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Sample records for posttraumatic lumbar cerebrospinal

  1. Monoamine metabolite concentrations in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid of patients with histologically verified Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A M; Sims, N R; Bowen, D M; Neary, D; Palo, J; Wikstrom, J; Davison, A N

    1984-01-01

    Concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), 5-hydroxy indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were determined in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from control subjects and patients of both presenile and senile age with histologically verified Alzheimer's dementia. CSF HVA increased with age in control but not in Alzheimer patients. HVA and 5-HIAA in the CSF of presenile Alzheimer patients was lower than that of age matched control subjects. PMID:6204017

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage and headache after lumbar puncture: a prospective non-invasive imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Feng; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Chen, Shih-Pin; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-06-01

    The spatial distribution and clinical correlation of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after lumbar puncture have not been determined. Adult in-patients receiving diagnostic lumbar punctures were recruited prospectively. Whole-spine heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance myelography was carried out to characterize post-lumbar puncture spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakages. Maximum rostral migration was defined as the distance between the most rostral spinal segment with cerebrospinal fluid leakage and the level of lumbar puncture. Eighty patients (51 female/29 male, mean age 49.4 ± 13.3 years) completed the study, including 23 (28.8%) with post-dural puncture headache. Overall, 63.6% of periradicular leaks and 46.9% of epidural collections were within three vertebral segments of the level of lumbar puncture (T12-S1). Post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks (length 3.0 ± 2.5 versus 0.9 ± 1.9 segments, P = 0.001; maximum rostral migration 4.3 ± 4.7 versus 0.8 ± 1.7 segments, P = 0.002) and epidural collections (length 5.3 ± 6.1 versus 1.0 ± 2.1 segments, P = 0.003; maximum rostral migration 4.7 ± 6.7 versus 0.9 ± 2.4 segments, P = 0.015). In conclusion, post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks and epidural collections. Further, visualization of periradicular leaks was not restricted to the level of dural defect, although two-thirds remained within the neighbouring segments. PMID:25688077

  3. Chronic lumbar intrathecal catheterization for the collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the canine.

    PubMed

    West, Wanda; Ehrmann, Jon; Johnson, Wendy

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an excessive production of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Studies have shown that concentrations of tau and amyloid protein (β-amyloid (Aβ)) are altered in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with AD. In an effort to support the investigation of specialized CSF biomarkers, a reliable and reproducible chronic system was developed to collect lumbar CSF from conscious dogs. Several nonsurgical and surgical procedures have been published for accessing lumbar CSF. We elected to use a lumbar catheter with a vascular access port to collect lumbar CSF. Although the surgical model is not novel, we evaluated various modifications to the procedure and maintenance to increase patency of chronic indwelling lumbar CSF catheters. Different types of catheters were evaluated, and for our purposes a 3.5 Fr open-ended polyurethane catheter was selected. With our final modified surgical procedure and catheter maintenance program, 67% remained patent for longer than 30 days for the first surgery and 86% remained patent for longer than 30 days if a repair or replacement surgery was performed. Based on the results of the proof of concept studies, our model proved to be useful for single and multiple dose pharmacokinetic studies in a search for effective Alzheimer's disease treatment. PMID:24694254

  4. A case of chronic subdural hematoma following lumbar drainage for the management of iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: pitfalls and lessons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Vincent Eng-Soon; Liew, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma as a complication of lumbar drain placement for the management of iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak has not been previously documented in the literature. We describe such a case in a 69-year-old man who presented with right nasal obstruction secondary to an inverted papilloma involving the paranasal sinuses. The patient underwent endoscopic sinus surgery, which included a medial maxillectomy. Surgery was complicated by a small CSF leak, which was repaired intraoperatively. Five days later, the patient experienced CSF rhinorrhea, and a lumbar drain was inserted. He developed overdrainage symptoms but was well when he was discharged. However, 22 days later he returned with right hemiparesis. Computed tomography of the brain showed a left frontoparietal subdural hematoma with a mass effect. The neurosurgical team performed an emergency drainage procedure, and the patient experienced a complete neurologic recovery. We discuss the pitfalls of lumbar drainage, the possible pathophysiology of overdrainage, and the lessons learned from this case. PMID:24170465

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y in combat veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Sah, Renu; Ekhator, Nosakhare N; Jefferson-Wilson, Lena; Horn, Paul S; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2014-02-01

    Accruing evidence indicates that neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide neurotransmitter, is a resilience-to-stress factor in humans. We previously reported reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY concentrations in combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subjects as compared with healthy, non-combat-exposed volunteers. Here we report CSF NPY in combat-exposed veterans with and without PTSD. We quantified NPY concentrations in morning CSF from 11 male subjects with PTSD from combat in Iraq and/or Afghanistan and from 14 combat-exposed subjects without PTSD. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was measured by EIA. The relationship between CSF NPY and clinical symptoms, as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), was assessed, as was the relationship between combat exposure scale (CES) scores and CSF NPY. As compared with the combat-exposed comparison subjects without PTSD, individuals with PTSD had significantly lower concentrations of CSF NPY [mean CSF NPY was 258. 6 ± 21.64 pg/mL in the combat trauma-no PTSD group but only 180.5 ± 12.62 pg/mL in PTSD patients (p=0.008)]. After adjusting for CES and BDI scores the two groups were still significantly different with respect to NPY. Importantly, CSF NPY was negatively correlated with composite CAPS score and intrusive (re-experiencing) subscale scores, but did not significantly correlate with CES or BDI scores. Our current findings further suggest that NPY may regulate the manifestation of PTSD symptomatology, and extend previous observations of low CSF NPY concentrations in the disorder. Central nervous system NPY may be a clinically important pharmacotherapeutic target, and/or diagnostic measure, for PTSD. PMID:24485499

  6. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma--Wait and See, or Lumbar Drain?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K; Li, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05.Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups.Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma. PMID:26080170

  7. Lumbar puncture-related cerebrospinal fluid leakage on magnetic resonance myelography: is it a clinically significant finding?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) due to excessive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a well-known complication of lumbar puncture. Although various factors, especially the type of spinal needle, have been demonstrated to be associated with PDPH, the clinical implications of CSF leakage detected on magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images remain unclear. The objective of this case–control study was to evaluate the association between radiologically visualized CSF leakage and PDPH. Methods Clinical data including patients’ age and gender, types of spinal needle, duration of bed rest, interval between lumbar puncture procedures and MRM studies, and incidence of PDPH were compared between patients who were radiologically-positive and -negative for CSF leakage. Results Of the 22 patients with definite CSF leakage on MRM images, most were asymptomatic (86%, 19/22). The remaining three patients, who were suffering from PDPH, only complained of headaches and were treated conservatively. In a review of patients’ clinical data, there were no significant differences in any parameter including the incidence of PDPH between the 22 patients who were radiologically-positive for CSF leakage and the 31 radiologically-negative patients. Conclusion The significance of radiologically visualized CSF leakage should not be overestimated, as most such incidents are not associated with PDPH and do not require any treatment. PMID:24160550

  8. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Port System for the Collection of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Rhonda Pung; Lester McCully, Cynthia M; Bacher, John; Thomas Iii, Marvin L; Cruz, Rafael; Wangari, Solomon; Warren, Katherine E

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical translational research frequently incorporates collection of CSF from NHP, because CSF drug levels are used as a surrogate for CNS tissue penetration in pharmacokinetic and dynamic studies. Surgical placement of a CNS ventricular catheter reservoir for CSF collection is an intensive model to create and maintain and thus may not be feasible or practical for short-term studies. Furthermore, previous NHP lumbar port models require laminectomy for catheter placement. The new model uses a minimally invasive technique for percutaneous placement of a lumbar catheter to create a closed, subcutaneous system for effective, repeated CSF sample collection. None of the rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 10) implanted with our minimally invasive lumbar port (MILP) system experienced neurologic deficits, postoperative infection of the surgical site, or skin erosion around the port throughout the 21.7-mo study. Functional MILP systems were maintained in 70% of the macaques, with multiple, high-quality, 0.5- to 1.0-mL samples of CSF collected for an average of 3 mo by using aspiration or gravitational flow. Among these macaques, 57% had continuous functionality for a mean of 19.2 mo; 50% of the cohort required surgical repair for port repositioning and replacement during the study. The MILP was unsuccessful in 2 macaques, at an average of 9.5 d after surgery. Nonpatency in these animals was attributed to the position of the lumbar catheter. The MILP system is an appropriate replacement for temporary catheterization and previous models requiring laminectomy and is a short-term alternative for ventricular CSF collection systems in NHP. PMID:27538866

  9. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  10. The Effectiveness of Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage to Reduce the Cerebral Vasospasm after Surgical Clipping for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojeong; Yang, Narae

    2015-01-01

    Objective Removal of blood from subarachnoid space with a lumbar drainage (LD) may decrease development of cerebral vasospasm. We evaluated the effectiveness of a LD for a clinical vasospasm and outcomes after clipping of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Between July 2008 and July 2013, 234 patients were included in this study. The LD group consisted of 126 patients, 108 patients in the non LD group. We investigated outcomes as follow : 1) clinical vasospasm, 2) angioplasty, 3) cerebral infarction, 4) Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score at discharge, 5) GOS score at 6-month follow-up, and 6) mortality. Results Clinical vasospasm occurred in 19% of the LD group and 42% of the non LD group (p<0.001). Angioplasty was performed in 17% of the LD group and 38% of the non LD group (p=0.001). Cerebral infarctions were detected in 29% and 54% of each group respectively (p<0.001). The proportion of GOS score 5 at 6 month follow-up in the LD group was 69%, and it was 58% in the non LD group (p=0.001). Mortality rate showed 5% and 10% in each group respectively. But, there was no difference in shunt between the two groups. Conclusion LD after aneurysmal SAH shows marked reduction of clinical vasospasm and need for angioplasty. With this technique we have shown favorable GOS score at 6 month follow-up. PMID:25810855

  11. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  12. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P; Snell, Jamaal T; Wilson, Taylor A; Lieber, Bryan A; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P; Sutin, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Jerrard, D A; Hanna, J R; Schindelheim, G L

    2001-08-01

    A quick and accurate diagnosis of maladies affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is imperative. Procurement and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are paramount in helping the clinician determine a patient's clinical condition. Various staining methods, measurement of white blood cell counts, glucose and protein levels, recognition of xanthochromia, and microbiologic studies are CSF parameters that are collectively important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of a catastrophic CNS condition. Many of these CNS parameters have significant limitations that should be recognized to minimize under treating patients with catastrophic illness. PMID:11489408

  15. [Lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Teiblum, Sandra Sofie; Hjørne, Flemming Pii; Bisgaard, Thue

    2010-03-22

    Lumbar hernia is a rare condition. Lumbar hernia should be considered a rare differential diagnosis to unexplained back pain. Symptoms are scarce and diffuse and can vary with the size and content of the hernia. As there is a 25% risk of incarceration, operation is indicated even in asymptomatic hernias. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a woman with a slow growing mass in the lumbar region. She presented with pain and a computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. She underwent open surgery and fully recovered with recurrence within the first half year. PMID:20334799

  16. Pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis: 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, M C

    1994-04-01

    Nine children (five girls and four boys) ranging in age from 1 to 18 years (median age, 12 years) with leptomeningeal metastasis were evaluated for cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization with cerebrospinal fluid flow studies using ventricular diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with indium 111 (111In-DTPA). Histologic diagnosis included medulloblastoma (two), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (two), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (two), pineoblastoma (one), ependymoma (one), and anaplastic astrocytoma (one). Sixteen 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed, of which nine demonstrated normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow of radionuclide, with the following cerebrospinal fluid compartment median times to appearance, with ranges in parentheses: ventricles, 1 minute (0 to 3 minutes); cisterna magna/basal cisterns, 5 minutes (3 to 5 minutes); cervical subarachnoid space, 8 minutes (5 to 10 minutes); thoracic subarachnoid space, 15 minutes (10 to 30 minutes); lumbar subarachnoid space, 35 minutes (20 to 45 minutes); and sylvian cistern, 80 minutes (60 to 90 minutes). Blockage of normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow was seen in seven 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies in the following cerebrospinal fluid compartments: cervical subarachnoid space (four), lumbar subarachnoid space (two), and cisterna magna/basal cisterns (one). Five 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed after demonstration of cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization and treatment with limited-field radiation therapy to involved regions; cerebrospinal fluid flow blocks resolved in three. In conclusion, cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization, as shown by radionuclide ventriculography, is a common occurrence in pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis (four of nine patients, or 44%) and may be palliated by involved-field radiotherapy. PMID:8006365

  17. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage as an early and potentially lethal complication of a discal lumbar herniation surgery.

    PubMed

    Royon, V; Rabehenoina, C; Tourrel, F; Compère, V; Dureuil, B

    2014-01-01

    Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is an infrequent but serious complication after lumbar herniation surgery. Little is known about this complication but excessive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is thought to be a leading cause of RCH. We describe the case of a patient suffering from a life-threatening RCH, which occurred a few hours after lumbar disc herniation surgery. PMID:24439492

  18. Posttraumatic Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Lelievre, Lucie; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Abdoul, Hendy; Hivelin, Mickael; Chouaki, Taieb; Toubas, Dominique; Mamez, Anne-Claire; Lantieri, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Lanternier, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Data on clinical, mycologic characteristics, and outcome of posttraumatic mucormycosis are scarce and often limited to case reports. From the French nationwide “RetroZygo” study, we compared posttraumatic mucormycosis cases with other forms of mucormycosis. We also reviewed reports of posttraumatic mucormycosis in the English-language literature from 1993 to 2013. We included all proven or probable cases for which underlying condition, route of infection, surgical and antifungal treatments, and outcome were detailed. From our cohort, posttraumatic mucormycosis (n = 16) differed significantly from other forms (n = 85) by rarity of underlying disease (31.2% vs 81%, p < 0.0001), frequency of cutaneous localization (87% vs 7%, p < 0.0001), short time before diagnosis (4.5 vs 21 d, p = 0.0002), species involved (Apophysomyces elegans complex and Saksenaea vasiformis), surgical requirement (93.7% vs 47%, p = 0.0006) and better survival (87.5% vs 47.6% at day 90, p = 0.03). We studied 122 cases of posttraumatic mucormycosis through our literature review. Most frequently reported traumas were traffic (37%), domestic accidents (15.1%), or natural disasters (13.4%). Mucormycosis occurred after extensive soft-tissue damage in 47.5% cases, with symptoms occurring a median of 9.5 days after trauma with necrosis being reported in 76.2% cases. Dissemination was found in 9% of patients, and bacterial coinfection in 41%. Nineteen percent of cases occurred in the Middle East or in India where Apophysomyces elegans complex was the predominant species recovered. Awareness of mucormycosis as a cause of posttrauma soft-tissue infection is warranted, especially in cases of soil-contaminated wounds. Survival is higher than in other forms of mucormycosis, but morbidity remains high. PMID:25500709

  19. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K.; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05. Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups. Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma. PMID:26080170

  20. Lumbar Catheter Placement Using Paramedian Approach Under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Herial, Nabeel A.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar catheter placement under fluoroscopic guidance may reduce the rate of technical failures and associated complications seen with insertion guided by manually palpable landmarks. Methods We reviewed our experience with 43 attempted lumbar catheter placements using paramedian approach under fluoroscopic guidance and ascertained rates of technical success, and clinical events. Results Among the 43 patients, 18, 1, and 1 patients were on aspirin (with dipyrimadole in 2), clopidogrel, and combination of both, respectively. Lumbar catheter placement was successful in 42 of 43 attempted placements. Floroscopic guidance was critical in three patients; one patient had severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) depletion (empty thecal sac phenomenon) following pituitary surgery leading to no cerebrospinal fluid return despite correct placement confirmation under fluoroscopy. Two patients had spinal needle placement at the junction between epidural and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (junctional position) leading to cerebrospinal fluid return but inability to introduce the lumbar catheter. After confirmation of position by the injection of contrast or radiographic landmarks the needle was advanced by indenting the subcutaneous tissue or reinserting at a spinal level above the first insertion. The lumbar catheter remained in position over a mean period (±standard deviation) of 4.1(±2.3) days. Improvement in hydrocephalus was seen in two patients with intracranial mass lesions. One patient developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the insertion track following removal of catheter and required skin suturing at the site of insertion. Conclusions We observed a high technical success rate with low rate of complications even in patients with intracranial mass lesions, those on ongoing antiplatelet medications or in whom insertion would not be possible guided by manually palpable landmarks. PMID:26958156

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  2. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  3. Intracranial fat migration: A newly described complication of autologous fat repair of a cerebrospinal fluid leak following supracerebellar infratentorial approach

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Cassie A.; Aujla, Parvir; Moreno, Mario; Veeravagu, Anand; Li, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial fat migration following autologous fat graft and placement of a lumbar drain for cerebrospinal fluid leak after pineal cyst resection surgery has not been previously reported. Case presentation The authors present a case of a 39-year-old male with a history of headaches who presented for removal of a pineal cyst from the pineal region. He subsequently experienced cerebrospinal fluid leak and postoperative Escherichia coli (E. Coli) wound infection, and meningitis, which were treated initially with wound washout and antibiotics in addition to bone removal and primary repair with primary suture-closure of the durotomy. A lumbar drain was left in place. The cerebrospinal fluid leak returned two weeks following removal of the lumbar drain; therefore, autologous fat graft repair and lumbar drain placement were performed. Three days later, the patient began experiencing right homonymous hemianopia and was found via computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to have autologous fat in the infra‑ and supratentorial space, including intraparenchymal and subarachnoid spread. Symptoms began to resolve with supportive care over 48 hours and had almost fully resolved within one week. Discussion This is the first known report of a patient with an autologous fat graft entering the subarachnoid space, intraparenchymal space, and ventricles following fat graft and lumbar drainage. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of monitoring for complications of lumbar drain placement. PMID:25557086

  4. Lumbar Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kirkham B

    2016-04-01

    When a patient presents with spine problems, the spine surgeon would do well to avoid use of, reliance on, and acceptance of radiographs as the sole or primary source of information. Measurement of pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis, although crucial, does not take into account the effort the patient must make to move, the level of involvement of other parts of the body, and the history of previous procedures and outcomes. Radiographs may show pathology that is not consistent with the appearance of the patient. How should we assess this situation? PMID:27015064

  5. Lumbar puncture in patients using anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan; Bruniera, Gustavo; Brunale, Fernando; Mangueira, Cristóvão; Senne, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents has largely increased. Diagnostic lumbar puncture in patients taking these drugs represents a challenge considering the opposing risks of bleeding and thrombotic complications. To date there are no controlled trials, specific guidelines, nor clear recommendations in this area. In the present review we make some recommendations about lumbar puncture in patients using these drugs. Our recommendations take into consideration the pharmacology of these drugs, the thrombotic risk according to the underlying disease, and the urgency in cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Evaluating such information and a rigorous monitoring of neurological symptoms after lumbar puncture are crucial to minimize the risk of hemorrhage associated neurological deficits. An individualized patient decision-making and an effective communication between the assistant physician and the responsible for conducting the lumbar puncture are essential to minimize potential risks. PMID:27556380

  6. Lumbar paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Dillard-Cannon, Erika; Atsina, Kofi-Buaku; Ghobrial, George; Gnass, Esteban; Curtis, Mark T; Heller, Joshua

    2016-08-01

    Spinal paragangliomas (SP) are benign and overall rare extra-adrenal neuroendocrine tumors often diagnosed during workup for lower back pain. Complete surgical resection achieves both symptomatic relief and cure. We present a 32-year-old man with a longstanding history of lumbago and bilateral lower extremity pain found to have a lumbar paraganglioma at the level of the L3 vertebrae. The clinical, histopathological, and radiological characteristics are described, including the rare finding of superficial siderosis on MRI of the brain. A laminectomy with microscopic dissection of the intradural mass achieved complete debulking without evidence of residual tumor. Excellent prognosis can be achieved with complete surgical resection of SP without the need for adjuvant therapy. Therefore, care should be taken to distinguish these spinal tumors from those that appear similar but are more aggressive. As such, the radiological finding of superficial siderosis should raise the suspicion for SP when a vascular intradural extramedullary spinal tumor is observed. PMID:27032749

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis after unprovoked first seizure

    PubMed Central

    Zisimopoulou, Vaso; Mamali, Margarita; Katsavos, Serafeim; Siatouni, Anna; Tavernarakis, Antonios; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics after an unprovoked first seizure (UFS). We reviewed the medical records of 71 patients with UFS who underwent lumbar puncture, and examined the CSF parameters. Each CSF parameter was evaluated separately for potential correlations with the other study variables. We observed an overall frequency of CSF abnormalities of 35.2%. CSF protein was the most common abnormal parameter (31%) and showed significant positive correlations with male gender (p=0.037) and older age (p=0.007). Only seven patients (9.9%) had an abnormal cell count (5–40 cells/μl). Higher CSF cell counts were found to predict a longer hospitalization period (p=0.005). No relationship with abnormal EEG findings could be established (p=0.169). This study is one of the few to evaluate postictal CSF parameters in a clinical setting, and to our knowledge the first to investigate these parameters specifically in the emergency department. The development of a rapid, easy-to-use test that does not require extensive laboratory equipment to differentiate UFS from other conditions could be of great value in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27358223

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Prospective studies of the serotonergic system and suicide report that low 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a history of attempted suicide predict suicide risk. Low CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) is reported to be associated with past and future lethality of suicide attempts but not with suicide. The interrelationships between monoamine metabolites, violent method, suicide intent and lethality of suicidal behaviour are complex. We hypothesized that CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels are related to suicide intent, violence and lethality of suicidal behaviour. Fifteen male suicide attempters admitted to a psychiatric ward at the Karolinska University Hospital and eight healthy male volunteers were submitted to lumbar puncture and CSF 5-HIAA and HVA were assayed. Suicide intent with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), lethality and violence of suicidal behaviour were assessed. All patients were followed up for causes of death. Six suicides and one fatal accident were identified with death certificates. Mean CSF 5-HIAA but not CSF HVA differed between suicides and survivors. Violent suicides had higher suicide intent and CSF 5-HIAA than non-violent suicides. In violent suicides, CSF 5-HIAA levels were negatively correlated with SIS. Greater suicide intent may be associated with greater aggressive intent and predicts a violent suicide method. PMID:19034712

  9. Endoscopic inter laminar management of lumbar disease

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Kher, Yatin; Bhatele, Pushp Raj

    2016-01-01

    Discectomy for lumbar disc provides faster relief in acute attack than does conservative management. Long-term results of open, microscopy-, and endoscopy-assisted discectomy are same. Early results of endoscopy-assisted surgery are better as compared to that of open surgery in terms of better visualization, smaller incision, reduced hospital stay, better education, lower cost, less pain, early return to work, and rehabilitation. Although microscopic discectomy also has comparable advantages, endoscopic-assisted technique better addresses opposite side pathology. Inter laminar technique (ILT) and trans foraminal technique (TFT) are two main endoscopic approaches for lumbar pathologies. Endoscopy-assisted ILT can be performed in recurrent, migrated, and calcified discs. All lumbar levels including L5-S1 level, intracanalicular, foraminal disc, lumbar canal and lateral recess stenosis, multiple levels, and bilateral lesions can be managed by ILT. Migrated, calcified discs, L5-S1 pathology, lumbar canal, and lateral recess stenosis can be better approached by ILT than by TFT. Most spinal surgeons are familiar with anatomy of ILT. It can be safely performed in foramen stenosis and in uncooperative and anxious patients. There is less risk of exiting nerve root damage, especially in short pedicles and in presence of facet osteophytes as compared to TFT. On the other hand, ILT is more invasive than TFT with more chances of perforations of the dura matter, pseudomeningocele formation, and cerebrospinal fluid fistula in early learning curve. Obtaining microsurgical experience, attending workshops, and suitable patient selection can help shorten the learning curve. Once adequate skill is acquired, this procedure is safe and effective. The surgeon must be prepared to convert to an open procedure, especially in early learning curve. Spinal endoscopy is likely to achieve more roles in future. Endoscopy-assisted ILT is a safer alternative to the microscopic technique. PMID

  10. Successful lumbar puncture with Taylor's approach for the diagnostic workup of meningitis in a patient with Ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Acharya, Subhash Prasad; Keyal, Niraj; Paneru, Hem Raj; Shrestha, Pramesh Sunder

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis and encephalitis are the neurological emergencies. As the clinical findings lack specificity, once suspected, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis should be performed and parenteral antimicrobials should be administered without delay. Lumbar puncture can be technically challenging in patients with ankylosing spondylitis due to ossification of ligaments and obliteration of interspinous spaces. Here, we present a case of ankylosing spondylitis where attempts for lumbar puncture by conventional approach failed. CSF sample was successfully obtained by Taylor's approach. PMID:26628829

  11. Vicarious Occupational Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Traditional studies of posttraumatic growth center on the individual or close family members as they deal with traumatic events. The current study examines workers who experience posttraumatic growth when a coworker has a traumatic experience. The participants in this study were firefighters in suburban Cook County, Illinois. Participants were…

  12. Post-traumatic catamenial sciatica.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael S; Burd, Timothy A; Allen, William C

    2008-04-01

    This article presents a unique case of posttraumatic extrapelvic endometriosis presenting as a gluteal mass causing cyclic sciatica. A 38-year-old woman presented with an enlarging right buttock mass over the previous 6 years. She also had symptoms of radicular pain referred to the right leg and foot with sitting and daily activity. Four years prior to noticing the mass, she sustained a gunshot wound through the lower abdomen while 5 months pregnant. Excisional biopsy of the gluteal mass revealed endometrioma. Sciatica is a common and painful disorder that is believed to have an incidence of 40% in the adult population. Sciatica is most often due to intraspinal pathology affecting the lumbar nerve roots. There are many recognized extraspinal etiologies for sciatica in the literature including aneurysms, sciatic hernia, abcess, neoplasm, trochanteric wire, piriformis syndrome, ischial fracture, a posteriorly flexed uterus, and even an intrauterine device following uterine perforation. Similarly, endometriosis is a gynecologic condition that represents a significant health problem for women of reproductive age as it occurs in up to 50% of premenopausal women and 71% to 87% in women with chronic pelvic pain. Although rare, endometriosis has a well known ability to migrate outside of the abdominal cavity and proliferate ectopically under the control of systemic estrogen. PMID:19292268

  13. Monoamines in the brain cerebrospinal fluid of facial pain patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bouckoms, A. J.; Sweet, W. H.; Poletti, C.; Lavori, P.; Carr, D.; Matson, W.; Gamache, P.; Aronin, N.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assay monoamines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the trigeminal cistern of 64 patients with intractable facial pain. The CSF was analyzed for homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), end-product markers of activity for the dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine systems, respectively. HVA averaged 121 ng/mL in these facial pain patients, compared to 150 to 550 ng/mL in 10 studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and pain patients. 5-HIAA averaged 29 to ng/mL in our facial pain patients compared to 60 to 120 ng/mL in nine studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and neurological patients. Trigeminal cistern CSF MHPG averaged 9 ng/mL, similar to the range of 13 studies of lumbar CSF of assorted psychiatric and pain diagnoses. These results indicate that (1) the electrochemical detection method provides a unique way of accurately measuring nanogram concentrations of multiple monoamines in a little as 0.25 mL of CSF; (2) trigeminal cistern and posterior fossa brain CSF monoamine metabolites reflect a different profile of dopaminergic and serotonergic functioning in these facial pain patients from that previously reported with lumbar CSF measurements of other patients; and (3) trigeminal sensory ganglion or brain dopamine and serotonin systems may be concomitantly dysfunctional in intractable facial pain. PMID:7504420

  14. Lumbar (Open) Microscopic Discectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common surgical treatment for ruptured or herniated discs of the lumbar spine. When the outer wall ... a slipped or bulging disc. (See discussion of herniated disc for more information.) Once the inner disc material ...

  15. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... 50. A herniated lumbar disc may also cause back pain, although back pain alone (without leg pain) can have many causes ... 90% success); surgery is less effective in relieving back pain. Nonsurgical treatment Your doctor may prescribe nonsurgical treatments ...

  16. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  17. Meningeal haemorrhage secondary to cerebrospinal fluid drainage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Mancio, Jennifer; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Bettencourt, Nuno; Oliveira, Marco; Santos, Lino; Melica, Bruno; Rodrigues, Alberto; Braga, José Pedro; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has shown lower mortality compared with open surgical repair (OSR). However, the risk of spinal cord ischaemia (SCI) remains similar than OSR. As a prophylactic measure to reduce the risk of SCI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage has been widely used in OSR. In TEVAR, the utility of this adjunct is still controversial. We report a case of a 56-year-old man referred for TEVAR for a descending thoracic aneurysm that previously underwent an abdominal aneurysmectomy with aortobifemoral bypass graft. On the day before, a lumbar cerebrospinal drain was placed prophylactically. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, meningeal symptoms without neurological deficits developed. Clinical investigation revealed meningeal haemorrhage. Therapy with nimodipine was initiated with symptomatic relief. Evidence from randomized controlled trials supporting the role of CSF drainage in TEVAR is still lacking. We discuss the current recommendations, potential benefits and risks and cautions associated with CSF drainage in TEVAR. PMID:25988028

  18. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  19. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  20. [Complex posttraumatic stress disorder].

    PubMed

    Green, Tamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2007-11-01

    The characteristic symptoms resulting from exposure to an extreme trauma include three clusters of symptoms: persistent experience of the traumatic event, persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma and persistent symptoms of increased arousal. Beyond the accepted clusters of symptoms for posttraumatic stress disorder exists a formation of symptoms related to exposure to extreme or prolonged stress e.g. childhood abuse, physical violence, rape, and confinement within a concentration camp. With accumulated evidence of the existence of these symptoms began a trail to classify a more complex syndrome, which included, but was not confined to the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This review addresses several subjects for study in complex posttraumatic stress disorder, which is a complicated and controversial topic. Firstly, the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder is presented. Secondly, the professional literature relevant to this disturbance is reviewed and finally, the authors present the polemic being conducted between the researchers of posttraumatic disturbances regarding validity, reliability and the need for separate diagnosis for these symptoms. PMID:18087837

  1. Interactions between Flow Oscillations and Biochemical Parameters in the Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Puy, Vincent; Zmudka-Attier, Jadwiga; Capel, Cyrille; Bouzerar, Roger; Serot, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Anne-Marie; Ausseil, Jérome; Balédent, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium between the ventricular and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments may be disturbed (in terms of flow and biochemistry) in patients with chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CSF assays, we sought to determine whether changes in CSF were associated with biochemical alterations. Nine elderly patients with CH underwent phase-contrast MRI. An index of CSF dynamics (Idyn) was defined as the product of the lumbar and ventricular CSF flows. During surgery, samples of CSF were collected from the lumbar and ventricular compartments and assayed for chloride, glucose and total protein. The lumbar/ventricular (L/V) ratio was calculated for each analyte. The ratio between measured and expected levels (Ibioch) was calculated for each analyte and compared with Idyn. Idyn varied from 0 to 100.10(3)μl(2).s(2). In contrast to the L/V ratios for chloride and glucose, the L/V ratio for total protein varied markedly from one patient to another (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 2.63 ± 1.24). The Ibioch for total protein was strongly correlated with the corresponding Idyn (Spearman's R: 0.98; p < 5 × 10(-5)).We observed correlated alterations in CSF flow and biochemical parameters in patients with CH. Our findings also highlight the value of dynamic flow analysis in the interpretation of data on CSF biochemistry. PMID:27445797

  2. Interactions between Flow Oscillations and Biochemical Parameters in the Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Puy, Vincent; Zmudka-Attier, Jadwiga; Capel, Cyrille; Bouzerar, Roger; Serot, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Anne-Marie; Ausseil, Jérome; Balédent, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium between the ventricular and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments may be disturbed (in terms of flow and biochemistry) in patients with chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CSF assays, we sought to determine whether changes in CSF were associated with biochemical alterations. Nine elderly patients with CH underwent phase-contrast MRI. An index of CSF dynamics (Idyn) was defined as the product of the lumbar and ventricular CSF flows. During surgery, samples of CSF were collected from the lumbar and ventricular compartments and assayed for chloride, glucose and total protein. The lumbar/ventricular (L/V) ratio was calculated for each analyte. The ratio between measured and expected levels (Ibioch) was calculated for each analyte and compared with Idyn. Idyn varied from 0 to 100.103μl2.s2. In contrast to the L/V ratios for chloride and glucose, the L/V ratio for total protein varied markedly from one patient to another (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 2.63 ± 1.24). The Ibioch for total protein was strongly correlated with the corresponding Idyn (Spearman’s R: 0.98; p < 5 × 10−5).We observed correlated alterations in CSF flow and biochemical parameters in patients with CH. Our findings also highlight the value of dynamic flow analysis in the interpretation of data on CSF biochemistry. PMID:27445797

  3. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  4. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  5. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  6. [Cerebrospinal fluid syndrome in neuroschistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Livramento, J A; Machado, L R; da Silva, L C; Spina-França, A

    1985-12-01

    A study was made of 220 samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients who suffered from several diseases of the central nervous system. In all samples immunological reactions for syphilis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, Chagas' disease and schistosomiasis were studied comparatively. Immunofluorescent reactions for schistosomiasis were made by indirect antiglobulin technic with two types of antigen: the worm and the liver granuloma of hamster infected by Schistosoma mansoni. Emphasis is given on data concerning to 16 cases in which these reactions were reagent. The importance of routine search in the CSF for schistosomiasis antibodies is discussed. The concept of a 'CSF neuroschistosomiasis syndrome' is discussed as the main aspect of diagnosis "in vivo" of the disease. It is supported by the demonstration of specific antibodies in the CSF. Hypercytosis of lymphomononuclear type associated to the presence of eosinophil cells, protein concentration increase and gamma globulins increase are other characteristics found in the CSF in this syndrome. PMID:3938654

  7. Cerebrospinal acanthamebic granulomas. Case report.

    PubMed

    Velho, Vernon; Sharma, Gopal Krishan; Palande, Deepak Amrut

    2003-09-01

    The authors present the case of a previously healthy 26-year-old man who presented with cerebrospinal acanthamebic granulomas, and they review the literature on acanthamebic granulomas of the central nervous system (CNS). The appearance of the lesion on imaging studies suggested the presence of tuberculous granulomas, which are common in India, and antituberculosis treatment was started. Despite surgical excision of a granuloma located in the right temporoparietal region and an intramedullary granuloma at T7-8, the disease progressed and resulted in death. Unlike other cases, this patient was not immunocompromised, had no history of engaging in water activities, and had no ulcers on his body, leaving in question the mode of entry used by the ameba. Acanthamebic granulomas can cause severe infections in healthy patients as well as in sick ones. This disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis when treating infective granulomas of the CNS. PMID:12959447

  8. Management of posttraumatic kyphosis: surgical technique to facilitate a combined approach.

    PubMed

    Marré, Bartolomé

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a variation of the "posterior-anterior-posterior" surgical techniques to correct posttraumatic kyphosis of the thoracic and lumbar spine with the USS internal fixator. This modification is based on the use of "temporary screws" to mark the entrance of the pedicles in the first stage of the operation (posterior approach, with the patient in prone position). Approaching both columns of the spine simultaneously facilitates correction of the kyphotic defect and permits 360 reconstruction of the spine. PMID:15993120

  9. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. In reply to a question, lumbar spinal stenosis, commonly a multifactorial disease that can have profound functional consequences, is considered, along with a discussion of physical and pharmacologic treatments and quality of life. PMID:27145444

  10. Lumbar corsets can decrease lumbar motion in golf swing.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key pointsRotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back painWearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity.Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  11. Lumbar Corsets Can Decrease Lumbar Motion in Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key points Rotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back pain Wearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity. Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  12. The Maze of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid's presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid's discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie. PMID:24396600

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. PMID:26416846

  14. Supine Digital Subtraction Myelography for the Demonstration of a Dorsal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak in a Patient with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Michael; Chaudhary, Navjot; Leung, Andrew; Ng, Wai

    2012-01-01

    A patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak required localization of the leakage site prior to surgical management. Conventional, computed tomography and prone digital subtraction myelography failed to localize the dural tear, which was postulated to be dorsally located. We present here a digital subtraction myelographic approach to accurately localize a dorsal site of CSF leakage by injecting iodinated contrast via a lumbar drain with the patient in the supine position. PMID:23378882

  15. Effects of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on Alzheimer’s disease in veterans, using the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Toga, Arthur W.; Friedl, Karl E.; Pacifico, Anthony; Sheline, Yvette; Yaffe, Kristine; Mohlenoff, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common problems resulting from military service, and both have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or other causes. This study aims to use imaging techniques and biomarker analysis to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or PTSD resulting from combat or other traumas increase the risk for AD and decrease cognitive reserve in Veteran subjects, after accounting for age. Using military and Department of Veterans Affairs records, 65 Vietnam War veterans with a history of moderate or severe TBI with or without PTSD, 65 with ongoing PTSD without TBI, and 65 control subjects are being enrolled in this study at 19 sites. The study aims to select subject groups that are comparable in age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia are being excluded. However, a new study just beginning, and similar in size, will study subjects with TBI, subjects with PTSD, and control subjects with MCI. Baseline measurements of cognition, function, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid bio-markers; magnetic resonance images (structural, diffusion tensor, and resting state blood-level oxygen dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging); and amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images with florbetapir are being obtained. One-year follow-up measurements will be collected for most of the baseline procedures, with the exception of the lumbar puncture, the PET imaging, and apolipoprotein E genotyping. To date, 19 subjects with TBI only, 46 with PTSD only, and 15 with TBI and PTSD have been recruited and referred to 13 clinics to undergo the study protocol. It is expected that cohorts will be fully recruited by October 2014. This study is a first step toward the design and statistical powering of an AD prevention trial using at-risk veterans as subjects, and provides the

  16. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia. PMID:27432684

  18. Testing of cerebrospinal compensatory reserve in shunted and non-shunted patients: a guide to interpretation based on an observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Czosnyka, M; Whitehouse, H; Smielewski, P; Simac, S; Pickard, J D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To design a computerised infusion test to compensate for the disadvantages of Katzman's lumbar infusion method: inadequate accuracy of estimation of the resistance to cerebrospinal fluid outflow and poor predictive value in normal pressure hydrocephalus. METHODS--Accuracy was improved by intracranial pressure signal processing and model analysis for measurement of cerebrospinal compensatory variable. These include the CSF outflow resistance, brain compliance, pressure-volume index, estimated sagittal sinus pressure, CSF formation rate, and other variables. Infusion may be made into the lumbar space, ventricles, or, when assessing shunt function in vivo, the shunt chamber. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS--The computerised test has been used for five years in a multicentre study in 350 hydrocephalic patients of various ages, aetiologies, and states of cerebrospinal compensation. The principles of using the test to characterise different types of CSF circulatory disorders in patients presenting with ventricular dilatation, including brain atrophy and normal and high pressure hydrocephalus, are presented and illustrated. Previous studies showed a positive correlation between cerebrospinal compensatory variables and the results of shunting, but such a prediction remains difficult in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, particularly in elderly patients. The technique is helpful in the assessment of shunt malfunction, including posture-related overdrainage, over-drainage related to the nocturnal B wave activity, and proximal or distal shunt obstruction. The appendix presents an introduction of the mathematical modelling of CSF pressure volume-compensation included in computerised infusion test software. Images PMID:8778261

  19. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  20. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    PubMed

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. PMID:27263067

  1. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  2. Lumbar spine chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma.

  3. Lumbar spinal surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bones (vertebrae) separated by soft cushions (intervertebral discs). ... Lumbar (lower back) spine disease is usually caused by herniated ... bodies (osteophytes), which compress spinal nerves, trauma, and ...

  4. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Yoshinori; Yuguchi, Takamichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC) is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression. PMID:25861499

  5. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Presenting With a Cerebrospinal Fluid Leukemoid Reaction in an Adolescent With preB-ALL in Remission.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kristina; Song, Sophie X; Kao, Roy L; Van Dyne, Elizabeth; Kempert, Pamela; Deville, Jaime G

    2016-08-01

    A 19-year-old girl with a history of precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission presented with fever, headache, and a skin rash. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination reported pleocytosis with blast-like cells concerning for a central nervous system leukemic relapse. After the patient showed significant improvement on intravenous acyclovir, a repeat lumbar puncture revealed normalization of CSF. The abnormal CSF cells were reviewed and ultimately determined to be activated and atypical lymphocytes. The patient recovered uneventfully. Atypical lymphocytes resembling leukemic blasts are an unusual finding in viral meningitis. Varicella zoster virus reactivation should be considered during initial evaluation for central nervous system relapse of leukemia. PMID:27322719

  6. [Cerebrospinal nematodosis in sheep in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tschuor, A C; Sydler, T; Rauch, S; Hertzberg, H; Gendotti, M; Schweizer, G

    2006-11-01

    In December 2005 three sheep, originating from Canton Tessin, were presented with cerebrospinal nematodosis. The animals had a history of progressive pelvic limb ataxia and recumbency. The most important clinical findings were an abnormal gait (wide stance, pelvic limb paresis) and decreased sensitivity of the pelvic limbs. The general condition was slightly or moderately disturbed, appetite was normal. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed mononuclear cells and eosinophils, suggesting a helminthic infection of the central nervous system. Postmortem findings confirmed the clinical diagnosis in one animal as parts of a nematode were found in the thoracic spinal cord. Even though the nematode could not be identified, infection with Elaphostrongylus cervi seems very likely, as the sheep are in close contact with deer on the pastures and the parasite is known to infect goats in Switzerland. This is the first description of cerebrospinal nematodosis in sheep in Switzerland. PMID:17209510

  7. [Iatrogenic meningitis after diagnosis lumbar puncture: 3 cases reports in the paediatric Children's Hospital of Tunis].

