects these NK cells in vivo. Clearly much has yet to be learnt on how the innate immune system influences the interaction between lentiviruses and the host within the GI tract, knowledge of which is reasoned to be critical for the formulation of effective vaccines against HIV-1. PMID:20730028

  20. First do no harm: uterine natural killer (NK) cells in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Ashley; Shreeve, Norman

    2015-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a type of lymphocyte circulating in peripheral blood named because of their effector functions in killing target cells. Immune cells that share similar phenotypic characteristics but are poor killers populate the uterine lining at implantation and during early pregnancy when the placenta is established. The functions of these uterine NK (uNK) cells are essentially unknown but available data point to a role in regulating placentation in concert with other elements of the decidua and invading trophoblast cells. Despite the lack of scientific rationale and advice from clinical governing bodies, such as the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, an increasing range of tests and therapies are still offered to women undergoing IVF or attending recurrent miscarriage clinics based on the myth that uterine NK cells need suppressing to prevent damage to the embryo. New treatments can be introduced at whim with subsequent demands for expensive trials to prove/disprove their efficacy. The evidence that targeting uNK or peripheral blood NK cells assists women with recurrent pregnancy failure is lacking. Healthcare professionals and patients should very carefully evaluate the practice of immunomodulation to enhance pregnancy outcome. A discussion on how to move towards stricter regulation of immunotherapy in non-hospital settings is now needed because it is clear that the potential risks and costs of these therapies outweigh any benefits. PMID:25954039

  1. Socio-demographic characteristics of UK families using pesticides and weed-killers.

    PubMed

    Steer, Colin D; Grey, Charlotte N B

    2006-05-01

    Pesticides are widely used in the home and garden to kill insects, weeds and other unwanted pests. There is mounting evidence that this usage may also have health consequences particularly on children. Using the ALSPAC cohort of 13,391 families with self-reported usage data up to age 4 years of the study child, the main users of pesticides appeared to be older, Caucasian, better educated, have higher incomes and more likely to own their home or to belong to non-manual social classes compared to less frequent users. There was some suggestion that different factors may affect weed-killer compared to other pesticide use. In particular, income appeared unrelated to other pesticide use. This may reflect different attitudes to indoor compared to garden applications. Alternatively, it may reflect whether the main user was the mother or the partner. Some authorities are currently encouraging domestic users to consider other non-chemical means of pest control before using pesticides. These results may help in targeting particular groups if further reductions in pesticide usage are desired. They have also helped in identifying the important confounders for adjusting future analyses on the potential health consequences of pesticides and weed-killers. PMID:16132066

  2. Immune activation by combination human lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, E J; Scott, K J; Jennings, V A; Melcher, A A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Optimal cellular immunotherapy for cancer should ideally harness both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAKs) can trigger early innate killing of tumour targets, whereas long-term adaptive-specific tumour control requires priming of CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) following acquisition of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). As DCs stimulate both innate and adaptive effectors, combination cell therapy using LAKs and DCs has the potential to maximise anti-tumour immune priming. Methods: Reciprocal activation between human clinical grade LAKs and DCs on co-culture, and its immune consequences, was monitored by cell phenotype, cytokine release and priming of both innate and adaptive cytotoxicity against melanoma targets. Results: Co-culture of DCs and LAKs led to phenotypic activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the LAK population, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and enhanced innate cytotoxicity against tumour cell targets. The LAKs reciprocally matured DCs, and the combination of LAKs and DCs, on addition of melanoma cells, supported priming of specific anti-tumour CTLs better than DCs alone. Conclusion: Clinical-grade LAKs/DCs represents a practical, effective combination cell immunotherapy for stimulation of both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity in cancer patients. PMID:21847125

  3. Ocular anatomy, ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution of a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y; Abramov, Andrey V; Mukhametov, Lev M; Rozanova, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the killer whale (Orcinus orca) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl violet. A distinctive feature of the killer whale's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 8 to 100 µm, with the majority of cells within a range of 20-40 µm. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed two spots of high cell density located in the temporal and nasal quadrants, 20 mm from the optic disk. The high-density areas were connected by a horizontal belt-like area passing below the optic disk of the retina. Peak cell densities in these areas were evaluated. Mean peak cell densities were 334 and 288 cells/mm(2) in the temporal and nasal high-density areas, respectively. With a posterior nodal distance of 19.5 mm, these high-density data predict a retinal resolution of 9.6' (3.1 cycles/deg.) and 12.6' (2.4 cycles/deg.) in the temporal and nasal areas, respectively, in water. PMID:23018493

