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1

Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease after Pediatric Solid Organ Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT) carry a substantially increased risk to develop malignant lymphomas. This is in part due to the immunosuppression required to maintain the function of the organ graft. Depending on the transplanted organ, up to 15% of pediatric transplant recipients acquire posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), and eventually 20% of those succumb to the disease. Early diagnosis of PTLD is often hampered by the unspecific symptoms and the difficult differential diagnosis, which includes atypical infections as well as graft rejection. Treatment of PTLD is limited by the high vulnerability towards antineoplastic chemotherapy in transplanted children. However, new treatment strategies and especially the introduction of the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab have dramatically improved outcomes of PTLD. This review discusses risk factors for the development of PTLD in children, summarizes current approaches to therapy, and gives an outlook on developing new treatment modalities like targeted therapy with virus-specific T cells. Finally, monitoring strategies are evaluated.

Behrends, Uta

2013-01-01

2

Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders  

PubMed Central

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a group of diseases that range from benign polyclonal to malignant monoclonal lymphoid proliferations. They arise secondary to treatment with immunosuppressive drugs given to prevent transplant rejection. Three main pathologic subsets/stages of evolution are recognised: early, polymorphic, and monomorphic lesions. The pathogenesis of PTLDs seems to be multifactorial. Among possible infective aetiologies, the role of EBV has been studied in depth, and the virus is thought to play a central role in driving the proliferation of EBV-infected B cells that leads to subsequent development of the lymphoproliferative disorder. It is apparent, however, that EBV is not solely responsible for the “neoplastic” state. Accumulated genetic alterations of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes (deletions, mutations, rearrangements, and amplifications) and epigenetic changes (aberrant hypermethylation) that involve tumour suppressor genes are integral to the pathogenesis. Antigenic stimulation also plays an evident role in the pathogenesis of PTLDs. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) that are critical to fight viral infections have been thought to play a pathogenetically relevant role in PTLDs. Furthermore, regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which are modulators of immune reactions once incited, seem to have an important role in PTLDs where antigenic stimulation is key for the pathogenesis.

Ibrahim, Hazem A. H.; Naresh, Kikkeri N.

2012-01-01

3

High Incidence of Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Pediatric Patients with Cystic Fibrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major cause of morbidity and mortality following lung trans- plantation is posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). In a retrospective cohort analysis of pediatric patients, we evaluated the risk factors associated with PTLD in 128 first-time lung trans- plant recipients from 1990 to 1997. The greatest risk factor for PTLD was a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Of the 16 patients

ALAN H. COHEN; STUART C. SWEET; ERIC MENDELOFF; GEORGE B. MALLORY; CHARLES B. HUDDLESTON; MADELEINE KRAUS; MICHAEL KELLY; ROBERT HAYASHI; MICHAEL R. D E BAUN

4

Cellular therapy of Epstein–Barr-virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the immunodeficiency that follows hemopoietic stem cell transplant or solid organ transplant, lymphoproliferation can develop due to uncontrolled expansion of Epstein–Barr-virus (EBV)-infected B cells that express the full spectrum of EBV latent antigens. As development of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in these patients is clearly associated with a deficient EBV-specific cellular immune response, immunotherapy strategies to restore the EBV-specific

Cliona M. Rooney; B SAVOLDO

2004-01-01

5

[Association of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and visceral leishmaniasis after kidney transplantation].  

PubMed

Malignancies and opportunistic infections are frequently observed after solid-organ transplantation. Their occurrence strongly affects recipient survival. We report the case of a 29-year-old Tunisian kidney-recipient who was diagnosed simultaneously with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy together with antiparasitic treatment using liposomal amphotericin B, and anti-CD20 antibodies medication resulted in cure of leishmaniasis and remission from PTLD. This case is of clinical interest because of the uncommon association of VL with PTLD after solid organ transplantation. It is also original by the favourable outcome of VL and PTLD, both known as life-threatening diseases. Also, it illustrates the predisposing role of immunosuppressive therapy in occurrence of opportunistic infections and malignancies after solid organ transplantation. PMID:21376690

Bacha, Mohamed Mongi; Abderrahim, Ezzeddine; Ounissi, Mondher; Chaouech, Dalel; Cherif, Mejda; Turki, Sami; Rajhi, Hatem; Znaidi, Nadia; Bahloul, Abdessalem; Trabelsi, Sonia; Khaled, Samira; Ben Abdallah, Taďeb; Ben Maďz, Hedi; Kheder, Adel

2011-03-03

6

Quantitative Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology in lung transplant recipients with primary EBV infection and/or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.  

PubMed

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibody response was studied in lung transplant patients to assess their value in the diagnosis and prognosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Recently developed synthetic peptides representing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), diffuse early antigen (EA(D)), and virus capsid antigen (VCA) were studied in a semiquantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to study antibody patterns in 12 seronegative lung transplant patients, of whom four developed a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and seven seropositive lung transplant patients, all of whom developed a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Immunoblot technique was used as a control. All 12 EBV-seronegative patients had a very limited antibody response that was restricted mainly to VCA antibodies. EA(D) antibodies became detectable in only two patients. Antibody response never preceded clinical diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in the four EBV-seronegative patients who developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. In the seven seropositive lung transplant patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, we found a rise in antibody titer in only two patients. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the serological results. In conclusion, EBV-specific antibody patterns after lung transplantation are highly restricted and variable and of limited value for the diagnosis or prognosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:12683416

Verschuuren, Erik; van der Bij, Wim; de Boer, Wim; Timens, Wim; Middeldorp, Jaap; The, T Hauw

2003-02-01

7

Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The increased risk of malignancy, especially of lymphoid tumors, in solid-organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HST)\\u000a recipients has been recognized for many years [1-3]. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) represents a heterogeneous\\u000a group of abnormal lymphoid proliferations, generally of B-cell origin, that occur in the setting of ineffective T-cell function\\u000a due to pharmacologic immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Unlike most other

Ran Reshef; Alicia K. Morgans; Donald E. Tsai

8

Verotoxin targets lymphoma infiltrates of patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is an invasive, EBV expressing B lymphoma and a major cause of morbidity and mortality following organ transplantation. Presently there is limited therapy available; rather the patient often loses the allograft or succumbs to the malignancy. CD77 (or globotriaosyl ceramide -Gb(3)) is a germinal center B cell marker [Gregory et al. Int J Cancer 1998;42:213-20; Gregory et al., J Immunol 1987;139:313-8; Mangeney et al. Eur J Immunol 1991;21:1131-40], expressed on most EBV infected B cells and is the receptor for the E. coli derived verotoxin (VT) [Lingwood CA. Advances in Lipid Research 1993;25:189-212]. We present the basis of a possible novel approach to PTLD therapy utilizing the specific targeting of VT to the infiltrating lymphoma cells. Biopsies of adenoid, kidney or liver tissue of four PTLD patients were stained with verotoxin to determine expression of CD77. VT is a potent inducer of necrosis/apoptosis of receptor positive cells. In each PTLD case, the infiltrating EBV positive B lymphoma cells were strongly and selectively stained with VT, identifying CD77 as a new marker for these cells. For such individuals, VT might provide the basis of an approach to control their malignancy. PMID:10996204

Arbus, G S; Grisaru, S; Segal, O; Dosch, M; Pop, M; Lala, P; Nutikka, A; Lingwood, C A

2000-10-01

9

[Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant recipients--Merkur University Hospital single center experience].  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an increasingly recognized condition as the number of solid organ and bone marrow transplant recipients increases. It can be a life threatening fulminant disorder and affects approximately 8% of solid organ transplant recipients. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is closely involved in the pathogenesis of PTLD and the majority of PTLD cases arise in response to primary infection with EBV or to re-activation of previously acquired EBV. The principal risk factors underlying the development of PTLD are the degree of overall immunosuppression and EBV serostatus of the recipient. The most commonly used pathologic classification of PTLD is the World Health Organization classification, which divides PTLD into three categories: early lesions, polymorphic PTLD, and monomorphic PTLD. Early lesions are characterized by reactive plasmacytic hyperplasia. Polymorphic PTLD may be either polyclonal or monoclonal and is characterized by destruction of the underlying lymphoid architecture, necrosis, and nuclear atypia. In monomorphic PTLD, the majority of cases (>80%) arise from B cells, similar to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in immunocompetent hosts. The most common subtype is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but Burkitt's/Burkitt's-like lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma are also seen. Rarely T-cell variants occur, which include peripheral T-cell lymphomas and, rarely, other uncommon types, including gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma and T-natural killer (NK) cell varieties. Hodgkin's disease-like lymphoma is very unusual. An accurate diagnosis of PTLD requires a high index of suspicion, since the disorder may present subtly and/or extranodally. Radiologic evidence of a mass or the presence of elevated serum markers (such as increased LDH levels) are suggestive of PTLD, with positive finding on ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and/or positron emission tomography scanning (possibly indicating metabolically active areas) also favoring the diagnosis. The management of PTLD poses a major therapeutic challenge and although there is reasonable agreement about the overall principles of treatment, there is still considerable controversy about the optimal treatment of individual patients. EBV-related PTLDs are a significant cause of mortality in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation with the observed mortality rate of up to 50%. This paper presents the experience acquired at Merkur University Hospital in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with liver transplantation and PTLD. PMID:23126028

Filipec-Kanizaj, Tajana; Budimir, Jelena; Coli?-Cvrlje, Vesna; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Susterci?, Dunja; Naumovski-Mihali?, Slavica; Mrzljak, Anna; Koloni?, Slobodanka Ostoji?; Sobocan, Nikola; Bradi?, Tihomir; Doli?, Zrinka Miseti?; Kocman, Branislav; Katici?, Miroslava; Zidovec-Lepej, Snjezana; Vince, Adriana

2011-09-01

10

Quantitative Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology in lung transplant recipients with primary EBV infection and\\/or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific antibody response was studied in lung transplant patients to assess their value in the diagnosis and prognosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Recently developed synthetic peptides representing Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), diffuse early antigen (EA(D)), and virus capsid antigen (VCA) were studied in a semiquantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to study antibody patterns in 12 seronegative lung

Erik Verschuuren; Wim van der Bij; Wim de Boer; Wim Timens; Jaap Middeldorp

2003-01-01

11

Epstein-Barr virus-associated pneumonia in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation or infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) most often induces post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), but it also may be associated with clinical symptoms such as pneumonia. Our aim was to investigate and describe the clinical manifestations of PTLD and PTLD accompanied by EBV-associated pneumonia in 323 patients after HSCT. PTLD within extravisceral lymphoid tissue was identified in 7 cases (5 with CD20(+) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 1 with CD20(+) polymorphic B-cell hyperplasia, and 1 with CD3(+)CD45RO(+) peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified). Six of the patients with PTLD were EBV positive. Three patients had EBV-associated pneumonia, and chest computed tomography revealed multifocal patchy and diffuse ground-glass attenuation in both lungs. EBV-DNA was positive in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which contained mainly CD3(+) T cells but no CD19(+) or CD20(+) B cells. Lung biopsy showed interstitial intra-alveolar infiltrates of mainly CD3(+) T cells and some CD68(+) macrophages without CD19(+) and CD20(+) B cells. The patients with PTLD accompanied by EBV-associated pneumonia developed hyperpyrexia and dyspnea, which progressed rapidly, and eventually all died within 2 weeks of the onset of PTLD. EBV-associated PTLD accompanied by EBV-associated pneumonia after HSCT is rare. Cytology of BAL fluid and lung biopsy may help establish the diagnosis. PMID:20345506

Liu, Q-F; Fan, Z-P; Luo, X-D; Sun, J; Zhang, Y; Ding, Y-Q

2010-03-23

12

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric patients.  

PubMed

Transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells is accompanied by profound disturbance of immune function mediated by immunosuppressive drugs or delayed immune reconstitution. Disturbed T cell control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells leads to posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in up to 10% of patients. Children are at a higher risk because they are more often EBV-naďve before transplantation. Patients with PTLD often present with unspecific symptoms (pain and organ/graft dysfunction). Depending on the onset of PTLD, manifestations vary between mainly nodal (late PTLD) and extranodal sites (early PTLD). Histology, immunohistology, EBER in situ hybridization and molecular pathology are required for diagnosis and subclassification of PTLD. The three major types are early lesions (resembling reactive proliferations in immunocompetent patients), polymorphic PTLD (proliferation of B and T cells with effacement of histoarchitecture) and monomorphic PTLD (presenting as malignant lymphomas, mainly high-grade B cell lymphomas). In a subfraction of cases, including monomorphic PTLD, reduction of immunosuppressive medication alone is sufficient to induce remission. Surgical debulking of tumor mass and anti-CD20-antibody treatment with or without chemotherapy (usually at lower dosages than in immunocompetent patients) constitute the basis of additional therapy. PMID:24013821

Hussein, Kais; Tiede, Christina; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Kreipe, Hans

2013-08-30

13

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases in Asian solid organ transplant recipients: late onset and favorable response to treatment.  

PubMed

Nineteen consecutive patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in an Asian population were reviewed. The histopathologic diagnoses were monomorphic (CD20-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, n = 14); plasmacytic (n = 1); Burkitt-like (n = 1); natural killer cell lymphoma (n = 1); lymphomatoid papulosis (n = 1); and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1). Early-onset (

Chan, Thomas S Y; Hwang, Yu-Yan; Gill, Harinder; Au, Wing-Yan; Leung, Anskar Y H; Tse, Eric; Chim, Chor-Sang; Loong, Florence; Kwong, Yok-Lam

2012-02-10

14

Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders after Heart or Kidney Transplantation at a Single Centre: Presentation and Response to Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) is a serious complication after solid organ transplantation. Reduction of immunosuppression (RI) alone is not able to control the disease. We report a prospective analysis of 30 patients with PTLD after heart or kidney transplantation. Only 5 of 30 patients, treated solely with RI, obtained a complete response. Five patients were treated heterogeneously; in the remaining

S. M. L. Aversa; S. Stragliotto; D. Marino; F. Calabrese; P. Rigotti; F. Marchini; A. Gambino; G. Feltrin; C. Boso; F. Canova; C. Soldŕ; R. Mazzarotto; P. Burra

2008-01-01

15

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease of donor origin, following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a patient with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.  

PubMed

Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is an extremely rare condition that originates from dendritic cells. We report on the first case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) of donor origin in a BPDC patient post-allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Flow cytometry study identified a cell population CD4+/CD56+/CD45RA+/CD123+/TCL1+ suggestive of BPDCN diagnosis, which was confirmed by a lymph node biopsy (cells positive for BCL11a, BDCA-2, CD2AP, CD123, TCL1 and S100). Cytogenetic analysis revealed a complex karyotype: (19 metaphase) 47,XX,t(1;6)(q21;q2?5),-13?+?2mar[11]/47, XX, +21 [3]/46,XX [5]. The patient was started on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) induction schedule, and subsequently an allogeneic HSCT was performed. On day +36 post-HSCT, bone marrow biopsy/aspirate showed complete morphological remission, and chimerism study showed 100% donor chimera. However, on day +37, the patient was found to have enlarged cervical and supraclavicular lymphoadenopathy, splenomegaly and raised lactic dehydrogenase. EBV-DNA copies in blood were elevated, consistent with a lytic cycle. A lymph node biopsy showed EBV encoded RNA and large atypical B cells (CD45dim-, CD4+/CD56+, monoclonal for k-chain, CD19+/CD20+/CD21+/CD22+/CD38+/CD43+/CD79?-/CD5-/CD10-), consistent with PTLD monomorphic type. Chimerism study showed that PTLD was of donor origin. This case together with the recent literature findings on BPDCN and PTLD are discussed. PMID:22915052

Piccin, Andrea; Morello, Enrico; Svaldi, Mirija; Haferlach, Torsten; Facchetti, Fabio; Negri, Giovanni; Vecchiato, Cinzia; Fisogni, Simona; Pusceddu, Irene; Cortelazzo, Sergio

2012-08-23

16

Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-24

17

Epstein–Barr viral load in whole blood of adults with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after solid organ transplantation does not correlate with clinical course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is closely linked to primary Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. A defect of EBV specific cellular immunity is postulated to play a pivotal role in the etiology of PTLD, but there is some debate as to whether EBV load in the peripheral blood of transplant patients predicts onset of PTLD or relapse after treatment. The current prospective,

Stephan Oertel; Ralf Ulrich Trappe; Kristin Zeidler; Nina Babel; Petra Reinke; Manfred Hummel; Sven Jonas; Matthias Papp-Vary; Marion Subklewe; Bernd Dörken; Hanno Riess; Barbara Gärtner

2006-01-01

18

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder localized in the colon after liver transplantation: Report of a case  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a life-threatening complication of any organ transplantation. It is\\u000a more common in children than in adults, and the risk factors include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and immunosuppression.\\u000a We report a case of colonic marginal zone B-cell lymphoma occurring 4 years after liver transplantation in a 52-year-old man\\u000a who had been taking immunosuppressive agents, namely, cyclosporin,

Min Jung Kim; Seong Hyeon Yun; Ho-Kyung Chun; Woo Yong Lee; Yong Beom Cho

2009-01-01

19

Pulmonary post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with a CT halo sign.  

PubMed

Background:   Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) comprises a spectrum of clinically relevant lymphatic diseases that occur in patients after transplantation. The PTLD-related mortality is high and the clinical picture and location of the lesions are very variable. For these reasons, the diagnosis of PTLD is difficult and new diagnostic tools are sought. Case Report: A 31-year-old woman, 17 years after kidney transplantation, presented with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, fever, and weakness and was diagnosed with pulmonary PTLD. Computed tomography appearance was not typical for lymphoma and demonstrated multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules and masses with a halo sign. Initial differential diagnosis included invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and acute Wegener granulomatosis. Since cultures from bronchoalveolar lavage and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were negative, videothoracoscopy with lung biopsy was performed. Pathology analysis revealed diffuse large T-cell lymphoma with histopathologic features of infiltrative growth along the lung interstitium, vessel invasion, and hemorrhagic necrosis possibly explaining the presence of a halo sign. Conclusions: We suggest PTLD should always be suspected in a transplant recipient presenting with the CT halo sign. Moreover, the correlation of this radiological phenomenon with the patient's clinical presentation and severe pathologic findings allows us to conclude that the thoracic halo sign in PTLD may reflect a worse prognosis. PMID:24045455

Mucha, Krzysztof; Foroncewicz, Bartosz; Palczewski, Piotr; Su?kowska, Katarzyna; Ziarkiewicz-Wróblewska, Bogna; Or?owski, Tadeusz; Go??biowski, Marek; P?czek, Leszek

2013-09-16

20

Therapeutic options in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders  

PubMed Central

Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are the second most frequent malignancies after solid organ transplantation and cover a wide spectrum ranging from polyclonal early lesions to monomorphic lymphoma. Available treatment modalities include immunosuppression reduction, immunotherapy with anti-B-cell monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, antiviral therapy, cytotoxic T-cell therapy as well as surgery and irradiation. Owing to the small number of cases and the heterogeneity of PTLD, current treatment strategies are mostly based on case reports and small, often retrospective studies. Moreover, many studies on the treatment of PTLD have involved a combination of different treatment options, complicating the evaluation of individual treatment components. However, there has been significant progress over the last few years. Three prospective phase II trials on the efficacy of rituximab monotherapy have shown significant complete remission rates without any relevant toxicity. A prospective, multicenter, international phase II trial evaluating sequential treatment with rituximab and CHOP-based chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) is ongoing and preliminary results have been promising. Cytotoxic T-cell therapy targeting Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells has shown low toxicity and high efficacy in a phase II trial and will be a future therapeutic option at specialized centers. Here, we review the currently available data on the different treatment modalities with a focus on PTLD following solid organ transplantation in adult patients.

Zimmermann, Heiner

2011-01-01

21

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult liver transplant recipients: a South American multicenter experience.  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a major and potentially life-threatening complication after solid-organ transplantation. The aim of this study was to describe the disease characteristics, clinical practices, and survival related to PTLD in adult orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) recipients in South America. We conducted a survey at four different transplant groups from Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Among 1621 OLT recipients, 27 developed PTLD (1.7%); the mean age at diagnosis was 53.7 (± 14) yr with a mean time of 39.7 (± 35.2) months from OLT to PTLD diagnosis. Initial therapy included reduction in immunosuppression alone in 23.1% of the patients. Either rituximab or chemotherapy was employed as initial or second-line therapy in 76.9% of the patients. PTLD location was frequently extranodal (80.7%) and mostly involving the transplanted liver (59.3%). The overall survival at one and five yr post-PTLD diagnosis was 53.8% and 46.2%, respectively. Significant univariate risk factors for post-PTLD mortality included lactate dehydrogenase ? 250 U/L (HR 9.66, p = 0.02), stage III/IV PTLD (HR 5.34, p = 0.004), and HCV infection (HR 7.68, p = 0.01). In conclusion, PTLD in OLT adult recipients is predominantly extranodal, and although mortality is high, long-term survival is possible. PMID:23758407

Mendizabal, Manuel; Marciano, Sebastián; dos Santos Schraiber, Luciana; Zapata, Rodrigo; Quiros, Rodolfo; Zanotelli, Maria Lucia; Rivas, María Marta; Kusminsky, Gustavo; Humeres, Roberto; Alves de Mattos, Angelo; Gadano, Adrián; Silva, Marcelo O

2013-06-13

22

Primary cutaneous posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders in solid organ transplant recipients: a multicenter European case series.  

PubMed

Primary cutaneous posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are rare. This retrospective, multicenter study of 35 cases aimed to better describe this entity. Cases were (re)-classified according to the WHO-EORTC or the WHO 2008 classifications of lymphomas. Median interval between first transplantation and diagnosis was 85 months. Fifty-seven percent of patients had a kidney transplant. Twenty-four cases (68.6%) were classified as primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) and 11 (31.4%) as primary cutaneous B cell PTLD. Mycosis fungoides (MF) was the most common (50%) CTCL subtype. Ten (90.9%) cutaneous B cell PTLD cases were classified as EBV-associated B cell lymphoproliferations (including one plasmablastic lymphoma and one lymphomatoid granulomatosis) and one as diffuse large B cell lymphoma, other, that was EBV-negative. Sixteen (45.7%) patients died after a median follow-up of 19.5 months (11 [68.8%] with CTCL [6 of whom had CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD)] and 5 [31.2%] with cutaneous B cell PTLD. Median survival times for all patients, CTCL and cutaneous B cell PTLD subgroups were 93, 93, and 112 months, respectively. Survival rates for MF were higher than those for CD30(+) LPD. The spectrum of primary CTCL in organ transplant recipients (OTR) is similar to that in the general population. The prognosis of posttransplant primary cutaneous CD30(+) LPD is worse than posttransplant MF and than its counterpart in the immunocompetent population. EBV-associated cutaneous B cell LPD predominates in OTR. PMID:23718915

Seçkin, D; Barete, S; Euvrard, S; Francčs, C; Kanitakis, J; Geusau, A; Del Marmol, V; Harwood, C A; Proby, C M; Ali, I; Güleç, A T; Durukan, E; Lebbé, C; Alaibac, M; Laffitte, E; Cooper, S; Bouwes Bavinck, J N; Murphy, G M; Ferrándiz, C; Mřrk, C; Cetkovská, P; Kempf, W; Hofbauer, G F L

2013-05-29

23

Clinicopathologic spectrum and EBV status of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are serious, life-threatening complications of solid-organ transplantation (SOT) and bone marrow transplantation, and are associated with high mortality. PTLDs represent a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative diseases, which show a spectrum of clinical, morphologic, and molecular genetic features ranging from reactive polyclonal lesions to frank lymphomas. We describe clinicopathologic features of 17 cases of PTLD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), which were analyzed by in situ hybridization for EBV and a panel of antibodies directed against numerous antigens, including CD20, PAX5, CD3, bcl-6, CD10, MUM-1/IRF4, CD138, Kappa, Lambda, CD30, CD15, and Ki67. The cases included 13 males and 4 females with a median age of 31 years (range 9-49 years) and the PTLDs developed 1.5-19 months post-transplant (mean 4.7 months). The histological types indicated five cases of early lesions, two of plasmacytic hyperplasia and three of infectious mononucleosis-like PTLD. Eight cases were polymorphic PTLD, and four were monomorphic PTLD, including three of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and one of plasmablastic lymphoma. Foci and sheets of necrosis were observed in five cases. The infected ratio of EBV was 88.2 %. Some cases were treated by reduction of immunosuppression, antiviral therapy, donor lymphocyte infusion, or anti-CD20 monoclonal rituximab. Eight cases died. The first half year after allo-HSCT is very important for the development of PTLD. The diagnosis of PTLD relies on morphology and immunohistochemistry, and EBV plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PTLD. The prognosis of PTLD is poor, and, notably, PTLD after allo-HSCT exhibits some features different from those of PTLD after SOT. PMID:23255160

Chen, Ding-Bao; Song, Qiu-Jing; Chen, Yun-Xin; Chen, Yu-Hong; Shen, Dan-Hua

2012-12-20

24

Pathology of central nervous system posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders: lessons from pediatric autopsies.  

PubMed

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) involving the central nervous system (CNS) in children are uncommon and can prove diagnostically challenging. The clinical and imaging characteristics of CNS PTLD can overlap with those of infection, hemorrhage, and primary CNS tumors. Some cases of CNS PTLD remain clinically unsuspected and are diagnosed postmortem. We report 6 instances of CNS PTLD in children, 2 of which were limited to the CNS and were unsuspected before autopsy. In our autopsy series, PTLD was found outside the CNS in 4 out of 6 cases. Since CNS PTLD has a poor prognosis and the presentation can be subtle, unsuspected, and high grade, it is important to maintain a high index of suspicion and to perform imaging and brain biopsy whenever clinically appropriate. In the presence of leptomeningeal involvement, the diagnosis could be made by cerebral spinal fluid examination. PMID:23286282

Gheorghe, Gabriela; Radu, Oana; Milanovich, Samuel; Hamilton, Ronald L; Jaffe, Ronald; Southern, James F; Ozolek, John A

2013-01-03

25

Single-center analysis of biopsy-confirmed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder: incidence, clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors.  

PubMed

Hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients diagnosed with biopsy-confirmed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) at our institution from 1989 to 2010 were identified. Patient-, transplant- and disease-related characteristics, prognostic factors and outcome were collected and analyzed. One hundred and forty biopsy-proven cases of PTLD were included. Overall incidence in the transplant population was 2.12%, with heart transplant recipients carrying the highest risk. Most PTLDs were monomorphic (82%), with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the most frequent subtype. The majority of cases (70.7%) occurred > 1 year posttransplant, and 66% were Epstein-Barr virus positive. Following initial therapy the overall response rate was 68.5%. Three-year relapse-free and overall survivals were 59% and 49%, respectively. At last follow-up, 44% of the patients were alive. Multivariable analysis identified several classical lymphoma-specific poor prognostic factors for the different outcome measures. The value of the International Prognostic Index was confirmed in our analysis. PMID:23442063

Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas; Sagaert, Xavier; Fieuws, Steffen; Wlodarska, Iwona; Morscio, Julie; Brepoels, Lieselot; Kuypers, Dirk; Vanhaecke, Johan; Nevens, Frederik; Verleden, Geert; Van Damme-Lombaerts, Rita; Renard, Marleen; Pirenne, Jacques; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Verhoef, Gregor

2013-04-01

26

Epstein-Barr Virus Polymerase Chain Reaction and Serology in Pediatric Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder: Three-Year Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess whether the semiquantitative peripheral blood Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test correlates\\u000a with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD), we compiled the results of the test done over a 3-year period ending\\u000a July 1997. Six hundred seventy-six tests were done on 185 patients. Four hundred-thirty tests (63%) were negative, 167 (25%)\\u000a were weak positive, 67 (10%) were moderate

Beverly Barton Rogers; John Sommerauer; Albert Quan; Charles F. Timmons; D. Brian Dawson; Richard H. Scheuermann; Karen Krisher; Carolyn Atkins

1998-01-01

27

Serum free light chains and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in patients with renal transplant.  

PubMed

Abstract The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is an association between serum free light chains (sFLC) quantification and the development of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), using serum samples from a nested case-control cohort of patients with renal transplant. Ten new cases of PTLD and 46 controls were enrolled. Additional comparison groups consisted of five human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, five with untreated Hodgkin lymphoma and six normal individuals. Serum ? and ? FLC concentrations were measured by nephelometry and compared with reference ranges (normal and renal ranges). ? and/or ? were above the normal range in 90% of cases and in 65% of matched controls. There was no statistically significant difference between all groups, except for ? FLC concentrations between cases of PTLD and normal individuals (p = 0.016). The ?/? sFLC ratios of cases and controls were within the renal range and normal range. Our results suggest that sFLC are not useful to predict PTLD development in renal transplant recipients. PMID:23398208

Fernando, Rodrigo C; Rizzatti, Edgar G; Braga, Walter M T; Santos, Melina G; de Oliveira, Mariana B; Pestana, José O M; Baiocchi, Otavio C G; Colleoni, Gisele W B

2013-03-04

28

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita.  

PubMed

Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition. We present a case of a 28-year-old woman with DC who was admitted for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for aplastic anemia and who developed acute myeloid leukemia with complex genetic karyotype abnormalities including the MLL (11q23) gene, 1q25, and chromosome 8. After transplantation, a monomorphic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) negative posttransplant-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was discovered involving the liver, omental tissue, and peritoneal fluid samples showing additional MLL (11q23) gene abnormalities by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Despite treatment, the patient died of complications associated with transplantation and invasive fungal infection. This case represents the first bona fide documented case of EBV-negative monomorphic PTLD host derived, with MLL gene abnormalities in a patient with DC, and shows another possible mechanism for the development of a therapy-related lymphoid neoplasm after transplantation. PMID:23222806

Bohn, Olga L; Whitten, Joseph; Spitzer, Barbara; Kobos, Rachel; Prockop, Susan; Boulad, Farid; Arcila, Maria; Wang, Lu; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

2012-12-05

29

Primary pleural effusion posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder: Distinction from secondary involvement and effusion lymphoma.  

PubMed

Pleural effusion presentation of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is relatively uncommon. Most examples of effusion-based PTLD have been secondary to widespread solid organ involvement, and are associated with an aggressive clinical course. We report on a case of primary effusion PTLD in a 70-yr-old male liver transplant recipient with a history of hepatitis B infection. Cytomorphologically, the pleural fluid specimen showed a monomorphous population of intermediate to large-sized transformed lymphoid cells, with irregular multilobated nuclear contours and readily identifiable mitotic figures. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic studies revealed a CD5-negative, CD10-negative, lambda immunoglobulin light chain-positive, monoclonal B-lymphocyte (CD19-positive/CD20-positive) population. The immunocytochemical stain for CD30 antigen was negative. In situ hybridization study for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early RNA (EBER) and Southern blot analysis for EBV terminal repeat sequences were both positive. Southern blot analysis for human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) was negative. No solid-organ PTLD was identified, and the cytologic results supported the diagnosis of primary effusion PTLD. Immunosuppression was decreased, and 8 mo following the diagnosis of pleural fluid PTLD, the patient was stable and his pleural effusion had markedly diminished. Recognition of primary effusion PTLD and its distinction from PTLD secondarily involving the body fluids and from other lymphomas is important, since the behavior and prognosis appear different. PMID:11466813

Ohori, N P; Whisnant, R E; Nalesnik, M A; Swerdlow, S H

2001-07-01

30

Treatment of Recurrent Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder of the Central Nervous System with High-Dose Methotrexate  

PubMed Central

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a frequent complication of intestinal transplantation and is associated with a poor prognosis. There is currently no consensus on optimal therapy. Recurrent PTLD involving the central nervous system (CNS) represents a particularly difficult therapeutic challenge. We report the successful treatment of CNS PTLD in a pediatric patient after liver/small bowel transplantation. Initial immunosuppression (IS) was with thymoglobulin, solucortef, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil. EBV viremia developed 8 weeks posttransplantation, and despite treatment with cytogam and valganciclovir the patient developed a polymorphic, CD20+, EBV+ PTLD with peripheral lymphadenopathy. Following treatment with rituximab, the lymphadenopathy resolved, but a new monomorphic CD20?, EBV+, lambda-restricted, plasmacytoid PTLD mesenteric mass emerged. Complete response of this PTLD was achieved with 6 cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy; however, 4 months off therapy he developed CNS PTLD (monomorphic CD20?, EBV+, lambda-restricted, plasmacytoid PTLD) of the brain and spine. IS was discontinued and HD-MTX (2.5–5?gm/m2/dose) followed by intrathecal HD-MTX (2?mg/dose ×2-3 days Q 7–10 days per cycle) was administered Q 4–7 weeks. After 3 cycles of HD-MTX, the CSF was negative for malignant cells, MRI of head/spine showed near-complete response, and PET/CT was negative. The patient remains in complete remission now for 3.5 years after completion of systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy. Conclusion. HD-MTX is an effective therapy for CNS PTLD and recurrent PTLD that have failed rituximab and CHOP chemotherapy.

Twist, Clare J.; Castillo, Ricardo O.

2013-01-01

31

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after liver transplantation: post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder or coincidental de novo leukaemia?  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T-cell origin are quite uncommon, and the vast majority represent neoplasms of mature, post-thymic T- or natural killer cells. Here, we report a rare case of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), which occurred in an 18-year-old man who had undergone three liver transplants, initially for biliary atresia and subsequently for graft failure due to chronic rejection. He had received immunosuppression with cyclosporine and tacrolimus, as well as short-term treatment with OKT3. The T-ALL occurred 16?years after the first liver transplant. This case highlights the challenge for classifying rare neoplasms occurring in recipients of solid organ transplants that are currently not recognized to lie within the spectrum of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders. Given the long interval between the liver transplants and the development of T-ALL, a coincidental occurrence of the leukaemia cannot be ruled out. However, the potential roles of immunosuppressive therapy and other co-morbid conditions of the individual as possible risk factors for the pathogenesis of T-ALL are discussed. PMID:22618860

Fang, Yanan; Pinkney, Kerice A; Lee, John C; Gindin, Tatyana; Weiner, Michael A; Alobeid, Bachir; Bhagat, Govind

2012-05-22

32

Rituximab is highly effective for pure red cell aplasia and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation  

PubMed Central

Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) constitute rare complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AlloHSCT). The incidence of EBV-PTLD is above 1%, but it may increase in patients with well-known risk factors such as EBV seronegativity at the time of transplantation, T-cell depletion of donor grafts, HLA mismatch and use of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) for prophylaxis of graft versus host disease. The risk factors for PRCA were defined and they include: 1) elevated post-transplant anti-donor isohemagglutinin titers, 2) reduced-intensity conditioning before transplant, 3) the presence of anti-A agglutinin and 4) ciclosporin for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis and 5) transplant from sibling donor. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab remains the first line treatment for PTLD following AlloHSCT, but its efficacy in PRCA is limited. Reduction of immunosuppression is also strongly advised. This is the first report on an adult patient who simultaneously developed PRCA and PTLD after ABO-mismatched AlloHSCT. The early introduction of rituximab resulted in prompt resolution of clinical symptoms with subsequent full recovery.

Kopinska, Anna; Frankiewicz, Andrzej; Grygoruk-Wisniowska, Iwona; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira

2012-01-01

33

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder associated with immunosuppressive therapy for renal transplantation in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).  

PubMed

Human post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an abnormal lymphoid proliferation that arises in 1-12% of transplant recipients as a consequence of prolonged immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr viral infection (EBV). Nonhuman primates, primarily rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), have been used extensively in research models of solid organ transplantation, as the nonhuman primate immune system closely resembles that of the human. Lymphocryptovirus of rhesus monkeys has been characterized and shown to be very similar to EBV in humans in regards to its cellular tropism, host immune response, and ability to stimulate B lymphocyte proliferation and lymphomagenesis. Thus, it appears that the NHP may be an appropriate animal model for EBV-associated lymphoma development in humans. The clinical management of post-transplant nonhuman primates that are receiving multiple immunosuppressive agents can be complicated by the risk of PTLD and other opportunistic infections. We report 3 cases of PTLD in rhesus macaques that illustrate this risk potential in the setting of potent immunosuppressive therapies for solid organ transplantation. PMID:23578881

Page, Eugenia K; Courtney, Cynthia L; Sharma, Prachi; Cheeseman, Jennifer; Jenkins, Joe B; Strobert, Elizabeth; Knechtle, Stuart J

2013-04-08

34

Quantitative Epstein-Barr virus shedding and its correlation with the risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder  

PubMed Central

We postulated that quantitative monitoring of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) shedding after transplantation could distinguish EBV-associated illnesses and predict clinical outcome. EBV DNA was measured in solid organ (SOT) and hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) using our own real-time TaqMan EBV PCR. The proportion of patients who had EBV DNAemia post-transplant was significantly lower in HCT vs. SOT (p < 0.001). Over a 7.5-yr period, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occurred in 66 (5.8%) of 1131 patients who met adequate monitoring criteria. SOT recipients developed PTLD significantly later than HCT recipients (median, 2.8 yr vs. 121 d; p < 0.001). PTLD was documented in 53 (14%) of 376 patients who had EBV in ?1 whole blood sample vs. 13 (2%) of 755 patients who had at least three EBV-negative blood samples and were never positive. PTLD risk in viremic patients increased with the peak quantity of EBV DNAemia (p < 0.001). PTLD occurred in 37/333 (11%) of patients with peak blood levels 103–105 copies/mL vs. 16/43 (37%) of patients with levels >105 (p < 0.001). EBV PCR was predictive in 29 (78%) of 37 patients tested within three wk prior to tissue diagnosis of PTLD, and thus, we conclude that EBV PCR with careful attention paid to changes in EBV DNAemia could lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment of PTLD.

Holman, Carol J.; Karger, Amy B.; Mullan, Beth D.; Brundage, Richard C.; Balfour, Henry H.

2013-01-01

35

[Diagnosis and treatment of CMV and EBV Reactivation as well as Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: An SFGM-TC report].  

PubMed

In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) set up the third annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in October 2012 in Lille. Here the SFGM-TC addressed the issue of post-transplant CMV and EBV reactivation, and EBV-related Lymphoproliferative Disorders. PMID:24011961

Bay, J-O; Peffault de Latour, R; Bruno, B; Coiteux, V; Guillaume, T; Hicheri, Y; Paillard, C; Suarez, F; Turlure, P; Alain, S; Bulabois, C-E; Socié, G; Bauters, F; Yakoub-Agha, I

2013-09-04

36

Long-term survival in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders with a dose-adjusted ACVBP regimen.  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are severe complications after solid organ transplantation with no consensus on best treatment practice. Chemotherapy is a therapeutic option with a high response and a significant relapse rate leading to a low long-term tolerance rate. Currently, most centres use anthracycline-based drug combinations, such as CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). We assessed the efficacy and safety of a dose-adjusted ACVBP (doxorubicin reduced to 50 mg/m(2), cyclophosphamide adjusted to renal function, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) regimen in patients failing to respond to a reduction in immunosuppressive therapy. Favourable responses were observed in 24 (73%) of the 33 treated patients. Fourteen (42%) patients died, mostly from PTLD progression. Actuarial survival was 60% at 5 years and 55% at 10 years. Survival prognostic factors were: number of involved sites (P = 0.007), clinical stage III/IV (P = 0.004), bulky tumour (P < 0.0001), B symptoms (P = 0.03), decreased serum albumin (P = 0.03) and poor performance status (P = 0.06). Both the international and the PTLD prognostic index were predictive for survival (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Overall 128 cycles were given. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was recorded after 26 (20%) chemotherapy cycles in 19 (58%) patients. Forty-one (32%) infections were recorded in 26 (79%) patients. This study demonstrated that an individual dose-adjustment of ACVBP regimen was manageable in PTLD patients and favourably impacted on long-term survival. PMID:16889621

Fohrer, Cécile; Caillard, Sophie; Koumarianou, Argyro; Ellero, Bernard; Woehl-Jaeglé, Marie-Lorraine; Meyer, Carole; Epailly, Eric; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Lioure, Bruno; Natarajan-Ame, Shanti; Maloisel, Frédéric; Lutun, Philippe; Kessler, Romain; Moulin, Bruno; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Wolf, Philippe; Herbrecht, Raoul

2006-08-02

37

Rapamycin improves lymphoproliferative disease in murine autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS)  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis, leading to lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and an increased number of double-negative T cells (DNTs). Treatment options for patients with ALPS are limited. Rapamycin has been shown to induce apoptosis in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Since ALPS is caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, we hypothesized that rapamycin would be effective in treating ALPS. We tested this hypothesis using rapamycin in murine models of ALPS. We followed treatment response with serial assessment of DNTs by flow cytometry in blood and lymphoid tissue, by serial monitoring of lymph node and spleen size with ultrasonography, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti–double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. Three-dimensional ultrasound measurements in the mice correlated to actual tissue measurements at death (r = .9648). We found a dramatic and statistically significant decrease in DNTs, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoantibodies after only 4 weeks when comparing rapamycin-treated mice with controls. Rapamycin induced apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We compared rapamycin to mycophenolate mofetil, a second-line agent used to treat ALPS, and found rapamycin's control of lymphoproliferation was superior. We conclude that rapamycin is an effective treatment for murine ALPS and should be explored as treatment for affected humans.

Teachey, David T.; Obzut, Dana A.; Axsom, Kelly; Choi, John K.; Goldsmith, Kelly C.; Hall, Junior; Hulitt, Jessica; Manno, Catherine S.; Maris, John M.; Rhodin, Nicholas; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Brown, Valerie I.; Grupp, Stephan A.

2006-01-01

38

Burkitt's Lymphoma Presenting as Late-Onset Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder following Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation: Case Report and Review of the Literature.  

PubMed

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a rare, but serious complication following transplantation. Late-onset PTLD are often associated with more monoclonal lesions and consequently have a worse prognosis. There are only isolated case reports of Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as PTLD. We present an extremely rare, aggressive Burkitt's lymphoma years after kidney and pancreas transplantation which was successfully treated with combination chemotherapy along with withdrawal of immunosuppression. The patient remains in complete remission more than 2 years after his diagnosis. We also provide a succinct review of treatment of various PTLD and discuss the role of Epstein-Barr virus infection in the pathogenesis of PTLD. PMID:23466659

Naik, Seema; Tayapongsak, Kristy; Robbins, Katherine; Manavi, Cyrus Koresh; Pettenati, Mark J; Grier, David D

2013-01-08

39

Burkitt's Lymphoma Presenting as Late-Onset Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder following Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation: Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a rare, but serious complication following transplantation. Late-onset PTLD are often associated with more monoclonal lesions and consequently have a worse prognosis. There are only isolated case reports of Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as PTLD. We present an extremely rare, aggressive Burkitt's lymphoma years after kidney and pancreas transplantation which was successfully treated with combination chemotherapy along with withdrawal of immunosuppression. The patient remains in complete remission more than 2 years after his diagnosis. We also provide a succinct review of treatment of various PTLD and discuss the role of Epstein-Barr virus infection in the pathogenesis of PTLD.

Naik, Seema; Tayapongsak, Kristy; Robbins, Katherine; Manavi, Cyrus Koresh; Pettenati, Mark J.; Grier, David D.

2013-01-01

40

Rituximab treatment for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) induces complete remission of recurrent nephrotic syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 12-year-old Japanese boy who underwent kidney transplantation with a kidney from his mother developed severe proteinuria immediately after the operation. Because his original disease was nephrotic syndrome (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, or FSGS) and electron microscopic examination of the renal biopsy showed foot process fusion, we diagnosed this as a recurrence of nephrotic syndrome to the transplanted kidney. Four months

Kandai Nozu; Kazumoto Iijima; Masato Fujisawa; Atsuko Nakagawa; Norishige Yoshikawa; Masafumi Matsuo

2005-01-01

41

The radiological spectrum of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) are characterised by abnormal proliferation of indigenous cell lines or infiltration of lung parenchyma by lymphoid cells. They encompass a wide spectrum of focal or diffuse abnormalities, which may be classified as reactive or neoplastic on the basis of cellular morphology and clonality. The spectrum of reactive disorders results primarily from antigenic stimulation of bronchial mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and comprises three main entities: follicular bronchiolitis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and (more rarely) nodular lymphoid hyperplasia. Primary parenchymal neoplasms are most commonly extranodal marginal zone lymphomas of MALT origin (MALT lymphomas), followed by diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) and lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG). Secondary lymphomatous parenchymal neoplasms (both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas) are far more prevalent than primary neoplasms. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma (ARL) and post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) may also primarily affect the lung parenchyma. Modern advances in treatments for AIDS and transplant medicine are associated with an increase in the incidence of LPD and have heightened the need to understand the range of imaging appearance of these diseases. The multidetector CT (MDCT) findings of LPD are heterogeneous, thereby reflecting the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of these entities. Understanding the spectrum of LPD and the various imaging manifestations is crucial because the radiologist is often the first one to suggest the diagnosis and has a pivotal role in differentiating these diseases. The current concepts of LPD are discussed together with a demonstration of the breadth of MDCT patterns within this disease spectrum.

Hare, S S; Souza, C A; Bain, G; Seely, J M; Frcpc; Gomes, M M; Quigley, M

2012-01-01

42

Clinicopathological characteristics of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders of T-cell origin: single-center series of nine cases and meta-analysis of 147 reported cases.  

PubMed

Abstract T-cell or natural killer (NK)-cell posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (T-PTLD) is a rare but severe complication after transplant. Here we present the clinicopathological features of a single-center series of nine cases. Additionally, we summarize the clinicopathological findings of 147 cases of T/NK-cell PTLD reported in the literature in an attempt to define subtype-specific characteristics. T/NK-cell PTLD occurs in patients of all ages, usually extranodally, and most frequently after kidney transplant. Organ specific incidence, however, is highest following heart transplant. Approximately one-third of T-cell PTLDs are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related, with peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS) being the most prevalent EBV-associated T-cell PTLD. A male predominance is observed, which is most striking in the EBV(+) group, particularly in PTCL, NOS. With a median posttransplant interval of 72 months, T-cell PTLDs are among the late-occurring PTLDs. Of the most common T-cell PTLDs, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has the best prognosis, whereas PTCL, NOS and hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) have the worst prognosis. EBV(+) cases seem to have a longer survival than EBV(-) cases, suggesting a different pathogenetic mechanism. PMID:23402267

Herreman, An; Dierickx, Daan; Morscio, Julie; Camps, Jordi; Bittoun, Emilie; Verhoef, Gregor; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Sagaert, Xavier; Tousseyn, Thomas

2013-03-27

43

Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the pituitary gland.  

PubMed

Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are heterogeneous lesions with variable morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular characteristics. Multiple distinct primary lesions can occur in PTLD, rarely with both B-cell and T-cell characteristics. Lesions can involve both grafted organs and other sites; however, PTLD involving the pituitary gland has not been previously reported. We describe a patient who developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative PTLD 13 years posttransplantation involving the terminal ileum and pituitary, which was simultaneously involved by a pituitary adenoma. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary lesion showed expression of CD79a, CD3, and CD7 with clonal rearrangements of both T-cell receptor gamma chain (TRG@) and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) genes. The terminal ileal lesion was immunophenotypically and molecularly distinct. This is the first report of pituitary PTLD and illustrates the potentially complex nature of PTLD. PMID:20656316

Meriden, Zina; Bullock, Grant C; Bagg, Adam; Bonatti, Hugo; Cousar, John B; Lopes, M Beatriz; Robbins, Mark K; Cathro, Helen P

2010-07-24

44

Chronic lymphoproliferative disease of large granular lymphocytes.  

PubMed

An 80-year-old patient has been followed for hepato- and splenomegaly, hemolytic anemia, neutropenia with lymphocytosis with large granular lymphocyte predominance in his peripheral blood, with infiltration of bone marrow, liver and probably also spleen. Determination of surface markers of proliferating lymphocytes in peripheral blood showed a mixed phenotype of T suppressor/cytotoxic and natural killer cells (SIg-, E+, T3+, T8+, EAC+, Leu7-, N901+, NK9+, VIB C5 and VIB E3-, Ia-). An in vitro cytotoxic test showed the functional inactivity of the cells tested also after human leukocyte interferon stimulation. Chromosomal analysis neither of peripheral blood lymphocytes nor of bone marrow cells proved the monoclonality marker. Following long-term prednisone therapy, the improvement of anemia, later also neutropenia accompanied by the decrease of lymphocytes has been achieved. As the disease present in our patient was distinguished only in recent years and in our country has not been reported yet, the details on its clinical, morphologic, hematologic, cytogenetic and mainly immunophenotypic characteristics are given in this paper. The problems concerning classification of the disease and determination of its biological nature are discussed. PMID:3352841

Vahancík, A; Babusíková, O; Ujházy, P; Klobusická, M; Jakubovský, J; Izakovic, V

1988-01-01

45

Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the southeastern United States  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The eight cases described herein represent the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in wild turkeys and the first identification of LPDV in North America. Systemic lymphoproliferative disease was presumably the cause of morbidity and mortality in five of the eight turk...

46

An SH2 domain stands between infectious mononucleosis and a fatal lymphoproliferative disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Host response to EBV infection in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease results from mutations in an SH2-domain encoding geneCoffey, A.J. et al. (1998)Nat. Genet. 20, 129–135The X-linked lymphoproliferative-disease gene product SAP regulates signals induced through the co-receptor SLAMSayos, J. et al. (1998)Nature 395, 462–469

Kathryn L Evans

1998-01-01

47

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease: pathology and diagnosis.  

PubMed

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a rare familial disorder resulting in selective immunodeficiency to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of EBV-infected lymphocytes. Phenotypes of this disease are variable and include fulminant infectious mononucleosis, hypogammaglobulinemia, and malignant lymphoma. In this article, we describe a case of a previously healthy 4-year-old boy with serologic evidence of acute EBV infection who died of fulminant hepatic failure. Histopathological examination of tissue obtained postmortem showed hemophagocytosis and prominent polymorphous infiltrates associated with necrosis in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) utilizing primers complementary to the EBV gene LMP2a performed on samples of liver tissue demonstrated approximately 0.6 copies of the EBV gene per cell. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated light chain restriction and PCR studies of the immunoglobulin V-D-J region revealed two strong bands, consistent with a clonal B cell proliferation. Extended family history revealed that the boy's family was followed by the XLP Registry, which was established in 1978 to follow kindreds with XLP. The genetic abnormality associated with XLP has been localized to the Xq25, allowing RFLP analysis to identify female carriers and affected boys. PMID:9841710

Maia, D M; Garwacki, C P

48

[Galectines as prognostic factors for the malignant lymphoproliferative diseases].  

PubMed

Galectines are a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins with an affinity for beta-galactosides. Galectines is differentially expressed by various normal and pathological tissues and appears to be functionally polyvalent, with a wide range of biological activity. The intracellular and extracellular activity of galectines has been described. Evidence points to galectin and its ligands as one of the master regulators of such immune responses as T-cell homeostasis and survival, T-cell immune disorders, inflammation and allergies as well as host-pathogen interactions. Galectines expression or overexpression in tumors and/or the tissue surrounding them must be considered as a sign of the malignant tumor progression that is often related to the long-range dissemination of tumoral cells (metastasis), to their dissemination into the surrounding normal tissue, and to tumor immune-escape. Elevated levels of galectines have been found to be significantly associated with higher risk progressing of the lymphoproliferative disease. The targeted inhibition of Galectines expression is what should be developed for therapeutic applications against cancer progression. Galectines are the promising molecular target for the development of new and original diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:23356132

Sivkovych, S O; Kysel'ova, O A; Mel'nyk, U I; Zubryts'ka, T B; Serbin, I M

49

[Lymphoproliferative disease in patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases: significance of antigenic stimulation and inflammatory processes].  