    PubMed

    Smaoui, H; Hariga, D; Hajji, N; Bouziri, A; Ben Jaballah, N; Barsaoui, S; Bousnina, S; Sammoud, A; Kechrid, A

    2011-02-01

    We have collected cases of iatrogenic meningitis managed in the Children's Hospital of Tunis, between January 1998 and December 2006. Clinical information about each patient were collected, all bacterial samples were investigated in the microbiology laboratory of the hospital. Bacterial isolates were identified according to conventional criteria. In the interval under study, we recorded three cases of iatrogenic meningitis after lumbar puncture. Two cases occurred in newborn admitted for suspicion of neonatal infection and one in a 2-month-old infant admitted for exploration of hyperpyretic convulsion. In all patients, the initial cerebrospinal fluid was normal. All patients developed symptoms of acute meningitis within 72 hours after lumbar puncture; the second cerebrospinal fluid was, then, typical for purulent meningitis. The causal agents isolated in the three cases were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Serratia marcescens, all resistant to beta-lactams by extended spectrum beta-lactamase production. The use of quinolones was required in all cases. Different complications were recorded: hydrocephalus and brain abscess in one case, respiratory and hemodynamic failure managed in the intensive care unit in the second, and brain hygroma in the third case. This study shows high morbidity of iatrogenic meningitis. Simple aseptic precautions undertaken before the procedure of lumbar puncture can prevent such cases. The urgent need for increasing the awareness among medical personnel in hospitals of developing countries cannot be overemphasized. PMID:21103965

  8. [Lumbar puncture training using simulation-based educational strategies: Experience in a clinical pediatric residency].

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Juan C; Gouguenheim, Bárbara; Ghiglione, Analía; Bravo, Nélida; Prudencio, Carla I; Villois, Florencia; Abadie, Yamila; Zubieta, Ana; Golini, Carol; Villar, Victoria; Rodríguez, Susana P

    2015-12-01

    Pediatricians should acquire multiple skills during their professional training, including procedural skills. Skill acquisition requires knowledge on theoretical bases, direct observation and, lastly, supervised repetitive practice. Training using simulators allows to learn procedures in a controlled setting, ensuring patients' safety, integrating this as a learning stage prior to the actual contact with patients. Here we report on the teaching experience of a simulated lumbar puncture procedure. Training was provided to 112 first year pediatric residents who entered Hospital Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan in the 2013-2014 period. Educational contents included communication with parents regarding the procedure, material preparation, compliance with biosafety standards, sepsis and general patient care, puncture and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid collection, and specimen collection. Strategies included, in a sequential order, the introduction of theoretical aspects using the bibliography and audiovisual resources available at the hospital's online campus and subsequent practice of lumbar puncture in a 3-month-old infant phantom on a lateral recumbent position that allowed to make a puncture and collect cerebrospinal fluid. At each training session, the level of confidence was measured before and after the procedure, and a checklist was developed to verify an adequate compliance with each step of the procedure. The simulated lumbar puncture training model has been introduced as an educational strategy of our Pediatric Residency Program. PMID:26593801

  9. Mimickers of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Bennett Douglas; Blessinger, Brian Joseph; Darden, Bruce Vaiden; Brigham, Craig D; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Laxer, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons frequently treat patients who report pain that radiates from the back into the lower extremity. Although the most common etiology is either a herniated disk or spinal stenosis, a myriad of pathologies can mimic the symptoms of radiculopathy, resulting in differences in the clinical presentation and the workup. Therefore, the clinician must be able to distinguish the signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy from pathologies that may have a similar presentation. Being cognizant of these other possible conditions enables the physician to consider a breadth of alternative diagnoses when a patient presents with radiating lower extremity pain. PMID:25538126

  10. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized. PMID:8817752

  11. Tonsillar Herniation After Lumbar Puncture in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Borire, Adeniyi A; Hughes, Andrew R; Lueck, Christian J

    2015-09-01

    A 30-year-old woman with coexisting renal tubular acidosis and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), treated with acetazolamide, experienced coning (cerebellar tonsillar herniation) after a lumbar puncture (LP). Brain magnetic resonance imaging at initial diagnosis of IIH showed minor tonsillar descent and computed tomographic venography revealed hypoplasia of the left transverse sinus. The patient previously had three uneventful LPs, all of which showed high opening pressures and normal cerebrospinal fluid composition. In retrospect, it was noted that her serum bicarbonate had fallen to 9 mmol/L (normal: 22-28 mm/L) 1 week before the LP. We hypothesize that the combination of cerebral edema (due to worsening metabolic acidosis), poor venous drainage, and preexisting minor tonsillar descent contributed to her post-LP coning. PMID:25786203

  12. Herniated lumbar disc

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. There is little evidence to suggest that drug treatments are effective in treating herniated disc. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgery for herniated lumbar disc? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 37 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics, antidepressants, bed rest, corticosteroids (epidural injections), cytokine inhibitors (infliximab), discectomy (automated percutaneous, laser, microdiscectomy, standard), exercise therapy, heat, ice, massage, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), percutaneous disc decompression, spinal manipulation, and traction. PMID:21711958

  13. Endonasal Endoscopic Closure of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Schmerber, S.; Righini, Ch.; Lavielle, J.-P.; Passagia, J.-G.; Reyt, E.

    2001-01-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (β2-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167603

  14. Efavirenz pharmacokinetics in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma over a 24-hour dosing interval.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Watson, Victoria; Dickinson, Laura; Back, David

    2012-09-01

    We determined the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) over a 24-h dosing interval in a patient who had undergone a lumbar drain because of cryptococcal meningitis. Drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in paired CSF (n = 24) and plasma (n = 25) samples. The median plasma efavirenz concentration was 3,718 ng/ml (range, 2,439 to 4,952), and the median CSF concentration was 16.3 ng/ml (range, 7.3 to 22.3). The CSF/plasma area-under-the-curve ratio was 0.0044 corresponding to a CSF penetration of 0.44% of plasma. PMID:22687515

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid examination may be useful in diagnosing neurosyphilis in asymptomatic HIV+ patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Salamano, Ronald; Ballesté, Raquel; Perna, Abayubá; Rodriguez, Natalia; Lombardo, Diego; García, Natalia; López, Pablo; Cappuccio, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar puncture in neurologically asymptomatic HIV+ patients is still under debate. There are different criteria for detecting neurosyphilis through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), especially in cases that are negative through the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL), regarding cellularity and protein content. However, a diagnosis of neurosyphilis can still exist despite negative VDRL. Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA) titers and application of the TPHA index in albumin and IgG improve the sensitivity, with a high degree of specificity. Thirty-two patients were selected for this study. VDRL was positive in five of them. The number of diagnoses reached 14 when the other techniques were added. It was not determined whether cellularity and increased protein levels were auxiliary tools in the diagnosis. According to our investigation, CSF analysis using the abovementioned techniques may be useful in diagnosing neurosyphilis in these patients. PMID:26982990

  16. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  17. [Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)].

    PubMed

    Martényi, Ferenc

    2004-11-14

    The diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been introduced in 1980. The diagnosis, as construct raises several political, moral, legal, and compensation issues. PTSD is considered as a multisystemic dysregulation, involving the hypothalamic- pituitary - adrenal axis, adrenergic hypersensibility, and serotonergic dysfunction. The prevalence of PTSD is 1-9% in the general population, but substantially higher among victims of traumatic events: 19-70%. Placebo controlled studies provide a body of evidence concerning efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of PTSD both in the acute and maintenance treatments. Studies with balanced male-female ratio suggest no gender-related differences in the clinical response, furthermore both civilians and veterans improved significantly for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. PMID:16106902

  18. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. For Consumers General Information Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ( NIMH ) Anxiety Information Stress Information Depression Information St. John's Wort Information See more Research ...

  19. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician September 01, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000901/1035.html) Post-traumatic Stress Reactions Following ... Physician August 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/990800ap/524.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  20. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder . It can occur after you have gone through an extreme ... Normally, after the event, the body recovers. The stress hormones and chemicals the body releases due to ...

  1. Primary Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bialer, Omer Y.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increasingly recognized as a cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal (CSF) leak in the ENT and neurosurgical literature. The diagnosis of IIH in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks is classically made a few weeks after surgical repair of the CSF leak when symptoms and signs of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) appear. Methods Case reports and literature review. Two young obese women developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea related to an empty sella in one, and a cribriform plate encephalocele in the other. Both patients underwent surgical repair of the CSF leak. A few weeks later, they developed chronic headaches and bilateral papilledema. Lumbar punctures showed elevated CSF-opening pressures with normal CSF contents, with temporary improvement of headaches. A man with a three-year history of untreated IIH developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea. He experienced improvement of his headaches and papilledema after a CSF shunting procedure, and the rhinorrhea resolved after endoscopic repair of the leak. Results These cases and the literature review confirm a definite association between IIH and spontaneous CSF leak based on: 1) similar demographics; 2) increased ICP in some patients with spontaneous CSF leak after leak repair; 3) higher rate of leak recurrence in patients with raised ICP; 4) patients with intracranial hypertension secondary to tumors may develop CSF leak, confirming that raised ICP from other causes than IIH can cause CSF leak. Conclusions CSF leak may occasionally keep IIH patients symptom-free; however, classic symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension may develop after the CSF leak is repaired, exposing these patients to a high risk of recurrence of the leak unless an ICP-lowering intervention is performed. PMID:24042170

  2. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  3. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  4. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  5. Outcome of Salvage Lumbar Fusion after Lumbar Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose This study aims to define the role of lumbar fusion for persistent back pains after the lumbar disc replacement. Overview of Literature Little is written about lumbar fusion after optimally placed lumbar arthroplasty in patients with persistent lower back pains. Methods Retrospective review of cases of lumbar artificial disc requiring subsequent fusion because of persistent back pains despite optimally placed artificial discs. Outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Clinical improvements indicated 25% improvement in ODI and VAS values. Results Five patients met the study criteria. The mean baseline ODI for the five patients was 52. The mean baseline VAS scores for back and leg pains were 76 and 26, respectively. All the five patients had optimally placed prosthesis. The indication for surgery was the constant low back pains found in all the patients. Revision surgery involved disc explantation and fusion in two of the patients and posterolateral fusion without removing the prosthesis in three. None of the patients achieved adequate pain control after the revision surgery despite the solid bony fusion documented by postoperative computed tomography. The mean ODI value after the fusion was 55. The mean values for back and leg pains VAS were 72 and 30, respectively. Conclusions Lack of good pain relief after successful lumbar artifical disc replacements may indicate different etiology for the back pains. The spine-treating surgeons should have a high threshold level to perform salvage fusion at that level. PMID:24596600

  6. Cellular immune surveillance of central nervous system bypasses blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier: revealed with the New Marburg cerebrospinal-fluid model in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tilmann O

    2015-03-01

    In healthy human brain/spinal cord, blood capillaries and venules are locked differently with junctions and basement membrane (blood-brain barrier, blood-venule barrier). In choroid plexus, epithelial tight junctions and basement membrane lock blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier. Lymphocytic cell data, quantified with multicolour flow-cytometry or immuno-cytochemical methods in sample pairs of lumbar CSF, ventrictricular CSF and peripheral venous blood, are taken from references; similarly, data of thoracic duct chyle and blood sample pairs. Through three circumventricular organs (median eminence, organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, area postrema), 15-30 μl blood are pressed by blood pressure through fenestrated capillaries, matrix/basement membrane spaces and ependyma cell lacks into ventricular/suboccipital CSF to generate CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) , CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) , CD16(+) 56(+) 3(-) NK, CD19(+) 3(-) B subsets; some B, few NK cells adhere in circumventricular organs. Into lumbar CSF, 10-15 μl thoracic chyle with five lymphocyte subsets (without CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) cells) reflux, when CSF drains out with to-and-fro movements of chyle/CSF along nerve roots. Lymphocytes in lumbar CSF represent a mixture of blood and lymph lymphocytic cells with similar HLA-DR(+) CD3(+) cell counts in ventricular and lumbar CSF, higher CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) subsets in lumbar CSF, and few NK and B cells due to absorption in circumventricular organs. The Marburg CSF Model reflects origin and turnover of lymphatic cells in CSF realistically; the model differs from ligand-multistep processes of activated lymphocytes through blood-brain-, blood-venule-, and blood-CSF-barriers; because transfer of inactivated native lymphocytes through the barriers is not found with healthy humans, although described so in literature. PMID:25641944

  7. C-5 palsy after cerebrospinal fluid diversion in posttraumatic syringomyelia: case report.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Beygi, Sara; Viereck, Matthew J; Heller, Joshua E; Sharan, Ashwini; Jallo, Jack; Harrop, James S; Prasad, Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    Syringomyelia is a potentially debilitating disease that involves abnormal CSF flow mechanics; its incidence after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is approximately 15%. Treatment consists of restoration of CSF flow, typically via arachnoidolysis and syrinx decompression. The authors present a case of pronounced syringomyelia in a patient with concomitant severe cervical myelomalacia to demonstrate unilateral C-5 palsy as a potential complication of aggressive syrinx decompression at a remote level. A 56-year-old man with a remote history of SCI at T-11 (ASIA [American Spinal Injury Association] Grade A) presented with complaints of ascending motor and sensory weakness into the bilateral upper extremities that had progressed over 1 year. MRI demonstrated severe distortion of the spinal cord at the prior injury level of T10-11, where an old anterior column injury and prior hook-rod construct was visualized. Of note, the patient had a holocord syrinx with demonstrable myelomalacia. To restore CSF flow and decompress the spinal cord, T-2 and T-3 laminectomies, followed by arachnoidolysis and syringopleural shunt placement, were performed. Postoperatively on Day 1, with the exception of a unilateral deltoid palsy, the patient had immediate improvement in upper-extremity strength and myelopathy. He was discharged from the hospital on postoperative Day 5; however, at his 2-week follow-up visit, a persistent unilateral deltoid palsy was noted. MRI demonstrated a significant reduction in the holocord syrinx, no neural foraminal stenosis, and a significant positional shift of the ventral spinal cord. Further motor recovery was noted at the 8-month follow-up. Syringomyelia is a debilitating disease arising most often as a result of traumatic SCI. In the setting of myelomalacia with a pronounced syrinx, C-5 palsy is a potential complication of syrinx decompression. PMID:25658467

  8. [Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostics for neuroinfectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Spreer, A; Nau, R

    2015-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is of prime importance to establish an early diagnosis of central nervous system infections. Beside the basic diagnostics containing CSF white cell count, lactate concentration and protein analysis, the targeted search for agents of bacterial, viral or fungal CNS infectious diseases is essential. Decisive methods are bacterial and fungal staining techniques, microbiological culture methods, nucleic acid amplification and antigen detection methods or indirect identification of pathogens by serologic testings including the determination of pathogen-specific intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis. Besides imparting basic principles of cerebrospinal fluid analysis, this article focuses on special aspects of detection of infectious agents. Well-directed questions and a close communication between clinician and laboratory allow optimal diagnostic analysis for successful confirmation of the diagnosis and for optimal treatment of the patient. PMID:25723775

  9. [BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID PURINES IN PREGNANT].

    PubMed

    Oreshnikov, E V; Oreshnikov, S F

    2015-01-01

    The research includes 88 pregnant women, that had their purine basis and malondialdehyde in water thermocoagulate extract of venous blood and cerebrospinal fluid examined (along with common standards clinical-laboratory tests) before the spinal anesthesia for the caesarian section was provided It was detected that preeclampsy and HELLP-syndine feature the increased adenine guanine hypoxantine and uric acid levels in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as increased concentrations of blood malondyaldehyde (higher than upper normal level), accompany with the increased hemotaencephalic barrier permeability for adenine, guanine and hypoxantine. It's demonstrated that level of guanine in blood serum can be used as a prognostic factor of spinal anesthesia quality in obstetrics. It is supposed to examine purine levels in pregnant women not only in blood but also in cere brospinal fluid. PMID:26596029

  10. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  11. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with post-traumatic stress need early treatment with methods that are used to treat other trauma victims. ... symptoms of post-traumatic stress. The crisis intervention method aims to relieve distress and help the patient ...

  12. [Posttraumatic fat embolism].

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Y; Guillaume, C; Perrot, D; Delafosse, B; Motin, J

    1984-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1982, fifty cases of post-traumatic fat embolism were treated in a general intensive care unit. Average age of patients was 25.5 +/- 13 years; there was no male majority. Mean free interval was 39 +/- 27 h. 12 cases (24%) had single fractures and 38 (76%) multiple fractures. Forty-four patients had a fractured femur. Thirty-two patients presented the complete clinical syndrome with general, respiratory, neurological and cutaneous signs. Thrombocytopaenia and hypocholesterolaemia were the biological signs most often seen. In forty-four patients, orthopaedic treatment consisted of immediate immobilization, usually with traction. Twenty-six patients were reoperated on: intramedullary nail for twenty patients, plate for the other six. Fat embolism appeared in spite of surgery in six cases; it worsened after surgery in six others. Seven patients had per- or postanaesthetic problems. Fourteen per cent of patients died. The decrease in mortality was mainly due to an improvement in mechanical ventilation techniques. Early surgical fixation remained the rule if there was no serious respiratory distress or haemodynamic instability, although it did not seem to change the mortality rate in this group of patients. PMID:6497076

  13. Posttraumatic Resilience in Former Ugandan Child Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Post, Manuela; Hoyer, Catrin; Adam, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    The present research examines posttraumatic resilience in extremely exposed children and adolescents based on interviews with 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age = 11-17, female = 48.5%). Despite severe trauma exposure, 27.6% showed posttraumatic resilience as indicated by the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and clinically…

  14. The posttraumatic stiff elbow: an update.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Jos J; Lindenhovius, Anneluuk L C; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-06-01

    Posttraumatic elbow stiffness is a disabling condition that remains challenging to treat despite improvement of our understanding of the pathogenesis of posttraumatic contractures and new treatment regimens. This review provides an update and overview of the etiology of posttraumatic elbow stiffness, its classification, evaluation, nonoperative and operative treatment, and postoperative management. PMID:26984466

  15. Vicarious posttraumatic growth among interpreters.

    PubMed

    Splevins, Katie A; Cohen, Keren; Joseph, Stephen; Murray, Craig; Bowley, Jake

    2010-12-01

    An emerging evidence base indicates that posttraumatic growth might be experienced vicariously by those working alongside trauma survivors. In this study we explored the vicarious experiences of eight interpreters working in a therapeutic setting with asylum seekers and refugees. We adopted a qualitative approach, using semistructured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four interrelated themes emerged from the findings: feeling what your client feels, beyond belief, finding your own way to deal with it, and a different person. Although all participants experienced distress, they also perceived themselves to have grown in some way. The implications for a theory of vicarious posttraumatic growth are discussed, along with clinical applications. PMID:20663936

  16. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  17. Diagnostic value of lumbar puncture among infants and children presenting with fever and convulsions

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Abdelrahim Abdrabou; Mohamad, Mostafa Ashry; Ali, Safaa Hussin; Hassan, Ismail Abd Al-Aleem; Hussein, Mohammad Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Central nervous system (CNS) infections can be categorized according to the nature of the infectious pathogen into viral, bacterial, protozoan, or fungal. The diagnosis of diffuse CNS infections depends on examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained by lumbar puncture (LP). The aim of this work was to determine the diagnostic value of CSF analysis in infants and children presenting with fever and convulsions. Methods Detailed clinical data of infants and children included in this study were collected with special reference to the course and duration of the illness, description of the convulsions, consciousness level, signs of increased intracranial pressure, and signs of meningeal irritation. Lumbar puncture and chemical and bacteriological analyses of the obtained cerebrospinal fluid were done for all of the children. Results The total number of children included in the study was 85, they had a median age 19 months, and 88% of them had generalized convulsions. CSF examination revealed that 20% had abnormal physical findings, while 23.5% had abnormal white blood cell count (WBC) (CSF Pleocytosis). CSF cultures were done in three cases with the highest White blood cells (WBCs), and streptococcus pneumoniae was present in all three cases. Conclusion This study found that CNS infections are not uncommon in infants and children presenting with fever and convulsions in our locality, and acute bacterial meningitis cannot be excluded. However, its presence in the absence of clinical symptoms and signs of meningeal irritation is a remote possibility, but it should always be considered. PMID:27280001

  18. Lumbar reservoir for intrathecal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1985-06-15

    The Ommaya ventricular reservoir has been the standby of intrathecal chemotherapy for more than a decade, in spite of some specific drawbacks. A general anaesthetic is often required. The scalp must be shaven. Ventricular puncture may not always be easy and keeping the ventricular catheter patent is sometimes difficult. Hence the author has adapted a commercially available lumbar peritoneal shunt system to function as a lumbar intrathecal reservoir. The procedure is simple and can be performed expeditiously under local anaesthesia. To date, eight cases have received intrathecal chemotherapy by this means. PMID:3838918

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and the eye.

    PubMed

    Morgan, William H; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Lind, Christopher R P; Colley, Steve; Kang, Min H; House, Philip H; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) interacts with intraocular pressure (IOP) and blood pressure to exert a major influence upon the eye, particularly the optic nerve head region. There is increased interest regarding the influence of CSFP upon disorders affecting this region, in particular glaucoma and idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Additionally, a high proportion of astronauts develop features similar to idiopathic intracranial hypertension that persist for years after returning to Earth. The factors that affect the CSFP influence upon the optic nerve and globe are likely to influence the outcome of various ophthalmic disorders. PMID:25877896

  20. Diagnostic angiography of the cerebrospinal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rabinov, James D; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic catheter angiography remains the gold standard for evaluation of vascular lesions of the brain, head and neck, and spine. It is often combined with cross-sectional and functional imaging to provide a complete anatomic and physiologic workup of patients. Such data are combined with clinical information to help make treatment decisions. This chapter describes the specific techniques for arterial access and catheter navigation of the cerebrospinal vasculature. Discussion of patient positioning, injection rates, and basic anatomy of arterial and venous systems is included. Finally, important safety issues related to contrast allergy, renal failure, and complications are considered. PMID:27432664

  1. Extracranial repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Persky, M.S.; Rothstein, S.G.; Breda, S.D.; Cohen, N.L.; Cooper, P.; Ransohoff, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Forty-eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid leaks comprise this retrospective study. There were 39 traumatic and 9 spontaneous leaks. Nine patients were initially managed with bed rest and spinal drainage, but 3 patients in this group ultimately required surgical intervention for repair of their persistent leaks. Thirty-nine patients had surgery as initial therapy, with 33 extracranial repairs, 2 intracranial repairs, and 4 combined approaches. The extracranial approach was used in 36 of 42 patients, with an initial success rate of 86%.

  2. The use of cytosolic enzyme increase in cerebrospinal fluid of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Brain Resuscitation Clinical Trial I Study Group.

    PubMed

    Vaagenes, P; Mullie, A; Fodstad, D T; Abramson, N; Safar, P

    1994-11-01

    Levels of brain creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamic oxalic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactate in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were analyzed as an adjunctive study in a randomized clinical trial evaluating the effects of thiopental loading intravenously in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Three hospitals participated and a total of 62 cases of enzyme changes were studied. Enzyme levels but not lactate were higher at 48 hours than at 24 hours after restoration of spontaneous circulation. All enzymes were highly correlated with one another at 24 and 48 hours (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between cerebral recovery and increased CPK levels at 24 hours (P < .05), and a highly significant correlation with all three enzyme levels at 48 hours (P < .0001). The increase of cytosolic enzyme activity in lumbar CSF reflects permanent brain damage, and there is a relationship between activity levels and cerebral outcome. PMID:7945601

  3. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  4. Lumbar discogram resulting from lumbar interlaminar epidural injection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey; Kwa, Andre

    2004-06-01

    Lumbar discography is a diagnostic modality to determine whether the intervertebral disc is the cause of pain. The injection of radiopaque contrast into the nucleus pulposus of the disc can reveal the internal details of the disc. We describe a case of inadvertent lumbar discogram resulting from an attempted lumbar interlaminar epidural injection at L5-S1 under fluoroscopy. The patient did not have a postdural puncture headache or nerve root irritation. The potential triangle in the lateral aspect of spinal cord may be the explanation for this situation, because this triangle is composed of the exiting nerve root laterally, the lateral margin of the dura medially, and the pedicle as its base. The L5-S1 disc is located in the center of the triangle. In our case, the Tuohy needle was placed possibly in the center of the triangle, too laterally to puncture the dura. Hence, the patient did not suffer from postdural puncture headache. The needle was probably inferior to the nerve root, and no obvious nerve root trauma or irritation occurred. This potential triangle may provide alternative access for lumbar discography at the L5-S1 level. PMID:15261324

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted. PMID:19472865

  6. Lumbar discography: an update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results. PMID:14976837

  7. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation). PMID:26945018

  8. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  9. Effect of Lumbar Stabilization and Dynamic Lumbar Strengthening Exercises in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Dae Ha; Kim, Ha Jeong; Cho, Young Ki; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Jung Hoo; Choi, Yoo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises and lumbar dynamic strengthening exercises on the maximal isometric strength of the lumbar extensors, pain severity and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods Patients suffering nonspecific LBP for more than 3 months were included prospectively and randomized into lumbar stabilization exercise group (n=11) or lumbar dynamic strengthening exercise group (n=10). Exercises were performed for 1 hour, twice weekly, for 8 weeks. The strength of the lumbar extensors was measured at various angles ranging from 0° to 72° at intervals of 12°, using a MedX. The visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) were used to measure the severity of LBP and functional disability before and after the exercise. Results Compared with the baseline, lumbar extension strength at all angles improved significantly in both groups after 8 weeks. The improvements were significantly greater in the lumbar stabilization exercise group at 0° and 12° of lumbar flexion. VAS decreased significantly after treatment; however, the changes were not significantly different between the groups. ODQ scores improved significantly in the stabilization exercise group only. Conclusion Both lumbar stabilization and dynamic strengthening exercise strengthened the lumbar extensors and reduced LBP. However, the lumbar stabilization exercise was more effective in lumbar extensor strengthening and functional improvement in patients with nonspecific chronic LBP. PMID:23525973

  10. Posttraumatic growth in exposure therapy for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Muriel A; van Minnen, Agnes

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to increase our understanding of trauma positive outcomes by (a) exploring associations between posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and (b) investigating posttraumatic growth course and its impact on exposure treatment. In 80 mixed trauma PTSD patients, growth was negatively related to PTSD symptoms, especially emotional numbing. Sixty-five PTSD patients also completed Prolonged Exposure therapy with pretreatment and posttreatment assessments. Posttraumatic growth-New Possibilities and Personal Strength-increased during exposure therapy, and these increases were associated to decreases of PTSD symptoms. Pretreatment posttraumatic growth, more specifically the Appreciation of Life subscale, predicted better treatment outcome after controlling for pretreatment PTSD. The results indicate that posttraumatic growth may be a valuable new concept in trauma therapy. PMID:20690196

  11. Transdural approach for calcified central disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Jung-Kil; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Yeon-Seong; Kim, Soo-Han

    2007-09-01

    Disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine (L1-2 and L2-3) have a frequency of 1 to 2% of all disc herniations. During posterior discectomy after laminectomy, significant manipulation of the exiting nerve root is unavoidable because of the narrow lamina and the difficulty in mobilizing the nerve root. The authors adopted a transdural approach in patients with calcified central disc herniation at the L1-2 level to reduce the risk of nerve root injury. Four patients suffering from radiating pain together with back pain were treated using the transdural approach. Preoperative neuroimaging studies revealed severe central disc herniation with calcification at the L1-2 level. After laminectomy or laminotomy, the incised dura mater was tacked, and the cauda equina rootlets were gently retracted. An intentional durotomy was performed over its maximal bulging of the ventral dura. After meticulous dissection of dense adhesions between the disc herniation and the dural sac, adequate decompression with removal of calcified disc fragments and osteophytes was accomplished. Clinical symptoms improved in all patients. Postoperative permanent cerebrospinal fluid leakage and pseudomeningocele were not observed, and no patient had a progressive lumbar deformity at an average follow-up of 53 months. Transient mild motor weakness and sensory change were observed in two patients postoperatively; however, these symptoms resolved completely within 1 week. The posterior transdural approach offers an alternative in central calcified upper lumbar disc herniation when root retraction is dangerous. PMID:17877277

  12. [Post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth].

    PubMed

    Korábová, I; Masopustová, Z

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth to health care professionals. The text focuses on the diagnostic definition of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth, symptoms, physiological background, prevalence, course, risk factors and consequences of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth for a woman, her child and her partner. Options for interventions and therapy are outlined as well. PMID:26982058

  13. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  14. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  15. A Sandwich Technique for Prevention of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea and Reconstruction of the Sellar Floor after Microsurgical Transsphenoidal Pituitary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Freyschlag, Christian F; Goerke, Stephanie Alice; Obernauer, Jochen; Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Thomé, Claudius; Seiz, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are a well-known complication of transsphenoidal surgery. Several autologous and artificial grafts have been used to close the sellar floor in an attempt to prevent postoperative CSF rhinorrhea. Objective To evaluate and describe a sandwich technique to close the sellar floor using autologous bone, absorbable gelatin sponge, and coated collagen fleece. Methods We reviewed 50 consecutive patients between April 2010 and August 2011 who underwent transsphenoidal surgery ending with reconstruction of the sellar floor with a particular sandwich technique. Patients with an intraoperative CSF leak received an additional lumbar drain. Results There were no cases of CSF rhinorrhea at postoperative follow-up after 6 weeks and no revision surgery. Conclusion The proposed sandwich technique for closure of the sellar floor to the sphenoid sinus is a suitable alternative to autologous grafts and seems to be effective in preventing CSF rhinorrhea. PMID:26091112

  16. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  17. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  18. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  19. Quantitative evaluation of changes in gait after extended cerebrospinal fluid drainage for normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Felix; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Tinl, Megan; Iracheta, Christine; Chen, Grace; Flynn, Patricia; Shuman, Matthew E; Johnson, Tatyana A; Rice, Rebecca R; Rice, Isaac M; Wiemann, Robert; Johnson, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is characterized by gait instability, urinary incontinence and cognitive dysfunction. These symptoms can be relieved by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, but the time course and nature of the improvements are poorly characterized. Attempts to prospectively identify iNPH patients responsive to CSF drainage by evaluating presenting gait quality or via extended lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage (eLCD) trials are common, but the reliability of such approaches is unclear. Here we combine eLCD trials with computerized quantitative gait measurements to predict shunt responsiveness in patients undergoing evaluation for possible iNPH. In this prospective cohort study, 50 patients presenting with enlarged cerebral ventricles and gait, urinary, and/or cognitive difficulties were evaluated for iNPH using a computerized gait analysis system during a 3day trial of eLCD. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and the Timed Up and Go test were quantified before and during eLCD. Qualitative assessments of incontinence and cognition were obtained throughout the eLCD trial. Patients who improved after eLCD underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and symptoms were reassessed serially over the next 3 to 15months. There was no significant difference in presenting gait characteristics between patients who improved after drainage and those who did not. Gait improvement was not observed until 2 or more days of continuous drainage in most cases. Symptoms improved after eLCD in 60% of patients, and all patients who improved after eLCD also improved after shunt placement. The degree of improvement after eLCD correlated closely with that observed after shunt placement. PMID:26775149

  20. [Psychosomatic posttraumatic resonances in refugees].

    PubMed

    Ottino, Saskia von Overbeck

    2016-06-22

    The recent flow of refugees in our countries connects the clinician to new challenges: posttraumatic consequences, exile pathologies, cultural differences. Moreover, the psychic pains express themselves often through the body in more or less qualified ways, making a clear understanding of them difficult. From the therapist's side, the confrontation to war violences and cultural differences might create difficulties in establishing an empathic and fruitful therapeutic alliance. PMID:27506069

  1. Spinal reflexes and the concentrations of 5-HIAA, MHPG, and HVA in lumbar cereborspinal fluid after spinal lesions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, P; Verrier, M; Warsh, J J; Price, K S

    1976-01-01

    Descending bulbospinal pathways that employ specific neurotransmitter substances are known to be capable of modulating segmental reflex activity in the experimental animal. To determine whether this might also occur in man correlations have been sought between the activity in spinal reflex pathways and the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), 3 methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and homovanillic acid (HVA) in 12 patients with complete or virtually complete spinal lesions. The concentrations of 5-HIAA and MHPG in lumbar CSF ARE REDUCED AFTER COMPLETE OR VIRTUALLY COMPLETE SPINAL LESIONS IN MAN. This may occur within 18 days of the lesion. MHPG concentrations appear to be inversely related to the level of the lesion. The HVA concentration in lumbar CSF is reduced when there is obstruction of the CSF pathways. No relationship could be demonstrated between the concentrations of 5-HIAA or MHPG in lumbar CSF and the activity in the spinal monosynaptic pathway (estimated from the proportion of the motoneurone pool activated by the Achilles tendon reflex or H reflex) or the activity of a spinal inhibitory mechanism (estimated by the degree of vibratory inhibition of the monosynaptic reflex). Patients with a tonic vibration reflex (TVR) tended to have higher MHPG levels. There appeared to be an association between low CSF HVA and enhanced vibratory inhibition of the monosynaptic reflex in the nine patients whose spinal lesions were complete. PMID:1011029

  2. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Observational study. Purpose To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. Overview of Literature IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Methods Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. Results For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=–0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=–0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). Conclusions The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain. PMID:27340529

  3. [Spontaneous resolution of a lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, M; Serramito-García, R; Aran-Echabe, E; García-Allut, A

    2007-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause of lower leg radiculopathy and the most effective methods of treatment remain in question. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments may provide a successful outcome in appropriately selected patients. The spontaneous resolution of herniated lumbar discs is a well-established phenomenon. The authors present a case of spontaneous regression of a herniated lumbar nucleus pulpous in a patient with radiculopathy. PMID:17497061

  4. The human lumbar dorsal rami.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Wilson, A S; Tynan, W

    1982-01-01

    The L 1-4 dorsal rami tend to form three branches, medial, lateral, and intermediate, which are distributed, respectively, to multifidus, iliocostalis, and longissimus. The intertransversarii mediales are innervated by a branch of the dorsal ramus near the origin of the medial branch. The L 4 dorsal ramus regularly forms three branches while the L 1-3 levels the lateral and intermediate branches may, alternatively, arise from a short common stem. The L 5 dorsal ramus is much longer than the others and forms only a medial and an intermediate branch. Each lumbar medial branch innervates two adjacent zygapophysial joints and ramifies in multifidus, supplying only those fascicles which arise from the spinous process with the same segmental number as the nerve. The comparative anatomy of the lumbar dorsal rami is discussed and the applied anatomy with respect to 'rhizolysis', 'facet denervation' and diagnostic paraspinal electromyography is described. PMID:7076562

  5. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option. PMID:22111086

  6. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic bilateral lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Segers, B; Himpens, J; Barroy, J P

    2007-06-01

    The first retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy was performed in 1924 by Julio Diez. The classic procedure for sympathectomy is open surgery. We report a unilateral laparoscopic retroperitoneal approach to perform bilateral lumbar sympathectomy. This approach was performed for a 43-year-old man with distal arterial occlusive disease and no indication for direct revascularization. His predominant symptoms were intermittent claudication at 100 metres and cold legs. The patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus position. The optical system was placed first in an intra-abdominal position to check that the trocars were well positioned in the retroperitoneal space. The dissection of retroperitoneum was performed by CO2 insufflation. The inferior vena cava was reclined and the right sympathetic chain was individualized. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. The aorta was isolated on a vessel loop and careful anterior traction allowed a retro-aortic pre-vertebral approach between the lumbar vessels. The left sympathetic chain was dissected. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. PMID:17685269

  7. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Kramer, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The lordotic curvature of the lumbar spine (lumbar lordosis) in humans is a critical component in the ability to achieve upright posture and bipedal gait. Only general estimates of the lordotic angle (LA) of extinct hominins are currently available, most of which are based on the wedging of the vertebral bodies. Recently, a new method for calculating the LA in skeletal material has become available. This method is based on the relationship between the lordotic curvature and the orientation of the inferior articular processes relative to vertebral bodies in the lumbar spines of living primates. Using this relationship, we developed new regression models in order to calculate the LAs in hominins. The new models are based on primate group-means and were used to calculate the LAs in the spines of eight extinct hominins. The results were also compared with the LAs of modern humans and modern nonhuman apes. The lordotic angles of australopithecines (41° ± 4), H. erectus (45°) and fossil H. sapiens (54° ± 14) are similar to those of modern humans (51° ± 11). This analysis confirms the assumption that human-like lordotic curvature was a morphological change that took place during the acquisition of erect posture and bipedalism as the habitual form of locomotion. Neandertals have smaller lordotic angles (LA = 29° ± 4) than modern humans, but higher angles than nonhuman apes (22° ± 3). This suggests possible subtle differences in Neandertal posture and locomotion from that of modern humans. PMID:22052243

  8. Near-Death Experiences and Posttraumatic Growth.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Surbhi; Greyson, Bruce

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic growth denotes positive psychological change after a traumatic experience that is an improvement over the state before the trauma. Inasmuch as it involves existential reevaluation, posttraumatic growth overlaps with spiritual change, although it also encompasses other domains of positive outcome. This study investigated posttraumatic growth and presence and depth of near-death experience at the time of the close brush with death among 251 survivors of a close brush with death, using the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and the Near-Death Experience (NDE) Scale. Near-death experiences were associated with greater posttraumatic growth than were close brushes with death in the absence of such an experience, and scores on the NDE Scale were significantly correlated with scores on the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. To the extent that NDEs are interpreted as spiritual events, these findings support prior research suggesting that spiritual factors make a significant contribution to posttraumatic growth and are consistent with the model that posits challenges to the assumptive worldview as a major stimulus to posttraumatic growth. PMID:26348586

  9. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper is a clinical discussion of post-traumatic stress disorder and violence, particularly as it applies to the Vietnam Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome. In the first section, the syndrome is described as the sudden onset of explosive rage and unprovoked violence with little or no warning, accompanied by a drastic change in personality. It is…

  10. Chronic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Laura M.; Baum, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Examined the relationship between chronic stress and symptoms of posttraumatic stress syndrome in people living within five miles of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power station. Results provided evidence of substantive links between chronic stress and development of mild symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. (Author/BL)

  11. Interventional Treatment for Post-traumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Conidi, Francis X

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache (migraine) is the most common symptom of concussion and traumatic brain injury. An expert opinion-based review along with a literature review (PubMed) was conducted looking at known interventional procedures for post-traumatic headache using the keywords post-traumatic headache, post-traumatic migraine headache, concussion, mild traumatic brain injury, and traumatic brain injury and the following categories: mechanism, pathophysiology, treatment, physical therapy, neurostimulation, Botox@/Onabotulinum toxin, and surgical intervention. The results returned a total of 181 articles of which 52 were selected. None of the articles included randomized placebo-controlled studies, and most were either prospective or retrospective case analysis and/or review articles or consensus opinion papers, with most studies yielding positive results. Despite a lack of hard evidence, interventional procedures, alone or in combination, appear to be an effective treatment for post-traumatic headaches. PMID:27130542

  12. Brain relaxation and cerebrospinal fluid pressure during craniotomy for resection of supratentorial mass lesions.

    PubMed

    Turner, C R; Losasso, T J; Muzzi, D A; Weglinski, M R

    1996-04-01

    Neurosurgery can be complicated by the clinical situation commonly referred to as "tight brain," in which the brain presses against the inner table of the skull or protrudes through the craniotomy site. We report here a retrospective study of 32 patients who had undergone elective craniotomy for resection of supratentorial mass lesions. We determined the relationship between lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and brain relaxation and whether brain relaxation varies with anesthetic technique. Patients had received one of four anesthetic techniques: 1 MAC isoflurane (ISO), 1 MAC desflurane (DES), 50% N2O with 0.5 MAC ISO, or 50% N2O with 0.5 MAC DES. Lumbar CSFP had been recorded before the induction of anesthesia (baseline) and immediately prior to dural incision. Charts were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of tight brain, which was considered present if mannitol had been administered, CSF had been drained via the lumbar needle, or the surgical dictation noted the brain was tight at the time of dural incision. Tight brain occurred in 10 of 32 patients. CSFP (mean +/- SD) was significantly greater in the tight than in the nontight group both at baseline (11 +/- 5 vs. 8 +/- 3 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and immediately prior to dural incision (13 +/- 7 vs. 9 +/- 4 mm Hg, p < 0.05). Tight brain did not occur in any patient with CSFP < 6 mm Hg, but it did occur in all patients with CSFP > 17 mm Hg. Within the range of 6-17 mm Hg, CSFP was not predictive of brain relaxation. Tight brain was more common in patients receiving 1 MAC ISO or DES (9 of 20 patients; 45%) than in patients receiving 0.5 MAC ISO or DES with 50% N2O (1 of 12 patients; 8%, p < 0.05). We conclude that in patients undergoing elective craniotomy for resection of a supratentorial mass lesion, brain relaxation is not predictive of CSFP. Although CSFP values at the extremes of the observed distribution ( > 17 mm Hg or < 6 mm Hg) did correlate with brain relaxation, within the range of 6-17 mm Hg, CSFP

  13. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  14. Delayed Post-Traumatic Anisocoria.