  4. Potential role of natural killer cells in controlling tumorigenesis by human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Stewart, S A; Baird, S M; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a malignancy of T lymphocytes that is characterized by a long latency period after virus exposure. Intraperitoneal inoculation of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HTLV-transformed cell lines and ATL tumor cells was employed to investigate the tumorigenic potential of HTLV type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells. In contrast to inoculation of ATL (RV-ATL) cells into SCID mice, which resulted in the formation of lymphomas, inoculation of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-transformed cell lines (SLB-I and JLB-II cells, respectively) did not result in tumor formation. Immunosuppression of SCID mice, either by whole-body irradiation or by treatment with an antiserum, anti-asialo GM1 (alpha-AGM1), which transiently abrogates natural killer cell activity in vivo, was necessary to establish the growth of tumors derived from HTLV-transformed cell lines. PCR and flow cytometric studies reveal that HTLV-I-transformed cells are eliminated from the peritoneal cavities of inoculated mice by 3 days postinoculation; in contrast, RV-ATL cells persist and are detected until the mice succumb to lymphoma development. The differing behaviors of HTLV-infected cell lines and ATL tumor cells in SCID mice suggest that ATL cells have a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo than do HTLV-infected cell lines because of their ability to evade natural killer cell-mediated cytolysis. PMID:7815516

  5. Natural Killer-like B Cells Prime Innate Lymphocytes against Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Chen, Yi; Huang, Guanling; Xiong, Zhen; Liu, Jing; Li, Chong; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-07-19

    Natural killer (NK) cells and non-cytotoxic interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing group I innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s) produce large amounts of IFN-γ and cause activation of innate and adaptive immunity. However, how NKs and ILC1s are primed during infection remains elusive. Here we have shown that a lymphocyte subpopulation natural killer-like B (NKB) cells existed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). NKBs had unique features that differed from T and B cells, and produced interleukin-18 (IL-18) and IL-12 at an early phase of infection. NKB cells played a critical role in eradication of microbial infection via secretion of IL-18 and IL-12. Moreover, IL-18 deficiency abrogated the antibacterial effect of NKBs. Upon bacterial challenge, NKB precursors (NKBPs) rapidly differentiated to NKBs that activated NKs and ILC1s against microbial infection. Our findings suggest that NKBs might be exploited to develop effective therapies for treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:27421702

  6. Orchestration of Invariant Natural Killer T cell development by E and Id proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sumedha; Zhuang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are αβ T cells that express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) along with Natural Killer (NK) cell markers, and have an innate cell-like ability to produce a myriad of cytokines very quickly upon antigen exposure and subsequent activation. These cells are diverted from conventional single positive (SP) T cell fate at the double positive (DP) stage where TCR-mediated recognition of a lipid antigen presented on a CD1d molecule promotes their selection into the NKT lineage. Although many key regulatory molecules have been shown to play important roles in the development of NKT cells, the mechanism of lineage specification and acquisition of effector functions in these cells still remain to be fully addressed. In this review we specifically discuss the role of a family of class I Helix Loop Helix proteins known as E proteins, and of their antagonists Id proteins in NKT cell development. Recent works have shown that these proteins play key roles in iNKT development, from the invariant TCR rearrangement to terminal differentiation and maturation. Elucidating these roles provides an opportunity to uncover the transcriptional network that separates NKT cells from the concurrently developed conventional αβ T cells. PMID:25746046

  7. Thermal biology of Pacific cicada killers, Sphecius convallis Patton, in the Upper Sonoran Desert.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Joseph R; Holliday, Charles W; Hastings, Jon M; Phillips, Christy M