PubMed

Evidence has been growing that the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disease involves immune processes deregulation. It is believed that antigens or immunological elements can trigger transformation of normal lymphocyte polyclonal population into monoclonal neoplastic disorder--lymphoproliferative disease. Extensive studies point to the link between malignant lymphoma development and autoimmune or inflammatory diseases--namely rheumatoid arthritis, Sjörgen's syndrome, coeliac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or thyroiditis. Increased risk of lymphoproliferative disease development was also proved for some infections. These infections involve both viral (e.g. Epstein-Barr virus, HIV or hepatitis C virus) and bacterial agents (e.g. Helicobacter pylori, Borrelia burgdorferi). Besides various lymphomas, the links to autoimmune/inflammatory diseases have also been described in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Regarding clinical medicine, it is necessary to distinguish patients with autoimmune, inflammatory and infectious diseases who are at the increased risk of tumour development. New approaches must be found to lower this risk. Also, the relationship between autoimmune/inflammatory disease therapy and lymphoma development should be clarified. Although lymphomas associated with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases represent only a small proportion of all lymphomas, any new findings regarding these diseases can cast light on lymphoma pathogenesis as a whole. PMID:21560455

Tvar?zková, Zuzana; Pavlová, Sárka; Doubek, Michael; Mayer, Jirí; Pospísilová, Sárka

2011-01-01

50

Neutropenia and G-CSF in lymphoproliferative diseases  

PubMed Central

Background Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It frequently causes dose reductions or treatment delay, which can be prevented or treated by the administration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, a better knowledge of the incidence, day of onset after therapy, and duration of neutropenia is essential to optimize the use of G-CSF. Design and methods Six hundred and ninety-four patients from a single institution, affected by lympho-proliferative diseases, were retrospectively reviewed for the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN). Duration of neutropenia and time of neutrophil nadir were also retrieved. The diagnoses included non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Chemotherapy regimens were obviously different according to the diagnosis, disease stage, and first or subsequent lines of therapy. Results No patient received G-CSF as primary prophylaxis. Median nadir did not significantly differ among patients treated with first or successive lines of therapy. The incidence of grade 4 neutropenia and FN ranged from 0 to 94%, depending on the chemotherapy regimen. Patients receiving a first-line chemotherapy regimen had a significantly lower incidence of febrile grade 4 neutropenia compared to patients treated with a second or subsequent line of therapy. The duration of grade 4 neutropenia was significantly longer in patients given second or subsequent lines. Conclusion The results of this study could be useful to define the nadir onset in the hematologic setting in order to correctly tailor timing and duration of G-CSF prophylaxis and to assess the lowest fully effective dose.

Ria, Roberto; Reale, Antonia; Moschetta, Michele; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo

2013-01-01

51

Does celiac disease influence survival in lymphoproliferative malignancy?  

PubMed

Celiac disease (CD) is associated with both lymphoproliferative malignancy (LPM) and increased death from LPM. Research suggests that co-existing autoimmune disease may influence survival in LPM. Through Cox regression we examined overall and cause-specific mortality in 316 individuals with CD+LPM versus 689 individuals with LPM only. CD was defined as having villous atrophy according to biopsy reports at any of Sweden's 28 pathology departments, and LPM as having a relevant disease code in the Swedish Cancer Register. During follow-up, there were 551 deaths (CD: n = 200; non-CD: n = 351). Individuals with CD+LPM were at an increased risk of death compared with LPM-only individuals [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.48]. However, this excess risk was only seen in the first year after LPM diagnosis (aHR = 1.76), with HRs decreasing to 1.09 in years 2-5 after LPM diagnosis and to 0.90 thereafter. Individuals with CD and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were at a higher risk of any death as compared with NHL-only individuals (aHR = 1.23; 95% CI = 0.97-1.56). This excess risk was due to a higher proportion of T cell lymphoma in CD patients. Stratifying for T- and B cell status, the HR for death in individuals with CD+NHL was 0.77 (95% CI = 0.46-1.31). In conclusion, we found no evidence that co-existing CD influences survival in individuals with LPM. The increased mortality in the first year after LPM diagnosis is related to the predominance of T-NHL in CD individuals. Individuals with CD+LPM should be informed that their prognosis is similar to that of individuals with LPM only. However, this study had low statistical power to rule our excess mortality in patients with CD and certain LPM subtypes. PMID:23463575

Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Murray, Joseph A; Green, Peter H R; Ekbom, Anders; Granath, Fredrik

2013-03-05

52

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: No relationship to recombinant human growth hormone use in Australian and New Zealand pediatric kidney transplant recipients.  

PubMed

PTLD is a potentially life-limiting complication of pediatric transplantation. Previous registry-based studies in renal transplantation have suggested a link between rhGH use and PTLD. In this study, demographic and transplant data on those aged <18 yr and transplanted between 1991 and 2008 were collected from the ANZDATA Registry. Associations between gender, age at time of transplant, recipient CMV and EBV status, use of monoclonal antibody therapy, and use of rhGH were studied as potential predictors of PTLD. Among 650 transplants, there were 20 cases (3.1%) of PTLD, with half presenting within two yr post-transplant. Eight patients exposed to rhGH at any time developed PTLD, and this association was not statistically significant (RR = 1.5[0.6-3.4], p = 0.36). On multivariate analysis, there were no significant predictors for PTLD. In this study, previously identified potential risk factors were not identified as significant predictors for the development of PTLD. Although limited sample size may affect our ability to infer safety, this large retrospective cohort study does not suggest an increased risk of PTLD in pediatric kidney transplant recipients who received rhGH treatment. PMID:24164826

Longmore, Danielle K; Conwell, Louise S; Burke, John R; McDonald, Stephen P; McTaggart, Steven J

2013-12-01

53

Genetic evidence for the role of Erk activation in a lymphoproliferative disease of mice  

PubMed Central

Germline mutation of the linker for activation of T cells (LAT) gene at the phospholipase C-?1 (PLC-?1)-binding site leads to a fatal lymphoproliferative disease in mice. The hyperactivated T cells that develop in these mice have defective T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-induced calcium flux but enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. We used genetic analysis to investigate genes whose products might suppress MAPK activation and lymphoproliferative disease in LAT mutant mice. B-lymphocyte adaptor molecule of 32 kDa (Bam32) is a known mediator of MAPK activation in B cells. We recently reported that in CD4+ T cells, Bam32 deficiency decreased MAPK activation and specifically extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling, following TCR stimulation. By crossing the Bam32 null mutation onto the LAT knock-in background, we found that the Bam32 null mutation delayed the onset and decreased the severity of lymphoproliferative disease in LAT knock-in mice. The pulmonary lymphocyte infiltration seen in LAT knock-in mice was also markedly decreased in double-mutant mice. Additionally, Erk activation was diminished in LAT knock-in Bam32 knockout CD4+ T cells. To more accurately determine the role of Erk in this delay of lymphoproliferative disease, we also bred a transgenic, hypersensitive Erk allele (the Erk2 sevenmaker mutant) onto the LAT knock-in Bam32 knockout double-mutant background. These triple transgenic mice demonstrated a role for Erk activation in lymphoproliferative disease caused by the LAT knock-in mutation.

Miyaji, Michihiko; Kortum, Robert L.; Surana, Rishi; Li, Wenmei; Woolard, Kevin D.; Simpson, R. Mark; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Sommers, Connie L.

2009-01-01

54

Genetic evidence for the role of Erk activation in a lymphoproliferative disease of mice.  

PubMed

Germline mutation of the linker for activation of T cells (LAT) gene at the phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1)-binding site leads to a fatal lymphoproliferative disease in mice. The hyperactivated T cells that develop in these mice have defective T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-induced calcium flux but enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. We used genetic analysis to investigate genes whose products might suppress MAPK activation and lymphoproliferative disease in LAT mutant mice. B-lymphocyte adaptor molecule of 32 kDa (Bam32) is a known mediator of MAPK activation in B cells. We recently reported that in CD4(+) T cells, Bam32 deficiency decreased MAPK activation and specifically extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling, following TCR stimulation. By crossing the Bam32 null mutation onto the LAT knock-in background, we found that the Bam32 null mutation delayed the onset and decreased the severity of lymphoproliferative disease in LAT knock-in mice. The pulmonary lymphocyte infiltration seen in LAT knock-in mice was also markedly decreased in double-mutant mice. Additionally, Erk activation was diminished in LAT knock-in Bam32 knockout CD4(+) T cells. To more accurately determine the role of Erk in this delay of lymphoproliferative disease, we also bred a transgenic, hypersensitive Erk allele (the Erk2 sevenmaker mutant) onto the LAT knock-in Bam32 knockout double-mutant background. These triple transgenic mice demonstrated a role for Erk activation in lymphoproliferative disease caused by the LAT knock-in mutation. PMID:19667175

Miyaji, Michihiko; Kortum, Robert L; Surana, Rishi; Li, Wenmei; Woolard, Kevin D; Simpson, R Mark; Samelson, Lawrence E; Sommers, Connie L

2009-08-10

55

An atypical case of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease revealed as a late cerebral lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immunodeficiency, partially characterized by a defect in cytotoxicity to Epstein-Barr virus. This viral infection is therefore often fatal in affected boys, whilst a variety of immune disorders or proliferative diseases may occur in surviving patients.We report an atypical case of a 41year-old male who presented with a primitive B-cell cerebral lymphoma, revealing an

B. Hervier; S. Latour; D. Loussouarn; M. Rimbert; G De-Saint-Basile; C. Picard; M. Hamidou

2010-01-01

56

Imaging manifestations of autoimmune disease-associated lymphoproliferative disorders of the lung.  

PubMed

Lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) may involve intrathoracic organs in patients with autoimmune disease, but little is known about the radiologic manifestations of autoimmune disease-associated LPDs (ALPDs) of the lungs. The purpose of our work was to identify the radiologic characteristics of pulmonary involvement in ALPDs. A comprehensive search for PubMed database was conducted with the combination of MeSH words. All articles which had original images or description on radiologic findings were included in this analysis. Also, CT images of eight patients with biopsy-proven lymphoproliferative disorder observed from our institution were added. Overall, 44 cases of ALPD were identified, and consisted of 24 cases of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (BALToma), eight cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), six cases of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), two cases of nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, two cases of unclassified lymphoproliferative disorder, and one case each of lymphomatoid granulomatosis and hyperblastic BALT. Multiple nodules (n?=?14, 32 %) and single mass (n?=?8, 18 %) were the predominant radiologic manifestations. The imaging findings conformed to previously described findings of BALToma, NHL, or LIP. Data suggest that BALToma, NHL, and LIP are the predominant ALPDs of the lung, and ALPD generally shared common radiologic features with sporadic LPDs. Familiarity with ALPDs and their imaging findings may enable radiologists or clinicians to include the disease as a potential differential diagnosis and thus, to prompt early biopsy followed by appropriate treatment. PMID:23728499

Lee, Geewon; Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Kyung Jong; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Han, Joungho; Chung, Man Pyo

2013-06-02

57

Quantative aspects of transfusion-transmitted retrovirus-induced lymphoproliferative disease in mice.  

PubMed

Healthy, adult C57BL/6Kh mice of both sexes were transfused with blood or blood products from syngeneic donors with retrovirus (LP-BM5)-induced lymphoproliferative disease. The disease produced in the recipients 8 weeks after transfusion was characterized by splenomegaly, disseminated lymphadenopathy, leukopenia with neutrophilia, abrogation of the primary immune response to SRBC, decreased in vitro proliferation of spleen cells co-stimulated with phorbol ester and IL-2 or ionomycin and abrogation of synergistic effect of the co stimulators. Quantitative analysis of the blood or blood products used for transfusion show that a single transfusion of 0.2 ml of PBS containing 0.2 mu 1 of whole blood or 2 microliters of plasma or 400 Ficoll-isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was sufficient for the inducing the disease. The results suggest that the retroviruses were present in preparations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma of mice with the disease. However, the latter was 10-fold less efficient in inducing the disease. Transfusion of 1.8 x 10(6) isolated erythrocytes failed to induce the disease suggesting a marginal role, if any, in transmission of the disease via transfusion of these cells. Thus, a simple, reliable and reproducible method for propagation of the murine lymphoproliferative disease in the laboratory has been elaborated. These results also point to some important differences with regard to blood transfusion between human and murine AIDS. PMID:8926622

Thacore, H R; Cunningham, R K; Nakeeb, S; Zaleski, M B

1995-01-01

58

Lymphoproliferative Disorders After Solid Organ Transplantation—Classification, Incidence, Risk Factors, Early Detection and Treatment Options  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous disease group of benign and malignant entities. The\\u000a new World Health Organisation classification introduced in 2008 distinguishes early lesions, polymorphic, monomorphic and\\u000a classical Hodgkin lymphoma-type PTLD. Based on the time of appearance, early and late forms can be identified.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PTLDs are the second most frequent posttransplantation tumors in adulthood, and the most frequent

Gyula Végs?; Melinda Hajdu; Anna Sebestyén

59

Post-transplant hyperlipidaemia.  

PubMed Central

The correction of post-transplant hyperlipidaemia warrants the judicious and timely use of pharmacological agents with dietary modification and exercise. Reduction in hyperlipidaemia may have some role in decreasing the incidence of chronic rejection of allografts. The awareness that the morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic disease may be lowered by active intervention will result in a better quality of life for transplant recipients.

Jindal, R. M.

1997-01-01

60

Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Infection Contributes to Lymphoproliferative Disease in a SCID Mouse Model  

PubMed Central

Most Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive tumor cells contain one of the latent forms of viral infection. The role of lytic viral gene expression in EBV-associated malignancies is unknown. Here we show that EBV mutants that cannot undergo lytic viral replication are defective in promoting EBV-mediated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD). Early-passage lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from EBV mutants with a deletion of either viral immediate-early gene grew similarly to wild-type (WT) virus LCLs in vitro but were deficient in producing LPD when inoculated into SCID mice. Restoration of lytic EBV gene expression enhanced growth in SCID mice. Acyclovir, which prevents lytic viral replication but not expression of early lytic viral genes, did not inhibit the growth of WT LCLs in SCID mice. Early-passage LCLs derived from the lytic-defective viruses had substantially decreased expression of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), and restoration of lytic gene expression reversed this defect. Expression of cellular IL-10 and viral IL-10 was also diminished in lytic-defective LCLs. These results suggest that lytic EBV gene expression contributes to EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease, potentially through induction of paracrine B-cell growth factors.

Hong, Gregory K.; Gulley, Margaret L.; Feng, Wen-Hai; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Holley-Guthrie, Elizabeth; Kenney, Shannon C.

2005-01-01

61

Mobilization Strategies for Autologous Collection and Cryopreservation of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells in Patients with Lymphoproliferative Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) have largely replaced conventional, unprimed bone marrow (BM) as source for autologous transplantation. Aim. To present the mobilizing strategies in patients with lymphoproliferative diseases taking in consideration demographic and treatment related variables that have influence as prognostic factors. Material and Methods. The study was accomplished with patients treated with autologous transplantation at University Hematology

Aleksandra Pivkova; Sonja Genadieva-Stavrik; Zlate Stojanoski; Lidija Cevreska; Oliver Karanfilski; Sanja Trajkova; Krstevska Balkanov; Vlado Milenkov; Borche Georgievski

2009-01-01

62

Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Infection Is Associated with Lymphoproliferative Disease and Lymphoma in BALB  2 Microglobulin-Deficient Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human gammaherpesvirus infections are associated with development of lymphoproliferative disease. Un- derstanding of the mechanisms of gammaherpesvirus lymphomagenesis during chronic infection in a natural host has been limited by the exquisite species specificity of human gammaherpesviruses and the expense of primates. Murine gammaherpesvirus HV68 is genetically and biologically related to human gammaherpes- viruses and herpesvirus saimiri and has been reported

Vera L. Tarakanova; Felipe Suarez; Scott A. Tibbetts; Meagan A. Jacoby; Karen E. Weck; Jay L. Hess; Samuel H. Speck; Herbert W. Virgin

2005-01-01

63

TEN-like eruption in setting of EBV positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease with HLH, in a child.  

PubMed

Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis complicating Epstein-Barr virus positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood is a rare and life-threatening entity. We report a child with this condition presenting with a toxic epidermal necrolysis-like eruption. PMID:23573996

Sharma, Niyati; Clark, Jonathan; Pham, Hiep; Efron, Daryl; Macgregor, Duncan; O'Keefe, Rodney; Orchard, David

2013-04-10

64

Novel molecular and cellular therapeutic targets in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoproliferative disease  

PubMed Central

While the outcome for pediatric patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) or lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has improved dramatically, patients often suffer from therapeutic sequelae. Additionally, despite intensified treatment, the prognosis remains dismal for patients with refractory or relapsed disease. Thus, novel biologically targeted treatment approaches are needed. These targets can be identified by understanding how a loss of lymphocyte homeostasis can result in LPD or ALL. Herein, we review potential molecular and cellular therapeutic strategies that (i) target key signaling networks (e.g., PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT, Notch1, and SRC kinase family-containing pathways) which regulate lymphocyte growth, survival, and function; (ii) block the interaction of ALL cells with stromal cells or lymphoid growth factors secreted by the bone marrow microenvironment; or (iii) stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses.

Seif, Alix E.; Reid, Gregor S. D.; Teachey, David T.; Grupp, Stephan A.

2010-01-01

65

Monotypic plasma cells in labial salivary glands of patients with Sj?gren's syndrome: prognosticator for systemic lymphoproliferative disease.  

PubMed Central

AIMS: To determine the prevalence of plasma cell monotypia in labial salivary gland tissue of patients with and without Sjögren's syndrome, and to evaluate its relation to the development of systemic monoclonal lymphoproliferative disorders. METHODS: A quantitative immunohistological study was performed on labial salivary gland tissue of 45 patients with Sjögren's syndrome, 18 with rheumatoid arthritis without Sjögren's syndrome, and 80 healthy controls. In none of the patients with Sjögren's syndrome was there evidence of systemic monoclonal lymphoproliferative disease at the time of biopsy. RESULTS: Monotypic plasma cell populations, defined by a kappa:lambda ratio of > or = 3, were only observed in older patients (above 43 years) with Sjögren's syndrome. In almost all these patients monotypic plasma cell populations were present in multiple labial salivary gland tissues and the IgM/kappa monotypia was observed most frequently. The prevalence of monotypic plasma cell populations in the group with Sjögren's syndrome was 22% (10/45) and there was no significant predilection for primary Sjögren's syndrome. Of special clinical interest was the observation that progression to systemic monoclonal lymphoproliferative disease had occurred exclusively in this subgroup of patients with Sjögren's syndrome, with a prevalence of 30% (3/10). CONCLUSION: Quantitative immunohistological examination of labial salivary gland tissues provides pathologists with a simple method to select those patients with Sjögren's syndrome who have an increased relative risk at the time of biopsy to develop benign or malignant lymphoproliferative disorders.

Bodeutsch, C; de Wilde, P C; Kater, L; van den Hoogen, F H; Hene, R J; van Houwelingen, J C; van de Putte, L B; Vooijs, G P

1993-01-01

66

Aromatase-deficient mice spontaneously develop a lymphoproliferative autoimmune disease resembling Sj?gren's syndrome  

PubMed Central

Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an incurable, autoimmune exocrinopathy that predominantly affects females and whose pathogenesis remains unknown. Like rheumatoid arthritis, its severity increases after menopause, and estrogen deficiency has been implicated. We have reported that estrogen receptor-? and -?-knockout mice develop autoimmune nephritis and myeloid leukemia, respectively, but neither develops SS. One model of estrogen deficiency in rodents is the aromatase-knockout (ArKO) mouse. In these animals, there is elevated B lymphopoiesis in bone marrow. We now report that ArKO mice develop severe autoimmune exocrinopathy resembling SS. By 1 year of age, there is B cell hyperplasia in the bone marrow, spleen, and blood of ArKO mice and spontaneous autoimmune manifestations such as proteinuria and severe leukocyte infiltration in the salivary glands and kidney. Also, as is typically found in human SS, there were proteolytic fragments of ?-fodrin in the salivary glands and anti-?-fodrin antibodies in the serum of both female and male ArKO mice. When mice were raised on a phytoestrogen-free diet, there was a mild but significant incidence of infiltration of B lymphocytes in WT mice and severe destructive autoimmune lesions in ArKO mice. In age-matched WT mice fed a diet containing normal levels of phytoestrogen, there were no autoimmune lesions. These results reveal that estrogen deficiency results in a lymphoproliferative autoimmune disease resembling SS and suggest that estrogen might have clinical value in the prevention or treatment of this disease.

Shim, Gil-Jin; Warner, Margaret; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Andersson, Sandra; Liu, Lining; Ekman, Jenny; Imamov, Otabek; Jones, Margaret E.; Simpson, Evan R.; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

2004-01-01

67

Expression of HSV-1 receptors in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease determines susceptibility to oncolytic HSV.  

PubMed

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. As PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus (HSV), and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising antitumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was the most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas downregulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a NB cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases, due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact antiviral PKR signaling. PMID:23254370

Wang, P-Y; Currier, M A; Hansford, L; Kaplan, D; Chiocca, E A; Uchida, H; Goins, W F; Cohen, J B; Glorioso, J C; van Kuppevelt, T H; Mo, X; Cripe, T P

2012-12-20

68

The Role of T Lymphocytes in the hu-PBMC-SCID Mouse Model of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a spectrum of benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders, including acute infectious mononucleosis (IM), Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and immunosuppression-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD). Immunosurveillance mediated by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes is believed to protect immunocompetent hosts from EBV-associated lymphoma and LPD. Due to the lack of an adequate animal model, however, the precise immunologic

Mary A. Cromwell

1995-01-01

69

The safety of immunosuppressants in the treatment of psoriasis patients: is there concern regarding those with familial lymphoproliferative disease?  

PubMed

Immunosuppressant drugs may increase the risk of lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) states, and additionally, the diagnosis of psoriasis may predispose to lymphoma. It is important to educate patients regarding the side effects of any treatment regimen. A positive family history of LPD disease may increase the risk of personal acquisition of LPD disease in those patients with psoriasis additionally making use of immunosuppressant therapy, such as the biologics. It is currently recommended to employ caution in those being treated with biologics who carry a high risk of developing malignancy. Those with a positive family history may fit into this category. PMID:23374957

Shutty, Brandon G; Hogan, Daniel J

2013-01-15

70

High-resolution mapping of probes near the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) locus  

SciTech Connect

Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was employed in high-resolution mapping of probes near the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) locus. The map includes the DXS42, DXS12, DXS6, DXS982, DXS739, DXS75, DXS100, DXS10, and DXS177 loci. Metaphase analysis showed that DXS1 and DXS42 mapped to proximal Xq25, while DXS10 and DXS177 mapped to proximal Xq26.1. DXS6, DXS982, DXS739, DXS75, and DXS100 were in Xq25. The order of probes deduced from interphase FISH was: Xq24-(DXS12, DXS42)-DXS6-DXS982-DXS739-DXS75-DXS100-DXS10-DXS177-Xq26.2. The authors estimate that the entire region between DXS12 and DXS177 is about 7 Mb. A previous study indicated that all three XLP deletions (63.3, 66-1, and 43-4) lacked DXS739. They now report that DXS75 and DXS982 are also missing in these deletions. Using interphase FISH measurements, they estimate that 2 Mb are absent in 63-3, and 4 Mb are absent in 66-1 and 43-4. This FISH map confines the XLP candidate gene region to a 2-Mb interval between DXS6 and DXS100 and places DXS100 distal to the XLP locus. This study also demonstrates that small probes (0.6 to 3.5 kb) can be utilized in FISH. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Wu, B.L.; Milunsky, A.; Skare, J. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)); Nelson, D. (Baylor College of Medicine, Waco, TX (United States)); Schmeckpeper, B. (Johns Hopkins Univ. Medical School, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Porta, G.; Schlessinger, D. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States))

1993-07-01

71

Epstein–Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disorder induced by equine anti-thymocyte globulin therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is generally caused by an uncontrolled B-cell proliferation induced by\\u000a Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the setting of impaired EBV-specific T-cell immunity. PTLD has been described in allogeneic hematopoietic\\u000a stem cell transplant (HSCT) and rarely in autologous HSCT. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) is being increasingly utilized for\\u000a acute rejection in organ transplantation, severe autoimmune diseases and aplastic anemia.

George M. ViolaYouli; Youli Zu; Kelty R. Baker; Saima Aslam

72

Lymphoproliferative Neoplasms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Renal involvement in myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disorders is generally not routinely imaged, as in most instances\\u000a they are asymptomatic owing to preserved renal function. Symptoms arise as a result of compression, renal obstruction, infection,\\u000a or hemorrhage. Ultrasound and CT remain the imaging modalities of choice due to their availability, relatively short scan\\u000a times, and reduced costs compared with MR imaging.

Clara G. C. Ooi; Ali Guermazi

73

Gamma heavy-chain disease: defining the spectrum of associated lymphoproliferative disorders through analysis of 13 cases.  

PubMed

Gamma heavy-chain disease (gHCD) is defined as a lymphoplasmacytic neoplasm that produces an abnormally truncated immunoglobulin gamma heavy-chain protein that lacks associated light chains. There is scant information in the literature regarding the morphologic findings in this rare disorder, but cases have often been reported to resemble lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL). To clarify the spectrum of lymphoproliferative disorders that may be associated with gHCD, this study reports the clinical, morphologic, and phenotypic findings in 13 cases of gHCD involving lymph nodes (n=7), spleen (n=2), bone marrow (n=8), or other extranodal tissue biopsies (n=3). Clinically, patients showed a female predominance (85%) with frequent occurrence of autoimmune disease (69%). Histologically, 8 cases (61%) contained a morphologically similar neoplasm of small lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes, and plasma cells that was difficult to classify with certainty, whereas the remaining 5 cases (39%) showed the typical features of one of several other well-defined entities in the 2008 WHO classification. This report demonstrates that gHCD is associated with a variety of underlying lymphoproliferative disorders but most often shows features that overlap with cases previously reported as "vaguely nodular, polymorphous" LPL. These findings also provide practical guidance for the routine evaluation of small B-cell neoplasms with plasmacytic differentiation that could represent a heavy-chain disease and give suggestions for an improved approach to the WHO classification of gHCD. PMID:22301495

Bieliauskas, Shannon; Tubbs, Raymond R; Bacon, Chris M; Eshoa, Camellia; Foucar, Kathryn; Gibson, Sarah E; Kroft, Steven H; Sohani, Aliyah R; Swerdlow, Steven H; Cook, James R

2012-04-01

74

Gamma Heavy-chain Disease: Defining the Spectrum of Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders Through Analysis of 13 Cases  

PubMed Central

Gamma heavy-chain disease (gHCD) is defined as a lymphoplasmacytic neoplasm that produces an abnormally truncated immunoglobulin gamma heavy-chain protein that lacks associated light chains. There is scant information in the literature regarding the morphologic findings in this rare disorder, but cases have often been reported to resemble lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL). To clarify the spectrum of lymphoproliferative disorders that may be associated with gHCD, this study reports the clinical, morphologic, and phenotypic findings in 13 cases of gHCD involving lymph nodes (n = 7), spleen (n = 2), bone marrow (n = 8), or other extranodal tissue biopsies (n = 3). Clinically, patients showed a female predominance (85%) with frequent occurrence of autoimmune disease (69%). Histologically, 8 cases (61%) contained a morphologically similar neoplasm of small lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes, and plasma cells that was difficult to classify with certainty, whereas the remaining 5 cases (39%) showed the typical features of one of several other well-defined entities in the 2008 WHO classification. This report demonstrates that gHCD is associated with a variety of underlying lymphoproliferative disorders but most often shows features that overlap with cases previously reported as “vaguely nodular, polymorphous” LPL. These findings also provide practical guidance for the routine evaluation of small B-cell neoplasms with plasmacytic differentiation that could represent a heavy-chain disease and give suggestions for an improved approach to the WHO classification of gHCD.

Bieliauskas, Shannon; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Bacon, Chris M.; Eshoa, Camellia; Foucar, Kathryn; Gibson, Sarah E.; Kroft, Steven H.; Sohani, Aliyah R.; Swerdlow, Steven H.; Cook, James R.

2013-01-01

75

137 Hypogammaglobulinemia in a Boy: Consider Also X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease  

PubMed Central

Background X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency presenting with a variety of clinical manifestations, the most common being dysgammaglobulinemia and B-cell lymphoma. The first gene causing XLP, when defective, was termed SH2D1A or SAP for signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein. The absence of SH2D1A leads to an overwhelming and uncontrolled TH1- shifted cytotoxic immune response, which might, at least in part, explain the severe clinical picture. A second gene, XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis), was later identified. Methods An 8 year old Mexican boy was admitted in June 2008 for bronchopneumonia, with no previous history of recurrent or severe infections. He had a family history of a brother deceased at 7 years from fulminate hepatitis, who was diagnosed with agammaglobulinemia. A laboratory evaluation for primary immunodeficiency was made, including serum immunoglobulins: IgG 30 mg/dL, IgA <5 mg/dL IgM 8.6 mg/dL; and flow citometry for lymphocyte subpopulations: CD3+ 2590 mm3 (56%) CD4+ 1004 mm3 (42%), CD8+ 1267 mm3(53%) CD16/56 171mm3 (41%) CD19+ 1493 mm3 (35%). The patient was started on monthly intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He was admitted in December 2008 with fever and severe abdominal pain; an exploratory laparotomy revealed a rectal-sigmoid tumor. The biopsy reported an atypical Burkitt lymphoma (Immunophenotype “B”: Bcl 2+, CD10+) with surgical margins negative for malignancy. Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy were negative for malignancy. In February 2009, management with chemotherapy was started with the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma stage III. Patient received 6 courses of chemotherapy with complete response to induction; for consolidation, 4 doses of rituximab were given. PCR amplification and direct automated sequencing by the Sanger method was performed in both genes known to be responsible for XLP in chromosome X. Results A hemizygous splice-site deletion in SAP was found, in intron 2: c.187_201+10del25, which deletes exon 2 splice donor site, and is predicted to result in the skipping of exon 2, and thus in a truncated, nonfunctional protein. XIAP was also sequenced and no mutation was found. Conclusions Final diagnosis: XLP.The patient is currently in the program for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

Gamez, Luisa; Yamazaki, Marco Antonio; Espinosa, Sara; Lugo-Reyes, Saul; Hernandez, Victor

2012-01-01

76

Cyclosporine A drives a Th17- and Th2-mediated posttransplant obliterative airway disease.  

PubMed

Calcineurin-inhibitor refractory bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) represents the leading cause of late graft failure after lung transplantation. T helper (Th)2 and Th17 lymphocytes have been associated with BO development. Taking advantage of a fully allogeneic trachea transplantation model in mice, we addressed the pathogenicity of Th cells in obliterative airway disease (OAD) occurring in cyclosporine A (CsA)-treated recipients. We found that CsA prevented CD8(+) T cell infiltration into the graft and downregulated the Th1 response but affected neither Th2 nor Th17 responses in vivo. In secondary mixed lymphocyte cultures, CsA dramatically decreased donor-specific IFN-? production, enhanced IL-17 production and did not affect IL-13. As CD4(+) depletion efficiently prevented OAD in CsA-treated recipients, we further explored the role of Th2 and Th17 immunity in vivo. Although IL-4 and IL-17 deficient untreated mice developed an OAD comparable to wild-type recipients, a single cytokine deficiency afforded significant protection in CsA-treated recipients. In conclusion, CsA treatment unbalances T helper alloreactivity and favors Th2 and Th17 as coexisting pathways mediating chronic rejection of heterotopic tracheal allografts. PMID:23331973

Lemaître, P H; Vokaer, B; Charbonnier, L-M; Iwakura, Y; Field, K A; Estenne, M; Goldman, M; Leo, O; Remmelink, M; Le Moine, A

2013-01-17

77

Lack of expression of inhibitory KIR3DL1 receptor in patients with natural killer cell-type lymphoproliferative disease of granular lymphocytes  

PubMed Central

Background Natural killer cell-type lymphoproliferative disease of granular lymphocytes is a disorder characterized by chronic proliferation of CD3?CD16+ granular lymphocytes. By flow cytometry analysis, we previously demonstrated a dysregulation in killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) expression in natural killer cells from patients with this lymphoproliferative disease, the activating KIR receptors being mostly expressed. We also found that patients with natural killer cell-type lymphoproliferative disease of granular lymphocytes usually had KIR genotypes characterized by multiple activating KIR genes. Design and Methods We investigated the mRNA levels of the KIR3DL1 inhibitory and the related KIR3DS1 activating receptors in 15 patients with natural killer cell-type lymphoproliferative disease of granular lymphocytes and in ten controls. These genes are usually expressed when present in the genome of the Caucasian population. Results We demonstrated the complete lack of KIR3DL1 expression in most of the patients analyzed, with the receptor being expressed in 13% of patients compared to in 90% of controls (P<0.01). Interestingly, studies of the methylation patterns of KIR3DL1 promoter showed a significantly higher methylation status (0.76 ± 0.12 SD) in patients than in healthy subjects (0.49±0.10 SD, P<0.01). The levels of expression of DNA methyl transferases, which are the enzymes responsible for DNA methylation, did not differ between patients and controls. Conclusions In this study we showed, for the first time, a consistent down-regulation of the inhibitory KIR3DL1 signal due to marked methylation of its promoter, thus suggesting that together with the increased expression of activating receptors, the lack of the inhibitory signal could also play a role in the pathogenesis of natural killer cell-type lymphoproliferative disease of granular lymphocytes.

Gattazzo, Cristina; Teramo, Antonella; Miorin, Marta; Scquizzato, Elisa; Cabrelle, Anna; Balsamo, Mirna; Agostini, Carlo; Vendrame, Elena; Facco, Monica; Albergoni, Maria Paola; Trentin, Livio; Vitale, Massimo; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

2010-01-01

78

Isolated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the breast and axilla as peripheral T-cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of isolated T-cell PTLD of the breast that occurred after a patient had been treated for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloblastic leukemia. PMID:24043963

Hwang, Ji-Young; Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun; Sung, Sun Hee

2013-08-30

79

Systemic Epstein-Barr-virus-positive T cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease in a 22-year-old Caucasian man: A case report and review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Systemic Epstein-Barr-virus-positive T cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood is an extremely rare disorder, characterized\\u000a by clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr-virus-infected T cells with an activated cytotoxic phenotype. The disease is more\\u000a frequent in Asia and South America, with only few cases reported in Western countries. A prompt diagnosis, though often difficult,\\u000a is a necessity due to the very aggressive clinical course

Valentina Tabanelli; Claudio Agostinelli; Elena Sabattini; Anna Gazzola; Francesco Bacci; Saveria Capria; Claudia Mannu; Simona Righi; Maria Teresa Sista; Giovanna Meloni; Stefano A Pileri; Pier Paolo Piccaluga

2011-01-01

80

Development of Disseminated Histiocytic Sarcoma in a patient with Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) and Associated Rosai-Dorfman Disease  

PubMed Central

Patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) have defective lymphocyte apoptosis, with increased risk for lymphoid malignancies. Herein, we report a patient with ALPS who developed histiocytic sarcoma in a background of sinus histiocytosis and massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) or Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD). This patient had documented ALPS type Ia with a germline missense mutation in exon 9 of the TNFRSF6 gene (973 A>T, D244V) encoding Fas (CD95/Apo-1). He presented at 10 months with hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune hemolytic anemia and was diagnosed with ALPS. At age 6 and˝, he developed classical Hodgkin lymphoma, which was treated using standard chemotherapy. Two years later, biopsy of a PET-positive axillary node showed features of ALPS and focal involvement by SHML. Thereafter, the patient continued to have continued lymphadenopathy and progressive splenomegaly, leading to exploratory surgery at age 13 for suspicion of lymphoma. Paraabdominal nodes revealed sheets of malignant-looking histiocytes with increased mitotic activity and areas of necrosis, indicative of histiocytic sarcoma. Spleen and lymph nodes also showed involvement by RDD. Both components had an identical phenotype of S-100+/CD68+/CD163+. The occurrence of malignancies involving two separate hematopoietic lineages in ALPS is not previously reported. Given the central role of defective Fas signaling in ALPS, histiocytes may be yet another lineage at risk for neoplastic transformation secondary to a block in apoptosis.

Venkataraman, Girish; McClain, Kenneth L.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Rao, V. Koneti; Jaffe, Elaine S.

2010-01-01

81

SAP gene transfer restores cellular and humoral immune function in a murine model of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.  

PubMed

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) arises from mutations in the gene encoding SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and leads to abnormalities of NKT-cell development, NK-cell cytotoxicity, and T-dependent humoral function. Curative treatment is limited to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. We tested whether HSC gene therapy could correct the multilineage defects seen in SAP(-/-) mice. SAP(-/-) murine HSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors containing either SAP or reporter gene before transplantation into irradiated recipients. NKT-cell development was significantly higher and NK-cell cytotoxicity restored to wild-type levels in mice receiving the SAP vector in comparison to control mice. Baseline immunoglobulin levels were significantly increased and T-dependent humoral responses to NP-CGG, including germinal center formation, were restored in SAP-transduced mice.We demonstrate for the first time that HSC gene transfer corrects the cellular and humoral defects in SAP(-/-) mice providing proof of concept for gene therapy in XLP1. PMID:23223356

Rivat, Christine; Booth, Claire; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria; Blundell, Michael; Sebire, Neil J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

2012-12-05

82

An essential role for ?-herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog in an acute lymphoproliferative disease of cattle.  

PubMed

Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a ?-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). This acute and lethal lymphoproliferative disease occurs after a prolonged asymptomatic incubation period after transmission. Our recent findings with the rabbit model indicated that AlHV-1 infection is not productive during MCF. Here, we investigated whether latency establishment could explain this apparent absence of productive infection and sought to determine its role in MCF pathogenesis. First, whole-genome cellular and viral gene expression analyses were performed in lymph nodes of MCF-developing calves. Whereas a severe disruption in cellular genes was observed, only 10% of the entire AlHV-1 genome was expressed, contrasting with the 45% observed during productive infection in vitro. In vivo, the expressed viral genes included the latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog ORF73 but none of the regions known to be essential for productive infection. Next, genomic conformation analyses revealed that AlHV-1 was essentially episomal, further suggesting that MCF might be the consequence of a latent infection rather than abortive lytic infection. This hypothesis was further supported by the high frequencies of infected CD8(+) T cells during MCF using immunodetection of ORF73 protein and single-cell RT-PCR approaches. Finally, the role of latency-associated ORF73 was addressed. A lack of ORF73 did not impair initial virus replication in vivo, but it rendered AlHV-1 unable to induce MCF and persist in vivo and conferred protection against a lethal challenge with a WT virus. Together, these findings suggest that a latent infection is essential for MCF induction. PMID:23630278

Palmeira, Leonor; Sorel, Océane; Van Campe, Willem; Boudry, Christel; Roels, Stefan; Myster, Françoise; Reschner, Anca; Coulie, Pierre G; Kerkhofs, Pierre; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Dewals, Benjamin G

2013-04-29

83

A rare case of primary cutaneous plasmacytoma-like lymphoproliferative disorder following renal transplantation.  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a lymphoid proliferation that develops as a complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplants. PTLD limited to the skin is very rare. Plasmacytoma-like PTLD is an uncommon variant of monomorphic PTLD. Its presentation in the skin is extraordinary with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a new case of plasmacytoma-like PTLD presenting as multiple skin nodules on the leg of a 74-year-old kidney transplant recipient. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination of one nodule revealed atypical plasmacytoid and plasmablastic cells that showed kappa light chain restriction and stained positive for CD138. Staging investigations excluded extracutaneous manifestations of the disease. This case is unusual for several reasons including involvement limited to the skin, plasmacytoid phenotype of the tumor, presentation 18 years following transplantation and Epstein-Barr virus negativity. PMID:22574640

Molina-Ruiz, Ana M; Pulpillo, Agueda; Lasanta, Begońa; Zulueta, Teresa; Andrades, Rocío; Requena, Luis

2012-05-11

84

Autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disease in (B6-GIX+ x 129) F1 mice: Relation to naturally occurring antibodies against murine leukemia virus-related cell surface antigens  

PubMed Central

GIX congeneic mouse strains, C57BL/6-GIX+(B6-GIX+) and 129-GIX-, have been derived from the prototype strains, B6(GIX-) and 129(GIX+). The hybrids, (B6-GIX+ × 129)F1 (GIX+F1) and (B6 × 129-GIX-)F1 (GIX-F1), differ only in regard to genetic loci controlling GIX antigen expression. GIX+F1 mice spontaneously produce GIX antibody and often show signs of autoimmune disease and lymphoproliferative disease. GIX-F1 mice and mice of the two parental strains (B6-GIX+ and 129) of GIX+F1 do not produce GIX antibody and seldom show signs of these diseases. G(ERLD), and G(RADA1), antibodies, natural thymocytotoxic autoantibody, and antinuclear antibodies were produced by GIX+F1 mice. However, these four antibodies were also found in the other strains. GIX+F1 mice develop pronounced diffuse glomerulonephritis similar to that found in systemic lupus erythematosus in man. Incidence studies in which mice were examined according to age rather than state of health showed that the lesions occurred in 38% of GIX+F1 mice but not in GIX-F1, B6-GIX+, or 129 mice. Lymphoproliferative lesions were either reticulum cell sarcoma (RCS) type A or reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH). RCS occurred more often in GIX+F1 (38%) than in GIX-F1 (12%) or B6-GIX+ (8%). No RCS occurred in mice of the 129 strain. RLH occurred in GIX+F1 mice (10%) but not in the other strains. From these results, the following conclusions are drawn: (i) Severe glomerulonephritis and the increased occurrence of lymphoproliferative lesions in these animals depend on the presence of GIX antigen; (ii) besides genes controlling GIX antigen expression, other genes from both parental strains are required to create the basis in the progeny F1 mice for the development of these diseases; and (iii) the chronic production of GIX antibody may be necessary for the development of the severe glomerulonephritis and for the increased occurrence of lymphoproliferative diseases in GIX+F1 mice.

Obata, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toshio; Stockert, Elisabeth; Good, Robert A.

1979-01-01

85

Interferon production in myelo- and lymphoproliferative diseases. I. Spontaneous interferon production in acute and chronic leukaemias.  

PubMed

Blood plasma interferon (IFN) of patients with acute myeloid (AML) and chronic granulocytic (CGL) and with acute and chronic lymphoid leukaemia (ALL and CLL) was measured by bioassay and characterized by neutralization with anti-human-IFN-alpha treatment. Elevated IFN-alpha level (60-125 IU/ml) was found in the quiescent phase of CGL as compared to the control samples (15 +/- 10 IU/ml). No significant differences could be found between plasma IFN of patients suffering from the blastic crisis of CGL and control persons. Analogous results were obtained in experiments with plasmas of AML patients, regardless the stage of the disease. Elevated IFN-alpha production (60-100 IU/ml) was found in patients being in the remission phase of T-cell ALL but only in one case in the progressive phase of the disease. No significant elevation of plasma IFN level was demonstrated in patients with O-cell ALL and B-cell CLL, as compared to the control samples. PMID:2465655

Szabó, B; Tóth, F D; Kiss, J; Váczi, L; Kiss, A; Rák, K

1988-01-01

86

[Clinical Features and Laboratory Findings of Adult Epstein-Barr Virus Associated T/NK Lymphoproliferative Disease].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical features and laboratory findings of adult Epstein-Barr virus associated T/NK cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV+T/NK-LPD)and to investigate the early diagnosis and prognosis of EBV+T/NK-LPD. The clinical data of 19 adult patients with EBV+T/NK-LPD were retrospectively analyzed. The results indicated that there were 11 males and 8 females. The median age was 32 years (range: 20-70 years). The average duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 3.5 months. The median survival time was 2.5 months. Unkown fever, hepatosplenomegaly, liver dysfunction and interstitial pneumonia were the main clinical features. High levels of ?2-MG, LDH, TNF, IL-6 and significantly increased EBV-DNA level (median level > 10(6) copies/ml) were occurred in all the patients. Cytopenia was seen in 18 cases. Morphologically, atypical large granular lymphocytes and hemophagocytosis were common in bone marrow smears. Deletion of CD5 or CD7 were frequently observed in T/NK lymphocytes in bone marrow cells by flow cytometry. Bone marrow biopsy showed atypical lymphocyte interstitial infiltrated in 10 cases, while a few large cells infiltrated in 6 cases. Immunohistochemistry showed the expression of CD3(+)CD56(+) were seen in 2 cases, CD3(+)CD8(+) in 11 cases and CD3(+)CD4(+) in 3 cases. TIA-1 and EBER were positive in all biopsy specimens. Three cases underwent biopsy of lymphonodes showed reactive proliferations of lymphocytes. All the patients died of multiorgan failure. It is concluded that the fever, hepatosplenomegaly are the most common clinical features in adult EBV+T/NK-LPD, the bone marrow infiltration of EBV-infected T/NK lymphocytes and significantly increased EBV-DNA level can be observed in all cases, the clinical outcome of this disease is poor, these clinical and experimental features can be served as a reliable marker for the timely diagnosis of adult EBV+T/NK-LPD. PMID:23998592

Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Wen-Li; Zhong, Feng-Luan; Feng, Jia; Meng, Qing-Xiang; Yin, Wei-Hua; Nie, Li-Ping

2013-07-01

87

Retroviral induction of acute lymphoproliferative disease and profound immunosuppression in adult C57BL/6 mice  

PubMed Central

We have shown that a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) causes the acute onset of lymphoproliferation and immunosuppression when injected into adult C57BL/6 mice. The ecotropic/MCF (mink cell focus- inducing) mixture of MuLV stimulates polyclonal B lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation to antibody-secreting cells. Serum Ig levels are elevated for all isotypes except IgA. The viral infection leads to a rapid decline in T lymphocyte responses to mitogens and alloantigens, as well as a decrease in helper cell activity. Specific antibody responses to both T-dependent and T-independent antigens are impaired, and the response of B lymphocytes to mitogens is abolished. The profound immunosuppression seems to be due to the MuLV-induced polyclonal activation of lymphocytes. No active suppression of normal lymphocyte responses by cells from virus-infected mice was observed. The disease induced by the LP-BM5 MuLV isolate thus seems a promising model for the study of lymphocyte activation and the mechanisms of retrovirus-induced immunosuppression.

1985-01-01

88

Long-term outcome of EBV-specific T-cell infusions to prevent or treat EBV-related lymphoproliferative disease in transplant recipients  

PubMed Central

T-cell immunotherapy that takes advantage of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–stimulated immunity has the potential to fill an important niche in targeted therapy for EBV-related cancers. To address questions of long-term efficacy, safety, and practicality, we studied 114 patients who had received infusions of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) at 3 different centers to prevent or treat EBV+ lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) arising after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Toxicity was minimal, consisting mainly of localized swelling at sites of responsive disease. None of the 101 patients who received CTL prophylaxis developed EBV+ LPD, whereas 11 of 13 patients treated with CTLs for biopsy-proven or probable LPD achieved sustained complete remissions. The gene-marking component of this study enabled us to demonstrate the persistence of functional CTLs for up to 9 years. A preliminary analysis indicated that a patient-specific CTL line can be manufactured, tested, and infused for $6095, a cost that compares favorably with other modalities used in the treatment of LPD. We conclude that the CTL lines described here provide safe and effective prophylaxis or treatment for lymphoproliferative disease in transplantation recipients, and the manufacturing methodology is robust and can be transferred readily from one institution to another without loss of reproducibility. The current trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00058812.

Slobod, Karen S.; Pule, Martin A.; Hale, Gregory A.; Rousseau, Alexandra; Smith, Colton A.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Liu, Hao; Wu, Meng-Fen; Rochester, Richard J.; Amrolia, Persis J.; Hurwitz, Julia L.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Rooney, Cliona M.

2010-01-01

89

Posttransplant recurrence of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. It is usually secondary to infections by strains of Escherichia coli (STEC) that produce Shiga-like toxin. In about 10% of patients, no STEC infections are reported. In these cases of atypical HUS (aHUS), mutations in genes encoding proteins of the complement system have been described. Atypical HUS is characterized by poor prognosis and by high risk of posttransplant recurrence which greatly depends on the specific gene mutation involved in the disease. Plasma therapy, eculizumab treatment and, in some cases, combined liver-kidney transplant have been used to prevent and/or treat posttransplant aHUS recurrences. PMID:22760880

Valoti, Elisabetta; Alberti, Marta; Noris, Marina

90

Lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised individuals and therapeutic antibodies for treatment.  

PubMed

The incidence of lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is significantly higher in individuals who have congenital, acquired or iatrogenically induced immunodeficiency. Although there are a wide range of LPDs including lymphoma and leukemia, this article only covers LPDs in patients with impaired immune function, which are called immunodeficiency-associated LPDs (ID-LPDs). Three of the four ID-LPD categories recognized by WHO have been selected for discussion: LPD in primary immune disorders, post-transplant LPD and LPD in HIV infection. Because of the high incidence and mortality of ID-LPDs, careful evaluation of the morphology, immunophenotype, genotype, viral status and clinical history is required for accurate diagnosis and treatment. Recently, treatment with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been widely used and developed because of its potential benefits. The aim of this review is to describe new information concerning mAb treatment in LPDs and to draw physicians' attention to mAb therapy, which should be effective for some types of LPD. PMID:23557424

Yang, Xi; Miyawaki, Toshio; Kanegane, Hirokazu

2013-04-01

91

Post-transplant recurrent hepatitis B viral liver disease. Viral-burden, steatoviral, and fibroviral hepatitis B.  

PubMed Central

Recurrence of hepatitis is a well-documented complication of hepatitis B liver disease, post-transplantation. It is well established also that the earliest hepatocellular change is the appearance of hepatitis B viral (HBV) markers and that the disease is rapidly progressive. In this article on 17 liver transplants in 16 HBV positive patients with long-term follow-ups (100-1234 days), the distinctive pathologic features of this disease are emphasized: the extreme viral load, the steatosis, and/or fibrosis. An attempt to quantitate the magnitude of the viral burden was made and the result was a staggering figure. In one patient, an estimated 10(18) HBV core particles were present in the liver. One of two patterns of progression were noted. In four patients in addition to the massive nuclear hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) and cytoplasmic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity, superimposed hepatitic changes led to diffuse hepatic fibrosis (fibroviral hepatitis B); and in another six patients, extraordinary hepatocellular viral marker positivity and steatosis were the hallmarks (steatoviral hepatitis B). Steatosis is not usually considered a feature of HBV liver pathology. These results suggest that more than one type of posttransfusion recurrent hepatitis B liver disease exists pathologically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

Phillips, M. J.; Cameron, R.; Flowers, M. A.; Blendis, L. M.; Greig, P. D.; Wanless, I.; Sherman, M.; Superina, R.; Langer, B.; Levy, G. A.