    PubMed

    Ergül, Dursun Fırat; Ekemen, Serdar; Özdemir, Özcan; Uzan, Çağdaş; Yelken, Birgül

    2015-06-01

    Post-traumatic carotid artery dissection is one of the major causes of ischemic stroke in young patients; its diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians because of its variable clinical presentation. An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man was referred to the intensive care unit of our faculty for the management of multiple trauma because of a car accident. At 11 days from admission, his doctor noticed the advent of anisocoria. A prompt treatment was instituted with anti-platelet and-coagulant agents. The patient had a complete resolution of symptoms. The prognosis was good, and the patient achieved a complete clinical recovery. He was discharged without any sequelae. PMID:27366498

  15. [Post-traumatic stress disorder].

    PubMed

    Ponteva, Matti; Henriksson, Markus; Isoaho, Raimo; Laukkala, Tanja; Männikkö, Timo; Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial support and careful monitoring are recommended for acute stress reaction (ASR) and acute stress disorder (ASD). If symptoms require, short focused cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy can be used for ASD. Medication is rarely necessary, but sleeping pills can be used for a short period. Trauma-focused psychotherapeutic interventions are first-line treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. SSRI or SNRI antidepressant medication is also effective. There is less evidence on antipsychotic and antiepileptic medication. Psychotherapeutic interventions and medication can be, and often are, combined. Children, the elderly, and military and peacekeeping personnel need interventions that are tailored to their needs. PMID:19839195

  16. Post-Traumatic Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Edward J.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Visual loss following head trauma is common, and the diagnosis can be challenging for the neurologist called to perform an emergency room assessment. The approach to the patient with post-traumatic visual loss is complicated by a wide range of potential ocular and brain injuries with varying pathophysiology. In addition to direct injuries of the eye and orbit, traumatic optic neuropathies, carotid cavernous fistulas, and damage to the intracranial visual pathways are classic causes of visual loss after head trauma. This review provides an update on the diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:18660739

  17. The lumbar shield: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Feild, J R; McHenry, H

    1978-01-01

    Postoperative perineural adhesions between the lumbar nerve root and the partially removed intervertebral disc are thought to be a cause of failure of the standard operative procedure for the removal of a ruptured lumbar intervertebral disc. Attempts have been made to reduce postoperative perineural adhesions by the use of epidural muscle, fat, gelatin sponge, silicone, and steroids. The present communication introduces a new implantable silicone device, a lumbar shield, designed to: (a) provide a radiopaque marker on the dorsal perimeter of the excavated lumbar disc so that the presence or absence of a recurrent disc herniation can easily be determined on plain postoperative x-ray films, (b) provide ready access to the operative site in the event of a recurrent disc herniation, (c) prevent postoperative perineural adhesions between the lumbar dura and the nerve root and the partially removed intervertebral disc, and (d) prevent postoperative adhesions between the lumbar dura and the nerve root and the paraspinal muscles. Satisfactory results of lumbar disc surgery over the past 44 years have occurred in about 90% of routine patients. The value of the lumbar shield in 82 patients (59 routine and 23 workmen's compensation/medicolegal patients) followed for 6 months is described. A satisfactory result, i.e., relief of pain or the presence of occasional postoperative pain, occurred in 85% of routine patients at 1 month, 97% at 3 months, and 95% at 6 months. PMID:683493

  18. [Neonatal occlusion due to a lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Hunald, F A; Ravololoniaina, T; Rajaonarivony, M F V; Rakotovao, M; Andriamanarivo, M L; Rakoto-Ratsimba, H

    2011-10-01

    A Petit lumbar hernia is an uncommon hernia. Congenital forms are seen in children. Incarceration may occur as an unreducible lumbar mass, associated with bilious vomiting and abdominal distention. Abdominal X-ray shows sided-wall bowel gas. In this case, reduction and primary closure must be performed as emergency repair. PMID:21868206

  19. Clinical utility of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in the diagnosis of early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kaj; Dubois, Bruno; Fagan, Anne M; Lewczuk, Piotr; de Leon, Mony J; Hampel, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Several potential disease-modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have failed to show any effect on disease progression in clinical trials, conceivably because the AD subjects are already too advanced to derive clinical benefit from treatment and because diagnosis based on clinical criteria alone introduces a high misdiagnosis rate. Thus, well-validated biomarkers for early detection and accurate diagnosis are crucial. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the amyloid-β (Aβ1-42) peptide, in combination with high total tau and phosphorylated tau, are sensitive and specific biomarkers highly predictive of progression to AD dementia in patients with mild cognitive impairment. However, interlaboratory variations in the results seen with currently available immunoassays are of concern. Recent worldwide standardization efforts and quality control programs include standard operating procedures for both preanalytical (e.g., lumbar puncture and sample handling) and analytical (e.g., preparation of calibration curve) procedures. Efforts are also ongoing to develop highly reproducible assays on fully automated instruments. These global standardization and harmonization measures will provide the basis for the generalized international application of CSF biomarkers for both clinical trials and routine clinical diagnosis of AD. PMID:24795085

  20. Clinical utility of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in the diagnosis of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Blennow, Kaj; Dubois, Bruno; Fagan, Anne M.; Lewczuk, Piotr; de Leon, Mony J.; Hampel, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Several potential disease-modifying drugs for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have failed to show any effect on disease progression in clinical trials, conceivably because the AD subjects are already too advanced to derive clinical benefit from treatment and because diagnosis based on clinical criteria alone introduces a high misdiagnosis rate. Thus, well-validated biomarkers for early detection and accurate diagnosis are crucial. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the amyloid-β (Aβ1-42) peptide, in combination with high total tau and phosphorylated tau, are sensitive and specific biomarkers highly predictive of progression to AD dementia in patients with mild cognitive impairment. However, interlaboratory variations in the results seen with currently available immunoassays are of concern. Recent worldwide standardization efforts and quality control programs include standard operating procedures for both preanalytical (e.g., lumbar puncture and sample handling) and analytical (e.g., preparation of calibration curve) procedures. Efforts are also ongoing to develop highly reproducible assays on fully automated instruments. These global standardization and harmonization measures will provide the basis for the generalized international application of CSF bio-markers for both clinical trials and routine clinical diagnosis of AD. PMID:24795085

  1. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  2. [Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma aminograms in patients with primary and secondary tumors of the CNS].

    PubMed

    Piek, J; Adelt, T; Huse, K; Bock, W J

    1987-04-01

    16 different free amino acids were determined in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of each 5 patients with glioblastomas, meningiomas, and low grade gliomas as well as in 21 patients with lumbar disk herniations (control group). The values from the control group were in good accordance with those previously observed in normal adults of 5 studies of the literature. Significant changes were seen only in 6 of 16 amino acids. Absolute values of free CSF amino acids showed significant lower levels of valine, leucine and asparagine in the 3 subgroups whereas serine remained constantly high. The greatest changes were observed in glioblastoma and meningioma patients. Relative values gave similar results. No significant changes were found in CSF-plasma free amino acid relations. The authors conclude that changes of free CSF amino acids are due to a non-specific reaction of the brain itself to tumor growth. The different histology of the tumor does not give specific results. Determination of free CSF amino acids may help in early diagnosis of brain tumor recurrence after operation and to watch the effect of chemotherapy and radiation on brain tumor growth. PMID:3610311

  3. Malignancy markers in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Koskiniemi, M

    1988-10-01

    The specificity and sensitivity of malignancy marker determinations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are often insufficient. Even at the subclinical stage of the disease the marker should be present. The effect of therapy should be monitored and relapses noted. Thus high standards of methodology are required. There are many substances that may indicate a malignant process in the central nervous system. However, there are many pitfalls in their determination. Malignant cells may occur in CSF via processes involving leptomeningeal structures such as metastases and leukaemia, but primary brain tumours seldom show cells in CSF. Human chorionic gonadotrophin and alpha-fetoprotein determinations assist in the early detection of cerebral germ cell tumours and of relapses, even in the subclinical stage. Desmosterol may aid in the diagnosis of medulloblastomas and malignant gliomas and in monitoring therapy. Putrescine levels are elevated in CSF of patients with medulloblastoma and correlate with the clinical state, and serial analyses may reveal relapses. Fibronectin, when determined in CSF at the time of diagnosis, appears to be of great significance for the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Ferritin and beta-2-microglobulin may help in some well-defined conditions. Brain-specific proteins and antibodies to them are non-specific markers whereas tumour-specific antigens and growth factors may be more significant. PMID:3058481

  4. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation. PMID:24817998

  5. Tegmental defects and cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, H; Geyer, C; Tarlov, E; Heilman, C; Poe, D

    2001-01-01

    Congenital tegmental defects that present as unsuspected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea are diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. We reviewed 5 such patients to determine an optimal strategy for evaluation. Five patients presented with watery otorrhea, 4 of them after ventilation tube placement, and only 1 with rhinorrhea. The preoperative analysis of middle ear effusion for beta(2)-transferrin was positive in 2/4, equivocal in 1/4 and false negative in 1/4. Computerized tomography (CT) revealed nonspecific tegmental defects in all 5 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated meningoencephalocele in 3/5 and dural irregularity in 1/5. Tegmental defects were confirmed at surgery in all cases, demonstrating meningocele or arachnoid granulations in 2/5 and encephalocele in 2/5 patients. We recommend a combination of beta(2)-transferrin analysis to verify CSF, high resolution CT (axial and coronal planes) to diagnose tegmental defects, and MRI (multiplanar) to evaluate the type of herniation. A combination mastoid and middle fossa approach for definitive repair is suggested. PMID:11174062

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir. PMID:25860317

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow Studies and Recent Advancements.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin J; Yamada, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques used to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement in the central nervous system (CNS), including Phase-Contrast (PC), Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, and simultaneous multi slice echo planar phase contrast imaging. These techniques have been used to assess CSF movement in the CNS under normal and pathophysiological situations. PC can quantitatively measure stroke volume in selected regions, particularly the aqueduct of Sylvius, as synchronized to the heartbeat. The PC is frequently used to investigate those patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus and a Chiari I malformation. Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, with high signal-to-noise ratio, captures motion of CSF anywhere in the CNS over a time period of up to 5 seconds. Variations of PC-MRI improved temporal resolution and included contributions from respiration. With non-invasive imaging such as these, more can be understood about CSF dynamics, especially with respect to the relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement. PMID:27063659

  8. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  9. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid movement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brinker et al. extensively reviewed recent findings about CSF circulation in a recent article: “A new look at cerebrospinal circulation”, but did not analyze some important available data in sufficient detail. For example, our findings as well as some clinical data and experimental results obtained from different animal species, do not support unidirectional CSF circulation but strongly suggest that there are cardiac cycle-dependent systolic-diastolic to-and-fro cranio-spinal CSF movements. These are based on: a) physiological oscillations of arterial and venous blood during cranio-spinal blood circulation; b) respiratory activity, and c) body activity and posture. That kind of complex CSF movement could explain the observed distribution of many different substances in all directions along the CSF system and within central nervous system tissue. It seems that efflux transport systems at capillary endothelium may be more important for brain homeostasis than the removal of metabolites by CSF flow. Thus, when discussing the CSF dynamics we suggest that a more appropriate term would be CSF movement rather than CSF circulation. PMID:25089184

  10. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  11. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  12. Posttraumatic spinal cord cysts: clinical features and characterization with metrizamide computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1983-02-01

    Sixteen patients with posttraumatic spinal cord cysts (PTSCC) were evaluated clinically and studied with metrizamide computed tomography (MCT). These patients presented months to years following a severe spinal cord injury, usually with new or progressively worsening neurological symptoms. The development of the PTSCC was unrelated to the location, type, and severity of injury, or to the time interval from the original injury. MCT showed that these cysts occur most frequently in normal or atrophic cords, they may be multiple, they most frequently are found in the dorsal portion of the cord, and they may vary along their length in width and position within the cord. Knowledge of this radiographic morphology is crucial to the surgical planning. The location of the cysts and the mode of their enlargement are correlated with anatomic features of the spinal cord and changes in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Cyst-to-subarachnoid space shunting relieves the majority of symptoms.

  13. Plexiform Schwannoma of Lumbar Region

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Asmita; Verma, Sarika; Suri, Tarun; Agarwal, Anil; Bansal, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Plexiform schwannoma is an unusual peripheral nerve sheath tumor. It can mimic plexiform neurofibroma. A five-year-old girl presented with painful swelling in left lumbar region. Radiologic investigations showed a multinodular tumor in the subcutaneous plane of lumbosacral region. A complete excision and histopathologic examination revealed a plexiform tumor composed of hypocellular and hypercellular areas with verocay bodies. The tumor cells showed strong positivity for S-100 protein, rendering a final diagnosis of plexiform schwannoma. The child has been free of recurrence in 12-month follow-up. PMID:26064806

  14. Peritraumatic distress, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and posttraumatic growth in victims of violence.

    PubMed

    Kunst, M J J

    2010-08-01

    This study explored whether peritraumatic distress and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are curvilinearly related to posttraumatic growth in victims of violence several years after victimization (Time 1; n = 678) and 6 months later (Time 2, n = 205). At both time points, curve estimation revealed linear and quadratic associations between peritraumatic distress and posttraumatic growth and quadratic associations between PTSD symptoms and posttraumatic growth. In multivariate regressions controlling for background variables, the linear peritraumatic distress and quadratic PTSD symptom terms remained significant predictors of posttraumatic growth Time 1 scores. For Time 2, the linear peritraumatic distress term remained significant, though only prior to controlling for posttraumatic growth Time 1 scores. The results suggest that peritraumatic distress enables growth after substantial time has elapsed since victimization. PMID:20648563

  15. [Headhache secondary to intracranial hypotension in a Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Surgery].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Mendía, Begoña; Angulo-Taberno, Marina; Jaroid-Audes, Ricardo; Untoria-Agustín, Carmen; Rivero-Zelada, David

    2016-01-01

    Intracraneal hypotension headache is a well known syndrome in neurosurgery practice. In most cases cerebrospinal fluid leaks are caused by medical interventions, such as lumbar puncture, peridural anesthesia and surgical interventions on the spine. Clinical symptoms tipically show orthostatic headache that resolves in supine position, and other symptoms like neck tightness, vertigo and diplopia. RMI diagnostic confirms paquimeningeal enhancement and subdural hygromas. Conservative treatment usually includes bed resting, hydratation and administration of caffeine or glucocorticoids, resolving spontaneously in one to four months. The importance of the diagnosis lies in the differential diagnosis with other causes of headache, as symptomatic limiting factor in the rehabilitation of the patient and the same favorable prognosis. PMID:27420146

  16. [Diagnosis of spinal diseases by cerebrospinal fluid examination].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R M

    1979-01-01

    In this work, changes in the cerebrospinal fluid in acute and chronic polyneuritis as well as in the Guillan-Barré-Strohl syndrome are discussed and and it is pointed out that a specific coordination of the inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid syndromes to certain pathogens or noxae cannot be made. For the differentiation of the Guillain-Barré-Strohl syndrome and existence of increased gamma-globulin bands with identical mobility in the serum is pointed out. In myelitic disease pictures, acute and chronic cerebrospinal fluid syndromes are distinguished also in the cerebrospinal fluid according to the clinical course; regular changes, however, cannot be derived. Syphilitic cerebrospinal-fluid syndromes can easily be differentiated by their immunoactive findings. In multiple sclerosis, we distinguish between typical and atypical changes in the cerebrospinal fluid. Above all, the oligoclonal bands, i. e. the discontinuous proceeding of the gamma-globulin zone and the existence of several bands in the agar gel electrophoresis, play an essential role. In 95 per cent of the cases, oligoclonal bands can be shown. There are no greater differences with respect to oligoclonal bands between intermittent and chronic-progressive courses. For the differential diagnosis of haemorrhagic syndromes, the cerebrospinal fluid cell picture can make a considerable contribution. Macrophages loaded with erythrocytes indicate that a haemorrhage occurred 12 to 18 hours before; macrophages loaded with haemosiderin indicate a haemorrhage that occurred 6 to 8 days before; and macrophages loaded with erythrocytes and haemosiderin indicate a seeping haemorrhage or an event that occurred several times. The Nonne-Froin syndrome indicates a massive protein increase often with a regular or only slightly increased number of cells. The importance of the Queckenstedt tests is pointed out. A particular role is played by meningitis carcinomatosa et sarcomatosa with the demonstration of a great number of

  17. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  18. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  19. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  20. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  1. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Alpoim, Bruno; Rodrigues, Elisa; Félix, António; Silva, Luís; Leal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation. PMID:26229836

  2. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  3. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  4. [Occupation and lumbar disk prolapse].

    PubMed

    Jensen, M V; Tüchsen, F

    1995-03-13

    All Danish occupational groups were screened for an increased risk of hospitalization due to a prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc (PLID) (ICD-8: 725.11). A cohort of all gainfully employed Danes aged 20 to 59 years in 1981 was followed-up for 10 years for first hospitalization with PLID. A Standardized Hospitalization Ratio was calculated using all economically active persons as the reference group. Male groups with an elevated risk were found in building and construction, the iron and metal industry, in the food and nutrition sector and in occupational driving. Almost all groups of professional drivers had an elevated risk. Female groups with an elevated risk were mainly found in the same industries, but home helps, service workers in the private sector and sewing machine operators also had an elevated risk. We conclude that there are significant and systematic differences between occupational groups as concerns the risk of hospital admission due to PLID. PMID:7725550

  5. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  6. Percutaneous laser lumbar disc decompression - mechanism of action, indications and contraindications.

    PubMed

    Maksymowicz, Wojciech; Barczewska, Monika; Sobieraj, Andrzej

    2004-06-30

    This article describes the development of minimally invasive methods in the treatment of lumbar discopathy, with particular attention to percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). The authors discus the therapeutic operating mechanism of PLDD, emphasizing the importance of the thermal characteristics of laser light, which is responsible for the vaporization and ablation of a small amount of tissue from the nucleus pulposus. This causes a significant reduction in pressure in the closed structure of the disc, and consequently reduced compression exerted by the disk on the dural sac and the nerve roots. Improvement in the flow of cerebro-spinal fluid has also been observed on the level at which the operation is performed. On the basis of our own experience and the reports of other authors, we have specified indications and contra-indications for PLDD. Our conclusion is that PLDD is an effective treatment method for low back pain and ischialgia caused by protrusion or herniation of the nucleus pulposus, with elimination or significant reduction in symptoms in over 75% of those treated; reduction or resolution of neurological deficits that arise in the course of lumbar discopathy has also been observed. This method enables one-stage treatment of multi-level degenerative changes in the intervertebral disc. The only absolute contraindications for PLDD are the presence of sequestration, disturbances in blood coagulation, and bacterial infection. PMID:17675991

  7. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots. PMID:23741553

  8. Spontaneous resolution of lumbar vertebral eosinophilic granuloma.

    PubMed

    Bavbek, M; Atalay, B; Altinörs, N; Caner, H

    2004-02-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a rare disease but is more common in adults than children. It's often self-limiting. Spinal involvement is rare. It is the localized and most benign form of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (previously known as histiocytosis X), characterised by lytic lesions in one or more bones. Spontaneous resolution of vertebral body lesions is very rare. In this case, the patient had one EG in a cervical vertebra and a similar lesion in a lumbar vertebra. This case is important because it featured a symptomatic lesion in the cervical spine accompanied by an asymptomatic lesion in a lumbar vertebra. We treated the cervical lesion by surgical fusion and followed the lumbar lesion up conservatively, with the patient in a corset. After 8 years of follow-up, control MRI showed that the lumbar lesion had spontaneously resolved. PMID:14963750

  9. Trait Resilience Moderates the Longitudinal Linkage between Adolescent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Liuhua; Wang, Yanli; Lin, Chongde; Chen, Chuansheng

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the longitudinal association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and posttraumatic growth (PTG) as well as the moderating role of trait resilience in that association. Participants completed measures of PTSD symptoms, PTG, and trait resilience at 12, 18, and 24 months after the Wenchuan earthquake.…

  10. Asystole during lumbar discectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vikas; Tiwari, Ankita; Rath, Girija Prasad; Banik, Sujoy

    2016-06-01

    Hemodynamic derangements have been reported after surgery involving upper cervical spine. Similar observations, however, are rare during a lumbar spine surgery. We share our experience in a patient who had 2 episodes of bradycardia leading to transient asystole while undergoing lumbar discectomy for prolapsed intervertebral disc. The risk of life-threatening hemodynamic disturbances during seemingly uncomplicated surgery in prone position has been emphasized. PMID:27185724

  11. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  12. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency. PMID:26849859

  13. Intracranial subdural empyema after surgery for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele: A rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Foy, Andrew; Havens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery is routinely recommended for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele, especially in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. The most common complications are wound infections and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, which remain confined to the surgical site. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports relating an intracranial subdural empyema following detethering surgery. Prompt diagnosis is essential since subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency. Case Description: The patient was an 11-month-old male who underwent detethering surgery for a lumbar lipomyelomeningocele. This was followed by wound drainage consistent with CSF leak, requiring revision. Cultures grew three aerobes (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella) and three anaerobes (Clostridium, Veillonella, and Bacteroides). He was started on cefepime, vancomycin, and flagyl. The patient required two more wound revisions and placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) secondary to persistent wound leakage. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain was carried out due to protracted irritability, which revealed extensive left subdural empyema along the parietooccipital region and the inferior and anterior temporal lobe. He underwent evacuation of the subdural empyema where cultures exhibited no growth. Subsequently, he progressed well. His lumbar incision continued to heal. Serial MRI brains and inflammatory markers were reassuring. He weaned off his EVD and went home to complete a 6-week course of antibiotics. Upon completion of his antibiotics, he returned for a clinic visit; he exhibited no interim fevers or wound issues; cranial imaging documented no evidence of a residual or recurrent subdural empyema. Conclusion: Intracranial subdural empyema may occur after wound complications from detethering surgery despite early initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Possible etiology may be local wound infection that seeds the subdural space and travels to the

  14. Transdural retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage: Technical case report.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Hasan Aqdas; Shah, Ashish; Kakarla, Udaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe a novel method to retrieve a herniated lumbar interbody cage. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an increasingly popular method of spinal fixation and fusion. Unexpected retropulsion of an interbody is a rare event that can result in intractable pain or motor compromise necessitating surgical retrieval of the interbody. Both anterior and posterior approaches to removing migrated cages may be associated with significant surgical morbidity and mortality. A 60-year-old woman underwent an L4-S1 TLIF coupled with pedicle screw fixation at a previous hospital 5 years prior to admission. She noted sudden-onset bilateral lower extremity weakness and right-sided foot drop. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographs were notable for purely centrally herniated interbody. A posterior, midline transdural approach was used to retrieve the interbody. Situated in between nerve rootlets to the ventral canal, this virgin corridor allowed us to easily visualize and protect neurological structures while safely retrieving the interbody. The patient experienced an immediate improvement in symptoms and was discharged on postoperative day 3. At 12-month follow-up, she had no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and had returned to normal activities of daily living. While the risk of CSF leak may be higher with a transdural approach, we maintain that avoiding unnecessary retraction of the nerve roots may outweigh this risk. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a transdural approach for the retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage. PMID:26889290

  15. Transdural retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Hasan Aqdas; Shah, Ashish; Kakarla, Udaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe a novel method to retrieve a herniated lumbar interbody cage. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an increasingly popular method of spinal fixation and fusion. Unexpected retropulsion of an interbody is a rare event that can result in intractable pain or motor compromise necessitating surgical retrieval of the interbody. Both anterior and posterior approaches to removing migrated cages may be associated with significant surgical morbidity and mortality. A 60-year-old woman underwent an L4-S1 TLIF coupled with pedicle screw fixation at a previous hospital 5 years prior to admission. She noted sudden-onset bilateral lower extremity weakness and right-sided foot drop. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographs were notable for purely centrally herniated interbody. A posterior, midline transdural approach was used to retrieve the interbody. Situated in between nerve rootlets to the ventral canal, this virgin corridor allowed us to easily visualize and protect neurological structures while safely retrieving the interbody. The patient experienced an immediate improvement in symptoms and was discharged on postoperative day 3. At 12-month follow-up, she had no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and had returned to normal activities of daily living. While the risk of CSF leak may be higher with a transdural approach, we maintain that avoiding unnecessary retraction of the nerve roots may outweigh this risk. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a transdural approach for the retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage. PMID:26889290

  16. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  17. An update on the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-09-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease without disc herniation, also known as discogenic pain, is an elusive diagnosis of chronic low back pain. Lumbar provocation discography and fusion surgery have been frequently utilized for several decades as the gold standards for the diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic lumbar discogenic pain, though controversial, based on conjecture, rather than evidence. In addition to lumbar fusion, various other operative and nonoperative modalities of treatments are available in managing chronic lumbar discogenic pain. This review provides an updated assessment of the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain with a critical look at the many modalities of treatments that are currently available. PMID:26255722

  18. CNS Penetration of Intrathecal-Lumbar Idursulfase in the Monkey, Dog and Mouse: Implications for Neurological Outcomes of Lysosomal Storage Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jing; Savioli, Nancy; Belov, Vasily; Huang, Yan; Lotterhand, Jason; Alessandrini, Mary; Liu, Nan; Fischman, Alan J.; Powell, Jan L.; Heartlein, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S). I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a) warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b) may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22279584

  19. A Comparative Study of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Girardi, Federico P.; Lebl, Darren R.; Cammisa, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Level 4 retrospective review. Purpose To compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with posterior segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Both PLIF and LLIF have been performed for degenerative spondylolisthesis with good results, but no study has directly compared these two techniques so far. Methods The electronic medical and radiographic records of 78 matched patients were analyzed. In one group, 39 patients underwent PLIF with SSI at 41 levels (L3-4/L4-5), while in the other group, 39 patients underwent the LLIF procedure at 48 levels (L3-4/L4-5). Radiological outcomes such as restoration of disc height and neuroforaminal height, segmental lumbar lordosis, total lumbar lordosis, incidence of endplate fracture, and subsidence were measured. Perioperative parameters were also recorded in each group. Clinical outcome in both groups was assessed by the short form-12, Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale scores. The average follow-up period was 16.1 months in the LLIF group and 21 months in the PLIF group. Results The restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and segmental lumbar lordosis was significantly better in the LLIF group (p<0.001). The duration of the operation was similar in both groups, but the average blood loss was significantly lower in the LLIF group (p<0.001). However, clinical outcome scores were similar in both groups. Conclusions Safe, effective interbody fusion can be achieved at multiple levels with neuromonitoring by the lateral approach. LLIF is a viable treatment option in patients with new onset symptoms due to degenerative spondylolisthesis who have had previous lumbar spine surgery, and it results in improved sagittal alignment and indirect foraminal decompression. PMID:26435782

  20. Multimodal Approach to Identifying Malingered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Shagufta; Alam, Farzana

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this article is to aid clinicians in differentiating true posttraumatic stress disorder from malingered posttraumatic stress disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder and malingering are defined, and prevalence rates are explored. Similarities and differences in diagnostic criteria between the fourth and fifth editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are described for posttraumatic stress disorder. Possible motivations for malingering posttraumatic stress disorder are discussed, and common characteristics of malingered posttraumatic stress disorder are described. A multimodal approach is described for evaluating posttraumatic stress disorder, including interview techniques, collection of collateral data, and psychometric and physiologic testing, that should allow clinicians to distinguish between those patients who are truly suffering from posttraumatic disorder and those who are malingering the illness. PMID:25852974

  1. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-04-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  2. Clinical approach to posttraumatic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vikram R; Parko, Karen L

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common causes of acquired epilepsy, and posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) results in significant somatic and psychosocial morbidity. The risk of developing PTE relates directly to TBI severity, but the latency to first seizure can be decades after the inciting trauma. Given this "silent period," much work has focused on identification of molecular and radiographic biomarkers for risk stratification and on development of therapies to prevent epileptogenesis. Clinical management requires vigilant neurologic surveillance and recognition of the heterogeneous endophenotypes associated with PTE. Appropriate treatment of patients who have or are at risk for seizures varies as a function of time after TBI, and the clinician's armamentarium includes an ever-expanding diversity of pharmacological and surgical options. Most recently, neuromodulation with implantable devices has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for some patients with refractory PTE. Here, we review the epidemiology, diagnostic considerations, and treatment options for PTE and develop a roadmap for providers encountering this challenging clinical entity. PMID:25714868

  3. Psychopharmacotherapy of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kozarić-Kovačić, Dragica

    2008-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that develops after a psychological trauma usually caused by a situation perceived as deeply threatening to a person’s life or integrity. Complex neurobiological changes triggered by such a traumatic and stressful experience may explain a wide range of PTSD symptoms and provide the rationale for psychopharmacological treatment. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors make the first-line treatment of PTSD. Clinical experience has shown that they are more effective than noradrenalin-reuptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants. Antipsychotic drugs, especially atypical ones, have been shown effective in PTSD patients with psychotic characteristics or refractoriness to other treatments. Mood stabilizers seem to reduce mostly autonomous overreactions to stress, whereas the evidence for effectiveness of monoamine oxidase inhibitors is largely inconclusive. Other groups of medications, such as serotonin agonists and antagonists, new antidepressants, dual inhibitors of serotonin- and noradrenalin-reuptake, anticonvulsants, and opiate antagonists are also sometimes used in PTSD treatment. However, as shown in the present review, most clinical studies performed to date to investigate the effectiveness of different psychopharmacological agents in the therapy of PTSD have serious limitations in terms of small sample size, lack of blinding and randomization, and small effect size. More rigorously designed, comparative studies are needed to determine the usefulness, efficacy, tolerability, and safety of particular psychopharmaceutical drugs in the treatment of this therapeutically and functionally challenging disorder. PMID:18716993

  4. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-01-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  5. The Incidence and Management of Dural Tears and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage during Corrective Osteotomy for Ankylosing Spondylitis with Kyphotic Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Dae-Jean; Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Sang-Hun; Cho, Myung-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the incidence and management of dural tears and cerebrospinal fluid leakage during corrective osteotomy [Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy (PSO) or Smith-Petersen Osteotomy (SPO)] for ankylosing spondylitis with kyphotic deformity. Methods A retrospective study was performed for ankylosing spondylitis patients with fixed sagittal imbalance, who had undergone corrective osteotomy (PSO or SPO) at lumbar level. 87 patients were included in this study. 55 patients underwent PSO, 32 patients underwent SPO. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 41.7 years (21-70 years). Of the 87 patients, 15 patients had intraoperative dural tears. Results The overall incidence of dural tears was 17.2%. The incidence of dural tears during PSO was 20.0%, SPO was 12.5%. There was significant difference in the incidence of dural tears based on surgical procedures (PSO vs. SPO) (p<0.05). The dural tears ranged in size from 12 to 221 mm2. A nine of 15 patients had the relatively small dural tears, underwent direct repair via watertight closure. The remaining 6 patients had the large dural tears, consequently direct repair was impossible. The large dural tears were repaired with an on-lay graft of muscle, fascia or fat harvested from the adjacent operation site. All patients had a successful repair with no patient requiring reoperation for the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion The overall incidence of dural tears during PSO or SPO for ankylosing spondylitis with kyphotic deformity was 17.2%. The risk factor of dural tears was complexity of surgery. All dural tears were repaired primarily using direct suture, muscle, fascia or fat graft. PMID:26279815

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid white cell count: discriminatory or otherwise for enteroviral meningitis in infants and young children?

    PubMed

    Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Lee, Elis Yuexian; Khoo, Gloria Mei Chin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Choong, Chew Thye

    2016-04-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses (EV) are the most common viruses causing aseptic meningitis in children. We aim to evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics of neonates and children with EV meningitis with a view to determine whether it could be discriminatory or otherwise in making a positive diagnosis. We performed a 3-year (July 2008-July 2011) retrospective study of children ≤16 years, treated at a tertiary children's hospital, with positive CSF EV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and negative blood and CSF bacterial cultures. A total of 206 children were studied. The median CSF white cell count was 79 cells/mm(3) (range 0-4608 cells/mm(3)). CSF pleocytosis was observed in 99/150 (66%) aged ≤90 days, 3/4 (75%) aged 90 days-1 year, and 49/52 (94%) children ≥3 years. There was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days, where 34% of them had no pleocytosis, while in 66%, a wide range of pleocytosis that might even suggest bacterial meningitis was noted. CSF red cells were low, and protein or sugar values were not discriminatory. CSF pleocytosis in relation to increasing age was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Early lumbar puncture within 48 h of symptoms and absence of CSF pleocytosis was also statistically significant (p = 0.039). CSF pleocytosis in EV meningitis is commoner in older children. As there was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days particularly, CSF analysis including EV PCR could avoid unnecessary antibiotic therapy. PMID:26463525

  7. Increases in Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Potassium Concentration Do Not Increase Isoflurane Minimum Alveolar Concentration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shnayderman, Dimitry; Laster, Michael J.; Eger, Edmond I; Oh, Irene; Zhang, Yi; Jinks, Steven L.; Antognini, Joseph F.; Raines, Douglas E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous studies demonstrated that MAC for isoflurane directly correlates with the concentration of Na+ in cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord, the primary site for mediation of the immobility produced by inhaled anesthetics. If this correlation resulted from increased irritability of the cord, then infusion of increased concentrations of potassium (K+) might be predicted to act similarly. However, an absence of effect of K+ might be interpreted to indicate that K+ channels do not mediate the immobility produced by inhaled anesthetics whereas Na+ channels remain as potential mediators. Accordingly, in the present study, we examined the effect of altering intrathecal concentrations of K+ on MAC. METHODS In rats prepared with chronic indwelling intrathecal catheters, we infused solutions deficient in K+ and with an excess of K+ into the lumbar space and measured MAC for isoflurane 24 h before, during, and 24 h after infusion. Rats similarly prepared were tested for the effect of altered osmolarity on MAC (accomplished by infusion of mannitol) and for the penetration of Na+ into the cord. RESULTS MAC of isoflurane never significantly increased with increasing concentrations of K+ infused intrathecally. At infused concentrations exceeding 12 times the normal concentration of KCl, i.e., 29 mEq/L, rats moved spontaneously at isoflurane concentrations just below, and sometimes at MAC, but the average MAC in these rats did not exceed their control MAC. At the largest infused concentration (58.1 mEq/L), MAC significantly decreased and did not subsequently return to normal (i.e., such large concentrations produced injury). Infusions of lower concentrations of K+ had no effect on MAC. Infusion of osmotically equivalent solutions of mannitol did not affect MAC. Na+ infused intrathecally measurably penetrated the spinal cord. CONCLUSIONS The results do not support a mediation or modulation of MAC by K+ channels. PMID:18713900

  8. Overton's Rule Helps To Estimate the Penetration of Anti-Infectives into Patients' Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Djukic, Marija; Munz, Martin; Sörgel, Fritz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Eiffert, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    In 1900, Ernst Overton found that the entry of anilin dyes through the cell membranes of living cells depended on the lipophilicity of the dyes. The brain is surrounded by barriers consisting of lipid layers that possess several inward and outward active transport systems. In the absence of meningeal inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of anti-infectives in humans estimated by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in CSF (AUCCSF) to that in serum (AUCCSF/AUCS) correlated positively with the lipid-water partition coefficient at pH 7.0 (log D) (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rS = 0.40; P = 0.01) and negatively with the molecular mass (MM) (rS = −0.33; P = 0.04). The ratio of AUCCSF to the AUC of the fraction in serum that was not bound (AUCCSF/AUCS,free) strongly correlated with log D (rS = 0.67; P < 0.0001). In the presence of meningeal inflammation, AUCCSF/AUCS also correlated positively with log D (rS = 0.46; P = 0.002) and negatively with the MM (rS = −0.37; P = 0.01). The correlation of AUCCSF/AUCS,free with log D (rS = 0.66; P < 0.0001) was as strong as in the absence of meningeal inflammation. Despite these clear correlations, Overton's rule was able to explain only part of the differences in CSF penetration of the individual compounds. The site of CSF withdrawal (lumbar versus ventricular CSF), age of the patients, underlying diseases, active transport, and alterations in the pharmacokinetics by comedications also appeared to strongly influence the CSF penetration of the drugs studied. PMID:22106225

  9. Modified Graded Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete sellar floor reconstruction is critical to avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during transsphenoidal surgery. Recently, the pedicled nasoseptal flap has undergone many modifications and eventually proved to be valuable and efficient. However, using these nasoseptal flaps in all patients who undergo transsphenoidal surgery, including those who had none or only minor CSF leakage, appears to be overly invasive and time-consuming. Methods Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal tumor surgery within a 5 year-period were reviewed. Since 2009, we classified the intraoperative CSF leakage into grades from 0 to 3. Sellar floor reconstruction was tailored to each leak grade. We did not use any tissue grafts such as abdominal fat and did not include any procedures of CSF diversions such as lumbar drainage. Results Among 200 cases in 188 patients (147 pituitary adenoma and 41 other pathologies), intraoperative CSF leakage was observed in 27.4% of 197 cases : 14.7% Grade 1, 4.6% Grade 2a, 3.0% Grade 2b, and 5.1% Grade 3. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in none of the cases. Septal bone buttress was used for Grade 1 to 3 leakages instead of any other foreign materials. Pedicled nasoseptal flap was used for Grades 2b and 3 leakages. Unused septal bones and nasoseptal flaps were repositioned. Conclusion Modified classification of intraoperative CSF leaks and tailored repair technique in a multilayered fashion using an en-bloc harvested septal bone and vascularized nasoseptal flaps is an effective and reliable method for the prevention of postoperative CSF leaks. PMID:26279811

  10. High Resolution Discovery Proteomics Reveals Candidate Disease Progression Markers of Alzheimer's Disease in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Ronald C; Lee, Anita Y H; Song, Qinghua; Liaw, Andy; Wiener, Matt; Paweletz, Cloud P; Seeburger, Jeffrey L; Li, Jenny; Meng, Fanyu; Deyanova, Ekaterina G; Mazur, Matthew T; Settlage, Robert E; Zhao, Xuemei; Southwick, Katie; Du, Yi; Holder, Dan; Sachs, Jeffrey R; Laterza, Omar F; Dallob, Aimee; Chappell, Derek L; Snyder, Karen; Modur, Vijay; King, Elizabeth; Joachim, Catharine; Bondarenko, Andrey Y; Shearman, Mark; Soper, Keith A; Smith, A David; Potter, William Z; Koblan, Ken S; Sachs, Alan B; Yates, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) constitute a major goal in medicine. Current trends suggest that biomarkers reflective of AD neuropathology and modifiable by treatment would provide supportive evidence for disease modification. Nevertheless, a lack of quantitative tools to assess disease modifying treatment effects remains a major hurdle. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemical markers such as total tau, p-tau and Ab42 are well established markers of AD; however, global quantitative biochemical changes in CSF in AD disease progression remain largely uncharacterized. Here we applied a high resolution open discovery platform, dMS, to profile a cross-sectional cohort of lumbar CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients versus those from non-AD/non-demented (control) patients. Multiple markers were identified to be statistically significant in the cohort tested. We selected two markers SME-1 (p<0.0001) and SME-2 (p = 0.0004) for evaluation in a second independent longitudinal cohort of human CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients and age-matched and case-matched control patients. In cohort-2, SME-1, identified as neuronal secretory protein VGF, and SME-2, identified as neuronal pentraxin receptor-1 (NPTXR), in AD were 21% (p = 0.039) and 17% (p = 0.026) lower, at baseline, respectively, than in controls. Linear mixed model analysis in the longitudinal cohort estimate a decrease in the levels of VGF and NPTXR at the rate of 10.9% and 6.9% per year in the AD patients, whereas both markers increased in controls. Because these markers are detected by mass spectrometry without the need for antibody reagents, targeted MS based assays provide a clear translation path for evaluating selected AD disease-progression markers with high analytical precision in the clinic. PMID:26270474

  11. Exercise-induced changes of cerebrospinal fluid vascular endothelial growth factor in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Shanahan, Kaitlyn J; Shriver, Leah P; Luciano, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a growth factor demonstrated to be a key factor in cerebral angiogenesis and neurogenesis. It has been considered a critical component in hippocampus neurogenesis and memory formation and has been observed to increase in the rat hippocampus after exercise. We previously found increased VEGF levels in experimental chronic hydrocephalus in several brain areas and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), suggesting a role in the adaption to chronic hypoxia. Here we investigate the ability of moderate exercise to increase CSF-VEGF levels in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients. Lumbar CSF samples were collected from 17 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. During CSF collection, 11 patients (exercise group) underwent a standard in-room occupational therapy session; six patients (no-exercise group) did not undergo a physical therapy session. CSF-VEGF levels were evaluated for increase related to exercise and the clinical response to CSF drainage. CSF-VEGF levels in the exercise group demonstrated significant increases 1-3 hours post-exercise compared with the levels 1-2 hours pre-exercise (p=0.04), and also showed significantly higher levels than the no-exercise groups (p=0.03). The post-exercise CSF-VEGF level in the group that did not clinically improve was significantly higher than both their own pre-exercise level (p=0.02) and that seen in the clinically improving group (p=0.05) after exercise. We conclude that CSF-VEGF levels can increase after moderate exercise even in elderly hydrocephalus patients. This suggests that a potential benefit of exercise, especially in CSF drainage non-improved patients, may exist via a central VEGF mechanism. PMID:26498093