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the Pacific cicada killer, Sphecius convallis Patton, was undertaken to examine the behavioral and physiological mechanisms by which they are able to complete their life cycle in the thermal extremes of the Upper Sonoran Desert. S. convallis were endothermic, exhibiting elevated and relatively constant thorax temperatures during many activities. Males basked in trees at dawn to warm up, then used a variety of behaviors and perching strategies to maintain thorax temperature during territorial behavior. The thorax temperature of females was highest during provisioning and orientation flights, somewhat lower while investigating burrows, and lowest while digging burrows. The optimal thorax temperature for flight was about 40°C, which was approximated most closely by males resting in the shade during the afternoon. In mating clusters, the mated male was the hottest, the female was coolest and the other males were intermediate. Wasps lost about 5% of body mass during heating treatments, and may use evaporative water loss for cooling. Pacific cicada killers use a complex suite of behavioral and physiological adaptations to regulate body temperature during their nesting season. PMID:27033045

  8. Natural Killer-Like T-Cell Lymphoma Localized to the Terminal Ileum: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bayol, Ümit; Cumurcu, Süheyla; Karaman, Kerem; Tuğmen, Cem; Akdeniz, Çağlar; Akman, Özlem; Ünlüoğlu, Saime

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes are non-organized lymphoid populations that are composed of heterogeneous subsets with diverse ontogeny and phenotypes, and the differential diagnosis is crucial. A 43-year-old male patient underwent an emergency laparotomy due to a perforated mass of the terminal ileum. A right hemicolectomy plus small bowel resection was performed. Histopathological examination showed medium to large cells with vesicular nuclei, including marked nucleoli with large, colorless cytoplasm. No signs of celiac disease were found in the adjacent mucosa. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically CD45+, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD56+, Pan-Cytokeratin-, CD20-, CD79a-, CD5- and CD30-. Endomysial antibody and antigliadin antibody, IgM and IgG tests; and anti-Ebstein Barr virus latent membrane protein all proved negative. Finally, the histopathological diagnosis of tumor mass was natural killer-like T-cell lymphoma. Primary intestinal cytotoxic natural killer-like T-cell lymphoma is a rare entity, which is difficult to distinguish from other T-cell lymphomas. In addition to microscopic evaluation, immunohistochemical analysis and serological tests are essential to reach a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26832181

  9. Ovarian cycle approach by rectal temperature and fecal progesterone in a female killer whale, Orcinus orca.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Satoshi; Kakizoe, Yuka; Kanda, Koji; Sengoku, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yohei; Adachi, Itsuki; Watanabe, Yoko; Doi, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the measurements of body temperature and fecal progesterone concentrations as minimally invasive techniques for assessing ovarian cycle in a single sexually mature female killer whale. Rectal temperature data, fecal and blood samples were collected in the dorsal position using routine husbandry training on a voluntary basis. The correlations between rectal temperature and plasma progesterone concentration and between fecal and plasma progesterone concentrations were investigated. Fecal progesterone metabolites were identified by a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Plasma progesterone concentrations (range: 0.2-18.6 ng/ml) and rectal temperature (range: 35.3-35.9°C) changed cyclically, and cycle lengths were an average (±SD) of 44.9±4.0 days (nine cycles) and 44.6±5.9 days (nine cycles), respectively. Rectal temperature positively correlated with the plasma progesterone concentrations (r=0.641, P<0.01). There was a visual trend for fecal progesterone profiles to be similar to circulating plasma progesterone profiles. Fecal immunoreactive progestagen analysis resulted in a marked immunoreactive peak of progesterone. The data from the single killer whale indicate that the measurement of rectal temperature is suitable for minimally invasive assessment of the estrous cycle and monitoring the fecal progesterone concentration is useful to assess ovarian luteal activity. PMID:20648568

  10. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in killer whales (Orcinus orca) from the Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Noël, Marie; Barrett-Lennard, Lance; Guinet, Christophe; Dangerfield, Neil; Ross, Peter S

    2009-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), are ubiquitous environmental contaminants of which significant concentrations are reported in upper trophic level animals. In 1998, we collected blubber biopsy samples (n=11) from killer whales (Orcinus orca) inhabiting the coastal waters around Possession Island, Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean, for contaminant analyses. Despite inhabiting an isolated region far removed from industrial activities, these killer whales can presently be considered among the most PCB-contaminated cetaceans in the southern hemisphere, with concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 20.5mg/kg lipid weight (lw). PCDD levels ranged from below the detection limit (5 ng/kg) to 77.1 ng/kg lw and PCDF levels from below the detection limit (7 ng/kg) to 36.1 ng/kg lw. Over 70% of our study animals had PCB concentrations which exceeded a 1.3mg/kg PCB threshold established for endocrine disruption and immunotoxicity in free-ranging harbour seals, suggesting that organic contaminants cannot be ruled out as an additional threat to this declining population. PMID:19625078