1992-01-01

92

Absence of Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Allogeneic Blood or Marrow Transplantation Using Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide as Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis.  

PubMed

Immunosuppressive regimens that effectively prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) have been associated with an increased incidence of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the first year after transplantation. We evaluated the incidence of PTLD associated with the use of high-dose post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) as GVHD prophylaxis. Between 2000 and 2011, a total of 785 adult allo-BMT recipients were given PTCy as GVHD prophylaxis at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, including 313 patients who received PTCy as sole GVHD prophylaxis. HLA-haploidentical or unrelated donor graft transplantation was performed in 526 patients (67%). No cases of PTLD occurred during the first year after allo-BMT in this series. PTLD is a rare occurrence after allo-BMT using PTCy, even in high-risk alternative donor transplantations. PMID:23871780

Kanakry, Jennifer A; Kasamon, Yvette L; Bolańos-Meade, Javier; Borrello, Ivan M; Brodsky, Robert A; Fuchs, Ephraim J; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Gladstone, Douglas E; Gocke, Christopher D; Huff, Carol Ann; Kanakry, Christopher G; Luznik, Leo; Matsui, William; Mogri, Huzefa J; Swinnen, Lode J; Symons, Heather J; Jones, Richard J; Ambinder, Richard F

2013-07-18

93

Introduction to the use of belatacept: a fusion protein for the prevention of posttransplant kidney rejection  

PubMed Central

The development of new immunosuppressive drugs for kidney transplantation resulted both in better short-term outcomes and in decreased metabolic, cardiovascular, and nephrotoxicity risk. Belatacept belongs to a new class of immunosuppressive drugs that selectively inhibits T-cell activation by preventing CD28 activation and by binding its ligands B7-1 and B7-2. The result is an inactivation of costimulatory pathways. A comparative analysis of the BENEFIT and BENEFIT-EXT datasets showed belatacept regimens resulted in better cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles than did cyclosporin A (CsA) regimens: belatacept likewise outperformed CsA in terms of lower blood pressure and serum lipids and less new onset diabetes after transplantation. About 20% of belatacept-treated patients developed adverse effects which included anemia, pyrexia, neutropenia, diarrhea, urinary tract infection, headache, and peripheral edema. At present, belatacept does not seem to predispose patients to a higher rate of infection than CsA maintenance immunosuppression. The risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative diseases was higher in Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-seronegative patients than in EBV-seropositive patients, but the risk may be reduced by use of a less intensive regimen and avoidance of EBV-negative patients and of patients whose pretransplant EBV serology is unknown. Belatacept provides a new option for immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation, but needs further evaluation in terms of the late effects that may derive from prolonged blockage of the costimulatory system and the induction of tolerance status.

Ippoliti, Giovanbattista; D'Armini, Andrea Maria; Lucioni, Marco; Marjieh, Mazen; Vigano, Mario

2012-01-01

94

Occult B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

The term monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) was recently introduced to identify individuals with a population of monoclonal B cells in the absence of other features that are diagnostic of a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. MBL is often identified through hospital investigation of a mild lymphocytosis, and approximately 1% of such individuals develop progressive disease requiring treatment per year. However, in population studies using high-sensitivity flow cytometry, MBL may be detectable in more than 10% of adults aged over 60 years, and clinical progression is rare. The majority of MBL cases have features that are characteristic of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, but an increasing amount of information is becoming available about MBL with the features of other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. In addition to flow cytometry findings, the incidental detection of an occult B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder is also occurring in a significant proportion of tissue biopsy samples. In this review, the clinical and biological relationship between MBL and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders will be discussed, with a focus on identifying the differences between low levels of peripheral blood or bone marrow involvement with lymphoma and the monoclonal B-cell populations that commonly occur in elderly adults. PMID:21261685

Rawstron, Andy C

2011-01-01

95

Systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood: Report of a case with review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) of childhood is an extremely rare and distinct clinicopathological entity. The majority of these cases occur with an apparent primary EBV infection. In this study, we describe a case of systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD of childhood in a 23-year-old female with primary EBV infection, and review the clinicopathological features of this disease. A 23-year-old previously healthy female without an immunocompromized status presented with an acute onset of high fever. Laboratory examinations revealed a markedly elevated white blood cell count and liver and renal function. Peripheral blood smears identified a number of atypical lymphocytes with small azurophilic granules in the cytoplasm. Bone marrow aspiration revealed marked proliferation of small-sized lymphocytes with convoluted nuclei, which expressed EBER1, CD3, CD8 and cytotoxic granules. Monoclonal rearrangements of T-cell receptors were also detected. The patient underwent chemotherapy, but succumbed to multiorgan failure 20 weeks after administration. Upon review of 17 cases of this disease, including the one in the present study, we identified that the major clinicopathological features of systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD of childhood are as follows: i) clonal systemic proliferation of EBV-infected T-cells that appear morphologically innocuous with an activated cytotoxic phenotype; ii) a high prevalence in the Asian population, commonly affecting children and young adults; iii) a predilection for males; iv) most commonly involved sites are the liver, spleen, lymph node and bone marrow, and the main clinical presentations are hepatosplenomegaly, fever and pancytopenia; v) almost all cases have an aggressive clinical course, which results in mortality. Cytological atypia of the neoplastic cells in this disease, as observed in the present case, is minimal. This study revealed that the cytomorphological features of atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral blood are indistinguishable from those of infectious mononucleosis.

YOSHII, MIYUKI; ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; HODOHARA, KEIKO; OKUNO, HIROKO; NAKANISHI, RYOTA; YOSHIDA, TAKASHI; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

2012-01-01

96

Analysis of the T-cell micro-environment in Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplantation B lymphoproliferative disease.  

PubMed

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) post-transplantation B lymphoproliferative disease (BLPD) may undergo regression after immunosuppression withdrawal and restoration of EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) activity in the immunocompromised allografted host. The presence of morphologically normal T cells in the BLPD micro-environment may influence tumour behaviour in vivo. In this immunopathological study, the phenotype and the number of T cells and other immunoregulatory cells have been investigated in seven primary and four recurrent BLPD biopsies from nine solid organ transplant recipients. BLPD with either viral lymphadenopathic or polymorphic lymphoma appearances was found to contain sizeable T-cell populations, mainly of memory/helper (TCR alpha/beta +, CD3+, CD4+, CD45RO+) type. Cytotoxic (TCR alpha/beta +, CD3, CD8+, Tia-1+) T cells were strikingly low in all samples. Low CD28 and CD25 expression suggested that secondary signals for functional and sustained T-cell activation may be deficient in these tumours. No close correlation was found between the degree of T-cell infiltration and clinical outcome, although appreciably higher number of CD8+ T cells were detected in three BLPD tumours showing prolonged clinical remission after treatment. While some level of EBV-specific T-cell function may be present in untreated BLPD, the overall findings of this study suggest that the nature of T-cell infiltrates may reflect a response to immunosuppressive therapy rather than to EBV infection per se. The possibility that a local EBV-specific T-cell response is generated in BLPD undergoing regression after treatment needs to be investigated. PMID:9602709

Perera, S M; Thomas, J A; Burke, M; Crawford, D H

1998-02-01

97

Mature T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease and Epstein-Barr virus infection are more frequent in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate.  

PubMed

We retrospectively analyzed in 54 consecutively enrolled Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) relevant clinicopathological characteristics, in particular paying attention to treatment with methotrexate (MTX). Between the 28 patients treated with MTX (MTX-treated group) and the 26 who were not (non-MTX group), there was no difference in age, interval between onset of RA and LPD, and lymphoma stage. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that in the MTX-treated group, 15 (53 %) patients had mature B-cell LPD, eight (29 %) mature T/NK-cell LPD, and five (18 %) had Hodgkin lymphoma. In the non-MTX group, 22 (84 %) had mature B-cell LPD, 2 (8 %) had mature T/NK-cell LPD, and 2 (8 %) had Hodgkin lymphoma. The frequency of mature T/NK-cell LPD was significantly higher in the MTX-treated group (p?

Kondo, Seiji; Tanimoto, Kazuki; Yamada, Kozue; Yoshimoto, Goichi; Suematsu, Eiichi; Fujisaki, Tomoaki; Oshiro, Yumi; Tamura, Kazuo; Takeshita, Morishige; Okamura, Seiichi

2013-03-14

98

An Epstein-Barr virus deletion mutant associated with fatal lymphoproliferative disease unresponsive to therapy with virus-specific CTLs  

Microsoft Academic Search

plantation received donor-derived, EBV- specific CTLs but died with progressive disease. The tumor cells proved substan- tially less sensitive to cytolysis than the EBV-transformed B-cell line used for CTL generation. The major cytolytic activity of the donor CTL was directed against 2 HLA-A11-restricted epitopes in the viral EBNA-3B antigen. Sequence analysis of this gene in the tumor virus revealed a

Stephen Gottschalk; Catherine Y. C. Ng; Margot Perez; Colton A. Smith; Clare Sample; Malcolm K. Brenner; Helen E. Heslop; Cliona M. Rooney

2001-01-01

99

Antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses to tetanus toxoid: a means for the evaluation of Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression in chickens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses were examined in chickens following immunization with tetanus toxoid (Ttx). The immune competence of chickens was assessed by mitogen assay utilizing phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulation and Ttx-specific antigen proliferation assay (Ttx-APA). Immune spleen cells but not peripheral blood leucocytes demonstrated specific proliferation following stimulation in vitro in a Ttx-APA. In this study, we examined firstly the effects of Marek's

S. K. Reddy; M. Suresh; K. Karaca; J. M. Sharma; J. McMillen; R. D. Schwartz

1996-01-01

100

Posttransplant erythrocytosis: case report and review of newer treatment modalities.  

PubMed

A case of posttransplant erythrocytosis in a 51-year-old diabetic man is described. This problem, which can occur in 5 to 15% of renal transplant patients, can result from a contracted plasma volume (diuretics, pressure natriuresis, or glycosuria) or from a true elevation in red blood cell mass. Once the diagnosis of true erythrocytosis is made by a radiolabeled red blood cell mass study, secondary causes such as hypoxia, liver disease, polycythemia rubra vera, renal artery stenosis, and cystic kidney disease should be excluded. Posttransplant erythrocytosis has only been observed in renal transplant recipients and appears to be more frequent with cyclosporine compared with azathioprine therapy. An inappropriately high level of erythropoietin has been described in some, but not all patients, suggesting stimulation of erythropoietin production as the mechanism. Posttransplant erythrocytosis can be associated with an increased incidence of thrombotic events. The presence of this potential complication has prompted intervention to maintain the hematocrit below 50 to 55%. Measures such as discontinuation of diuretics as well as better control of blood pressure and plasma glucose should be used to facilitate the correction of extracellular volume contraction. Phlebotomy has been the most accepted intervention to intermittently lower the hematocrit when needed, but this can lead to iron deficiency. Newer therapeutic modalities are now being used to treat the problem medically. Theophylline, which reduces adenosine-mediated erythropoietin synthesis, is effective but may be associated with side effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8318681

Perazella, M A; Bia, M J

1993-04-01

101

Detection of EBV DNA in the cord blood donor for a patient developing Epstein–Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder following mismatched unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epstein–Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) has been well described as a complication following allogeneic stem cell transplantation but has only recently been reported following umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant. We report the case of a child transplanted with unrelated mismatched UCB for juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia (JCML) who developed EBV-associated PTLD, which was confirmed pathologically, 139 days following stem

PR Haut; P Kovarik; PH Shaw; D Walterhouse; HB Jenson; M Kletzel

2001-01-01

102

Transformation of hematopoietic cell lines to growth-factor independence and induction of a fatal myelo- and lymphoproliferative disease in mice by retrovirally transduced TEL/JAK2 fusion genes.  

PubMed Central

Recent reports have demonstrated fusion of the TEL gene on 12p13 to the JAK2 gene on 9p24 in human leukemias. Three variants have been identified that fuse the TEL pointed (PNT) domain to (i) the JAK2 JH1-kinase domain, (ii) part of and (iii) all of the JH2 pseudokinase domain. We report that all of the human TEL/JAK2 variants, and a human/mouse chimeric hTEL/mJAK2(JH1) fusion gene, transform the interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine hematopoietic cell line Ba/F3 to IL-3-independent growth. Transformation requires both the TEL PNT domain and JAK2 kinase activity. Furthermore, all TEL/JAK2 variants strongly activated STAT 5 by phosphotyrosine Western blots and by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Mice (n = 40) transplanted with bone marrow infected with the MSCV retrovirus containing either the hTEL/mJAK2(JH1) fusion or its human counterpart developed a fatal mixed myeloproliferative and T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with a latency of 2-10 weeks. In contrast, mice transplanted with a TEL/JAK2 mutant lacking the TEL PNT domain (n = 10) or a kinase-inactive TEL/JAK2(JH1) mutant (n = 10) did not develop the disease. We conclude that all human TEL/JAK2 fusion variants are oncoproteins in vitro that strongly activate STAT 5, and cause lethal myelo- and lymphoproliferative syndromes in murine bone marrow transplant models of leukemia.

Schwaller, J; Frantsve, J; Aster, J; Williams, I R; Tomasson, M H; Ross, T S; Peeters, P; Van Rompaey, L; Van Etten, R A; Ilaria, R; Marynen, P; Gilliland, D G

1998-01-01

103

Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome  

SciTech Connect

The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.

Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

1987-04-01

104

Herpesvirus-associated central nervous system diseases after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesvirus-DNA and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells were sampled from 58 recipients with herpesvirus-associated diseases or with unexplainable CNS manifestations. Results showed that 23 patients were diagnosed as herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases, including 15 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases (4 encephalitis and 11 lymphoproliferative diseases), 5 herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis, 2 cytomegalovirus encephalitis/myelitis and 1 varicella zoster virus encephalitis. The median time of diseases onset was 65 (range 22-542) days post-transplantation. The 3-year cumulative incidence of herpesvirus-associated encephalitis/myelitis and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) was 6.3% ±1.9% and 4.1% ±1.2%, respectively. Of the evaluable cases, CSF cells mainly consisted of CD19(+)CD20(+) B cells (7/11) and had clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes (3/11) in patients with CNS-PTLD. On the contrary, in patients with encephalitis/myelitis, CSF cells were comprised of different cell populations and none of the gene rearrangement was detected. Herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases are common in the early stages of allo-HSCT, wherein EBV is the most frequent causative virus. The immunophenotypic and clonal analysis of CSF cells might be helpful in the differential diagnosis between encephalitis and lymphoproliferative diseases. PMID:24124621

Wu, Meiqing; Huang, Fen; Jiang, Xinmiao; Fan, Zhiping; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Can; Jiang, Qianli; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Ke; Xuan, Li; Zhai, Xiao; Zhang, Fuhua; Yin, Changxin; Sun, Jing; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa

2013-10-04

105

Herpesvirus-Associated Central Nervous System Diseases after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesvirus-DNA and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells were sampled from 58 recipients with herpesvirus-associated diseases or with unexplainable CNS manifestations. Results showed that 23 patients were diagnosed as herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases, including 15 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated diseases (4 encephalitis and 11 lymphoproliferative diseases), 5 herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis, 2 cytomegalovirus encephalitis/myelitis and 1 varicella zoster virus encephalitis. The median time of diseases onset was 65 (range 22-542) days post-transplantation. The 3-year cumulative incidence of herpesvirus-associated encephalitis/myelitis and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) was 6.3% ±1.9% and 4.1% ±1.2%, respectively. Of the evaluable cases, CSF cells mainly consisted of CD19+CD20+ B cells (7/11) and had clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes (3/11) in patients with CNS-PTLD. On the contrary, in patients with encephalitis/myelitis, CSF cells were comprised of different cell populations and none of the gene rearrangement was detected. Herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases are common in the early stages of allo-HSCT, wherein EBV is the most frequent causative virus. The immunophenotypic and clonal analysis of CSF cells might be helpful in the differential diagnosis between encephalitis and lymphoproliferative diseases.

Wu, Meiqing; Huang, Fen; Jiang, Xinmiao; Fan, Zhiping; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Can; Jiang, Qianli; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Ke; Xuan, Li; Zhai, Xiao; Zhang, Fuhua; Yin, Changxin; Sun, Jing; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa

2013-01-01

106

?-HHVs and HHV-8 in Lymphoproliferative Disorders  

PubMed Central

Similarly to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is a ?-herpesvirus, recently recognized to be associated with the occurrence of rare B cell lymphomas and atypical lymphoproliferations, especially in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected subjects. Moreover, the human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), a ?-herpesvirus, has been shown to be implicated in some non-malignant lymph node proliferations, such as the Rosai Dorfman disease, and in a proportion of Hodgkin’s lymphoma cases. HHV-6 has a wide cellular tropism and it might play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of human diseases, but given its ubiquity, disease associations are difficult to prove and its role in hematological malignancies is still controversial. The involvement of another ?-herpesvirus, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), has not yet been proven in human cancer, even though recent findings have suggested its potential role in the development of CD4+ large granular lymphocyte (LGL) lymphocytosis. Here, we review the current knowledge on the pathogenetic role of HHV-8 and human ?-herpesviruses in human lymphoproliferative disorders.

Quadrelli, C.; Barozzi, P.; Riva, G.; Vallerini, D.; Zanetti, E.; Potenza, L.; Forghieri, F.; Luppi, M.

2011-01-01

107

Pure Red Cell Aplasia and Lymphoproliferative Disorders: An Infrequent Association  

PubMed Central

Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

Vlachaki, Efthymia; Diamantidis, Michael D.; Klonizakis, Philippos; Haralambidou-Vranitsa, Styliani; Ioannidou-Papagiannaki, Elizabeth; Klonizakis, Ioannis

2012-01-01

108

Epstein-Barr virus-associated posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder after high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous CD34-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe autoimmune diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently being evaluated for the control of severe autoimmune diseases. The addition of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) to high-dose chemoradiotherapy in the high-dose immunosuppressive therapy regimen and CD34 selection of the autologous graft may induce a higher degree of immunosuppression compared with conventional autologous HSCT for malignant diseases. Patients

Richard A Nash; Roger Dansey; Jan Storek; George E Georges; James D Bowen; Leona A Holmberg; George H Kraft; Maureen D Mayes; Kevin T McDonagh; Chien-Shing Chen; John DiPersio; C. Fred LeMaistre; Steven Pavletic; Keith M Sullivan; Julie Sunderhaus; Daniel E Furst; Peter A McSweeney

2003-01-01

109

Diagnostic pathology of lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

The last 20 years have seen a dramatic change in the way we classify, and therefore diagnose, lymphoma. Two decades ago, the International Working Formulation enabled diagnosis and management on the basis of H&E sections alone, with no mandatory requirement for immunophenotyping, molecular studies or any other ancillary investigations. The concept of categorisation by 'clinicopathological entities' defined by clinical features, morphology, immunophenotype and more recently, genotype, began with the Kiel, and Lukes and Collins classifications in the late 1970s, becoming fully expressed in the REAL and subsequently WHO classifications. The current, multidisciplinary approach to categorisation adds significantly to the task facing the anatomical pathologist, since it requires distribution of biopsy material to all the appropriate specialised laboratories, the gathering of a range of cross-disciplinary information, the correlation of all diagnostic findings, deduction of a definitive diagnosis and, finally, integration of all the above into a single multiparameter report. In this review, we summarise the contemporary approach to the biopsy, diagnosis and reporting of lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:16373226

Ellis, David W; Eaton, Michael; Fox, Richard M; Juneja, Surender; Leong, Anthony S-Y; Miliauskas, John; Norris, Debra L; Spagnolo, Dominic; Turner, Jenny

2005-12-01

110

Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infects monotypic (IgMl) but polyclonal naive B cells in Castleman disease and associated lymphoproliferative disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a previous study, it was shown that the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was specifically associated with monotypic (IgMl) plasmablasts in multi- centric Castleman disease (MCD). The plasmablasts occur as isolated cells in the mantle zone of B-cell follicles but may form microlymphoma or frank plasma- blastic lymphoma. To determine the clonality and cellular origin of the mono- typic plasmablasts,

Ming-Qing Du; Hongxiang Liu; Tim C. Diss; Hongtao Ye; Rifat A. Hamoudi; Nicolas Dupin; Veronique Meignin; Eric Oksenhendler; Chris Boshoff; Peter G. Isaacson

2001-01-01

111

Delayed seroconversion and rapid onset of lymphoproliferative disease after transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 from a multiorgan donor.  

PubMed

Background.?Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) screening of blood and organ donors is not mandatory in Germany because of its low prevalence (about 7/100 000). An HTLV-1 transmission event caused by a multiple organ donor was investigated. Validity of diagnostic procedures and HTLV-1 disease association in immunosuppressed organ recipients were analyzed. Methods.?Two screening immunoassays and an immunoblot (confirmatory assay) were used for detection of HLTV-1/2 antibodies. Proviral DNA was quantified in blood and biopsies of organ recipients by HTLV-1 real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results.?Proviral HTLV-1-DNA was detected in all blood samples of 3 organ recipients (1-100 copies/10(2) cells), but seroconversion was delayed for up to 2 years in screening assays and >6 years in the confirmatory assay. In 2 of 3 organ recipients, a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma was diagnosed 2 and 3 years after infection, respectively. Proviral HTLV-1 DNA concentration was almost 100 copies/10(2) cells in cutaneous lymphoma biopsies whereas in biopsies of other tissues ?3.0 copies/10(2) cells were found. The third organ recipient did not suffer from lymphoma, but detailed clinical data on this patient were not available to us. Conclusions.?Biopsy results support an etiological role for HTLV-1 in these cases of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma after solid organ transplant. HTLV-1-associated lymphoma can arise quickly in immunocompromised transplant recipients. The diagnosis of potentially HTLV-1-associated disease in organ recipients may require PCR because of delayed seroconversion. PMID:23956168

Glowacka, Ilona; Korn, Klaus; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Lehmann, Ulrich; Kreipe, Hans H; Ivens, Katrin; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Schulz, Thomas F; Heim, Albert

2013-08-15

112

alpha-Naphthyl acetate esterase activity--a cytochemical marker for T lymphocytees. Correlation with immunologic studies of normal tissues, lymphocytic leukemias, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and other lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed Central

Cytochemical identification of T lymphocytes on the basis of alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (NAE) activity was compared with immunologic markers for cell suspensions and/or cryostat sections of 113 specimens. Nonneoplastic tissues (peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleens, tonsils, thymus, and pleural fluid) and specimens from various lymphoproliferative disorders, including acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, lymphosarcoma cell leukemia, hairy cell leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of B-and T-cell types, and Hodgkin's disease, were evaluated. T (E-rosetting) cells demonstrated several patterns of NAE reactivity: 1) a strong globular reaction product, the most specific pattern for T-cell identification, 2) granular cytoplasmic staining, or 3) no reactivity. B lymphocytes revealed a granular pattern of NAE staining, were devoid of enzyme, or, in rare instances, exhibited strong NAE activity. Percentages of lymphoid cells with strong (globular) NAE activity closely paralleled T-cell (E-rosette) values in the majority of cases, with the best correlations observed for peripheral blood studies. However, discordant results were noted for some neoplastic and nonneoplastic tissues, including cases of T-cell lymphoma or leukemia. Markedly discrepant results were noted for thymic lymphocytes, most of which revealed E-rosette formation and weak or absent NAE activity. Lymph nodes involved by Hodgkin's disease demonstrated a heterogeneous pattern of staining in E-rosetting cells and in Reed-Sternberg variants. Cryostat section studies of reactive lymph nodes and nodular lymphomas demonstrated strong NAE staining in lymphoid cells of T-cell (interfollicular, internodular) areas, with little or no positivity in follicles or nodules (B-cell areas). NAE staining patterns further suggested that T cells comprise part of the follicular cuff and possibly represent a minor population of some neoplastic nodules. Although NAE determinations do not represent a consistently reliable alternative to immunologic methods for T-cell identification, this easily applicable cytochemical marker is complementary to other techniques in assessing neoplastic or nonneoplastic tissues, particularly cryostat sections. (Am J Pathol 97:17--42, 1979). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13

Pinkus, G. S.; Hargreaves, H. K.; McLeod, J. A.; Nadler, L. M.; Rosenthal, D. S.; Said, J. W.

1979-01-01

113

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in Jamaica and its relationship to human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I-associated lymphoproliferative disease.  

PubMed

We had shown previously that the prevalence of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I)-antibody positivity is high in Jamaican non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients and that virus-positive patients have the clinical features and poor prognosis of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Sixty-two % of 45 NHL patients diagnosed consecutively between 2/1/82 and 1/31/84 and studied prospectively were HTLV-I-antibody positive. Skin involvement (38%), hypercalcemia (44%), and leukemia (40%) were unusually prevalent and there was a strong association (p less than 0.05) with HTLV-I-antibody positivity. Fifty-two % of the patients had bone marrow infiltration, and 74% of these patients were HTLV-I-antibody positive (p = 0.06). Lymphadenopathy (96%), hepatomegaly (60%), and splenomegaly (25%) were detected with about the same frequency as in other series of NHL patients with advanced disease, and 61-88% of these patients were HTLV-I-antibody positive. Patients were classified into those with "typical ATL" (NHL associated with 2 of the 4 features i) hypercalcemia; ii) histologically proven skin infiltration; iii) leukemia; and iv) bone marrow infiltration, providing that the morphology of infiltrating or leukemic cells was characteristic of ATL; those "consistent with ATL" (NHL associated with 1 of these 4 features); and "non-ATL" (NHL without any of these 4 additional features). Thirty-two (71%) of the NHL patients were ATL patients, i.e., had features typical of or consistent with ATL, and 78% of these were HTLV-I-antibody positive. HTLV-I provirus was detected in tumour cells of all HTLV-I-antibody positive patients tested. Three (23%) of the non-ATL patients were HTLV-I-antibody positive. There was no correlation between histopathological features and the clinical classification or HTLV-I-antibody positivity. Median survival of ATL and non-ATL patients was 16 and 53 weeks. Although the disease was usually fulminant, 34% of the ATL patients had a subacute or chronic course. Skin involvement and leukemia were prominent in these patients. Hypercalcemia was the chief prognostic determinant. Median survival of hypercalcemic and normocalcemic ATL patients was 13 and 86 weeks (p less than 0.05). Hypercalcemia caused 10 deaths, infections 12, and death was due to tumour progression in 4 patients. Infections were usually due to pyogenic organisms and only 2 patients had systemic opportunistic infections. Six (27%) of 22 chronic lymphocytic leukemic (CLL) patients were HTLV-I-antibody positive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6100652

Gibbs, W N; Lofters, W S; Campbell, M; Hanchard, B; LaGrenade, L; Clark, J; Cranston, B; Saxinger, C; Gallo, R; Blattner, W A

1984-01-01

114

Differentiating chronic lymphocytic leukemia from monoclonal B-lymphocytosis according to clinical outcome: on behalf of the GIMEMA chronic lymphoproliferative diseases working group  

PubMed Central

Background Optimal lymphocyte parameters and thresholds for the diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia have been proposed by The National Cancer Institute sponsored Working Group and recently updated by the International Workshop on chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, it is not clear how these criteria apply to patient management in daily clinical practice and whether the lymphocyte thresholds recommended truly predict clinical outcome in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Design and Methods For the purpose of this study, an observational database of the GIMEMA (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell’Adulto) which included 1,158 patients with newly diagnosed Binet stage A chronic lymphocytic leukemia who were observed at different primary hematology centers during the period 1991–2000, was used. Results Among 818 consecutive chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with Rai stage 0 (i.e. no palpable lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly) who had flow cytometry evaluations at the time of diagnosis and were included in a GIMEMA database, both absolute lymphocyte count and B-cell count were of a similar value in predicting time to first treatment as continuous variables (P<0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified an absolute lymphocyte count of 11.5×109/L and an absolute B-cell count of 10.0×109/L as the best thresholds capable of identifying patients who will require treatment from those with stable disease. However, in a Cox’s multivariate analysis only the B-cell count retained its discriminating power (P<0.0001) and the estimated rate of progression to chronic lymphocytic leukemia requiring treatment among subjects with a B-cell count less than 10.0×109/L was approximately 2.3% per year (95% CI 2.1–2.5%) while it was 2-fold higher for patients with a B-cell count of 10.0×109/L or over (i.e. 5.2% per year; 95% CI 4.9–5.5%). Finally, in this community-based patient cohort, the B-cell threshold defined by investigators at the Mayo Clinic (i.e. 11.0×109/L) allowed patients to be divided into two subsets with a higher and lower likelihood of treatment (P<0.0001). Conclusions Our results, based on a retrospective patients’ cohort, provide a clear justification to retain the B-cell count as the reference gold standard of chronic lymphocytic leukemia diagnosis and imply that a count of 10×109/L B cells is the best lymphocyte threshold to predict time to first treatment. The use of clinical outcome to distinguish chronic lymphocytic leukemia from other premalignant conditions, such as monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, is a pragmatic approach meeting the patients’ need to minimize the psychological discomfort of receiving a diagnosis of leukemia when the risk of adverse clinical consequences is low.

Molica, Stefano; Mauro, Francesca R.; Giannarelli, Diana; Lauria, Francesco; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Brugiatelli, Maura; Liso, Vincenzo; Cuneo, Antonio; Foa, Robin

2011-01-01

115

Intraventricular rituximab and systemic chemotherapy for treatment of central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after kidney transplantation.  

PubMed

PTLD of the CNS is a rare complication of solid organ transplantation, and there are only case reports/series available in the literature. Current literature suggests that CNS PTLD carries a worse prognosis than PTLD outside the CNS, and most are of B-cell lineage, predominantly monomorphic, and are associated with EBV infection. Because this disorder is so rare, there is no standard chemotherapy for pediatric patients with CNS PTLD and reported therapies for EBV-associated CNS PTLD are heterogeneous with mixed results. Since outcomes of CNS PTLD are historically poor, we attempted to develop a novel therapeutic treatment regimen. Based on a review of the literature and with the help of a multidisciplinary team, we created a regimen of chemotherapy that included dexamethasone and high-dose methotrexate in addition to intravenous and intraventricular Rituximab in two pediatric patients. The intraventricular chemotherapy succeeded in shrinking the tumor in both of our patients; however, as shown in the second case, the clinical outcome depends on the location of the tumor. Systemic and intraventricular therapies hold promise in the management of EBV-associated CNS PTLD; however the rarity of this entity prevents the development of well-designed studies necessary for the establishment of an evidence-based treatment standard. PMID:22646132

Twombley, Katherine; Pokala, Hanumantha; Ardura, Monica I; Harker-Murray, Paul; Johnson-Welch, Sarah F; Weinberg, Arthur; Seikaly, Mouin

2012-05-30

116

[EB virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders and cytokine storm].  

PubMed

Epstein-barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-LPD) include a series of diseases from chronic to aggressive EBV-positive T-cells, NK cells, T/NK cells or B-cell LPD. The occurrence and development of EBV-LPD are closely associated with the cytokine storm, the clinical manifestations are very complex. Studies found that the different types of EBV-LPD express different cytokine secretion patterns, which help to further understand the progression of diseases, thus the EBV-LPD can be diagnosed early and treated early. In this article, different cytokine secretion patterns and their roles in EBV-LPD progression are reviewed. The main problems discussed above are the classification of EBV-LPD, T/NK-LPD and cytokine, B-LPD and cytokine, HLH and cytokine, and so on. PMID:23628063

Liu, Qian; Zhu, Ping

2013-04-01

117

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome misdiagnosed as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.  

PubMed

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of apoptosis, most commonly due to mutations in the FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. It presents with chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and symptomatic multilineage cytopenias in an otherwise healthy child. Unfortunately, these clinical findings are also noted in other childhood lymphoproliferative conditions, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, which can confound the diagnosis. This report describes a 6-year-old girl with symptoms misdiagnosed as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and treated with chemotherapy before the recognition that her symptoms and laboratory values were consistent with a somatic FAS mutation leading to ALPS. This case should alert pediatricians to include ALPS in the differential diagnosis of a child with lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and cytopenias; obtain discriminating screening laboratory biomarkers, such as serum vitamin B-12 and ferritin levels; and, in the setting of a highly suspicious clinical scenario for ALPS, pursue testing for somatic FAS mutations when germ-line mutation testing is negative. PMID:24101757

Rudman Spergel, Amanda; Walkovich, Kelly; Price, Susan; Niemela, Julie E; Wright, Dowain; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti

2013-10-07

118

Lymphoproliferative lesions of the ocular adnexa  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveLymphoproliferative lesions of the ocular adnexa were analyzed to examine (1) the suitability of the Revised European-American Lymphoma (REAL) classification for the subtyping of the lymphomas in these sites; (2) the predictive value of the REAL classification for the evolution of these tumors; and (3) the frequency and prognostic impact of tumor type, location, proliferation rate (Ki-67 index), p53, and

Sarah E Coupland; Lothar Krause; Henri-Jacques Delecluse; Ioannis Anagnostopoulos; Hans-Dieter Foss; Michael Hummel; Norbert Bornfeld; William R Lee; Harald Stein

1998-01-01

119

Association of Pretransplant Serum Phosphorus with Posttransplant Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Summary Background and objectives Serum phosphorus levels are associated with mortality, cardiovascular disease, and renal function loss in individuals with and without chronic kidney disease. The association of pretransplant serum phosphorus levels with transplant outcomes is not clear. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data of the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) up to June 2007 were linked to the database (2001 through 2006) of one of the U.S.-based large dialysis organizations (DaVita). The selected 9384 primary kidney recipients were divided into five groups according to pretransplant serum phosphorus levels (mg/dl): <3.5, 3.5 to <5.5 (reference group), 5.5 to <7.5, 7.5 to <9.5, and ?9.5. Unadjusted and multivariate adjusted risks for transplant outcomes were compared. Results Patients were 48 ± 14 years old and included 37% women and 27% African Americans. After multivariate adjustment, all-cause and cardiovascular death hazard ratios were 2.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.28 to 4.65) and 3.63 (1.13 to 11.64), respectively, in recipients in the ?9.5 group; allograft loss hazard ratios were 1.42 (1.04 to 1.95) and 2.36 (1.33 to 4.17) in recipients with 7.5 to >9.5 and ?9.5, respectively. No significant association with delayed graft function was found. Conclusions Pretransplant phosphorus levels 7.5 to <9.5 mg/dl and ?9.5 mg/dl were associated with increased risk of functional graft failure and increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular deaths, respectively, when compared with 3.5 to <5.5 mg/dl. Additional studies are needed to examine whether more aggressive control of pretransplant serum phosphorus may improve posttransplant outcomes.

Sampaio, Marcelo S.; Molnar, Miklos Z.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Mucsi, Istvan; Sim, John J.; Krishnan, Mahesh; Nissenson, Allen R.

2011-01-01

120

Novel ORC4L gene mutation in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are characterized by marked genetic, morphological, and clinical heterogeneity. The identification of prognostic markers could help to develop risk-adapted treatment strategies. Because proliferation of cells is essential for tumor growth, analysis of the cell cycle might give additional information on tumor progression and clinical behavior. Because initiation of DNA replication represents a significant step in cell division, it is worthwhile to focus the attention to the origin recognition complex (ORC), protein complex essential for initiation of DNA replication. Studies have already shown that ORC-associated factors give a more accurate assessment of cell proliferation than previous markers for many types of malignancies, but so far there have been no studies of eventual role of ORC4L in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Here, we describe 3 patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (2 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 1 with nonsecretory multiple myeloma) carrying a novel A286V mutation within ORC4L gene. All 3 patients were in the advanced stage of disease, but their response to the chemotherapy treatment was good and they achieved complete clinical remission in a relatively short period. Although the functional relevance of this mutation has not yet been elucidated, our observation raises a possibility that A286V mutation, which is constitutively present in these patients, might represent a favorable prognostic marker in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:20010161

Radojkovic, Milica; Ristic, Slobodan; Divac, Aleksandra; Tomic, Branko; Nestorovic, Aleksandra; Radojkovic, Dragica

2009-12-01

121

Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database  

Cancer.gov

Familial aggregation of lymphoproliferative disorders from the Scandinavian family cancer database Print This Page Familial Aggregation of Lymphoproliferative Disorders from the Scandinavian Family Cancer Database Our Research

122

Posttransplant sarcopenia: an underrecognized early consequence of liver transplantation.  

PubMed

Liver transplantation is believed to reverse the clinical and metabolic abnormalities of cirrhosis. Reduced skeletal muscle mass or sarcopenia contributes to increased mortality and adverse consequences of cirrhosis. Failure of reversal of sarcopenia of cirrhosis after liver transplantation is not well recognized. Six temporally, geographically, and methodologically distinct follow-up studies in 304 cirrhotics reported conflicting data on changes in indirect measures of skeletal muscle mass after transplantation. Distinct measures of body composition but not skeletal muscle mass were used and did not focus on the clinical consequences of sarcopenia after transplantation. A number of studies reported an initial rapid postoperative loss of lean mass followed by incomplete recovery with a maximum follow-up of 2 years. Posttransplant sarcopenia may be responsible for metabolic syndrome and impaired quality of life after liver transplantation. Potential reasons for failure to reverse sarcopenia after liver transplantation include use of immunosuppressive agents [mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and calcineurin inhibitors] that impair skeletal muscle growth and protein accretion. Repeated hospitalizations, posttransplant infections, and renal failure also contribute to posttransplant sarcopenia. Finally, recovery from muscle deconditioning is limited by lack of systematic nutritional and physical-activity-based interventions to improve muscle mass. Despite the compelling data on sarcopenia before liver transplantation, the impact of posttransplant sarcopenia on clinical outcomes is not known. There is a compelling need for studies to examine the mechanisms and consequences of sarcopenia post liver transplantation to permit development of therapies to prevent and reverse this disorder. PMID:23912247

Dasarathy, Srinivasan

2013-08-04

123

Large ulceration of the oropharynx induced by methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

We present a case of a 67-year-old Japanese man with a serious oropharyngeal ulceration that at first seemed to be destructive malignant lymphoma or oropharyngeal carcinoma. We suspected methotrexate (MTX)-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) induced by MTX treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). About 3 weeks after simple discontinuation of MTX, complete regression of the disease was observed, confirming our diagnosis. PMID:23970326

Hanakawa, Hiroyuki; Orita, Yorihisa; Sato, Yasuharu; Uno, Kinya; Nishizaki, Kazunori; Yoshino, Tadashi

2013-08-01

124

Diagnostic and prognostic value of immunohistological bone marrow examination: Results in 212 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cryostat sections of 246 consecutive bone marrow biopsies from 212 patients with lymphoproliferative disease were investigated using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MOAb's) and an immunoperoxidase technique. Bone marrow involvement was demonstrated by immunohistological examination in 121\\/160 patients (76%) with non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and 16\\/23 patients (70%) with plasma cell malignancies; the definite immunological diagnosis could be performed in 77%

J. Thaler; H. Denz; C. Gattringer; H. Glassl; M. Lechleitner; O. Dietze

1987-01-01

125

Effect of in vivo lymphocyte-depleting strategies on development of lymphoproliferative disorders in children post allogeneic bone marrow transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

T cell depletion (TCD) of marrow is a proven method of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Nonetheless, TCD is associated with an increased risk of developing post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Between 1986 and 1998, 241 pediatric patients at the University of Iowa underwent BMT using ex vivo TCD of marrow from mismatched related or

B A Lynch; M A Vasef; M Comito; A L Gilman; N Lee; J Ritchie; S Rumelhart; M Holida; F Goldman

2003-01-01

126

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: Case report and review of literature  

PubMed Central

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by headache, nausea, vomiting, seizures and visual disturbances. PRES has been usually associated with hypertension, chronic renal disease, malignancy and chemotherapeutic agents. We report the association of PRES with Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, which to our best knowledge has not been reported before.

Chandramohan, Vaishnavi; Nagarajan, Vinoth Ponnurangam; Sathyamoorthi, Muthamil Selvan; Kumar, Sathish; Shanmugasundaram, Chitrambalam; Periakaruppan, Gokulakrishnan; Scott, Julius Xavier

2012-01-01

127

Treatment of Post-transplant Erythrocytosis with Enalapril.  

PubMed

This prospective study was carried out to estimate the efficacy and safety of Enalapril therapy in post-transplant erythrocytosis. Thirteen long-term renal allograft recipients (11 males and two females) with increased hematocrit values (>51%) and elevated red cell mass were treated with Enalapril for 12 weeks; their age ranged from 18 to 54 years. At the end of the study period the mean hematocrit values decreased from 53.9% to 46.7%, red cell mass significantly decreased from 50.8 ml/kg to 40.5 ml/kg. During the following six months without Enalapril treatment, an increase in hematocrit was observed reaching a mean of 47.5%. In conclusion, enalapril can be safely and efficiently used to treat post-transplant erythrocytosis. PMID:18408290

Akash, N; Smadi, I; El-Lozi, M

128

IL-17A mediates early post-transplant lesions after heterotopic trachea allotransplantation in Mice.  

PubMed

Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) and bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Reports from clinical and rodent models suggest the implication of IL-17A in either PGD or BO. We took advantage of the heterotopic trachea transplantation model in mice to study the direct role of IL-17A in post-transplant airway lesions. Across full MHC barrier, early lesions were controlled in IL-17A(-/-) or anti-IL17 treated recipients. In contrast, IL-17A deficiency did not prevent subsequent obliterative airway disease (OAD). Interestingly, this early protection occurred also in syngeneic grafts and was accompanied by a decrease in cellular stress, as attested by lower HSP70 mRNA levels, suggesting the involvement of IL-17A in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Furthermore, persistence of multipotent CK14(+) epithelial stem cells underlined allograft protection afforded by IL-17A deficiency or neutralisation. Recipient-derived ??(+) and CD4(+) T cells were the major source of IL-17A. However, lesions still occurred in the absence of each subset, suggesting a high redundancy between the innate and adaptive IL-17A producing cells. Notably, a double depletion significantly diminished lesions. In conclusion, this work implicated IL-17A as mediator of early post-transplant airway lesions and could be considered as a potential therapeutic target in clinical transplantation. PMID:23936171

Lemaître, Philippe H; Vokaer, Benoît; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Estenne, Marc; Goldman, Michel; Leo, Oberdan; Remmelink, Myriam; Le Moine, Alain

2013-07-30

129

IL-17A Mediates Early Post-Transplant Lesions after Heterotopic Trachea Allotransplantation in Mice  

PubMed Central

Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) and bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Reports from clinical and rodent models suggest the implication of IL-17A in either PGD or BO. We took advantage of the heterotopic trachea transplantation model in mice to study the direct role of IL-17A in post-transplant airway lesions. Across full MHC barrier, early lesions were controlled in IL-17A-/- or anti-IL17 treated recipients. In contrast, IL-17A deficiency did not prevent subsequent obliterative airway disease (OAD). Interestingly, this early protection occurred also in syngeneic grafts and was accompanied by a decrease in cellular stress, as attested by lower HSP70 mRNA levels, suggesting the involvement of IL-17A in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Furthermore, persistence of multipotent CK14+ epithelial stem cells underlined allograft protection afforded by IL-17A deficiency or neutralisation. Recipient-derived ??+ and CD4+ T cells were the major source of IL-17A. However, lesions still occurred in the absence of each subset, suggesting a high redundancy between the innate and adaptive IL-17A producing cells. Notably, a double depletion significantly diminished lesions. In conclusion, this work implicated IL-17A as mediator of early post-transplant airway lesions and could be considered as a potential therapeutic target in clinical transplantation.

Lemaitre, Philippe H.; Vokaer, Benoit; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Estenne, Marc; Goldman, Michel; Leo, Oberdan; Remmelink, Myriam; Le Moine, Alain

2013-01-01

130

How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350.

Oliveira, Joao Bosco

2011-01-01

131

X-linked lymphoproliferative syndromes: brothers or distant cousins?  

PubMed Central

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1), described in the mid-1970s and molecularly defined in 1998, and XLP2, reported in 2006, are prematurely lethal genetic immunodeficiencies that share susceptibility to overwhelming inflammatory responses to certain infectious triggers. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP; encoded by SH2D1A) is mutated in XLP1, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP; encoded by BIRC4) is mutated in XLP2. XLP1 is a disease with multiple and variable clinical consequences, including fatal hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) triggered predominantly by Epstein-Barr virus, lymphomas, antibody deficiency, and rarer consequences of immune dysregulation. To date, XLP2 has been found to cause HLH with and without exposure to Epstein-Barr virus, and HLH is commonly recurrent in these patients. For both forms of XLP, the only curative therapy at present is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Beyond their common X-linked locus and their requirement for normal immune responses to certain viral infections, SAP and XIAP demonstrate no obvious structural or functional similarity, are not coordinately regulated with respect to their expression, and do not appear to directly interact. In this review, we describe the genetic, clinical, and immunopathologic features of these 2 disorders and discuss current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Zhang, Kejian; Snow, Andrew L.; Marsh, Rebecca A.

2010-01-01

132

Cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders with CD8 expression: a clinicopathologic study of 21 cases.  

PubMed

Lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) belong to the spectrum of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, an indolent form of T-cell lymphoproliferative disease. We reviewed 21 cases of CD30+ lymphoproliferative lesions expressing cytotoxic profile (CD8+). Seven cases of cutaneous ALCL, 2 cases of systemic ALCL involving the skin, and 12 cases of LyP. The cases of LyP were predominated by small lymphocytes exhibiting a prominent epidermotropic pattern consistent with either type B or type D LyP. Four cases showed co-expression of CD56. The ALCL cases included myxoid features, pseudoepitheliomatous change, and an intravascular component. In all cases that were primary in the skin an indolent clinical course was seen while one patient with systemic myxoid ALCL is in remission following systemic multiagent chemotherapy. The paucity of other neutrophils and eosinophils and concomitant granulomatous inflammation were distinctive features in cases of type B and type D LyP. CD30 and CD45 Ro positivity and a clinical course typical of LyP were useful differentiating features from an aggressive cytotoxic CD8+ T cell lymphoma. In all cases that were primary in the skin an indolent clinical course was observed. CD30 and CD45 Ro positivity and a clinical course typical of LyP were useful in preventing a misdiagnosis of an aggressive cytotoxic CD8+ T cell lymphoma. PMID:23189966

Plaza, Jose A; Feldman, Andrew L; Magro, Cynthia

2012-11-28

133

[Lymphoproliferative disorder as a complication after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation].  

PubMed

Lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) occur often in EBV-infected patients, especially in solid-organ and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The risk of developing LPD ranges from 1 to 25% and depends on the type of transplantation. We are presenting the case of a 9-year-old boy with acute myelogenous leukaemia in second remission, who developed LPD after matched unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation (MUD BMT) not identical in two loci. On day 50 after BMT the patient presented with fever and symptoms of paronychia. Two weeks later, bilateral cervical tenderness and adenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly developed. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed continuing remission. An extensive infection workup, including bacterial, mycotic and CMV infection yielded negative results. Basing on clinical picture and suspecting LPD, EBV-PCR was performed. The patient was found to have extremely high EBV DNA levels (4.905.152 genomes/mcg) in the peripheral blood. On days 64 and 73 after BMT, the patient received two doses of rituximab (MabThera) (375 mg/m(2)) After the first dose of rituximab EBV DNA copy numbers decreased to 707.723/mcg. However the patient's general condition was worsening; 71 days after BMT increasing aplasia and symptoms of venoocclusive disease (VOD) developed. The patient received two doses of defibrotide (Novarid). Despite of intensive therapy, progressive hepatic failure and increasing pulmonary oedema led to the patient's death, on day 96 after BMT. PMID:19531835

Sta?czak, Elzbieta; Pawelec, Katarzyna; Romiszewski, Micha?

134

Pleural posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder following liver transplantation.  

PubMed

A case of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) involving the pleura is reported. The patient was a 57-year-old man who underwent liver transplantation 2 years prior to the development of PTLD. The PTLD was pleural-based and was first detected by radiologic studies as a pleural effusion. Transbronchial biopsy and cytologic examination of 2 pleural fluid specimens were nondiagnostic. Subsequent open-wedge biopsy revealed a monomorphic PTLD, composed of large immunoblasts with plasmacytoid differentiation. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated B-cell lineage with expression of monotypic cytoplasmic immunoglobulin kappa light chain and CD79a, and absence of T-cell antigens. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies demonstrated Epstein-Barr virus protein and RNA, respectively. No evidence of human herpesvirus 8 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction. We report this case because pleural-based PTLD is rare. The diagnosis of this entity is made more difficult by the fact that PTLD is often underrepresented in pleural fluid cytology samples. PMID:11231496

Hoffmann, H; Schlette, E; Actor, J; Medeiros, L J

2001-03-01

135

Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder developed following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for relapsing Hodgkin's lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are lymphoid or plasmacytic proliferations that develop as a consequence of immunosuppression in a recipient of a solid organ, bone marrow or stem cell allograft. The development of PTLDs is usually associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the disorder is also termed EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The development of PTLD is a rare complication in autologous bone marrow/peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. In the present study, we report a case of EBV-associated LPD which developed following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for relapsing Hodgkin’s lymphoma. A 51-year-old male presented with swelling of the left cervical lymph nodes. A biopsy revealed nodular sclerosis classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Following four courses of ABVd (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) therapy, the Hodgkin’s lymphoma relapsed. CHASE (cyclophosphamide, etoposide, cytarabine, dexamethasone) therapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were performed. In the 128 days following the transplantation, lymph node swelling was noted and a biopsy specimen demonstrated EBV-associated LPD. The serum copy number of EBV-DNA was 2.7×103 copies/ml. The occurrence of EBV-associated LPD may be on the rise due to the increased number of patients undergoing immunosuppression therapy. The measurement of the serum EBV-DNA copy number and the detection of EBV-infected atypical lymphocytes using in situ hybridization are significant in establishing an early accurate diagnosis and initiating the correct treatment for EBV-associated LPD in patients with immunosuppression.

IZUMIYA, SAKURA; ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; HODOHARA, KEIKO; YOSHIDA, TAKASHI; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

2012-01-01

136

Post-transplant acute renal failure in cadaver renal recipients treated with cyclosporine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-transplant acute renal failure in cadaver renal recipients treated with cyclosporine. The outcome of patients with acute renal failure following cadaveric renal transplant has been evaluated in a prospective, controlled trial, comparing treatment with cyclosporine (CSA) to prednisone, azathioprine, and antilymphocyte globulin (AZA). There was a high incidence of acute post-transplant renal failure in both groups: 37 of 51 CSA

Bruce M Hall; David J Tiller; Geoffrey G Duggin; John S Horvath; Annabelle Farnsworth; James May; James R Johnson; A G Ross Sheil

1985-01-01

137

Correlates of lymphoproliferative responses to measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) virus vaccines following MMR-II vaccination in healthy children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to measles, mumps, and rubella viral antigens plays a critical role in providing long-term protection against these infectious diseases. We examined CMI by measuring lymphoproliferative response induced in response to stimulation with the above three antigens following two doses of measles, mumps, and rubella-II (MMR-II) vaccine in a randomly selected, population-based cohort of healthy children. We determined

Neelam Dhiman; Inna G. Ovsyannikova; Robert M. Jacobson; Robert A. Vierkant; V. Shane Pankratz; Steven J. Jacobsen; Gregory A. Poland

2005-01-01

138

Variations of the UNC13D gene in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.  