  12. Stage-dependent agreement between cerebrospinal fluid proteins and FDG-PET findings in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Igor; Muller, Matthias J; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Lang, Ulrike; Rossmann, Heidi; Hampel, Harald; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral hypometabolism and abnormal levels of amyloid beta (Aβ), total (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (ptau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We examined the agreement between these biomarkers in a single center study of patients with AD of severity extending over a wide range. Forty seven patients (MMSE 21.4 ± 3.6, range 13-28 points) with incipient and probable AD underwent positron emission tomography with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) and lumbar puncture for CSF assays of Aβ1-42, p-tau181, and t-tau. All findings were classified as either positive or negative for AD. Statistical analyses were performed for the whole sample (n=47) and for the subgroups stratified as mild (MMSE > 20 points, n=30) and moderate (MMSE < 21 points, n=17) AD. In the whole patient sample, the agreement with the FDG-PET finding was 77% (chance-corrected kappa [κ]=0.34, p=0.016) for t-tau, 68% (κ=0.10, n.s.) for p-tau181, and 68% (κ=0.04, n.s.) for Aβ1-42. No significant agreement was found in the mild AD subgroup, while there was a strong agreement for t-tau (94%, κ=0.77, p=0.001) and p-tau181 (88%, κ=0.60, p=0.014) in the moderate AD group. A significant agreement between the FDG-PET and CSF tau findings in patients with AD supports the view that both are markers of neurodegeneration. CSF tau proteins and FDG-PET might substitute each other as supportive diagnostic tools in patients with suspected moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's dementia, while this is not the case in subjects at an earlier disease stage. PMID:22044023

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A; Frandsen, Thomas L; Rosthøj, Steen; Schrøder, Henrik; Albertsen, Birgitte K

    2014-07-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The objective of this study was to describe CSF asparagine depletion during 30 weeks of pegylated asparaginase therapy, 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week, and to correlate CSF asparagine concentration with serum L-asparaginase enzyme activity. Danish children (1-17 years) with ALL, treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol, standard and intermediate risk, were included. CSF samples were obtained throughout L-asparaginase treatment at every scheduled lumbar puncture. A total of 128 samples from 31 patients were available for analysis. Median CSF asparagine concentration decreased from a pre-treatment level of 5·3 μmol/l to median levels ≤1·5 μmol/l. However, only 4/31 patients (five samples) had CSF asparagine concentrations below the limit of detection (0·1 μmol/l). In 11 patients, 24 paired same day serum and CSF samples were obtained. A decrease in CSF asparagine corresponded to serum enzyme activities above 50 iu/l. Higher serum enzyme activities were not followed by more extensive depletion. In conclusion, pegylated asparaginase 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week effectively reduced CSF asparagine levels. PMID:24702187

  14. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  15. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  16. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  17. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  18. The frequency and severity of intracranial hypotension post-intraoperative lumbar drainage using a Tuohy needle and the traditional needle.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Gormley, William B; Zamani, Amir A; Dunn, Ian F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2016-08-01

    Background Intraoperative lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage is a well-recognised technique in cranial and vascular surgery. The goal of the study was to assess the frequency and severity of intracranial hypotension post-intraoperative lumbar drainage performed using two different techniques, a 14G Tuohy needle versus an 18G traditional needle. Methods The medical records and imaging studies of 94 patients who had undergone open cranial operation were retrospectively studied: 47 patients had intraoperative lumbar drainage and 47 patients did not. A 14G Tuohy needle was employed in 27 (57.4%) patients and an 18G traditional needle was employed in 20 (42.6%) patients. Results There were signs of intracranial hypotension on MR images in nine (19.1%) patients who had intraoperative lumbar CSF drainage; none of the patients in the control group exhibited the MR signs of intracranial hypotension. A 14G needle was used in 6/9 patients and resulted in severe complications: one patient developed a delayed intracranial epidural hematoma that required emergency evacuation and a blood patch. Another patient developed somnolence that required two epidural blood patches and a third patient had protracted headaches. The 18G needle was used in the remaining 3/9 patients who were asymptomatic or presented with mild headaches. Conclusion The use of the smaller 18G traditional needle was associated with better outcomes with regards to intracranial hypotension, and the frequency of severe complications was higher with the use of the 14G Tuohy needle. PMID:26743824

  19. Study of tryptophan metabolism via serotonin in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with noncommunicating hydrocephalus using a new endoscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Comai, Stefano; Longatti, Pierluigi; Perin, Alessandro; Bertazzo, Antonella; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Costa, Carlo V L; Allegri, Graziella

    2006-08-15

    By a recent minimally invasive neuroendoscopic technique, the cerebral ventricles have been reached in a quick, reliable, and harmless way, making possible the study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the lateral ventricles and, above all, the CSF adjacent to the walls of the third ventricle. Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin (5-HT), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured in CSF by HPLC equipment. Twenty-six patients affected with noncommunicating hydrocephalus were enrolled in the study and, as controls, 28 subjects not suffering from any neurological disease. The concentrations of tryptophan were higher in right ventricular CSF than in lumbar CSF (P < 0.01). 5-HT was detectable in the CSF of the right ventricle of hydrocephalic patients. 5-HIAA was higher in right ventricular CSF than in cisternal and lumbar CSF (P < 0.01), both in controls and in hydrocephalic patients. However, there was a higher concentration of 5-HIAA in right ventricular (P < 0.05) and cisternal (P < 0.01) CSF in hydrocephalic patients in comparison with controls. In the CSF samples withdrawn during neuroendoscopy, 5-HT presented the highest concentrations in the pineal recess. The highest amounts of 5-HIAA were found in the choroid plexus, third and right ventricles, pituitary recess, and aqueduct, and the lowest in pineal recess, subarachnoid space, infundibulum, and interpeduncolar cistern. These results provide new insight into the fate of tryptophan and its metabolites via serotonin in the CSF and suggest the feasibility of the new neuroendoscopic technique for brain metabolic studies. PMID:16721766

  20. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  1. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  2. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-16

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  3. A musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Christophy, Miguel; Faruk Senan, Nur Adila; Lotz, Jeffrey C; O'Reilly, Oliver M

    2012-01-01

    A new musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine is described in this paper. This model features a rigid pelvis and sacrum, the five lumbar vertebrae, and a rigid torso consisting of a lumped thoracic spine and ribcage. The motion of the individual lumbar vertebrae was defined as a fraction of the net lumbar movement about the three rotational degrees of freedom: flexion-extension lateral bending, and axial rotation. Additionally, the eight main muscle groups of the lumbar spine were incorporated using 238 muscle fascicles with prescriptions for the parameters in the Hill-type muscle models obtained with the help of an extensive literature survey. The features of the model include the abilities to predict joint reactions, muscle forces, and muscle activation patterns. To illustrate the capabilities of the model and validate its physiological similarity, the model's predictions for the moment arms of the muscles are shown for a range of flexion-extension motions of the lower back. The model uses the OpenSim platform and is freely available on https://www.simtk.org/home/lumbarspine to other spinal researchers interested in analyzing the kinematics of the spine. The model can also be integrated with existing OpenSim models to build more comprehensive models of the human body. PMID:21318374

  4. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  5. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  6. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  7. Endovascular Management of Posttraumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Chiramel George Keshava, Shyamkumar Nigudala; Surendrababu, Narayanam R. S.; Moses, Vinu; Stephen, Edwin; Agarwal, Sunil

    2009-09-15

    Surgery is considered to be the treatment of choice for vascular injuries caused by trauma. However, endovascular techniques are emerging as an alternative means of treatment. In this article, we describe three patients with posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulae in different body regions that were managed using endovascular techniques. Each case had its unique set of associated problems requiring innovative methods and a multidisciplinary approach. While the short-term results are encouraging, long-term follow-up of posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulae that have been treated with endovascular techniques is still required.

  8. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  9. Relationships Between Latent Factors of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tiamiyu, Mojisola F; Gan, Yiqun; Kwiatkowski, Dani; Foreman, Kayla C; Dietrich, Aaron; Elliott, Kirstin; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and posttraumatic growth (PTG) responses among a nonclinical sample of 202 participants. Instruments included the PTSD Checklist for the DSM-5 (fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated the most support for the 6-factor DSM-5 PTSD model and 5-factor PTG model, previously supported in the literature. Canonical correlation analysis evidenced a strong relationship between PTSD and PTG subscales. Path analysis results demonstrated that PTSD's re-experiencing subscale was related to PTG's appreciation for life subscale. Posttraumatic stress disorder's avoidance was related to PTG's personal strength subscale. We also tested curvilinear relationships between PTSD and PTG subscales. Results and implications are discussed in the context of the constructs of PTSD and PTG. PMID:26915015

  10. Return to Play After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ralph W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-10-01

    Surgical management of lumbar spine conditions can produce excellent outcomes in athletes. Microdiscectomy for lumbar disc herniation has favorable outcomes; most athletes return to play at preoperative performance levels. Direct pars repair is successful in younger athletes, with high rates of return to play for a variety of fixation techniques. Fusion in athletes with scoliosis is a negative predictor. There are few evidence-based return to play criteria. Athletes should demonstrate full resolution of symptoms and flexibility, endurance, and strength before returning to play. Deciding when to return an athlete to sport depends on particular injury sustained, sport, and individual factors. PMID:27543402

  11. Mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Ricks, Christian; Tempel, Zachary; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2016-07-01

    In deformity surgery, anterior lumbar interbody fusion provides excellent biomechanical support, creates a broad surface area for arthrodesis, and induces lordosis in the lower lumbar spine. Preoperative MRI, plain radiographs, and, when available, CT scan should be carefully assessed for sacral slope as it relates to pubic symphysis, position of the great vessels (especially at L4/5), disc space height, or contraindication to an anterior approach. This video demonstrates the steps in an anterior surgical procedure with minimal open exposure. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/r3bC4_vu1hQ . PMID:27364424

  12. Microdiscectomy for a Paracentral Lumbar Herniated Disk.

    PubMed

    Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Savage, Jason W

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar disk herniations occur frequently and are often associated with leg pain, weakness, and paresthesias. Fortunately, the natural outcomes of radiculopathy due to a disk herniation are generally favorable, and the vast majority of patients improve with nonoperative care. Surgical intervention is reserved for patients who have significant pain that is refractory to at least 6 weeks of conservative care, patients who have a severe or progressive motor deficit, or patients who have any symptoms of bowel or bladder dysfunction. This paper reviews the preoperative and postoperative considerations, as well as the surgical technique, for a microdiscectomy for a lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. PMID:26710186

  13. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  14. Progression of a lumbar disc extrusion.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Michael S; Alitz, Curtis

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 34-year-old woman who was referred to a physical therapist for a chief complaint of progressively worsening right buttock pain with paresthesias of the right posterior thigh and calf. Prior magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed a large left paracentral disc extrusion at L5-S1. Following physical therapist intervention, the patient reported a new onset of left posterior thigh pain, with paresthesias of the dorsolateral aspect of the left foot. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed an increase in the size of the disc extrusion at L5-S1. PMID:25361862

  15. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  16. Ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Akino, Minoru; Seki, Toshitaka; Yano, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2005-05-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of ligamentum flavum hematoma manifesting as low back pain and gait difficulty beginning 1 month before consulting our institute. He had no history of lumbar spine surgery or lumbar puncture. However, he might have suffered forgotten back injury while practicing martial arts. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous intensity mass lesion with a cystic component at the L3-4 levels. The lesion was totally removed through a hemilaminectomy. Intraoperative and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of old hematoma with granulomatous change in the ligamentum flavum. Postoperatively, his low back pain and gait difficulty resolved within a few days. PMID:15914970

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the significance of immunoglobulin G autoantibody specific for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was administered intrathecally to naïve mice, and the distribution and pathogenic impact was evaluated. A distinct distribution pattern of aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G deposition was observed in the subarachnoid and subpial spaces where vessels penetrate the brain parenchyma, via a paravascular route with intraparenchymal perivascular deposition. Perivascular astrocyte-destructive lesions were associated with blood-borne horseradish peroxidase leakage indicating blood-brain barrier breakdown. The cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G therefore distributes widely in brain to initiate astrocytopathy and blood-brain barrier breakdown. PMID:26339679

  18. A Poorly Known Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Complication: Miyazaki Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Riccardo; Wierzbicki, Venceslao; Marrocco, Luigi; Pesce, Alessandro; Piccione, Emanuele

    2015-09-01

    We studied a poorly known form of cerebrospinal fluid hypotension characterized by cervical myelopathy, a considerable growth in volume of the venous plexus of the cervical spine, and absence of headache. This form was first described by Miyazaki. We reported a case brought to our attention, reviewed the literature, and formulated etiopathogenic theories that might explain all the various clinical aspects of this pathology. PMID:25913430

  19. Distinct Lysosomal Network Protein Profiles in Parkinsonian Syndrome Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Boman, Andrea; Svensson, Samuel; Boxer, Adam; Rojas, Julio C.; Seeley, William W.; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce; Kågedal, Katarina; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes like Parkinson’s disease (PD), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is hampered by overlapping symptomatology and lack of diagnostic biomarkers, and definitive diagnosis is only possible post-mortem. Objective: Since impaired protein degradation plays an important role in many neurodegenerative disorders, we hypothesized that profiles of select lysosomal network proteins in cerebrospinal fluid could be differentially expressed in these parkinsonian syndromes. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from PD patients (n = 18), clinically diagnosed 4-repeat tauopathy patients; corticobasal syndrome (CBS) (n = 3) and PSP (n = 8); and pathologically diagnosed PSP (n = 8) and CBD patients (n = 7). Each patient set was compared to its appropriate control group consisting of age and gender matched individuals. Select lysosomal network protein levels were detected via Western blotting. Factor analysis was used to test the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the select lysosomal network protein expression profiles. Results: PD, CBD and PSP were markedly different in their cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal network protein profiles. Lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 were significantly decreased in PD; early endosomal antigen 1 was decreased and lysozyme increased in PSP; and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and lysozyme were increased in CBD. A panel of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2, lysozyme and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain discriminated between controls, PD and 4-repeat tauopathies. Conclusions: This study offers proof of concept that select lysosomal network proteins are differentially expressed in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal syndrome and progressive supranuclear palsy. Lysosomal network protein analysis

  20. [Relationship between lumbosacral multifidus muscle and lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-ye; Wang, Kuan; Yuan, Wei-an; Zhan, Hong-sheng

    2016-06-01

    As a common disease in clinical, the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) focused on local intervertebral disc, such as surgery and other interventional therapy treatment, but postoperative complications and recurrence rate has been a difficult problem in the field of profession. With the development of spine biomechanics and anatomy, researches on lumbar herniation also increased. Researchers discovered that the incidence and prognosis of LDH were inseparable with local muscle and soft tissue. As the deep paraspinal muscles, multifidus muscle plays an important role to make lumbar stability. Its abnormal function could reduce the stable of lumbar spine, and the chronic lumbar disease could also lead to multifidus muscle atrophy. PMID:27534095

  1. Levetiracetam for Pediatric Posttraumatic Seizure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nita, Dragos A; Hahn, Cecil D

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Nationwide Children's Hospital performed an observational cohort study of early post-traumatic seizures (EPTS) among 34 children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who received levetiracetam (LEV) prophylaxis following admission to their pediatric intensive care unit. PMID:27396956

  2. Gender Differences in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olff, Miranda; Langeland, Willie; Draijer, Nel; Gersons, Berthold P. R.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most consistent findings in the epidemiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the higher risk of this disorder in women. Explanations reviewed within a psychobiological model of PTSD suggest that women's higher PTSD risk may be due to the type of trauma they experience, their younger age at the time of trauma exposure, their…

  3. Adolescent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, William

    2003-01-01

    Based on over a decade of work in the area of PTSD, including a longitudinal study of PTSD among adolescents, Dr. Yule provides an introduction to post-traumatic stress disorder as it occurs in youth. This includes a look at the manifestations of stress reactions, the incidence and prevalence of PTSD, and the relationship between levels of…

  4. Measuring Growth with the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Walter P., Jr.; Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.

    2008-01-01

    The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI; R. G. Tedeschi & L. G. Calhoun, 1996) was used to measure the growth of university students (N = 347). Results were compared with those of trauma studies and indicate that the PTGI is a general measure of growth suitable for future nontrauma studies. Results reflect a minimal relationship between…

  5. Posttraumatic Growth and HIV Disease Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milam, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between posttraumatic growth (PTG; perceiving positive changes since diagnosis) and disease status, determined by changes in viral load and CD4 count over time, was examined among 412 people living with HIV. In controlled multiple regression models, PTG was not associated with disease status over time for the entire sample.…

  6. Imagery Rescripting in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackmann, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of methods of working with imagery to change meanings and ameliorate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It opens with a description of phenomenology in this disorder, usually characterized by a small number of recurrent images of the trauma, each representing a moment that warned of a threat to the physical or…

  7. Posttraumatic elbow contractures: targeting neuroinflammatory fibrogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Monument, Michael J; Hart, David A; Salo, Paul T; Befus, A Dean; Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2013-11-01

    Posttraumatic elbow stiffness remains a common and challenging clinical problem. In the setting of a congruent articular surface, the joint capsule is regarded as the major motion-limiting anatomic structure. The affected joint capsule is characterized by irreversible biomechanical and biochemical fibrogenic changes strikingly similar to those observed in many other fibroproliferative human conditions. Studies in humans and preclinical animal models are providing emergent evidence that neuroinflammatory mechanisms are critical upstream events in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic connective tissue fibrogenesis. Maladaptive recruitment and activation of mast cell infiltrates coupled with the aberrant expression of growth factors such as transforming growth factor-beta, nerve growth factor, and neuropeptides such as substance P are common observations in posttraumatic joint contractures and many other fibroproliferative disorders. Blockade of these factors is providing promising evidence that if treatment is timed correctly, the fibrogenic process can be interrupted or impeded. This review serves to highlight opportunities derived from these recent discoveries across many aberrant fibrogenic disorders as we strive to develop novel, targeted antifibrotic prevention and treatment strategies for posttraumatic elbow stiffness. PMID:24005582

  8. Stereotactic injection of cerebrospinal fluid from anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis into rat dentate gyrus impairs NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Würdemann, Till; Kersten, Maxi; Tokay, Tursonjan; Guli, Xiati; Kober, Maria; Rohde, Marco; Porath, Katrin; Sellmann, Tina; Bien, Christian G; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-02-15

    Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized in patients with otherwise unexplained encephalopathy with epilepsy. Among these, patients with anti-N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis present epileptic seizures, memory deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. However, the functional consequences of such autoantibodies are poorly understood. In order to investigate the pathophysiology of this disease, we stereotactically injected either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from three anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients or commercially available anti-NMDAR1 into the dentate gyrus of adult female rats. Control animals were injected with either CSF obtained from three epilepsy patients (ganglioglioma, posttraumatic epilepsy, focal cortical dysplasia) lacking anti-NMDAR or saline. Intracellular recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells showed a significant reduction of the NMDAR-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDAR-EPSPs) in animals treated with anti-NMDAR. As a consequence of this, action potential firing in these cells by NMDAR-EPSPs was significantly impaired. Long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus was also significantly reduced in rats injected with anti-NMDAR as compared to control animals. This was accompanied by a significantly impaired learning performance in the Morris water maze hidden platform task when the animals had been injected with anti-NMDAR antibody-containing CSF. Our findings suggest that anti-NMDAR lead to reduced NMDAR function in vivo which could contribute to the memory impairment found in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26721688

  9. Combined transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with posterolateral instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease can be a safe and effective treatment for lower back pain

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J; Cianciabella, Augusto J; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lumbar fusion is a proven treatment for chronic lower back pain (LBP) in the setting of symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis; however, fusion is controversial when the primary diagnosis is degenerative disc disease (DDD). Our objective was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of lumbar fusion in the treatment of LBP due to DDD. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and five consecutive patients with single or multi-level DDD underwent lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion for the treatment of chronic LBP between the years of 2008 and 2011. The primary outcome measures in this study were back and leg pain visual analogue scale (VAS), patient reported % resolution of preoperative back pain and leg pain, reoperation rate, perioperative complications, blood loss and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: The average resolution of preoperative back pain per patient was 84% (n = 205) while the average resolution of preoperative leg pain was 90% (n = 190) while a mean follow-up period of 528 days (1.5 years). Average VAS for combined back and leg pain significantly improved from a preoperative value of 9.0 to a postoperative value of 1.1 (P ≤ 0.0001), a change of 7.9 points for the cohort. The average number of lumbar disc levels fused per patient was 2.3 (range 1-4). Median postoperative LOS in the hospital was 1.2 days. Average blood loss was 108 ml perfused level. Complications occurred in 5% of patients (n = 11) and the rate of reoperation for symptomatic adjacent segment disease was 2% (n = 4). Complications included reoperation at index level for symptomatic pseudoarthrosis with hardware failure (n = 3); surgical site infection (n = 7); repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 1), and one patient death at home 3 days after discharge. Conclusion: Lumbar fusion for symptomatic DDD can be a safe and effective treatment for medically refractory LBP with or without leg pain. PMID:26692696

  10. Vitamin D Binding Protein Isoforms and Apolipoprotein E in Cerebrospinal Fluid as Prognostic Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Katarzyna; Minari, Nicoletta; Falvo, Sara; Marnetto, Fabiana; Caldano, Marzia; Reviglione, Raffaella; Berchialla, Paola; Capobianco, Marco A.; Malentacchi, Maria; Corpillo, Davide; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a heterogeneous and unpredictable course. To date there are no prognostic biomarkers even if they would be extremely useful for early patient intervention with personalized therapies. In this context, the analysis of inter-individual differences in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome may lead to the discovery of biological markers that are able to distinguish the various clinical forms at diagnosis. Methods To this aim, a two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) study was carried out on individual CSF samples from 24 untreated women who underwent lumbar puncture (LP) for suspected MS. The patients were clinically monitored for 5 years and then classified according to the degree of disease aggressiveness and the disease-modifying therapies prescribed during follow up. Results The hierarchical cluster analysis of 2-DE dataset revealed three protein spots which were identified by means of mass spectrometry as Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and two isoforms of vitamin D binding protein (DBP). These three protein spots enabled us to subdivide the patients into subgroups correlated with clinical classification (MS aggressive forms identification: 80%). In particular, we observed an opposite trend of values for the two protein spots corresponding to different DBP isoforms suggesting a role of a post-translational modification rather than the total protein content in patient categorization. Conclusions These findings proved to be very interesting and innovative and may be developed as new candidate prognostic biomarkers of MS aggressiveness, if confirmed. PMID:26046356

  11. Resolution of Chronic Aspiration Pneumonitis Following Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistula of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Justin; Babadjouni, Arash; Wrobel, Bozena B.; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea due to a skull base defect requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. Multiple surgical options are available for repairing the fistula, including the two-layer “fascial apposition” method and use of a pedicled nasal-septal flap. A 44-year-old obese woman presented with 4 months of progressive cough, exertional dyspnea, hoarseness, and intermittent fluid drainage from the right nostril. Chest computed tomography (CT) imaging and bronchoscopy showed chronic pneumonitis, which was confirmed by pulmonary wedge resection. CT and magnetic resonance imaging of the skull base, as well as laboratory analysis of the nasal fluid for β2-transferrin, confirmed a skull base defect causing CSF rhinorrhea. During surgery, insertion of a lumbar drain with the intrathecal fluorescein administration was performed, followed by endoscopic endonasal repair using an autologous fascial apposition graft and pedicled nasal-septal flap. Both the CSF leak and the pulmonary complications resolved following the operation with no symptoms at 11-month follow-up. This is the first reported case of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea complicated by chronic aspiration and pneumonitis. Increased diagnostic complexity due to chronic pulmonary complications resulted in unnecessary interventions and treatment delays. Prompt recognition of spontaneous CSF leaks is essential to prevent potentially harmful complications. PMID:27247911

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and perceived early-life stress in depressed patients and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Linda L; Tyrka, Audrey R; McDougle, Christopher J; Malison, Robert T; Owens, Michael J; Nemeroff, Charles B; Price, Lawrence H

    2004-04-01

    Previous studies have reported elevated concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in patients with major depression. Elevations of CSF CRF have also been reported in adult laboratory animals exposed to the stress of brief maternal deprivation or maternal neglect in the neonatal or preweaning period. The present study was designed to determine whether major depression and a history of perceived early adversity in childhood are independently associated with elevated CSF CRF concentrations in adults. In this case-control study, 27 medication-free adults with major depression and 25 matched controls underwent standardized lumbar puncture for collection of a single CSF sample at 1200. Subjects provided data about significant adverse early-life experiences and rated their global perceived level of stress during pre-school and preteen years on a six-point Likert scale. The mean difference in CSF CRF between depressed patients and controls did not reach statistical significance. In a regression model, perceived early-life stress was a significant predictor of CSF CRF, but depression was not. Perinatal adversity and perceived adversity in the preteen adversity years (ages 6-13 years) were both independently associated with decreasing CSF CRF concentrations. The relationship observed between perceived early-life stress and adult CSF CRF concentrations in this study closely parallels recent preclinical findings. More work is needed to elucidate the critical nature and timing of early events that may be associated with enduring neuroendocrine changes in humans. PMID:14702025

  13. Practical detection of a definitive biomarker panel for Alzheimer’s disease; comparisons between matched plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Light, Roger A; Soria, Daniele; Garibaldi, Jonathan; Smith, A David; Warden, Donald; Wilcock, Gordon; Bajaj, Nin; Morgan, Kevin; O’Shea, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has allowed the identification of a panel of molecular markers that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The panel comprises Amyloid beta, Apolipoprotein E, Fibrinogen alpha chain precursor, Keratin type I cytoskeletal 9, Serum albumin precursor, SPARC-like 1 protein and Tetranectin. Here we report the development and implementation of immunoassays to measure the abundance and diagnostic capacity of these putative biomarkers in matched lumbar CSF and blood plasma samples taken in life from individuals confirmed at post-mortem as suffering from AD (n = 10) and from screened ‘cognitively healthy’ subjects (n = 18). The inflammatory components of Alzheimer’s disease were also investigated. Employment of supervised learning techniques permitted examination of the interrelated expression patterns of the putative biomarkers and identified inflammatory components, resulting in biomarker panels with a diagnostic accuracy of 87.5% and 86.7% for the plasma and CSF datasets respectively. This is extremely important as it offers an ideal high-throughput and relatively inexpensive population screening approach. It appears possible to determine the presence or absence of AD based on our biomarker panel and it seems likely that a cheap and rapid blood test for AD is feasible. PMID:24959311

  14. Resolution of Chronic Aspiration Pneumonitis Following Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistula of the Skull Base.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Justin; Babadjouni, Arash; Wrobel, Bozena B; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea due to a skull base defect requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. Multiple surgical options are available for repairing the fistula, including the two-layer "fascial apposition" method and use of a pedicled nasal-septal flap. A 44-year-old obese woman presented with 4 months of progressive cough, exertional dyspnea, hoarseness, and intermittent fluid drainage from the right nostril. Chest computed tomography (CT) imaging and bronchoscopy showed chronic pneumonitis, which was confirmed by pulmonary wedge resection. CT and magnetic resonance imaging of the skull base, as well as laboratory analysis of the nasal fluid for β2-transferrin, confirmed a skull base defect causing CSF rhinorrhea. During surgery, insertion of a lumbar drain with the intrathecal fluorescein administration was performed, followed by endoscopic endonasal repair using an autologous fascial apposition graft and pedicled nasal-septal flap. Both the CSF leak and the pulmonary complications resolved following the operation with no symptoms at 11-month follow-up. This is the first reported case of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea complicated by chronic aspiration and pneumonitis. Increased diagnostic complexity due to chronic pulmonary complications resulted in unnecessary interventions and treatment delays. Prompt recognition of spontaneous CSF leaks is essential to prevent potentially harmful complications. PMID:27247911

  15. Penetration of Drugs through the Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid/Blood-Brain Barrier for Treatment of Central Nervous System Infections†

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Roland; Sörgel, Fritz; Eiffert, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The entry of anti-infectives into the central nervous system (CNS) depends on the compartment studied, molecular size, electric charge, lipophilicity, plasma protein binding, affinity to active transport systems at the blood-brain/blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, and host factors such as meningeal inflammation and CSF flow. Since concentrations in microdialysates and abscesses are not frequently available for humans, this review focuses on drug CSF concentrations. The ideal compound to treat CNS infections is of small molecular size, is moderately lipophilic, has a low level of plasma protein binding, has a volume of distribution of around 1 liter/kg, and is not a strong ligand of an efflux pump at the blood-brain or blood-CSF barrier. When several equally active compounds are available, a drug which comes close to these physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties should be preferred. Several anti-infectives (e.g., isoniazid, pyrazinamide, linezolid, metronidazole, fluconazole, and some fluoroquinolones) reach a CSF-to-serum ratio of the areas under the curves close to 1.0 and, therefore, are extremely valuable for the treatment of CNS infections. In many cases, however, pharmacokinetics have to be balanced against in vitro activity. Direct injection of drugs, which do not readily penetrate into the CNS, into the ventricular or lumbar CSF is indicated when other effective therapeutic options are unavailable. PMID:20930076

  16. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  17. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Indications, Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian; Kim, David Hanwuk

    2016-02-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive spinal fusion technique that uses the retroperitoneal approach to the anterior spinal column. Mechanical and technical results of the technique compare favorably with those of anterior lumbar interbody fusion in regard to large graft placement, graft volumes, and early initial stability. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion uses the transpsoas approach and traverses near the lumbar plexus. It is not, however, without its unique complications. Groin pain or numbness is well tolerated and often temporary; however, quadriceps palsy can be long-lasting and debilitating. Rarer but serious complications include vascular and visceral injury. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion has been used successfully to treat common degenerative spinal conditions such as spinal instability, stenosis, scoliosis, and degenerative disk disease. While understanding of the lumbar plexus and the technical challenges of the procedure improves, lateral lumbar interbody fusion will continue to provide safe and successful clinical outcomes with less morbidity than traditional procedures. PMID:26803545

  18. Partial Facetectomy for Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kevin; Rodriguez-Olaverri, Juan Carlos; Razi, Afshin; Farcy, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57%) reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17%) reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13%) continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11%) required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability. PMID:25110591

  19. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  20. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  1. A hundred years of lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Dugacki, V

    1992-01-01

    In the years 1991 and 1992 the 100th anniversary of the announcement of the lumbar puncture method (1891) and 150th anniversary of the birth of its inventor Heinrich Irenaeus Quincke (1842) are celebrated. In the article a short review is given of the development of this method. PMID:1463808

  2. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Javidi, H; Yadollahie, M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected extreme sudden traumatic stressor may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Important traumatic events include war, violent personal assault (e.g., sexual assault, and physical attack), being taken hostage or kidnapped, confinement as a prisoner of war, torture, terrorist attack, severe car accidents, and natural disasters. In childhood age sexual abuse or witnessing serious injuries or unexpected death of a beloved one are among important traumatic events.PTSD can be categorized into two types of acute and chronic PTSD: if symptoms persist for less than three months, it is termed "acute PTSD," otherwise, it is called "chronic PTSD." 60.7% of men and 51.2% of women would experience at least one potentially traumatic event in their lifetime. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD is significantly higher in women than men. Lifetime prevalence of PTSD varies from 0.3% in China to 6.1% in New Zealand. The prevalence of PTSD in crime victims are between 19% and 75%; rates as high as 80% have been reported following rape. The prevalence of PTSD among direct victims of disasters was reported to be 30%-40%; the rate in rescue workers was 10%-20%. The prevalence of PTSD among police, fire, and emergency service workers ranged from 6%-32%. An overall prevalence rate of 4% for the general population, the rate in rescue/recovery occupations ranged from 5% to 32%, with the highest rate reported in search and rescue personnel (25%), firefighters (21%), and workers with no prior training for facing disaster. War is one of the most intense stressors known to man. Armed forces have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse and PTSD. High-risk children who have been abused or experienced natural disasters may have an even higher prevalence of PTSD than adults.Female gender, previous psychiatric problem, intensity and nature of exposure to the traumatic event, and lack of social support are known risk factors for work-related PTSD. Working with

  3. [Spontaneous trans-sphenoidal encephalocele presenting with nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea (case report)].

    PubMed

    Yücel, Aylin; Değirmenci, Bumin; Yilmaz, M Deniz; Altuntaş, Ali

    2004-09-01

    Encephaloceles are uncommon and can arise from congenital, traumatic, or spontaneous origins. Approximately 80% of all cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrheas are caused by head injuries. Spontaneous or nontraumatic encephaloceles or cerebrospinal fluid leaks have been the least common in most series, accounting for only 3% to 5% of all cerebrospinal fluid leaks. There is a high incidence of meningitis and brain abscess. Thus, early diagnosis is very important. We present an adult patient with uncomplicated nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea that was caused by spontaneous trans-sphenoidal encephalocele. PMID:15470620

  4. Management of delayed posttraumatic cervical kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley; Smith, Zachary A; Hitchon, Patrick W; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    We describe three patients with misdiagnosed unstable fractures of the cervical spine, who were treated conservatively and developed kyphotic deformity, myelopathy, and radiculopathy. All three patients were then managed with closed reductions by crown halo traction, followed by instrumented fusions. Their neurologic function was regained without permanent disability in any patient. Unstable fractures of the cervical spine will progress to catastrophic neurologic injuries without surgical fixation. Posttraumatic kyphosis and the delayed reduction of partially healed fracture dislocations by preoperative traction are not well characterized in the subaxial cervical spine. The complete evaluation of any subaxial cervical spine fracture requires CT scanning to assess for bony fractures, and MRI to assess for ligamentous injury. This allows for assessment of the degree of instability and appropriate management. In patients with delayed posttraumatic cervical kyphosis, preoperative closed reduction provided adequate realignment, facilitating subsequent operative stabilization. PMID:26321304

  5. Posttraumatic genu valgum: operative versus nonoperative treatment.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J J; Kim, D H; Eilert, R E

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results of operative versus nonoperative treatment for posttraumatic genu valgum. It is a retrospective chart and radiograph review of all patients with the diagnosis of posttraumatic genu valgum from our institution and from data obtained in response to 389 letters sent to the members of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). The complementary physeal shaft (CPS) angle and the tibial femoral angle (TFA) were measured at the time of injury, at maximal deformity, and at latest follow-up. Fifteen patients were identified, 10 in the nonoperative group and five in the operative group. In both groups, the valgus deformity progressed over a 20-month span. In both groups, the valgus deformity improved at the time of follow-up. There was no significant difference in the CPS angle or TFA, between groups at the time of injury, at maximal deformity, or at follow-up. PMID:9661865

  6. Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khoonsari, Payam Emami; Häggmark, Anna; Lönnberg, Maria; Mikus, Maria; Kilander, Lena; Lannfelt, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas; Ingelsson, Martin; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer’s disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve) and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer’s disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6) in Alzheimer’s disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system. PMID:26950848

  7. A methodology for quantifying seated lumbar curvatures.

    PubMed

    Leitkam, Samuel T; Bush, Tamara Reid; Li, Mingfei

    2011-11-01

    To understand the role seating plays in the support of posture and spinal articulation, it is necessary to study the interface between a human and the seat. However, a method to quantify lumbar curvature in commercially available unmodified seats does not currently exist. This work sought to determine if the lumbar curvature for normal ranges of seated posture could be documented by using body landmarks located on the anterior portion of the body. The development of such a methodology will allow researchers to evaluate spinal articulation of a seated subject while in standard, commercially available seats and chairs. Anterior measurements of boney landmarks were used to quantify the relative positions of the ribcage and pelvis while simultaneous posterior measurements were made of lumbar curvature. The relationship between the anterior and the posterior measures was compared. The predictive capacity of this approach was evaluated by determining linear and second-order regressions for each of the four postures across all subjects and conducting a leave-one-out cross validation. The relationships between the anterior and posterior measures were approximated by linear and second-order polynomial regressions (r(2 ) =  0.829, 0.935 respectively) across all postures. The quantitative analysis showed that openness had a significant relationship with lumbar curvature, and a first-order regression was superior to a second-order regression. Average standard errors in the prediction were 5.9° for the maximum kyphotic posture, 9.9° for the comfortable posture, 12.8° for the straight and tall, and 22.2° for the maximum lordotic posture. These results show predictions of lumbar curvature are possible in seated postures by using a motion capture system and anterior measures. This method of lumbar curvature prediction shows potential for use in the assessment of seated spinal curvatures and the corresponding design of seating to accommodate those curvatures; however

  8. Primary and Posttraumatic Arthritis of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debdut; Wysocki, Robert W.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Whether degenerative joint disease of the elbow may be the result of primary or posttraumatic etiologies, arthritis of the elbow commonly leads to pain, loss of motion, and functional disability. A detailed history and focused physical examination, in combination with imaging modalities, can help localize the origin of symptoms and help direct treatment. Although nonoperative treatment is the initial therapy for arthritis of the elbow, surgical interventions may provide substantial relief to the appropriately selected patient. PMID:23781338

  9. Management of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Encephaloceles.

    PubMed

    Illing, Elisa A; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-08-01

    Encephaloceles and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks of the frontal sinus may result from congenital, traumatic, spontaneous, or neoplastic causes. Paramount to success is adequate preoperative planning with accurate history, physical exam, endoscopy, imaging, and testing to confirm location of the leak and origin of the disease. Generally, frontal sinus CSF leaks may be addressed endoscopically with favorable anatomy, proper surgical technique, and appropriate equipment. Open surgical approaches (eg, osteoplastic flap) are often required for superior/lateral defects or if the surgeon is not experienced with endoscopic frontal sinus techniques. PMID:27450619

  10. Diagnosis of chordoma by cytologic examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Marigil, M A; Pardo-Mindan, F J; Joly, M

    1983-09-01

    This is a case report of a 44-year-old man with a chordoma of the clivus that caused dysphonia, low back pain, and urinary and fecal incontinence. The diagnosis was made by cytologic study of the CSF, which demonstrated vacuolated malignant cells. The patient was treated with intrathecal methotrexate, dexamethasone, and radiotherapy. At autopsy extensive dissemination of chordoma was found at the base of the brain, in the ventricles, and in the leptomeninges of the spinal cord. This is the sixth reported case of intrathecal dissemination of a chordoma and the first diagnosed by cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6881106

  11. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  12. Posttraumatic stress disorder and posttraumatic growth among Israeli ex-pows.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Zahava; Dekel, Rachel

    2007-06-01

    In this article, the authors present a prospective study that dealt with pathological (posttraumatic stress disorder; PTSD) and salutary (posttraumatic growth; PTG) outcomes of captivity and the correlates of those outcomes among a sample of ex-prisoners of war (POWs) and a control group of combat veterans. Posttraumatic stress disorder and its correlates were assessed in 1991 and 2003, and PTG was assessed in 2003. The results indicate that ex-POWs exhibited higher levels of PTSD and PTG than did the controls. In addition, both linear and quadratic associations between PTSD and PTG were found. The authors discuss some unresolved issues related to assessment of PTG and salutary outcomes, and outline directions for future research. PMID:17597131

  13. Südeck's post-traumatic osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Murariu, Isabella Cristina; Macovei, Luana

    2012-01-01

    The diversity that exists in the types of trauma, in the investigated anatomical structures, in the sites of trauma, in the outcomes of traumatic injuries, and in the general reaction of the body lead to a symptomatological polymorphism of post-traumatic sequelae. Therefore it is impossible to establish a well-defined nosological entity of these sequelae. The damaged tissues react under a very similar scheme, irrespective of the type of tissue, trauma or area, namely, through an inflammatory process, that causes various sequelae depending on certain parameters. Südeck post-traumatic osteodystrophy may be defined as a pathological entity based on some well-defined clinical features, on the development of its own therapy and on its more or less ubiquitous character. Südeck's post-traumatic osteodystrophy of the hand is rarely found isolated. This "acute bone atrophy" is usually included in the "pathological syndrome of the hand" and is caused by circulatory disorders that occur on a traumatized hand or on a hand with injury "at a distance", especially when nerve damage is involved. PMID:23700903

  14. Posttraumatic Growth After Motor Vehicle Crashes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kitty K; Leung, Patrick W L; Cho, Valda W; Law, Lawrence S C

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between sub-dimensions of posttraumatic growth (PTG) and distress was investigated for survivors of motor vehicle crashes (MVC). PTG and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for 1045 MVC survivors who attended the Accident and Emergency Services were examined with the Chinese versions of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised 1 week after the experience of a MVC. A factor structure, which was different from both the original English version of the PTGI and the Chinese version of PTGI for cancer survivors, was identified. Factors extracted were: (1) Life and Self Appreciation; (2) New Commitments; (3) Enlightenment; and (4) Relating to Others. However, correlation analyses indicated a functional similarity between factors from this study and those from previous studies. Relations between PTG sub-dimensions and PTSD symptoms were identified. Results from hierarchical multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling show that there were different predictors for different PTG sub-dimensions. Findings suggest that different modes of relationship between PTSD symptoms and PTG sub-dimensions may co-exist. PMID:27040687

  15. Post-traumatic elbow rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Samuel KK; Faan, Yan Sui; Lui, Paulina WY; Ngai, Wai Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background The elbow is an important but complex structure, with movement in both the sagittal plane in flexion and extension, as well as the rotational plane in forearm supination and pronation. Trauma is a common cause of elbow stiffness, which significantly hampers daily function. There are currently no gold-standard management guidelines for post-traumatic elbow stiffness, and most of the published literature focuses solely on the sagittal plane of motion. Methods This is a retrospective case series reviewing all patients who underwent a surgical release for treatment of post-traumatic elbow stiffness during a 36-month period. Motion range and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were serially measured and analyzed. Results The results obtained showed that both the sagittal and rotational range of motion directly influenced upper limb function; however, the relationship between these two motion planes was weak, meaning that both sagittal and rotational motion in the elbow need be addressed individually. Post-traumatic elbow stiffness could be aptly managed by various surgical approaches, including arthroscopic-assisted procedures; these were all effective in increasing both the sagittal and rotational range of motion. More importantly, this gain in range translated to a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function. Conclusions Management of elbow stiffness needs to be tackled in both the sagittal and rotational motion planes.