  11. Functional Annotation of Putative Regulatory Elements at Cancer Susceptibility Loci

    PubMed Central

    Rosse, Stephanie A; Auer, Paul L; Carlson, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer-associated genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) do not obviously change protein structure, leading to the hypothesis that the associations are attributable to regulatory polymorphisms. Translating genetic associations into mechanistic insights can be facilitated by knowledge of the causal regulatory variant (or variants) responsible for the statistical signal. Experimental validation of candidate functional variants is onerous, making bioinformatic approaches necessary to prioritize candidates for laboratory analysis. Thus, a systematic approach for recognizing functional (and, therefore, likely causal) variants in noncoding regions is an important step toward interpreting cancer risk loci. This review provides a detailed introduction to current regulatory variant annotations, followed by an overview of how to leverage these resources to prioritize candidate functional polymorphisms in regulatory regions. PMID:25288875

  12. Mouse models for induced genetic instability at endogenous loci.

    PubMed

    Reliene, Ramune; Schiestl, Robert H

    2003-10-13

    Exposure to environmental factors and genetic predisposition of an individual may lead individually or in combination to various genetic diseases including cancer. These diseases may be a consequence of genetic instability resulting in large-scale genomic rearrangements, such as DNA deletions, duplications, and translocations. This review focuses on mouse assays detecting genetic instability at endogenous loci. The frequency of DNA deletions by homologous recombination at the pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) locus is elevated in mice with mutations in ATM, Trp53, Gadd45, and WRN genes and after exposure to carcinogens. Other quantitative in vivo assays detecting loss of heterozygosity events, such as the mammalian spot assay, Dlb-1 mouse and Aprt mouse assays, are also reviewed. These in vivo test systems may predict hazardous effects of an environmental agent and/or genetic predisposition to cancer. PMID:14557804

  13. Ammonium stress in Arabidopsis: signaling, genetic loci, and physiological targets.

    PubMed

    Li, Baohai; Li, Guangjie; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Baluška, František; Shi, Weiming

    2014-02-01

    Ammonium (NH4(+)) toxicity is a significant ecological and agricultural issue, and an important phenomenon in cell biology. As a result of increasing soil nitrogen input and atmospheric deposition, plants have to deal with unprecedented NH4(+) stress from sources below and above ground. In this review, we describe recent advances in elucidating the signaling pathways and identifying the main physiological targets and genetic loci involved in the effects of NH4(+) stress in the roots and shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana. We outline new experimental approaches that are being used to study NH4(+) toxicity in Arabidopsis and propose an integrated view of behavior and signaling in response to NH4(+) stress in the Arabidopsis system. PMID:24126103

  14. Stochastic search variable selection for identifying multiple quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nengjun; George, Varghese; Allison, David B

    2003-07-01

    In this article, we utilize stochastic search variable selection methodology to develop a Bayesian method for identifying multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) for complex traits in experimental designs. The proposed procedure entails embedding multiple regression in a hierarchical normal mixture model, where latent indicators for all markers are used to identify the multiple markers. The markers with significant effects can be identified as those with higher posterior probability included in the model. A simple and easy-to-use Gibbs sampler is employed to generate samples from the joint posterior distribution of all unknowns including the latent indicators, genetic effects for all markers, and other model parameters. The proposed method was evaluated using simulated data and illustrated using a real data set. The results demonstrate that the proposed method works well under typical situations of most QTL studies in terms of number of markers and marker density. PMID:12871920

  15. Precision mapping of multiple quantitative trait loci in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    Mapping complex quantitative traits in humans is in general a difficult task. Parametric methods are very efficient in mapping a single major quantitative trait locus but they are sensitive to violations in modeling assumptions such non-normality, absence of major genes, and biased sampling. Semi-parametric methods such as Haseman-Elston sib-pair method are more robust but they are less efficient than parametric ones. We have extended the sib-pair method to (1) incorporate information from multiple markers based on the gene identical-by-descent proportions and the proportion of allele sharing at the trait locus, all based on flanking markers; (2) to include sibship data; and (3) to allow for precise localization of multiple quantitative trait loci. We show through simulation that the power of the proposed approach is greater than the sib-pair method. Further extension to include other types of relative pairs is possible.