PubMed

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is caused by genetic defects decreasing Fas function and is characterized by lymphadenopathy/splenomegaly and expansion of CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells. This latter expansion is absent in the ALPS variant named Dianzani Autoimmune/lymphoproliferative Disease (DALD). In addition to the causative mutations, the genetic background influences ALPS and DALD development. We previously suggested a disease-modifying role for the perforin gene involved in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The UNC13D gene codes for Munc13-4, which is involved in perforin secretion and FHL development, and thus, another candidate for a disease-modifying role in ALPS and DALD. In this work, we sequenced UNC13D in 21 ALPS and 20 DALD patients and compared these results with sequences obtained from 61 healthy subjects and 38 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. We detected four rare missense variations in three heterozygous ALPS patients carrying p.Cys112Ser, p.Val781Ile, and a haplotype comprising both p.Ile848Leu and p.Ala995Pro. Transfection of the mutant cDNAs into HMC-1 cells showed that they decreased granule exocytosis, compared to the wild-type construct. An additional rare missense variation, p.Pro271Ser, was detected in a healthy subject, but this variation did not decrease Munc13-4 function. These data suggest that rare loss-of-function variations of UND13D are risk factors for ALPS development. PMID:23840885

Aricň, Maurizio; Boggio, Elena; Cetica, Valentina; Melensi, Matteo; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Clemente, Nausicaa; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Buttini, Sara; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Comi, Cristoforo; Dufour, Carlo; Pende, Daniela; Dianzani, Irma; Ellis, Steven R; Pagliano, Sara; Marcenaro, Stefania; Ramenghi, Ugo; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

2013-07-01

139

Posttransplant Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Other Autoimmune Cytopenias are Increased in Very Young Infants Undergoing Unrelated Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune cytopenias are a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), and are considered to be a feature of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). We report on a cohort of very young infants (?3 months of age) receiving HSCT from unrelated donor umbilical cord blood for genetic disorders who developed posttransplant autoimmune cytopenias at an increased rate compared to older

Kristin M. Page; Adam M. Mendizabal; Vinod K. Prasad; Paul L. Martin; Suhag Parikh; Susan Wood; Gregory D. Sempowski; Paul Szabolcs; Joanne Kurtzberg

2008-01-01

140

Mutations in Fas Associated with Human Lymphoproliferative Syndrome and Autoimmunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fas (also known as Apo1 and CD95) is a cell surface receptor involved in apoptotic cell death. Fas expression and function were analyzed in three children (including two siblings) with a lymphoproliferative syndrome, two of whom also had autoimmune disorders. A large deletion in the gene encoding Fas and no detectable cell surface expression characterized the most affected patient. Clinical

F. Rieux-Laucat; F. Le Deist; C. Hivroz; I. A. G. Roberts; K. M. Debatin; A. Fischer; J. P. de Villartay

1995-01-01

141

Two patients with history of STEC-HUS, posttransplant recurrence and complement gene mutations.  

PubMed

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. About 90% of cases are secondary to infections by Escherichia coli strains producing Shiga-like toxins (STEC-HUS), while 10% are associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of complement system (aHUS). We describe two patients with a clinical history of STEC-HUS, who developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) soon after disease onset. They received a kidney transplant but lost the graft for HUS recurrence, a complication more commonly observed in aHUS. Before planning a second renal transplantation, the two patients underwent genetic screening for aHUS-associated mutations that revealed the presence of a heterozygous CFI mutation in patient #1 and a heterozygous MCP mutation in patient #2, and also in her mother who donated the kidney. This finding argues that the two cases originally diagnosed as STEC-HUS had indeed aHUS triggered by STEC infection on a genetic background of impaired complement regulation. Complement gene sequencing should be performed before kidney transplantation in patients who developed ESRD following STEC-HUS since they may be undiagnosed cases of aHUS, at risk of posttransplant recurrence. Furthermore, genetic analysis of donors is mandatory before living-related transplantation to exclude carriers of HUS-predisposing mutations. PMID:23731345

Alberti, M; Valoti, E; Piras, R; Bresin, E; Galbusera, M; Tripodo, C; Thaiss, F; Remuzzi, G; Noris, M

2013-06-03

142

Post-transplant soluble MICA and MICA antibodies predict subsequent heart graft outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of MICA in heart graft acceptance. Pre- and post-transplant sera from 31 patients were evaluated for MICA antibodies by cytotoxicity on recombinant cell lines and soluble MICA (sMICA) concentrations by ELISA. The results demonstrated that the patients with post-transplant anti-MICA antibodies were at a high risk for the development

Beatriz Suárez-Álvarez; Antonio López-Vázquez; Roberto Díaz-Peńa; Beatriz Díaz-Molina; Rosa M. Blanco-García; M. Rocío Álvarez-López; Carlos López-Larrea

2006-01-01

143

Post-transplant renal function in the first year predicts long-term kidney transplant survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-transplant renal function in the first year predicts long-term kidney transplant survival.BackgroundImprovements in long-term kidney graft survival have been recently noted. However, the reasons for this were unclear. This study examined post-transplant renal function within the first year as an independent variable influencing long-term survival.MethodsThe influence of demographic characteristics (age, sex, race); transplant variables (cadaver versus living donor, cold ischemia

Sundaram Hariharan; Maureen A Mcbride; Wida S Cherikh; Christine B Tolleris; Barbara A Bresnahan; Christopher P Johnson

2002-01-01

144

Gray's Time-Varying Coefficients Model for Posttransplant Survival of Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients with a Diagnosis of Cancer  

PubMed Central

Transplantation is often the only viable treatment for pediatric patients with end-stage liver disease. Making well-informed decisions on when to proceed with transplantation requires accurate predictors of transplant survival. The standard Cox proportional hazards (PH) model assumes that covariate effects are time-invariant on right-censored failure time; however, this assumption may not always hold. Gray's piecewise constant time-varying coefficients (PC-TVC) model offers greater flexibility to capture the temporal changes of covariate effects without losing the mathematical simplicity of Cox PH model. In the present work, we examined the Cox PH and Gray PC-TVC models on the posttransplant survival analysis of 288 pediatric liver transplant patients diagnosed with cancer. We obtained potential predictors through univariable (P < 0.15) and multivariable models with forward selection (P < 0.05) for the Cox PH and Gray PC-TVC models, which coincide. While the Cox PH model provided reasonable average results in estimating covariate effects on posttransplant survival, the Gray model using piecewise constant penalized splines showed more details of how those effects change over time.

Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Tomko, Heather E.; Donnell, Drew Michael S.; Roberts, Mark S.; Bryce, Cindy L.

2013-01-01

145

Correlates of lymphoproliferative responses to measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) virus vaccines following MMR-II vaccination in healthy children.  

PubMed

Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to measles, mumps, and rubella viral antigens plays a critical role in providing long-term protection against these infectious diseases. We examined CMI by measuring lymphoproliferative response induced in response to stimulation with the above three antigens following two doses of measles, mumps, and rubella-II (MMR-II) vaccine in a randomly selected, population-based cohort of healthy children. We determined if a correlative and predictive intraclass relationship exists between CMI to the three components of MMR-II. We detected positive lymphoproliferative responses to measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines. Mumps vaccine used as an antigen had the highest median stimulation index followed by measles and rubella vaccines. The overall intraclass correlation value for lymphoproliferative response to measles, mumps, and rubella using Pearson's correlation was 0.61 (95% confidence interval = 0.56, 0.66). We observed a significant pairwise association to individual vaccine components between subjects in the upper and lower 10th percentile of immune response. This study demonstrates recall CMI post-MMR-II vaccination with significant intraclass correlation among the CMI responses to the three vaccine components. PMID:15885638

Dhiman, Neelam; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Jacobson, Robert M; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V Shane; Jacobsen, Steven J; Poland, Gregory A

2005-05-01

146

Potential Donor-Recipient MYH9 Genotype Interactions in Posttransplant Nephrotic Syndrome After Pediatric Kidney Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) with nephrotic syndrome is relatively common after kidney transplantation in young recipients whose predialysis course consists of heavy proteinuria, hypertension and subacute loss of kidney function. The gene(s) mediating this effect remain unknown. We report an unusual circumstance where kidneys recovered from a deceased African American male donor with MYH9-related occult FSGS (risk variants in seven of eight MYH9 E1 haplotype single nucleotide polymorphisms) were transplanted into an African American male child with risk variants in four MYH9 E1 risk variants and a European American female teenager with two MYH9 E1 risk variants. Fulminant nephrotic syndrome rapidly developed in the African American recipient, whereas the European American had an uneventful posttransplant course. The kidney donor lacked significant proteinuria at the time of organ procurement. This scenario suggests that donor–recipient interactions in MYH9, as well as other gene–gene and gene–environment interactions, may lead to recurrent nephrotic syndrome after renal transplantation. The impact of transplanting kidneys from donors with multiple MYH9 risk alleles into recipients with similar genetic background at high risk for recurrent kidney disease needs to be determined.

Freedman, B. I.; Nagaraj, S. K.; Lin, J.-J.; Gautreaux, M. D.; Bowden, D. W.; Iskandar, S. S.; Stratta, R. J.; Rogers, J.; Hartmann, E. L.; Farney, A. C.; Reeves-Daniel, A. M.

2010-01-01

147

Acquired C1-inhibitor deficiency and lymphoproliferative disorders: A tight relationship.  

PubMed

Angioedema due to the acquired deficiency of C1-inhibitor is a rare disease known as acquired angioedema (AAE), which was first described in a patient with high-grade lymphoma and is frequently associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, including expansion of B cell clones producing anti-C1-INH autoantibodies, monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). AAE is clinically similar to hereditary angioedema (HAE), and is characterized by recurrent episodes of sub-cutaneous and sub-mucosal edema. It may affect the face, tongue, extremities, trunk and genitals. The involvement of the gastrointestinal tract causes bowel sub-occlusion with severe pain, vomiting and diarrhea, whereas laryngeal edema can be life-threatening. Unlike those with HAE, AAE patients usually have late-onset symptoms, do not have a family history of angioedema and present variable response to treatment due to the hyper-catabolism of C1-inhibitor. Reduced C1-inhibitor function leads to activation of the classic complement pathway with its consumption and activation of the contact system leading to the generation of the vasoactive peptide bradykinin, which increases vascular permeability and induces angioedema. Lymphoprolipherative diseases and AAE are tightly linked with either angioedema or limphoprolyferation being the first symptom. Experimental data indicate that neoplastic tissue and/or anti-C1-inhibitor antibodies induce C1-inhibitor consumption, and this is further supported by the observation that cytotoxic treatment of the lymphoproliferative diseases associated with AAE variably reverses the complement impairment and leads to a clinical improvement in angioedema symptoms. PMID:23490322

Castelli, Roberto; Zanichelli, Andrea; Cicardi, Marco; Cugno, Massimo

2013-03-13

148

Herpesvirus saimiri-induced lymphoproliferative disease in howler monkeys.  

PubMed

Four of 5 howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) experimentally infected with Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) developed a rapidly fatal malignant lymphoma accompanied by peripheral T-cell lymphocytosis. HVS was isolated from fresh and tissue cultured blood and tissue lymphocytes and from cell cultures derived from nonlymphoid organs. Humoral antibodies against HVS-induced antigens were detected in the sera of the animals. The in vitro response of the peripheral blood lymphocytes to mitogenic stimulants was depressed following HVS infection. PMID:195067

Rangan, S R; Martin, L N; Enright, F M; Abee, C R

1977-07-01

149

Sympathetic Nervous System-Immune Interactions in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

With some exceptions, the sympathetic nervous system has often been regarded as an immunosuppressive system. However, we know now that the immunoregulatory role of the sympathetic nervous system cannot be described in such absolute terms. Indeed, sympathetic neurotransmitters can inhibit or stimulate an immune response depending on numerous variables, which include the type of adrenergic receptor involved, the kind of

Adriana del Rey; Hugo O. Besedovsky

2008-01-01

150

FcR? Controls the Fas-Dependent Regulatory Function of Lymphoproliferative Double Negative T Cells  

PubMed Central

Patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and lymphoproliferation (LPR) mice are deficient in Fas, and accumulate large numbers of ??-TCR+, CD4?, CD8? double negative (DN) T cells. The function of these DN T cells remains largely unknown. The common ? subunit of the activating Fc receptors, FcR?, plays an important role in mediating innate immune responses. We have shown previously that a significant proportion of DN T cells express FcR?, and that this molecule is required for TCR transgenic DN T cells to suppress allogeneic immune responses. Whether FcR? plays a critical role in LPR DN T cell-mediated suppression of immune responses to auto and allo-antigens is not known. Here, we demonstrated that FcR?+, but not FcR?? LPR DN T cells could suppress Fas+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro and attenuated CD4+ T cell-mediated graft-versus host disease. Although FcR? expression did not allow LPR DN T cells to inhibit the expansion of Fas-deficient cells within the LPR context, adoptive transfer of FcR?+, but not FcR??, DN T cells inhibited lymphoproliferation in generalized lymphoproliferative disease (GLD) mice. Furthermore, FcR? acted in a cell-intrinsic fashion to limit DN T cell accumulation by increasing the rate of apoptosis in proliferated cells. These results indicate that FcR? can confer Fas-dependent regulatory properties on LPR DN T cells, and suggest that FcR? may be a novel marker for functional DN Tregs.

Juvet, Stephen C.; Thomson, Christopher W.; Kim, Edward Y.; Han, Mei; Zhang, Li

2013-01-01

151

Serum alpha-fetoprotein level independently predicts posttransplant survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.  

PubMed

We aimed to determine whether combining serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor burden would allow better stratification of posttransplant survival for patients with HCC undergoing liver transplantation. Adjusting for donor and recipient characteristics, we calculated the risk of posttransplant mortality associated with serum AFP level or HCC tumor burden for all first-time adult liver transplants performed in the United States between 2002 and 2011 (n?=?45,267). Serum AFP level, rather than tumor burden, was the tumor characteristic most strongly associated with posttransplant survival. Although recipients with HCC and a serum AFP level???15 ng/mL at the time of transplantation had no excess posttransplant mortality [adjusted hazard ratio (AHR)?=?1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI)?=?0.93-1.12], patients with a serum AFP level of 16 to 65 ng/mL (AHR?=?1.38, 95% CI?=?1.23-1.54), patients with a serum AFP level of 66 to 320 ng/mL (AHR?=?1.65, 95% CI?=?1.45-1.88), and patients with a serum AFP level?>?320 ng/mL (AHR?=?2.37, 95% CI?=?2.06-2.73) had progressively worse posttransplant mortality in comparison with recipients without HCC. Patients with a tumor burden exceeding the Milan criteria (who are usually excluded from transplantation) had excellent posttransplant survival if their serum AFP level was 0 to 15 ng/mL (AHR?=?0.97, 95% CI?=?0.66-1.43). In contrast, patients within the Milan criteria (who are routinely considered to be transplant candidates) had poor survival if their serum AFP level was substantially elevated (for a serum AFP level???66 ng/mL, AHR?=?1.93, 95% CI?=?1.74-2.15). Changes in serum AFP level while patients were on the waiting list corresponded closely to changes in posttransplant mortality. In conclusion, the absolute serum AFP level and changes in the serum AFP level strongly predict posttransplant survival independently of the tumor burden. We hope that these data, in combination with other factors, can be used to inform future studies and ongoing discussions aimed at improving the eligibility criteria for liver transplantation for patients with HCC. PMID:23536495

Berry, Kristin; Ioannou, George N

2013-06-01

152

Attenuated Revertant Serotype 1 Marek's Disease Vaccine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Marek's disease (MD), a highly prevalent and important lymphoproliferative disease of chickens, is controlled in commercial chickens by live virus vaccines consisting of attenuated or naturally avirulent MD-related herpesviruses. Although vaccination prog...

R. L. Witter

1991-01-01

153

Rearrangement of T-Cell Receptor 8 Chain Gene as a Marker of Lineage and Clonality in T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders1  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed the rearrangement of T-cell receptor (TcR) 5 chain gene in 88 cases of lymphoproliferative disorders; 31 acute lymphoblastic leukemias\\/lymphoblastic lymphomas (ALL\\/LBL); 27 adult T-cell leu- kemias\\/lymphomas, 9 angioimmunoblastic lymphoadenopathies (AILD); 10 T-cell lymphomas (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma); and 11 Hodgkin's disease. All of 9 T-ALL\\/LBL cases, of which 4 cases have neither Ăź nor 7 gene rearrangement, had a new

Nobuhiro Kimura; Yoshihiro Takihara; Tomi Akiyoshi; Takahisa Yoshida; Koichi Ohshima; Takashi Kawara; Shusuke Hisano; Mitsuo Kozuru; Makoto Okumura; Masahiro Kikuchi

1989-01-01

154

Dobutamine stress echocardiography for assessing coronary artery disease after transplantation in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety and diagnostic accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) for evaluating posttransplant coronary artery disease (TxCAD) in children, and to determine the frequency of selected cardiac events after normal or abnormal DSE.Background. Posttransplant coronary artery disease is the most common cause of graft loss (late death or retransplantation) after

Ranae L Larsen; Patricia M Applegate; Daniel A Dyar; Paulo A Ribeiro; Sharon D Fritzsche; Neda F Mulla; Girish S Shirali; Micheal A Kuhn; Richard E Chinnock; Pravin M Shah

1998-01-01

155

Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, Thymoglobulin and Rituximab as Graft-versus-Host-Disease Prophylaxis in Patients Undergoing Haploidentical and HLA Partially Matched Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

2012-11-26

156

Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation.  

PubMed

Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor-encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients' CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative) T cells--accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS--revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases. PMID:21183795

Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Bénédicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cécile; Arkwright, Peter D; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gérard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

2010-12-22

157

Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor–encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients’ CD4–CD8– (double negative) T cells — accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS — revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases.

Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Benedicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cecile; Arkwright, Peter D.; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gerard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P.; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic

2010-01-01

158

Notch-Deficient Skin Induces a Lethal Systemic B-Lymphoproliferative Disorder by Secreting TSLP, a Sentinel for Epidermal Integrity  

PubMed Central

Epidermal keratinocytes form a highly organized stratified epithelium and sustain a competent barrier function together with dermal and hematopoietic cells. The Notch signaling pathway is a critical regulator of epidermal integrity. Here, we show that keratinocyte-specific deletion of total Notch signaling triggered a severe systemic B-lymphoproliferative disorder, causing death. RBP-j is the DNA binding partner of Notch, but both RBP-j–dependent and independent Notch signaling were necessary for proper epidermal differentiation and lipid deposition. Loss of both pathways caused a persistent defect in skin differentiation/barrier formation. In response, high levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were released into systemic circulation by Notch-deficient keratinocytes that failed to differentiate, starting in utero. Exposure to high TSLP levels during neonatal hematopoiesis resulted in drastic expansion of peripheral pre- and immature B-lymphocytes, causing B-lymphoproliferative disorder associated with major organ infiltration and subsequent death, a previously unappreciated systemic effect of TSLP. These observations demonstrate that local skin perturbations can drive a lethal systemic disease and have important implications for a wide range of humoral and autoimmune diseases with skin manifestations.

Demehri, Shadmehr; Liu, Zhenyi; Lee, Jonghyeob; Lin, Meei-Hua; Crosby, Seth D; Roberts, Christopher J; Grigsby, Perry W; Miner, Jeffrey H; Farr, Andrew G; Kopan, Raphael

2008-01-01

159

CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders of the skin: still an open question.  

PubMed

CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders of the skin represent a well-defined spectrum of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. They include lymphomatoid papulosis and cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma which are characterized by the common expression of the CD30 antigen, but different clinical, histological and molecular features. Recent progress in the pathobiology and identification of therapeutic targets has contributed to our current understanding of this peculiar group of cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders. The characteristic features of this group of cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders are reviewed with particular emphasis to their diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:23149700

Alaibac, M; Zarian, H; Russo, I; Peserico, A

2012-12-01

160

Constitutive activation of the Fas ligand gene in mouse lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed Central

Mice homozygous for lpr (lymphoproliferation) or gld (generalized lymphoproliferative disease) develop lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly and suffer from autoimmune disease. The lpr mice have a defect in a cell-surface receptor, Fas, that mediates apoptosis, while gld mice have a mutation in the Fas ligand (FasL). Northern hybridization with the FasL cDNA as probe indicated that the cells accumulating in lpr and gld mice abundantly express the FasL mRNA without stimulation. By means of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we identified the cells expressing the FasL mRNA as CD4-CD8- double negative T cells. The T cells from lpr mice were specifically cytotoxic against Fas-expressing cells. Since FasL is normally expressed in activated mature T cells these results indicate that the double negative T cells accumulating in lpr and gld mice are activated once, and support the notion that the Fas/FasL system is involved in activation-induced suicide of T cells. Furthermore, the graft-versus host disease caused by transfer of lpr bone marrow to wild-type mice can be explained by the constitutive expression of the FasL in lpr-derived T cells. Images

Watanabe, D; Suda, T; Hashimoto, H; Nagata, S

1995-01-01

161

VITA-D: Cholecalciferol substitution in vitamin D deficient kidney transplant recipients: A randomized, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the post-transplant outcome  

PubMed Central

Background Vitamin D does not only regulate calcium homeostasis but also plays an important role as an immune modulator. It influences the immune system through the induction of immune shifts and regulatory cells resulting in immunologic tolerance. As such, vitamin D is thought to exert beneficial effects within the transplant setting, especially in kidney transplant recipients, considering the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in kidney transplant recipients. Methods/Design The VITA-D study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with two parallel groups including a total of 200 kidney transplant recipients, is designed to investigate the immunomodulatory and renoprotective effects of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) within the transplant setting. Kidney transplant recipients found to have vitamin D deficiency defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 < 50 nmol per liter will be randomly assigned to receive either oral cholecalciferol therapy or placebo and will be followed for one year. Cholecalciferol will be administered at a dose of 6800 International Units daily over a time period of one year. The objective is to evaluate the influence of vitamin D3 substitution in vitamin D deficient kidney transplant recipients on the post-transplant outcome. As a primary endpoint glomerular filtration rate calculated with the MDRD formula (modification of diet in renal disease) one year after kidney transplantation will be evaluated. Incidence of acute rejection episodes, and the number and severity of infections (analyzed by means of C-reactive protein) within the first year after transplantation will be monitored as well. As a secondary endpoint the influence of vitamin D3 on bone mineral density within the first year post-transplant will be assessed. Three DXA analyses will be performed, one within the first four weeks post-transplant, one five months and one twelve months after kidney transplantation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00752401

Thiem, Ursula; Heinze, Georg; Segel, Rudolf; Perkmann, Thomas; Kainberger, Franz; Muhlbacher, Ferdinand; Horl, Walter; Borchhardt, Kyra

2009-01-01

162

Posttransplant Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Other Autoimmune Cytopenias are Increased in Very Young Infants Undergoing Unrelated Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune cytopenias are a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), and are considered to be a feature of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). We report on a cohort of very young infants (?3 months of age) receiving HSCT from unrelated donor umbilical cord blood for genetic disorders who developed posttransplant autoimmune cytopenias at an increased rate compared to older aged controls. These infants received a conditioning regimen consisting of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin (ATG). All infants received HLA mismatched unrelated umbilical cord blood as graft source. GVHD prophylaxis was either cyclosporine + methylprednisolone (n = 16) or cyclosporine + mycophenolate mofetil (n =3). Engraftment, acute GVHD (aGVHD) and cGVHD, survival, treatment-related mortality (TRM), and deaths were evaluated. Ten patients developed cGVHD manifesting as autoimmune cytopenias at a median 247 days posttransplant with a cumulative incidence of 44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 21%–68%) and 56% (95% CI 32%–80%) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. In 6 of 10 patients developing autoimmune cytopenias, cGVHD presented as autoimmune cytopenia de novo. The cytopenias observed included anemia (n =4), thrombocytopenia (n =1), anemia with thrombocytopenia (n =3), and pancytopenia (n =2). No graft factors were identified as being significant to development of cGVHD. All patients responded to treatment with methylprednisolone, azithioprine ± rituximab. One patient required splenectomy. We hypothesize that posttransplant immunosuppression interferes with normal immune ontogeny creating immune dysregulation and graft directed cell destruction. Alternative strategies to prevent GVHD should be considered for this unique patient population.

Page, Kristin M.; Mendizabal, Adam M.; Prasad, Vinod K.; Martin, Paul L.; Parikh, Suhag; Wood, Susan; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Szabolcs, Paul; Kurtzberg, Joanne

2013-01-01

163

New Media for New OrgansA Virtual Community for Pediatric Post-Transplant Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes an eight-month pilot study in which 19 pediatric post-transplant patients at Children’s Hospital Boston, ages 11 to 15, used a computer-based psychosocial intervention developed on the Zora 3D multiuser environment. Zora provides tools to create an online virtual city and populate it with houses and personally-meaningful objects. Users can communicate with each other via real-time chat and

Marina U. Bers

2009-01-01

164

Mutation of FAS, XIAP, and UNC13D Genes in a Patient With a Complex Lymphoproliferative Phenotype.  

PubMed

This article presents a case report for a child presenting with mixed clinical features of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), and X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) disease. From 6 months, he exhibited splenomegaly and lymphoadenopathy and from 4 years, he showed recurrent severe autoimmune hemocytopenia and sepsislike bouts of fever, from which he eventually died at the age of 12. Intriguingly, the patient carried mutations in FAS, XIAP, and UNC13D genes, which are involved in ALPS, XLP disease, and FHL, respectively. These mutations were inherited from the mother, who had rheumatoid arthritis but no signs of ALPS. A role for other modifying genes was suggested by the finding that the healthy father exhibited defective Fas function, without mutation of the FAS gene, and had transmitted to the patient an osteopontin (OPN) gene variant previously associated with ALPS. Therefore, several genes might influence the disease outcome in this family. In vitro analyses revealed that the FAS and the XIAP mutations decreased expression of the corresponding proteins, and the UNC13D mutation decreased granule secretion and Munc interaction with Rab-27a. These findings suggest that overlap may exist between ALPS, FHL, and XLP disease, in accordance with the notion that FHL and XLP disease are due to defective natural killer (NK)/NK T-cell function, which involves Fas. Therefore, we propose that NK cell defects should be evaluated in patients with ALPS-like characteristics, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be considered in individuals with severe refractory cytopenia and FHL-like manifestations. PMID:24043286

Boggio, Elena; Aricň, Maurizio; Melensi, Matteo; Dianzani, Irma; Ramenghi, Ugo; Dianzani, Umberto; Chiocchetti, Annalisa

2013-09-16

165

Association of pre-transplant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent responsiveness with post-transplant outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background The role of pre-transplant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) responsiveness in affecting post-transplant outcomes is not clear. Methods Linking the 5-year patient data of a large dialysis organization to the ‘Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients’, we identified 8795 hemodialyzed patients who underwent first kidney transplantation. Mortality or graft failure, delayed graft function (DGF) and acute rejection risks were estimated by Cox regression [hazard ratio (HR)] and logistic regression, respectively. Results Patients were 48 ± 14 years old and included 38% women and 36% diabetics. Compared to renal allograft recipients who were in the first quartile of pre-transplant ESA responsiveness index (ERI), i.e. ESA dose divided by hemoglobin and weight, recipients in second, third and fourth quartiles had higher adjusted graft-censored death HR (and 95% confidence intervals) of 1.7 (1.0–2.7), 1.8 (1.1–2.9) and 2.3 (1.4–3.9) and higher death-censored graft failure HR of 1.6 (1.0–2.5), 2.0 (1.2–3.1) and 1.6 (0.9–2.6), respectively. No significant association between pre-transplant ERI and post-transplant DGF or acute rejection was detected. Conclusions Higher pre-transplant ERI during the hemodialysis treatment period was associated with worse post-transplant long-term outcomes including increased all-cause death and higher risk of graft failure.

Molnar, Miklos Z.; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Huang, Edmund; Krishnan, Mahesh; Nissenson, Allen R.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

2012-01-01

166

Post-transplant gastric antral vascular ectasia after intra-venous busulfan regimen.  

PubMed

Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is an angiodysplastic disorder that causes gastric bleeding. GAVE can develop as a complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT-GAVE), and it has been suggested that it may be associated with oral administration of busulfan. We report two cases of HSCT-GAVE after a conditioning regimen containing intra-venous busulfan (ivBu), not oral busulfan. The first case, a 42-year-old woman with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, underwent second allogeneic HSCT with conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and ivBu (12.8 mg/kg). HSCT-GAVE developed on day 84 post-transplant, and argon plasma coagulation (APC) was performed successfully. The second case, a 60-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia, underwent allogeneic HSCT with the conditioning regimen consisting of ivBu (12.8 mg/kg) and fludarabine (150 mg/kg). She developed melena and was diagnosed with GAVE by endoscopy on day 145 post-transplant. Although complete hemostasis was not achieved despite four administrations of APCs, the melena spontaneously terminated on day 235 post-transplant. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing HSCT-GAVE after ivBU-based HSCT. Although there is no established therapy for HSCT-GAVE, APC may be an option for HSCT-GAVE. PMID:23632949

Fukuda, Kuniyoshi; Kurita, Naoki; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiro; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Okoshi, Yasushi; Sugano, Masato; Chiba, Shigeru

2013-04-30

167

Atypical hydroa vacciniforme-like epstein-barr virus associated T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.  

PubMed

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell/natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-T/NK-LPDs) accompany severe chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) or comprise the CAEBV disease entity. The CAEBV disease entity has the common feature of lymphoproliferation of T or NK cells (primarily), and B cells (rarely), with chronic activation of EBV infection. The disease is rare and seems to be more prevalent in East Asian countries. The CAEBV disease entity encompasses heterogenous disorders, including hydroa vacciniforme (HV), hypersensitivity to mosquito bites, EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome, NK/T-cell lymphoma, and NK-cell leukemia. Atypical HV-like eruptions are present on sun-exposed and nonexposed areas with facial edema, fever, and hepatosplenomegaly, unlike classic HV. Recently, it has been suggested that classic HV and atypical HV-like eruptions are variants within the same disease spectrum of EBV-T/NK-LPD. We report a Korean boy with an atypical HV-like eruption and various systemic manifestations, including fever, sore throat, abdominal pain, headaches, seizures, and hematologic abnormalities for 2 years. After the initial mild eruption, which resembled a viral exanthem, ulceronecrotic skin lesions gradually developed and were associated with a high-grade fever and constitutional symptoms. He had a CAEBV infection, which showed a predominant proliferation of NK cells with high EBV DNA levels in the peripheral blood. However, in the skin lesions, there were nonneoplastic CD4 T-cell infiltrations predominantly showing a monoclonal T-cell receptor-? gene rearrangement and positive EBV in situ hybridization. PMID:23169419

Lee, Hye Young; Baek, Jin Ok; Lee, Jong Rok; Park, Sang Hui; Jeon, In Sang; Roh, Joo Young

2012-12-01

168

Posttransplant Complex Inferior Venacava Balloon Dilatation After Hepatic Vein Stenting  

SciTech Connect

Orthotopic and living related liver transplantation is an established mode of treatment of end-stage liver disease. One of the major causes of postoperative complications is vascular anastomotic stenosis. One such set of such complications relates to hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC), or portal vein stenosis, with a reported incidence of 1-3%. The incidence of vascular complications is reported to be higher in living donor versus cadaveric liver transplants. We encountered a patient with hepatic venous outflow tract obstruction, where the hepatic vein had been previously stented, but the patient continued to have symptoms due to additional IVC obstruction. The patient required double-balloon dilatation of the IVC simultaneously from the internal jugular vein and IVC.

Kohli, Vikas, E-mail: vkohli_md@yahoo.co [Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, Pediatric Cardiology and Congenital Cardiac Surgery Unit (India); Wadhawan, Manav [Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (India); Gupta, Subhash [Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, Department of Liver Transplant (India); Roy, Vipul [Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, Department of Cardiology (India)

2010-02-15

169

Plasmacytoma-like post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder confined to the renal allograft: a case report.  

PubMed

A 44-year-old woman who had end-stage kidney disease from diabetes and hypertension underwent a deceased donor kidney transplantation. Eighteen months after the transplantation she developed an abrupt increase in her creatinine level and a kidney biopsy specimen showed the presence of a plasma cell-rich infiltrate. A vast majority of the plasma cells were kappa (?) light chain restricted on in situ hybridization. ? and lambda (?) free light chain were elevated in her serum and so was the ?/? ratio. A bone marrow biopsy specimen showed no evidence of clonal plasmacytosis. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed hypermetabolic activity confined to the kidney. Prior to transplantation she was Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immunoglobulin (Ig)G-negative but had detectable EBV based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in her blood during this episode. Despite reduction in immunosuppression there was no change in the ?/? ratio and her renal function worsened. She underwent a transplant nephrectomy and her ?/? ratio became normal. Twenty-one months later she is lymphoma-free and doing well on dialysis. Plasmacytoma-like post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is rare and even more is the localization of the malignancy to the allograft. When reduction of immunosuppression is unsuccessful in treatment, removal of the organ may be necessary as is demonstrated in our case. PMID:24034051

Kuppachi, S; Naina, H V; Self, S; Fenning, R

2013-09-01

170

Adverse drug interactions as a high-risk factor for lethal post-transplant complications in Chinese population.  

PubMed

Metabolism of triazole antifungal agents is highly competitive to conventional post-transplant immunosuppressants like cyclosporine A (CsA) via the cytochrome P450-dependent pathway. We present the first report on lethal complications that may arise due to this type of drug interaction. A retrospective survey identified 10 of 104 cases (9.62%) that suffered life-threatening complications associated with the interaction between CsA and itraconazole or voriconazole following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) at our center. According to the close drug monitoring, all 10 patients experienced supratherapeutic levels of CsA even with a preemptive CsA dosage reduction and prompt dose adjustment. Six patients developed grade I to III acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and eventually died from either idiopathic pneumonia syndrome or diffuse alveolar hemorrhage; another four patients died from CSA-associated neurological complications. Impaired hepatic and renal function was noted in only one of these 10 cases. The high frequency as well as the unpredictability of severe complications lead us to suggest that triazole should always be replaced by another antifungal medication (e.g., amphotericin B or Echincandins) while patients receive CsA after HSCT, especially in the Chinese population. PMID:23294039

Yang, Ting; Wu, Xue Mei; Qiu, Hong Qiang; Fu, Dan Hui; Hu, Jian Da; Li, Jian; Zheng, Xiao Yun; Luo, Xiao Feng; Yuan, Xiao Hong; Chen, Ru Ling; Chen, Zhi Zhe

2013-01-07

171

Immunophenotyping of acute leukemia and lymphoproliferative disorders: a consensus proposal of the European LeukemiaNet Work Package 10.  

PubMed

The European LeukemiaNet (ELN), workpackage 10 (WP10) was designed to deal with diagnosis matters using morphology and immunophenotyping. This group aimed at establishing a consensus on the required reagents for proper immunophenotyping of acute leukemia and lymphoproliferative disorders. Animated discussions within WP10, together with the application of the Delphi method of proposals circulation, quickly led to post-consensual immunophenotyping panels for disorders on the ELN website. In this report, we established a comprehensive description of these panels, both mandatory and complementary, for both types of clinical conditions. The reason for using each marker, sustained by relevant literature information, is provided in detail. With the constant development of immunophenotyping techniques in flow cytometry and related software, this work aims at providing useful guidelines to perform the most pertinent exploration at diagnosis and for follow-up, with the best cost benefit in diseases, the treatment of which has a strong impact on health systems. PMID:21252983

Béné, M C; Nebe, T; Bettelheim, P; Buldini, B; Bumbea, H; Kern, W; Lacombe, F; Lemez, P; Marinov, I; Matutes, E; Maynadié, M; Oelschlagel, U; Orfao, A; Schabath, R; Solenthaler, M; Tschurtschenthaler, G; Vladareanu, A M; Zini, G; Faure, G C; Porwit, A

2011-01-21

172

Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

173

Interleukin-12 stimulation of lymphoproliferative responses in Trypanosoma cruzi infection  

PubMed Central

The cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) is essential for resistance to Trypanosoma cruzi infection because it stimulates the synthesis of interferon-? (IFN-?), a major activator of the parasiticidal effect of macrophages. A less studied property of IL-12 is its ability to amplify the proliferation of T or natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. We investigated the role of endogenously produced IL-12 in the maintenance of parasite antigen (T-Ag)-specific lymphoproliferative responses during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. We also studied whether treatment with recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12) would stimulate T-Ag-specific or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphoproliferation and abrogate the suppression that is characteristic of the acute phase of infection. Production of IL-12 by spleen-cell cultures during T. cruzi infection increased in the first days of infection (days 3–5) and decreased as infection progressed beyond day 7. The growth-promoting activity of endogenous IL-12 on T-Ag-specific proliferation was observed on day 5 of infection. Treatment of cultures with rIL-12 promoted a significant increase in Con A-stimulated proliferation by spleen cells from normal or infected mice. Enhanced T-Ag-specific proliferation by rIL-12 was seen in spleen cell cultures from infected mice providing that nitric oxide production was inhibited by treatment with the competitive inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (NMMA). Enhancement of proliferation promoted by IL-12 occurred in the presence of neutralizing anti-interleukin-2 (IL-2) antibody, suggesting that this activity of IL-12 was partly independent of endogenous IL-2. Thymidine incorporation levels achieved with rIL-12 treatment of the cultures were ? 50% of those stimulated by rIL-2 in the same cultures.

Galvao da Silva, Ana Paula; de Almeida Abrahamsohn, Ises

2001-01-01

174

Posttransplant donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies negatively impact pancreas transplantation outcome.  

PubMed

During a 9-year follow-up, 167 consecutive pancreas transplant recipients (152 simultaneous pancreas-kidney [SPK]) were followed for the detection of posttransplant anti-HLA antibodies. Forty patients (24%) developed anti-HLA antibodies, 26 (65%) had donor-specific antibodies (DSA; 61% anticlass 2) and 14 (35%) non-DSA (78.6% anticlass 1). More rejection episodes were observed in patients with positive anti-HLA antibodies than in patients without antibodies (42.5% vs. 11%; p = 0.001), with the highest incidence observed in DSA patients (53.8%). More severe rejections (according to rescue therapy) were observed in DSA patients compared to non-DSA (p < 0.05) or to negative patients (p < 0.001). Contrasting with the kidney, pancreas graft survival did not differ between patients with or without anti-HLA antibodies. On the contrary, pancreas and kidney survivals were significantly lower in DSA positive patients (75% for both organs) as compared to non-DSA positive patients (100% for pancreas and 92% for kidney) or to HLA-negative patients (91% for pancreas and 89% for kidney). Nontechnical pancreas and kidney graft failures were significantly higher in positive than in negative anti-HLA patients (32.5% vs. 11%; p < 0.01). Occurrence of posttransplant DSA was an independent risk factor for both pancreas and kidney survival (HR 3.2; p = 0.039) in diabetic transplant recipients. PMID:21906255

Cantarovich, D; De Amicis, S; Akl, A; Devys, A; Vistoli, F; Karam, G; Soulillou, J-P

2011-09-11

175

Methotrexate-Related Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorder—So-Called “Hodgkin-Like Lesion”—of the Oral Cavity in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients affected by autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, dermatomyositis) who are treated with methotrexate\\u000a (MTX) sometimes develop lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). In approximately 40% of reported cases, the affected sites have\\u000a been extranodal, and have included the gastrointestinal tract, skin, lung, kidney, and soft tissues. However, MTX-associated\\u000a LPD (MTX-LPD) is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 69-year-old

Kentaro Kikuchi; Yuji Miyazaki; Akio Tanaka; Hisao Shigematu; Masaru Kojima; Hideaki Sakashita; Kaoru Kusama

2010-01-01

176

[Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders].  

PubMed

This study was purposed to investigate the clinical characteristics of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPD) complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) so as to improve the understanding of this disease. The clinical characteristics, laboratory data, therapy and outcome of 14 patients suffering from B-CLPD complicated by AIHA were restrospectively analyzed in Wuxi People Hospital and the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from 2000 to 2012. The results showed that 9 cases of the 14 patients were patients with chronic lymplocytic leukemia (CLL), 5 cases were patients with lymphoma, at time of hemolysis the median level of hemoglobine was 61 (33 - 84)g/L, the median ratio of reticulocytes was 12.0 (3.1 - 35.0)%, the positive rate of Coombs test was 100%. 1 case received corticosteroid alone, 5 cases were treated with chemotherapy combined with corticosteroid, 8 cases were treated with immunochemotherapy rituximab combined with corticosteroid. Overall response rate was 100%, in which CR was 78.6% (11/14), PR was 21.4% (3/14). The follow-up for these patients were performed to now, 35.7% (5/14) patients relapsed with hemolysis again, but they showed therapeutic response to treatment with above-menthoned therapy. From patients treated with rituximab alone, only 1 patient relapsed. Among 14 patients, 6 cases died, 1 case was lost, the other cases are still alive. It is concluded that the AIHA is the commonest complication of B-CLPD, it can be observed at different stages of B-CLPD, the treatment with corticosteroids can give well therapeutic effect for these patients, but the long time CR is lower, the rituximab has been confirmed to be effective for B-CLPD complicated by AIHA. PMID:23815912

Zhuang, Yun; Fan, Lei; Shen, Yun-Feng; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong

2013-06-01

177

Effects of interferon alpha on autocrine growth factor loops in B lymphoproliferative disorders  

PubMed Central

The B lymphoproliferative disorders B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B- CLL) and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) produce a number of autocrine growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-1, all of which may induce positive feedback growth loops. If such malignancies depend on these autocrine growth loops for survival, their interruption may be therapeutically valuable. Interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) abrogates TNF- or IL-6-induced proliferation of HCL and B- CLL cells in vitro and has therapeutic activity in these diseases. We have investigated the possibility that IFN-alpha may act by interrupting autocrine growth factor loops. If purified B-CLL or HCL cells are cultured in the presence of TNF, there is induction of mRNA for TNF, IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6. However, culture in the presence of IFN-alpha in addition to TNF reduced the level of mRNA for all these cytokines, compared with cells cultured in TNF alone. While cytokine mRNA levels were diminished, levels of mRNA for the ribonuclease activator 2-5A synthetase were increased. Analysis of the kinetics of cytokine mRNA production showed that levels fall shortly after the rise of 2-5A synthetase mRNA. IFN-alpha may produce these effects by shortening the half-life of cytokine mRNA, since TNF mRNA half-life in B-CLL and HCL cells is substantially reduced when the cells are cultured with IFN-alpha. These data suggest that IFN-alpha may mediate its therapeutic effects in these malignancies by blocking autocrine growth factor loops.

1990-01-01

178

Risk for Lymphoma and the Results of Follow-up Gut Biopsies in Patients with Celiac Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... of Follow-up Gut Biopsies in Patients With Celiac Disease The full report is titled “Mucosal Healing and Risk for Lymphoproliferative Malignancy in Celiac Disease. A PopulationBased Cohort Study.” It is in the ...

179

The association of pretransplant ferritin level with waiting list and post-transplant survival. Does ferritin actually predict outcome?  

PubMed

Recent data suggest an association of serum ferritin (SF) with waiting list (WL) and postliver transplant (LT) outcomes. To assess the predictive capacity of SF on pre- and post-LT outcomes, and to identify whether recipient or donor liver siderosis is associated with post-LT survival; a retrospective analysis of 1079 patients assessed for first LT, 2000-2007 was performed. Iron deposition in the liver tissue was assessed using a semi-quantitative grading system. Median age was 54 (18-82) years and 67% were male. Seventeen per cent had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Median Model for End-stage Liver Disease MELD score was 14 (6-40), ferritin was 174 ?g/l (4-4597) with 36.5% had a SF ? ?g/l. Age (OR = 1.028) and MELD score (OR = 1.158) were independently associated with WL mortality (P < 0.001), whilst SF was not (P = NS). Age (OR = 1.018), HCC (OR = 1.542) and cold ischemia time (CIT) ? 10 h (OR = 1.418) were independently associated with post-LT survival (P < 0.05). Explant siderosis grade <2 was seen in 376 (71.7%) patients. Patients with explant siderosis grade ?2 had inferior 12-month post-LT survival (P = 0.030). Presence of graft siderosis (15.8% of patients) was not associated with survival. In conclusion, we found a limited role for SF as a prognostic indicator for pre- or post-transplant survival. PMID:24138201

Al-Freah, Mohammad A B; Kriese, Stephen; Foxton, Matthew R; Quaglia, Alberto; Bomford, Adrian; Heaton, Nigel D; O'Grady, John G; Agarwal, Kosh; Wendon, Julia A; Heneghan, Michael A

2013-11-01

180

Dossier: Rheumatoid arthritis Benign, atypical and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders in rheumatoid arthritis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lymphadenopathy, which may be associated with systemic symptoms, is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Reactive non- neoplastic tissue comprises the majority of the lymph node lesions. However, several cohort studies have demonstrated that RA has an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). Since the early 1990s, an atypical or malignant lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients immunosupressed with methtorexate (MTX)

M. Kojima; T. Motoori; S. Nakamura

2006-01-01

181

Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on methotrexate and rofecoxib: idiosyncratic reaction or pharmacogenetics?  

PubMed

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with altered immunoregulation and resulting in a deforming polyarthritis. Methotrexate (MTX) is a commonly used second line agent for RA, and there have been several recent reports of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated polyclonal B cell lymphoproliferative disorder in MTX-treated RA patients. The patient in this report had long standing RA treated with MTX and had recently begun taking a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor. She developed a febrile illness associated with severe pancytopenia and leukocytoclastic vasculitic rash followed by diffuse adenopathy, with serologic and pathologic evidence of EBV infection. Previous studies have demonstrated the interaction of MTX and a variety of non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with various clinical manifestations including acute renal failure, pancytopenia, vomiting, diarrhea, elevated liver transaminases, jaundice, mucosal ulcerations, and pyrexia. However, we have not identified previous reports suggesting interaction between MTX and COX-2 inhibitors. We hypothesize that decreased renal elimination of MTX induced by the COX-2 inhibitor resulted in enhanced hematopoietic toxicity and immunosuppression causing the EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:15595320

Vincent, Simi; Slease, R Bradley; Rocca, Peter V

2002-12-01

182

Association of Pretransplant Glycemic Control With Posttransplant Outcomes in Diabetic Kidney Transplant Recipients  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Observational studies have yielded inconsistent findings regarding the association of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) with survival in diabetic patients on dialysis. The association between pretransplant glycemic control and short- and long-term posttransplant outcomes in kidney transplant recipients is not clear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Linking the 5-year patient data of a large dialysis organization (DaVita) to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we identified 2,872 diabetic dialysis patients who underwent first kidney transplantation. Mortality or graft failure and delayed graft function (DGF) risks were estimated by Cox regression (hazard ratio [HR]) and logistic regression (odds ratio), respectively. RESULTS Patients were 53 ± 11 years old and included 36% women and 24% African Americans. In our fully adjusted model, allograft failure–censored, all-cause death HR and 95% CI for time-averaged pretransplant HbA1c categories of 7 to <8%, 8 to <9%, 9 to 10%, and ?10%, compared with 6 to <7% (reference), were 0.89 (0.59–1.36), 2.06 (1.31–3.24), 1.41 (0.73–2.74), and 3.43 (1.56–7.56), respectively; and graft failure–censored cardiovascular death HR was 0.38 (0.13–1.05), 1.78 (0.69–4.55), 1.59 (0.44–5.76), and 4.28 (0.85–21.64), respectively. We did not find any difference in risk of death-censored graft failure or DGF with different pretransplant HbA1c levels. CONCLUSIONS Poor pretransplant glycemic control appears associated with decreased posttransplant survival in kidney transplant recipients, whereas allograft outcomes may not be affected.

Molnar, Miklos Z.; Huang, Edmund; Hoshino, Junichi; Krishnan, Mahesh; Nissenson, Allen R.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

2011-01-01

183

Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genomics and Immunogenetics Use of genomics to identify QTL, genes, and proteins associated with resistance to Marek’s disease. Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the p...

184

Loss-of-function of the protein kinase C ? (PKC?) causes a B-cell lymphoproliferative syndrome in humans.  

PubMed

Defective lymphocyte apoptosis results in chronic lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly associated with autoimmune phenomena. The prototype for human apoptosis disorders is the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is caused by mutations in the FAS apoptotic pathway. Recently, patients with an ALPS-like disease called RAS-associated autoimmune leukoproliferative disorder, in which somatic mutations in NRAS or KRAS are found, also were described. Despite this progress, many patients with ALPS-like disease remain undefined genetically. We identified a homozygous, loss-of-function mutation in PRKCD (PKC?) in a patient who presented with chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, autoantibodies, elevated immunoglobulins and natural killer dysfunction associated with chronic, low-grade Epstein-Barr virus infection. This mutation markedly decreased protein expression and resulted in ex vivo B-cell hyperproliferation, a phenotype similar to that of the PKC? knockout mouse. Lymph nodes showed intense follicular hyperplasia, also mirroring the mouse model. Immunophenotyping of circulating lymphocytes demonstrated expansion of CD5+CD20+ B cells. Knockdown of PKC? in normal mononuclear cells recapitulated the B-cell hyperproliferative phenotype in vitro. Reconstitution of PKC? in patient-derived EBV-transformed B-cell lines partially restored phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced cell death. In summary, homozygous PRKCD mutation results in B-cell hyperproliferation and defective apoptosis with consequent lymphocyte accumulation and autoantibody production in humans, and disrupts natural killer cell function. PMID:23430113

Kuehn, Hye Sun; Niemela, Julie E; Rangel-Santos, Andreia; Zhang, Mingchang; Pittaluga, Stefania; Stoddard, Jennifer L; Hussey, Ashleigh A; Evbuomwan, Moses O; Priel, Debra A Long; Kuhns, Douglas B; Park, C Lucy; Fleisher, Thomas A; Uzel, Gulbu; Oliveira, Joăo B

2013-02-21

185

Waldenström's macroglobulinemia harbors a unique proteome where Ku70 is severely underexpressed as compared with other B-lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a clonal B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) of post-germinal center nature. Despite the fact that the precise molecular pathway(s) leading to WM remain(s) to be elucidated, a hallmark of the disease is the absence of the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we compared proteomic profiles of WM cells with that of other LPDs. We were able to demonstrate that WM constitutes a unique proteomic entity as compared with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and marginal zone lymphoma. Statistical comparisons of protein expression levels revealed that a few proteins are distinctly expressed in WM in comparison with other LPDs. In particular we observed a major downregulation of the double strand repair protein Ku70 (XRCC6); confirmed at both the protein and RNA levels in an independent cohort of patients. Hence, we define a distinctive proteomic profile for WM where the downregulation of Ku70-a component of the non homologous end-joining pathway-might be relevant in disease pathophysiology. PMID:22961060

Perrot, A; Pionneau, C; Azar, N; Baillou, C; Lemoine, F M; Leblond, V; Merle-Béral, H; Béné, M-C; Herbrecht, R; Bahram, S; Vallat, L

2012-09-07

186

Presence of the diffuse early antigen of Epstein-Barr virus in lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

The authors recently demonstrated that 40% of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated lymphoproliferative lesions contained lytic as well as latent EBV DNA. To examine more fully the replicative state of EBV in these disorders, the authors studied protein extracts of EBV-associated lymphoid lesions from 13 patients, most of whom were immunosuppressed, for expression of the diffuse early antigen (EA-D) of EBV, by immunoblotting techniques. The reagent used was a mouse monoclonal antibody. Seven of thirteen samples (54%) contained EA-D. These data indicate that in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative lesions, lytic viral replication occurs frequently, manifested by the presence of EBV diffuse early antigen as well as by the presence of lytic EBV DNA replication. PMID:1316087

Katz, B Z; Saini, U

1992-05-01

187

Successful treatment of a classic Hodgkin lymphoma-type post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with tailored chemotherapy and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in a pediatric heart transplant recipient.  