  16. Lumbar spinal epidural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary venous drainage after endoscopic lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Toshiharu; Wada, Takeshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) with perimedullary venous drainage are rare. This report describes a case of lumbar epidural AVF in a patient with a history of endoscopic lumbar discectomy at the same level 8 years prior to presenting with progressive myelopathy secondary to retrograde venous reflux into the perimedullary vein. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive lower extremity weakness and sensory disturbance and loss of sphincter control 8 years after endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a disc herniation at L4–5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord edema and dilated intradural perimedullary vessels. Spinal angiography revealed an epidural AVF at the site of the previous endoscopic lumbar surgery with intradural perimedullary venous drainage. The fistula was successfully occluded via endovascular transarterial embolization, and the patient had stabilization of his neurological deficits. Lumbar spinal epidural AVFs, especially those associated with iatrogenic trauma, are rare. Endoscopic surgical procedure can occlude the epidural venous plexus and disturb venous drainage, thereby inducing local venous hypertension and leading to epidural AVF with perimedullary venous drainage. This type of pathology should be considered within the differential diagnosis of delayed neurological deterioration after spinal surgery. PMID:25948114

  17. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    PubMed Central

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A.; Yri, Hanne M.; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Wibroe, Morten A.; Hamann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. Methods We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred on suspicion of IIH from 2011–2013. Subjects included as patients fulfilled Friedman and Jacobson’s diagnostic criteria for IIH. Individuals in whom intracranial hypertension was refuted were included as controls. Lumbar puncture with ICP measurement was performed at inclusion and repeated for patients after three months of treatment. Osmolality was measured with a Vapor Pressure Osmometer. Results We collected 90 CSF samples from 38 newly diagnosed patients and 28 controls. At baseline 27 IIH-samples and at 3 months follow-up 35 IIH-samples were collected from patients. We found no significant differences in osmolality between 1) patients at baseline and controls (p = 0. 86), 2) patients at baseline and after 3 months treatment (p = 0.97), and 3) patients with normalized pressure after 3 months and their baseline values (p = 0.79). Osmolality in individuals with normal ICP from 6–25 cmH2O (n = 41) did not differ significantly from patients with moderately elevated ICP from 26–45 cmH2O (n = 21) (p = 0.86) and patients with high ICP from 46–70 cmH2O (n = 4) (p = 0.32), respectively. There was no correlation between osmolality and ICP, BMI, age and body height, respectively. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg (± 1 SE, 95% confidence interval 267–272) for both patients and controls. Conclusions CSF osmolality was normal in patients with IIH, and there was no relation to treatment, ICP, BMI, age and body height. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg and constitutes a reference for future studies. Changes in CSF osmolality are not responsible for development of IIH. Other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms must be searched. PMID:26808050

  18. Hypothermia Decreases Cerebrospinal Fluid Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Levels in Traumatic Brain Injury Children

    PubMed Central

    Thampatty, Bhavani P; Klamerus, Megan M; Oberly, Patrick J; Feldman, Kerri L; Bell, Michael J; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Adelson, P. David; Clark, Robert SB; Kochanek, Patrick M; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pathological increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, have been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases. Reduced NO early after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may contribute to hypoperfusion. Currently, methods to quantify ADMA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have not been fully explored. We aimed to develop and validate a method to determine ADMA in the CSF of a pediatric TBI population and to use this method to assess the effects of (i) TBI and (ii) therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on this mediator. Design, Setting, Patients An ancillary study to a prospective, phase II randomized clinical trial (RCT) of early hypothermia in a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit for children with TBI admitted to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results A UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated to quantitate ADMA. A total of 56 samples collected over 3 days starting with injury onset were analyzed from the CSF of consented therapeutic hypothermia (n=9) and normothermia (n=10) children. Children undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture (n=5) were controls. ADMA was present at a quantifiable level in all samples. Mean ADMA levels were significantly increased in normothermic TBI children compared to control (0.19± 0.08 μmol/L and 0.11± 0.02μmol/L respectively, p=0.01), and hypothermic children had significantly reduced mean ADMA levels (0.11 ± 0.05 μmol/L) vs. normothermic (p=0.03) measured on day 3. Patient demographics including age, gender, and NO levels (measured as nitrite and nitrate using liquid chromatography coupled with Griess reaction) did not significantly differ between normothermia and hypothermia groups. Also, NO levels did not correlate with ADMA concentrations. Conclusions ADMA levels were significantly increased in the CSF of TBI children. Early hypothermia attenuated this increase. The implications of attenuated ADMA on

  19. Aetiological agents of cerebrospinal meningitis: a retrospective study from a teaching hospital in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in low-resource settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, the meningitis belt has been characterized by particularly high and seasonal incidences of bacterial meningitis extending throughout life. Despite the progress being made in treating the condition, the mortality rates continue to be high, ranging between 2% and 30% globally. In Ghana, the mortality rate of meningitis has been estimated to range from 36% to 50%. However little information is available on the pathogens contributing to meningitis and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Updated information is essential to adjust the recommendations for empirical treatment or prevention of meningitis which could have immense implications for local and global health. Methods We retrospectively reviewed laboratory records of all patients suspected of bacterial meningitis who underwent a lumbar puncture from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data were retrieved from laboratory record books and double entered into a Microsoft® excel spreadsheet. Results Records of 4,955 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed. Of these, 163 (3.3%, 95%CI: 2.8% to 3.8%) were confirmed meningitis and 106 (2.1%, 95%CI: 1.7% to 2.6%) were probable meningitis cases. Confirmed meningitis cases were made up of 117 (71.8%) culture positive bacteria, 19 (11.7%) culture positive Cryptococcus neoformans and 27(16.6%) Gram positive bacteria with negative culture. The most prevalent bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae 91 (77.7%), followed by E.coli 4 (3.4%), Salmonella species 4 (3.4%), Neisseria meningitidis 3 (2.5%), Pseudomonas species 3(2.5%) and others. Pneumococcal isolates susceptibility to penicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone were 98.9% (95%CI: 94.0% to 100.0%), 83.0% (95%CI: 73.4% to 90.1%) and 100.0% (95%CI: 95.8% to 100.0%) respectively. Conclusion Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of meningitis among all age groups and its

  20. Diet Intervention and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bayer-Carter, Jennifer L.; Green, Pattie S.; Montine, Thomas J.; VanFossen, Brian; Baker, Laura D.; Watson, G. Stennis; Bonner, Laura M.; Callaghan, Maureen; Leverenz, James B.; Walter, Brooke K.; Tsai, Elaine; Plymate, Stephen R.; Postupna, Nadia; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Zhang, Jing; Lampe, Johanna; Kahn, Steven E.; Craft, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of a 4-week high–saturated fat/high–glycemic index (HIGH) diet with a low–saturated fat/low–glycemic index (LOW) diet on insulin and lipid metabolism, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of Alzheimer disease, and cognition for healthy adults and adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Veterans Affairs Medical Center clinical research unit. Participants Forty-nine older adults (20 healthy adults with a mean [SD] age of 69.3 [7.4] years and 29 adults with aMCI with a mean [SD] age of 67.6 [6.8] years). Intervention Participants received the HIGH diet (fat, 45% [saturated fat, >25%]; carbohydrates, 35%–40% [glycemic index, >70]; and protein, 15%–20%) or the LOW diet (fat, 25%; [saturated fat, <7%]; carbohydrates, 55%–60% [glycemic index, <5]; and protein, 15%–20%) for 4 weeks. Cognitive tests, an oral glucose tolerance test, and lumbar puncture were conducted at baseline and during the fourth week of the diet. Main Outcome Measures The CSF concentrations of β-amyloid (Aβ42 and Aβ40), tau protein, insulin, F2-isoprostanes, and apolipoprotein E, plasma lipids and insulin, and measures of cognition. Results For the aMCI group, the LOW diet increased CSF Aβ42 concentrations, contrary to the pathologic pattern of lowered CSF Aβ42 typically observed in Alzheimer disease. The LOW diet had the opposite effect for healthy adults, ie, decreasing CSF Aβ42, whereas the HIGH diet increased CSF Aβ42. The CSF apolipoprotein E concentration was increased by the LOW diet and decreased by the HIGH diet for both groups. For the aMCI group, the CSF insulin concentration increased with the LOW diet, but the HIGH diet lowered the CSF insulin concentration for healthy adults. The HIGH diet increased and the LOW diet decreased plasma lipids, insulin, and CSF F2-isoprostane concentrations. Delayed visual memory improved for both groups after completion of 4 weeks of the LOW diet

  1. Neurogranin as a Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker for Synaptic Loss in Symptomatic Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Maartje I.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Crimmins, Daniel L.; Herries, Elizabeth M.; Ladenson, Jack. H.; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurogranin (NGRN) seems to be a promising novel cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for synaptic loss; however, clinical, and especially longitudinal, data are sparse. OBJECTIVE To examine the utility of NGRN, with repeated CSF sampling, for diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of Alzheimer disease (AD). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal study of consecutive patients who underwent 2 lumbar punctures between the beginning of 1995 and the end of 2010 within the memory clinic–based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. The study included 163 patients: 37 cognitively normal participants (mean [SE] age, 64 [2] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score, 28 [0.3]), 61 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (mean [SE] age, 68 [1] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 27 [0.3]), and 65 patients with AD (mean [SE] age, 65 [1] years; 45% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 22 [0.7]). The mean (SE) interval between lumbar punctures was 2.0 (0.1) years, and the mean (SE) duration of cognitive follow-up was 3.8 (0.2) years. Measurements of CSF NGRN levels were obtained in January and February 2014. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Levels of NGRN in CSF samples. RESULTS Baseline CSF levels of NGRN in patients with AD (median level, 2381 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1651-3416 pg/mL]) were higher than in cognitively normal participants (median level, 1712 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1206-2724 pg/mL]) (P = .04). Baseline NGRN levels were highly correlated with total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 in all patient groups (all P < .001), but not with Aβ42. Baseline CSF levels of NGRN were also higher in patients with MCI who progressed to AD (median level, 2842 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1882-3950 pg/mL]) compared with those with stable MCI (median level, 1752 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1024-2438 pg/mL]) (P = .004), and they were predictive of progression from MCI to AD (hazard ratio, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.1-2.9]; stratified

  2. Symptomatic Pneumocephalus after Lumbar Disc Surgery: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kizilay, Zahir; Yilmaz, Ali; Ismailoglu, Ozgur

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic pneumocephalus is frequently seen after traumatic fracture of the skull base bone. However, it has rarely been reported after spinal surgery and its mechanism has not been fully explained. In this paper, we present a 30 year old male patient who had lumbar discectomy due to a symptomatic midline lumbar disc herniation. He had developed symptomatic pneumocephalus after the lumbar disc surgery associated with application of a vacuum suction device. We present and discuss our patient in the light of the literatures.

  3. [Idiopathic Lumbar Hernia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Takuya; Inamoto, Teruo; Matsunaga, Tomohisa; Uchimoto, Taizo; Saito, Kenkichi; Takai, Tomoaki; Minami, Koichiro; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Nomi, Hayahito; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman, complained of an indolent lump about 60 × 70 mm in size in the left lower back. We conducted a computed tomography scan, which exhibited a hernia of Gerota'sfascia-commonly called superior lumbar hernia. In the right lateral position, the hernia contents were observed to attenuate, hence only closure of the hernial orifice was conducted by using Kugel patch, without removal of the hernia sack. Six months after the surgery, she has had no relapse of the hernia. Superior lumbar hernia, which occurs in an anatomically brittle region in the lower back, is a rare and potentially serious disease. The urologic surgeon should bear in mind this rarely seen entity. PMID:26699890

  4. Primary lumbar extradural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paek, Matthew; Glass, Eric; Kent, Marc; Clifford, Craig A; De Lahunta, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A 9 yr old castrated male golden retriever weighing 36 kg was presented for evaluation of progressive left pelvic limb paresis and fecal and urinary incontinence. MRI demonstrated an extradural, ovoid mass compressing the lumbar spinal cord. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Histologically, the mass was consistent with hemangiosarcoma with no involvement of the adjacent vertebrae. The dog underwent a doxorubicin-based chemotherapy protocol with the addition of oral cyclophosphamide. After completion of chemotherapy, the dog was evaluated q 4 mo for restaging. Clinicopathological evidence of primary tumor recurrence or metastatic disease was not detected for 15 mo after initial diagnosis and treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a primary extradural hemangiosarcoma in the lumbar vertebral column in a dog. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome are also discussed. PMID:25955146

  5. Intradural herniation of lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Hodge, C J; Binet, E F; Kieffer, S A

    1978-12-01

    A case of intradural rupture of a lumbar intervertebral disc is reported, and the literature is reviewed. The majority of intradural disc herniations occur at the L4--5 level. These patients usually have neurologic deficits more severe than those found in the much more common extradural disc herniations. The myelographic picture varies from an irregularly marginated intradural lesion overlying the disc space to a complete block. The common factor allowing intradural disc herniation is probably dense adhesions between the dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament, preventing the more common lateral extradural disc herniation. Intradural disc herniation should be included in the differential diagnosis of lumbar intradural lesions causing nerve root or cauda equina compression. PMID:741242

  6. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. PMID:25662569

  7. Hemophilic pseudotumor of the first lumbar vertebra.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Gurusamy; Arockiaraj, Justin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-11-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor involving the spine is extremely uncommon and presents a challenging problem. Preoperative planning, angiography, intra and perioperative monitoring with factor VIII cover and postoperative care for hemophilic pseudotumor is vital. Recognition of the artery of Adamkiewicz in the thoracolumbar junction helps to avoid intraoperative neurological injury. We report the case of a 26-year-old male patient with hemophilia A, who presented with a massive pseudotumor involving the first lumbar vertebra and the left iliopsoas. Preoperative angiography revealed the artery of Adamkiewicz arising from the left first lumbar segmental artery. Excision of pseudotumor was successfully carried out with additional spinal stabilization. At 2 years followup, there was no recurrence and the patient was well stabilized with a satisfactory functional status. Surgical excision gives satisfactory outcome in such cases. PMID:25404776

  8. Hemophilic pseudotumor of the first lumbar vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Nachimuthu, Gurusamy; Arockiaraj, Justin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor involving the spine is extremely uncommon and presents a challenging problem. Preoperative planning, angiography, intra and perioperative monitoring with factor VIII cover and postoperative care for hemophilic pseudotumor is vital. Recognition of the artery of Adamkiewicz in the thoracolumbar junction helps to avoid intraoperative neurological injury. We report the case of a 26-year-old male patient with hemophilia A, who presented with a massive pseudotumor involving the first lumbar vertebra and the left iliopsoas. Preoperative angiography revealed the artery of Adamkiewicz arising from the left first lumbar segmental artery. Excision of pseudotumor was successfully carried out with additional spinal stabilization. At 2 years followup, there was no recurrence and the patient was well stabilized with a satisfactory functional status. Surgical excision gives satisfactory outcome in such cases. PMID:25404776

  9. Trauma-exposed firefighters: relationships among posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress, resource availability, coping and critical incident stress debriefing experience.

    PubMed

    Sattler, David N; Boyd, Bill; Kirsch, Julie

    2014-12-01

    This project examines protective factors associated with resilience/posttraumatic growth and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress among firefighters exposed to critical incidents. The participants were 286 (257 men and 29 women) volunteer and paid firefighters in Whatcom County, Washington. Participants completed an anonymous survey asking about demographics, critical incident exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, resource availability, coping, occupational stress and critical incident stress debriefing experience. Most participants had significant critical incident exposure, and about half had attended critical incident stress debriefing sessions. Posttraumatic growth was associated with being female, critical incident exposure, critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic stress symptoms (negative association), occupational support, occupation satisfaction, occupational effort, problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping and personal characteristic resources. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with years of firefighting, burnout, occupational effort and disengagement coping and negatively associated with critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic growth, social support, internal locus of control, personal characteristic resources, energy resources and condition resources. The findings support conservation of resources stress theory and show that the maintenance and acquisition of resources can offset losses and facilitate resilience/posttraumatic growth. Implications of the findings for enhancing firefighter resources, facilitating resilience and minimizing occupational stressors are discussed. PMID:25476961

  10. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy. PMID:6372123

  11. Weightlifter Lumbar Physiology Health Influence Factor Analysis of Sports Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Chinese women's weightlifting project has been in the advanced world level, suggests that the Chinese coaches and athletes have many successful experience in the weight lifting training. Little weight lifting belongs to high-risk sports, however, to the lumbar spine injury, some young good athletes often due to lumbar trauma had to retire, and the national investment and athletes toil is regret things. This article from the perspective of sports medicine, weightlifting athletes training situation analysis and put forward Suggestions, aimed at avoiding lumbar injury, guarantee the health of athletes. In this paper, first of all to 50 professional women's weightlifting athletes doing investigation, found that 82% of the athletes suffer from lumbar disease symptoms, the reason is mainly composed of lumbar strain, intensity is too large, motion error caused by three factors. From the Angle of sports medicine and combined with the characteristics of the structure of human body skeleton athletes lumbar structural mechanics analysis, find out the lumbar force's two biggest technical movement, study, and regulate the action standard, so as to minimize lumbar force, for athletes to contribute to the health of the lumbar spine. PMID:26981162

  12. [Post-traumatic subdural hygroma: diagnostic conditions and therapeutic attitude in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Ndong-Launay, M

    1989-01-01

    An excessive collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the subdural space is known as subdural hygroma, or hydroma. By far, the most common cause is severe cranial trauma. The diagnosis can be made by angiography or computer tomography and, with certainly, only by trephine or burr hole evacuation. 11 cases of post-traumatic subdural hygromas, mainly diagnosed during operative interventions, from April 1981 to September 1988, are reported. Most patients had acute forms of hygroma requiring acute surgical intervention. The acuteness could broken down as: coma (medium Glasgow coma scale: 6), lateralizing neurologic signs (4 cases) and temporal lobe herniation signs (7 cases). There were difficulties in obtaining angiographic studies. 10 patients underwent burr hole evacuation. Craniectomy was performed in one case. Time between cranial trauma and surgical intervention varied from 24 hours (6 cases) to 34 days. It appears that the prognosis is related to the extent of primary brain damage and not to the pressure exerted by the (usually) small mass lesion. The authors propose a clinical management of this lesion and hope for improvement in the diagnostic technics available. PMID:2808559

  13. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  14. Linear Lumbar Localized Lysis of Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tschen, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The absence or loss of elastic fibers in the skin is referred to as dermal elastolysis. Purpose: This paper describes a woman with a distinctive clinical presentation of mid-dermal elastolysis characterized morphologically by multiple horizontal raised bands on the lower back. Methods: A 20-year-old Filipino woman presented with multiple asymptomatic, flesh-colored, raised, firm, linear, cord-like bands on the lumbar area of her back. There were neither similar lesions elsewhere nor a family member with this condition. Results: Microscopic examination of the raised band showed nearly complete absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. In contrast, a biopsy of symmetrically located normal-appearing skin showed a uniform distribution of elastic fibers throughout the dermis. Linear lumbar localized elastolysis is a descriptive designation that accurately reflects a correlation of the clinical and pathological changes of this condition. Conclusion: The clinical differential of raised horizontal cord-like bands on the lower back (without a family history of an inherited elastic fiber disorder, a prior history of trauma, or a significant change in weight or exercise habit) includes linear focal elastosis and linear lumbar localized elastolysis. Microscopic evaluation of a Verhoeff-van Gieson stained lesion specimen (which may be accompanied by a biopsy of normal-appearing skin for comparison) will readily differentiate these conditions. The former is usually characterized by increased elastic fibers, whereas the latter, as in this patient, shows a paucity or absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. PMID:23882313

  15. Approach to diagnosis of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid evaluation.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, J E

    1990-12-01

    CSF evaluation is the single most important aspect of the laboratory diagnosis of meningitis. Analysis of the CSF abnormalities produced by bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal infections may greatly facilitate diagnosis and direct initial therapy. Basic studies of CSF that should be performed in all patients with meningitis include measurement of pressure, cell count and white cell differential; determination of glucose and protein levels; Gram's stain; and culture. In bacterial meningitis, Limulus lysate assay and tests to identify bacterial antigens may allow rapid diagnosis. Where there is strong suspicion of tuberculous or fungal meningitis, CSF should also be submitted for acid-fast stain, India ink preparation, and cryptococcal antigen; unless contraindicated by increased intracranial pressure, large volumes (up to 40-50 mL) should be obtained for culture. If a history of residence in the Southwest is elicited, complement-fixing antibodies to Coccidioides immitis should also be ordered. Newer tests based on immunologic methods or gene amplification techniques hold great promise for diagnosis of infections caused by organisms that are difficult to culture or present in small numbers. Despite the great value of lumbar puncture in the diagnosis of meningitis, injudicious use of the procedure may result in death from brain herniation. Lumbar puncture should be avoided if focal neurologic findings suggest concomitant mass lesion, as in brain abscess, and lumbar puncture should be approached with great caution if meningitis is accompanied by evidence of significant intracranial hypertension. Institution of antibiotic therapy for suspected meningitis should not be delayed while neuroradiologic studies are obtained to exclude abscess or while measures are instituted to reduce intracranial pressure. PMID:2277190

  16. Post-Traumatic Blepharocele in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraju, Venkatesh; Bharathi, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection in the eyelid is known as blepharocele. It is rarely reported in adults. In this report, we describe one such patient who developed a non-resolving swelling of the left upper eyelid associated with mechanical ptosis following a head injury. He had fractures involving the left orbital rim and roof, and the medial and lateral walls. His left frontal sinus was hypoplastic. The diagnosis of CSF blepharocele was made based on clinical, biochemical and radiological findings. He underwent transcranial repair of the left frontobasal dural tear with a good recovery. PMID:23984042

  17. High Blood Pressure Effects on the Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier and Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein Composition: A Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Study in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; González-Toledo, Juan M.; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Agustín; de Paz-Carmona, Hector; Castro, Rafael; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Carmona-Calero, Emilia M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to analyze the cerebrospinal fluid proteomic profile, trying to find possible biomarkers of the effects of hypertension of the blood to CSF barrier disruption in the brain and their participation in the cholesterol and β-amyloid metabolism and inflammatory processes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a system linked to the brain and its composition can be altered not only by encephalic disorder, but also by systemic diseases such as arterial hypertension, which produces alterations in the choroid plexus and cerebrospinal fluid protein composition. 2D gel electrophoresis in cerebrospinal fluid extracted from the cistern magna before sacrifice of hypertensive and control rats was performed. The results showed different proteomic profiles between SHR and WKY, that α-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein A1, albumin, immunoglobulin G, vitamin D binding protein, haptoglobin and α-1-macroglobulin were found to be up-regulated in SHR, and apolipoprotein E, transthyretin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, transferrin, α-1β-glycoprotein, kininogen and carbonic anhidrase II were down-regulated in SHR. The conclusion made here is that hypertension in SHR produces important variations in cerebrospinal fluid proteins that could be due to a choroid plexus dysfunction and this fact supports the close connection between hypertension and blood to cerebrospinal fluid barrier disruption. PMID:23401751

  18. Lumbar discal cyst with spontaneous regression and subsequent occurrence of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Watanabe, Mizuki; Kitahama, Yoshihiro; Kuraishi, Keita; Uesaka, Toshio; Minami, Manabu; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with an extremely rare discal cyst at the L3-4 level manifesting as a left L4 radiculopathy. Two months after onset, he suffered right L4 radiculopathy with new lumbar disc protrusion. Five months after medical treatment, the patient's symptoms improved, and the discal cyst showed complete regression on magnetic resonance imaging. Most cases of discal cyst are surgically treated, with only two previous cases of spontaneous regression. The present case suggests clinical and radiological recovery of symptomatic lumbar discal cyst can be obtained by only conservative therapy. PMID:22123489

  19. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  20. Lumbar disk herniation surgery: outcome and predictors.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Mahsa; Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Study Design A retrospective cohort study. Objectives To determine the outcome and any differences in the clinical results of three different surgical methods for lumbar disk herniation and to assess the effect of factors that could predict the outcome of surgery. Methods We evaluated 148 patients who had operations for lumbar disk herniation from March 2006 to March 2011 using three different surgical techniques (laminectomy, microscopically assisted percutaneous nucleotomy, and spinous process osteotomy) by using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire, Resumption of Activities of Daily Living scale and changes of visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and radicular pain. Our study questionnaire addressed patient subjective satisfaction with the operation, residual complaints, and job resumption. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States). Statistical significance was set at 0.05. For statistical analysis, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and repeated measure analysis were performed. For determining the confounding factors, univariate analysis by chi-square test was used and followed by logistic regression analysis. Results Ninety-four percent of our patients were satisfied with the results of their surgeries. VAS documented an overall 93.3% success rate for reduction of radicular pain. Laminectomy resulted in better outcome in terms of JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire. The outcome of surgery did not significantly differ by age, sex, level of education, preoperative VAS for back, preoperative VAS for radicular pain, return to previous job, or level of herniation. Conclusion Surgery for lumbar disk herniation is effective in reducing radicular pain (93.4%). All three surgical approaches resulted in significant decrease in preoperative radicular pain and low back pain, but intergroup variation in the outcome was not achieved. As indicated

  1. Life-Threatening Intracranial Hypotension after Skull Base Surgery with Lumbar Drainage.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Setoguchi, Taiki; Kihara, Kazunori; Horiguchi, Kentaro; Kado, Ken; Sato, Motoki; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Saeki, Naokatsu; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-07-01

    Although lumbar drainage (LD) is widely used in skull base surgery (SBS), no cases with intracranial hypotension (IH) following LD-assisted SBS have been reported, and skull base surgeons lack awareness of this potentially life-threatening condition. We report two cases of IH after LD-assisted SBS, a spheno-orbital meningioma and an osteosarcoma in the orbit. Despite a minimal amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage and early LD removal, severe postural headache and even a deteriorating consciousness level were observed in the early postoperative course. Neuroimages demonstrated epidural fluid collections, severe midline shift, and tonsillar sag compatible with IH. Epidural blood patch (EBP) immediately and completely reversed the clinical and radiologic findings in both patients. IH should be included in the differential diagnosis of postural headache after LD-assisted SBS that can be managed successfully with EBP. Persistent leakage of CSF at the LD-inserted site leads to IH. Broad dural dissection and wide removal of bony structure may be involved in the midline shift. EBP should be performed soon after conservative management fails. Further reports will determine the risk factors for IH development following LD-assisted SBS. PMID:26251819

  2. Complications of Minimally Invasive, Tubular Access Surgery for Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    The object of the study was to review the author's large series of minimally invasive spine surgeries for complication rates. The author reviewed a personal operative database for minimally access spine surgeries done through nonexpandable tubular retractors for extradural, nonfusion procedures. Consecutive cases (n = 1231) were reviewed for complications. There were no wound infections. Durotomy occurred in 33 cases (2.7% overall or 3.4% of lumbar cases). There were no external or symptomatic internal cerebrospinal fluid leaks or pseudomeningoceles requiring additional treatment. The only motor injuries were 3 C5 root palsies, 2 of which resolved. Minimally invasive spine surgery performed through tubular retractors can result in a low wound infection rate when compared to open surgery. Durotomy is no more common than open procedures and does not often result in the need for secondary procedures. New neurologic deficits are uncommon, with most observed at the C5 root. Minimally invasive spine surgery, even without benefits such as less pain or shorter hospital stays, can result in considerably lower complication rates than open surgery. PMID:25097785

  3. Distribution of /sup 3/H-morphine following lumbar subarachnoid injection in unanesthetized rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.C.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.; Hillman, D.E.; Rosenberg, C.; Turndorf, H.

    1989-05-01

    Morphine sulfate (40-100 micrograms) and /sup 3/H-morphine (125-200 pmol) were injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space of 18 unanesthetized rabbits through a surgically implanted catheter. Radioactivity remaining in the spinal cord 2, 4, 6, and 12 h later revealed recovery (mean +/- SEM) of 45 +/- 5.6% (n = 3), 30.5 +/- 14.1% (n = 4), 11.23 +/- 4.4% (n = 3), and 3.7 +/- 1.1% (n = 3), respectively, of the injected radioactivity. Tritiated morphine was found to be predominantly centered around the injection site, with limited rostral and caudal spread in the cord. No significant radioactivity was detected in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from the cisterna magna taken at 5, 15, 30, min and 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after receiving radioactive labeled drug (with the exception of that in one rabbit). Of the injected radioactivity, 75% was recovered in the urine in 12 h. These results suggest that the persistence of morphine in the spinal cord could account for its prolonged analgesic effect following intrathecal administration.

  4. Life-Threatening Intracranial Hypotension after Skull Base Surgery with Lumbar Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Setoguchi, Taiki; Kihara, Kazunori; Horiguchi, Kentaro; Kado, Ken; Sato, Motoki; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Saeki, Naokatsu; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-01-01

    Although lumbar drainage (LD) is widely used in skull base surgery (SBS), no cases with intracranial hypotension (IH) following LD-assisted SBS have been reported, and skull base surgeons lack awareness of this potentially life-threatening condition. We report two cases of IH after LD-assisted SBS, a spheno-orbital meningioma and an osteosarcoma in the orbit. Despite a minimal amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage and early LD removal, severe postural headache and even a deteriorating consciousness level were observed in the early postoperative course. Neuroimages demonstrated epidural fluid collections, severe midline shift, and tonsillar sag compatible with IH. Epidural blood patch (EBP) immediately and completely reversed the clinical and radiologic findings in both patients. IH should be included in the differential diagnosis of postural headache after LD-assisted SBS that can be managed successfully with EBP. Persistent leakage of CSF at the LD-inserted site leads to IH. Broad dural dissection and wide removal of bony structure may be involved in the midline shift. EBP should be performed soon after conservative management fails. Further reports will determine the risk factors for IH development following LD-assisted SBS. PMID:26251819

  5. Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar canal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Spinal nerve roots have a peculiar structure, different from the arrangements in the peripheral nerve. The nerve roots are devoid of lymphatic vessels but are immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the subarachnoid space. The blood supply of nerve roots depends on the blood flow from both peripheral direction (ascending) and the spinal cord direction (descending). There is no hypovascular region in the nerve root, although there exists a so-called water-shed of the bloodstream in the radicular artery itself. Increased mechanical compression promotes the disturbance of CSF flow, circulatory disturbance starting from the venous congestion and intraradicular edema formation resulting from the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier. Although this edema may diffuse into CSF when the subarachnoid space is preserved, the endoneurial fluid pressure may increase when the area is closed by increased compression. On the other hand, the nerve root tissue has already degenerated under the compression and the numerous macrophages releasing various chemical mediators, aggravating radicular symptoms that appear in the area of Wallerian degeneration. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is a potent vasodilator as well as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and has therefore attracted interest as a therapeutic drug for lumbar canal stenosis. However, investigations in the clinical setting have shown that PGE1 is effective in some patients but not in others, although the reason for this is unclear. PMID:24829876

  6. Psychological Abuse and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Elizabeth M.; Swopes, Rachel M.; Davis, Joanne L.; Elhai, Jon D.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that among college students, physical and sexual abuse in intimate relationships are associated with posttraumatic stress. Psychological abuse occurs in intimate relationships among college students, and though there is evidence that such abuse has a negative emotional impact, posttraumatic stress has not been extensively…

  7. Victimization and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Homeless Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Angela J.; Steiman, Mandy; Cauce, Ana Mari; Cochran, Bryan N.; WhiteBeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine street victimization and posttraumatic stress symptoms among urban homeless adolescents and to test whether emotional numbing and avoidance represent distinct posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom clusters. Method: Structured, private interviews were conducted with homeless adolescents (N = 374) in the Seattle…

  8. Trajectories of posttraumatic growth and depreciation after two major earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Emma M; Frazier, Patricia; Frankfurt, Sheila; Kuijer, Roeline G

    2015-03-01

    This study examined trajectories of posttraumatic growth or depreciation (i.e., positive or negative life change) in personal strength and relationships after 2 major earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand using group-based trajectory modeling. Participants completed questionnaires regarding posttraumatic growth or depreciation in personal strength and relationship domains 1 month after the first earthquake in September 2010 (N = 185) and 3 months (n = 156) and 12 months (n = 144) after the more severe February 2011 earthquake. Three classes of growth or depreciation patterns were found for both domains. For personal strength, most of the participants were grouped into a "no growth or depreciation" class and smaller proportions were grouped into either a "posttraumatic depreciation" or "posttraumatic growth" class. The 3 classes for relationships all reported posttraumatic growth, differing only in degree. None of the slopes were significant for any of the classes, indicating that levels of growth or depreciation reported after the first earthquake remained stable when assessed at 2 time points after the second earthquake. Multinomial logistic regression analyses examining pre- and postearthquake predictors of trajectory class membership revealed that those in the "posttraumatic growth" personal strength class were significantly younger and had significantly higher pre-earthquake mental health than those in the "posttraumatic depreciation" class. Sex was the only predictor of the relationship classes: No men were assigned to the "high posttraumatic growth" class. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:25793686

  9. Posttraumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Loss Debriefing: Brief Strategic Intervention for Survivors of Sudden Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rosemary A.

    1993-01-01

    Identifies diagnostic criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and describes PTSD symptoms as possible student reactions to sudden, unexpected death by suicide or sudden loss from accidental or deliberate death. Reviews literature on PTSD. identifies phases of recovery, and describes brief strategic intervention for school counselors to…

  10. Relationships between explanatory style, posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among Chinese breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ho, Samuel M Y; Chan, Michelle W Y; Yau, T K; Yeung, Rebecca M W

    2011-03-01

    Many existing models posit that cognitive processing style is an important factor affecting self-perceived positive changes. In this study, the effects of explanatory style (the manner in which people cognitively process and explain why they experience good and bad events) on both posttraumatic growth (PTG) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were examined among 90 Chinese women with breast cancer. It was found that explanatory style for good events, but not for bad events, was significantly associated with self-reported PTG. Women who attributed the causes of positive events to internal, global and stable factors tended to report more posttraumatic growth. In contrast, explanatory style for bad events, as opposed to good events, was significantly and positively correlated with PTSD symptoms. Among the three dimensions of explanatory style (internal, stable and global), the tendency to globalise the causes of good and bad events were the most important predictors of self-reported PTG and PTSD symptoms, respectively. While enhancing an optimistic explanatory style for bad events might reduce posttraumatic stress symptoms, cultivating an optimistic explanatory style for good events is likely to increase self-perceived positive changes after breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20204977

  11. Childhood Sexual Abuse as a Predictor of Birth-Related Posttraumatic Stress and Postpartum Posttraumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Daphna-Tekoah, Shir; Hallak, Mordechai

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the extent to which childbirth may function as a retraumatization of childhood sexual abuse, and may exacerbate postpartum posttraumatic stress reactions. Methods: Data was obtained from a convenience sample of 837 women in mid-pregnancy, at 2 and 6 months following childbirth. Three groups were drawn from this sample:…

  12. Animal Models of Posttraumatic Seizures and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Glushakov, Alexander V; Glushakova, Olena Y; Doré, Sylvain; Carney, Paul R; Hayes, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is one of the most common and devastating complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Currently, the etiopathology and mechanisms of PTE are poorly understood and as a result, there is no effective treatment or means to prevent it. Antiepileptic drugs remain common preventive strategies in the management of TBI to control acute posttraumatic seizures and to prevent the development of PTE, although their efficacy in the latter case is disputed. Different strategies of PTE prophylaxis have been showing promise in preclinical models, but their translation to the clinic still remains elusive due in part to the variability of these models and the fact they do not recapitulate all complex pathologies associated with human TBI. TBI is a multifaceted disorder reflected in several potentially epileptogenic alterations in the brain, including mechanical neuronal and vascular damage, parenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage, subsequent toxicity caused by iron-rich hemoglobin breakdown products, and energy disruption resulting in secondary injuries, including excitotoxicity, gliosis, and neuroinflammation, often coexisting to a different degree. Several in vivo models have been developed to reproduce the acute TBI cascade of events, to reflect its anatomical pathologies, and to replicate neurological deficits. Although acute and chronic recurrent posttraumatic seizures are well-recognized phenomena in these models, there is only a limited number of studies focused on PTE. The most used mechanical TBI models with documented electroencephalographic and behavioral seizures with remote epileptogenesis include fluid percussion, controlled cortical impact, and weight-drop. This chapter describes the most popular models of PTE-induced TBI models, focusing on the controlled cortical impact and the fluid percussion injury models, the methods of behavioral and electroencephalogram seizure assessments, and other approaches to detect epileptogenic properties

  13. Validating the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Screen and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist with Soldiers Returning from Combat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliese, Paul D.; Wright, Kathleen M.; Adler, Amy B.; Cabrera, Oscar; Castro, Carl A.; Hoge, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to assess the diagnostic efficiency of the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Screen (PC-PTSD) and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL) as clinical screening tools for active duty soldiers recently returned from a combat deployment. A secondary goal was to examine the item-level characteristics…

  14. What is post-traumatic stress disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are categorized as separate and discrete disorders, the boundary between them is sometimes indistinct. Their separation is based on the assumption that PTSD results primarily from psychological stress, while TBI is the consequence of an identifiable injury to the brain. This distinction is based on an antiquated polarity between mind and brain, and the separation of the two disorders often becomes arbitrary in day-to-day psychiatric practice and research. PMID:22033951

  15. Posttraumatic headaches in civilians, soldiers, and athletes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2014-05-01

    Posttraumatic headaches are one of the most common and controversial secondary headache types. After mild head injury, more than 50% of people develop a postconcussion syndrome which has been controversial for more than 150 years. Headache is estimated as present in 30% to 90% of patients after mild head injury. Most headaches are of the tension type, although migraines can increase in frequency or occur acutely or chronically de novo. A review is provided of headaches in civilians, soldiers after blast trauma, athletes, and post-craniotomy including pathogenesis. The treatments are the same as for the primary phenotypes. PMID:24703532

  16. [Posttraumatic adhesive ileus following pelvic ring fracture].

    PubMed

    Kusmenkov, T; Kasparek, M S; Brumann, M; Bogner, V; Mutschler, W

    2015-09-01

    We report on two cases of posttraumatic ileus after pelvic ring fracture in two patients aged 73 and 74 years, respectively. Although all conservative measures were exhausted, in both cases the ileus resulted in additional operative procedures and a significant extension of the hospital stay. Intraoperatively both patients presented with a mechanical ileus caused by adhesions which were unapparent for decades. Only the trauma-related motility disorder led to a clinical manifestation. Pathophysiological mechanisms and their implications on prophylaxis and therapy are discussed. PMID:25432671

  17. [Dorso-lumbar pain caused by a schmorl hernia].

    PubMed

    Esteban Navarro, Pedro Luis; García Casas, Oscar; Girvent Montllor, Francesc

    2008-09-01

    Thoracic and lumbar spine conditions cause primarily mechanical back pain, although the clinician has to ensure that the symptoms are not from another etiology. We present the case of a patient with thoracic and lumbar non mechanical pain, resistant to treatment, diagnosed with a herniation of the intervertebral disc through the vertebral end-plate. We also performed a literature review. PMID:21794532

  18. The Robotic Lumbar Spine: Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control

    PubMed Central

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The robotic lumbar spine (RLS) is a 15 degree-of-freedom, fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The design incorporates five active lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. It is actuated by 20 cables connected to electric motors. Every vertebra is connected to the neighboring vertebrae by spherical joints. Medical schools can benefit from a tool, system, or method that will help instructors train students and assess their tactile proficiency throughout their education. The robotic lumbar spine has the potential to satisfy these needs in palpatory diagnosis. Medical students will be given the opportunity to examine their own patient that can be programmed with many dysfunctions related to the lumbar spine before they start their professional lives as doctors. The robotic lumbar spine can be used to teach and test medical students in their capacity to be able to recognize normal and abnormal movement patterns of the human lumbar spine under flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. This paper presents the dynamics and nonlinear control of the RLS. A new approach to solve for positive and nonzero cable tensions that are also continuous in time is introduced. PMID:24151527

  19. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen...

  20. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen...