  16. Bayesian Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping for Multiple Traits

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Samprit; Yandell, Brian S.; Yi, Nengjun

    2008-01-01

    Most quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping experiments typically collect phenotypic data on multiple correlated complex traits. However, there is a lack of a comprehensive genomewide mapping strategy for correlated traits in the literature. We develop Bayesian multiple-QTL mapping methods for correlated continuous traits using two multivariate models: one that assumes the same genetic model for all traits, the traditional multivariate model, and the other known as the seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) model that allows different genetic models for different traits. We develop computationally efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms for performing joint analysis. We conduct extensive simulation studies to assess the performance of the proposed methods and to compare with the conventional single-trait model. Our methods have been implemented in the freely available package R/qtlbim (http://www.qtlbim.org), which greatly facilitates the general usage of the Bayesian methodology for unraveling the genetic architecture of complex traits. PMID:18689903

  17. Tetranucleotide microsatellite loci from the black bear (Ursus americanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanderlin, J.S.; Faircloth, B.C.; Shamblin, B.; Conroy, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe primers and polymerase chain reaction conditions to amplify 21 tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA loci in black bears (Ursus americanus). We tested primers using individuals from two populations, one each in Georgia and Florida. Among individuals from Georgia (n = 29), primer pairs yielded an average of 2.9 alleles (range, one to four) and an average observed heterozygosity (HO) of 0.50 (range, 0.00 to 0.79). Among individuals from Florida (n = 19), primer pairs yielded an average of 5.7 alleles (range, one to 14) and an HO of 0.55 (range, 0.00 to 1.00). A comparison of previously developed markers with individuals from Georgia suggests that bear populations in Georgia and Florida have reduced allelic diversity relative to other populations. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  18. Quantitative Trait Loci Identify Functional Noncoding Variation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of noncoding alterations in cancer genomes presents an unresolved problem in cancer studies. While the impact of somatic variations in protein-coding regions is widely accepted, noncoding aberrations are mostly considered as passenger events. However, with the advance of genome-wide profiling strategies, alterations outside the coding context entered the focus, and multiple examples highlight the role of gene deregulation as cancer-driving events. This review describes the implication of noncoding alterations in oncogenesis and provides a theoretical framework for the identification of causal somatic variants using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Assuming that functional noncoding alterations affect quantifiable regulatory processes, somatic QTL studies constitute a valuable strategy to pinpoint cancer gene deregulation. Eventually, the comprehensive identification and interpretation of coding and noncoding alterations will guide our future understanding of cancer biology. PMID:26938653

  19. A Nonparametric Approach for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Kruglyak, L.; Lander, E. S.

    1995-01-01

    Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is performed typically by using a parametric approach, based on the assumption that the phenotype follows a normal distribution. Many traits of interest, however, are not normally distributed. In this paper, we present a nonparametric approach to QTL mapping applicable to any phenotypic distribution. The method is based on a statistic Z(w), which generalizes the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test to the situation of whole-genome search by interval mapping. We determine the appropriate significance level for the statistic Z(w), by showing that its asymptotic null distribution follows an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. These results provide a robust, distribution-free method for mapping QTLs. PMID:7768449

  20. Quantitative trait loci for growth trajectories in Populus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongling; Ma, Chang-Xing; Yang, Mark C K; Chang, Myron; Littell, Ramon C; Santra, Upasana; Wu, Samuel S; Yin, Tongming; Huang, Minren; Wang, Minxiu; Casella, George

    2003-02-01

    Growth trajectories are a biological process important to plant and animal breeding, and to evolutionary genetic studies. In this article, we report the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for growth trajectories in poplars that are used as a model system for the study of forest biology. These QTLs were localized on a genetic linkage map of polymorphic markers using a statistical mapping method incorporating growth-curve models. The effects of the QTLs on growth are described as a function of age, so that age-specific changes in QTL effects can be readily projected throughout the entire growth process. The QTLs identified display increased effects on growth when trees age, yet the timing of QTL activation is earlier for stem height than diameter, which is consistent with the ecological viewpoint of canopy competition. The implications of the results for breeding and silviculture are discussed. PMID:12693683