PubMed

CHL type is the least common major form of EBV-related PTLD but rarely occurs in pediatric recipients; development of CHL subsequent to other PTLD subtypes in the same transplant recipient is even more unusual. Because of its rarity, indications on the best treatment strategy are limited. Patients have been mostly treated with standard HL chemotherapy/radiotherapy, and prognosis seems more favorable than other monomorphic PTLDs. Herein, we describe a pediatric case of EBV-associated, stage IV-B, CHL arising in a heart allograft recipient eight yr after diagnosis of B-cell polymorphic PTLD. The patient was successfully treated with adjusted-dose HL chemotherapy and autologous EBV-specific CTL, without discontinuation of maintenance immunosuppression. At two yr from therapy completion, the patient is in CR with stable organ function. With this strategy, it may be possible to reproduce the good prognostic data reported for CHL-type PTLD, with decreased risk of organ toxicity or rejection. PMID:23992468

Basso, Sabrina; Zecca, Marco; Calafiore, Lucia; Rubert, Laura; Fiocchi, Roberto; Paulli, Marco; Quartuccio, Giuseppe; Guido, Ilaria; Sebastiani, Roberta; Croci, Giorgio Alberto; Beschi, Claudia; Nardiello, Ida; Ginevri, Fabrizio; Cugno, Chiara; Comoli, Patrizia

2013-09-01

188

T-cell-rich lymphoproliferative disorders. Morphologic and immunologic differential diagnoses.  

PubMed

To differentiate peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL), the authors evaluated the results of T11 monoclonal antibody studies on consecutive cell suspensions prepared from 509 lymph nodes from various lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD). They used T11 (CD2) positivity to identify those LPD in which the content of T cells was high. There were 266 (52%) cell suspensions which contained more than 50% T11-positive cells. More than 75% of the following non-Hodgkin's lymphomas had over 50% T11-positive cells: diffuse mixed cell (DM), diffuse atypical poorly differentiated lymphocytic and lymphoblastic lymphomas; mycosis fungoides; and true histiocytic lymphoma. Eleven cell suspensions had more than 90% T11-positive cells; four were involved by B-cell lymphomas. The cell suspensions prepared from nine of 14 diffuse large cell lymphomas of the T-cell type had more than 50% T11-positive cells. Of these, three of five cases of the polymorphous subtype had fewer than 50% T11 cells, but six of seven lymph nodes of the clear-cell type had more than 50% T11-positive cells. Each of seven DM samples of the T-cell type contained over 50% T11 cells; none had a polymorphous appearance. In the 112 cases of reactive LPD studied, more than 75% of cases of necrotizing lymphadenitis, dermatopathic lymphadenitis, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and those with lymph nodes with no specific reactive pattern had more than 50% T11-positive cells. The authors' findings indicate that T11 positivity is a reliable T-cell marker in reactive and neoplastic LPD except for those cases of PTCL with a polymorphous appearance; these tend to lose T11-expression. A multi-parameter diagnostic approach is required in the following LPD: (1) PTCL which are T11-negative; (2) PTCL of small lymphocytic type having an unremarkable T-cell phenotype; (3) SIg-negative B-cell lymphomas which are rich in nonneoplastic T cells; (4) non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with minimal disease which are rich in reactive T cells; and (5) polymorphous large cell proliferations. PMID:2901904

Winberg, C D; Sheibani, K; Burke, J S; Wu, A; Rappaport, H

1988-10-15

189

Novel Fas (CD95\\/APO1) mutations in infants with a lymphoproliferative disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fas is an apoptosis-signaling receptor important for homeostasis of the immune system. In this study, Fas-mediated apoptosis and Fas mutations were analyzed in three Japanese children from two families with a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia and an increase in TCRabFCD4- CD8- T cells. Apoptosis induced by anti-Fas mAb was defective in both activated T cells and

Yoshihito Kasahara; Taizo Wada; Yo Niida; Akihiro Yachie; Hidetoshi Seki; Yasushi Ishida; Tsuyoshi Sakai; Fumitomo Koizumi; Shoichi Koizumi; Toshio Miyawaki; Noboru Taniguchi

1998-01-01

190

Benign, atypical and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders in rheumatoid arthritis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lymphadenopathy, which may be associated with systemic symptoms, is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Reactive non-neoplastic tissue comprises the majority of the lymph node lesions. However, several cohort studies have demonstrated that RA has an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). Since the early 1990s, an atypical or malignant lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients immunosupressed with methtorexate (MTX) therapy

M. Kojima; T. Motoori; S. Nakamura

2006-01-01

191

Effects of oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

Pretherapy sperm cryopreservation in young men is currently included in good clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to outline the effects of different oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders, based on an 8-year experience of the Cryopreservation Centre of a large public hospital. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with testicular neoplasia and 219 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and pretherapy semen cryopreservation were evaluated. Sperm and hormonal parameters (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, inhibin B levels) were assessed prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months after the end of cancer treatment. At the time of sperm collection, baseline FSH level and sperm concentration were impaired to a greater extent in patients with malignant testicular neoplasias than in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Toxic effects on spermatogenesis were still evident at 6 and 12 months after the end of cancer therapies, while an improvement of seminal parameters was observed after 18 months. In conclusion, an overall increase in sperm concentration was recorded about 18 months after the end of cancer treatments in the majority of patients, even if it was not possible to predict the evolution of each single case 'a priori'. For this reason, pretherapy semen cryopreservation should be considered in all young cancer patients. PMID:23542137

Di Bisceglie, Cataldo; Bertagna, Angela; Composto, Emanuela R; Lanfranco, Fabio; Baldi, Matteo; Motta, Giovanna; Barberis, Anna M; Napolitano, Emanuela; Castellano, Elena; Manieri, Chiara

2013-04-01

192

Effects of oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders  

PubMed Central

Pretherapy sperm cryopreservation in young men is currently included in good clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to outline the effects of different oncological treatments on semen quality in patients with testicular neoplasia or lymphoproliferative disorders, based on an 8-year experience of the Cryopreservation Centre of a large public hospital. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with testicular neoplasia and 219 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders who underwent chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and pretherapy semen cryopreservation were evaluated. Sperm and hormonal parameters (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, inhibin B levels) were assessed prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months after the end of cancer treatment. At the time of sperm collection, baseline FSH level and sperm concentration were impaired to a greater extent in patients with malignant testicular neoplasias than in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. Toxic effects on spermatogenesis were still evident at 6 and 12 months after the end of cancer therapies, while an improvement of seminal parameters was observed after 18 months. In conclusion, an overall increase in sperm concentration was recorded about 18 months after the end of cancer treatments in the majority of patients, even if it was not possible to predict the evolution of each single case ‘a priori'. For this reason, pretherapy semen cryopreservation should be considered in all young cancer patients.

Di Bisceglie, Cataldo; Bertagna, Angela; Composto, Emanuela R; Lanfranco, Fabio; Baldi, Matteo; Motta, Giovanna; Barberis, Anna M; Napolitano, Emanuela; Castellano, Elena; Manieri, Chiara

2013-01-01

193

Impact of the donor body mass index on the survival of pediatric liver transplant recipients and post-transplant obesity.  

PubMed

In adult liver transplant recipients, the donor body mass index (dBMI) is associated with posttransplant obesity but not with graft or patient survival. Because of the obesity epidemic in the United States and the already limited supply of liver donors, clarifying whether the dBMI affects pediatric outcomes is important. United Network for Organ Sharing data for pediatric liver transplants in the United States (1990-2010) were evaluated. Data on transplants performed between 2004 and 2010 (n = 3788) were used for survival analyses with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models and for posttransplant obesity analyses with generalized estimating equations. For children receiving adult donor livers, a dBMI of 25 to <35 kg/m(2) was not associated with graft or patient survival in univariate or multivariate analyses. A dBMI ? 35 kg/m(2) increased the risk of graft loss [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.29-5.01, P = 0.007] and death (HR = 3.56, 95% CI = 1.64-7.72, P = 0.001). For pediatric donors, the dBMI was not associated with graft loss or mortality in a univariate or multivariate analysis. An overweight or obese donor was not a risk factor for posttransplant obesity. Overweight and obesity are common among liver transplant donors. This analysis suggests that for adult donors, a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to <35 kg/m(2) should not by itself be a contraindication to liver donation. Severe obesity (BMI ? 35 kg/m(2)) in adult donors increased the risk of graft loss and mortality, even after adjustments for recipient, donor, and transplant risk factors. Posttransplant obesity was not associated with the dBMI in this analysis. Further research is needed to clarify the impact of donor obesity on pediatric liver transplant recipients. PMID:22467594

Perito, Emily Rothbaum; Rhee, Sue; Glidden, Dave; Roberts, John Paul; Rosenthal, Philip

2012-08-01

194

Hematopoietic progenitor cells from allogeneic bone marrow transplant donors circulate in the very early post-transplant period  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the therapeutic efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT), circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells after bone marrow transplantation have not been well characterized. In the present study, we focused on these ‘post-transplant circulating progenitor cells (PTCPC)’ which may be on their way to bone marrow. We analyzed the number of myeloid progenitor cells (CFU-GM) per 10 ml of peripheral blood

Y Katayama; N Mahmut; H Takimoto; Y Maeda; T Yano; K Kojima; T Azuma; M Hara; K Imajyo; S Takahashi; T Kai; Y Ohno; T Miyamoto; K Nagafuji; K Matsue; K Takenaka; T Teshima; K Shinagawa; F Ishimaru; E Omoto; M Harada

1999-01-01

195

A COMPREHENSIVE SCREEN FOR MAREK'S DISEASE VIRUS CHICKEN PROTEIN INTERACTIONS TO IDENTIFY DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens and an estimated $1 billion problem annually to the worldwide poultry industry. The causative agent is the Marek's disease virus (MDV), a ubiquitous herpesvirus. Vaccines limit tumor incidence but do not block MDV replication and sp...

196

Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genomics and Immunogenetics Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the poultry industry. The fear of MD is further enhanced by unpredictable vaccine breaks that result in ...

197

Marek's disease virus induced transient paralysis--a closer look  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek’s Disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include depression, crippling, weight loss, and transient paralysis (TP). TP is a disease of the central nervous system...

198

Primary cutaneous CD30 positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders with aberrant expression of PAX5: report of three cases.  

PubMed

Accurate diagnosis of lymphoma includes the assessment of lineage-specific markers. Hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues express PAX5 exclusively in pro-B-cell to mature B-cell stages. However, some mature PAX5+ T-cell lymphomas have been reported. We report three cases of primary cutaneous CD30+ T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) with PAX5 expression: one cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and two cases of lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP). The three patients were 26 years old and female, 75 years old and female, and 65 years old and male. In all cases, Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg-like large lymphoid cells were present, positive for CD30, fascin, and PAX5, and negative for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD45RO, CD56, cytotoxic markers, and Epstein-Barr virus. The ALCL was accompanied by lymphadenopathy; the patient died of progressive disease 5 months after diagnosis. The LyP cases were localized in the skin with spontaneous regression. One case was diagnosed during pregnancy, transformed to ALCL, and ended in death 32 months after diagnosis despite multi-agent chemotherapy. This study is the first to address the clinical significance of PAX5+ primary cutaneous CD30+ T-cell LPDs. These cases were distinct regarding PAX5 expression and a relatively aggressive clinical course versus conventional primary cutaneous CD30+ T-cell LPDs. PMID:22449230

Hagiwara, Masahiro; Tomita, Akihiro; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Yoshino, Tadashi; Tomita, Yasushi; Nakamura, Shigeo

2012-01-30

199

Characteristics and prognosis of lymphoproliferative disorders post-renal transplantation in living versus deceased donor allograft recipients.  

PubMed

In this study, we compared the features and prognosis of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) occurring in living donor recipients with those of deceased donor kidney transplant patients. A comprehensive search was performed for finding studies reporting data of PTLD in living and deceased donor renal recipients in the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines. Finally, international data from 14 different studies were included in the analysis. Overall, 122 renal recipients with PTLD were entered into this analysis. Chi square test showed that renal recipients from living donors significantly less frequently represented any remission episodes during the course of their disease (41% vs. 63%, respectively; P = 0.05). Living donor renal recipients were significantly more likely to develop metastasis in comparison with deceased donor recipients (64% vs. 23%, respectively; P = 0.035). Histopathological evaluations were comparable between the two patient groups. Survival analysis did not show any difference between the patient groups, even when patients were adjusted for the type of immuno-suppression. The mortality rate of the transplant patients with PTLD was 55.3% and the 1- and 5-year patients survival rates were 50% and 37%, respectively, for the deceased donor renal recipients compared with 60% and 34%, respectively, for the living donors group. We conclude that living donor kidney transplant recipients who develop PTLD have a higher rate of metastasis and a lower rate of remission episodes. Further prospective studies with a large patient population are needed to confirm our results. PMID:24029253

Khedmat, Hossein; Taheri, Saeed

2013-09-01

200

Primary mediastinal Castleman's disease  

PubMed Central

Castleman's disease is a rare entity with an unknown etiology which was first described by Castleman in 1954. It is a lymphoproliferative disorder histologically classified into three types; hyaline-vascular, plasma cell type and mixed type. It might be localized or multicentric and usually involves the mediastinum. We report a case of Castleman's disease discovered accidentally in a case of blunt chest trauma which caused a challenging diagnostic process and management.

Regal, Mohamed A.H; Aljehani, Yasser M; Bousbait, Hanan

2010-01-01

201

The systemic distribution of Epstein-Barr virus genomes in fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders. An in situ hybridization study.  

PubMed Central

The systemic distribution of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes was studied in paraffin-embedded tissues from 12 fatal cases of Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), using an in situ hybridization technique employing an alpha-35S-dCTP-radiolabeled BamHI-W fragment of EBV DNA. The presence of EBV was documented in various PTLD-involved organs. The hybridization signal for the virus localized predominantly in the abnormal lymphoid cells, but signals also were detected in hepatocytes and/or adrenal cortical cells in five cases. The distribution of autoradiographic label within the lymphoid cells was focal and its intensity varied from field to field suggesting a nonuniformity of the viral genomic load in the infected tissues. Recruitment of EBV genome-bearing cells was not observed into inflammatory mononuclear infiltrates found in organs without histopathologic evidence of PTLD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4

Randhawa, P. S.; Jaffe, R.; Demetris, A. J.; Nalesnik, M.; Starzl, T. E.; Chen, Y. Y.; Weiss, L. M.

1991-01-01

202

Validation of Cytomegalovirus Immune Competence Assays for the Characterization of CD8+ T Cell Responses Posttransplant  

PubMed Central

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most important infectious complications of transplantation. Monitoring CMV-specific CD8 T cell immunity is useful for predicting active CMV infection and for directing targeted antiviral therapy. In this study, we examined four basic parameters for validation of CMV-specific tetramer staining and peptide stimulation assays that cover five most frequent HLA class I alleles. We also examined the potential use of CMV-specific CD8+ T cell numbers and functional and cytolytic responses in two autologous HSCT recipients treated for multiple myeloma. The coefficient of variation (CV %) of the precision within assays was 3.1?24% for HLA-tetramer staining, 2.5?47% for IFN-?, and 3.4?59.7% for CD107a/b production upon peptide stimulation. The precision between assays was 5?26% for tetramer staining, 4?24% for IFN-?, and 5?48% for CD107a/b. The limit of detection was 0.1?0.23 cells/?L of blood for tetramer staining, 0?0.23 cell/?L for IFN-?, and 0.11?0.98 cells/?L for CD107a/b. The assays were linear and specific. The reference interval with 95% confidence level was 0?18 cells/?L for tetramer staining, 0?2 cells/?L for IFN-?, and 0–3 cells/?L for CD107a/b. Our results provide acceptable measures of test performance for CMV immune competence assays for the characterization of CD8+ T cell responses posttransplant measured in the absolute cell count per ?L of blood.

Ravkov, Eugene V.; Pavlov, Igor Y.; Hanson, Kimberly E.; Delgado, Julio C.

2012-01-01

203

Mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferations of the head and neck show a clinicopathologic spectrum similar to cutaneous CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are classified as cutaneous (primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis) or systemic. As extent of disease dictates prognosis and treatment, patients with skin involvement need clinical staging to determine whether systemic lymphoma also is present. Similar processes may involve mucosal sites of the head and neck, constituting a spectrum that includes both neoplasms and reactive conditions (eg, traumatic ulcerative granuloma with stromal eosinophilia). However, no standard classification exists for mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferations. To improve our understanding of these processes, we identified 15 such patients and examined clinical presentation, treatment and outcome, morphology, phenotype using immunohistochemistry, and genetics using gene rearrangement studies and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The 15 patients (11 M, 4 F; mean age, 57 years) had disease involving the oral cavity/lip/tongue (9), orbit/conjunctiva (3) or nasal cavity/sinuses (3). Of 14 patients with staging data, 7 had mucosal disease only; 2 had mucocutaneous disease; and 5 had systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Patients with mucosal or mucocutaneous disease only had a favorable prognosis and none developed systemic spread (follow-up, 4-93 months). Three of five patients with systemic disease died of lymphoma after 1-48 months. Morphologic and phenotypic features were similar regardless of extent of disease. One anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive case was associated with systemic disease. Two cases had rearrangements of the DUSP22-IRF4 locus on chromosome 6p25.3, seen most frequently in primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Our findings suggest mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferations share features with cutaneous CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and require clinical staging for stratification into primary and secondary types. Primary cases have clinicopathologic features closer to primary cutaneous disease than to systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma, including indolent clinical behavior. Understanding the spectrum of mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferations is important to avoid possible overtreatment resulting from a diagnosis of overt T-cell lymphoma. PMID:22388754

Sciallis, Andrew P; Law, Mark E; Inwards, David J; McClure, Rebecca F; Macon, William R; Kurtin, Paul J; Dogan, Ahmet; Feldman, Andrew L

2012-03-02

204

[Chronic HBV infection in patients with lymphoproliferative syndromes].  

PubMed

Treatment of patients with neoplastic diseases of the lymphatic or lymphoreticular system and HBV infection can lead to reactivation of viral infection. Assessment of HBs antigen among this group is insufficient for the diagnosis of chronic HBV infection. Current research suggests the necessity of determining anti-HBc, antiHBs and HBV-DNA. Elimination of HBV as well as the influence of the virus on hepatocytes is associated with increased inflammatory and necrotic changes in the liver. Understandable, therefore, becomes a possibility of significant damage to hepatocytes caused by HBV during chemoimmunotherapy. Ofparticular importance in the reactivation of HBV are glicocorticosteroids acting as suppressants of the immune system and rituximab activating B cell apoptosis. Reactivation of HBV may occur in more than 60% of patients with positive HBs antigen and in approximately 50% of patients without HBsAg. Early therapy with nucleo(z)tide analogues significantly reduces the incidence ofHBV reactivation. PMID:22708294

?api?ski, Tadeusz Wojciech; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Ostapczuk, Anna; Flisiak, Robert

2012-01-01

205

Co-existence of acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia and Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease mediated by inflammatory processes mainly at the joints. Recently, awareness of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (T-LPD) has been heightened for its association with methotraxate usage in RA patients. In the contrary, acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia (AML-MLD) has never been documented to be present concomitantly with the above two conditions. In this report we present a case of an autopsy-proven co-existence of AML-MLD and EBV-associated T-LPD in a patient with RA.

Tokuhira, Michihide; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nemoto, Tomoe; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kameda, Hideto; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

2009-01-01

206

Cervical Castleman's disease: imaging findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Castleman's disease, a lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology, rarely causes a neck mass and may mimic granulomatous,\\u000a inflammatory and metastatic lymph nodes, or lymphoma with its nonspecific imaging findings. Definitive diagnosis and treatment\\u000a is possible with complete surgical resection. Imaging findings of a case with Castleman's disease detected during multinodular\\u000a goiter surgery and later verified through excisional biopsy are

A. Poyanli; F. A. Genç; S. Sencer; H. Yanar; Y. Kapran

2000-01-01

207

Plasmablastic transformation of low-grade CD5+ B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with MYC gene rearrangements.  

PubMed

Plasmablastic transformation of low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is rarely reported, particularly in cases with clonal evolution. Moreover, the relationship of these 2 morphologically and immunophenotypically distinctive neoplasms remains elusive. Here, we report 2 exceptional cases of plasmablastic transformation with apparently direct transformation from their preceding low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. In both cases, the plasmablastic transformation and low-grade lymphoproliferative disorder shared the same immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements and an identical chromosomal translocation. Notably, both plasmablastic transformation cases also carried MYC gene rearrangements on chromosome 8q24, which have been frequently identified in de novo plasmablastic lymphoma. Therefore, our data suggest that dysregulation of MYC gene may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of plasmablastic transformation. PMID:23791008

Pan, Zenggang; Xie, Qingmei; Repertinger, Susan; Richendollar, Bill G; Chan, Wing C; Huang, Qin

2013-06-20

208

Castleman disease: a case with atypical presentation.  

PubMed

Castleman disease is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by enlarged lymph nodes. In children the disease is rare, usually localized, and asymptomatic. Resection of the node is almost always curative. A case is reported that was diagnosed as hyaline vascular-type Castleman disease at 1 year of age. The disease recurred from infraclavicular region in addition to primary site, even though total excision was performed. Although the disease is mullticentric after recurrence, the patient has no systemic symptoms. PMID:15202159

Yaris, Nilgün; Cakir, Murat; Kalyoncu, Mukaddes; Yildiz, Kadriye; Okten, Aysenur

209

Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus in egyptian patients with chronic lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

Background. Occult hepatitis C virus infection (OCI) was identified as a new form of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), characterized by undetectable HCV antibodies and HCV RNA in serum, while HCV RNA is detectable in liver and peripheral blood cells only. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of OCI in Egyptian patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) and to compare its prevalence with that of HCV in those patients. Subjects and Methods. The current study included 100 subjects, 50 of them were newly diagnosed cases having different lymphoproliferative disorders (patients group), and 50 were apparently healthy volunteers (controls group). HCV antibodies were detected by ELISA, HCV RNA was detected in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR), and HCV genotype was detected by INNO-LiPA. Results. OCI was detected in 20% of patients group, compared to only 4% OCI in controls group. HCV was detected in 26% of patients group with a slightly higher prevalence. There was a male predominance in both HCV and OCI. All HCV positive patients were genotype 4. Conclusion. Our data revealed occurrence of occult HCV infection in Egyptian LPD patients at a prevalence of 20% compared to 26% of HCV. PMID:23304473

Youssef, Samar Samir; Nasr, Aml S; El Zanaty, Taher; El Rawi, Rasha Sayed; Mattar, Mervat M

2012-12-12

210

Lymphocyte markers and clinical expression of lymphoproliferative disorders with moderate lymphocytosis.  

PubMed Central

Lymphoproliferative syndrome with well differentiated lymphocytes and moderate lymphocytosis in the peripheral blood includes a heterogeneous group of disorders, that present often difficulties in classification. We have studied the lymphocyte markers (ER, EMR, sIg and T3, T4, T8 antigens) in 36 cases who had lymphocytic infiltration in the bone marrow and peripheral lymphocyte counts less than 15 X 10(9) l-1. Four cases (11.1%) had the characteristics of T8 lymphocytosis and 31 had a B cell monoclonal proliferation in the peripheral blood. Of these, four were sIg-, EMR+, 19 were sIg+, EMR+ and 8 were sIg+, EMR-. Most patients (17/32) had the clinical picture of stage 0 and I B-CLL. Six cases presented as pure splenomegalic form of CLL, three had the features of immunocytic lymphoma and five had the features of lymphocytic lymphoma. It is concluded that the majority of lymphoproliferative disorders presenting with moderate lymphocytosis represent early forms of B-CLL. Occasionally cases of lymphocytic or immunocytic lymphoma may present problems of differential diagnosis since there may be a dissociation of phenotypic characteristics of lymphocytes between tissues and peripheral blood.

Economidou, J.; Choremi, H.; Konstantinidou, N.; Kofina, A.; Psarra, K.; Stefanoudaki, K.; Papayannis, A.; Economopoulos, F.; Dervenoulas, J.; Vlachos, J.

1986-01-01

211

Post-transplant increase in soluble human leukocyte antigen-G associated with non-severe cardiac allograft vasculopathy.  

PubMed

Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is the single most important long-term limitation to heart transplantation. This study aimed to assess the value of monitoring soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G) during the first year post-transplantation to predict the severity of CAV, in 21 out of 77 heart recipients assessed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Serum sHLA-G concentration increased after transplant in recipients free of severe CAV, but decreased in recipients suffering from severe CAV, significant differences between these two groups were found 6 to 12 months post-transplantation. The optimal value of the change in post-transplant sHLA-G for identifying severe CAV was ?0.062%, which maximized sensitivity (80%) and specificity (100%). Importantly, increases in post-transplant sHLA-G were inversely associated with severe CAV, but directly associated with human cytomegalovirus reactivation. In addition, recipients presenting non-severe CAV or an increased sHLA-G post-transplantation, showed higher numbers of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells and a down-modulation of CD28 on CD4(+) lymphocytes, which typically identifies CD8(+) regulatory T cells and anergic/tolerogenic T helper cells, respectively. In conclusion, quantification of sHLA-G might offer a complementary non-invasive method for identifying recipients at risk of more severe CAV and who might benefit from earlier preventive therapies, although these results need to be confirmed in larger series. PMID:23247208

Blanco-García, R M; López-Álvarez, M R; Garrido, I P; Salgado-Cecilia, G; Campillo, J A; Bolarín, J M; Gimeno, L; Muro, M; García-Alonso, A M; Martínez-Sánchez, M V; Bernardo Pisa, M V; Soriano-Díaz, S; Pascual-Figal, D A; Alvarez-López, M R; Minguela, A

2012-12-14

212

Temporal transcriptome changes induced by MDV in Marek's disease-resistant and -susceptible inbred chickens  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Mareks disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV) and characterized by T cell lymphoma and infiltration of lymphoid cells into various organs such as liver, spleen, peripheral nerves and muscle. Resistance to MD and disease risk have long been tho...

213

Genome-wide identification of host genes directly regulated by Marek's disease virus (MDV) oncoprotein Meq  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek's disease (MD) is a contagious lymphoproliferative and neurotropic disease of poultry caused by the Marek's disease virus (MDV), an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus. Despite the use of vaccines, field strains of MDV continue to evolve resulting in unpredictable disease outbreaks. Therefore, understa...

214

Targeting Marek's disease virus by RNA interference delivered from a herpesvirus vaccine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Live attenuated herpesvirus vaccines such as herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) have been used since 1970 for the control of Marek's disease (MD), a highly infectious lymphoproliferative disease of poultry. Despite the success of these vaccines in reducing losses from the disease, Marek's disease virus (MDV) strains have shown a continuing increase in virulence, presumably due to the inability of the

Luke S. Lambeth; Yuguang Zhao; Lorraine P. Smith; Lydia Kgosana; Venugopal Nair

2009-01-01

215

Immuno-histological diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases by selected combinations of antisera and monoclonal antibodies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue sections of frozen biopsy specimens obtained from normal and hyperplastic human lymphoid tissues, 33 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas as well as various forms of immunoregulatory disorders (angioimmunoblastic and dermatopathic lymphadenopathy) were analysed in immunofluorescence tests (using red TRITC and green FITC double-labelling). A panel of antisera including well-characterized conventional reagents to immunoglobulin classes, T lymphoid and Ia-like antigens, and

G Janossy; J A Thomas; G Pizzolo; S M Granger; J McLaughlin; J A Habeshaw; A G Stansfeld; J Sloane

1980-01-01

216

Development of Lymphoproliferative Diseases by Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1alpha Is Associated with Prolonged Lymphocyte Survival  

PubMed Central

Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1 alpha) plays an essential role in the regulation of various genes associated with low oxygen consumption. Elevated expression of HIF-1alpha has been reported to be associated with tumor progression, invasion and metastasis in many cancers. To investigate the role of HIF-1alpha in tumor development and metastasis, we established transgenic mice constitutively expressing HIF1A gene under regulation of the cytomegalovirus gene promoter. Although HIF-1alpha protein levels varied among organs, expression of HIF1A mRNA in most organs gradually increased in an age-dependent manner. The transgenic mice showed no gross morphological abnormality up to 8 weeks after birth, although they subsequently developed tumors in the lymphoid, lung, and breast; the most prominent tumor was lymphoma appearing in the intestinal mucosa and intra-mesenchymal tissues. The prevalence of tumors reached 80% in 13 months after birth. The constitution of lymphocyte populations in the transgenic mice did not differ from that in wild-type mice. However, lymphocytes of the transgenic mice revealed prolonged survival under long-term culture conditions and revealed increased resistance to cytotoxic etoposide. These results suggest that HIF-1alpha itself is not oncogenic but it may play an important role in lymphomagenesis mediated through the prolonged survival of lymphocytes in this transgenic mouse model.

Sueoka, Eisaburo; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Ide, Masaru; Nakamura, Hideaki; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Taya, Choji; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Kitagawa, Tomoyuki; Kubota, Yasushi; Kimura, Shinya; Nakachi, Kei; Tanimoto, Keiji

2013-01-01

217

Aromatase-deficient mice spontaneously develop a lymphoproliferative autoimmune disease resembling Sjögren's syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an incurable, autoimmune exocrinopathy that predominantly affects females and whose pathogenesis remains unknown. Like rheumatoid arthritis, its severity increases after menopause, and estrogen deficiency has been implicated. We have reported that estrogen receptor- and --knockout mice develop autoimmune nephritis and myeloid leukemia, respectively, but neither develops SS. One model of estrogen deficiency in rodents is the

Gil-Jin Shim; Margaret Warner; Hyun-Jin Kim; Sandra Andersson; Lining Liu; Jenny Ekman; Otabek Imamov; Margaret E. Jones; Evan R. Simpson; Jan-Ĺke Gustafsson

2004-01-01

218

Association of the lymphoproliferative disease inducer gene Arp with autoimmunity and resistance to tumour growth.  

PubMed Central

This report describes a biological role for the diallelic gene system, Arpa and Arpb, which codes for surface antigens on murine lymphocytes and tumour cells. Arpb is present only in a mutant strain of BALB/c which is designated BALB/c-Arpb. Normal BALB/c and all other strains of mice tested express Arpa. Cross immunizations between BALB/c and BALB/c-Arpb generated autoantibodies and autoreactive cytostatic effector cells which recognize Arp-encoded determinants on normal and tumour cells. The latter expressed quantitatively more Arp encoded products than normal cells as indicated by increased binding of autoantibodies and susceptibility to cytostasis. The anti-tumour response generated by Arp-incompatible immunizations resulted in increased resistance to challenge with syngeneic tumour cells and in some cases total suppression of tumour growth. BALB/c-Arpb mice were inherently different from BALB/c in that they generated H-2 unrestricted cytostatic effectors, produced higher levels of autoantibodies on immunization and survived longer than normal BALB/c when challenged with 10(5) Meth. A tumour cells. The role of the Arp gene in tumour immunity is discussed.

Matossian-Rogers, A

1985-01-01

219

[Clinical usefulness of the immunophenotypic study of circulating lymphocytes in leukemic lymphoproliferative diseases].  

PubMed

The immunophenotypes (IF) on peripheral lymphocytes of 24 B-CLL in different stage, 2 PLL and 14 leukemic B-non Hodgkin lymphomas were investigated. As regard to B-CLL and PLL, the results are similar to those reported so far. In stage A and B of B-CLL the IF appear less variable than in advanced stages where a decrease of CD21+ and an increase of both CD25+ and CD38+ lymphocytes were observed. In the lymphocytic, small cleaved cell lymphomas and splenic lymphomas, the peripheral IF correspond to the theoretical ones of respective lymphoma tissues. On the contrary they disagree in three cases of large cells, mixed small and cleaved cell, immunoblastic lymphomas. These features are discussed. PMID:7567166

Büchi, G; Messina, M; Girotto, M; Termine, G; Morello, M; Orlassino, R; Autino, R; Grosso, E

1995-02-01

220

MAREK'S DISEASE: CURRENT STATUS AND STRATEGIES FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Mareks disease (MD), an economically important lymphoproliferative disease of primarily chickens, is caused by an alphaherpesvirus. This paper is primarily focused on: a) current strategies for diagnosis and control of MD; b) need for continued research efforts; and c) future strategies for better c...

221

Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is associated with an increased frequency of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) latently infected B lymphocytes in long-term renal transplant patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a common phenomenon in kidney transplant patients that might be a prestage of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Because the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) for PTLD development is well established, we wondered about the association between EBV and MGUS. Thus, B-cells from kidney transplant patients (25 with and 100 without MGUS) and from

N. Babel; F. Schwarzmann; A. Pruss; H.-D. Volk; P. Reinke

2004-01-01

222

Enhancing Brain Lesions in a Renal Transplant Patient  

PubMed Central

Neurologists should be familiar with the spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) pathology that renal transplants patients are prone to. We are presenting a case of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder of the CNS to highlight less commonly described imaging findings and review this disease entity.

Moscato, Margaret; Boon-Unge, Kritsanapol; Restrepo, Lucas

2013-01-01

223

Conversion from cyclosporine to everolimus at 4.5 months posttransplant: 3-year results from the randomized ZEUS study.  

PubMed

The long-term effect of conversion from calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy to an mTOR inhibitor requires clarification. Following completion of the 12-month, open-label, multicenter ZEUS study, in which 300 kidney transplant recipients were randomized to continue cyclosporine (CsA) or convert to everolimus at 4.5 months posttransplant, outcomes were assessed at month 36 (n = 284; 94.7%). CNI therapy was reintroduced in 28.4% of everolimus patients by month 36. The primary efficacy endpoint, estimated glomerular filtration rate (Nankivell, ANCOVA) was significantly higher with everolimus versus the CsA group at month 24 (7.6 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , 95%CI 4.3, 11.0 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ; p < 0.001) and month 36 (7.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) , 95%CI 3.6, 11.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ; p < 0.001). The incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection from randomization to month 36 was 13.0% in the everolimus arm and 4.8% in the CsA arm (p = 0.015). Patient and graft survival, as well as incidences of malignancy, severe infections and hospitalization, were similar between groups. Kidney transplant patients who are converted from CsA to everolimus at month 4.5 and who remain on everolimus thereafter may achieve a significant improvement in renal function that is maintained to 3 years. There was a significantly higher rate of rejection in the everolimus arm but this did not exert a deleterious effect by 3 years posttransplant. PMID:22642473

Budde, K; Lehner, F; Sommerer, C; Arns, W; Reinke, P; Eisenberger, U; Wüthrich, R P; Scheidl, S; May, C; Paulus, E-M; Mühlfeld, A; Wolters, H H; Pressmar, K; Stahl, R; Witzke, O

2012-03-05

224

Revaccination with Marek's Disease Vaccines Induces Productive Infection and Superior Immunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most common lymphoproliferative disease in chickens is Marek's disease (MD), which is caused by the oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV). The emergence of hypervirulent pathotypes of MDV has led to vaccine failures, which have become common and which have resulted in serious economic losses in some countries, and a revaccination strategy has been introduced in practice. The mechanism

Changxin Wu; Junji Gan; Qiao Jin; Chuangfu Chen; Ping Liang; Yantao Wu; Xuefen Liu; Li Ma; Fred Davison

2009-01-01

225

Marek's Disease Virus-Induced Immunosuppression: Array Analysis of Chicken Immune Response Gene Expression Profiling  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4+ T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to...

226

Non-MHC genomic variation affecting Marek’s disease resistance and vaccine protective efficiency  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of the domestic chicken caused by a highly infectious, oncogenic herpesvirus commonly referred to as Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MD has been controlled by vaccination with non-oncogenic turkey herpesvirus (HVT), non-oncogenic chicken herpesvirus...

227

Overexpression of src family gene for tyrosine-kinase p59fyn in CD4-CD8- T cells of mice with a lymphoproliferative disorder.  

PubMed Central

Overexpression of a src family gene, lck, has been associated with differentiation of the murine thymic lymphoma line LSTRA. Recent findings by several groups strongly suggest a functional role for the gene product p56lck protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) in the activation of normal T cells. A single recessive gene, lpr or gld, induces a lymphoproliferative disorder concomitant with autoimmune disease in mice. In this study, a 10-fold elevated activity of PTK encoded by fyn, another src family gene, was demonstrated in CD4-CD8- T cells in mutant mice. The increased PTK activity was consistent with overexpression of fyn mRNA. The elevated fyn mRNA expression appeared to be a characteristic of CD4-CD8- T cells, since it was not observed in normal T cells at any stage of differentiation. The fact that fyn mRNA expression was markedly induced in normal T cells by mitogenic stimulation with anti-T3 epsilon antiserum supports the possibility that p59fyn PTK is a signal-generating molecule in T cells. Thus, our findings provide insight into the physiological role for a src gene family kinase in T-cell development and contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease-inducing recessive genes. Images

Katagiri, T; Urakawa, K; Yamanashi, Y; Semba, K; Takahashi, T; Toyoshima, K; Yamamoto, T; Kano, K

1989-01-01

228

BCA1, A B-cell chemoattractant signal, is constantly expressed in cutaneous lymphoproliferative B-cell disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analysed the immunophenotypic and molecular expression of BCA-1 (B-cell-specific chemokine) and CXCR5 (BCA-1 receptor) in normal skin and different cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL); cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL); cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma (PCBCL)), with the aim of investigating their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of cutaneous B-cell disorders. BCA-1 and CXCR5 were constantly expressed in CBCL and PCBCL,

M. Mori; C. Manuelli; N. Pimpinelli; B. Bianchi; C. Orlando; C. Mavilia; P. Cappugi; E. Maggi; B. Giannotti; M. Santucci

2003-01-01

229

The clinical spectrum in a large kindred with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by a Fas mutation that impairs lymphocyte apoptosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by chronic, histologically benign splenomegaly and generalized lymphadenopathy, hypergammaglobulinemia, and autoantibody formation. ALPS has been attributed to defective programmed cell death of lymphocytes, most often arising as a result of mutations in the gene encoding the lymphocyte apoptosis receptor Fas\\/APO-l\\/CD95. We identified a novel mutation in the intracellular apoptosis signaling domain of Fas in

Anthony J. Infante; Howard A. Britton; Thomas DeNapoli; Lindsay A. Middelton; Michael J. Lenardo; Christine E. Jackson; Jin Wang; Thomas Fleisher; Stephen E. Straus; Jennifer M. Puck

1998-01-01

230

From cytomorphology to molecular pathology: maximizing the value of cytology of lymphoproliferative disorders and soft tissue tumors.  

PubMed

Objectives: The field of cytopathology has been rapidly advancing in the era of molecular pathology and personalized medicine. On-site cytologic evaluation for adequacy and triaging specimens for small core biopsy or fine-needle aspiration (FNA) are often required. Cytopathologists face the challenge of how to best triage small specimens for diagnosis, molecular testing, and personalized treatment. Owing to its minimally invasive nature, FNA alone or combined with core biopsy for lymphoproliferative disorders and soft tissue tumors has gained popularity. Methods: Literature review and author's institutional experience are used for this review article. This article will focus mainly on lymphoproliferative disorders and soft tissue tumors. Results: Evaluation combining cytomorphology, immunohistochemistry, and/or molecular pathology is often needed to accurately diagnose and classify lymphomas and soft tissue tumors. Many molecular tests have been performed on cytologic specimens, such as tests for BRAF and RET in thyroid FNA. Conclusions: Molecular pathology has been widely integrated into conventional cytopathology for diagnosing lymphoproliferative disorders and soft tissue tumors, and the diagnostic value of FNA on those tumors has increased significantly. Cytology will play a more important role in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:24045541

Zhang, Songlin; Gong, Yun

2013-10-01

231

[Castleman's disease located in the central nervous system].  

PubMed

A 26-year-old woman complained of trijeminal nevralgy and ocular symptoms revealing a paracavernal tumor which had progressed for three months. Histopathological analysis after partial resection led to the diagnosis of Castleman's disease. Six months later, the patient was considered cured after focal adjuvant radiotherapy. Castleman's disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder. Solitary intracranial involvement is unusual. Unlike multifocal disease, localized Castleman's disease has an excellent prognosis. PMID:12773906

Delmont, E; Lonjon, M; Michiels, J-F; Chanalet, S; Bourg, V; Xerri, L; Bondiau, P-Y; Lebrun, C

2003-05-01

232

Positive correlation between replication rate and pathotype of Marek’s disease virus strains in maternal antibody negative chickens  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek’s disease (MD) is a highly contagious lymphoproliferative disease of chickens associated with large economic losses worldwide. The etiological agent, Marek’s disease virus (MDV), can be divided into three pathotypes: virulent (v), very virulent (vv), and very virulent plus (vv+). While previou...

233

Lack of evidence of human herpesvirus 8 DNA sequences in HIV-negative patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders of the skin.  

PubMed

Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is a new virus which has been reported in Kaposi's sarcoma and some lymphoproliferative disorders such as Castleman's disease and body-cavity-based lymphoma. Because HHV-8 shares homology with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), we searched for the presence of HHV-8 DNA sequences in various cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphoma by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Forty-seven HIV-negative patients with cutaneous lymphoma or large plaque parapsoriasis were enrolled in the study. For the detection of HHV-8 DNA sequences we used PCR followed by a hybridization with a digoxigenin-labelled probe and nested-PCR. HHV-8 DNA sequences could only be detected in a patient with large plaque parapsoriasis. Our study does not suggest any direct implication of HHV-8 in the pathogenesis of most cutaneous lymphoma. Serological studies will be helpful to appreciate if there is an epidemiological link between HHV-8 and cutaneous lymphomas. PMID:9217812

Dupin, N; Franck, N; Calvez, V; Gorin, I; Grandadam, M; Huraux, J M; Leibowitch, M; Agut, H; Escande, J P

1997-06-01

234

Epstein-Barr virus infection and associated diseases in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an ubiquitous human B lymphotropic virus, is the cause of infectious mononucleosis. Moreover, EBV infection can be followed by lymphoproliferative diseases in patients with inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies. Primary EBV infection may be a threat to all children after marrow or organ transplantation or those receiving chronic immunosuppressive treatment for various other reasons. The virus has been

V. Schuster; H. W. Kreth

1992-01-01

235

Overexpression of Batf induces an apoptotic defect and an associated lymphoproliferative disorder in mice  

PubMed Central

Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is a dimeric transcription factor composed of the Jun, Fos and Atf families of proteins. Batf is expressed in the immune system and participates in AP-1 dimers that modulate gene expression in response to a variety of stimuli. Transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing human BATF in T cells were generated using the human CD2 promoter (CD2-HA (hemagglutinin antigen) - BATF). By 1 year of age, over 90% of the mice developed a lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The enlarged lymph nodes characteristic of this LPD contain a polyclonal accumulation of T cells with a CD4+ bias, yet efforts to propagate these tumor cells in vitro demonstrate that they do not proliferate as well as wild-type CD4+ T cells. Instead, the accumulation of these cells is likely due to an apoptotic defect as CD2-HA-BATF Tg T cells challenged by trophic factor withdrawal in vitro resist apoptosis and display a pro-survival pattern of Bcl-2 family protein expression. As elevated levels of Batf expression are a feature of lymphoid tumors in both humans and mice, these observations support the use of CD2-HA-BATF mice as a model for investigating the molecular details of apoptotic dysregulation in LPD.

Logan, M R; Jordan-Williams, K L; Poston, S; Liao, J; Taparowsky, E J

2012-01-01

236

Epstein-Barr virus induced lymphoproliferative tumors in severe combined immunodeficient mice are oligoclonal.  

PubMed

Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice reconstituted with lymphocytes from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) negative human donors develop aggressive tumors after the chimeric mice are infected with EBV. The tumors were composed of human B cells that expressed EBV encoded antigens (latent membrane protein and EBV nuclear antigen2). Southern blot analysis of DNA from 16 SCID/hu tumors with human Ig gene probes showed that each tumor contained multiple heavy and light chain gene rearrangements. Ig kappa gene rearrangements were frequent, while clonal lambda gene rearrangements were infrequent. Analysis of EBV terminal repeat sequences indicated two or more fused termini in each tumor, consistent with a multiclonal origin. Linear terminal repeat segments and viral antigens (EA-D and EA-R) associated with EBV replication were not detected in the tumors. High levels of human Igs in the SCID/hu serum were oligoclonal and primarily contained kappa light chains. Before the appearance of overt tumors, circulating cells with human and EBV DNA could be detected in the SCID/hu mice by the polymerase chain reaction. We conclude that EBV infection in SCID/hu chimeric mice produces a limited number of transformation events, which give rise to oligoclonal tumors resembling EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders in some immune-deficient patients. PMID:1309425

Pisa, P; Cannon, M J; Pisa, E K; Cooper, N R; Fox, R I

1992-01-01

237

Cutaneous presentation of post-renal transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: a series of four cases.  

PubMed

We report detailed histological and molecular characteristics of four post transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) presenting in the skin of renal transplant patients, and their clinical outcome. Three had B-cell lymphomas (cases 1-3), and one had a T-cell lymphoma (case 4). All B-cell lymphomas showed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or in situ hybridization (ISH). Cases 1 and 2 were large cell lymphomas, and case 3 a plasmacytoma. Case 1 showed light chain restriction and heavy chain gene rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The patient was then diagnosed with an abdominal lymphoma and died of sepsis. Case 2 had no recoverable DNA. Case 3 had a plasmacytoma that showed monoclonal light chain restriction on IHC and an oligoclonal heavy chain rearrangement by PCR. In cases 2 and 3, the lesions regressed following reduction of immunosuppression, and died 1.5 and 8 years later from unrelated medical causes. Case 4 was a CD 30+ anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma with no EBV detected by IHC, ISH and PCR, and died of heart failure 2 years later. Cutaneous manifestations of PTLD are rare, show wide array of clinical and pathological features, and generally have a favorable prognosis. EBV appears to be associated only with B-cell cutaneous lymphomas. PMID:19903218

Salama, Samih; Todd, Stanley; Cina, Davide Pietro; Margetts, Peter

2009-11-09

238

Viral interleukin-6 encoded by rhesus macaque rhadinovirus is associated with lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD)  

PubMed Central

Background Rhesus macaques (RM) co-infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and rhesus macaque rhadinovirus (RRV) develop abnormal cellular proliferations characterized as extra-nodal lymphoma and retroperitoneal fibromatosis (RF). RRV encodes a viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), much like Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and involvement of the viral cytokine was examined in proliferative lesions. Methods Formalin fixed tissue from RM co-infected with SIV and RRV were analyzed for RRV genomes by in situ hybridization and RRV vIL-6 expression by immunofluorescence analysis. Results In situ hybridization analysis indicated that RRV is present in both types of lesions. Immunofluorescence analysis of different lymphomas and RF revealed positive staining for vIL-6. Similarly to KS, RF lesion is positive for vimentin, CD117 (c-kit), and smooth muscle actin (SMA) and contains T cell, B cell and monocytes/macrophage infiltrates. Conclusions Our data support the idea that vIL-6 may be critical to the development and progression of lymphoproliferative disorder in RRV/SIV-infected RM.

Orzechowska, B.U.; Manoharan, M.; Sprague, J.; Estep, R.D.; Axthelm, M.K.; Wong, S.W.

2011-01-01

239

Cold agglutinin disease in fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: a rare association with a rare cancer variant.  

PubMed

Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a rare autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Although it can occur secondary to lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune or infectious diseases, CAD is rarely reported as secondary to solid tumors. We report a case of a woman aged 18 years diagnosed with a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma of the fibrolamellar subtype, who was shown to have CAD also. Her general condition, including CAD, improved after targeted therapy with sorafenib for the hepatocellular carcinoma and only conservative measures for the CAD that consisted of avoidance of cold. In summary, although it is an extremely rare association and less common than lymphoproliferative disorders, CAD can be associated with solid tumors. PMID:21293066

Al-Matham, Khalid; Alabed, Iehab; Zaidi, Syed Z A; Qushmaq, Khalid A

240

MAREK'S DISEASE VIRUS ENCODED MEQ GENE IS INVOLVED IN TRANSFORMATION OF LYMPHOCYTES BUT DISPENSABLE FOR REPLICATION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens resulting in T-cell lymphomas in visceral organs and major nerves tracks. Earlier studies have determined that the repeat regions of oncogenic serotype 1 MDV encode a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein, Meq, which s...

241

Post-transplant recurrence of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in a patient with thrombomodulin mutation.  

PubMed

HUS is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. While "typical" HUS is usually associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and recovers in the majority of cases, aHUS is caused by mutations of complement components or antibodies against CFH leading to uncontrolled activation of alternative complement pathway and often to ESRD. Recently, THBD gene mutations have been reported in aHUS. Theoretically, the risk of disease recurrence after renal transplantation should be low because THBD is primarily a membrane-bound protein expressed by endothelial cells; however, a small proportion of THBD is present as a soluble form in plasma. We report the case of a 19-yr-old man with aHUS secondary to a THBD mutation that relapsed twice after two renal transplantations performed 12 yr apart. Despite successful control of HUS with plasma exchange and eculizumab after the second transplantation, the graft was ultimately lost due to severe steroid-resistant cellular rejection. The present report suggests that THBD mutations may favor-relapse of aHUS after renal transplantation. PMID:24118826

Sinibaldi, Serena; Guzzo, Isabella; Piras, Rossella; Bresin, Elena; Emma, Francesco; Dello Strologo, Luca

2013-09-30

242

Influence of vaccination with CVI988\\/Rispens on load and replication of a very virulent Marek's disease virus strain in feathers of chickens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several highly efficacious vaccines are currently available for control of Marek's disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens. However, these vaccines are unable to prevent infection with Marek's disease virus (MDV) in vaccinated birds. This leads to shedding of virulent MDV from feather follicle epithelium and skin epithelial cells of vaccinated and infected chickens. The objective of the present study

Kamran Haq; Thomas Fear; Abdelhakeem Ibraheem; Mohamed Faizal Abdul-Careem; Shayan Sharif

2011-01-01

243

Influence of vaccination with CVI988\\/Rispens on load and replication of a very virulent Marek's disease virus strain in feathers of chickens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several highly efficacious vaccines are currently available for control of Marek's disease, a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens. However, these vaccines are unable to prevent infection with Marek's disease virus (MDV) in vaccinated birds. This leads to shedding of virulent MDV from feather follicle epithelium and skin epithelial cells of vaccinated and infected chickens. The objective of the present study was

Kamran Haq; Thomas Fear; Abdelhakeem Ibraheem; Mohamed Faizal Abdul-Careem; Shayan Sharif

2012-01-01

244

Quantitation of Marek’s disease virus in vaccinated population of resistant and susceptible chicken samples using real-time PCR  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chicken caused by cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus, known as Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MD virus load in challenged chickens has been well studied, but the difference between the virus load in vaccinated MD resistant and susceptible chicken...