  1. Congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula through the inner ear and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Proops, D; Sellars, S; Evans, J; Michaels, L

    1993-06-01

    Congenital deformities of the labyrinth of the inner ear can be associated with a fistulous communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the middle ear cavity. We describe seven such cases, six confirmed by high resolution CT and one by postmortem histological section. The seven patients all presented with meningitis although a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was demonstrated at subsequent surgery or postmortem. The lesions were bilateral in three patients, unilateral in three and probably bilateral in the postmortem case although only one temporal bone was obtained. In every case there was a dilated sac instead of the normal two and a half turn cochlea on the affected side and this was confirmed at surgery. The demonstration of the basal cochlear turn is of paramount importance in any deaf child presenting with meningitis. A true Mondini deformity with a normal basal turn and some hearing is not at risk of developing a fistula. PMID:8345296

  2. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  3. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure in conscious head-down tilted rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, Walter B.; Morrow, Bret A.; Keil, Lanny C.

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of a 1-h -45 deg head-down tilt on continouously recorded cerebrospinal fluid pressure (PCSF) of conscious rats are studied in order to investigate the shift of blood volume into the thoracic cavity in microgravity. PCSF, evaluated in 15-min time blocks over a 3-h experiment, increased slightly (less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of a control hour at 0 deg. There was a transient increase for about 5 min immediately after tilt (-45 deg) that may have been due to head movement after the position change. PCSF was statistically unchanged (above 0.05) during the second (-45 deg) hour and the third (0 deg) recovery hour. It is shown that the dynamics of intracranial pressure regulation can accommodate the acute cephalad fluid shift after tilting.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid carnitine levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rubio, J C; de Bustos, F; Molina, J A; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Benito-León, J; Martín, M A; Campos, Y; Ortí-Pareja, M; Cabrera-Valdivia, F; Arenas, J

    1998-03-01

    We assessed free carnitine (FC) and acylcarnitine esters (AC) in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from 24 patients with diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 28 healthy matched-controls. We found no significant correlation between FC and AC levels in CSF. FC and AC levels in CSF did not differ significantly between AD patients and controls, but plasma FC levels were significantly lower in AD patients. CSF and plasma FC and AC levels did not correlate with age, age at onset of AD, duration of AD, and scores of the Minimental State Examination of Folstein. Although these results suggest that CSF carnitine levels are apparently unrelated with the risk for AD, the trend of the FC/AC ratio to be higher in AD patients might suggest the possibility of a lower carnitine acetyltransferase activity in AD, as previously reported in some brain areas. PMID:9562266

  6. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    MIYAJIMA, Masakazu; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics—(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  7. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics-(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  8. Climate Change and Cerebrospinal Meningitis in the Ghanaian Meningitis Belt

    PubMed Central

    Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Nabie, Vivian Adams

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) is one of the infectious diseases likely to be affected by climate change. Although there are a few studies on the climate change-CSM nexus, none has considered perceptions of community members. However, understanding public perception in relation to a phenomenon is very significant for the design of effective communication and mitigation strategies as well as coping and adaptation strategies. This paper uses focus group discussions (FGDs) to fill this knowledge lacuna. Results show that although a few elderly participants ascribed fatal causes (disobedience to gods, ancestors, and evil spirits) to CSM infections during FGDs, majority of participants rightly linked CSM infections to dry, very hot and dusty conditions experienced during the dry season. Finally, community members use a suite of adaptation options to curb future CSM epidemics. PMID:25003550

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  10. Citramalic acid in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Perlman, S; Carr, S A

    1984-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from uninfected patients and from patients with bacterial and viral meningitis was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, with use of a flame ionization detector, and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting profiles were consistent and reproducible. Hydroxy acids were the compounds found in greatest abundance in both normal and infected CSF. Control experiments to establish the sensitivity and efficiency of the extraction and derivatization methods are also presented. Constituents of CSF from patients with bacterial meningitis differed quantitatively and qualitatively from those of CSF from uninfected patients or patients with nonbacterial infections. CSF from seven of eight patients with bacterial meningitis contained citramalic acid, a compound not previously identified in either normal or infected CSF. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:6145530

  11. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  13. A new multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap combined with fascia graft dural suturing for high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kentaro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yamada, Shozo

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of a new endoscopic multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap (NSF) to prevent high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery. This study was a retrospective review on 97 patients who underwent multilayer reconstructions using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing after endoscopic endonasal surgery between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into two groups, third ventricle opening group and nonopening group, based on the presence of a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus after tumor removal. Furthermore, we compared this procedure with our previous reconstruction after resection of craniopharyngioma. Finally, we checked the patients who had postoperative prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurred in three patients (3.1 %): one from the third ventricle opening group and the remaining two from the nonopening group. External lumbar drain was performed after surgery in only seven patients (7.2 %). The incidence of postoperative CSF leak was similar in both groups, whereas the rate of craniopharyngioma in the third ventricle opening group was significantly higher. The incidence of postoperative CSF leak after resection of craniopharyngioma was not statistically significant but obviously higher in the previous group (12.2 %) compared with that in the present group (2.3 %). Twelve patients (12.4 %) had postoperative nasal discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Multilayer reconstruction using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing is a more reliable method for preventing postoperative high-flow CSF leakage after endoscopic endonasal surgery even if there is a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus. However, we should pay close attention especially to prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity after harvesting NSF

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomics Reveals Potential Pathogenic Changes in the Brains of SIV-infected Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Trauger, Sunia A.; Kalisiak, Ewa; Ellis, Ronald J.; Siuzdak, Gary; Fox, Howard S.

    2009-01-01

    The HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder occurs in approximately one-third of infected individuals. It has persisted in the current era of anti-retroviral therapy, and its study is complicated by the lack of biomarkers for this condition. Since the cerebrospinal fluid is the most proximal biofluid to the site of pathology, we studied the cerebrospinal fluid in a nonhuman primate model for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder. Here we present a simple and efficient liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry based proteomics approach that utilizes small amounts of cerebrospinal fluid. First, we demonstrate the validity of the methodology using human cerebrospinal fluid. Next, using the simian immunodeficiency virus infected monkey model, we show its efficacy in identifying proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, complement C3, hemopexin, IgM heavy chain and plasminogen, whose increased expression is linked to disease. Finally, we find that the increase in cerebrospinal fluid proteins is linked to increased expression of their genes in the brain parenchyma, revealing that the cerebrospinal fluid alterations identified reflect changes in the brain itself and not merely leakage of the blood-brain or blood- cerebrospinal fluid barriers. This study reveals new central nervous system alterations in lentivirus-induced neurological disease, and this technique can be applied to other systems in which limited amounts of biofluids can be obtained. PMID:19281240

  15. Early embryonic brain development in rats requires the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Santiago, C; Moro, J A; De la Mano, A; Carretero, R; Gato, A

    2009-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid has shown itself to be an essential brain component during development. This is particularly evident at the earliest stages of development where a lot of research, performed mainly in chick embryos, supports the evidence that cerebrospinal fluid is involved in different mechanisms controlling brain growth and morphogenesis, by exerting a trophic effect on neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPC) involved in controlling the behaviour of these cells. Despite it being known that cerebrospinal fluid in mammals is directly involved in corticogenesis at fetal stages, the influence of cerebrospinal fluid on the activity of NPC at the earliest stages of brain development has not been demonstrated. Here, using "in vitro" organotypic cultures of rat embryo brain neuroepithelium in order to expose NPC to or deprive them of cerebrospinal fluid, we show that the neuroepithelium needs the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid to undergo normal rates of cell survival, replication and neurogenesis, suggesting that NPC are not self-sufficient to induce their normal activity. This data shows that cerebrospinal fluid is an essential component in chick and rat early brain development, suggesting that its influence could be constant in higher vertebrates. PMID:19540909

  16. The ability to cross the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier is a generic property of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark T S; Yousafzai, Yasar M; Elder, Alex; Rehe, Klaus; Bomken, Simon; Frishman-Levy, Liron; Tavor, Sigal; Sinclair, Paul; Dormon, Katie; Masic, Dino; Perry, Tracey; Weston, Victoria J; Kearns, Pamela; Blair, Helen; Russell, Lisa J; Heidenreich, Olaf; Irving, Julie A E; Izraeli, Shai; Vormoor, Josef; Graham, Gerard J; Halsey, Christina

    2016-04-21

    Prevention of central nervous system (CNS) relapse is critical for cure of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). Despite this, mechanisms of CNS infiltration are poorly understood, and the timing, frequency, and properties of BCP-ALL blasts entering the CNS compartment are unknown. We investigated the CNS-engrafting potential of BCP-ALL cells xenotransplanted into immunodeficient NOD.Cg- ITALIC! Prkdc (ITALIC! scid) ITALIC! Il2rg (ITALIC! tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. CNS engraftment was seen in 23 of 29 diagnostic samples (79%): 2 of 2 from patients with overt CNS disease and 21 of 27 from patients thought to be CNS negative by diagnostic lumbar puncture. Histologic findings mimic human pathology and demonstrate that leukemic cells transit the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier situated close to the dural sinuses, the site of recently discovered CNS lymphatics. Retrieval of blasts from the CNS showed no evidence for chemokine receptor-mediated selective trafficking. The high frequency of infiltration and lack of selective trafficking led us to postulate that CNS tropism is a generic property of leukemic cells. To test this, we performed serial dilution experiments which showed CNS engraftment in 5 of 6 mice after transplant of as few as 10 leukemic cells. Clonal tracking techniques confirmed the polyclonal nature of CNS-infiltrating cells, with multiple clones engrafting in both the CNS and periphery. Overall, these findings suggest that subclinical seeding of the CNS is likely to be present in most BCP-ALL patients at original diagnosis, and efforts to prevent CNS relapse should concentrate on effective eradication of disease from this site rather than targeting entry mechanisms. PMID:26869395

  17. High Resolution Discovery Proteomics Reveals Candidate Disease Progression Markers of Alzheimer’s Disease in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anita Y. H.; Song, Qinghua; Liaw, Andy; Wiener, Matt; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Seeburger, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jenny; Meng, Fanyu; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Mazur, Matthew T.; Settlage, Robert E.; Zhao, Xuemei; Southwick, Katie; Du, Yi; Holder, Dan; Sachs, Jeffrey R.; Laterza, Omar F.; Dallob, Aimee; Chappell, Derek L.; Snyder, Karen; Modur, Vijay; King, Elizabeth; Joachim, Catharine; Bondarenko, Andrey Y.; Shearman, Mark; Soper, Keith A.; Smith, A. David; Potter, William Z.; Koblan, Ken S.; Sachs, Alan B.

    2015-01-01

    Disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) constitute a major goal in medicine. Current trends suggest that biomarkers reflective of AD neuropathology and modifiable by treatment would provide supportive evidence for disease modification. Nevertheless, a lack of quantitative tools to assess disease modifying treatment effects remains a major hurdle. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemical markers such as total tau, p-tau and Ab42 are well established markers of AD; however, global quantitative biochemical changes in CSF in AD disease progression remain largely uncharacterized. Here we applied a high resolution open discovery platform, dMS, to profile a cross-sectional cohort of lumbar CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients versus those from non-AD/non-demented (control) patients. Multiple markers were identified to be statistically significant in the cohort tested. We selected two markers SME-1 (p<0.0001) and SME-2 (p = 0.0004) for evaluation in a second independent longitudinal cohort of human CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients and age-matched and case-matched control patients. In cohort-2, SME-1, identified as neuronal secretory protein VGF, and SME-2, identified as neuronal pentraxin receptor-1 (NPTXR), in AD were 21% (p = 0.039) and 17% (p = 0.026) lower, at baseline, respectively, than in controls. Linear mixed model analysis in the longitudinal cohort estimate a decrease in the levels of VGF and NPTXR at the rate of 10.9% and 6.9% per year in the AD patients, whereas both markers increased in controls. Because these markers are detected by mass spectrometry without the need for antibody reagents, targeted MS based assays provide a clear translation path for evaluating selected AD disease-progression markers with high analytical precision in the clinic. PMID:26270474

  18. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Management of Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To study the surgical outcome of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with trans-pedicular screws fixation for management of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Overview of Literature Recurrent lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of surgical failure, occurring in 5%–11% of cases. The optimal technique for treatment is controversial. Some authors believe that repeated simple discectomy is the treatment of choice, but approach-related complications can be considerable. Other surgeons prefer more removal of posterior elements (as lamina and facet joints) with posterior fusion. Methods The study included 15 patients who presented with symptomatic recurrent lumbar disc herniation who underwent reoperation through posterior trans-pedicular screws and TLIF in our department from April 2008 to May 2010, with a 24-month follow-up. Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale (JOA) was used for low back pain. The results of surgery were also evaluated with the MacNab classification. Results The mean JOA score showed significant improvement, increasing from 9.5 before surgery to 24.0 at the end of follow-up (p<0.001). Clinical outcome was excellent in 7 patients (46% of cases), good in 6 patients (40%) and fair in only 2 patients (14%). There was a significant difference (p<0.05) between patients presenting with recurrent disc at the ipsilateral side and those at the contralateral side. Conclusions In spite of the small number of patients and the short follow-up period, the good clinical and radiological outcome achieved in this study encourage the belief that TLIF is an effective option for the treatment of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. PMID:26949458

  19. Long-term investigation of nonsurgical treatment for thoracolumbar and lumbar burst fractures: an outcome analysis in sight of spinopelvic balance

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Hempfing, Axel; Rohrmüller, David; Tauber, Mark; Lederer, Stefan; Resch, Herbert; Zenner, Juliane; Klampfer, Helmut; Schwaiger, Robert; Bogner, Robert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The nonsurgical treatment of thoracolumbar (TLB) and lumbar burst (LB) fractures remains to be of interest, though it is not costly and avoids surgical risks. However, a subset of distinct burst fracture patterns tend to go with a suboptimal radiographic and clinical long-term outcome. Detailed fracture pattern and treatment-related results in terms of validated outcome measures are still lacking. In addition, there are controversial data on the impact of local posttraumatic kyphosis that is associated, in particular, with nonsurgical treatment. The assessment of global spinal balance following burst fractures has not been assesed, yet. Therefore, the current study intended to investigate the radiographical and clinical long-term outcome in neurologically intact patients with special focus on the impact of regional posttraumatic kyphosis, adjacent-level compensatoric mechanisms, and global spine balance on the clinical outcome. For the purpose of a homogenous sample, strong in- and exclusion criteria were applied that resulted in a final study sample of 21 patients with a mean follow-up of 9.5 years. Overall, clinical outcome evaluated by validated measures was diminished, with 62% showing a good or excellent outcome and 38% a moderate or poor outcome in terms of the Greenough Low Back Outcome Scale. Notably, vertebral comminution in terms of the load-sharing classification, posttraumatic kyphosis, and an overall decreased lumbopelvic lordosis showed a significant effect on clinical outcome. A global and segmental curve analysis of the spine T9 to S1 revealed significant alterations as compared to normals. But, the interdependence of spinopelvic parameters was not disrupted. The patients’ spinal adaptability to compensate for the posttraumatic kyphotic deformity varied in the ranges dictated by pelvic geometry, in particular the pelvic incidence. The study substantiates the concept that surgical reconstruction and maintenance of a physiologically shaped spinal

  20. Provocation Lumbar Diskography at Previously Fused Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dulai, H.S.; Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.S.; Gerszten, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recurrent or persistent low back pain (LBP) after lumbar fusion can be related to many factors. We reviewed the provocation lumbar diskogram (PLD) features and redo-fusion outcome in our patients evaluated for recurrent/persistent LBP after technically successful fusion. LD was performed in 27 patients with recurrent/persistent LBP after prior successful lumbar surgical fusion (31 fused levels: single-level fusion-23; two-level fusion-4). PLD response and imaging characteristics at fused and non-fused levels were assessed including: intra-diskal lidocaine response, diskogram-image/post-diskogram CT appearance, presence/absence of diskographic contrast leakage, and evidence of fusion integrity or hardware failure. Outcomes in patients having redo-fusion were assessed. Concordant pain was encountered at 15 out of 23 (65%) single-level fusions, non-concordant pain in one fusion with non-painful response in seven. Adjacent-level concordant pain was identified in seven out of 23 (30%) patients (three of 15 with painful fused levels; four of seven with non-painful fusions). In two-level fusions, concordant pain was encountered at one fused level in each patient. In painful fused levels, leaking and contained disks were encountered with partial or complete pain elimination after intra-diskal lidocaine injection. In anterior fusions, space or contrast surrounding the cage was noted at five of 11 levels. Pseudoarthrosis was noted only with trans-sacral screw fusions. Redo-fusion in 13 patients resulted in significant improvement in nine and moderate improvement in one. Patients with recurrent/persistent LBP after technically successful fusion may have a diskogenic pain source at the surgically fused or adjacent level confirmed by lidocaine-assisted PLD. PMID:20977869

  1. Microtrauma in the lumbar spine: a cause of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Maiman, D J; Pintar, F; Ray, G; Myklebust, J B; Sances, A; Larson, S J

    1988-08-01

    Excessive mechanical stress on the intervertebral disc may be one of the causes of low back pain. Most studies testing this thesis, however, have been based on quantification of the mechanical response of functional units at failure. Typically, radiography is used to demonstrate trauma to the vertebral body at the failure load. The description of failure and radiographic demonstration of damage are meaningful in specifying the tolerance limits of the structure. It is important, however, to understand the sequence underlying the initiation of injury, which may occur at subfailure physiological loads. In this study, we identified the initiation of injury to the lumbar spine by subjecting functional units to axial compressive loads using the mechanical response as a basis. Because conventional radiography failed to detect trauma at this level, advanced sectioning techniques were used. The initiation of injury (microtrauma) is defined as the point on the load-deflection curve where the structure exhibits a decreasing level of resistance for the first time before reaching its ultimate load-carrying capacity. The load deflection curve on this basis was classified into the ambient or preload phase, physiological loading phase, traumatic phase, and post-traumatic phase. Structures loaded to the end of the physiological loading phase did not exhibit any yielding or microtrauma. Injury in the form of microfractures of the endplate not detected on radiography, however, was observed under cryomicrotomy for structures loaded into the traumatic loading phase. PMID:2972940

  2. Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by a Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Myun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Woo, Sungmin; Son, Kyu Ri; Cho, Seong Whi; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the radiologic findings and imaging response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the lumbar artery.MethodsBetween April 2004 and December 2012, we encountered HCC supplied by a lumbar artery in 21 patients. Two investigators retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiological findings of HCC supplied by the lumbar artery using computed tomography (CT) scans and digital subtraction angiograms.ResultsPatients had received 1–27 sessions of previous chemoembolization procedures (mean 7.7 sessions, median 4 sessions). Mean tumor size was 5.3 cm. The locations of HCC supplied by lumbar artery were the bare area (n = 14, 67 %) and segment VI (n = 7, 33 %). Tumor-feeding arteries arose from the main lumbar artery (n = 7), proximal anterior division (n = 4), and distal anterior division (n = 14). In 20 patients, selective chemoembolization through the tumor-feeding arteries of the lumbar artery was achieved. In 1 patient, nonselective embolization at the main lumbar artery was performed. There was no complication such as skin necrosis or paralysis. On the first follow-up enhanced CT scan, target tumors fed by the lumbar artery showed complete response (n = 6), partial response (n = 4), stable disease (n = 3), and progressive disease (n = 8), but overall tumor response was partial response (n = 1) and progressive disease (n = 20).ConclusionWhen HCC is located in the inferior tip or bare area of the liver, a lumbar artery may supply the tumor. Although selective chemoembolization via the tumor-feeding vessel of the lumbar artery can be achieved in most cases, overall tumor response is commonly unfavorable.

  3. Establishment of a new animal model for ischemic lumbar vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Changlong; Tan, Guosheng; Zhuang, Wenquan; Yang, Jianyong

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration and ischemia of lumbar intervertebral disc has become a more and more important issue for elder people. However the mechanism for this is still known, largely due to a lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, we constructed a new animal model for the study of ischemic lumbar vertebrae. 42 New Zealand white rabbits were chosen for the study. For each rabbit, two vertebrae were used. L5 was set as the experimental group and L4 was set as the control group. Percutaneous lumbar puncture needles were applied in vertebrae adjacent to endplate for L5 and L4. For L4 1 ml saline was injected and for L5 1 ml pingyangmycin (2 mg/mL) was used. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 weeks; 2 and 3 months after surgery, 6 rabbits at each time point were randomly chosen and underwent MRI, pathological test. The results in L5 and L4 were compared. Another 6 rabbits were used for DSA (Digital Subtraction Angiography) and vascular cast to study the length and diameters of the branches of lumbar artery. It was identified that since the third week, slightly hyperintense signal on T2-weighted image (T2WI) and fat-suppression T2-weighted image (FS T2WI) were detected. Lumbar vertebrae damage could be identified since the fourth week. Results of MRI and the size of pathological area were positively related (r=0.965, P<0.05). DSA and vascular cast could both clearly show the third level branches of lumbar artery. Our study suggested that injection of pingyangmycin via percutaneous lumbar needle could successfully induce ischemia in lumbar endplate. This method had little trauma, required a simple operation process and is highly repetitive. Besides, by vascular cast, the most important source of blood supply is the media branch of the lumbar artery. This branch could be a new therapy pathway for the degeneration of lumbar vertebrae. PMID:26379856

  4. [Ischemic optic neuropathy after lumbar spine surgery].

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Carpintero, M; García-Carro, G; Acebal, G; Fervienza, P; Cosío, F

    2007-12-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of visual complications after non-ophthalmic surgery. The incidence has varied in different case series, but prone-position spine surgery appears to be involved in most of the reports. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed near total blindness in the left eye following lumbar spine fusion surgery involving the loss of 900 mL of blood. An ophthalmic examination including inspection of the ocular fundus, fluorescein angiography, and visual evoked potentials returned a diagnosis of retrolaminar optic neuropathy. Outcome was poor. PMID:18200998

  5. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junyoung; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Singh, Kern

    2015-07-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is performed via tubular dilators thereby preserving the integrity of the paraspinal musculature. The decreased soft tissue disruption in the MIS technique has been associated with significantly decreased blood loss, shorter length of hospitalization, and an expedited return to work while maintaining comparable arthrodesis rates when compared with the open technique particularly in the setting of spondylolisthesis (isthmic and degenerative), recurrent symptomatic disk herniation, spinal stenosis, pseudoarthrosis, iatrogenic instability, and spinal trauma. The purpose of this article and the accompanying video wass to demonstrate the techniques for a primary, single-level MIS TLIF. PMID:26079840

  6. Trajectories of posttraumatic stress among urban residents.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Galea, Sandro; Uddin, Monica; Koenen, Karestan C

    2014-03-01

    Urban residents experience a wide range of traumatic events and are at increased risk of assaultive violence. Although previous research has examined trajectories of posttraumatic stress (PTS) through latent class growth analysis (LCGA) among persons exposed to the same index events (e.g., a natural disaster), PTS trajectories have not been documented among urban residents. The aims of this study were to conduct LGCA with a sample of trauma survivors from Detroit, Michigan (N = 981), and to explore predictors of trajectory membership. Participants completed three annual telephone surveys, each of which included the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist-Civilian Version. Four PTS trajectories were detected. Although the majority evidenced a trajectory of consistently few symptoms (Low: 72.5%), 4.6% were in a trajectory of chronic severe PTSD (High), and the remainder were in trajectories of consistently elevated, but generally subclinical, levels of PTS (Decreasing: 12.3%; Increasing: 10.6%). Socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., lower income), more extensive trauma history (e.g., childhood abuse), and fewer social resources (e.g., lower social support) were associated with membership in higher PTS trajectories, relative to the Low trajectory. The results suggest that efforts to reduce PTS in urban areas need to attend to socioeconomic vulnerabilities in addition to trauma history and risk for ongoing trauma exposure. PMID:24469249

  7. Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Among Urban Residents

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Sandro; Uddin, Monica; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Urban residents experience a wide range of traumatic events and are at increased risk of assaultive violence. Although previous research has examined trajectories of posttraumatic stress (PTS) through latent class growth analysis (LCGA) among persons exposed to the same index events (e.g., a natural disaster), PTS trajectories have not been documented among urban residents. The aims of this study were to conduct LGCA with a sample of trauma survivors from Detroit, Michigan (N = 981), and to explore predictors of trajectory membership. Participants completed three annual telephone surveys, each of which included the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Check-list-Civilian Version. Four PTS trajectories were detected. Although the majority evidenced a trajectory of consistently few symptoms (Low: 72.5 %), 4.6 % were in a trajectory of chronic severe PTSD (High), and the remainder were in trajectories of consistently elevated, but generally subclinical, levels of PTS (Decreasing: 12.3 %; Increasing: 10.6 %). Socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., lower income), more extensive trauma history (e.g., childhood abuse), and fewer social resources (e.g., lower social support) were associated with membership in higher PTS trajectories, relative to the Low trajectory. The results suggest that efforts to reduce PTS in urban areas need to attend to socioeconomic vulnerabilities in addition to trauma history and risk for ongoing trauma exposure. PMID:24469249

  8. Peripheral Biomarker Candidates of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Jin; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2015-01-01

    There is high variability in the manifestation of physical and mental health problems following exposure to trauma and disaster. Although most people may show a range of acute symptoms in the aftermath of traumatic events, chronic and persistent mental disorders may not be developed in all individuals who were exposed to traumatic events. The most common long-term pathological consequence after trauma exposure is posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, comorbid conditions including depression, anxiety disorder, substance use-related problems, and a variety of other symptoms may frequently be observed in individuals with trauma exposure. Post-traumatic syndrome (PTS) is defined collectively as vast psychosocial problems that could be experienced in response to traumatic events. It is important to predict who will continue to suffer from physical and mental health problems and who will recover following trauma exposure. However, given the heterogeneity and variability in symptom manifestations, it is difficult to find identify biomarkers which predict the development of PTSD. In this review, we will summarize the results of recent studies with regard to putative biomarkers of PTSD and suggest future research directions for biomarker discovery for PTSD. PMID:26412967

  9. Indirect Neuromonitoring of the Spinal Cord by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Paraspinous Thoracic and Lumbar Muscles in Aortic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Luehr, Maximilian; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Etz, Christian D

    2016-06-01

    Paraplegia remains the most devastating complication of open and endovascular thoracic/thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAA/A) repair. However, the assessment of currently available neuromonitoring modalities remains challenging and difficult to interpret. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been introduced as a strategy for noninvasive, real-time monitoring of the paraspinous collateral network (CN) to detect potential spinal cord ischemia at our institution. Prior to TAA/A repair, a cerebrospinal fluid catheter is placed and four NIRS optodes are bilaterally positioned on the patient's back to transcutaneously monitor regional muscle oxygenation at the thoracic and lumbar levels. Indirect surveillance of the spinal cord by NIRS seems to be a tempting option with increasing evidence supporting the CN concept. PMID:26011674

  10. Amine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid in Huntington's chorea

    PubMed Central

    Curzon, G.; Gumpert, John; Sharpe, David

    1972-01-01

    The amine metabolites HVA and 5-HIAA in the lumbar CSF of 15 patients with Huntington's chorea were determined. A negative correlation was found between the severity of symptoms and the CSF HVA, but not 5-HIAA levels. The mean HVA concentration was lower than that of a group of patients with miscellaneous neurological disorders, similar to that of a group with miscellaneous psychiatric disorders and higher than that of a group with Parkinson's disease. The mean 5-HIAA concentration was similar to that of the neurological group and higher than those of the groups with psychiatric disorders or Parkinson's disease. CSF HVA and 5-HIAA concentrations of a single patient with severe akinetic rigid Huntington's chorea were similar to those found in Parkinson's disease. The findings are discussed in relation to previous neuropathological observations and to reported effects of drugs on the choreic symptoms. PMID:4261957

  11. Adult attachment as a predictor of posttraumatic stress and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, David A

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether K. Bartholomew's (1990) self-report dimensions of adult attachment (secure, dismissing, preoccupied, and fearful) mediate or moderate links from victimization/abuse to posttraumatic stress and dissociation. Participants were 199 college women with and without a history of childhood physical abuse, childhood sexual victimization, and adolescent/adult sexual victimization. Path analysis revealed no significant mediation effects for attachment; however, hierarchical multiple linear regression indicated that dismissing attachment moderated the link between victimization/abuse and posttraumatic stress (i.e., the relationship was strongest for women with high dismissing scores). All 4 attachment dimensions uniquely predicted posttraumatic stress, whereas only fearful attachment uniquely predicted dissociation. PMID:20603764

  12. A Case of Post-Traumatic Meniere's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Juyong; Jung, Hahn Jin; Kim, Chong Sun

    2014-01-01

    There are only a few reports of post-traumatic Meniere's disease and there is few literature that contains detailed data associated with the disease. We report a case of post-traumatic Meniere's disease. He suffered from tinnitus, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss, and recurrent vertigo. Symptomatic medical treatment was not helpful and neither was soft tissue plugging around the oval and round windows during exploratory tympanotomy. Three months after soft tissue plugging, endolymphatic sac decompression surgery was performed. The patient's symptoms improved markedly thereafter. The clinical significance of post-traumatic Meniere's disease is described and we present a brief review of the literature. PMID:24782951

  13. Collateral Adverse Outcomes After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Gundle, Kenneth; Hart, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Collateral adverse outcomes are the expected or unavoidable results of a procedure that is performed in a standard manner and typically experienced by the patient. Collateral adverse outcomes do not result from errors, nor are they rare. Collateral adverse outcomes occur as the direct result of a surgical procedure and must be accepted as a trade-off to attain the intended benefits of the surgical procedure. As such, collateral adverse outcomes do not fit into the traditional definition of a complication or adverse event. Examples of collateral adverse outcomes after lumbar spine arthrodesis include lumbar stiffness, postoperative psychological stress, postoperative pain, peri-incisional numbness, paraspinal muscle denervation, and adjacent-level degeneration. Ideally, a comparison of interventions for the treatment of a clinical condition should include information on both the negative consequences (expected and unexpected) and potential benefits of the treatment options. The objective evaluation and reporting of collateral adverse outcomes will provide surgeons with a more complete picture of invasive interventions and, thus, the improved ability to assess alternative treatment options. PMID:27049197

  14. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  15. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology

    PubMed Central

    K. L., Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-01-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  16. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Chao; Zotti, Mario Giuseppe Tedesco; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  17. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, G; K L, Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-06-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  18. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  19. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Surendra Mohan; Kapoor, Varun; Jain, Anil K; Jain, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic instability following laminectomy occurs in patients with degenerative lumbar canal stenosis. Long segment fusions to obviate postoperative instability result in loss of motion of lumbar spine and predisposes to adjacent level degeneration. The best alternative would be an adequate decompressive laminectomy with a nonfusion technique of preserving the posterior ligament complex integrity. We report a retrospective analysis of multilevel lumbar canal stenosis that were operated for posterior decompression and underwent spinaplasty to preserve posterior ligament complex integrity for outcome of decompression and iatrogenic instability. Materials and Methods: 610 patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis (n=520) and development spinal canal stenosis (n=90), with a mean age 58 years (33–85 years), underwent multilevel laminectomies and spinaplasty procedure. At followup, changes in the posture while walking, increase in the walking distance, improvement in the dysesthesia in lower limb, the motor power, capability to negotiate stairs and sphincter function were assessed. Forward excursion of vertebrae more than 4 mm in flexion–extension lateral X-ray of the spine as compared to the preoperative movements was considered as the iatrogenic instability. Clinical assessment was done in standing posture regarding active flexion–extension movement, lateral bending and rotations Results: All patients were followed up from 3 to 10 years. None of the patients had neurological deterioration or pain or catch while movement. Walking distance improved by 5–10 times, with marked relief (70–90%) in neurogenic claudication and preoperative stooping posture, with improvement in sensation and motor power. There was no significant difference in the sagittal alignment as well as anterior translation. Two patients with concomitant scoliosis and one with cauda equine syndrome had incomplete recovery. Two patients who developed disc protrusion, underwent

  20. Instrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Adult Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ching-Hsiao; Wang, Chen-Ti

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear whether using artificial cages increases fusion rates compared with use of bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. We hypothesized artificial cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion would provide better clinical and radiographic outcomes than bone chips alone. We assumed solid fusion would provide good clinical outcomes. We clinically and radiographically followed 34 patients with spondylolisthesis having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with mixed autogenous and allogeneic bone chips alone and 42 patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of artificial cages packed with morselized bone graft. Patients with the artificial cage had better functional improvement in the Oswestry disability index than those with bone chips alone, whereas pain score, patient satisfaction, and fusion rate were similar in the two groups. Postoperative disc height ratio, slip ratio, and segmental lordosis all decreased at final followup in the patients with bone chips alone but remained unchanged in the artificial cage group. The functional outcome correlated with radiographic fusion status. We conclude artificial cages provide better functional outcomes and radiographic improvement than bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis, although both techniques achieved comparable fusion rates. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18846411

  1. Morphological structure and variations of lumbar plexus in human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Soner; Kaya, Serdar; Temiz, Cağlar; Tehli, Ozkan; Kural, Cahit; Izci, Yusuf

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to study the anatomy of lumbar plexus on human fetuses and to establish its morphometric characteristics and differences compared with adults. Twenty lumbar plexus of 10 human fetal cadavers in different gestational ages and genders were dissected. Lumbar spinal nerves, ganglions, and peripheral nerves were exposed. Normal anatomical structure and variations of lumbar plexus were investigated and morphometric analyses were performed. The diameters of lumbar spinal nerves increased from L1 to L4. The thickest nerve forming the plexus was femoral nerve, the thinnest was ilioinguinal nerve, the longest nerve through posterior abdominal wall was iliohypogastric nerve, and the shortest nerve was femoral nerve. Each plexus had a single furcal nerve and this arose from L4 nerve in all fetuses. No prefix or postfix plexus variation was observed. In two plexuses, L1 nerve was in the form of a single branch. Also, in two plexuses, genitofemoral nerve arose only from L2 nerve. Accessory obturator nerve was observed in four plexuses. According to these findings, the morphological pattern of the lumbar plexus in the fetus was found to be very similar to the lumbar plexus in adults. PMID:22696243

  2. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G.; Norvell, Daniel C.; Anderson, Paul A.; Hart, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  3. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  4. Identification of immunodiagnostic antigens for cerebrospinal filariasis in horses by western blot analysis

    PubMed Central

    TAKESUE, Masataka; OSAKA, Yuki; MURANAKA, Masanori; KATAYAMA, Yoshinari; IKADAI, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the present study, the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of horses diagnosed with Setaria digitata cerebrospinal filariasis were analyzed by western blot. The results revealed S. digitata protein bands measuring 65, 34, 22, and 18 kDa in molecular weight. In particular, the 18 kDa band is a possible candidate for clinical immunodiagnosis on the basis of western blot findings. PMID:27073332

  5. Cytomegalovirus Antibody in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Schizophrenic Patients Detected by Enzyme Immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller Torrey, E.; Yolken, Robert H.; Winfrey, C. Jack

    1982-05-01

    By means of enzyme immunoassay techniques to detect the presence of antibody to cytomegalovirus, the cerebrospinal fluid of 178 patients with schizophrenia, 17 patients with bipolar disorders, and 11 other psychiatric patients was compared with that of 79 neurological patients and 41 normal control subjects. The cerebrospinal fluid of 20 of the schizophrenic patients and 3 of the patients with bipolar disorders showed significant increases in immunoglobulin M antibody to cytomegalovirus; no difference was found in patients on or off psychotropic medications.

  6. Clinicoradiological Images of a Rare Type of Lumbar Hernia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Arjun; Mukherjee, Sujoy; Garg, Cheena

    2015-12-01

    A surgeon will rarely see a case of lumbar hernia in his lifetime. They are usually divided into superior and inferior types, but in cases of huge hernias where anatomical delineation is not possible, they are called as diffuse. Further classification into primary and secondary types (on the basis of etiology) and congenital and acquired types is done. Evisceration in a lumbar hernia can be present due to secondary causes but never spontaneously. This is therefore probably the first reported case of a primary eviscerated diffuse lumbar hernia. PMID:26884669

  7. The lumbar interspinous bursae and Baastrup's syndrome. An autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Bywaters, E G; Evans, S

    1982-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence, distribution, pathology and pathogenesis of lumbar interspinous bursitis (described as a clinical syndrome by Baastrup in 1933). It is based on an anatomic study of 152 lumbar spines derived from routine and random postmortem material, together with selected specimens from autopsies on patients with various rheumatic diseases. From a statistical study of 50 randomly chosen spines, bursae are found when the interspinous distance is small compared with the total height of the lumbar spine ('bursal index'): nearly all bursal spaces show some sign of inflammation and a few show severe bony erosion. Crystal deposits therein are also described. PMID:7178764

  8. Influence Of Lumbar Spine Kinematics On Feet Pressure Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Săftescu-Jescu, C.; Bereteu, L.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the center of pressure trajectories, as an indicator of postural stability or lumbar pathology, has been a challenging issue for researchers during the last decades. The paper advances an investigational method in order to determine a correlation between lumbar spine movements and feet center of pressure distribution. Five young healthy volunteers were simultaneously tested using an ultrasound based motion analyzing system and a force platform, while performing imposed tasks. Results showed specific patterns described by the center of pressure trajectories and a good coordination of angular amplitudes during lumbar spine movement.

  9. A global CT to US registration of the lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Simrin; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Ungi, Tamas; Rasoulian, Abtin; Osborn, Jill; Lessoway, Victoria A.; Rohling, Robert N.; Borschneck, Daniel P.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2014-03-01

    During percutaneous lumbar spine needle interventions, alignment of the preoperative computed tomography (CT) with intraoperative ultrasound (US) can augment anatomical visualization for the clinician. We propose an approach to rigidly align CT and US data of the lumbar spine. The approach involves an intensity-based volume registration step, followed by a surface segmentation and a point-based registration of the entire lumbar spine volume. A clinical feasibility study resulted in mean registration error of approximately 3 mm between CT and US data.

  10. Development of a permeability-limited model of the human brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to integrate known physiological and biological knowledge: Estimating time varying CSF drug concentrations and their variability using in vitro data.

    PubMed

    Gaohua, Lu; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Johnson, Trevor N; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Jamei, Masoud

    2016-06-01

    A 4-compartment permeability-limited brain (4Brain) model consisting of brain blood, brain mass, cranial and spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments has been developed and incorporated into a whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model within the Simcyp Simulator. The model assumptions, structure, governing equations and system parameters are described. The model in particular considers the anatomy and physiology of the brain and CSF, including CSF secretion, circulation and absorption, as well as the function of various efflux and uptake transporters existing on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), together with the known parameter variability. The model performance was verified using in vitro data and clinical observations for paracetamol and phenytoin. The simulated paracetamol spinal CSF concentration is comparable with clinical lumbar CSF data for both intravenous and oral doses. Phenytoin CSF concentration-time profiles in epileptic patients were simulated after accounting for disease-induced over-expression of efflux transporters within the BBB. Various 'what-if' scenarios, involving variation of specific drug and system parameters of the model, demonstrated that the 4Brain model is able to simulate the possible impact of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions, the lumbar puncture process and the age-dependent change in the CSF turnover rate on the local PK within the brain. PMID:27236639

  11. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period. PMID:26834359

  12. Posttraumatic stress disorder and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Donald; Cohen, Beth E

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder initiated by exposure to a traumatic event and characterized by intrusive thoughts about the event, attempts to avoid reminders of the event, and physiological hyperarousal. In a number of large prospective observational studies, PTSD has been associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Also, in recent years, a number of studies have shown that cardiovascular events can themselves cause PTSD in more than 1 in 8 patients with acute coronary syndrome. Further, a few small studies suggest that PTSD secondary to an acute CVD event then places patients at increased risk for subsequent CVD events and mortality. In this article, we review the evidence for a link between PTSD and CVD, and discuss potential mechanisms for that association as well as future directions for research. PMID:23621964

  13. [Atypical early posttraumatic syndromes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Muller, G E

    1974-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 1,925 head injuries, 283 patients (14.7%), could not be classified, neither in the group of simple head injuries without cerebral symptoms, nor in the group of typical concussions characterized by immediate amnesia or observed coma. We have prefered the rather neutral term of atypical early posttraumatic syndromes. In this group, apart from neurovegetative manifestations, partial disturbances of consciousness and perception, we have also classified delayed disturbances of consciousness. Special attention has been given to migraineous phenomena and to a syndrome, characteristic for children, described by Mealey. This is an intermediate group important from a medico-legal point of view because certain transient cerebral manifestations risk to be mistaken for psychological reactions. On the other hand symptoms probably of psychic origin were discussed. PMID:4469864

  14. Psychologic trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Lanius, Ruth A; Van der Kolk, Bessel A

    2005-10-01

    Psychologic trauma refers to events (such as sexual assault, major earthquake, or plane crashes) that overwhelm an individual's capacity to cope. Psychologic trauma can result in chronic and recurring dermatologic symptoms that persist after the trauma subsides. Examples are cutaneous sensory flashbacks (which may be fragments of the sensory component of the traumatic experience), autonomic hyperarousal (with symptoms such as profuse sweating or flare-up of an underlying stress-reactive dermatosis), conversion symptoms (such as numbness, pain, or other medically unexplained cutaneous symptoms), and cutaneous self-injury (manifesting in many forms, including trichotillomania, dermatitis artefacta, and neurotic excoriations--tension-reducing behaviors in patients who have posttraumatic stress disorder). PMID:16112441

  15. Tribulin in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J; Glover, V; Clow, A; Kudler, H; Meador, K; Sandler, M

    1988-11-01

    Tribulin (endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor/benzodiazepine receptor binding inhibitor) output was measured in the urine of 18 patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 13 controls. The level of the two inhibitory activities was highly significantly correlated in the group as a whole. There was no difference between output of either inhibitor in patients and controls. However, when the PTSD group was subdivided according to various psychometric ratings, a pattern of output did emerge. Levels of both inhibitory activities were higher in agitated compared with non-agitated subjects, and lower in extroverts compared with introverts. This finding supports the view that tribulin output is raised in conditions of greater arousal. PMID:3270828

  16. Biological Studies of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Roger K.; Rasmusson, Ann M.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Shin, Lisa M.; Orr, Scott P.; Gilbertson, Mark W.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Preface Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the only major mental disorder for which a cause is considered to be known, viz., an event that involves threat to the physical integrity of oneself or others and induces a response of intense fear, helplessness, or horror. Although PTSD is still largely regarded as a psychological phenomenon, over the past three decades the growth of the biological PTSD literature has been explosive, and thousands of references now exist. Ultimately, the impact of an environmental event, such as a psychological trauma, must be understood at organic, cellular, and molecular levels. The present review attempts to present the current state of this understanding, based upon psychophysiological, structural and functional neuroimaging, endocrinological, genetic, and molecular biological studies in humans and in animal models. PMID:23047775

  17. Psychological theories of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Brewin, Chris R; Holmes, Emily A

    2003-05-01

    We summarize recent research on the psychological processes implicated in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as an aid to evaluating theoretical models of the disorder. After describing a number of early approaches, including social-cognitive, conditioning, information-processing, and anxious apprehension models of PTSD, the article provides a comparative analysis and evaluation of three recent theories: Foa and Rothbaum's [Foa, E. B. & Rothbaum, B. O. (1998). Treating the trauma of rape: cognitive behavioral therapy for PTSD. New York: Guilford Press] emotional processing theory; Brewin, Dalgleish, and Joseph's [Psychological Review 103 (1996) 670] dual representation theory; Ehlers and Clark's [Behaviour Research and Therapy 38 (2000) 319] cognitive theory. We review empirical evidence relevant to each model and identify promising areas for further research. PMID:12729677

  18. Processing threatening information in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R A; Harvey, A G

    1995-08-01

    The authors used a modified Stroop task to study how people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) process threatening information. Participants were motor vehicle accident (MVA) survivors with either PTSD (n = 15), simple phobia of driving (n = 15), or low anxiety (n = 15). Participants named colors of 4 types of words: strong threat words (MVA related), mild threat words (MVA related), positive words, and neutral words. Participants with PTSD demonstrated greater interference on strong threat words than those with simple phobia or low anxiety. Contrary to expectation, participants with simple phobia did not display an interference effect. Findings suggest that individuals with PTSD and simple phobia may process threatening information differently. The nature of attentional bias in different anxiety conditions following trauma is discussed. PMID:7673578

  19. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Emerging Concepts of Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Dewleen G.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Risbrough, Victoria B.

    2009-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can result from a traumatic experience that elicits emotions of fear, helpless or horror. Most individuals remain asymptomatic or symptoms quickly resolve, but in a minority intrusive imagery and nightmares, emotional numbing and avoidance, and hyperarousal persist for decades. PTSD is associated with psychiatric and medical co-morbidities, increased risk for suicide, and with poor social and occupational functioning. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are common treatments. Whereas, research supports the efficacy of the cognitive behavioral psychotherapies, there is insufficient evidence to unequivocally support the efficacy of any specific pharmacotherapy. Proven effective pharmacologic agents are sorely needed to treat core and targeted PTSD symptoms, and for prevention. This review describes current and emerging pharmacotherapies that advance these goals. PMID:19453285

  20. Social Bonds and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Charuvastra, Anthony; Cloitre, Marylene

    2009-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies consistently show that individuals exposed to human-generated traumatic events carry a higher risk of developing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) than those exposed to other kinds of events. These studies also consistently identify perceptions of social support both before and after a traumatic event as an important factor in the determining vulnerability to the development of PTSD. We review the literature on interpersonal traumas, social support and risk for PTSD and integrate findings with recent advances in developmental psychopathology, attachment theory and social neuroscience. We propose and gather evidence for what we term the social ecology of PTSD, a conceptual framework for understanding how both PTSD risk and recovery are highly dependent on social phenomena. We explore clinical implications of this conceptual framework. PMID:17883334

  1. Post-traumatic headaches: a clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; D'Onofrio, F; Conte, F; Petretta, V; Tedeschi, G; Tessitore, A

    2014-05-01

    Headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma or injury, the so-called post-traumatic headache (PTH), is the most common secondary headache disorder and one of the most controversial clinical entities in the headache field, due to its unclear pathophysiological mechanisms and the unsolved role of associated psychological and medico-legal aspects. PTH, as a significant cause of morbidity after traumatic brain injury, may occur as an isolated symptom or as one of a constellation of symptoms known as post-concussive syndrome. However, in many cases, PTH might also represent an accentuation of non-disabling, remote or infrequent pre-existing primary headaches rather than a new onset headache strictly related to the trauma. Recently, the International Classification of Headache Disorders attempted to classify PTH; however, many unsolved issues are still to be clarified. In this brief review, we will focus on PTH clinical aspects and diagnostic criteria. PMID:24867854

  2. Update on the management of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Duncan; Cooper, John

    2015-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs in people exposed to life-threatening trauma. GPs may be seeing more patients with post-traumatic stress disorder as military personnel return from overseas deployments. The condition can present in various ways. To reduce the likelihood of missed or delayed diagnosis GPs can screen at-risk populations. A comprehensive assessment is recommended. Specialist referral may be required, particularly if there are other mental health problems. Trauma-focused psychological therapies should be offered as the first line of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. Usually 8-12 sessions are needed for a therapeutic effect. If drug treatment is needed, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first line. Other drugs used in post-traumatic stress disorder include antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and prazosin. PMID:26648617

  3. Measurement of posttraumatic growth in young people: a review.

    PubMed

    Clay, Rebecca; Knibbs, Jacky; Joseph, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    The potential of the positive psychology perspective to change the focus of clinical research and practice has become increasingly recognized. A variety of new psychometric instruments informed by positive psychology are now available to mental health clinicians, providing them with tools to assess change across the spectrum of human functioning. One area of research and practice in which this is evident is in posttrauma work, where it is becoming more common to assess posttraumatic growth alongside posttraumatic stress. The majority of work on posttraumatic growth has been with adults, but the last few years have also seen a new body of research with children and adolescents. The aim is to review literature relating to the measurement of growth. It is concluded that several measures with acceptable psychometric properties now exist for the assessment of posttraumatic growth in children and adolescents. PMID:19515756

  4. An Integrated Model of Posttraumatic Stress and Growth.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Steven L; Klein, Keith R; Nadia, Cyrus; Szabo, Lisa; Mogerman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent models have examined cognitive predictors of posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth (S. Barton, A. Boals, & L. Knowles, 2013; J. Groleau, L. Calhoun, A. Cann, & G. Tedeschi, 2013; K. N. Triplett, R. G. Tedeschi, A. Cann, L. G. Calhoun, & C. L. Reeve, 2012). The current study examined an integrated model of predictors of distress and perceived growth in 194 college undergraduates. Domains covered included the roles of core belief challenge, event centrality, posttrauma cognitions, and event-related rumination. Negative cognitions about the self and the centrality of the event directly predicted both growth and distress, although intrusive rumination predicted only posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and deliberate rumination predicted only posttraumatic growth. Future research should continue to examine the shared and unique predictors of postevent growth and distress. PMID:26011515

  5. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children: Suggested Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews literature-based techniques of intervention with posttraumatic stress disorder in children, including such techniques as crisis intervention, in vitro flooding, communication training, physical mastery, perspective taking, elimination of self-blame, and self-calming. (JDD)

  6. Update on the management of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Duncan; Cooper, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs in people exposed to life-threatening trauma. GPs may be seeing more patients with post-traumatic stress disorder as military personnel return from overseas deployments. The condition can present in various ways. To reduce the likelihood of missed or delayed diagnosis GPs can screen at-risk populations. A comprehensive assessment is recommended. Specialist referral may be required, particularly if there are other mental health problems. Trauma-focused psychological therapies should be offered as the first line of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. Usually 8–12 sessions are needed for a therapeutic effect. If drug treatment is needed, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first line. Other drugs used in post-traumatic stress disorder include antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and prazosin. PMID:26648617

  7. Comparison of the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Shan, Jian-Lin; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Li, Fang; Guan, Kai; Sun, Tian-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few studies comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Of 96 patients with lumbar degenerative disease included in this retrospectively analysis, 46 were treated with the Dynesys system and 50 underwent PLIF from July 2008 to March 2011. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated. We also evaluated the occurrence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Results The mean follow-up time in the Dynesys group was 53.6 ± 5.3 months, while that in the PLIF group was 55.2 ± 6.8 months. At the final follow-up, the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale score were significantly improved in both groups. The range of motion (ROM) of stabilized segments in Dynesys group decreased from 7.1 ± 2.2° to 4.9 ± 2.2° (P < 0.05), while that of in PLIF group decreased from 7.3 ± 2.3° to 0° (P < 0.05). The ROM of the upper segments increased significantly in both groups at the final follow-up, the ROM was higher in the PLIF group. There were significantly more radiographic ASDs in the PLIF group than in the Dynesys group. The incidence of complications was comparable between groups. Conclusions Both Dynesys and PLIF can improve the clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to PLIF, Dynesys stabilization partially preserves the ROM of the stabilized segments, limits hypermobility in the upper adjacent segment, and may prevent the occurrence of ASD. PMID:26824851

  8. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, D; Collier, A C; Lukehart, S A; Kith, P; Goldstein, E; Hooton, T M

    1996-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis, we evaluated 65 patients, 36 prospectively and 29 retrospectively, in a primary care clinic. Information was collected on history of treponemal infections, neurologic symptoms and signs, and total protein concentration, leukocyte count, and the VDRL test in the cerebrospinal fluid. Neurologic symptoms were reported by all patients for whom data were available. Abnormal neurologic signs were found or noted in medical records in 15 (42%) prospectively evaluated patients and 9 (64%) of 14 retrospectively evaluated patients for whom data were available. No patient had evidence of congenital or non-neurologic sequelae such as cutaneous or cardiovascular manifestations of syphilis. No patient had a positive cerebrospinal fluid VDRL test, 1 had more than 5 x 10(6) leukocytes per liter (5 leukocytes per mm3), and 6 (9%) had elevated total protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Previous therapy for syphilis was not associated with lower serum VDRL reactions, neurologic symptoms and signs, or cerebrospinal fluid findings. In the absence of other indications, routine examination of the cerebrospinal fluid in seropositive Southeast Asian refugees who have nonspecific neurologic symptoms has a low yield, perhaps because of the high prevalence of yaws in this population, and may not be warranted. PMID:8993199

  9. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Rocha, Ivan Diasda; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes). Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138). The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups. PMID:27276397

  10. Predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth has gained growing attention in the recent years. Although a number of predictors for PTSD following childbirth have been identified (e.g., history of sexual trauma, emergency caesarean section, low social support), only very few studies have tested predictors derived from current theoretical models of the disorder. This study first aimed to replicate the association of PTSD symptoms after childbirth with predictors identified in earlier research. Second, cognitive predictors derived from Ehlers and Clark’s (2000) model of PTSD were examined. Methods N = 224 women who had recently given birth completed an online survey. In addition to computing single correlations between PTSD symptom severities and variables of interest, in a hierarchical multiple regression analyses posttraumatic stress symptoms were predicted by (1) prenatal variables, (2) birth-related variables, (3) postnatal social support, and (4) cognitive variables. Results Wellbeing during pregnancy and age were the only prenatal variables contributing significantly to the explanation of PTSD symptoms in the first step of the regression analysis. In the second step, the birth-related variables peritraumatic emotions and wellbeing during childbed significantly increased the explanation of variance. Despite showing significant bivariate correlations, social support entered in the third step did not predict PTSD symptom severities over and above the variables included in the first two steps. However, with the exception of peritraumatic dissociation all cognitive variables emerged as powerful predictors and increased the amount of variance explained from 43% to a total amount of 68%. Conclusions The findings suggest that the prediction of PTSD following childbirth can be improved by focusing on variables derived from a current theoretical model of the disorder. PMID:25026966

  11. Outcome of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, BS Narayana; Kumar, J Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis is still a gold standard salvage procedure for the management of ankle arthritis. There are several functional and mechanical benefits of ankle arthrodesis, which make it a viable surgical procedure in the management of ankle arthritis. The functional outcomes following ankle arthrodesis are not very well known. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical and radiographic evaluation of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis performed using Charnley's compression device. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2009 a functional assessment of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females) who had undergone ankle arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis and/or avascular necrosis (AVN) talus (n=6), malunited bimalleolar fracture (n=4), distal tibial plafond fractures (n=3), medial malleoli nonunion (n=2). All the patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after an average followup of 2 years 8 months (range 1–5.7 years). Results: All patients had sound ankylosis and no complications related to the surgery. Scoring the patients with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot scale, we found that 11 of the 15 had excellent results, two had good, and two showed fair results. They were all returned to their preinjury activities. Conclusion: We conclude that, the ankle arthrodesis can still be considered as a standard procedure in ankle arthritis. On the basis of these results, patients should be counseled that an ankle fusion will help to relieve pain and to improve overall function. Still, one should keep in mind that it is a salvage procedure that will cause persistent alterations in gait with a potential for deterioration due to the development of subtalar arthritis. PMID:22719119

  12. Acute posttraumatic stress: nonacceptance of early intervention.

    PubMed

    Weisaeth, L

    2001-01-01

    Psychological resistance may be of considerable importance in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) population, considering that researchers in the field of traumatic stress are frequently unsuccessful in achieving high response rates, that many subjects suffering from PTSD never seek help, and that dropouts from therapy are frequent. This article presents data on the main complaints reported in the acute aftermath of an industrial disaster by 246 employees who had been exposed to the disaster. The dominant concerns were symptomatic complaints related to posttraumatic stress reactions rather than external problems. Sleep disturbance, anxiety/fear responses, and physical symptoms were reported by individuals with complaints in the acute phase as most problematic, while irritability and depressive symptoms appeared very infrequently among the reported main complaints. A high specificity and sensitivity were achieved in predicting later PTSD (as defined by DSM-III criteria) by applying early response variables: thus, there were few false-positives and false-negatives. There was a considerable overlap between the PTSD predictors and the main symptom complaints. From a prevention point of view, this should be advantageous, since it would bring the right people to seek help. However, in a significant proportion of the acutely distressed, the reluctance to seek help was motivated by the very symptoms that predicted PTSD. Even a relatively high rate of subjects agreeing to be screened (82.8%) would have lost 42% of those who qualified for a diagnosis of PTSD, and more than half of the subjects with severe outcomes would not have been included. For primary and secondary prevention, the findings suggest that early screening and outreach should be very active. PMID:11495094

  13. Lumbar extension exercises in conjunction with mechanical traction for the management of a patient with a lumbar herniated disc.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Allison R; Hasson, Scott M

    2010-05-01

    Low back pain resulting from lumbar disc herniation is a common reason for referral for physical therapy. There is no evidence to support the management of lumbar disc herniation and derangement using mechanical traction combined with lumbar extension exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this case report was to describe and discuss the use of mechanical traction in conjunction with lumbar extension exercises for a patient with a lumbar herniated disc. The patient was a 49-year-old male referred to physical therapy with a medical diagnosis of a lumbar herniated disc at L5-S1 with compression of the L5 nerve root confirmed by MRI. The patient's chief complaint was pain over the left lumbosacral and central lumbar region with radiating pain into the left buttock accompanied by numbness and tingling in the left lower leg and foot. The patient was seen for a total of 14 visits. The first 5 days (2 weeks) of therapy consisted of lumbar extension exercises. For the following nine visits (over a 3-week period), mechanical traction was added as an adjunct to the extension exercises. Outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Back Pain Function Scale (BPFS), and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). Results from initial evaluation to discharge (Oswestry: 36% to 0%; BPFS: 33/60 to 57/60; NPRS: 7/10 to 0/10) demonstrated that the patient no longer experienced low back pain and improved in terms of functional status and pain-related disability. The patient no longer complained of numbness and tingling in the left lower extremity and the goals for the patient had been attained. The data from this case report suggests lumbar extension exercises in conjunction with mechanical traction facilitated the patient's improvement in pain and return to prior level of function. PMID:20397860

  14. Intradural lumbar disc herniation after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yasuaki; Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takefumi; Shimakawa, Tateaki; Sairyo, Koichi; Chikawa, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the authors with low-back pain (LBP) and right leg pain with a history of previously diagnosed lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at L4-5. He had undergone 2 percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomies (PELDs) for the herniation at another institution, and according to the surgical record of the second surgery, a dural tear occurred intraoperatively but was not repaired. Postoperative conservative treatments such as an epidural block and blood patch had not relieved his persistent LBP or right leg pain. Upon referral to the authors, MRI and myelography revealed an intradural LDH. The herniated mass was removed by durotomy, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed. His symptoms were partially improved after surgery. Primary suture is technically difficult when a dural tear occurs during PELD. Therefore, close attention should be paid to avoiding such tears, and surgeons should increase their awareness of intradural LDH as a possible postoperative complication of PELD. PMID:26068274

  15. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disorders: Mini-open TLIF and Corrective TLIF

    PubMed Central

    HARA, Masahito; NISHIMURA, Yusuke; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; UMEBAYASHI, Daisuke; TAKEMOTO, Masaya; YAMAMOTO, Yuu; HAIMOTO, Shoichi

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) as a short fusion is widely accepted among the spine surgeons. However in the long fusion for degenerative kyphoscoliosis, corrective spinal fixation by an open method is thought to be frequently selected. Our objective is to study whether the mini-open TLIF and corrective TLIF contribute to the improvement of the spinal segmental and global alignment. We divided the patients who performed lumbar fixation surgery into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of mini-open TLIF procedures without complication. Group 2 (G2) consisted of corrective TLIF without complication. Group 3 (G3) consisted of corrective TLIF with instrumentation-related complication postoperatively. In all groups, the lumbar lordosis (LL) highly correlated with developing surgical complications. LL significantly changed postoperatively in all groups, but was not corrected in the normal range in G3. There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and postoperative LL and mean difference between the pelvic incidence (PI) and LL between G3 and other groups. The most important thing not to cause the instrumentation-related failure is proper correction of the sagittal balance. In the cases with minimal sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, short fusion by mini-open TLIF or long fusion by corrective TLIF contributes to good clinical results if the lesion is short or easily correctable. However, if the patients have apparent sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, we should perform proper correction of the sagittal spinal alignment introducing various technologies. PMID:26119895

  16. EMDR for post-traumatic stress and other psychological trauma.

    PubMed

    Norgate, Kath

    Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) is a powerful psychotherapy with well-researched benefits for adults and children who are experiencing post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is a wealth of research and practice-based evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of EMDR in many differing clinical presentations but the true potential of this extraordinarily beneficial therapeutic approach has not been fully embraced by the mental health nursing profession. PMID:23243806

  17. Posttraumatic Cholesteatoma Complicated by a Facial Paralysis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chihani, M.; Aljalil, A.; Touati, M.; Bouaity, B.; Ammar, H.

    2012-01-01

    The posttraumatic cholesteatoma is a rare complication of different types of the temporal bone damage. Its diagnosis is often done after several years of evolution, sometimes even at the stage of complications. A case of posttraumatic cholesteatoma is presented that was revealed by a facial nerve paralysis 23 years after a crash of the external auditory canal underlining the importance of the otoscopic and radiological regular monitoring of the patients with a traumatism of the temporal bone. PMID:22953104

  18. Fat graft-assisted internal auditory canal closure after retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma: Technique for prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tareq; Mendelson, Zachary S; Wong, Anni; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2016-02-01

    The retrosigmoid transmeatal approach remains an important strategy in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas. Gross total resection of acoustic neuromas requires removal of tumor within the cerebellopontine angle as well as tumor involving the internal auditory canal (IAC). Drilling into the petrous bone of the IAC can expose petrous air cells, which can potentially result in a fistulous tract to the nasopharynx manifesting as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. We describe our method of IAC closure using autologous fat graft and assessed the rates of postoperative CSF leakage. We performed a retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients who underwent retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma who underwent our method of fat graft-assisted IAC closure. We assessed rates of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, and occurrence of meningitis. Twenty-four patients (10 males, 14 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range 18-84) underwent fat graft-assisted IAC closure. No lumbar drains were used postoperatively. There were no instances of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, or occurrence of meningitis. There were no graft site complications. Our results demonstrate that autologous fat grafts provide a safe and effective method of IAC defect closure to prevent postoperative CSF leakage after acoustic tumor removal via a retrosigmoid transmeatal approach. The surgical technique and operative nuances are described. PMID:26482457

  19. Alzheimer Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers Moderate Baseline Differences and Predict Longitudinal Change in Attentional Control and Episodic Memory Composites in the Adult Children Study

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Balota, David A.; Fagan, Anne M.; Duchek, Janet M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Morris, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cognitive measures that are sensitive to biological markers of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology are needed in order to (a) facilitate preclinical staging, (b) identify individuals who are at the highest risk for developing clinical symptoms and (c) serve as endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of interventions. The present study assesses the utility of two cognitive composite scores of attentional control and episodic memory as markers for preclinical AD pathology in a group of cognitively normal older adults (N = 238), as part of the Adult Children Study. Method All participants were given a baseline cognitive assessment and follow-up assessments every 3 years over an 8-year period, as well as a lumbar puncture within two years of the initial assessment to collect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a PET-PIB scan for amyloid imaging. Results Results indicated that attentional control was correlated with levels of Aβ42 at the initial assessment whereas episodic memory was not. Longitudinally, individuals with high CSF tau exhibited a decline in both attention and episodic memory over the course of the study. Conclusion These results indicate that measures of attentional control and episodic memory can be utilized to evaluate cognitive decline in preclinical AD and provide support that CSF tau may be a key mechanism driving longitudinal cognitive change. PMID:26416094

  20. Postoperative cerebrospinal-fluid fistula associated with erosion of the dura. Findings after anterior resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Smith, M D; Bolesta, M J; Leventhal, M; Bohlman, H H

    1992-02-01

    Of twenty-two patients who had had anterior decompression of the spinal canal for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and cervical myelopathy, seven had absence of the dura adjacent to the ossified part of the ligament. The spinal cord and nerve-roots were visible through this defect. Although the arachnoid membrane appeared to be intact and watertight in most patients, a cerebrospinal-fluid fistula developed postoperatively in five, and three had a second operation to repair the defect in the dura. On the basis of this experience, we recommend use of autogenous muscle or fascial dural patches, immediate lumbar subarachnoid shunting, and modification of the usual postoperative regimen, such as limitation of mechanical pulmonary ventilation to the shortest time that is safely possible and use of anti-emetic and antitussive medications to protect the remaining coverings of the spinal cord when the dura is found to be absent adjacent to an ossified portion of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine. PMID:1541620

  1. Serum pharmacokinetics and cerebrospinal fluid concentration analysis of the new IgG4 monoclonal antibody GNbAC1 to treat multiple sclerosis: A Phase 1 study.

    PubMed

    Curtin, François; Vidal, Virginie; Bernard, Corinne; Kromminga, Arno; Lang, Alois B; Porchet, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    GNbAC1 is a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody antagonist of Mulitple Sclerosis Retrovirus Envelope (MSRV-Env), a protein that could play a critical role in multiple sclerosis. This randomized placebo-controlled dose-escalation study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of GNbAC1 in 21 healthy volunteers after single intravenous infusion at doses of 6, 18 and 36 mg/kg. Lumbar punctures were performed at days 2, 15 or 29 to measure GNbAC1 concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). GNbAC1 was well tolerated. Serum data show a dose-linear pharmacokinetics. A mean CSF/serum ratio of 0.12% was observed at Day 2, increasing to 0.39% at Day 15 and 0.42% at Day 29. Linear regression analysis shows a relationship between GNbAC1 CSF/serum ratio and albumin CSF/serum ratio and a relationship at the limit of statistical significance with the timing of CSF sampling. PMID:27030142

  2. Prospective Study of Use of PCR Amplification and Sequencing of 16S Ribosomal DNA from Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, Tim; de Boer, Richard F.; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M. D.; van Zwet, Anton A.

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the use of a broad-range PCR aimed at the 16S rRNA gene in detecting bacterial meningitis in a clinical setting. To achieve a uniform DNA extraction procedure for both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, a combination of physical disruption (bead beating) and a silica-guanidiniumthiocyanate procedure was used for nucleic acid preparation. To diminish the risk of contamination as much as possible, we chose to amplify almost the entire 16S rRNA gene. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was approximately 1 × 102 to 2 × 102 CFU/ml of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. In a prospective study of 227 CSF samples, broad-range PCR proved to be superior to conventional methods in detecting bacterial meningitis when antimicrobial therapy had already started. Overall, our assay showed a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 80%, and a negative predictive value of 98% compared to culture. We are currently adapting the standard procedures in our laboratory for detecting bacterial meningitis; broad-range 16S ribosomal DNA PCR detection is indicated when antimicrobial therapy has already started at time of lumbar puncture or when cultures remain negative, although the suspicion of bacterial meningitis remains. PMID:14766845

  3. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency: Masked multimodal imaging assessment

    PubMed Central

    Brod, Staley A.; Kramer, Larry A.; Cohen, Alan M.; Barreto, Andrew D.; Bui, Thanh-Tung; Jemelka, James R.; Ton, Kelly; Lindsey, John W.; Nelson, Flavia; Narayana, Ponnada A.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) was implicated in the pathophysiology of MS. Objective We evaluated neurosonography (NS), magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and transluminal venography (TLV) in subsets of MS patients drawn from a single center, prospective case-control study of 206 MS and 70 non-MS volunteers. Methods As previously reported, findings on high resolution B-mode NS imaging with color and spectral Doppler of the extracranial and intracranial venous drainage consistent with CCSVI were similar among MS and non-MS volunteers (3.88% vrs. 7.14%; p=0.266). Ninety-nine MS participants consented to intravascular contrast enhanced 3D MRV to assess their major systemic and intracranial venous circulation, and 40 advanced to TLV that included pressure measurements of the superior vena cava, internal jugular, brachiocephalic, and azygous veins. Results NS findings and MRV patterns were discrepant for 26/98 evaluable subjects, including four with abnormal findings on NS that had normal venous anatomy by MRV. In no instance were TLV pressure gradients indicative of clinically significant functional stenosis encountered. The three imaging approaches provided generally consistent data with discrepancies referable to inherent technique properties. Conclusions Our findings lend no support for altered venous outflow dynamics as common among MS patients, or likely contribute to the disease process. PMID:23828872

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers mirror rate of cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Sindre; Berg, Anne Ingeborg; Bjerke, Maria; Johansson, Boo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wallin, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict future decline in cognitive systems using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers 42 amino acid form of amyloid-β (Aβ42) and total tau (T-tau) is not fully understood. In a clinical sample ranging from cognitively healthy to dementia (n = 326), linear regression models were performed in order to investigate the ability of CSF biomarkers to predict cognitive decline in all cognitive domains from baseline to 2-year follow-up. Gender, age, and years of education were included as covariates. In patients with subjective cognitive impairment, T-tau had a small impact on executive functions (r2 = 0.07). T-tau had a small to moderate influence (r2 = 0.06-0.11) on all cognitive functions with the exception of visuospatial functions in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In patients with dementia, the impact of T-tau was large (r2 = 0.29) on semantic memory. Aβ42 had a small effect (r2 = 0.07) on speed and executive functions in MCI. In patients with dementia, Aβ42 had a moderate influence (r2 = 0.13-0.24) on semantic and verbal working memory/fluency. Our results speak in favor of the notion that CSF biomarkers reflect the rate of cognitive decline across the continuum of cognitive impairment from healthy to dementia. CSF predicted subsequent decline in more cognitive domains among MCI cases, but the impact was most pronounced in patients with dementia. PMID:23313924

  5. Molecular biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Brit; Hecker, Michael; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young adults and leading to disability. Despite the progress in technology and intensive research work of the last years, diagnosing MS can still be challenging. A heterogenic and complex pathophysiology with various types of disease courses makes MS unique for each patient. There is an urgent need to identify markers facilitating rapid and accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessments with regard to optimal therapy for each MS patient. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an outstanding source of specific markers related to MS pathology. Molecules reflecting specific pathological processes, such as inflammation, cellular damage, and loss of blood-brain-barrier integrity, are detectable in CSF. Clinically used biomarkers of CSF are oligoclonal bands, IgG-index, measles-rubella-zoster-reaction, anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies, and antibodies against John Cunningham virus. Many other potential biomarkers have been proposed in recent years. In this review we examine the current scientific knowledge on CSF molecular markers that could guide diagnosis and discrimination of different MS forms, support treatment decisions, or be helpful in monitoring and predicting disease progression, therapy response, and complications such as opportunistic infections. PMID:26071103

  6. Catheter venography and endovascular treatment of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Mandato, Kenneth; Englander, Meridith; Keating, Lawrence; Vachon, Jason; Siskin, Gary P

    2012-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder characterized by damage to the myelin sheath insulation of nerve cells of the brain and spinal cord affecting nerve impulses which can lead to numerous physical and cognitive disabilities. The disease, which affects over 500,000 people in the United States alone, is widely believed to be an autoimmune condition potentially triggered by an antecedant event such as a viral infection, environmental factors, a genetic defect or a combination of each. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a condition characterized by abnormal venous drainage from the central nervous system that has been theorized to have a possible role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of MS (1). A significant amount of attention has been given to this theory as a possible explanation for the etiology of symptoms related to MS patients suffering from this disease. The work of Dr. Zamboni, et al, who reported that treating the venous stenoses causing CCSVI with angioplasty resulting in significant improvement in the symptoms and quality of life of patients with MS (2) has led to further interest in this theory and potential treatment. The article presented describes endovascular techniques employed to diagnose and treat patients with MS and CCSVI. PMID:22640501

  7. Phantom model of physiologic intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2012-06-01

    We describe herein a novel life-size phantom model of the intracranial cavity and its validation. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) domains including ventricular, cysternal, and subarachnoid spaces were derived via magnetic resonance imaging. Brain mechanical properties and cranio-spinal compliance were set based on published data. Both bulk and pulsatile physiologic CSF flow were modeled. Model validation was carried out by comparisons of flow and pressure measurements in the phantom with published in vivo data of healthy subjects. Physiologic intracranial pressure with 10 mmHg mean and 0.4 mmHg peak pulse amplitude was recorded in the ventricles. Peak CSF flow rates of 0.2 and 2 ml/s were measured in the cerebral aqueduct and subarachnoid space, respectively. The phantom constitutes a first-of-its-kind approach to modeling physiologic intracranial dynamics in vitro. Herein, we describe the phantom design and manufacturing, definition and implementation of its operating parameters, as well as the validation of the modeled dynamics. PMID:22333981

  8. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus. PMID:15825857

  9. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R.; Claridge, Tim D. W.; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R.; Turner, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The 1H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that 1H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  10. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R; Claridge, Tim D W; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R; Turner, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The (1)H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that (1)H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  11. Postoperative Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Associated With Total En Bloc Spondylectomy.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Igarashi, Takashi; Fang, Xiang; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a serious postoperative complication associated with total en bloc spondylectomy. The authors examined the risk factors for CSF leakage after this procedure. A total of 72 patients underwent total en bloc spondylectomy at the authors' institution between May 2010 and April 2013. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in 17 of the 72 patients (23.6%). The results of univariate analysis suggested that age 54 years or older, preoperative surgical site irradiation, resection of 3 or more vertebral bodies, and dural injury were significant risk factors for postoperative CSF leakage after total en bloc spondylectomy. Multivariate analysis showed that preoperative surgical site irradiation was the only significant risk factor for postoperative CSF leakage (adjusted odds ratio, 5.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-26.45, P=.046). The authors also assessed the course of treatment for postoperative CSF leakage in each patient. Of 17 patients with postoperative CSF leakage, 13 recovered without further complications, but 4 required reoperation (2 for wound dehiscence, 1 for surgical site infection, and 1 for severe intracranial hypotension). All 4 patients who required reoperation had a history of surgical site irradiation. Thus, this study suggests that careful consideration should be given to postoperative CSF leakage in patients with a history of surgical site irradiation. These findings may contribute to the management of postoperative CSF leakage associated with total en bloc spondylectomy and supplement the information given to the patient in the process of obtaining informed consent. PMID:26186316

  12. Short-term stability of Borrelia garinii in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Berenová, Dagmar; Krsek, Daniel; Šípková, Lenka; Lukavská, Alena; Malý, Marek; Kurzová, Zuzana; Hořejší, Jan; Kodym, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the optimal conditions for short-term storage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples for direct diagnosis of Lyme disease. A mixture of Borrelia-negative CSFs spiked with a defined amount of cultured Borrelia garinii was used. Borrelia stability was investigated over 7 days at four different temperatures [room temperature (RT), +4, -20 and -70 °C]. Quantitative changes in CSF Borrelia were measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and morphological changes in the spirochetes were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These qPCR results were statistically evaluated. We found +4 °C to be an optimal temperature for short-term storage of CSF samples intended for TEM observation. There was no significant difference between the temperatures tested in the average quantity of Borrelia measured by qPCR. On the contrary, electron optical diagnosis of frozen samples and samples stored at RT showed destructive morphological changes and decreased spirochete counts. Our results show that optimal conditions for the pre-analytical phase of investigation of one type of material can differ depending on the diagnostic method employed. PMID:26104540

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid folate and cobalamin levels in febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Osifo, B O; Lukanmbi, F A; Familusi, J B

    1985-05-01

    Folate and cobalamin parameters were studied in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 40 febrile paediatric patients. Eighteen of these children were in a state of febrile convulsion while the remaining 22 were non-convulsing. The serum folate concentration of all the patients was higher than that of the control group but the highest value was found in the convulsing children. There was no significant difference in the CSF folate levels between the two groups of patients. The serum cobalamin levels of the patients were significantly lower than those of the control children and the lowest mean was observed in the convulsing state. On the other hand, there was no difference in the CSF cobalamin between the convulsing and non-convulsing children. These results confirm that there is an effective blood-brain barrier system for folate even when serum folate levels are higher than normal. There is also a definite decrease in serum cobalamin during pyrexia but this decrease is more apparent in the convulsing state. The role of cobalamin metabolism in convulsion is not clear. PMID:4009203

  15. A potential endophenotype for Alzheimer's disease: cerebrospinal fluid clusterin.

    PubMed

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Holmans, Peter; Bertelsen, Sarah; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have associated clusterin (CLU) variants with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of CLU on AD pathogenesis is not totally understood. We used cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma CLU levels as endophenotypes for genetic studies to understand the role of CLU in AD. CSF, but not plasma, CLU levels were significantly associated with AD status and CSF tau/amyloid-beta ratio, and highly correlated with CSF apolipoprotein E (APOE) levels. Several loci showed almost genome-wide significant associations including LINC00917 (p = 3.98 × 10(-7)) and interleukin 6 (IL6, p = 9.94 × 10(-6), in the entire data set and in the APOE ε4- individuals p = 7.40 × 10(-8)). Gene ontology analyses suggest that CSF CLU levels may be associated with wound healing and immune response which supports previous functional studies that demonstrated an association between CLU and IL6. CLU may play a role in AD by influencing immune system changes that have been observed in AD or by disrupting healing after neurodegeneration. PMID:26545630

  16. Cysticercus Antigens in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples from Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Alessandra Xavier; Vaz, Adelaide José; Machado, Luis Dos Ramos; Livramento, José Antônio

    2001-01-01

    Antigens were detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with neurocysticercosis (NC) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using polyclonal sera of rabbit anti-Taenia solium cysticerci (anti-Tso) and anti- Taenia crassiceps cysticerci vesicular fluid (anti-Tcra or anti-Tcra <30 kDa). A group of NC patients (n = 174) were studied (NC), including 40 patients in different phases of the disease. ELISAs carried out with the anti-Tso, anti-Tcra, and anti-Tcra <30 kDa showed sensitivities of 81.2, 90, and 95.8% and specificities of 82, 98, and 100%, respectively. The 14- and 18-kDa low-molecular-weight peptides were only detected in CSF samples from patients with NC by immunoblotting with anti-Tso and anti-Tcra sera. Because of the importance of the diagnosis and prognosis of cysticercosis, the detection of antigens may contribute as an additional marker to the study and clarification of the parasite-host relationship. PMID:11526181

  17. Increased Ventricular Cerebrospinal Fluid Lactate in Depressed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Kailyn A. L.; Mao, Xiangling; Case, Julia A. C.; Kang, Guoxin; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Gabbay, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction has been increasingly examined as a potential pathogenic event in psychiatric disorders, although its role early in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction in medication-free adolescents with MDD through in vivo measurements of neurometabolites using high-spatial resolution multislice/multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with MDD and 29 healthy controls, ages 12–20, were scanned at 3T and concentrations of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid lactate, as well as N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), and total choline (tCho) in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and thalamus were reported. Results Adolescents with MDD exhibited increased ventricular lactate compared to healthy controls [F(1, 41) = 6.98, p = .01]. However, there were no group differences in the other neurometabolites. Dimensional analyses in the depressed group showed no relation between any of the neurometabolites and symptomatology, including anhedonia and fatigue. Conclusions Increased ventricular lactate in depressed adolescents suggests mitochondrial dysfunction may be present early in the course of MDD; however it is still not known whether the presence of mitochondrial dysfunction is a trait vulnerability of individuals predisposed to psychopathology or a state feature of the disorder. Therefore, there is a need for larger multimodal studies to clarify these chemical findings in the context of network function. PMID:26802978

  18. Endoscopic Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: The Charing Cross Experience

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Elmiyeh, Behrad; Saleh, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe our experience of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea management. Design Retrospective. Setting Charing Cross Hospital, London, a tertiary referral center. Participants Fifty-four patients with CSF rhinorrhea managed from 2003 to 2011. Main outcome measures Surgical technique; Recurrence. Results Etiologically, 36 were spontaneous and 18 traumatic. Eight patients with spontaneous and two with traumatic leaks had previous failed repairs in other units. Success rates after first and second surgery were 93% and 100%, respectively. Mean follow-up was 21 months. Four patients, all of spontaneous etiology, had recurrences; three of these underwent successful second repair with three layered technique, and the fourth had complete cessation of the leak after gastric bypass surgery and subsequent weight reduction. Adaptation of anatomic three-layered repair since then averted any further failure in the following 7 years. Mean body mass index was 34.0 kg/m2 in spontaneous and 27.8 kg/m2 in traumatic cases (p < 0.05). Fifty percent of spontaneous leaks were from the cribriform plate, 22% sphenoid, 14% ethmoid, and 14% frontal sinus. In the traumatic CSF leak group: 33.3% were from the cribriform plate, 33.3% sphenoid, 22.2% ethmoid, and 11.1% frontal. Conclusion Endoscopic CSF fistula closure is a safe and effective operation. All sites of leak can be accessed endoscopically. We recommend the use of an anatomic three-layered closure in difficult cases. PMID:24436890

  19. Simulating transitional hydrodynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid at extreme scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kartik; Roller, Sabine; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    Chiari malformation type I is a disorder characterized by the herniation of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum resulting in obstruction to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow. The flow of pulsating bidirectional CSF is of acutely complex nature due to the anatomy of the conduit containing it - the subarachnoid space. We report lattice Boltzmann method based direct numerical simulations on patient specific cases with spatial resolution of 24 μm amounting meshes of up to 2 billion cells conducted on 50000 cores of the Hazelhen supercomputer in Stuttgart. The goal is to characterize intricate dynamics of the CSF at resolutions that are of the order of Kolmogorov microscales. Results unfold velocity fluctuations up to ~ 10 KHz , turbulent kinetic energy ~ 2 times of the mean flow energy in Chiari patients whereas the flow remains laminar in a control subject. The fluctuations confine near the cranio-vertebral junction and are commensurate with the extremeness of pathology and the extent of herniation. The results advocate that the manifestation of pathological conditions like Chiari malformation may lead to transitional hydrodynamics of the CSF, and a prudent calibration of numerical approach is necessary to avoid overlook of such phenomena.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B.; Monteith, Rachael; Perry, Elaine K.