245

[Kidney allograft: a target for systemic disease].  

PubMed

Recurrence of disease after transplantation is frequent and represents the third cause of allograft loss. Recurrence of lupus nephritis after transplantation is rare. Kidney transplantation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome or lupus anticoagulant is challenging due to the high risk of immediate post-transplant thrombosis and bleeding risk associated to the subsequent anticoagulation. Moreover, vascular changes associated to the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies negatively impact allograft rate survival. Recurrence of pauci immune glomerulonephritis or Goodpasture syndrome is exceptional. PMID:22244721

Canaud, Guillaume; Legendre, Christophe

2012-01-13

246

Immunodeficiency-associated lymphoid proliferations (ALPS, HIV, and KSHV/HHV8).  

PubMed

The World Health Organization recognizes four categories of immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (ID-LPDs): (1) lymphoproliferative diseases associated with primary immune disorders, (2) lymphomas associated with HIV infection, (3) post-transplant LPDs, and (4) other iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated LPDs. Although these lesions are heterogeneous, due to their various underlying causes, they share several features, including frequent involvement of extranodal sites, diffuse aggressive histology, B-cell lineage, associated herpesvirus infection, and rapid clinical progression. The accurate diagnosis and treatment of the patients who develop immunodeficiency-associated LPDs often require careful evaluation of the morphology, immunophenotype, genotype, viral status, and clinical history. In this article, two of these four categories of ID-LPD are examined: lymphomas associated with HIV infections and lymphoproliferative diseases associated with primary immune disorders (PIDs), focusing on autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), as a representative disorder from this latter category. PMID:23537912

Chadburn, Amy

2013-03-26

247

Marek's disease virus-encoded Meq gene is involved in transformation of lymphocytes but is dispensable for replication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, resulting in T cell lymphomas in visceral organs and peripheral nerves. Earlier studies have determined that the repeat regions of oncogenic serotype 1 MDV encode a basic leucine zipper protein, Meq, which structurally resembles the Jun\\/Fos family of transcriptional activators. Meq is consistently expressed in MDV-induced tumor cells and

Blanca Lupiani; Lucy F. Lee; Xiaoping Cui; Isabel Gimeno; Amy Anderson; Robin W. Morgan; Robert F. Silva; Richard L. Witter; Hsing-Jien Kung; Sanjay M. Reddy

2004-01-01

248

Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease as a risk factor for diabetes mellitus following renal transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease as a risk factor for diabetes mellitus following renal transplantation.BackgroundPosttransplant diabetes mellitus is an important complication of renal transplantation that is associated with a significant impact on quality of life and an increase in long-term morbidity and mortality. Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease that commonly leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in

Angelo M. de Mattos; Ali J. Olyaei; Jonathan C. Prather; Muralikrishna S. Golconda; John M. Barry; Douglas J. Norman

2005-01-01

249

Early-onset EBV-positive post-transplant plasmablastic lymphoma arising in a liver allograft: a case report and literature review.  

PubMed

We report a case of a 51-year-old man who received a cadaveric liver allograft for autoimmune and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The patient was admitted with symptoms of progressive vomiting and diarrhea 16 months after transplantation. Laboratory studies showed abnormal liver functions, and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 76-mm heterogeneous mass in the liver. Histological examination showed a malignant lymphoid neoplasm with plasmablastic features. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL) is rare in the post-transplantation period. To the best of our knowledge, only 25 well-documented cases of posttransplant PL, including ours, have been described. PMID:23222808

Benítez, Carlos E; Rey, Paula; Zoroquiaín, Pablo; Martínez, Jorge; Ramírez, Pablo; Arrese, Marco; Pérez-Ayuso, Rosa María; Valbuena, José R

2012-12-05

250

Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene  

SciTech Connect

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01

251

Oncornavirus particles in lymphoid cultures from a howler monkey with Herpesvirus saimiri-induced disease.  

PubMed

Budding and extracellular oncornavirus particles were observed in cells of lymphoid cultures derived from the spleen, lymph node, and blood of a howler monkey (Alouatta caraya) that developed a malignant lymphoproliferative disease after infection with Herpesvirus saimiri. The various possible sources of origin of these particles are discussed. PMID:187783

Rangan, S R

1976-10-01

252

A Case of Multicentric Castleman's Disease Presenting with Follicular Bronchiolitis  

PubMed Central

Multicentric Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare atypical lymphoproliferative disorder, which is characterized by various systemic manifestations. Some patients with multicentric CD may have concomitant lung parenchymal lesions, for which lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is known to be the most common pathologic finding. Follicular bronchiolitis and LIP are considered to be on the same spectrum of the disease. We describe a case of multicentric CD with pulmonary involvement, which was pathologically proven as follicular bronchiolitis.

Hwangbo, Yup; Lee, Yong Hoon; Lee, So Yeon; Seo, Hyewon; Oh, Serim; Kim, Minjung; Choi, Sun Ha; Park, Tae In; Shin, Kyung-Min

2013-01-01

253

Presence of Epstein-Barr virus latency type III at the single cell level in post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders and AIDS related lymphomas.  

PubMed Central

AIMS: To investigate the expression pattern of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent genes at the single cell level in post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders and acquired immunodefiency syndrome (AIDS) related lymphomas, in relation to cellular morphology. METHODS: Nine post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders and three AIDS related lymphomas were subjected to immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific for EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) (2H4), EBNA2 (PE2 and the new rat anti-EBNA2 monoclonal antibodies 1E6, R3, and 3E9), and LMP1 (CS1-4 and S12). Double staining was performed combining R3 or 3E9 with S12. RESULTS: R3 and 3E9 anti-EBNA2 monoclonal antibodies were more sensitive than PE2, enabling the detection of more EBNA2 positive lymphoma cells. Both in post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders and AIDS related lymphomas, different expression patterns were detected at the single cell level. Smaller neoplastic cells were positive for EBNA2 but negative for LMP1. Larger and more blastic neoplastic cells, sometimes resembling Reed-Sternberg cells, were LMP1 positive but EBNA2 negative (EBV latency type II). Morphologically intermediate neoplastic cells coexpressing EBNA2 and LMP1 (EBV latency type III), were detected using R3 and 3E9, and formed a considerable part of the neoplastic population in four of nine post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders and two of three AIDS related lymphomas. All samples contained a subpopulation of small tumour cells positive exclusively for Epstein-Barr early RNA and EBNA1. The relation between cellular morphology and EBV expression patterns in this study was less pronounced in AIDS related lymphomas than in post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders, because the AIDS related lymphomas were less polymorphic than the post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders. CONCLUSIONS: In post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders and AIDS related lymphomas, EBV latency type III can be detected by immunohistochemistry in a subpopulation of tumour cells using sensitive monoclonal antibodies R3 and 3E9. Our data suggest that EBV infected tumour cells in these lymphomas undergo gradual changes in the expression of EBV latent genes, and that these changes are associated with changes in cellular morphology. Images

Brink, A A; Dukers, D F; van den Brule, A J; Oudejans, J J; Middeldorp, J M; Meijer, C J; Jiwa, M

1997-01-01

254

Castleman disease  

PubMed Central

Castleman and Towne described a disease presenting as a mediastinal mass resembling thymoma. It is also known as "giant lymph node hyperplasia", "lymph node hamartoma", "angiofollicular mediastinal lymph node hyperplasia", and "angiomatous lymphoid hyperplasia". The pathogenesis is unknown, but the bulk of evidence points toward faulty immune regulation, resulting in excessive B-lymphocyte and plasma-cell proliferation in lymphatic tissue. In addition to the mediastinal presentation, extrathoracic involvement in the neck, axilla, mesentery, pelvis, pancreas, adrenal gland, and retroperitoneum also have been described. There are 2 major pathologic variations of Castleman disease: (1) hyaline-vascular variant, the most frequent, characterized by small hyaline-vascular follicles and capillary proliferation; and (2) the plasma-cell variant, in which large lymphoid follicles are separated by sheets of plasma cells. The hyaline-vascular cases usually are largely asymptomatic, whereas the less common plasma-cell variant may present with fever, anemia, weight loss, and night sweats, along with polyclonal hypergamma-globulinemia. Castleman disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorders. Few cases have been described world widely. In this article we reviewed the classification, pathogenesis, pathology, radiological features and up to date treatment with special emphasis on the role of viral stimulation, recent therapeutic modalities and the HIV-associated disease.

Al-Amri, Ali M.

2012-01-01

255

Gene Expression Signatures of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells during the Early Post-Transplant Period in Patients Developing Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy  

PubMed Central

Background. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major cause of graft loss and death after heart transplantation. Currently, no diagnostic methods are available during the early post-transplant period to accurately identify patients at risk of CAV. We hypothesized that PBMC gene expression profiles (GEP) can identify patients at risk of CAV. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed a limited set of whole-genome PBMC microarrays from 10 post-transplant patients who did (n = 3) or did not (n = 7) develop advanced grade CAV during their long-term follow-up. We used significance analysis of microarrays to identify differentially expressed genes and High-Throughput GoMiner to assess gene ontology (GO) categories. We corroborated our findings by retrospective analysis of PBMC real-time PCR data from 33 patients. Results. Over 300 genes were differentially expressed (FDR < 5%), and 18 GO-categories including “macrophage activation”, “Interleukin-6 pathway”, “NF-KappaB cascade”, and “response to virus” were enriched by these genes (FDR < 5%). Out of 8 transcripts available for RT-PCR analysis, we confirmed 6 transcripts (75.0%) including FPRL1, S100A9, CXCL10, PRO1073, and MMP9 (P < .05). Conclusion. Our pilot data suggest that GEP of PBMC may become a valuable tool in the evaluation of patients at risk of CAV. Larger prospectively designed studies are needed to corroborate our hypothesis.

Shahzad, Khurram; Cadeiras, Martin; Memon, Sarfaraz; Zeeberg, Barry; Klingler, Tod; Sinha, Anshu; Tabak, Esteban G.; Unniachan, Sreevalsa; Deng, Mario C.

2010-01-01

256

Use of the polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of natural infection of chickens and turkeys with Marek's disease virus and reticuloendotheliosis virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marek's disease (MD) is a highly contagious lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by a herpesvirus, while reticuloendotheliosis (REV) virus is an avian C?type retrpvirus that causes bursal and nonbursal lymphomas which often closely resemble MDV lymphomas. To provide a rapid and sensitive means of diagnosing and differentiating between these two neoplastic conditions, we have applied the PCR. The primers chosen

Irit Davidson; Anya Borovskaya; S. Perl; M. Malkinson

1995-01-01

257

Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into the genome of CVI988 strain of Marek’s disease virus results in enhanced growth and protection  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chicken caused by serotype 1 MD virus (MDV). Vaccination of commercial poultry has drastically reduced losses from MD and the poultry industry cannot be sustained without the use of vaccines. Retrovirus insertion into herpesviruses genome is a...

258

Lymphoproliferative response to mitogen (ConA) after treatment of rats with gentamicin and doxycyclin: relevance to human therapeutics.  

PubMed

Interaction of xenobiotics with the immune system may result in undesirable effects such as immunosuppression. In the future, it is probable that immunological screening tests may be required for safety evaluation of new drug candidates as an adjunct to more traditional toxicity testing. The lymphoproliferative response to mitogens has been proposed as a screening test. This test has been set up and validated in mice, but will probably have to be done in rats, the species of choice for drug safety studies. This test has been adapted to rats, using both in vivo and in vitro treatments, and used to validate drugs, including doxycyclin and gentamicin (with cyclosporin A and hydroxycortisone as controls) at the dose levels used in toxicology studies. Discrepant results obtained with doxycyclin and hydroxycortisone (effect in vitro but not in vivo) suggest that further validation studies are necessary in order to assess the reliability of this test. PMID:7821231

Salauze, D; Serre, V; Amelin, L

1994-11-01

259

Post-transplant T cell chimerism predicts graft versus host disease but not disease relapse in patients undergoing an alemtuzumab based reduced intensity conditioned allogeneic transplant.  

PubMed

In this multicentre retrospective study we have studied the impact of T cell chimerism on the outcome of 133 patients undergoing an alemtuzumab based reduced intensity conditioning allograft (RIC). The median age of the patients was 50 years (range 42-55 years). 77 patients were transplanted using an HLA identical sibling donor while 56 patients received a fully matched volunteer unrelated donor graft. 64 patients had a lymphoid malignancy and 69 were transplanted for a myeloid malignancy. 38 patients (29%) relapsed with no significant difference in risk of relapse between patients developing full donor and mixed donor chimerism in the T-cell compartment on D+90 and D+180 post transplant. Day 90 full donor T cell chimerism correlated with an increased incidence of acute GVHD according to NIH criteria (p=0.0004) and the subsequent development of chronic GVHD. Consistent with previous observations, our results confirmed a correlation between the establishment of T cell full donor chimerism and acute GVHD in T deplete RIC allografts. However our study failed to identify any correlation between T cell chimerism and relapse risk and challenge the use of pre-emptive donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) in patients with mixed T cell chimerism transplanted using an alemtuzumab based RIC regimen. PMID:23395505

Nikolousis, E; Robinson, S; Nagra, S; Brookes, C; Kinsella, F; Tauro, S; Jeffries, S; Griffiths, M; Mahendra, P; Cook, M; Paneesha, S; Lovell, R; Kishore, B; Chaganti, S; Malladi, R; Raghavan, M; Moss, P; Milligan, D; Craddock, C

2013-02-05

260

Regulation of human cell engraftment and development of EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders in Hu-PBL-scid mice.  

PubMed

Human PBMC engraft in mice homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (Prkdcscid) mutation (Hu-PBL-scid mice). Hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice generate 5- to 10-fold higher levels of human cells than do Hu-PBL-C.B-17-scid mice, and Hu-PBL-NOD-scid beta2-microglobulin-null (NOD-scid-B2mnull) mice support even higher levels of engraftment, particularly CD4+ T cells. The basis for increased engraftment of human PBMC and the functional capabilities of these cells in NOD-scid and NOD-scid-B2mnull mice are unknown. We now report that human cell proliferation in NOD-scid mice increased after in vivo depletion of NK cells. Human cell engraftment depended on CD4+ cells and required CD40-CD154 interaction, but engrafted CD4+ cells rapidly became nonresponsive to anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. Depletion of human CD8+ cells led to increased human CD4+ and CD20+ cell engraftment and increased levels of human Ig. We further document that Hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice are resistant to development of human EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders. These disorders, however, develop rapidly following depletion of human CD8+ cells and are prevented by re-engraftment of CD8+ T cells. These data demonstrate that 1) murine NK cells regulate human cell engraftment in scid recipients; 2) human CD4+ cells are required for human CD8+ cell engraftment; and 3) once engrafted, human CD8+ cells regulate human CD4+ and CD20+ cell expansion, Ig levels, and outgrowth of EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders. We propose that the Hu-PBL-NOD-scid model is suitable for the in vivo analysis of immunoregulatory interactions between human CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:10861091

Wagar, E J; Cromwell, M A; Shultz, L D; Woda, B A; Sullivan, J L; Hesselton, R M; Greiner, D L

2000-07-01

261

Extracorporeal photopheresis in chronic graft-versus-host disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite significant advances in stem cell manipulation and post-transplant immunosuppression, chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) remains a cause of major long-term morbidity in survivors of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is a novel therapeutic intervention which has demonstrated efficacy in patients with refractory acute and chronic GVHD. Clinical responses have been reported in skin and visceral GVHD. While the

FM Foss; G Gorgun; KB Miller

2002-01-01

262

The histologic classification of 602 cases of feline lymphoproliferative disease using the National Cancer Institute working formulation.  

PubMed

Case information and histologic slides for 688 admissions of feline tissues from 12 veterinary institutions were assembled and reviewed to determine tissues obtained by biopsy or necropsy, age and sex of cat, tumor topography, feline leukemia viral antigen status, histologic frequency of mitoses, diagnosis, presence of necrosis, and presence and degree of sclerosis. Histologic sections were examined to place the lesions in one of the diagnostic categories of the National Cancer Institute working formulation (NCI WF) for lymphomas or lymphoid leukemia. Correlations between the various factors determined were tested using contingency tables and chi-square analysis to provide a statistical comparison between the levels of observations determined by case examination with the numbers expected from chance alone. Significant correlations (P < or = 0.05) were found between diagnosis and tumor topography, the frequency of mitoses, necrosis, sclerosis, and age, between mitoses and necrosis, topography, age, and feline leukemia viral infection status, between topography and necrosis and age, and between leukemia viral status and age. Significant correlations between diagnosis and tumor topography included a greater than expected number of cases of acute and chronic lymphoid leukemia and multicentric distribution of tumor. Small cell lymphomas were more frequent than expected in enteric and cutaneous areas and less frequent than expected in mediastinal, renal, and multicentric areas. In contrast, the high-grade small noncleaved type of lymphomas was found significantly more frequently than expected in the mediastinum and less frequently than expected in enteric tissues. In comparing diagnosis and frequency of mitoses, the lymphomas classified as low grade by the NCI WF were significantly more frequent than expected in the lower categories (0-2/100x) of mitoses, and those classified as high-grade lymphomas were more frequent than expected in the higher categories (4-8/1OOx) of mitoses. In comparing diagnosis and sclerosis, diffuse sclerosis was more frequent than expected for the intermediate grade lymphomas of mixed cell type and for the high-grade lymphomas of the immunoblastic polymorphous type. In comparing diagnosis and locally extensive necrosis, this feature was more frequently observed than expected for cases of intermediate grade lymphoma of the small-cleaved cell category and for the high-grade lymphoma of the immunoblastic cell type. In comparing mitoses and necrosis, the lower grade lymphomas were, in general, characterized by a lower frequency of mitoses and a lower incidence of necrosis then would be expected from chance alone. In contrast, the higher grade lymphomas were characterized by more frequent mitoses and a higher incidence of necrosis. In tests comparing mitoses and tumor topography, lymphomas of the alimentary tract were more frequently observed than expected in the category with the lowest level of mitoses (0-1/100x), whereas lymphomas of the mediastinum and kidney were more frequently observed than expected in the categories with a higher level (4-20/ 100x) of mitoses. PMID:10907857

Valli, V E; Jacobs, R M; Norris, A; Couto, C G; Morrison, W B; McCaw, D; Cotter, S; Ogilvie, G; Moore, A

2000-07-01

263

A Newly Identified Mutation in the Complement Factor I Gene Not Associated With Early Post-transplant Recurrence of Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A Case Report.  

PubMed

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), which can recur after renal transplantation, is associated with poor graft outcomes. The underlying genetic defect, namely, mutations in genes coding for the complement factor H, I (CFI), or membrane cofactor protein, greatly impacts the risk of aHUS recurrence. We report here the case of a patient with chronic renal failure due to aHUS in which screening for complement mutations, performed before wait-listing for kidney transplantation, showed a never described previously heterozygous mutation in the exon II of the CFI gene. Specifically, this mutation leads to a substitution of cytosine for guanosine at nucleotide 148, resulting in the change at amino acid 50 from arginine to proline. Subsequently, he received a renal allograft from deceased donor. Good graft function was established immediately, without clinical features of aHUS. Due to a lack of data on this mutation, we avoided prophylactic treatment for aHUS but closely monitored biochemical markers of aHUS to treat a possible recurrence. Immunosuppressive treatment was based on basiliximab, tacrolimus, steroids, and mycophenolic acid. At the time of discharge the serum creatinine was 1.4 mg/dL. Ten months after transplantation the patient is doing well without evidence of aHUS. Our case suggested that a heterozygous mutation in exon II of the CFI gene was not associated with a risk of early post-transplant aHUs recurrence adding new knowledge on complement mutations implicated in aHUS post-transplant recurrences. PMID:24034049

Ranghino, A; Tognarelli, G; Basso, E; Messina, M; Manzione, A M; Daidola, G; Segoloni, G P

2013-09-01

264

CD200 Flow Cytometric Assessment and Semiquantitative Immunohistochemical Staining Distinguishes Hairy Cell Leukemia From Hairy Cell Leukemia-Variant and Other B-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders.  

PubMed

Objectives: To evaluate CD200 expression in B-cell proliferative disorders. Methods: We analyzed 180 recent specimens of B-cell neoplasms for CD200 expression by flow cytometric immunophenotypic analysis, which is better able to assess relative intensity of staining than immunohistochemical staining. Results: We found that hairy cell leukemia exhibits a high level of staining for CD200 in comparison to other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, including hairy cell leukemia-variant (HCL-V), marginal zone lymphoma, and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. We confirmed this observation by semiquantitative immunohistochemical staining. Conclusions: Assessment of the CD200 expression level is helpful to distinguish HCL from HCL-V and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and in the differential diagnosis of B-cell neoplasms in general. PMID:24045551

Pillai, Vinodh; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Charest, Karry; Li, Betty; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Dorfman, David M

2013-10-01

265

Spontaneous outgrowth of EBV-transformed B-cells reflects EBV-specific immunity in vivo; a useful tool in the follow-up of EBV-driven immunoproliferative disorders in allograft recipients  

Microsoft Academic Search

During immunosuppressive medication, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with a risk of developing posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). The appropriateness of a spontaneous EBV B-cell transformation (SET) assay as a monitor of EBV-specific immunity was evaluated to investigate if it safely allows reducing immunosuppressive medication, thereby decreasing the risk of developing PTLD. PBMC were isolated longitudinally from 20 pediatric renal

Mireille T. M. Vossen; Mi-Ran Gent; Jean-Claude Davin; Paul A. Baars; Pauline M. E. Wertheim-van Dillen; Jan F. L. Weel; Marijke T. L. Roos; Debbie van Baarle; Jaap Groothoff; René A. W. van Lier; Taco W. Kuijpers

2004-01-01

266

Successful therapy of transplant-associated veno-occlusive disease with a combination of tissue plasminogen activator and defibrotide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 36-year-old man underwent matched unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia. He developed\\u000a severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease as an early post-transplant complication. Tissue plasminogen activator was initially\\u000a felt to be contraindicated since the patient had concomitant pericarditis. Defibrotide was therefore commenced as treatment\\u000a for veno-occlusive disease. The pericarditis improved but the veno-occlusive disease continued to worsen (peak

MJ Jenner; INM Micallef; AZ Rohatiner; SM Kelsey; AC Newland; JD Cavenagh

2000-01-01

267

Unicentric Castleman's Disease of Abdomen  

PubMed Central

Castleman’s disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disease of uncertain etiology that affects lymph nodes. CD can be classified as a) unicentric vs. multicentric, based on clinical and radiological findings, b) hyaline vascular (80–90%) vs. plasmacytic (10–20%) vs. mixed cellularity variety based on histopathology. Unicentric disease is more common in the 3rd and 4th decade, whereas the multicentric form is more common in the 5th and 6th decade with no sex predilection. HIV seropositive individuals appear to be at an increased risk for multicentric castleman's disease (MCD) at a younger age due to the increased incidence of HHV- 8 infection. Diagnosis is usually based on histopathology features as imaging features show considerable overlap, thus posing diagnostic difficulties. Overall prognosis is good, particularly in the unicentric variety of disease. We have presented a case of the unicentric CD in a 40 year old male patient having abdominal pain and hematuria as chief complaints.

Shah, Dharita; Darji, Parth; Lodha, Sambhav; Bolla, Soujanya

2013-01-01

268

Different HBs Antibody versus Lymphoproliferative Responses after Application of a Monovalent (Hepatitis B) or Combined (Hepatitis A + Hepatitis B) Vaccine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate a possible adjuvanticity of simultaneous hepatitis A (HAV) vaccination for the development of HBs-specific antibodies and lymphoproliferative responses in prophylactic immunization with hepatitis B (HBV). Methods: Thirty-nine volunteers were vaccinated (schedule: 0\\/1\\/6 months) either with a bivalent HAV\\/HBV (18 individuals) or with HBV (recombinant HBs-antigen) vaccine alone (21 individuals). Anti-HBs antibody

U. Wiedermann; M. Kundi; U. Vollmann; H. Kollaritsch; Ch. Ebner; G. Wiedermann

2000-01-01

269

Addition of intravenous iron to epoetin beta increases hemoglobin response and decreases epoetin dose requirement in anemic patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies: a randomized multicenter study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This randomized study assessed if intravenous iron improves hemoglobin (Hb) response and permits decreased epoetin dose in anemic (Hb 9–11 g\\/dl), transfusion-independent patients with stainable iron in the bone marrow and lymphoproliferative malignancies not receiving chemotherapy. Patients (n=67) were randomized to subcutaneous epoetin beta 30 000 IU once weekly for 16 weeks with or without concomitant intravenous iron supplementation. There

M Hedenus; G Birgegĺrd; P Näsman; L Ahlberg; T Karlsson; B Lauri; J Lundin; G Lärfars; A Österborg

2007-01-01

270

Surgically Curable Non-Iron Deficiency Microcytic Anemia: Castleman's Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

c Summary Background: Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare, benign lymphoproliferative disorder that can involve single lymph node stations or can be systemic. Unicentric CD in patients with microcytic anemia is rarely described in the English literature. Case Report: We describe the case of a 19-year-old Chinese woman with hyaline vascular type of unicentric CD presenting as severe non-iron deficiency

J. John

2011-01-01

271

Telomere length correlates with histopathogenesis according to the germinal center in mature B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

In this study we investigated telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length in a panel of mature B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (MBCLDs) and correlated this parameter with histology and histopathogenesis in relation to the germinal center (GC). We assessed 123 MBCLD samples containing 80% or more tumor cells. TRF length was evaluated by Southern blot analysis using a chemiluminescence-based assay. GC status was assessed through screening for stable and ongoing somatic mutations within the immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes. Median TRF length was 6170 bp (range, 1896-11 200 bp) and did not correlate with patient age or sex. TRF length was greater in diffuse large cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma (medians: 7789 bp, 9471 bp, and 7383 bp, respectively) than in mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (medians: 3582 bp and 4346 bp, respectively). GC-derived MBCLDs had the longest telomeres, whereas those arising from GC-inexperienced cells had the shortest (P < 10(-9)). We conclude that (1) TRF length in MBCLD is highly heterogeneous; (2) GC-derived tumors have long telomeres, suggesting that minimal telomere erosion occurs during GC-derived lymphomagenesis; and (3) the short TRF lengths of GC-inexperienced MBCLDs indicates that these neoplasms are good candidates for treatment with telomerase inhibitors, a class of molecules currently the subject of extensive preclinical evaluation. PMID:14988160

Ladetto, Marco; Compagno, Mara; Ricca, Irene; Pagano, Marco; Rocci, Alberto; Astolfi, Monica; Drandi, Daniela; di Celle, Paola Francia; Dell'Aquila, Maria; Mantoan, Barbara; Vallet, Sonia; Pagliano, Gloria; De Marco, Federica; Francese, Roberto; Santo, Loredana; Cuttica, Alessandra; Marinone, Carlo; Boccadoro, Mario; Tarella, Corrado

2004-02-26

272

B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274) suppresses host immunity in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders  

PubMed Central

Stromal elements present within the tumor microenvironment may suppress host immunity and promote the growth of malignant lymphocytes in B cell–derived non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In contrast, little is known about the microenvironment's role in T cell–derived NHL. B7-H1 (PD-L1, CD274), a member of the B7 family of costimulatory/coinhibitory ligands expressed by both malignant cells and stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment, has emerged as an important immune modulator capable of suppressing host immunity. Therefore, B7-H1 expression and function were analyzed in cutaneous and peripheral T-cell NHL. B7-H1 was expressed by tumor cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived cells within the tumor microenvironment in T-cell NHL and was found to inhibit T-cell proliferation and promote the induction of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Collectively, the data presented provide the first evidence implicating B7-H1 in the suppression of host immunity in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and suggest that the targeting of B7-H1 may represent a novel therapeutic approach.

Wilcox, Ryan A.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wada, David A.; Yang, Zhi-Zhang; Comfere, Nneka I.; Dong, Haidong; Kwon, Eugene D.; Novak, Anne J.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Witzig, Thomas E.

2009-01-01

273

Long-term follow-up of EBV-positive lymphoproliferative disorders in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.  

PubMed

We report a woman in her early thirties with a long-term history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and prednisolone administration, who progressed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). Treatment for SLE consisted of 1 mg/kg/ day prednisolone followed by 5 mg/day of maintenance therapy. Lymph node biopsies were performed when the patient was in her early thirties, mid-forties, and late fifties. Histologically, the initial lymph node lesion was characterized by numerous enlarged, coalescing lymphoid follicles. The second biopsy showed effacement of the follicles and expansion of the paracortical area. A polymorphous population of small- to medium-sized lymphocytes, plasma cells, and immunoblasts had diffusely infiltrated the paracortical area. In the third lymph node biopsy, fibrous collagen bands divided the epithelioid cell granulomas into nodules. There were numerous Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in the epithelioid cell granuloma. In situ hybridization demonstrated there were no EBV-infected lymphocytes in the first biopsy; however, EBER(+) cells were detected in the second and third biopsy specimens. The current findings illustrate the natural progression in a patient with a long-term history of EBV(+) B-cell LPD in which the immunodeficiency was caused by SLE and probably her aging, which together resulted in histological change. PMID:22179188

Tsukamoto, Norifumi; Handa, Hiroshi; Yokohama, Akihiko; Mitsui, Takeki; Saitoh, Takayuki; Koiso, Hiromi; Uchiumi, Hideki; Hoshino, Takumi; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Murakami, Hirokazu; Kojima, Masaru; Nojima, Yoshihisa

2011-12-17

274

Alpha tropomyosin as a self-antigen in patients with Beh?et's disease  

PubMed Central

We report for the first time a significant increased lymphoproliferative response to alpha tropomyosin as well as observing autoantibodies to tropomyosin observed in Behçet's disease (BD) patients with posterior uveitis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 18 BD patients with posterior uveitis, 18 patients with other forms of noninfectious uveitis, 9 patients with retinal damage due to photocoagulation as well as 18 healthy donors were evaluated for antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses to alpha tropomyosin and its derivative peptides. The proliferative responses of PBMCs to these antigens were studied using 3H thymidine incorporation assay. Serum samples were also screened by ELISA for autoantibodies against tropomyosin. Six of the 18 (33%) BD patients with posterior uveitis showed increased proliferative response to alpha tropomyosin or its derivative peptides, while none of the healthy, disease controls were positive. The mean lymphoproliferative responses to tropomyosin were significantly higher (P < 0·02) in the BD patients compared to healthy or disease controls. Higher titres of anti-tropomyosin antibodies were also seen in four of the 18 BD patients but none in the healthy or disease control groups (P < 0·002). The occurrence of these abnormalities supports a possible role for alpha tropomyosin as a self-antigen in a subset of patients with Behçet's disease.

Mahesh, S P; Li, Zhuqing; Buggage, R; Mor, F; Cohen, I R; Chew, E Y; Nussenblatt, R B

2005-01-01

275

Limited sampling strategy of mycophenolic acid in adult kidney transplant recipients: influence of the post-transplant period and the pharmacokinetic profile.  

PubMed

We aimed to develop an accurate and convenient LSS for predicting MPA-AUC(0-12 hours) in Tunisian adult kidney transplant recipients whose immunosuppressive regimen consisted of MMF and tacrolimus combination with regards to the post-transplant period and the pharmacokinetic profile. Each pharmacokinetic profile consisted of eight blood samples collected during the 12-hour dosing interval. The AUC(0-12 hours) was calculated according to the linear trapezoidal rule. The MPA concentrations at each sampling time were correlated by a linear regression analysis with the measured AUC(0-12). We analyzed all the developed models for their ability to estimate the MPA-AUC(0-12 hours). The best multilinear regression model for predicting the full MPA-AUC(0-12 hours) was found to be the combination of C1, C4, and C6. All the best correlated models and the most convenient ones were verified to be also applicable before 5 months after transplantation and thereafter. These models were also verified to be applicable for patients having or not the second peak in their pharmacokinetic profiles. For practical reasons we recommend a LSS using C0, C1, and C4 that provides a reasonable MPA-AUC(0-12 hours) estimation. PMID:23813362

Chaabane, Amel; Aouam, Karim; Ben Fredj, Nadia; Hammouda, Mouna; Chadly, Zohra; El May, Mezri; Boughattas, Naceur; Skhiri, Habib

2013-06-27

276

UK-based real-time lymphoproliferative disorder diagnostic service to improve the management of patients in Ghana.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of a UK-based real-time service to improve the diagnosis and management of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) in Ghana. Adult patients reporting to hospital with a suspected LPD, during a 1 year period, were prospectively enrolled. Bone marrow and/or lymph node biopsies were posted to the Haematology Malignancy Diagnostic Service (HMDS), Leeds, UK and underwent morphological analysis and immunophenotyping. Results were returned by e-mail. The initial diagnoses made in Ghana were compared with the final HMDS diagnoses to assess the contribution of the HMDS diagnosis to management decisions. The study was conducted at the two teaching hospitals in Ghana-Komfo Anokye, Kumasi and Korle Bu, Accra. Participants comprised 150 adult patients (>/=12 years old), 79 women, median age 46 years. Bone marrow and lymph node biopsy samples from all adults presenting with features suggestive of a LPD, at the two teaching hospitals in Ghana, over 1 year were posted to a UK LPD diagnostic centre, where immunophenotyping was performed by immunohistochemistry. Molecular analysis was performed where indicated. Diagnostic classifications were made according to international criteria. Final diagnosis was compared to the initial Ghanaian diagnosis to evaluate discrepancies; implications for alterations in treatment decisions were evaluated. Median time between taking samples and receiving e-mail results in Ghana was 15 days. Concordance between initial and final diagnoses was 32% (48 of 150). The HMDS diagnosis would have changed management in 31% (46 of 150) of patients. It is feasible to provide a UK-based service for LPD diagnosis in Africa using postal services and e-mail. This study confirmed findings from wealthy countries that a specialised haematopathology service can improve LPD diagnosis. This model of Ghana-UK collaboration provides a platform on which to build local capacity to operate an international quality diagnostic service for LPDs. PMID:19669193

Parkins, Elizabeth; Owen, Roger G; Bedu-Addo, George; Sem, Ohene Opare; Ekem, Ivy; Adomakoh, Yvonne; Bates, Imelda

2009-07-09

277

Tumor Microenvironment and Immune Effects of Antineoplastic Therapy in Lymphoproliferative Syndromes  

PubMed Central

Lymphomas represent a wide group of heterogenic diseases with different biological and clinical behavior. The underlying microenvironment-specific composition seems to play an essential role in this scenario, harboring the ability to develop successful immune responses or, on the contrary, leading to immune evasion and even promotion of tumor growth. Depending on surrounding lymphoid infiltrates, lymphomas may have different prognosis. Moreover, recent evidences have emerged that confer a significant impact of main lymphoma's treatment over microenvironment, with clinical consequences. In this review, we summarize these concepts from a pathological and clinical perspective. Also, the state of the art of lymphoma's anti-idiotype vaccine development is revised, highlighting the situations where this strategy has proven to be successful and eventual clues to obtain better results in the future.

Alvaro, Tomas; de la Cruz-Merino, Luis; Henao-Carrasco, Fernando; Villar Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Vicente Baz, David; Codes Manuel de Villena, Manuel; Provencio, Mariano

2010-01-01

278

Presence of Simian Virus 40 DNA Sequences in Egyptian Patients with Lymphoproliferative Disorders  

PubMed Central

Background: Although no definite risk factors have emerged for the different hematological malignancies, a viral cause has been postulated. Several studies have detected SV40 DNA sequences in tumor tissues obtained from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients. A link between SV40 and NHL is biologically plausible because SV40 causes hematological malignancies in laboratory rodents. Methods: We investigated 266 Egyptian cases of different hematological malignancies, for the presence of SV40 DNA using multiplex nested PCR technique. These cases consisted of 158 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), 54 Hodgkin’s disease(HD), 26 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), 13 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 8 chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (CLL), 7 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), in addition to 34 subjects of control group. Results: Our results have shown that SV40 DNA sequences were found in 53.8% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients, 29.6% of Hodgkin’s disease patients, and 40.7% of different types of leukemia cases. Frequency of SV40 DNA sequences was higher in NHL patients compared to the other tumor cases. Also, frequency of SV40 DNA sequences was significantly higher (p<0.05) in NHL patients than in the control group. Regarding the different histological types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, SV40 DNA sequences were detected frequently in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and in follicular lymphoma. Conclusions: The present study suggests that SV40 DNA virus is significantly associated with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and might have a role in the development of these hematological malignancies. Polyomavirus SV40 may act as a cofactor in the pathogenesis of these tumors and this could lead to new diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive approaches.

Mohamed, Waleed S.; Samra, Mohamed A.; Fawzy, Mohamed A.

2007-01-01

279

Transferred WT1-reactive CD8+ T cells can mediate antileukemic activity and persist in post-transplant patients  

PubMed Central

Relapse remains a leading cause of death after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with high-risk leukemias. The potentially beneficial donor T-cell-mediated graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect is often mitigated by concurrent graft versus host disease (GVHD). Providing T-cells that can selectively target Wilms’ Tumor Antigen 1 (WT1), a transcription factor over-expressed in leukemias that contributes to the malignant phenotype, represents a potential opportunity to promote anti-leukemic activity without inducing GVHD. HLA A*0201-restricted WT1-specific donor-derived CD8+ cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) clones were administered post-HCT to 11 relapsed or high-risk leukemia patients without any evidence of on-target toxicity. The last four treated patients received CTL clones generated with exposure to IL-21 as a means to prolong in vivo CTL survival, as IL-21 can limit terminal differentiation of antigen-specific T-cells generated in vitro. Transferred cells exhibited direct evidence of anti-leukemic activity in 2 patients: a transient response in one patient with advanced progressive disease and the induction of a prolonged remission in a patient with minimal residual disease (MRD). Additionally, three treated patients at high risk for relapse post-HCT survive without leukemia relapse, GVHD or additional anti-leukemic treatment. CTL generated in the presence of IL-21, which were transferred in these latter three patients and the patient with MRD, all remained detectable long-term and maintained/acquired in vivo phenotypic and functional characteristics associated with long-lived memory CD8+ T-cells. This study supports expanding efforts to immunologically target WT1, and provides insights into the requirements necessary to establish potent persistent T-cell responses in patients.

Chapuis, A.G.; Ragnarsson, G. B.; Nguyen, H. N.; Chaney, C. N.; Pufnock, J. S.; Schmitt, T. M.; Duerkopp, N.; Roberts, I. M.; Pogosov, G. L.; Ho, W. Y.; Ochsenreither, S.; Wolfl, M.; Bar, M.; Radich, J. P.; Yee, C; Greenberg, P. D.

2013-01-01

280

HHV-8 is associated with a plasmablastic variant of Castleman disease that is linked to HHV-8-positive plasmablastic lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Castleman disease (CD) is a lymphoprolif- erative disorder of unknown etiology that is associated with the development of secondary tumors, including B-cell lym- phoma. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvi- rus) sequences have been described in some cases of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Using a monoclonal anti- body against an HHV-8-latent nuclear antigen, we show that HHV-8 is specifi-

Nicolas Dupin; Tim L. Diss; Paul Kellam; Micheline Tulliez; Ming-Qing Du; Didier Sicard; Robin A. Weiss; Peter G. Isaacson; Chris Boshoff

281

Autocrine IFN? Controls the Regulatory Function of Lymphoproliferative Double Negative T Cells  

PubMed Central

TCR??+ CD4?CD8?NK? double negative T cells (DN T cells) can act as regulatory T cells to inhibit allograft rejection and autoimmunity. Their role in graft-versus-host disease and mechanisms of suppression remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DN T cells can inhibit CD4+ T cell-mediated GVHD in a semi-allogeneic model of bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, we present evidence of a novel autocrine IFN? signaling pathway in Fas-deficient C57BL/6.lpr (B6.lpr) DN T cells. B6.lpr DN T cells lacking IFN? or its receptor were impaired in their ability to suppress syngeneic CD4+ T cells responding to alloantigen stimulation both in vitro and in vivo. Autocrine IFN? signaling was required for sustained B6.lpr DN T cell IFN? secretion in vivo and for upregulation of surface Fas ligand expression during TCR stimulation. Fas ligand (FasL) expression by B6.lpr DN T cells permitted lysis of activated CD4+ T cells and was required for suppression of GVHD. Collectively, our data indicate that DN T cells can inhibit GVHD and that IFN? plays a critical autocrine role in controlling the regulatory function of B6.lpr DN T cells.

Juvet, Stephen C.; Han, Mei; Vanama, Ramesh; Joe, Betty; Kim, Edward Y.; Zhao, Fei Linda; Jeon, Caroline; Adeyi, Oyedele; Zhang, Li

2012-01-01

282

Immune deficiency as a risk factor in Epstein-Barr virus-induced malignant diseases.  

PubMed Central

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous DNA virus that normally infects silently, establishing lifelong latency. Substantial empirical observations support the view that immunodeficiency is permissive in EBV-induced lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD). Primary immune deficient patients such as those with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease and individuals with acquired immune deficiency secondary to immunosuppressive drugs for organ transplantation or individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus are also at very high risk for lethal LPD. The importance of immunodeficiency and EBV in the development of head and neck carcinomas and uterine cervical carcinoma is less clear. Methods are available for detecting immunodeficiency and EBV genome and thus preventive strategies are being developed to preclude LPD from occurring.

Purtilo, D T; Okano, M; Grierson, H L

1990-01-01

283

Late de novo minimal change disease in a renal allograft.  

PubMed

Among the causes of the nephrotic syndrome in renal allografts, minimal change disease is a rarity with only few cases described in the medical literature. Most cases described have occurred early in the post-transplant course. There is no established treatment for the condition but prognosis is favorable. We describe a case of minimal change disease that developed 8 years after a successful transplantation of a renal allograft in a middle-aged woman. The nephrotic syndrome was accompanied by deterioration of allograft function. Treatment with mycophenolate mofetil was successful in inducing remission and stabilizing allograft function. PMID:19237816

Madhan, Krishan K; Temple-Camp, Cynric R E

2009-03-01

284

Surgically Curable Non-Iron Deficiency Microcytic Anemia: Castleman’s Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground: Castleman’s disease (CD) is a rare, benign lymphoproliferative disorder that can involve single lymph node stations or can be systemic. Unicentric CD in patients with microcytic anemia is rarely described in the English literature. Case Report: We describe the case of a 19-year-old Chinese woman with hyaline vascular type of unicentric CD presenting as severe non-iron deficiency microcytic anemia.

Chien-Hsiang Weng; Joe-Bin Chen; John Wang; Cheng-Chung Wu; Yuan Yu; Tseng-Hsi Lin

2011-01-01

285

Sequence Conservation and Differential Expression of Marek's Disease Virus MicroRNAs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marek's disease virus (MDV), a herpesvirus that causes a lymphoproliferative disorder in chickens, encodes a number of microRNAs derived primarily from two locations in the MDV genome. One cluster of microRNA genes flanks the meq oncogene, and a second cluster is found within the latency-associated transcript (LAT) region. The sequences of MDV microRNAs from a collection of field and reference

Robin Morgan; Amy Anderson; Erin Bernberg; Sachin Kamboj; Emily Huang; Grace Lagasse; Grace Isaacs; Mark Parcells; Blake C. Meyers; Pamela J. Green; Joan Burnside

2008-01-01

286

Identification of T-Cell Epitopes in Nonstructural Proteins of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Porcine T-cell recognition of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) nonstructural proteins (NSP) was tested using in vitro lymphoproliferative responses. Lymphocytes were obtained from outbred pigs experimentally infected with FMDV. Of the different NSP, polypeptides 3A, 3B, and 3C gave the highest stimulations in the in vitro assays. The use of overlapping synthetic peptides allowed the identification of amino acid regions within

ESTHER BLANCO; MERCEDES GARCIA-BRIONES; ARANTZA SANZ-PARRA; PAULA GOMES; ELIANDRE DE OLIVEIRA; MARI LUZ VALERO; DAVID ANDREU; VICTORIA LEY; FRANCISCO SOBRINO

2001-01-01

287

Monocytes promote tumor cell survival in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and are impaired in their ability to differentiate into mature dendritic cells  

PubMed Central

A variety of nonmalignant cells present in the tumor microenvironment promotes tumorigenesis by stimulating tumor cell growth and metastasis or suppressing host immunity. The role of such stromal cells in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is incompletely understood. Monocyte-derived cells (MDCs), including professional antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs), play a central role in T-cell biology. Here, we provide evidence that monocytes promote the survival of malignant T cells and demonstrate that MDCs are abundant within the tumor microenvironment of T cell–derived lymphomas. Malignant T cells were observed to remain viable during in vitro culture with autologous monocytes, but cell death was significantly increased after monocyte depletion. Furthermore, monocytes prevent the induction of cell death in T-cell lymphoma lines in response to either serum starvation or doxorubicin, and promote the engraftment of these cells in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. Monocytes are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment by CCL5 (RANTES), where their differentiation into mature DCs is impaired by tumor-derived interleukin-10. Collectively, the data presented demonstrate a previously undescribed role for monocytes in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

Wilcox, Ryan A.; Wada, David A.; Ziesmer, Steven C.; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Comfere, Nneka I.; Dietz, Allan B.; Novak, Anne J.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Pittelkow, Mark R.

2009-01-01

288

Detection of heterogeneous Epstein-Barr virus gene expression patterns within individual post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

Using RT-PCR analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent gene transcription in EBV-harboring cell lines (JY and RAJI) and in post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PT-LPDs), we detected transcription of all tested latent genes (EBNA1, EBNA2, LMP1, LMP2A, and BARF0) in all cases, suggesting the presence of similar EBV expression patterns in both PT-LPDs and cell lines. In addition, the detection of immediate early (ZEBRA) and early gene (BHRF1) transcripts in cell lines and PT-LPDs indicates that activation of the virus lytic cycle occurs. To investigate EBV expression patterns at the single-cell level, a combination of immunohistochemistry and RNA in situ hybridization (including double-staining procedures) was used. In the JY and RAJI cell lines, the latency type 3 expression pattern was detected in 80 to 90% of the cells as shown by the co-expression of EBNA2 and LMP1. In contrast, in the three PT-LPDs that could be analyzed by double staining, cells expressing both EBNA2 and LMP1 were rarely detected. A mixture of at least three different cell populations were identified: (1) cells exclusively expressing EBER1/2 and EBNA1 (latency type 1); (2) cells expressing EBER1/2, EBNA1, and LMP1 (latency type 2); and (3) cells expressing EBER1/2, EBNA1, and EBNA2 in the absence of LMP1. Activation of the lytic cycle was observed in a small minority of cells, as demonstrated by detection of ZEBRA and EA-D in all cases and GP350/220 in two cases. Thus, in contrast to EBV-transformed cell lines, the observed EBV gene expression pattern in PT-LPDs reflects a mixture of multiple EBV-harboring subpopulations expressing different subsets of EBV-encoded proteins. These data indicate that the operational definitions of EBV latencies in vitro cannot easily be applied to PT-LPDs but that a continuum of different latency expression patterns can be detected at the single cell level in these lymphomas with, in a small minority of cells, progression to the virus lytic cycle. PMID:7573368

Oudejans, J J; Jiwa, M; van den Brule, A J; Grässer, F A; Horstman, A; Vos, W; Kluin, P M; van der Valk, P; Walboomers, J M; Meijer, C J

1995-10-01

289

Detection of heterogeneous Epstein-Barr virus gene expression patterns within individual post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed Central

Using RT-PCR analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent gene transcription in EBV-harboring cell lines (JY and RAJI) and in post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PT-LPDs), we detected transcription of all tested latent genes (EBNA1, EBNA2, LMP1, LMP2A, and BARF0) in all cases, suggesting the presence of similar EBV expression patterns in both PT-LPDs and cell lines. In addition, the detection of immediate early (ZEBRA) and early gene (BHRF1) transcripts in cell lines and PT-LPDs indicates that activation of the virus lytic cycle occurs. To investigate EBV expression patterns at the single-cell level, a combination of immunohistochemistry and RNA in situ hybridization (including double-staining procedures) was used. In the JY and RAJI cell lines, the latency type 3 expression pattern was detected in 80 to 90% of the cells as shown by the co-expression of EBNA2 and LMP1. In contrast, in the three PT-LPDs that could be analyzed by double staining, cells expressing both EBNA2 and LMP1 were rarely detected. A mixture of at least three different cell populations were identified: (1) cells exclusively expressing EBER1/2 and EBNA1 (latency type 1); (2) cells expressing EBER1/2, EBNA1, and LMP1 (latency type 2); and (3) cells expressing EBER1/2, EBNA1, and EBNA2 in the absence of LMP1. Activation of the lytic cycle was observed in a small minority of cells, as demonstrated by detection of ZEBRA and EA-D in all cases and GP350/220 in two cases. Thus, in contrast to EBV-transformed cell lines, the observed EBV gene expression pattern in PT-LPDs reflects a mixture of multiple EBV-harboring subpopulations expressing different subsets of EBV-encoded proteins. These data indicate that the operational definitions of EBV latencies in vitro cannot easily be applied to PT-LPDs but that a continuum of different latency expression patterns can be detected at the single cell level in these lymphomas with, in a small minority of cells, progression to the virus lytic cycle. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7

Oudejans, J. J.; Jiwa, M.; van den Brule, A. J.; Grasser, F. A.; Horstman, A.; Vos, W.; Kluin, P. M.; van der Valk, P.; Walboomers, J. M.; Meijer, C. J.

1995-01-01

290

In vitro lymphoproliferative assays with HgCl2 cannot identify patients with systemic symptoms attributed to dental amalgam.  

PubMed

Dental amalgam is suspected, by some exposed individuals, to cause various systemic psychological, sensory, and neurological symptoms. Since not all amalgam-bearers experience such reactions, an individual characteristic--for example, a susceptible immune system--might explain these conditions. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of allergy. With HgCl2 as the antigen, however, the test is hampered, because Hg2+ can cause unspecific lymphocyte proliferation, optimal at 1.4 to 9.5 micrograms HgCl2/mL. Recently, the use of suboptimal HgCl2 concentrations (< or = 0.5 microgram/mL) has been suggested to circumvent these problems. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with systemic symptoms alleged to result from the presence of dental amalgam differ from healthy controls, with reference to in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL. Three different test protocols--lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) in micro- and macro-cultures, and the memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA)--were used. Other immune parameters--such as a standard patch test for dental materials, the number of T- and B-lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK cells in peripheral blood, allergic symptoms, and predisposition--were also investigated. Twenty-three amalgam patients, 30 healthy blood donors with amalgam, ten healthy subjects without amalgam, and nine patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) adjacent to dental amalgam and a positive patch test to Hg0 were tested. None of the investigated immune parameters revealed any significant differences between amalgam patients and controls. The sensitivity of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation ranged from 33 to 67%, with the OLP patients as a positive control group, and the specificity from 0 to 70% for healthy controls with a negative patch test to Hg0. Thus, despite the use of HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL, a high frequency of positive results was obtained among healthy subjects with or without dental amalgam. Consequently, in vitro lymphocyte proliferation with HgCl2 cannot be used as an objective marker for mercury allergy in dental amalgam-bearers. PMID:10439033

Cederbrant, K; Gunnarsson, L G; Hultman, P; Norda, R; Tibbling-Grahn, L

1999-08-01

291

Combined immunodeficiency with life-threatening EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in patients lacking functional CD27.  

PubMed

CD27, a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, interacts with CD70 and influences T-, B- and NK-cell functions. Disturbance of this axis impairs immunity and memory generation against viruses including Epstein Barr virus (EBV), influenza, and others. CD27 is commonly used as marker of memory B cells for the classification of B-cell deficiencies including common variable immune deficiency. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping including expression analysis of CD27 on lymphoid cells was followed by capillary sequencing of CD27 in index patients, their parents, and non-affected siblings. More comprehensive genetic analysis employed single nucleotide polymorphism-based homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Analysis of exome sequencing data was performed at two centers using slightly different data analysis pipelines, each based on the Genome Analysis ToolKit Best Practice version 3 recommendations. A comprehensive clinical characterization was correlated to genotype. We report the simultaneous confirmation of human CD27 deficiency in 3 independent families (8 patients) due to a homozygous mutation (p. Cys53Tyr) revealed by whole exome sequencing, leading to disruption of an evolutionarily conserved cystein knot motif of the transmembrane receptor. Phenotypes varied from asymptomatic memory B-cell deficiency (n=3) to EBV-associated hemophagocytosis and lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD; n=3) and malignant lymphoma (n=2; +1 after LPD). Following EBV infection, hypogammaglobulinemia developed in at least 3 of the affected individuals, while specific anti-viral and anti-polysaccharide antibodies and EBV-specific T-cell responses were detectable. In severely affected patients, numbers of iNKT cells and NK-cell function were reduced. Two of 8 patients died, 2 others underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation successfully, and one received anti-CD20 (rituximab) therapy repeatedly. Since homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing did not reveal additional modifying factors, our findings suggest that lack of functional CD27 predisposes towards a combined immunodeficiency associated with potentially fatal EBV-driven hemo-phagocytosis, lymphoproliferation, and lymphoma development. PMID:22801960

Salzer, Elisabeth; Daschkey, Svenja; Choo, Sharon; Gombert, Michael; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Ginzel, Sebastian; Schwendinger, Martina; Haas, Oskar A; Fritsch, Gerhard; Pickl, Winfried F; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Borkhardt, Arndt; Boztug, Kaan; Bienemann, Kirsten; Seidel, Markus G

2012-07-16

292

Combined immunodeficiency with life-threatening EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in patients lacking functional CD27  

PubMed Central

CD27, a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, interacts with CD70 and influences T-, B- and NK-cell functions. Disturbance of this axis impairs immunity and memory generation against viruses including Epstein Barr virus (EBV), influenza, and others. CD27 is commonly used as marker of memory B cells for the classification of B-cell deficiencies including common variable immune deficiency. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping including expression analysis of CD27 on lymphoid cells was followed by capillary sequencing of CD27 in index patients, their parents, and non-affected siblings. More comprehensive genetic analysis employed single nucleotide polymorphism-based homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Analysis of exome sequencing data was performed at two centers using slightly different data analysis pipelines, each based on the Genome Analysis ToolKit Best Practice version 3 recommendations. A comprehensive clinical characterization was correlated to genotype. We report the simultaneous confirmation of human CD27 deficiency in 3 independent families (8 patients) due to a homozygous mutation (p. Cys53Tyr) revealed by whole exome sequencing, leading to disruption of an evolutionarily conserved cystein knot motif of the transmembrane receptor. Phenotypes varied from asymptomatic memory B-cell deficiency (n=3) to EBV-associated hemophagocytosis and lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD; n=3) and malignant lymphoma (n=2; +1 after LPD). Following EBV infection, hypogammaglobulinemia developed in at least 3 of the affected individuals, while specific anti-viral and anti-polysaccharide antibodies and EBV-specific T-cell responses were detectable. In severely affected patients, numbers of iNKT cells and NK-cell function were reduced. Two of 8 patients died, 2 others underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation successfully, and one received anti-CD20 (rituximab) therapy repeatedly. Since homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing did not reveal additional modifying factors, our findings suggest that lack of functional CD27 predisposes towards a combined immunodeficiency associated with potentially fatal EBV-driven hemo-phagocytosis, lymphoproliferation, and lymphoma development.

Salzer, Elisabeth; Daschkey, Svenja; Choo, Sharon; Gombert, Michael; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Ginzel, Sebastian; Schwendinger, Martina; Haas, Oskar A.; Fritsch, Gerhard; Pickl, Winfried F.; Forster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Borkhardt, Arndt; Boztug, Kaan; Bienemann, Kirsten; Seidel, Markus G.

2013-01-01

293

Post-Transplant Opportunistic Infection: Case of Mycobacterium Haemophilum Masquerading as Leprosy in a Renal Transplant Patient  

PubMed Central

Abstract Introduction Immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation (SOT) predisposes patients to the development of opportunistic infections that manifest in many ways including cutaneous infection. Skin lesions in immunosuppressed patients have a broad differential including both infectious and non-infectious etiologies. Skin infections by mycobacteria are relatively rare and most are due to nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM). One such NTM, Mycobacterium haemophilum, is generally reported in opportunistic skin infections often associated with water exposure. Very rarely, M. leprae also has been reported as a cause of opportunistic skin infections in SOT recipients. Both pathogens may be difficult to distinguish both clinically and pathologically, but culture can distinguish between the two because M. haemophilum will grow and M. leprae will not. We present a case of M. haemophilum cutaneous infection in a renal transplant recipient that was initially felt to be due to M. leprae based on biopsy appearance. Case Report A 67-year-old Asian man with a history of renal transplant in 2006 presented to an outside facility with a 4 month history of swelling and rash over his right lower extremity. Examination revealed multiple non-pruritic, painless, erythematous plaques and edema over the right residual limb. Treatment with anti-fungal cream was unsuccessful and steroid cream resulted in worsening of rash. Biopsy showed tuberculoid granulomatous dermatitis with no visualized acid fast bacilli (AFB) but neuronal invasion that was concerning for leprosy. He was referred to the Infectious Disease service. The patient's history was also significant for DM, PVD status post right below the knee amputation, and travel or residence in Thailand, Vietnam, and Panama. Patient had been on immunosuppression since 2006 with cyclosporine, mycophenolate, and low dose prednisone. Due to the concern for leprosy, a tissue sample was obtained at our facility for pathology and AFB culture. Biopsy was notable for granulomatous dermatitis and presence of AFB consistent with borderline tuberculoid leprosy. Culture, however, was positive for AFB and final identification revealed M. haemophilum by PCR. Patient was treated initially with clarithromycin then ciprofloxacin was added based on results of susceptibility testing. The patient has had a good clinical response with significant improvement of the rash. Discussion NTM are known to cause skin infections in SOT patients. M. leprae is a very rare pathogen whereas other NTM such as M. haemophilum are more common. Nerve involvement is a common feature of M. leprae and is considered to be highly suggestive of leprosy in the appropriate clinical setting. This case was unique as the initial biopsy showed neuronal invasion, leading to the suspicion for leprosy, but the culture subsequently grew M. haemophilum. This is the first known case describing neuronal invasion caused by M. haemophilum.

Ferguson, Tomas; Denunzio, Troy; Arora, Navin

2013-01-01

294

Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies  

PubMed Central

A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, Castleman’s disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist.

Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

2011-01-01

295

Risk Factors for Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease After HLA-Identical Sibling Bone Marrow Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an important complication of bone marrow transplantation. We analyzed risk factors for chronic GVHD in 2,534 recipients of HLA-identical sibling transplants surviving at least 90 days after transplantation. The actuarial probability of develop- ing chronic GVHD within three years posttransplant was 46% T 3% (95% confidence interval). The most important risk factor for chronic GVHD

Kerry Atkinson; Mary M. Horowitz; Robert Peter Gale; Dirk W. van Bekkum; Eliane Gluckman; Robert A. Good; Niels Jacobsen; Hans-Jochem Kolb; Alfred A. Rimm; Olle Ringden; Ciril Rozman; Kathleen A. Sobocinski

2010-01-01

296

Value of the First Post-Transplant Biopsy for Predicting Long-Term Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy (CAV) and Graft Failure in Heart Transplant Patients  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is the principal cause of long-term graft failure following heart transplantation. Early identification of patients at risk of CAV is essential to target invasive follow-up procedures more effectively and to establish appropriate therapies. We evaluated the prognostic value of the first heart biopsy (median: 9 days post-transplant) versus all biopsies obtained within the first three months for the prediction of CAV and graft failure due to CAV. Methods and Findings In a prospective cohort study, we developed multivariate regression models evaluating markers of atherothrombosis (fibrin, antithrombin and tissue plasminogen activator [tPA]) and endothelial activation (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) in serial biopsies obtained during the first three months post-transplantation from 172 patients (median follow-up?=?6.3 years; min?=?0.37 years, max?=?16.3 years). Presence of fibrin was the dominant predictor in first-biopsy models (Odds Ratio [OR] for one- and 10-year graft failure due to CAV?=?38.70, p?=?0.002, 95% CI?=?4.00–374.77; and 3.99, p?=?0.005, 95% CI?=?1.53–10.40) and loss of tPA was predominant in three-month models (OR for one- and 10-year graft failure due to CAV?=?1.81, p?=?0.025, 95% CI?=?1.08–3.03; and 1.31, p?=?0.001, 95% CI?=?1.12–1.55). First-biopsy and three-month models had similar predictive and discriminative accuracy and were comparable in their capacities to correctly classify patient outcomes, with the exception of 10-year graft failure due to CAV in which the three-month model was more predictive. Both models had particularly high negative predictive values (e.g., First-biopsy vs. three-month models: 99% vs. 100% at 1-year and 96% vs. 95% at 10-years). Conclusions Patients with absence of fibrin in the first biopsy and persistence of normal tPA in subsequent biopsies rarely develop CAV or graft failure during the next 10 years and potentially could be monitored less invasively. Presence of early risk markers in the transplanted heart may be secondary to ischemia/reperfusion injury, a potentially modifiable factor.

Labarrere, Carlos A.; Woods, John R.; Hardin, James W.; Campana, Gonzalo L.; Ortiz, Miguel A.; Jaeger, Beate R.; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Pitts, Douglas E.; Kirlin, Philip C.

2012-01-01

297

Interleukin-21 overexpression dominates T cell response to Epstein-Barr virus in a fatal case of X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1.  

PubMed

Interleukin-21 (IL-21) is a cytokine whose actions are closely related to B cell differentiation into plasma cells as well as to CD8(+) cytolytic T cell effector and memory generation, influencing the T lymphocyte response to different viruses. X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP-1) is a primary immunodeficiency syndrome that is characterized by a high susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus. We observed in a pediatric patient with XLP-1 that IL-21 was expressed in nearly all peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. However, IL-21 could not be found in the lymph nodes, suggesting massive mobilization of activated cells toward the infection's target organs, where IL-21-producing cells were detected, resulting in large areas of tissue damage. PMID:23467775

Ortega, Consuelo; Estévez, Orlando A; Fernández, Silvia; Aguado, Rocío; Rumbao, José M; Gonzalez, Teresa; Pérez-Navero, Juan L; Santamaría, Manuel

2013-03-06

298

Bone disease in organ transplant patients: pathogenesis and management.  

PubMed

Bone disease is common in recipients of kidney, heart, lung, liver, and bone marrow transplants, and causes debilitating complications, such as osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, bone pain, and fractures. The frequency of fractures ranges from 6% to 45% for kidney transplant recipients to 22% to 42% for heart, lung, and liver transplant recipients. Bone disease in transplant patients is the sum of complex mechanisms that involve both preexisting bone disease before transplant and post-transplant bone loss due to the effects of immunosuppressive medications. Evaluation of bone disease should preferably start before the transplant or in the early post-transplant period and include assessment of bone mineral density and other metabolic factors that influence bone health. This requires close coordination between the primary care physician and transplant team. Patients should be stratified based on their fracture risk. Prevention and treatment include risk factor reduction, antiresorptive medications, such as bisphosphonates and calcitonin, calcitriol, and/or gonadal hormone replacement. A steroid-avoidance protocol may be considered. PMID:22691902

Chauhan, Veeraish; Ranganna, Karthik M; Chauhan, Nishtha; Vaid, Megha; Kelepouris, Ellie

2012-05-01

299

Castleman Disease: An Unexpected Cause of a Solitary Pleural Mass  

PubMed Central

Castleman disease (CD) is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder, the etiology of which is unclear. Clinically it may manifest as localized disease (unicentric) or disseminated disease (multicentric). CD occurs in the thorax in 70% of cases, abdomen and pelvis in 15%, and in the neck in 10–15% of cases. We present a case of a pleural mass located posteriorly in a paraspinal location, which was discovered incidentally in a 50-year-old man and was subsequently resected followed by an unexpected diagnosis of Castleman disease on histological examination. In this report, we review the clinical and histological findings in a rare presentation of Castleman disease and discuss the findings in this case as part of an overall review of the typical radiological findings seen in Castleman disease.

Moloney, Fiachra; Twomey, Maria; Hinchion, John; Maher, Michael

2013-01-01

300

Malignant lymphoma-associated autoimmune diseases--a descriptive epidemiological study.  

PubMed

Lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune diseases have some common aspects in their clinical appearance. We reviewed 940 patient charts with malignant lymphomas to assess the rate of associated autoimmune diseases. Of 421 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients (230 males, 191 females), 32 (7.6%) had an autoimmune disease (26 females, six males, mean age 48.3 years). The most common diagnosis was Sjögren's syndrome. The other cases were autoimmune skin diseases (5), thyroiditis (3), polymyositis (2), scleroderma (2), other musculoskeletal disorders (2), rheumatoid arthritis (1), vasculitis (1), undifferentiated collagenosis (1), colitis ulcerosa (1), autoimmune hepatitis (1), Addison's disease (1), and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (1). Of 519 Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (308 males, 211 females), an associated autoimmune disease occurred in 45 (8.6%) (25 females, 20 males, mean age 39.2 years). In 31 cases, we found autoimmune thyroid disorders, then came glomerulonephritis (3), immune thrombocytopenia (3), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (2), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (1), seronegative spondylarthritis (1), systemic lupus erythematosus (1), mixed connective tissue disease (1), scleroderma (1), and vasculitis (1). We also analyzed histology, choice of treatment, and sequence of appearance of the disease types. We found a difference between NHL and Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, since in NHL autoimmunity - mostly from Sjögren's syndrome - preceded the lymphoma diagnosis (70%), but in Hodgkin's the autoimmunity developed mainly after the treatment of malignancy. The relatively high prevalence of autoimmune diseases in malignant lymphomas has several explanations. Clinicians have to consider autoimmunity when treating lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:12426661

Váróczy, László; Gergely, Lajos; Zeher, Margit; Szegedi, Gyula; Illés, Arpád

2002-08-29

301

Radiotherapy for steroid-resistant laryngeal Rosai-Dorfman disease  

PubMed Central

Rosai–Dorfman disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder that can have nodal and extranodal manifestations. In the absence of established guidelines for the management of this condition, various therapeutic modalities are used, including radiotherapy. Radiation dosages and fractionation schedules have not been reported in all instances. We present a case in which glottic and subglottic Rosai–Dorfman lesions causing airway obstruction in a frail steroid-refractory patient were put into complete remission using radiotherapy. The lesions responded transiently to a course of prednisone, but responded completely to external-beam radiation, with minimal side effects to the patient.

Toguri, D.; Louie, A.V.; Rizkalla, K.; Franklin, J.; Rodrigues, G.; Venkatesan, V.

2011-01-01

302

Correction of chronic granulomatous disease after second unrelated-donor umbilical cord blood transplantation.  

PubMed

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), but many patients lack a suitably matched related donor. We report successful outcomes after mismatched, unrelated-donor umbilical cord blood transplantation (uUCBT) in two boys with X-linked CGD. Both patients experienced autologous recovery after first transplants, required second transplants to achieve durable donor engraftment, and are alive 27 and 15 months post-transplant. Both had invasive fungal disease and received granulocyte transfusions. In conclusion, uUCBT is effective in children with CGD, but immunosuppression in the conditioning regimen may need to be increased to decrease the risk of graft rejection. PMID:17941061

Parikh, Suhag H; Szabolcs, Paul; Prasad, Vinod K; Lakshminarayanan, Sonali; Martin, Paul L; Driscoll, Timothy A; Kurtzberg, Joanne

2007-12-01

303

Antibodies Elicited by Naked DNA Vaccination against the Complementary determining Region 3 Hypervariable Region of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Idiotypic Determinants of B-lymphoproliferative Disorders Specifically React with Patients' Tumor Cells 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several reports have suggested that the mechanism of protection in- duced by antiidiotypic vaccination against low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders is likely to be antibody mediated. Here we test the hypothesis that DNA vaccination with the short peptide encompassing the comple- mentary-determining region 3 hypervariable region of immunoglobulin heavy chain (VH-CDR3) may elicit a specific antibody immune response able to recognize the

Monica Rinaldi; Francesco Ria; Paola Parrella; Emanuela Signori; Anna Serra; Silvia A. Ciafre; Isabella Vespignani; Marzia Lazzari; Maria Giulia Farace; Giuseppe Saglio; Vito M. Fazio

304

Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-01-16

305

Plasmablastic lymphoma following transplantation  

PubMed Central

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication following solid organ as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation due to prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmablastic lymphoma, although classically associated with HIV infection, has since been described in transplant patients as a variant of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder with varying clinical presentations. Here we add two additional cases to the literature: one following lung transplantation and one following pancreatic transplantation. In addition, the demographic, therapeutic, and immunophenotypic characteristics from prior reported cases are summarized.

Keglovits, Latoya; Krause, John

2013-01-01

306

Plasmablastic lymphoma following transplantation.  

PubMed

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication following solid organ as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation due to prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmablastic lymphoma, although classically associated with HIV infection, has since been described in transplant patients as a variant of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder with varying clinical presentations. Here we add two additional cases to the literature: one following lung transplantation and one following pancreatic transplantation. In addition, the demographic, therapeutic, and immunophenotypic characteristics from prior reported cases are summarized. PMID:23543973

Van Vrancken, Michael J; Keglovits, Latoya; Krause, John

2013-04-01

307

EORTC, ISCL, and USCLC consensus recommendations for the treatment of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders: lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders (CD30(+) LPDs) are the second most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and include lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Despite the anaplastic cytomorphology of tumor cells that suggest an aggressive course, CD30(+) LPDs are characterized by an excellent prognosis. Although a broad spectrum of therapeutic strategies has been reported, these have been limited mostly to small retrospective cohort series or case reports, and only very few prospective controlled or multicenter studies have been performed, which results in a low level of evidence for most therapies. The response rates to treatment, recurrence rates, and outcome have not been analyzed in a systematic review. Moreover, international guidelines for staging and treatment of CD30(+) LPDs have not yet been presented. Based on a literature analysis and discussions, recommendations were elaborated by a multidisciplinary expert panel of the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, and the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium. The recommendations represent the state-of-the-art management of CD30(+) LPDs and include definitions for clinical endpoints as well as response criteria for future clinical trials in CD30(+) LPDs. PMID:21841159

Kempf, Werner; Pfaltz, Katrin; Vermeer, Maarten H; Cozzio, Antonio; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Bagot, Martine; Olsen, Elise; Kim, Youn H; Dummer, Reinhard; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Whittaker, Sean; Hodak, Emmilia; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Berti, Emilio; Horwitz, Steve; Prince, H Miles; Guitart, Joan; Estrach, Teresa; Sanches, José A; Duvic, Madeleine; Ranki, Annamari; Dreno, Brigitte; Ostheeren-Michaelis, Sonja; Knobler, Robert; Wood, Gary; Willemze, Rein

2011-08-12

308

The Utility of the BIOMED-2 Primers in the Detection of 2 Clonal, B-Lymphoproliferative Disorders Simultaneously Involving the Same Site.  

PubMed

Context.-Molecular tests for clonality performed on atypical lymphoid lesions may yield abnormal results because of the coexistence of monoclonal B lymphocytosis or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in the sample investigated. Objective.-To investigate the ability of the BIOMED-2 sets of primers to identify 2 clonal populations in the same formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sample. Design.-Ten cases with 2 B-lymphoproliferative disorders at the same site were analyzed using 5 BIOMED-2 primer sets (IGH FR1, FR2, FR3, IGK VJ, and IGK VKde). Results.-All 10 cases (100%) showed at least 1 clone; 8 of 10 cases (80%) had 2 clones with at least 1 primer set, and the 2 clones were shown by 4 or 5 primer sets in none of the cases (0%), by 3 sets in 1 of 10 cases (10%), by 2 sets in 4 of 10 cases (40%), and by 1 set in 3 of 10 cases (30%). The most effective set was IGH FR2, detecting 4 of 10 biclonal cases (40%). The IGK VJ and IGK VKde each showed 2 clones in 3 of 10 cases (30% each). The least effective sets were IGH FR1 and FR3, with 2 of 10 cases (20%) each, with IGH FR1 being the least useful. Conclusions.-The BIOMED-2 primers are effective in the detection of 2 clonal populations in the same sample. PMID:24168505

Ly, Brenda; Cotta, Claudiu V

2013-11-01

309

EORTC, ISCL, and USCLC consensus recommendations for the treatment of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders: lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma*  

PubMed Central

Primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders (CD30+ LPDs) are the second most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and include lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Despite the anaplastic cytomorphology of tumor cells that suggest an aggressive course, CD30+ LPDs are characterized by an excellent prognosis. Although a broad spectrum of therapeutic strategies has been reported, these have been limited mostly to small retrospective cohort series or case reports, and only very few prospective controlled or multicenter studies have been performed, which results in a low level of evidence for most therapies. The response rates to treatment, recurrence rates, and outcome have not been analyzed in a systematic review. Moreover, international guidelines for staging and treatment of CD30+ LPDs have not yet been presented. Based on a literature analysis and discussions, recommendations were elaborated by a multidisciplinary expert panel of the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, and the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium. The recommendations represent the state-of-the-art management of CD30+ LPDs and include definitions for clinical endpoints as well as response criteria for future clinical trials in CD30+ LPDs.

Pfaltz, Katrin; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Cozzio, Antonio; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Bagot, Martine; Olsen, Elise; Kim, Youn H.; Dummer, Reinhard; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Whittaker, Sean; Hodak, Emmilia; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Berti, Emilio; Horwitz, Steve; Prince, H. Miles; Guitart, Joan; Estrach, Teresa; Sanches, Jose A.; Duvic, Madeleine; Ranki, Annamari; Dreno, Brigitte; Ostheeren-Michaelis, Sonja; Knobler, Robert; Wood, Gary; Willemze, Rein

2011-01-01

310

A Novel MspI PCR-RFLP in the Human Cytosine 5Methyltransferase Gene: Lack of Relevance for Malignant Lymphoproliferative Disease and Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two alternate allelic forms of human cytosine 5-methyltransferase, 5-MT I and 5-MT II, which differ by the absence or presence of an intronic MspI recognition sequence, have been recognised. The polymorphic region was localised using a series of subprobes prepared upon MspI digestion of the 2.5-kb cDNA probe (hmt-2.5). A PCR-based method was then developed for rapid 5-MT genotyping. The

Aparna N. Bagwe; Mohammed O. Ahmed; M. Franchina; Dominic V. Spagnolo; John M. Papadimitriou; Peter H. Kay

1998-01-01

311

Retrovirus-induced disease in poultry.  

PubMed

Three species of avian retrovirus cause disease in poultry: the avian leukosis/sarcoma virus (ALSV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), and lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) of turkeys. The ALSV can be classified as slowly transforming viruses, which lack a viral oncogene, and acutely transforming viruses, which possess a viral oncogene. Slowly transforming viruses induce late onset leukoses of the B cell lymphoid, erythroid, and myeloid cell lineages, and other tumors, by viral promoter insertion into the genome of a host cell and activation of a cellular protooncogene. The various acutely transforming leukemia and sarcoma viruses induce leukotic or other tumors rapidly and carry one or anther (sometimes two) viral oncogenes, of which some 15 have been identified. The ALSV fall into six envelope subgroups, A through E, and the recently recognized J subgroup, which induces myeloid leukosis. With the exception of Subgroup E viruses, these viruses spread vertically and horizontally as infectious virions, and are termed exogenous viruses. Subgroup E viruses are usually spread genetically as DNA proviruses (often defective) in host germ cell genome, and are termed endogenous viruses. Several other families of endogenous viruses also exist, one of which, endogenous avian retrovirus (EAV), is related to Subgroup J ALV. Exogenous viruses, and sometimes endogenous viruses, can have detrimental effects on commercially important production traits. Exogenous viruses are currently controlled by virus eradication schemes. Reticuloendotheliosis virus, which lacks a viral oncogene, causes chronic B cell and T-cell lymphomas in chickens, and also chronic lymphomas in turkeys and other species of birds. An acutely transforming variant of REV, Strain T, carries a viral oncogene, and induces reticuloendotheliosis within a few days. In chickens and turkeys, REV spreads vertically and horizontally. No commercial control schemes are operated. In turkeys, LPDV infection has occurred in several countries, where it caused a lymphoproliferative disease of uncertain nature. PMID:9706091

Payne, L N

1998-08-01

312

Disease causing mutations in the TNF and TNFR superfamilies: Focus on molecular mechanisms driving disease.  

PubMed

The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor (TNFR) superfamilies comprise multidomain proteins with diverse roles in cell activation, proliferation and cell death. These proteins play pivotal roles in the initiation, maintenance and termination of immune responses and have vital roles outside the immune system. The discovery and analysis of diseases associated with mutations in these families has revealed crucial mechanistic details of their normal functions. This review focuses on mutations causing four different diseases, which represent distinct pathological mechanisms that can exist within these superfamilies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS; FAS mutations), common variable immunodeficiency (CVID; TACI mutations), tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS; TNFR1 mutations) and hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED; EDA1/EDAR mutations). In particular, we highlight how mutations have revealed information about normal receptor-ligand function and how such studies might direct new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21724465

Lobito, Adrian A; Gabriel, Tanit L; Medema, Jan Paul; Kimberley, Fiona C

2011-07-02

313

Folliculocentric B-cell-rich follicular dendritic cells sarcoma: a hitherto unreported morphological variant mimicking lymphoproliferative disorders.  

PubMed

We report three cases of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) showing a hitherto undescribed histological pattern consisting of nodular tumor growth associated with small B lymphocytes. FDCS tumor cells consistently showed large epithelioid features and were intermingled with small lymphocytes in the nodules in two cases, whereas they formed cohesive aggregates surrounded by lymphocyte mantle in the other. These features were easily confused with lymphomatous proliferations and, in particular, subtypes of Hodgkin lymphoma, high-grade follicular lymphoma, and germinotropic large B-cell lymphomas. The diagnosis was established by the use of a broad panel of antibodies that showed a variable expression of the FDC markers CD21, CD23, CD35, clusterin, podoplanin, claudin 4, epidermal growth factor receptor, and CXCL13. The associated B lymphocytes revealed a mantle zone B phenotype, with expression of CD20 and PAX5, together with TCL1 and IgD. Of notice, in all cases, morphological features suggesting hyaline-vascular Castleman disease were recognized in the interfollicular areas, containing scattered epithelioid cells similar to those found in the nodules, thus providing a useful clue for FDCS diagnosis. Of the 3 cases, 1 presented multiple recurrences unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and finally died of disease 14 years after diagnosis. This study further emphasizes the extreme variability of morphological presentation of FDCS and expands the spectrum of lesions showing a nodular growth pattern occurring in human lymph nodes. PMID:21835430

Lorenzi, Luisa; Lonardi, Silvia; Petrilli, Giulia; Tanda, Francesco; Bella, Michelangelo; Laurino, Licia; Rossi, Giuseppe; Facchetti, Fabio

2011-08-10

314

Epstein-Barr virus myelitis and Castleman's disease in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Few cases of Epstein-Barr virus myelitis have been described in the literature. Multi-centric Castleman's disease is a lymphoproliferative\\u000a disorder that is well known for its associations with the human immunodeficiency virus, human herpes virus 8, and Kaposi's\\u000a sarcoma. The concurrent presentation of these two diseases in a patient at the same time is extremely unusual.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Case Presentation  We describe the case

Costantine Albany; George Psevdos; Jasminka Balderacchi; Victoria L Sharp

2011-01-01

315

Truncated form of TGF-?RII, but not its absence, induces memory CD8+ T cell expansion and lymphoproliferative disorder in mice.  

PubMed

Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the generation of effector and memory CD8(+) T cells. We used two different models, transgenic expression of truncated (dominant negative) form of TGF-?RII (dnTGF?RII) and Cre-mediated deletion of the floxed TGF-?RII to examine the role of TGF-? signaling in the formation, function, and homeostatic proliferation of memory CD8(+) T cells. Blocking TGF-? signaling in effector CD8(+) T cells using both of these models demonstrated a role for TGF-? in regulating the number of short-lived effector cells but did not alter memory CD8(+) T cell formation and their function upon Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice. Interestingly, however, a massive lymphoproliferative disorder and cellular transformation were observed in Ag-experienced and homeostatically generated memory CD8(+) T cells only in cells that express the dnTGF?RII and not in cells with a complete deletion of TGF-?RII. Furthermore, the development of transformed memory CD8(+) T cells expressing dnTGF?RII was IL-7- and IL-15-independent, and MHC class I was not required for their proliferation. We show that transgenic expression of the dnTGF?RII, rather than the absence of TGF-?RII-mediated signaling, is responsible for dysregulated expansion of memory CD8(+) T cells. This study uncovers a previously unrecognized dominant function of the dnTGF?RII in CD8(+) T cell proliferation and cellular transformation, which is caused by a mechanism that is different from the absence of TGF-? signaling. These results should be considered during both basic and translational studies where there is a desire to block TGF-? signaling in CD8(+) T cells. PMID:23686479

Ishigame, Harumichi; Mosaheb, Munir M; Sanjabi, Shomyseh; Flavell, Richard A

2013-05-17

316

Methotrexate-related Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in the gingiva of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

It is well recognized that patients with immunodeficiency have a high risk of development of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with the occurrence of LPDs. Methotrexate (MTX) is one of the common cause of iatrogenic-associated LPD, and approximately 40-50% of MTX-related LPD cases occur in extranodal sites. However, the occurrence of MTX-related LPD in the gingiva is extremely rare. Herein, we report the fourth documented case of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD occurring in the gingiva of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 76-year-old Japanese female with a 10-year history of RA, who was treated with MTX and infliximab, presented with a tumorous lesion in the gingiva. Biopsy of the gingiva tumor revealed diffuse proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells with cleaved nuclei containing conspicuous nucleoli. These lymphoid cells were CD20- and EBER-positive. Therefore, a diagnosis of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD showing features of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that occurred in the gingiva was made. Although the occurrence of LPD in the oral region, as seen in the present case, is rare, the prevalence of this disorder may be on the rise due to the increased number of patients undergoing immunosuppression therapy. Moreover, immunosenescence can also be a cause of EBV-associated LPD. Therefore, recognition of the occurrence of this disorder in the oral cavity and consideration of the clinical history can facilitate the correct diagnosis.

Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

2013-01-01

317

Methotrexate-related Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in the gingiva of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

It is well recognized that patients with immunodeficiency have a high risk of development of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with the occurrence of LPDs. Methotrexate (MTX) is one of the common cause of iatrogenic-associated LPD, and approximately 40-50% of MTX-related LPD cases occur in extranodal sites. However, the occurrence of MTX-related LPD in the gingiva is extremely rare. Herein, we report the fourth documented case of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD occurring in the gingiva of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 76-year-old Japanese female with a 10-year history of RA, who was treated with MTX and infliximab, presented with a tumorous lesion in the gingiva. Biopsy of the gingiva tumor revealed diffuse proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells with cleaved nuclei containing conspicuous nucleoli. These lymphoid cells were CD20- and EBER-positive. Therefore, a diagnosis of MTX-related EBV-associated LPD showing features of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that occurred in the gingiva was made. Although the occurrence of LPD in the oral region, as seen in the present case, is rare, the prevalence of this disorder may be on the rise due to the increased number of patients undergoing immunosuppression therapy. Moreover, immunosenescence can also be a cause of EBV-associated LPD. Therefore, recognition of the occurrence of this disorder in the oral cavity and consideration of the clinical history can facilitate the correct diagnosis. PMID:24133604

Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

2013-09-15

318

Nodal and extranodal plasmacytomas expressing immunoglobulin A: an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder with a low risk of clinical progression  

PubMed Central

Plasmacytomas expressing immunoglobulin A are rare and not well characterized. In this study, nine cases of IgA-positive plasmacytomas presenting in lymph node and three in extranodal sites were analyzed by morphology, immunohistochemistry, and PCR examination of immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light chain genes. Laboratory features were correlated with clinical findings. There were seven males and five females; age range was 10 to 66 years (median, 32 years). Six of the patients were younger than 30-years-old, five of whom had nodal disease. 67% (6/9) of the patients with nodal disease had evidence of immune system dysfunction, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, T-cell deficiency, autoantibodies, arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome, and decreased B-cells. An IgA M-spike was detected in 6/11 cases, and the M-protein was nearly always less than 30 g/L. All patients had an indolent clinical course without progression to plasma cell myeloma. Histologically, IgA plasmacytomas showed an interfollicular or diffuse pattern of plasma cell infiltration. The plasma cells were generally of mature Marschalko type with little or mild pleomorphism and exclusive expression of monotypic IgA. There was an equal expression of kappa and lambda light chains (ratio 6:6). Clonality was demonstrated in 9 of 12 cases: by PCR in 7 cases, by cytogenetic analysis in 1 case, and by immunofixation in 1 case. Clonality did not correlate with pattern of lymph node infiltration. Our results suggest that IgA plasmacytomas may represent a distinct form of extramedullary plasmacytoma characterized by younger age at presentation, frequent lymph node involvement and low risk of progression to plasma cell myeloma.

Shao, Haipeng; Xi, Liqiang; Raffeld, Mark; Pittaluga, Stefania; Dunleavy, Kieron; Wilson, Wyndham; Spector, Nelson; Milito, Cristiane; Morais, Jose Carlos; Jaffe, Elaine S.

2010-01-01

319

Subclinical pulmonary function defects following autologous and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: relationship to total body irradiation and graft-versus-host disease  

SciTech Connect

Pulmonary function results pre- and post-transplant, to a maximum of 4 years, were analyzed in 98 patients with haematological disorders undergoing allogeneic (N = 53) or autologous bone marrow transplantation (N = 45) between 1982 and 1988. All received similar total body irradiation based regimens ranging from 9.5 Gy as a single fraction to 14.4 Gy fractionated. FEV1/FVC as a measure of airway obstruction showed little deterioration except in patients experiencing graft-versus-host disease in whom statistically significant obstructive ventilatory defects were evident by 6 months post-transplant (p less than 0.01). These defects appeared to be permanent. Restrictive ventilatory defects, as measured by reduction in TLC, and defects in diffusing capacity (DLCO and KCO) were also maximal at 6 months post-transplant (p less than 0.01). Both were related, at least in part, to the presence of GVHD (p less than 0.01) or use of single fraction TBI with absorbed lung dose of 8.0 Gy (p less than 0.05). Fractionated TBI resulted in less marked restricted ventilation and impaired gas exchange, which reverted to normal by 2 years, even when the lung dose was increased from 11.0 Gy to between 12.0 and 13.5 Gy. After exclusion of patients with GVHD (30% allografts) there was no significant difference in pulmonary function abnormalities between autograft and allograft recipients.

Tait, R.C.; Burnett, A.K.; Robertson, A.G.; McNee, S.; Riyami, B.M.; Carter, R.; Stevenson, R.D. (Department of Haematology, Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (Scotland))

1991-06-01

320

Multicentric Castleman Disease in an HHV8-Infected Child Born to Consanguineous Parents With Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Childhood multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a rare and unexplained lymphoproliferative disorder. We report a human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8)-infected child, born to consanguineous Comorian parents, who displayed isolated MCD in the absence of any known immunodeficiency. We also systematically review the clinical features of the 32 children previously reported with isolated and unexplained MCD. The characteristics of this patient and the geographic areas of origin of most previous cases suggest that pediatric MCD is associated with HHV-8 infection. Moreover, as previously suggested for Kaposi sarcoma, MCD in childhood may result from inborn errors of immunity to HHV-8 infection.

Moshous, Despina; Cassar, Olivier; Reguerre, Yves; Byun, Minji; Pedergnana, Vincent; Canioni, Danielle; Gessain, Antoine; Oksenhendler, Eric; Fieschi, Claire; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Riviere, Jean-Pierre; Herbigneaux, Rose-Marie; Muszlak, Matthias; Arnaud, Jean-Pierre; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Blanche, Stephane; Plancoulaine, Sabine

2012-01-01

321

A Rare Presentation of a Rare Disease: Pulmonary Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis  

PubMed Central

A 70-year-old female presented with a 4-week history of dry cough and wheezing. Chest radiograph showed a 10.5?cm mass-like density in the anterior mediastinum which had not been previously visualized. Computed tomography scan (CT) of the chest showed a right hilar mass encasing and narrowing right upper lobe bronchus and right mainstem bronchus and secondary atelectatic changes. Biopsy was consistent with a diagnosis of lymphomatoid granulomatosis Grade 3. She responded well clinically and radiologically to therapy. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare EBV-associated disorder which is considered a lymphoproliferative disease. The most common radiographic feature is multiple lung nodules. An isolated hilar mass is an exceptionally rare presentation of this rare disease.

Mohyuddin, Ghulam Rehman; Sultan, Fatima; Khaleeq, Ghulam

2012-01-01

322

Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning  

PubMed Central

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m2; n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT.

Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F.; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Wade, James C.; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A.; Maloney, David G.

2007-01-01

323

Immunosuppressive agents and bone disease in renal transplant patients with hypercalcemia.  

PubMed

Renal transplantation is the definitive treatment for many metabolic abnormalities of uremic patients, although it is only partially effective for renal osteodystrophy, which may interact with posttransplant renal osteopathy. Osteopenic-osteoporotic syndrome represents, together with fractures secondary to osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, the bone complication most related to renal transplantation. Several factors contribute to the pathogenesis of posttransplantation osteoporosis, particularly immunosuppressive treatment. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of factors related to posttransplant renal osteopathy and the clinical impact of immunosuppressive protocols. We studied 24 renal transplant recipients with hypercalcemia. Glomerular filtration rate was >50 mL/min. Mean age, time on dialysis, and time from transplantation were 49.6, 5.4, and 6.9 years, respectively. We evaluated serum and urine calcium and phosphorus, calcitonin, parathormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, urine deoxypyridinoline, telopeptide of type 1 procollagen, 1,25-(OH)(2) and 25-OH vitamin D, parathyroid ultrasound, and computerized bone mineralometry. The combination of sirolimus and steroids resulted in the most disadvantageous outcomes regarding alkaline phosphatase and mineralometry. Calcineurin inhibitors did not significantly influence bone metabolism markers; mycophenolate mofetil evidenced no effect on bone. According to the literature, steroids account for the abnormalities found in our patients and in severe osteopenia. Several factors may contribute to the development of osteoporosis and fractures in transplantation patients, although they are overcome by the prominent effect of steroids. In patients at high risk of osteoporosis, steroid-free therapy should be considered. Everolimus is indicated for diseases with bone loss. Combined therapy with everolimus and mycophenolic acid without cyclosporine and steroids, seemed to be particularly indicated. Prophylactic treatments should be commenced early. No single marker was useful to diagnose posttransplant renal osteopathy. The definitive diagnosis should be made by bone biopsy during transplantation, and noninvasive procedures, such as densitometry and evaluation of biologic markers, may be useful during follow-up. PMID:20534247

Sessa, A; Esposito, A; Iavicoli, G D; Lettieri, E; Dente, G; Costa, C; Bergallo, M; Rossano, R; Capuano, M

2010-05-01

324

Belatacept for prevention of acute rejection in adult patients who have had a kidney transplant: an update  

PubMed Central

In June 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved belatacept for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in adult kidney transplant recipients. This review discusses the use of belatacept for the prevention of acute rejection as part of a maintenance immunosuppression regimen. Belatacept is a selective costimulation blocker designed to provide effective immunosuppression while avoiding the toxicities associated with calcineurin inhibitors. Phase III trial data have demonstrated that belatacept is noninferior to cyclosporine in 1-year patient and allograft survival. Three-year data demonstrate an ongoing improvement in mean measured glomerular filtration rate in belatacept-treated versus cyclosporine-treated patients. However, the rate of acute rejection was higher in belatacept-treated patients compared with cyclosporine. Specifically, there was a higher incidence of Banff type II rejections in patients treated with belatacept. Despite the higher Banff grade, rejections on belatacept were not associated with other factors associated with poor outcomes, such as the development of donor-specific antibodies or reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate. One safety issue that must be considered when using belatacept is the potential for increased risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. There were more cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in belatacept-treated patients, especially in recipients seronegative for Epstein–Barr virus or patients treated with lymphocyte-depleting agents. Therefore, belatacept can be recommended for use in Epstein–Barr virus antibody-positive recipients.

Wojciechowski, David; Vincenti, Flavio

2012-01-01

325

Minimal residual disease after bone marrow transplantation for multiple myeloma: evidence for cure in long-term survivors.  

PubMed

Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can induce long-term complete remission (CR) in patients with multiple myeloma but it is not yet clear whether the disease can be eradicated. We have used immunoglobulin gene fingerprinting, a PCR-based technique, to evaluate minimal residual disease in 5 patients in unmaintained CR 9-60 months after allogeneic BMT. All 5 patients were PCR-positive within the first year after BMT, suggesting that early PCR positivity is common and not predictive of relapse. Three patients were studied at > 1 year post-transplant; one had become PCR-negative at 1 year, a second at 2 years and the third at 4.5 years post-BMT. The ability of the technique to detect clonal evolution was demonstrated by serial studies in a further patient who relapsed post-BMT. The absence of any detectable disease at the molecular level in 3 patients in long-term CR post-transplant suggests that cure of multiple myeloma may be a realistic goal. PMID:8136748

Bird, J M; Russell, N H; Samson, D

1993-12-01

326

Clonal rearrangement for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in systemic Castleman's disease. Association with Epstein-Barr virus.  

PubMed Central

Castleman's disease is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. Both a localized benign variant and an aggressive form with systemic manifestations have been described. To investigate the differences between these variants of Castleman's disease, the authors analyzed lymph node DNA from 4 patients with the localized type and 4 with the systemic type of Castleman's disease for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was also studied by viral genomic DNA probes. They detected clonal rearrangements in 3 of the 4 patients with the systemic variant of Castleman's; no patients with localized disease had rearrangements. Copies of EBV genome were also detected in 2 of the 3 patients with clonal rearrangements. These results suggest that systemic Castleman's disease is a disorder distinct from the classical localized variant in that it may evolve into a clonal lymphoproliferation. Images Figure 1

Hanson, C. A.; Frizzera, G.; Patton, D. F.; Peterson, B. A.; McClain, K. L.; Gajl-Peczalska, K. J.; Kersey, J. H.

1988-01-01

327

Malignancy and mortality in people with coeliac disease: population based cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objective To quantify the risks of malignancy and mortality in people with coeliac disease compared with the general population. Design Population based cohort study. Setting General practice research database. Participants 4732 people with coeliac disease and 23 620 matched controls. Main outcome measures Hazard ratios for malignancy and mortality. Results Of the 4732 people with coeliac disease, 134 (2.8%) had at least one malignancy and 237 (5.0%) died. The overall hazard ratios were: for any malignancy 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.55), for mortality 1.31 (1.13 to 1.51), for gastrointestinal cancer 1.85 (1.22 to 2.81), for breast cancer 0.35 (0.17 to 0.72), for lung cancer 0.34 (0.13 to 0.95), and for lymphoproliferative disease 4.80 (2.71 to 8.50). The increased risk was primarily in the first year after diagnosis, with the risk for only lymphoproliferative disease remaining significantly raised thereafter. After excluding events in the year after diagnosis, the hazard ratio for malignancy was 1.10 (0.87 to 1.39) and for mortality was 1.17 (0.98 to 1.38), giving absolute excess rates of 6 and 17 per 10 000 person years, respectively. Conclusions People with coeliac disease have modest increases in overall risks of malignancy and mortality. Most of this excess risk occurs in the year of follow up after diagnosis. People with coeliac disease also have a noticeably reduced risk of breast cancer. The mechanism of this merits further attention as it may provide insights into the cause of this common malignancy.

West, Joe; Logan, Richard F A; Smith, Chris J; Hubbard, Richard B; Card, Timothy R

2004-01-01

328

Retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene in a Marek's disease T-lymphoma cell line.  

PubMed Central

Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an avian herpesvirus that causes, in chickens, a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by malignant transformation of T lymphocytes. The rapid onset of polyclonal tumors indicates the existence of MDV-encoded oncogenic products. However, the molecular basis of MDV-induced lymphoproliferative disease and latency remains largely unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that MDV and Rous-associated virus (RAV) might cooperate in the development of B-cell lymphomas induced by RAV. Our present results indicate for the first time that MDV and RAV might also act synergistically in the development of T-cell lymphomas. We report an example of an MDV-transformed T-lymphoblastoid cell line (T9) expressing high levels of a truncated C-MYB protein as a result of RAV integration within one c-myb allele. The chimeric RAV-c-myb mRNA species initiated in the 5' long terminal repeat of RAV are deprived of sequences corresponding to c-myb exons 1 to 3. The attenuation of MDV oncogenicity has been strongly related to structural changes in the MDV BamHI-D and BamHI-H DNA fragments. We have established that both DNA restriction fragments are rearranged in the T9 MDV-transformed cells. Our results suggest that retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is a critical factor involved in the maintenance of the transformed phenotype and the tumorigenic potential of this T-lymphoma cell line.

Le Rouzic, E; Perbal, B

1996-01-01

329

Monogenic autoimmune diseases - lessons of self-tolerance.  

PubMed

The molecular defects recently identified in the rare monogenic autoimmune diseases (AIDs) have pinpointed critical steps in the pathways that contribute to the development of normal immune responses and self-tolerance. Recent studies of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy and enteropathy, X-linked, IL-2 receptor alpha-chain deficiency, and, in particular, their corresponding mouse models, have revealed the details of the molecular mechanisms of normal immune tolerance, and exposed how defects in these mechanisms result in human autoimmunity. In addition to a deeper understanding of the immune system, detailed molecular characterization of monogenic AIDs will help us to understand the mechanisms behind common polygenic AIDs and, furthermore, to develop novel therapies and intervention strategies to treat them. PMID:16226439

Ulmanen, Ismo; Halonen, Maria; Ilmarinen, Tanja; Peltonen, Leena

2005-10-13

330

Castleman disease mimicked pancreatic carcinoma: report of two cases  

PubMed Central

Castleman disease (CD) is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder, which usually presents as solitary or multiple masses in the mediastinum. Peripancreatic CD was rarely reported. Herein, we report two cases of unicentric peripancreatic CD from our center. A 43-year-old man and a 58-year-old woman were detected to have a pancreatic mass in the routine medical examinations. Both of them were asymptomatic. The computed tomography and ultrasonographic examination revealed a mild enhancing solitary mass at the pancreatic head/neck. No definite preoperative diagnosis was established and Whipple operations were originally planned. The intraoperative frozen section diagnosis of both patients revealed lymphoproliferation. Then the local excisions of mass were performed. Histological examination revealed features of CD of hyaline-vascular type. No recurrence was found during the follow-up period. CD should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Local excision is a suitable surgical choice.

2012-01-01

331

Rosai-Dorfman disease of the central nervous system.  

PubMed

Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is an idiopathic, non-neoplastic, lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by sinus histiocytosis and massive lymphadenopathy. When RDD involves the central nervous system the lesion simulates a meningioma. Histological and immunohistochemical confirmation is essential for a definitive diagnosis. In this paper, ten cases of RDD confined to the central nervous system are reported. Another case with orbital RDD was excluded. Nine cases involved the cranial cavity alone; in one, the cervical extradural region was also involved. Treatment consisted of surgical excision or biopsy. Histology and immunohistochemistry revealed a mixed cell population of predominantly mature histiocytes with evidence of emperipolesis and strong positivity for S100 protein in all cases. No recurrence was observed during follow up ranging from three months to eight years. PMID:16099162

Purav, P; Ganapathy, K; Mallikarjuna, V S; Annapurneswari, S; Kalyanaraman, S; Reginald, J; Natarajan, P; Bapu, K R Suresh; Balamurugan, M

2005-08-01

332

Treatment of unicentric Castleman disease with neoadjuvant rituximab.  

PubMed

Angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia, known more commonly as Castleman disease, is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. Castleman disease has two distinct clinical manifestations described as unicentric and multicentric disease. These presentations have distinct treatment algorithms and portend very different prognoses. Standard treatment of unicentric disease is complete surgical resection, which confers a cure rate approaching 100%. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of neoadjuvant rituximab in the treatment of unicentric Castleman disease to enable a less morbid surgical resection. Given the vascularity of the tumor, proximity to the pulmonary artery and superior vena cava, and possible intimate association with the lung parenchyma, the tumor was treated preoperatively with rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, at doses of 375 mg/m˛ weekly for 4 weeks. Rituximab therapy successfully decreased the diameter of the tumor from 4.79 cm×2.67 cm to 2.8 cm×1.5 cm, as confirmed by CT imaging. Postoperative surgical pathology confirmed the diagnosis of Castleman disease, hyaline vascular type, with negative margins. Notably, the lymph node tissue in the rituximab-treated specimen demonstrated reduced mantle zone thickness, decreased size of follicles, and increased hyalinization of vessels. Rituximab shows promise in neoadjuvant treatment of unresectable or partially resectable unicentric Castleman disease. PMID:21051400

Bandera, Bradley; Ainsworth, Craig; Shikle, James; Rupard, Erik; Roach, Michael

2010-11-01

333

Clopidogrel reduces post-transplant obliterative bronchiolitis.  

PubMed

Survival after lung transplantation is mainly limited by the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). The aim of this study was to investigate if platelet inhibition by clopidogrel has an influence on the formation of obliterative bronchiolitis, the histopathological correlate to bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, present in the majority of patients suffering from CLAD. C57Bl/6(H2(b) ) donor tracheas were orthotopically transplanted into CBA.J(H2(k) ). Mice received different doses of clopidogrel alone or in combination with tacrolimus or everolimus. Grafts were analyzed by histology and immunofluorescence method on postoperative days 15, 30 or 60. Cytokines were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction on postoperative day 21 and alloantibodies by FACS. Mice treated with 20 mg/kg/day clopidogrel for 30 days showed reduced obliteration [34.40 ± 3.76% (20 mg/kg/day clopidogrel) vs. 49.92 ± 2.11% (control), n = 5, P < 0.05]. Platelet inhibition resulted in significant lower infiltration of T cells and macrophages, and we also found significantly lower expression of IL-12, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-?, TGF-?, PDGF?, MCP1, P-/E-selectin, ICAM1 and CD40L after treatment with clopidogrel. Combination of 1 mg/kg/day clopidogrel and 0.05 mg/kg/day everolimus or 12 mg/kg/day tacrolimus revealed a synergistic effect. Humoral immunity as manifested by donor-specific alloantibody secretion was also impaired after treatment with clopidogrel. Here, we can show that platelet inhibition by clopidogrel as a single treatment and in combination with tacrolimus or everolimus reduced the development of fibrosis and obliteration in tracheal allografts. PMID:23952051

Preidl, Raimund H M; Eckl, Sebastian; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Koch, Nina; Spriewald, Bernd M; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M

2013-08-17

334

Superantigens and their role in infectious disease.  

PubMed

Although the exact mechanisms by which superantigens may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases are unknown, it seems increasingly likely that they have a role in the induction and pathogenesis of disease. The studies described here demonstrate that in several different diseases either bacterial or viral superantigens can be isolated from patients. There is also a preferential expansion of particular V beta T-cell subsets, which is a common feature of superantigen stimulation. From the work that has been done to date it can be hypothesized that superantigens may act in several ways. They may stimulate and activate T cells that are autoreactive and lead to the induction or exacerbation of autoimmune disease, as in RA. Alternatively, they may lead to the depletion of T-cell subsets based on V beta expression, thereby resulting in the severe reduction in lymphocytes in certain immunodeficiency diseases such as AIDS. But perhaps the most likely contribution of superantigens to disease pathogenesis is seen indirectly by their effect on the immune system-particularly the stimulation of large numbers of T lymphocytes expressing the same V beta domain. Thus it is likely that the direct effect of various T-cell-derived inflammatory mediators (i.e., interleukins and other cytokines) released by these activated T lymphocytes is the primary cause of disease pathology via response to superantigen stimulation. In addition to the diseases discussed here, there are a number of other diseases in which a potential role for superantigens is being studied. These include autoimmune diseases seen after group A streptococcal infections in which the streptococcal M protein has been postulated to act as a superantigen such as scarlet fever, rheumatic heart disease, and poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Other diseases being studied include psoriasis, lupus-like disease, and lymphoproliferative diseases (reviewed in Kotzin et al.). In the coming years the exact role of superantigens and the specific mechanisms by which they contribute to disease should be more clearly defined. Our understanding of these molecules could also lead to new therapies for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:7718212

Schafer, R; Sheil, J M

1995-01-01

335

Subacute radiation dermatitis: a histologic imitator of acute cutaneous graft-versus-host disease  

SciTech Connect

The histopathologic changes of radiation dermatitis have been classified either as early effects (necrotic keratinocytes, fibrin thrombi, and hemorrhage) or as late effects (vacuolar changes at the dermal-epidermal junction, atypical radiation fibroblasts, and fibrosis). Two patients, one exposed to radiation therapeutically and one accidentally, are described. Skin biopsy specimens showed an interface dermatitis characterized by numerous dyskeratotic epidermal cells with lymphocytes in close apposition (satellite cell necrosis); that is, the epidermal changes were similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease. Because recipients of bone marrow transplants frequently receive total body irradiation as part of their preparatory regimen, the ability of radiation to cause persistent epidermal changes similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease could complicate the interpretation of posttransplant skin biopsy specimens.

LeBoit, P.E.

1989-02-01

336

Regulatory T-Cells in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Autoimmune Diseases  

PubMed Central

Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in cancer and autoimmune disorders, as well.

D'Arena, Giovanni; Rossi, Giovanni; Vannata, Barbara; Deaglio, Silvia; Mansueto, Giovanna; D'Auria, Fiorella; Statuto, Teodora; Simeon, Vittorio; De Martino, Laura; Marandino, Aurelio; Del Poeta8, Giovanni; De Feo, Vincenzo; Musto, Pellegrino

2012-01-01

337

T/NK cell type chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease in adults: an underlying condition for Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/NK-cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

A chronic infectious mononucleosis-like illness caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is called 'chronic active EBV disease', which is defined as an EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease. This lymphoproliferative disease is rare and predominantly occurs in Japanese children. Between 1998 and 2010, seven adult-onset cases (aged 20-45 years, median 39 years) were identified, which initially presented with inflammatory diseases, including hepatitis, interstitial pneumonitis, uveitis, nephritis and hypersensitivity to mosquito bites. They showed an EBV viral load in the peripheral blood and evidence of EBV infection of T or natural killer (NK) cells. Five cases (71.4%) developed EBV-positive T/NK-cell lymphoma/leukaemia at a median of 5 years (range 1-7 years) after the diagnosis. Although l-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy was effective for the lymphomas, only allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation eradicated EBV-infected cells. This observation indicates that persistent EBV infection of T or NK cells defines a distinct disease entity, which provides an underlying condition for EBV-positive T/NK-cell lymphoma/leukaemia. PMID:22247563

Isobe, Yasushi; Aritaka, Nanae; Setoguchi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yoshinori; Kimura, Hiroshi; Hamano, Yasuharu; Sugimoto, Koichi; Komatsu, Norio

2012-01-13

338

Recent progress in managing graft-versus-host disease and viral infections following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Despite recent reductions in transplant-related mortality, post-transplant complications such as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) remain major obstacles to the successful application of allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation. Steroid-refractory GvHD has a poor outcome. Although there are a variety of new approaches to the treatment of refractory GvHD, many have limited evidence of efficacy. Other approaches appear to be unacceptably toxic. It would be preferable to improve GvHD prophylaxis. There is good evidence that rates of GvHD can be reduced without unacceptable reduction of the graft-versus-leukemia effect or compromising overall survival. However, prophylactic measures aimed at reducing T-cell numbers or functions are associated with high rates of reactivation of latent viruses. New technologies that allow rapid generation of virus-specific T-cells show promise to reduce the frequency and severity of such reactivations and have the potential to revolutionize the approach to post-transplant infectious complications. PMID:23231517

Sellar, Rob S; Peggs, Karl S

2012-12-01

339

Characterization of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells in EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in two patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 and type 2  

PubMed Central

Background X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) is a rare inherited immunodeficiency by an extreme vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, frequently resulting in hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). XLP are now divided into type 1 (XLP-1) and type 2 (XLP-2), which are caused by mutations of SH2D1A/SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) genes, respectively. The diagnosis of XLP in individuals with EBV-associated HLH (EBV-HLH) is generally difficult because they show basically similar symptoms to sporadic EBV-HLH. Although EBV-infected cells in sporadic EBV-HLH are known to be mainly in CD8+ T cells, the cell-type of EBV-infected cells in EBV-HLH seen in XLP patients remains undetermined. Methods EBV-infected cells in two patients (XLP-1 and XLP-2) presenting EBV-HLH were evaluated by in EBER-1 in situ hybridization or quantitative PCR methods. Results Both XLP patients showed that the dominant population of EBV-infected cells was CD19+ B cells, whereas EBV-infected CD8+ T cells were very few. Conclusions In XLP-related EBV-HLH, EBV-infected cells appear to be predominantly B cells. B cell directed therapy such as rituximab may be a valuable option in the treatment of EBV-HLH in XLP patients.

2012-01-01

340

A case of age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disorder, so-called polymorphous subtype, of the mandible, with a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is known to be associated with the development of lymphomas in immunocompromised patients. Recently, age-related immune impairment has been recognized as a predisposing factor in the development of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) in elderly patients without any known immunodeficiency or prior lymphoma. In approximately 70% of reported cases, the affected sites have been extranodal, such as the skin, lung, tonsil and stomach. However, age-related EBV-associated B cell (EBV + B cell) LPD is extremely rare in the oral cavity. Here we report a 71-year-old Japanese man who developed an EBV + B cell LPD resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL)--so-called polymorphous subtype-of the mandible. Histopathologically, infiltration of large atypical lymphoid cells including Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells into granulation tissue with marked necrosis was found in the mandibular bone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the large atypical Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells were CD3-, CD15-, CD20+, CD30+ and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP-1)+. In situ hybridization (ISH) demonstrated EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) + in numerous Hodgkin or Reed-Sternberg-like cells. EBNA-2 was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using an extract from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the polymorphous subtype of age-related EBV + B cell LPD affecting the mandible. PMID:22869357

Kikuchi, Kentaro; Fukunaga, Shuichi; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kojima, Masaru; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

2012-08-07

341

[Castleman's disease : a rare differential diagnosis for Heerfordt's syndrome].  

PubMed

A 50-year-old male patient demonstrated an existing left proptosis for several weeks. The patient was suffering from physical exhaustion and had lost considerable weight. Furthermore, we observed greatly enlarged parotid and submandibular glands on both sides. MRI of the neck showed multiple, sharply circumscribed lesions in the major salivary glands and both lacrimal glands as well as in the orbit. Initially we suspected Heerfordt's syndrome, a manifestation of sarcoidosis, but laboratory diagnosis could not reveal a pathological erythrocyte sedimentation rate or an increased ACE titer. After exploratory excision from the right submandibular gland, histological examination revealed Castleman's disease. Therefore, we initiated an immunomodulatory therapy with interleukin-6 receptor antagonists.Castleman's disease is one of the very rare, benign, lymphoproliferative processes that have a tendency to turn malignant. Isolated findings of Castleman's disease should be completely resected. There are no clear treatment strategies for multiple localizations of Castleman's disease. The approaches range from systemic glucocorticoid therapy with chemotherapy to immunomodulatory treatment. In contrast to isolated findings, the prognosis for multicentric occurrence is unfavorable. PMID:22534680

Hirt, R; Krause, U; Knipping, S

2012-12-01

342

Acquired haemophilia in HIV negative, HHV-8 positive multicentric Castleman's disease: a case report.  

PubMed

Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD) is an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder, related to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection and often associated with autoimmune diseases such as haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Acquired haemophilia (AH) is a rare, life-threatening disease, which can occur in association with lymphoproliferative disorders, although only one case of AH in MCD has been described so far. We report the case of a human immuno deficiency virus negative 71-yr-old woman referred to our hospital for prolonged bleeding on surgical site following a lymph node biopsy. Lymph node histology revealed MCD, while the screening for the bleeding disorder showed prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (ratio: 1.89, normal value <1.24), low factor VIII (FVIII:C) levels (6%) with anti-factor VIII antibodies (2.3 Bethesda units), leading to a diagnosis of AH. Virological studies on plasma, lymphocyte and bronchoalveolar wash showed positivity for HHV-8 infection. Treatment with steroids (metilprednisolone 1-1.5 mg/kg/d) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/d orally) was unsuccessful, and then antiviral therapy with cidofovir (5 mg/kg/wk) was started. A transient normalisation of APTT was seen after two administrations of cidofovir, but then coagulation parameters worsened and a large haematoma of the arm appeared. Bleeding was successfully stopped with two boluses of recombinant activated factor VII (Novoseven 90 microg/kg). Therapy with anti-CD 20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (Mabthera 375 mg/m2 once a week for 4 wk) was started, and following two administrations APTT normalised once again. Cardiological and neurological complications arose before the third dose of rituximab and the patient died shortly afterwards. PMID:12605662

Marietta, Marco; Pozzi, Samantha; Luppi, Mario; Bertesi, Marcello; Cappi, Cinzia; Morselli, Monica; Torelli, Giuseppe

2003-03-01

343

Expanded infectious diseases screening program for Hispanic transplant candidates.  

PubMed

Most guidelines for pre-transplant screening recommend enhanced screening among patients with potential exposure to such pathogens as Strongyloides stercoralis and Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. The incidence of these diseases in the Hispanic immigrant population has not been extensively studied. Transplant candidates who were evaluated by our program's Hispanic Transplant Program were referred for expanded infectious disease screening including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, S. stercoralis, Leishmania, and T. cruzi. Between December 2006 and December 2008, 83 patients were screened. Most were from Mexico but we also screened patients from Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and Peru. Most patients lived in urban locations before moving to the United States. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was found in 20%, and 6.7% had serologic evidence of S. stercoralis infection. These patients underwent treatment of latent infection without difficulty. To date, 14 patients have undergone living-donor kidney transplantation. Two of these patients had positive Leishmania titers and are being followed clinically, 1 was treated for S. stercoralis, and 2 were treated for LTBI pre-transplant. All have done well without evidence of screened pathogens an average of 348 days (range 65-766 days) post transplant. Expanded screening identifies endemic infections in the Hispanic immigrant population that can be treated before transplant, thereby minimizing post-transplant infectious complications. PMID:20534036

Fitzpatrick, M A; Caicedo, J C; Stosor, V; Ison, M G

2010-05-30

344

Ursodiol to prevent hepatic venoocclusive disease.  

PubMed

VOD is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Although VOD may improve in some patients, severe cases are often fatal. There is no established therapy to prevent progression to severe VOD; nor are there any conclusive or universally accepted methods for prevention of mortality associated with severe VOD. A treatment that could minimize hepatic damage and cause VOD to manifest as reversible liver damage rather than a progressive, fatal disease would indeed have a place in posttransplant therapy. Nontoxic ursodiol may play such a role by replacing hepatotoxic bile acids. Based on the limited available literature (2 studies), it is difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding the use of ursodiol to prevent VOD, although the preliminary results are promising. The studies, although small and not without weakness, suggested that ursodiol effectively reduces the incidence of VOD in allogeneic BMT patients. They do not, however, suggest that ursodiol is effective as treatment for existing VOD, as this was not studied. Also, conclusions were based on patients given busulfan and cyclophosphamide as conditioning therapy and thus might not apply to patients conditioned by other means such as total body irradiation. In summary, the available data do not definitively support the use of ursodiol; however, patients conditioned with busulfan and cyclophosphamide who are at risk for VOD (e.g., pretransplant liver disease, liver metastases) may be candidates for ursodiol prophylactic therapy. Larger, randomized clinical trials are warranted to further define the potential role of ursodiol for the prevention of venoocclusive disease of the liver in BMT patients. PMID:9337452

Comcowich, S A; Spitzer, T R; Tsunoda, S M

1997-10-01

345

Paediatric liver transplantation: the surgical view  

PubMed Central

Liver transplantation is the accepted treatment for a wide variety of liver diseases in children. Over the past 10 years a number of innovative surgical techniques have been developed to overcome the shortage of size matched donors particularly in children less than 5 years of age. Graft and patient survival at one year after liver transplantation has continued to improve, and is now over 85% and higher for good risk cases. Complications are relatively common, but provided graft function is satisfactory, long term survival for these children is to be expected. The need for retransplantation has fallen significantly. Causes of early mortality include graft dysfunction and sepsis. Late mortality is due to sepsis, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and non-compliance. Long term survival with good graft function and excellent quality of life is possible for the majority of children undergoing liver transplantation.

Vilca-Melendez, H; Heaton, N

2004-01-01

346

Liver in haematological disorders.  

PubMed

Prothrombotic haematological disorders, in particular myeloproliferative disorders, are identified in a significant proportion of patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Multiple prothrombotic disorders may coexist. PVT is diagnosed in one fourth of patients with cirrhosis and is more common with advanced liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. PVT in cirrhosis can precipitate decompensation. Intrahepatic microthrombosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome is usually a complication of myeloablative treatment before haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders can complicate liver transplantation and are related to Epstein-Barr virus infection. Hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving chemotherapy for haematological malignancies is very common without pre-emptive treatment, and can lead to liver failure. Liver involvement is common in primary haematological diseases, such as haemolytic anaemias, lymphomas and leukaemia. PMID:24090939

Pieri, Giulia; Theocharidou, Eleni; Burroughs, Andrew K

2013-08-01

347

Prevention and treatment for epstein-barr virus infection and related cancers.  

PubMed

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the first herpes virus described as being oncogenic in humans. EBV infection is implicated in post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD) and several other cancers in non-immunocompromised patients, with more than 200,000 new cases per year. While prevention of PTLD is improving, mainly based on EBV monitoring and preemptive tapering of immunosuppression, early diagnosis remains the best current option for the other malignancies. Significant progress has been achieved in treatment, with decreased mortality and morbidity, but some challenges are still to face, especially for the more aggressive diseases. Possible prevention by EBV vaccination would be a more global approach of this public health problem, but further active research is needed before this goal could be reached. PMID:24008299

Smets, Françoise; Sokal, Etienne M

2014-01-01

348

A Rare Case of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Development in an Immunocompromised Patient with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Multicentric Castleman's Disease  

PubMed Central

Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) development in HIV with preexistent progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) has been extensively studied. PML-IRIS typically manifests clinically as new or worsening neurologic symptoms in conjunction with enlarging CNS lesions and occurs in approximately 10–20 percent of HIV-infected patients with PML who begin HAART. Likewise, Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD), a rare malignant lymphoproliferative disorder, has a strong and well-known association with HIV. Our case provides a rare instance of PML-IRIS in combination with MCD in an HIV-positive individual. The combination of all three diseases has never been reported in the literature. Both MCD and PML were present during initial determination of HIV infection in our patient and their disease courses were altered during the subsequent development of IRIS.

Kurukumbi, Mohankumar; Dunlap, Shariff; Chapman, Sherita; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

2013-01-01

349

Challenges of T Cell Therapies for Virus-associated Diseases after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Importance of the field Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the treatment of choice for many hematological malignancies and genetic disorders. A majority of patients do not have a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor, and alternative stem cell sources include HLA-matched or mismatched unrelated donors and haploidentical related donors. However, alternative donor HSCT are associated with three major complications (i) graft rejection, (ii) graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and (iii) delayed immune reconstitution leading to viral infections and relapse. Areas covered in this review Graft rejection and the risk of GvHD can be significantly reduced by using intensive conditioning regimens, including in vivo T cell depletion as well as ex vivo T cell depletion of the graft. However, the benefits of removing alloreactive T cells from the graft are offset by the concomitant removal of T cells with anti-viral or anti-tumor activity as well as the profound delay in endogenous T cell recovery post-transplant. Thus, opportunistic infections, many of which are not amenable to conventional small-molecule therapeutics, are frequent in these patients and are associated with significant morbidity and high mortality rates. This review discusses current cell therapies to prevent or treat viral infections/reactivations post-transplant. What the reader will gain The reader will gain an understanding of the current state of cell therapy to prevent and treat viral infections post-HSCT, and will be introduced to preclinical studies designed to develop and validate new manufacturing procedures intended to improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce associated toxicities. Take home message Reconstitution of HSCT recipients with antigen-specific T cells, produced either by allodepletion or in vitro reactivation, can offer an effective strategy to provide both immediate and long-term protection without harmful alloreactivity.

Leen, Ann M.; Tripic, Tamara; Rooney, Cliona M.

2009-01-01

350

Behcet's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

NINDS Behcet's Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Behcet's Disease? Is there any ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Behcet's Disease? Behcet's disease is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder. ...

351

Lipoprotein metabolism differs between Marek's disease susceptible and resistant chickens.  

PubMed

Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by MD virus and has an important impact on the poultry industry worldwide. There have been reports showing different physiological characteristics between MD susceptible and resistant chickens. However, little is known about whether there are differences in lipid metabolism between MD susceptible and resistant lines of chickens. In this study, we examined the BW and the weight of tissues (abdominal fat, breast muscle with bone, leg muscle with bone, liver, and heart), the lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations and distributions, and the plasma and tissue levels of adiponectin and its receptors in the highly resistant and susceptible lines during chicken growth. Our data showed that the increase in total cholesterol during growth was mainly due to the elevation of cholesterol in the low-density/very low-density lipoprotein fraction in MD susceptible chickens, whereas the increase of total cholesterol was mainly attributable to the increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in MD resistant chickens. Meanwhile, the MD resistant line appeared to have increased plasma adiponectin levels compared with MD susceptible chickens during growth. Taken together, our data suggested that lipoprotein-cholesterol and adiponectin metabolism are different between MD susceptible and resistant chickens. PMID:22991546

Yuan, P; Yu, Y; Luo, J; Tian, F; Zhang, H; Chang, S; Ramachandran, R; Zhang, L; Song, J

2012-10-01

352

T CELL BASED THERAPIES FOR MALIGNANCY AND INFECTION IN CHILDHOOD  

PubMed Central

One major advance in T cell based immunotherapy in the last twenty years has been the molecular definition of numerous viral and tumor antigens. Adoptive T-cell transfer has shown definite clinical benefit in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections that develop in pediatric patients after allogeneic transplant and in Epstein–Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Developing adoptive T cell therapies for other malignancies presents additional challenges. This article describes the recent advances in T cell based therapies for malignancy and infection in childhood and strategies to enhance the effector functions of T cells and optimize the cellular product, including gene modification and modulation of the host environment.

Ahmed, Nabil; Heslop, Helen E.; Mackall, Crystal L.

2009-01-01

353

Daclizumab.  

PubMed

Daclizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody which binds to the IL-2 receptor on activated lymphocytes and blocks the production of IL-2. Its use is well established in solid organ transplantation as induction therapy, especially in high-risk patients where reduction or delayed dose of standard immunosuppression would be beneficial. It has been used effectively in both 2-dose and 5-dose regimens in conjunction with other standard immunosuppressive agents. The incidence of acute rejection appears reduced without increasing the rates of infection or post-transplant lympho-proliferative disorders. The agent is generally well tolerated in adults and children and there is no need for additional monitoring. Daclizumab has also been used outside the transplant arena in a variety of immune-mediated diseases with limited success. PMID:17916050

Mottershead, Marcus; Neuberger, James

2007-10-01

354

Human herpesvirus 8 DNA in HIV-negative Japanese patients with multicentric Castleman's disease and related diseases.  

PubMed

Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by systemic lymphadenopathy and hypergammaglobulinemia. Recently, a French group reported that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) DNA was detected in tissue samples of MCD patients. The detection rate was especially high in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive MCD patients. Thus, HHV8 infection seems to be closely related to HIV infection. In Japan, the HIV infection rate in the general population is very low. To examine whether HHV8 is actually related to MCD in Japan, we performed nested polymerase chain reaction for the HHV8 genome using DNA samples from 7 patients with MCD and 23 patients with related diseases such as POEMS syndrome, amyloidosis, myeloma and lymphoma. They were all HIV-negative Japanese. Three of 7 MCD patients were positive for HHV8. There were no clear differences in clinical characteristics between HHV8-positive patients and negative ones. All other patients were negative for HHV8. Thus, we have shown that some MCD patients in Japan are also infected with HHV8. PMID:11605026

Tohda, S; Murakami, N; Nara, N

2001-11-01

355

Growth hormone interacts with the Marek's disease virus SORF2 protein and is associated with disease resistance in chicken  

PubMed Central

Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a herpesvirus, the MD virus (MDV). Because MD is a significant economic problem to the poultry industry, there is great interest in enhancing genetic resistance, which is controlled by multiple genes. The influence of the MHC has been clearly demonstrated, and several relevant quantitative trait loci have been mapped; however, no single gene influencing MD resistance has been identified. Transcription of SORF2 is perturbed in the MDV recombinant clone RM1 due to a solo insertion of the reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat, which may explain the loss of oncogenicity for this strain. Hypothesizing that SORF2-interacting host proteins are involved in MD resistance, we screened a chicken splenic cDNA library by the yeast two-hybrid assay using SORF2 as bait. The chicken growth hormone (GH) structural peptide was identified, and the specific interaction was verified by coimmunoprecipitation. Immunohistochemical staining and indirect immunofluorescence assay indicated that GH and SORF2 can be coexpressed in MDV-infected cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, polymorphism in the GH gene (GH1) is associated with the number of tissues with tumors in commercial White Leghorn chickens with the MHC B*2/B*15 genotype. We conclude that GH1 may well be a MD resistance gene.

Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Fulton, Janet E.; Morgan, Robin W.; Cheng, Hans H.

2001-01-01

356

Recurrence of secondary glomerular disease after renal transplantation.  

PubMed

The risk of a posttransplant recurrence of secondary glomerulonephritis (GN) is quite variable. Histologic recurrence is frequent in lupus nephritis, but the lesions are rarely severe and usually do not impair the long-term graft outcome. Patients with Henoch-Schonlein nephritis have graft survival similar to that of other renal diseases, although recurrent Henoch-Schonlein nephritis with extensive crescents has a poor prognosis. Amyloid light-chain amyloidosis recurs frequently in renal allografts but it rarely causes graft failure. Amyloidosis secondary to chronic inflammation may also recur, but this is extremely rare in patients with Behcet's disease or in those with familial Mediterranean fever, when the latter are treated with colchicine. Double organ transplantation (liver/kidney; heart/kidney), chemotherapy, and autologous stem cell transplantation may be considered in particular cases of amyloidosis, such as hereditary amyloidosis or multiple myeloma. There is little experience with renal transplantation in light-chain deposition disease, fibrillary/immunotactoid GN, or mixed cryoglobulinemic nephritis but successful cases have been reported. Diabetic nephropathy often recurs but usually only after many years. Recurrence in patients with small vessel vasculitis is unpredictable but can cause graft failure. However, in spite of recurrence, patient and graft survival rates are similar in patients with small vessel vasculitis compared with those with other renal diseases. Many secondary forms of GN no longer represent a potential contraindication to renal transplantation. The main issues in transplantation of patients with secondary GN are the infectious, cardiovascular, or hepatic complications associated with the original disease or its treatment. PMID:21493742

Ponticelli, Claudio; Moroni, Gabriella; Glassock, Richard J

2011-04-14

357

Targeting Marek's disease virus by RNA interference delivered from a herpesvirus vaccine.  

PubMed

Live attenuated herpesvirus vaccines such as herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) have been used since 1970 for the control of Marek's disease (MD), a highly infectious lymphoproliferative disease of poultry. Despite the success of these vaccines in reducing losses from the disease, Marek's disease virus (MDV) strains have shown a continuing increase in virulence, presumably due to the inability of the current vaccines in preventing MDV replication. The highly specific and effective nature of RNA interference (RNAi) makes this technology particularly attractive for new antiviral strategies. In order to exploit the power of RNAi-mediated suppression of MDV replication in vivo delivered through existing vaccines, we engineered recombinant HVT expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against MDV genes gB and UL29. The levels of protection induced by the RNAi-expressing HVT against virulent virus challenge were similar to the parent pHVT3 virus. However, chickens vaccinated with recombinant HVT expressing shRNA showed moderate reduction of challenge virus replication in blood and feather samples. Delivery of RNAi-based gene silencing through live attenuated vaccines for reducing replication of pathogenic viruses is a novel approach for the control of infectious diseases. PMID:18977264

Lambeth, Luke S; Zhao, Yuguang; Smith, Lorraine P; Kgosana, Lydia; Nair, Venugopal

2008-10-31

358

Acute or chronic life-threatening diseases associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.  

PubMed

Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is one of the representative, usually benign, acute diseases associated with primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. IM is generally self-limiting and is characterized mostly by transient fever, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. However, very rarely primary EBV infection results in severe or fatal conditions such as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis together with fulminant hepatitis designated as severe or fatal IM or EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis alone. In addition, chronic EBV-associated diseases include Burkitt's lymphoma, undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD)/lymphoma, natural killer-cell LPD including leukemia or lymphoma, gastric carcinoma, pyothorax-associated lymphoma and senile B-cell LPD as well as chronic active EBV infection and LPD/lymphoma in patients with immunodeficiency. The number of chronic life-threatening diseases linked to the EBV infection is increasingly reported and many of these diseases have a poor prognosis. This review will focus on the historical, pathogenetic, diagnostic, therapeutic and prophylactic issues of EBV-associated life-threatening diseases. PMID:22104426

Okano, Motohiko; Gross, Thomas G

2012-06-01

359

Behcet's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... for Behcet’s Disease is Behcet’s syndrome . Who gets Behcet’s Disease (the “typical” patient)? Behcet’s disease is most common ... in the pons). Classic symptoms and signs of Behcet’s Disease Behcet’s disease is virtually unparalleled among the vasculitides ...

360

Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation: Review of Factors Affecting the Hospitalized Patient.  

PubMed

The use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) as a stem cell donor source has dramatically increased over the last 2 decades. Patients undergoing UCB transplantation share medical management issues with patients receiving a hematopoietic stem cell transplantion using adult donor sources (peripheral blood stem cells or bone marrow stem cells) and may also have more complex medical issues that appear to be related to delayed immune recovery from UCB-derived stem cells. The interface with critical care providers is likely to occur in the transplant and posttransplant setting. Patients may experience UCB infusion reactions that range from mild to rarely severe. Following transplant, patients are transfusion dependent for long periods due to the prolonged engraftment of UCB cells. They are at high risk of infection, particularly viral. Once engrafted, UCB transplant patients have a lower rate of graft versus host disease compared to other donor sources. Some of the other complications that are seen in patients undergoing UCB transplant are posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, and posterior reversible encephalopathy will also be discussed. PMID:23753249

Delaney, Meghan; Ballen, Karen K

2013-05-12

361

Liver transplantation in alcoholic liver disease current status and controversies  

PubMed Central

Alcoholic cirrhosis remains the second most common indication for liver transplantation. A comprehensive medical and psychosocial evaluation is needed when making a decision to place such patients on the transplant list. Most transplant centers worldwide need a minimum of 6 mo of alcohol abstinence for listing these patients. Patients with alcohol dependence are at high risk for relapse to alcohol use after transplantation (recidivism). These patients need to be identified and require alcohol rehabilitation treatment before transplantation. Recidivism to the level of harmful drinking is reported in about 15%-20% cases. Although, recurrent cirrhosis and graft loss from recidivism is rare, occurring in less than 5% of all alcoholic cirrhosis-related transplants, harmful drinking in the post-transplant period does impact the long-term outcome. The development of metabolic syndrome with cardiovascular events and de novo malignancy are important contributors to non liver-related mortality amongst transplants for alcoholic liver disease. Surveillance protocols for earlier detection of de novo malignancy are needed to improve the long-term outcome. The need for a minimum of 6 mo of abstinence before listing makes transplant a nonviable option for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis who do not respond to corticosteroids. Emerging data from retrospective and prospective studies has challenged the 6 mo rule, and beneficial effects of liver transplantation have been reported in select patients with a first episode of severe alcoholic hepatitis who are unresponsive to steroids.

Singal, Ashwani K; Chaha, Khushdeep S; Rasheed, Khalid; Anand, Bhupinderjit S

2013-01-01

362

Infectious Diseases  

MedlinePLUS

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... to live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

363

Binswanger's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Binswanger's Disease? Binswanger's disease (BD), also called subcortical vascular dementia , is a type of dementia caused by widespread, ... Hope Through Research Information booklet about Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and other types of dementia compiled by the ...

364

Refsum Disease  

MedlinePLUS

NINDS Refsum Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Phytanic Acid Storage Disease, Heredopathia Atactica Polyneuritiformis Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Refsum Disease? Is there any ...

365

Celiac Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... as our most commonly consumed ingredient. What Is Celiac Disease? The digestive system is the set of organs ... an injury or pregnancy. Back Continue How Is Celiac Disease Diagnosed? Because the symptoms of celiac disease are ...

366

Autoimmune Diseases  

MedlinePLUS

... protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure ...

367

Farber's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... a group of inherited metabolic disorders called lipid storage diseases, in which excess amounts of lipids (oils, ... Institutes of Health (NIH), conducts research about lipid storage diseases such as Farber’s disease in laboratories at ...

368

Gum Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... which is both embarrassing and serious!). What Is Gum Disease? Gum disease is also known as periodontal (pronounced: per- ... tissues and bone that support the teeth. Untreated gum disease can become very serious, causing teeth to ...

369

Huntington's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of ...

370

End-Stage Liver Disease Candidates at the Highest MELD Scores Have Higher Wait-list Mortality than Status-1A Candidates  

PubMed Central

Background Candidates with fulminant hepatic failure (Status-1A) receive the highest priority for liver transplantation (LT) in the United States. However, no studies have compared wait-list mortality risk among end-stage liver disease (ESLD) candidates with high Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores to those listed as Status-1A. We aimed to determine if there are MELD scores for ESLD candidates at which their wait-list mortality risk is higher than that of Status-1A, and to identify the factors predicting wait-list mortality among Status-1A. Methods Data were obtained from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients for adult LT candidates (n=52,459) listed between 09/01/2001 and 12/31/2007. Candidates listed for repeat LT as Status-1 A were excluded. Starting from the date of wait listing, candidates were followed for 14 days or until the earliest of death, transplant, or granting of an exception MELD score. ESLD candidates were categorized by MELD score, with a separate category for those with calculated MELD >40. We compared wait-list mortality between each MELD category and Status-1A (reference) using time-dependent Cox regression. Results ESLD candidates with MELD >40 had almost twice the wait-list mortality risk of Status-1A candidates, with a covariate-adjusted hazard ratio of HR=1.96 (p=0.004). There was no difference in wait-list mortality risk for candidates with MELD 36–40 and Status-1A, while candidates with MELD <36 had significantly lower mortality risk than Status-1A candidates. MELD score did not significantly predict wait-list mortality among Status-1A candidates (p=0.18). Among Status-1A candidates with acetaminophen toxicity, MELD was a significant predictor of wait-list mortality (p<0.0009). Post-transplant survival was similar for Status-1A and ESLD candidates with MELD >20 (p=0.6). Conclusions Candidates with MELD >40 have significantly higher wait-list mortality and similar post-transplant survival as Status-1A, and therefore, should be assigned higher priority than Status-1A for allocation. Since ESLD candidates with MELD 36–40 and Status-1A have similar wait-list mortality risk and post-transplant survival, these candidates should be assigned similar rather than sequential priority for deceased donor LT.

Sharma, Pratima; Schaubel, Douglas E; Gong, Qi; Guidinger, Mary; Merion, Robert M

2011-01-01

371

Deletion of the meq gene significantly decreases immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic marek's disease virus  

PubMed Central

Background Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, resulting in immunosuppression, which is considered to be an integral aspect of the pathogenesis of Marek's disease (MD). A recent study showed that deletion of the Meq gene resulted in loss of transformation of T-cells in chickens and a Meq-null virus, rMd5?Meq, could provide protection superior to CVI988/Rispens. Results In the present study, to investigate whether the Meq-null virus could be a safe vaccine candidate, we constructed a Meq deletion strain, GX0101?Meq, by deleting both copies of the Meq gene from a pathogenic MDV, GX0101 strain, which was isolated in China. Pathogenesis experiments showed that the GX0101?Meq virus was fully attenuated in specific pathogen-free chickens because none of the infected chickens developed Marek's disease-associated lymphomas. The study also evaluated the effects of GX0101?Meq on the immune system in chickens after infection with GX0101?Meq virus. Immune system variables, including relative lymphoid organ weight, blood lymphocytes and antibody production following vaccination against AIV and NDV were used to assess the immune status of chickens. Experimental infection with GX0101?Meq showed that deletion of the Meq gene significantly decreased immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic MDV. Conclusion These findings suggested that the Meq gene played an important role not only in tumor formation but also in inducing immunosuppressive effects in MDV-infected chickens.

2011-01-01

372

Marek?s disease: rapid progress in research with unclear biological implementations.  

PubMed

Here we would like to provide a brief overview of the modern history of Marek?s disease (MD) research with a focus on the most recent developments in experimental work and we will try to sum up their impact on the understanding of the biological properties of Marek?s disease type 1 (MDV-1), the only representative of the Mardivirus genus causing fatal lymphoproliferative disease in poultry. We will also compare MDV-1 with other serologically-related poultry herpesviruses, Marek?s disease virus type 2 (MDV-2) and herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT). Although MD was first described at the beginning of the last century, proper characterization of its biological impact on poultry production and utilization of molecular biology methods for detailed characterization of causative agent MDV-1 were introduced only in recent decades. However, many characteristics of MD infection, pathogenesis and vaccine protection mechanisms remain unclarified, though novel methods bring a challenge for better understanding of these unanswered questions. PMID:23600883

Zelník, V; Lapuníková, B; Kúdelová, M

2013-01-01

373

Genetics Home Reference: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... one from each parent. Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of ALPS? These resources address the diagnosis or ... Ways to Manage ALPS You might also find information on the diagnosis or management of ALPS in Educational resources . General information about ...

374

Radiation therapy in Hodgkin's disease - decades of steady progress.  

PubMed

The treatment of lymphoproliferative diseases has changed dramatically during the last decades. The improved therapeutic results for this disease group are included among the most important achievements of modern oncohaematology. They are due to better disease staging, use of new markers for risk assessment, patient stratification in separate risk groups, implementation of highly effective chemotherapy (CHT), progress of targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies, proteasome inhibitors, modern radiation therapy (RT) and supportive care. The achieved progress, especially in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease (HD), is an example of the fundamental dependence of clinical practice on the scientific achievements, mainly in the field of diagnostics and in the two pure anticancer therapeutic modalities: chemo- and radiotherapy. The aim of this article was to discuss the basic variants of RT in the multimodal treatment of HD and the clinical experience accumulated during the last decades. The experience gained in the area of involved field RT (IFRT) and extended field RT (EFRT), both alone or as a part of the combined-therapy protocols, is considered in detail. The role of RT is also discussed as a part of the dose-escalated CHT combined programmes for patients recurring, progressing or partially responding to treatment, carried out mainly as IFRT, total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) or total body irradiation (TBI). Regardless of the already attained achievements of the combined treatment at the present stage of development of oncological knowledge, there is still no consensus with respect to the optimal therapy of HD in children and in adult patients. New trials addressing issues of the best modality, best RT technique, optimal dose of RT, optimal number of cycles and timing of CHT are still needed. The contemporary challenge is to optimize treatment so that it can be accomplished with the least toxicity, lowest cost, and greatest efficiency possible. PMID:20658714

Gocheva, L

375

Renal outcome and monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease in 289 old patients with blood cell dyscrasias: a single center experience.  

PubMed

Monoclonal components (MC) formed by chains/fragments of intact/truncated globulin components produced in different lymphoproliferative diseases are responsible for monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD) and consequent tissue damage by organized (amyloid fibrils) or non-organized (amorphous) deposits. The kidneys are the most commonly affected organs in MIDD, and renal failure represents an important adverse factor for prognosis. The renal outcome and the role of renal pathology in diagnosing MIDD was evaluated in 289 elderly patients with multiple myeloma (MM, n=115) and monoclonal gammopathy (MGUS, n=174). Renal impairment was the only significant risk factor for patient death, while significant risk factors for renal impairment were diabetes (HR 3.65, 95% CI: 2.08-6.41), light chain (LC) proteinuria (HR 2.18; 95% CI: 1.10-4.32) and type of MC (p=0.0019). Renal pathology documented MIDD in 12/30 cases (40%): six cases of AL-amyloidosis, two of LC disease, one of heavy chain disease and three of cast nephropathy, as well as four cases of glomerulonephritis, eight of arteriolosclerosis and six of normal picture. Main conclusions are that diabetes, sharing common glomerular damage with LC disease, is the strongest risk factor for progression of renal disease, and glomerular proteinuria or heavy LC proteinuria should raise a strong suspicion index of MIDD and prompt pathology assessment to reach the correct diagnosis. PMID:20570173

Stratta, Piero; Gravellone, Luciana; Cena, Tiziana; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Fenoglio, Roberta; Lazzarich, Elisa; Quaglia, Marco; Airoldi, Andrea; Bozzola, Cristina; Monga, Guido; Valente, Guido; Canavese, Caterina; Magnani, Corrado

2010-05-31

376

Unicentric mixed variant Castleman disease associated with Hashimoto disease: the role of PET/CT in staging and evaluating response to the treatment  

PubMed Central

Abstract Castleman disease (CD) is a rare atypical lymphoproliferative disease, pathologically classified as hyaline vascular, plasma cell type and mixed type variant. The underlying cause of CD is unknown, however several theories including autoimmunity have been proposed. We describe a patient diagnosed with unicentric mixed variant CD and Hashimoto thyroiditis, concurrently. She was staged with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and the disease was localized to the mediastinum. After 6 cycles of chemotherapy consisting of vincristine and prednisone, the mediastinal lymph nodes regressed, but did not disappear from the CT scan. However, FDG-PET/CT showed complete metabolic response. Although the role of FDG-PET/CT in staging and evaluation of treatment response is controversial, this case shows that PET/CT can be effective and even better for staging and response evaluation. This case is also unique as there no case of CD in association with Hashimoto thyroiditis has been reported previously. However, the possibility of a coincidental association must be raised, especially when the high prevalence of Hashimoto thyroiditis is considered.

Akosman, Cengiz; Ordu, Cetin; Ercan, Sina; Ekici, Isin Dogan; Oyan, Basak

2011-01-01

377

Case report of intracranial rosai-dorfman disease.  

PubMed

Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD)-sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy-represents a peculiar proliferation of histiocyte-like cells in patients. The condition was described by Rosai and Dorfman in 1969, after examining 4 cases, as an idiopathic histiocytic disorder. In 1972, they studied an additional 30 cases of patients with RDD. A histioproliferative disorder, RDD is characterized by bilateral, painless, cervical lymphadenopathy in 81% of patients. Fever, leukocytosis, elevated sedimentation rate, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia may also be found. In 30% of patients, extranodal involvement is present and may include the skin, eye orbit, upper respiratory tract, or testes. Cases involving the central nervous system are rare and account for < 5% of patients with RDD. We report on a 78-year-old woman presenting with new-onset headache, dizziness, and imbalance, which had been present for a few weeks prior to admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed 2 enhancing lesions within the right and left cerebellar hemispheres. Biopsy of the mass demonstrated a lymphohistiocytic infiltrate involving the cerebellum with foci of emperipolesis (phagocytosed lymphocytes). The adjacent cerebellum showed myelinated nerve fibers with reactive gliosis. A thorough work-up and histopathologic exam of the biopsied mass demonstrated lymphohistiocytic infiltrate with foci of emperipolesis (phagocytosed lymphocytes) consistent with RDD. Other differential considerations, such as primary or secondary neoplasms, infections, lymphoproliferative disorders, granulomatoses, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocyte-rich meningioma were ruled out by additional histopathologic exam. PMID:24145594

Wahba, Mervat

2013-10-01

378

Recombinant interleukin 2 therapy in severe combined immunodeficiency disease.  

PubMed Central

Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is a congenital disorder of severe B- and T-lymphocyte dysfunction in which several pathogenic mechanisms have been identified. The present study describes a female child with SCID who had a primary defect in the ability of T cells to secrete interleukin 2 (IL-2). B- and T-cell numbers were normal, but their functions were severely deficient. Mitogen and antigen-driven lymphoproliferative responses were diminished but were correctable in vitro with recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2). The patient's phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes expressed IL-2 receptors normally. Despite the presence of the gene for IL-2, the patient's cells were grossly deficient in messenger RNA for IL-2 and endogenous IL-2 production. Pokeweed mitogen-driven B-cell differentiation was decreased and was not corrected by the addition of normal T cells to the B cells. Two attempts at immune reconstitution by haploidentical bone marrow transplantation failed. Therapy with rIL-2 (30,000 units/kg, given daily i.v.) resulted in marked clinical improvement as well in improved T-cell functions. The child, now 3 yr old, has been on rIL-2 therapy for 2 yr and receives rIL-2 (30,000 units/kg) three times weekly at home. This case study points to a new direction in the treatment of such disorders with rIL-2. Images

Pahwa, R; Chatila, T; Pahwa, S; Paradise, C; Day, N K; Geha, R; Schwartz, S A; Slade, H; Oyaizu, N; Good, R A

1989-01-01

379

Newcastle disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Newcastle disease (ND), referred to as Exotic Newcastle disease (END) in the U. S., is an acute viral disease of domestic poultry and many other bird species and a recognized worldwide problem. Occurrence of END is due to an infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and is a ...

380

[Prion diseases].  

PubMed

Prion diseases are a family of progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by prions. There are four human prion diseases: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal insomnia and Kuru. They can arise in three different ways: acquired, familial or sporadic. We review clinical presentations, pathophysiology, morphological picture, diagnostic procedures and available treatment options of prion diseases. PMID:23235426

Sto?da, N I; Zavalishin, I A

2012-01-01

381

Kidney Diseases  

MedlinePLUS

... urine until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

382

Buerger's Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... United States, but is more common in the Middle East and Far East. Buerger's disease usually affects men ... Buerger's disease are highest in areas of the Middle East and Far East where heavy smoking is most ...

383

Pneumococcal Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningitis (Meningococcal Disease) Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease ... 3,000 to 6,000 cases of pneumococcal meningitis occur each year in the US. The case- ...

384

Alzheimer Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... brain works by sending signals. Chemical messengers, called neurotransmitters (say: nur-oh- trans -mih-terz), allow brain ... person with Alzheimer disease has decreased amounts of neurotransmitters. People with Alzheimer disease also develop deposits of ...

385

Legionnaire's disease  

MedlinePLUS

... not been proven. Most infections occur in middle-aged or older people, although they have been reported in children. Typically, the disease is less severe in children. Risk factors include: Alcoholism Cigarette smoking Diseases such as kidney failure or ...

386

Alexander Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... by which the mutations cause disease, developing better animal models for the disorder, and exploring potential strategies for treatment. At present, there is no exact animal model for the disease; however, mice have been engineered ...

387

Gaucher disease  

MedlinePLUS

... population. Persons of Eastern and Central European (Ashkenazi) Jewish heritage are more likely to get this disease. ... adults. It is most common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Type 2 disease usually begins in infancy ...

388

Moyamoya Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... discovering how and why diseases develop in the brain, and focus on finding ways to prevent, treat, or cure them. NIH Patient Recruitment for Moyamoya Disease Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and ...

389

Chagas Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... the disease has affected your intestines and heart. Medicines can kill the parasite, especially early on. You can also treat related problems. For example, a pacemaker helps with certain heart complications. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

390

Krabbe disease  

MedlinePLUS

Krabbe disease is a rare genetic disorder of the nervous system. It is a type of leukodystrophy. ... A defect in the GALC gene causes Krabbe disease. Persons with this gene ... (galactosylceramidase). The body needs this substance to ...

391

Lyme Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... on the Pacific Coast). These ticks can spread the disease to animals and humans through tick bites. These ticks are typically about the size of a sesame seed. Lyme disease is most common in rural and suburban areas ...

392

Alzheimer's disease  

MedlinePLUS

In a person with Alzheimer's disease, neurofibrillary tangles and plaques develop causing both structural and chemical problems in the brain. Alzheimer's disease appears to disconnect areas of the brain that ...

393

Huntington's disease  

MedlinePLUS

Huntington chorea ... Huntington's disease is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4. The defect causes a part of ... 10 to 28 times. But in persons with Huntington's disease, it is repeated 36 to 120 times. ...

394

Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's

J. R. Playfer

1997-01-01

395

Behçet's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Behçet's disease is a multisystem disease that is rare in the United States.Objective: The purpose of our study was to assess the characteristics and treatment of a series of patients with Behçet's disease in the United States.Methods: A retrospective clinical review of 25 patients with Behçet's disease was performed, and histopathologic findings and therapeutic modalities were reviewed.Results: All patients

Heidi C. Mangelsdorf; Wain L. White; Joseph L. Jorizzo

1996-01-01

396

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for peripheral T-cell NHL results in long-term disease control  

PubMed Central

The study analyzed outcomes of a consecutive case series of 37 patients with peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, from related and unrelated donors, using allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), between the years 2000 and 2007. All patients were pretreated; the majority had either relapsed or progressive disease (n=25, 68%), 13 had cutaneous histologies (CTCL), and all were ineligible for autologous transplant. Fully ablative conditioning regimens were used in 13 patients while 24 patients underwent reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). At five years the overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 52.2% and 46.5%, respectively. At the time of analysis, 9 (24.3%) patients had either relapsed (n=6) or progressed (n=3) post allo-HCT. The cumulative incidences of relapse/progression and non-relapse mortality at 5 years were 24.3% and 28.9%. No statistically significant variables for survival or relapse were discovered by univariate Cox-regression analysis of disease and patient characteristics; differences between CTCL and other histologies were not significant. The median follow-up of 64.0 months (range: 16.4–100.4) indicates a mature data-set with probable cure in the survivors. The relapse/progression curves reached and maintained plateaus after 1 year post-transplant, demonstrating that long-term disease control is possible after allo-HCT in PTCL patients with advanced disease.

Zain, Jasmine; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; Delioukina, Maria; Thomas, Sandra; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Nademanee, Auayporn; Popplewell, Leslie; Gaal, Karl; Senitzer, David; Kogut, Neil; O'Donnell, Margaret; Forman, Stephen J.

2012-01-01

397

Meniere's Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Meniere's disease is characterized by unpredictable spells of severe vertigo and fluctuations in hearing and tinnitus. This article discusses the incidence of Meniere's disease, the present status of our understanding of this disease, controversies in its diagnosis, and the multiple therapeutic modalities recruited in its treatment. (Contains…

Schessel, David A.

1997-01-01

398

Prostate Diseases  

MedlinePLUS

Aging & Health A to Z Prostate Diseases Basic Facts & Information What are Prostate Diseases? The prostate—one of the components of a man's sex organs—is a ... out anything serious. The Most Common Types of Prostate Diseases Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) Prostatitis Prostate cancer ...

399

Celiac Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... absorbing enough iron. Continue Why Do Kids Get Celiac Disease? No one is sure why celiac disease happens, but it appears to run in families. ... have a 5% to 10% chance of getting celiac disease if someone in your family has it. It's ...

400

Lyme Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded…

Taylor, George C.

1991-01-01

401

Sandhoff Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... body. Sandhoff disease is a severe form of Tay-Sachs disease--which is prevalent primarily in people of ... Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association 2001 Beacon Street Suite ...

402

Foodborne Diseases  

MedlinePLUS

... this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • National ... Diseases Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this ... disease information from CDC Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, a CDC-sponsored program known as ...

403

Redefining Disease?  

Microsoft Academic Search

How will developments in genetic knowledge affect the classification of disease? Leaders in genetics have suggested that knowledge of the role of genes in dis- ease can determine nosology. Diseases might be defined by genotype, thus avoiding the limitations of more empirical approaches to categorization. Other commentators cau- tion against disease definitions that are detached from the look and feel

Fiona Alice Miller; Megan E. Begbie; Mita Giacomini; Catherine Ahern; Erin A. Harvey

2006-01-01

404

Mouse models of graft-versus-host disease: advances and limitations  

PubMed Central

The limiting factor for successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), a post-transplant disorder that results from immune-mediated attack of recipient tissue by donor T cells contained in the transplant. Mouse models of GvHD have provided important insights into the pathophysiology of this disease, which have helped to improve the success rate of HSCT in humans. The kinetics with which GvHD develops distinguishes acute from chronic GvHD, and it is clear from studies of mouse models of GvHD (and studies of human HSCT) that the pathophysiology of these two forms is also distinct. Mouse models also further the basic understanding of the immunological responses involved in GvHD pathology, such as antigen recognition and presentation, the involvement of the thymus and immune reconstitution after transplantation. In this Perspective, we provide an overview of currently available mouse models of acute and chronic GvHD, highlighting their benefits and limitations, and discuss research and clinical opportunities for the future.

Schroeder, Mark A.; DiPersio, John F.

2011-01-01

405

Plasma HHV8 DNA predicts relapse in individuals with HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease.  

PubMed

HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease (HIV-MCD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder caused by infection with human herpesvirus-8. The disease follows a relapsing and remitting clinical