    2010-01-01

    More than 750,000 of the UK population suffer from some form of cognitive impairment and dementia. Of these, 5–20% will have Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Clinico-pathological studies have shown that it is the low frequency of DLB clinical core features that makes the DLB diagnosis hardly recognisable during life, and easily misdiagnosed for other forms of dementia. This has an impact on the treatment and long-term care of the affected subjects. Having a biochemical test, based on quantification of a specific DLB biomarker within Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) could be an effective diagnostic method to improve the differential diagnosis. Although some of the investigated DLB CSF biomarkers are well within the clinical criteria for sensitivity and specificity (>90%), they all seem to be confounded by the contradictory data for each of the major groups of biomarkers (α-synuclein, tau and amyloid proteins). However, a combination of CSF measures appear to emerge, that may well be able to differentiate DLB from other dementias: α-synuclein reduction in early DLB, a correlation between CSF α-synuclein and Aβ42 measures (characteristic for DLB only), and t-tau and p-tau181 profile (differentiating AD from DLB). PMID:21048932

  1. Metagenomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Perlejewski, Karol; Bukowska-Ośko, Iwona; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Stokowy, Tomasz; Płoski, Rafał; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Podlecka-Piętowska, Aleksandra; Nojszewska, Monika; Gogol, Anna; Caraballo Cortés, Kamila; Demkow, Urszula; Stępień, Adam; Laskus, Tomasz; Radkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of central nervous system of unknown etiology. However, some infectious agents have been suggested to play a significant role in its pathogenesis. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and metagenomics can be employed to characterize microbiome of MS patients and to identify potential causative pathogens. In this study, 12 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorders (IIDD) of the central nervous system were studied: one patient had clinically isolated syndrome, one patient had recurrent optic neuritis, and ten patients had multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, there was one patient with other non-inflammatory neurological disease. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from all patients. RNA was extracted from CSF and subjected to a single-primer isothermal amplification followed by NGS and comprehensive data analysis. Altogether 441,608,474 reads were obtained and mapped using blastn. In a CSF sample from the patient with clinically isolated syndrome, 11 varicella-zoster virus reads were found. Other than that similar bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and protozoan reads were identified in all samples, indicating a common presence of contamination in metagenomics. In conclusion, we identified varicella zoster virus sequences in one out of the 12 patients with IIDD, which suggests that this virus could be occasionally related to the MS pathogenesis. A widespread bacterial contamination seems inherent to NGS and complicates the interpretation of results. PMID:27311319

  2. Visualization of the cerebrospinal fluid drainage into the Galen's vein.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, P H; Gotow, T; Ichimura, T; Nakatani, T; Takasu, N; Kodaka, R; Sumitani, S; Fukuda, T

    1985-04-01

    Arachnoid granulations are not always present in lower mammals and primate newborns. In order to visualize the route for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to drain into the venous system, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the lateral ventricle or cisterna cerebellomedullaris of the mouse and rat. From 30 to 60 min after the commencing of a slow infusion for 15-30 min of 0.05-0.1 ml solution containing 10-20 mg HRP, the mouse, whose skull had been exposed, was dropped into cold acetone at dry ice temperature; other animals were fixed by perfusion with aldehyde solution. The frozen head was dissected in a cryostat kept at -18 degrees C to remove the skull, but leave the dura mater and the falx cerebri. The brain with meninges was cut into 30-45 microns sagittal sections in the cryostat, and processed for peroxidase reaction. The perfusion-fixed brains were used for scanning electron microscopy and for electron microscope observation of the tracer. The reaction product was found within fenestrated venous capillaries of the choroid plexus. The route for the HRP in the CSF to drain into the sinus rectus via the vena choroidea and vena cerebri magna was directly visualized in the mouse. PMID:4038002

  3. Head movement, an important contributor to human cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiang; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Chi, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cong; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lin, Xiang-Tao; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via the myodural bridges (MDBs). Recently, it was suggested that they might work as a pump to provide power for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the suboccipital muscles contractions on the CSF flow. Forty healthy adult volunteers were subjected to cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Each volunteer was scanned twice, once before and once after one-minute-head-rotation period. CSF flow waveform parameters at craniocervical junction were analyzed. The results showed that, after the head rotations, the maximum and average CSF flow rates during ventricular diastole were significantly increased, and the CSF stroke volumes during diastole and during entire cardiac cycle were significantly increased. This suggested that the CSF flow was significantly promoted by head movements. Among the muscles related with head movements, only three suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via MDBs. It was believed that MDBs might transform powers of the muscles to CSF. The present results suggested that the head movements served as an important contributor to CSF dynamics and the MDBs might be involved in this mechanism. PMID:27538827

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Brouillette, Ashley M.; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  6. Vitamin B6 in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Children

    PubMed Central

    Albersen, Monique; Bosma, Marjolein; Jans, Judith J. M.; Hofstede, Floris C.; van Hasselt, Peter M.; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G. M.; Visser, Gepke; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce. Materials and Methods B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For ethical reasons, CSF samples could not be obtained from healthy children. The influence of sex, age, epilepsy and treatment with anti-epileptic drugs, were investigated. Results The B6 vitamer composition of plasma (pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxal (PL)) differed from that of CSF (PL > PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxamine). Strong correlations were found for B6 vitamers in and between plasma and CSF. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs resulted in decreased concentrations of PL and PLP in CSF. Conclusion We provide concentrations of all B6 vitamers in plasma and CSF of children with intellectual disability (±epilepsy), which can be used in the investigation of known and novel disorders associated with vitamin B6 metabolism as well as in monitoring of the biochemical effects of treatment with vitamin B6. PMID:25760040

  7. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  8. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  9. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control

    PubMed Central

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M. Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M. F.; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called “embryonic CSF.” Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  10. [Cerebrospinal fluid markers in early diagnosis of Alzheimer dementia].

    PubMed

    Wiltfang, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics (CSF-NDD) is meanwhile validated on S3 evidence level and international dementia guidelines like those of the German neuropsychiatric associations (DGPPN, DGN; http://www.DGPPN.de) recommend CSF-NDD for the improved early and differential diagnostics of multigenetic (sporadic) Alzheimer's Dementia (AD). CSF-NDD does also offer a predictive diagnosis of incipient AD for high-risk patients when they are still within the prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). But since currently no (secondary) preventive therapy of AD is available, the use of CSF-NDD for the predictive molecular diagnosis of AD is not recommended by the latter guidelines. However, molecular diagnostics of preclinical AD by CSF-NDD and/or [18F]Amyloid-PET has meanwhile gained high clinical relevance for therapeutic clinical research, as this novel clinical model allows to systematically screen for promising (secondary) preventive therapy options. Moreover, future blood based neurochemical diagnostics of preclinical or early AD by means of multiplex assays seems to be promising. However, so far blood assays were not consistently validated by independent research groups and in contrast to CSF-NDD a blood-based diagnosis of AD is not yet available. PMID:25791051

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  12. [Lumbar disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2014-12-10

    A lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a condition frequently encountered in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of one or more nerve roots, which can lead to a nerve root irritation, a so-called radiculopathy, with or without a sensorimotor deficit. The majority of LDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment consisting of physical therapy, ergotherapy, analgetics, anti-inflammatory therapy or corticosteroids, which may be eventually administered by infiltrations. If a clinico-radiological correlation is present and moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during four to six months, surgery is then recommended. PMID:25632633

  13. An unexpectedly progressed lumbar herniated disk.

    PubMed

    Lipton, James A; McLeod, Geoffrey A

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe a case of a 26-year-old female military veteran who presented with low back pain that she attributed to a recent foot injury. The patient reported a history of lumbar pain while in the military that had been treated successfully with high-velocity, low-amplitude osteopathic manipulative treatment. The patient's current pain was improved with osteopathic manipulative treatment and gait correction. Several weeks after her initial presentation, the patient reported that she had had a herniated disk diagnosed 2 years earlier by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Updated magnetic resonance imaging was performed, the results of which revealed a large herniated disk that had caused severe stenosis. The patient was immediately referred to a neurosurgeon for consultation and subsequently underwent surgical treatment. PMID:24285036

  14. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K.; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25 ± 0.8) and postoperative (3.1 ± 2.1) VAS scores (p < 0.0001). The ODI scale also demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from preoperative (56.3 ± 16.5) and postoperative (30.4 ± 19.3) scores (p < 0.0001). The SF-12 scores were significantly improved after ALIF salvage surgery: Physical Health Composite Score (32.18 ± 5.5 versus 41.07 ± 9.67, p = 0.0003) and Mental Health Composite Score (36.62 ± 12.25 versus 50.89 ± 10.86, p = 0.0001). Overall, 19 patients (95%) achieved successful fusion. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that the ALIF procedure results not only in radiographic improvements in bony fusion but in significant improvements in the patient's physical and mental experience of pain secondary to lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  15. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K; Rao, Prashanth J

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25 ± 0.8) and postoperative (3.1 ± 2.1) VAS scores (p < 0.0001). The ODI scale also demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from preoperative (56.3 ± 16.5) and postoperative (30.4 ± 19.3) scores (p < 0.0001). The SF-12 scores were significantly improved after ALIF salvage surgery: Physical Health Composite Score (32.18 ± 5.5 versus 41.07 ± 9.67, p = 0.0003) and Mental Health Composite Score (36.62 ± 12.25 versus 50.89 ± 10.86, p = 0.0001). Overall, 19 patients (95%) achieved successful fusion. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that the ALIF procedure results not only in radiographic improvements in bony fusion but in significant improvements in the patient's physical and mental experience of pain secondary to lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  16. Spinous Process Osteochondroma as a Rare Cause of Lumbar Pain.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Bárbara; Campos, Pedro; Barros, André; Karmali, Samir; Ussene, Esperança; Durão, Carlos; Alves da Silva, João; Coutinho, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 5th Lumbar Vertebra (L5) spinous process osteochondroma as a rare cause of lumbar pain in an old patient. A 70-year-old male presented with progressive and disabling lower lumbar pain. Tenderness over the central and left paraspinal area of the lower lumbar region and a palpable mass were evident. CT scan showed a mass arising from the spinous process of L5. Marginal resection of the tumor was performed through a posterior approach. The histological study revealed an osteochondroma. After surgery, pain was completely relieved. After one year there was no evidence of local recurrence or symptoms. Osteochondromas rarely involve the spine, but when they do symptoms like pain, radiculopathy/myelopathy, or cosmetic deformity may occur. The imagiologic exam of election for diagnosis is CT scan. When symptomatic the treatment of choice is surgical resection. The most concerning complication of osteochondromas is malignant transformation, a rare event. PMID:27579204

  17. Spinous Process Osteochondroma as a Rare Cause of Lumbar Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bárbara; Campos, Pedro; Barros, André; Karmali, Samir; Ussene, Esperança; Alves da Silva, João; Coutinho, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 5th Lumbar Vertebra (L5) spinous process osteochondroma as a rare cause of lumbar pain in an old patient. A 70-year-old male presented with progressive and disabling lower lumbar pain. Tenderness over the central and left paraspinal area of the lower lumbar region and a palpable mass were evident. CT scan showed a mass arising from the spinous process of L5. Marginal resection of the tumor was performed through a posterior approach. The histological study revealed an osteochondroma. After surgery, pain was completely relieved. After one year there was no evidence of local recurrence or symptoms. Osteochondromas rarely involve the spine, but when they do symptoms like pain, radiculopathy/myelopathy, or cosmetic deformity may occur. The imagiologic exam of election for diagnosis is CT scan. When symptomatic the treatment of choice is surgical resection. The most concerning complication of osteochondromas is malignant transformation, a rare event.

  18. Safety of CT-Guided Lumbar Nerve Root Infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Summary Selective nerve root infiltrations are frequently performed in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Computed tomography (CT) is now commonly used for image guidance. Despite the widespread use of CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations few studies have systematically examined the safety of this approach. In a two-year period, 231 lumbar nerve root infiltrations were performed on in-patients and were retrospectively reviewed. No major complications like inflammation (especially spondylodiscitis), large haematomas requiring surgery, severe allergic reactions or spinal ischaemia occurred. In accordance with other published studies, CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations seem to be safe. To minimize the risk of catastrophic neurological complications due to spinal ischaemia, careful needle placement dorsal to the nerve root and the use of a non-particulate corticosteroid, like dexamethasone, are advocated. PMID:25363255

  19. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression-the surgical learning curve.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choll W

    2016-08-01

    Commentary On: Ahn J, Iqbal A, Manning BT, Leblang S, Bohl DD, Mayo BC, et al. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression-the surgical learning curve. Spine J 2016:16:909-16. (in this issue). PMID:27545398

  20. Lumbar stabilization: core concepts and current literature, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Barr, Karen P; Griggs, Miriam; Cadby, Todd

    2005-06-01

    The factors that affect lumbar stability have been an area of extensive research. The clinical application of this research in the form of lumbar stabilization exercise programs has become a common treatment of low back pain and is also increasingly used by athletes to improve performance and by the general public for health and the prevention of injury. This article includes a review of the key concepts behind lumbar stabilization. The literature regarding how those with low back pain differ in their ability to stabilize the spine from those without low back pain is discussed, and an overview of current research that assesses the benefits of a lumbar stabilization program to treat low back pain is provided. PMID:15905663

  1. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis. PMID:26949473

  2. Intradural lumbar disc herniations: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Prestar, F J; Schattke, H H

    1995-09-01

    Intradural lumbar disc herniation is a rare pathological entity. Three new cases among a series of 5000 lumbar spine operations are added to the about 60 previous case reports in the literature. None of our patients had undergone lumbar spine surgery before. In one patient the location of the free disc fragment was medial within the dural sac; in two patients the free disc fragment had penetrated the dural sac from the axilla of the nerve root. Pathogenesis is discussed (congenital adhesions of the dura mater to the posterior longitudinal ligament at the lower lumbar spine; weakness of the dura mater ventrally and at the axilla of the nerve root). By multiplanar MRI, the free disc hernia within the dural sac may be shown preoperatively. PMID:8542333

  3. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin: relation to cognition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Skillbäck, Tobias; Törnqvist, Ulrika; Andreasson, Ulf; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Shaw, Leslie M; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic dysfunction is linked to cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, measurement of synapse proteins in cerebrospinal fluid may be useful biomarkers to monitor synaptic degeneration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of the postsynaptic protein neurogranin are increased in Alzheimer's disease, including in the predementia stage of the disease. Here, we tested the performance of cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin to predict cognitive decline and brain injury in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. An in-house immunoassay was used to analyse neurogranin in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a cohort of patients who at recruitment were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 95) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 173), as well as in cognitively normal subjects (n = 110). Patients with mild cognitive impairment were grouped into those that remained cognitively stable for at least 2 years (stable mild cognitive impairment) and those who progressed to Alzheimer's disease dementia during follow-up (progressive mild cognitive impairment). Correlations were tested between baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels and baseline and longitudinal cognitive impairment, brain atrophy and glucose metabolism within each diagnostic group. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.001), progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.001) and stable mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with controls, and in Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.01) and progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with stable mild cognitive impairment. In the mild cognitive impairment group, high baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels predicted cognitive decline as reflected by decreased Mini-Mental State Examination (P < 0.001) and increased Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (P < 0.001) scores at clinical follow-up. In addition, high baseline

  5. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Philip S.; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  6. Laparoscopic Repair of Left Lumbar Hernia After Laparoscopic Left Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Luca; Gumbs, Andrew; Turner, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar hernias, rarely seen in clinical practice, can be acquired after open or laparoscopic flank surgery. We describe a successful laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh repair of multiple trocar-site hernias after extraperitoneal nephrectomy. All the key steps including creating a peritoneal flap, reducing the hernia contents, and fixation of the mesh are described. A review of the literature on this infrequent operation is presented. Laparoscopic repair of lumbar hernias has all the advantages of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. PMID:21333197

  7. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  8. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and its imposters: three case studies

    PubMed Central

    Ammendolia, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis causing neurogenic claudicaton is a common condition impacting walking ability in older adults. There are other highly prevalent conditions in this patient population that have similar signs and symptoms and cause limited walking ability. The purpose of this study is to highlight the diagnostic challenges using three case studies of older adults who present with limited walking ability who have imaging evidence of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:25202160

  9. Hemorrhage from lumbar artery following percutaneous renal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Devi, B. Vijayalakshmi; Lakshmi, B. Sangeetha; Supraja, C.; Vanajakshmma, V.; Ram, R.; Rajasekhar, D.; Lakshmi, A. Y.; Sivakumar, V.

    2015-01-01

    We present a 58-year-old lady who underwent ultrasound-guided renal biopsy for suspected acute glomerulonephritis. Within minutes, the radiologist noticed an echogenic band around left kidney and in the muscular planes. Computerized tomography revealed focal active contrast extravasation from arcuate or interlobular artery in lower pole of left kidney and lumbar artery at third lumbar vertebra. The bleeding vessel was occluded with gelfoam. PMID:26199475

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  11. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John; Gebbeken, Norbert; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the influence of defined geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilising five parametrised musculoskeletal lumbar spine models for four different postures. The influence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine was studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most influential. These parameters can be easily acquired from X-rays and should be used to morph a musculoskeletal lumbar spine model for subject-specific approaches with respect to bone geometry. Furthermore, the model was very sensitive to uncommon configurations and therefore, it is advised that stiffness properties of discs and ligaments should be individualised. PMID:26680014

  12. The cortical and cerebellar representation of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Boendermaker, Bart; Meier, Michael L; Luechinger, Roger; Humphreys, B Kim; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2014-08-01

    Eight decades after Penfield's discovery of the homunculus only sparse evidence exists on the cortical representation of the lumbar spine. The aim of our investigation was the description of the lumbar spine's cortical representation in healthy subjects during the application of measured manual pressure. Twenty participants in the prone position were investigated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An experienced manual therapist applied non-painful, posterior-to-anterior (PA) pressure on three lumbar spinous processes (L1, L3, and L5). The pressure (30 N) was monitored and controlled by sensors. The randomized stimulation protocol consisted of 68 pressure stimuli of 5 s duration. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses were analyzed in relation to the lumbar stimulations. The results demonstrate that controlled PA pressure on the lumbar spine induced significant activation patterns. The major new finding was a strong and consistent activation bilaterally in the somatosensory cortices (S1 and S2). In addition, bilateral activation was located medially in the anterior cerebellum. The activation pattern also included other cortical areas probably related to anticipatory postural adjustments. These revealed stable somatosensory maps of the lumbar spine in healthy subjects can subsequently be used as a baseline to investigate cortical and subcortical reorganization in low back pain patients. PMID:24464423

  13. The Effects of Extraversion, Social Support on the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Growth of Adolescent Survivors of the Wenchuan Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuji; Ying, Liuhua; Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Xinchun; Lin, Chongde

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among extraversion, social support, posttraumatic stress disorder and posttraumatic growth among adolescent survivors of the Wenchuan earthquake. Methods Six hundred thirty-eight participants were selected from the survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Participants completed four main questionnaires, including the Extraversion Subscale, the Social Support Scale, the Child PTSD Symptom Scale, and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. Results A bivariate correlation analysis revealed significant correlations among extraversion, social support, posttraumatic stress disorder and posttraumatic growth. Extraversion had significant indirect effects on posttraumatic stress disorder (β = −.037, p < .01) and posttraumatic growth (β = .077, p < .001) through social support. The results also indicated that extraversion had a significant direct effect on posttraumatic growth and a nonsignificant direct effect on posttraumatic stress disorder. Conclusions Social support fully mediates the relationship between extraversion and posttraumatic stress disorder and partially mediates the relationship between extraversion and posttraumatic growth. Psychological interventions and care for survivors of the earthquake should include the various functions and sources of social support and how they serve to benefit individuals. PMID:25815720

  14. Relationships among Trait Resilience, Virtues, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, and Post-traumatic Growth.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenjie; Guo, Pengfei; Gan, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between trait resilience and virtues in the context of trauma. A total of 537 participants who attended the preliminary investigation and completed the Life Events Checklist were screened. Of these participants, 142 suffered from personal traumatic experiences in the past year; these individuals were qualified and invited to respond to online questionnaires to assess trait resilience, virtues (i.e., Conscientiousness, Vitality, and Relationship), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and post-traumatic growth (PTG). The following questionnaires were used: Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-Revised, Chinese Virtues Questionnaire, PTSD Checklist-Specific, and Post-traumatic Growth Inventory-Chinese. Only 95 participants who manifested self-reported PTSD symptoms and PTG were involved in the current analyses. Trauma was positively and significantly correlated with PTSD in the current sample. Results indicated that trait resilience was positively associated with virtues and PTG; by contrast, PTSD scores were negatively but not significantly related to most of these factors. The three virtues contributed to PTG to a greater extent than trait resilience in non-PTSD and PTSD groups. However, trait resilience remained a significant predictor in the PTSD group even when the three virtues were controlled. The relationship between trait resilience and PTG was moderated by PTSD type (non-PTSD group vs. PTSD group). Our results further suggested that trait resilience and virtues were conceptually related but functionally different constructs. Trait resilience and virtues are positively related; thus, these factors contributed variances to PTG in the context of trauma; however, trait resilience is only manifested when virtues are controlled and when individuals are diagnosed as PTSD. Furthermore, implications and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:25932954

  15. Relationships among Trait Resilience, Virtues, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, and Post-traumatic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenjie; Guo, Pengfei; Gan, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between trait resilience and virtues in the context of trauma. A total of 537 participants who attended the preliminary investigation and completed the Life Events Checklist were screened. Of these participants, 142 suffered from personal traumatic experiences in the past year; these individuals were qualified and invited to respond to online questionnaires to assess trait resilience, virtues (i.e., Conscientiousness, Vitality, and Relationship), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and post-traumatic growth (PTG). The following questionnaires were used: Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-Revised, Chinese Virtues Questionnaire, PTSD Checklist-Specific, and Post-traumatic Growth Inventory-Chinese. Only 95 participants who manifested self-reported PTSD symptoms and PTG were involved in the current analyses. Trauma was positively and significantly correlated with PTSD in the current sample. Results indicated that trait resilience was positively associated with virtues and PTG; by contrast, PTSD scores were negatively but not significantly related to most of these factors. The three virtues contributed to PTG to a greater extent than trait resilience in non-PTSD and PTSD groups. However, trait resilience remained a significant predictor in the PTSD group even when the three virtues were controlled. The relationship between trait resilience and PTG was moderated by PTSD type (non-PTSD group vs. PTSD group). Our results further suggested that trait resilience and virtues were conceptually related but functionally different constructs. Trait resilience and virtues are positively related; thus, these factors contributed variances to PTG in the context of trauma; however, trait resilience is only manifested when virtues are controlled and when individuals are diagnosed as PTSD. Furthermore, implications and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:25932954

  16. Postural Cueing to Increase Lumbar Lordosis Increases Lumbar Multifidus Activation During Trunk Stabilization Exercises: Electromyographic Assessment Using Intramuscular Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Beneck, George J; Story, John W; Donald, Shelby

    2016-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Background Diminished multifidus activation and cross-sectional area are frequent findings in persons with low back pain. Increasing lumbar lordosis has been shown to increase activation of the multifidus with a minimal increase in activation of the long global extensors during unsupported sitting. Objectives To examine the influence of postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis on lumbar extensor activation during trunk stabilization exercises. Methods Thirteen asymptomatic participants (9 male, 4 female) were instructed to perform 6 trunk stabilization exercises using a neutral position and increasing lumbar lordosis. Electrical activity of the deep multifidus and longissimus thoracis was recorded using fine-wire intramuscular electrodes. The mean root-mean-square of the electromyography (EMG) signal obtained during each exercise was normalized to a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A 2-way, repeated-measures analysis of variance (posture by exercise) was performed for each muscle. Results When averaged across the 6 exercises, postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis resulted in greater multifidus EMG activity compared to performing the exercises in a neutral posture (35.3% ± 15.1% versus 29.5% ± 11.2% MVIC). No significant increase in longissimus thoracis EMG activity was observed when exercising with cueing to increase lumbar lordosis. Conclusion This study suggests that postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis during trunk stabilization exercises may better promote multifidus activation than traditional stabilization exercises alone. Future studies are needed to determine whether increasing lumbar lordosis improves multifidus activation in persons with low back pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(4):293-299. Epub 8 Mar 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6174. PMID:26954268

  17. The effect of lumbar total disc replacement on the spinopelvic alignment and range of motion of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung Soo; Lee, Chong Suh; Kang, Chang Seok; Kim, Sang Hyun

    2006-07-01

    A lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is a type of motion-preserving surgery, which aims to restore and maintain the normal range of motion (ROM) and the sagittal balance of the spine. However, little is known regarding how the spinopelvic alignment and ROM of the lumbar spine are influenced by the lumbar TDR with ProDisc. This study retrospectively analyzed the sagittal alignment and ROM of the lumbar spine in 26 consecutive patients who had undergone the TDR with ProDisc with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A standing lateral radiograph, which included the femoral heads and dynamic flexion-extension lateral radiographs of the spine were taken before surgery and at the follow-up visit. The radiological parameters included the sacral tilt, the pelvic tilt, and the lumbar lordosis. The segmental lordosis and ROM were also measured at each operative level. Nineteen patients underwent a single-level TDR and 7 patients underwent a double-level TDR. The mean lumbar lordosis increased significantly from 30.5 degrees to 40.8 degrees in all patients who underwent TDR without any significant changes in the sacral tilt and pelvic tilt at the latest follow-up (P<0.05). In the patients who underwent single-level TDR, the mean segmental lordosis at the L5-S1 and L4-5 operative levels increased significantly from 15.8 degrees to 23.2 degrees and from 14.1 degrees to 24.9 degrees, respectively. The mean ROM at L5-S1 and L4-5 increased significantly from 7.1 degrees to 11.2 degrees and from 11.4 degrees to 14.6 degrees, respectively. The sagittal balance and ROM of the lumbar spine improved significantly after the lumbar TDR. PMID:16825999

  18. Monoamine acid metabolites and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in normal pressure hydrocephalus: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Maira, G; Bareggi, S R; Di Rocco, C; Calderini, G; Morselli, P L

    1975-01-01

    Lumbar and ventricular CSF concentration of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxy-indole-acetic acid (5-HIAA) have been determined in 13 patients admitted to hospital for suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus. Low values of HVA in lumbar CSF were found in all patients with reduced CSF absorption and CSF flow inversion. The HVA lumbar concentration remained low after shunt procedure; it increased if obstruction of the shunt occurred. The ventricular CSF concentration of HVA was normal before surgery; it became higher, in two cases, after surgery. No important variations were found in the lumbar and ventricular CSF concentration of 5-HIAA. The possible mechanisms and diagnostic value of these findings are discussed. PMID:1151392

  19. Clearance of valproic acid from cerebrospinal fluid in anesthetized rabbit.

    PubMed

    Artru, A A; Adkinson, K D; Powers, K M; Shen, D D

    1994-07-01

    Clearance of valproic acid from brain tissue is believed to occur via a carrier-mediated system(s). The present study was designed to determine whether clearance was capacity-limited (saturable) and whether it occurred primarily at the choroid plexus. Ten rabbits were anesthetized with halothane and surgically prepared for ventriculocisternal perfusion. In group 1 (n = 5) valproic acid was added to blue dextran-containing mock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to achieve concentrations of 5, 20, 100, and 500 micrograms.ml-1. The mixture was infused through needles in both cerebral ventricles. The purpose of this group was to determine whether over a large range (100x) of valproic acid concentrations, clearance from CSF was capacity limited (saturable). In group 2 (n = 5) valproic acid concentrations were 3, 10, and 30 microgram.ml-1 and infusion was into the left cerebral ventricle only. The purposes of this group were to determine (a) the magnitude of valproic acid clearance for the "clinical" range of valproic acid in CSF (10-30 micrograms.ml-1), and (b) whether clearance of valproic acid was changed by perfusion across a portion of the choroid plexus surface area (group 2) as compared with perfusion across the entire choroid plexus surface area (group 1). In both groups the percent extraction of valproic acid was calculated from the concentration ratio (valproic acid)out/(valproic acid)in corrected for the rate of CSF formation. In group 1 the percent extraction of valproic acid was 93 +/- 2% (mean +/- SD) at 5 micrograms.ml-1 and stabilized within the range of 58-70% (individual values) at the higher inflow concentrations of valproic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7521700

  20. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-01-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ∼13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R2 = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  1. Evaluation of Cerebrospinal Fluid Assay Variability in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Matthew T.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Xie, Sharon X.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have indicated that much of the variability observed in the biomarkers may be due to measurement error. Biomarkers are often obtained with measurement error, which may make the diagnostic biomarker appear less effective than it truly is. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, technical replicates of CSF biomarkers are available; the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database contains longitudinal replicates of CSF biomarkers. We focus on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as the measure of diagnostic effectiveness for differentiating AD from normal cognition using CSF biomarkers and compare AUC estimates obtained by a more standard, naïve method (which uses a single observation per subject and ignores measurement error) to a maximum likelihood (ML) based method (which uses all replicates per subject and adjusts for measurement error). The choice of analysis method depends upon the noise to signal ratio (i.e., the magnitude of the measurement error variability relative to the true biomarker variability); moderate to high ratios may significantly bias the naïve AUC estimate, and the ML-based method would be preferred. The noise to signal ratios were low for the ADNI biomarkers but high for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in NACC. Correspondingly, the naïve and ML-based AUC estimates were nearly identical in the ADNI data but dissimilar for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in the NACC data. Therefore, using the naïve method is adequate for analysis of CSF biomarkers in the ADNI study, but the ML method is recommended for the NACC data. PMID:26890778

  2. Endostatin level in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salza, Romain; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Bakchine, Serge; Thoannès, Henri; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII that accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The concentrations of total protein, endostatin, amyloid-β1-42 peptide, tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in CSF of patients with AD (n = 57), behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 22), non AD and non FTD dementia (nAD/nFTD, n = 84), and 45 subjects without neurodegenerative diseases. The statistical significance of the results was assessed by Mann-Whitney and Kruskal and Wallis tests, and by ROC analysis. The concentration of endostatin in CSF was higher than the levels of the three markers of AD both in control subjects and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The endostatin/amyloid-β1-42 ratio was significantly increased in patients with AD (257%, p < 0.0001) and nAD/nFTD (140%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. The endostatin/tau protein ratio was significantly decreased in patients with AD (-49%, p < 0.0001) but was increased in bvFTD patients (89%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. In the same way, the endostatin/hyperphosphorylated tau protein ratio was decreased in patients with AD (-21%, p = 0.0002) but increased in patients with bvFTD (81%, p = 0.0026), compared to controls. The measurement of endostatin in CSF and the calculation of its ratio relative to well-established AD markers improve the diagnosis of bvFTD patients and the discrimination of patients with AD from those with bvFTD and nAD/nFTD. PMID:25408220

  3. Surgical challenge: endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) result from an abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the extracranial space. Approximately 90% of CSF leak at the anterior skull base manifests as rhinorrhea and can become life-threatening condition. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has become a common otolaryngologist procedure. The aim of this article is to consider our experience and to evaluate the outcomes in patients who underwent a purely endoscopic repair of CSF leaks of the anterior skull base. Findings Retrospective chart review was performed of all patients surgically treated for CSF leaks presenting to the Section of Nasal and Sinus Disorders at the Service of ENT–Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS), between 2004 and 2010. A total of 30 patients who underwent repair CSF leak by ESS. The success rate was 93.4% at the first attempt; only two patients (6.6%) required a second surgical procedure, and none of it was necessary to use a craniotomy for closure. Follow-up periods ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Conclusion Identifying the size, site, and etiology of the CSF leak remains the most important factor in the surgical success. It is generally accepted that the ESS have made procedures minimally invasive, and CSF leak is now one of its well-established indications with low morbidity and high success rate, with one restriction for fistulas of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus should be repaired in conjunction with open techniques. PMID:22925201

  4. A novel method to study cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimy, Jason K.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Kurland, David B.; Yu, Edward; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics play critical roles in both the immature and adult brain, with implications for neurodevelopment and disease processes such as hydrocephalus and neurodegeneration. Remarkably, the only reported method to date for measuring CSF formation in laboratory rats is the indirect tracer dilution method (a.k.a., ventriculocisternal perfusion), which has limitations. New Method Anesthetized rats were mounted in a stereotaxic apparatus, both lateral ventricles were cannulated, and the Sylvian aqueduct was occluded. Fluid exited one ventricle at a rate equal to the rate of CSF formation plus the rate of infusion (if any) into the contralateral ventricle. Pharmacological agents infused at a constant known rate into the contralateral ventricle were tested for their effect on CSF formation in real-time. Results The measured rate of CSF formation was increased by blockade of the Sylvian aqueduct but was not changed by increasing the outflow pressure (0–3 cm of H2O). In male Wistar rats, CSF formation was age-dependent: 0.39±0.06, 0.74±0.05, 1.02±0.04 and 1.40±0.06 µL/min at 8, 9, 10 and 12 weeks, respectively. CSF formation was reduced 57% by intraventricular infusion of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide. Comparison with existing methods Tracer dilution methods do not permit ongoing real-time determination of the rate of CSF formation, are not readily amenable to pharmacological manipulations, and require critical assumptions. Direct measurement of CSF formation overcomes these limitations. Conclusions Direct measurement of CSF formation in rats is feasible. Our method should prove useful for studying CSF dynamics in normal physiology and disease models. PMID:25554415

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's biomarker profiles in CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Krut, Jan Jessen; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Cinque, Paola; Hagberg, Lars; Price, Richard W; Studahl, Marie; Gisslén, Magnus

    2013-02-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker profile in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by decreased beta amyloid (Aβ(1-42)), increased total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau, respectively), which is a useful diagnostic tool and gives insight in the pathogenesis of AD. It is of importance to study how these biomarkers react in other CNS diseases; therefore, we decided to analyse amyloid and tau biomarkers in different CNS infections. We also included analysis of soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPPα and -β). CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β, t-tau and p-tau were analysed in bacterial meningitis (n = 12), Lyme neuroborreliosis (n = 13), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (n = 10), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 21), AD (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 42). Concurrent with AD, Aβ(1-42) was decreased in all groups except neuroborreliosis compared to controls. HSV-1 encephalitis, bacterial meningitis and HAD showed lower concentrations of sAPPα and -β compared to AD. T-tau was increased in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to all other groups. P-tau was higher in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to bacterial meningitis, HAD and control. Decreased CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β in various CNS infections imply an effect of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism which is similar in regard to AD concerning Aβ(1-42), but differs concerning sAPPα and -β. These results clearly indicate different pathologic pathways in AD and infectious CNS disease and may provide help in the differential biomarker diagnostics. Increased p-tau in HSV-1 encephalitis probably reflect acute neuronal damage and necrosis. PMID:23052602

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  7. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ), amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42), and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau) in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+) subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC), 25 with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV-) subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those of Alzheimer's disease

  8. [Diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leakages by gamma-cisternography].

    PubMed

    Oberson, R

    1976-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakages either secondary (traumatic) or spontaneous (non-traumatic) are first considered in their frequency and origin. The exact topography of the various meningeal and cranial lesions involved are difficult to assess particularly in the most important groups of persistant traumatic CSF rhinorrhea and recurrent meningitis. Among the various diagnostic approaches, direct observation is always necessary, but of limited value. Standard X-rays must be followed by multidirectionnal tomography (Polytome) and, whenever available, computed tomodensitography of the base of the skull. Brain pneumography provides a thorough setting fourth of the congenital or acquired cerebral lesions as well as the new cranio-meningeal conditions. Difficulties encountered with the techniques of subdurography and Pantopaque injection are underlined. Three radioisotope techniques are considered. 1) The earlier technique of cotton-pledgets only shows the external orifice. 2) The recent proposal of nuclide cranial subdurography is criticized for ignoring the leptomeningeal bag. 3) Radioisotope cisternography (RIC) or gamma-cisternography is described more precisely. It remains the most complete and appropriate method for observing the natural behaviour of the leakage. RIC with fistulography is performed through suboccipital injection of 99mTc-DTPA. RIC provides essential clues on the relative importance of associated dynamic disturbances of the third circulation and morphological changes of its anatomical bed (stenoses and widenings of the ependymal and leptomeningeal spaces). If present, the leakage may be directly shown on the RIC pictures. If rhinorrhea is abundant, there is no difficulty in assessing side and site of the fistula. If rhinorrhea is occult, dubious or intermittent, diagnosis is often difficult. There are also indirect signs of rhinorrhea: leptomeningeal dilatation near a frontal or ethmoidal fracture, contamination of the rhinopharynx, examination of

  9. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-11-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R(2) = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  10. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics. PMID:25162173

  11. Mammalian embryonic cerebrospinal fluid proteome has greater apolipoprotein and enzyme pattern complexity than the avian proteome.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2005-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, which has an essential role in the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. We identified and analyzed the proteome of Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid from rat embryos (Rattus norvegicus), which includes proteins involved in the regulation of Central Nervous System development. The comparison between mammalian and avian Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteomes reveals great similarity, but also greater complexity in some protein groups. The pattern of apolipoproteins and enzymes in CSF is more complex in the mammals than in birds. This difference may underlie the greater neural complexity and synaptic plasticity found in mammals. Fourteen Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid gene products were previously identified in adult human Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteome, and interestingly they are altered in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis may contribute to our understanding of Central Nervous System development and evolution, and these human diseases. PMID:16335996

  12. [Degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine Total disc replacement as an alternative to lumbar fusion?].

    PubMed

    Mayer, H M

    2005-10-01

    Spinal fusion is accepted worldwide as a therapeutic option for the treatment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. Because there are only few evidence-based data available supporting the usefulness of lumbar spinal fusion, its questionable benefit as well as the potential for complications are the reasons for an ongoing discussion. In recent years, total disc replacement with implants has emerged as an alternative treatment. Although early results are promising, there is still a lack of evidence-based data as well as of long-term results for this technology. This article gives a critical update on the implant systems currently in use (SB Charité, Prodisc II L, Maverick, Flexicore, Mobidisc), which all have to be considered as "first-generation" implants. Morphological and clinical sequelae of the different biomechanical properties, designs, and materials have not yet been sufficiently investigated. There is no international consensus on the indication spectrum and on the preoperative diagnosis of discogenic low back pain. The same is true for the (minimally invasive) surgical access strategies. Complication rates seem to be somewhat lower compared to spinal fusion techniques. There are no standardized revision concepts in cases of implant failure. Lumbar disc replacement has opened a new era in spinal surgery with a still unproven benefit for the patient. It is strongly recommended that these techniques should only be applied by experienced and well-trained spine surgeons. Until evidence-based data are available, all patients should be treated under scientific study conditions with close postoperative follow-up. PMID:16034627

  13. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  14. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Psychopathology in Dancers.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S Victoria

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in pre-professional and professional dancers (n=209) who were exposed to traumatic events. Nine self-report instruments assessed (1) adverse childhood experiences, (2) past traumatic events, (3) coping strategies under stressful situations, and (4) fantasy proneness. The psychopathology variables included (5) anxiety, (6) depression, (7) dissociation, (8) shame, and (9)) PTSD diagnostic scale. Statistical calculations included descriptive, distributional, and multivariate analysis of covariates (MANCOVA). Results indicate that dancers had a significantly higher distribution of PTSD (20.2%) compared to the normal population (7.8%). They also had a higher frequency of family members with mental illness, an inability to speak about their trauma, and more suicidal thoughts. The PTSD group of dancers had higher levels of psychopathology (anxiety, depression, dissociation, and shame) and they had more childhood adversity and adult trauma. Compared to the no-PTSD group, the PTSD group had higher scores on fantasy proneness and emotion-oriented coping strategies. These coping strategies may increase psychological instability. Addressing early abuse and trauma is recommended. Clinicians may help dancers alter their internal working models that their self is worthless, others are abusive, and the world is threatening and dangerous. By understanding PTSD in dancers, medical and mental health treatment protocols may be established to address the debilitating, and often hidden, symptoms of PTSD. PMID:26395617

  15. Neuropeptide Y and posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sah, R; Geracioti, TD

    2016-01-01

    Resiliency to the adverse effects of extraordinary emotional trauma on the brain varies within the human population. Accordingly, some people cope better than others with traumatic stress. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid peptide transmitter abundantly expressed in forebrain limbic and brain stem areas that regulate stress and emotional behaviors. Studies largely in rodents demonstrate a role for NPY in promoting coping with stress. Moreover, accruing data from the genetic to the physiological implicate NPY as a potential ‘resilience-to-stress’ factor in humans. Here, we consolidate findings from preclinical and clinical studies of NPY that are of relevance to stress-associated syndromes, most prototypically posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Collectively, these data suggest that reduced central nervous system (CNS) NPY concentrations or function may be associated with PTSD. We also link specific symptoms of human PTSD with extant findings in the NPY field to reveal potential physiological contributions of the neuropeptide to the disorder. In pursuit of understanding the physiological basis and treatment of PTSD, the NPY system is an attractive target. PMID:22801411

  16. Atypical visual processing in posttraumatic stress disorder☆

    PubMed Central

    Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Schick, Matthis; Schulte-Vels, Thomas; O'Gorman, Ruth; Michels, Lars; Martin-Soelch, Chantal; Blair, James R.; Rufer, Michael; Schnyder, Ulrich; Zeffiro, Thomas; Hasler, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) feel overwhelmed in situations with high levels of sensory input, as in crowded situations with complex sensory characteristics. These difficulties might be related to subtle sensory processing deficits similar to those that have been found for sounds in electrophysiological studies. Method Visual processing was investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging in trauma-exposed participants with (N = 18) and without PTSD (N = 21) employing a picture-viewing task. Results Activity observed in response to visual scenes was lower in PTSD participants 1) in the ventral stream of the visual system, including striate and extrastriate, inferior temporal, and entorhinal cortices, and 2) in dorsal and ventral attention systems (P < 0.05, FWE-corrected). These effects could not be explained by the emotional salience of the pictures. Conclusions Visual processing was substantially altered in PTSD in the ventral visual stream, a component of the visual system thought to be responsible for object property processing. Together with previous reports of subtle auditory deficits in PTSD, these findings provide strong support for potentially important sensory processing deficits, whose origins may be related to dysfunctional attention processes. PMID:24371791

  17. Visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali Reza; Heydari, Ali Hosain; Abdollahi, Mohammad Hossain; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Dalgleish, Tim; Jobson, Laura

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Scenic False Memory paradigm (SFM, Hauschildt, Peters, Jelinek, & Moritz, 2012) was administered to male Iranian military personnel who had participated in the Iran-Iraq war and were diagnosed with (n = 21) or without (n = 21) PTSD and a sample of healthy male non-trauma-exposed controls (n = 21). Trauma-exposed participants recalled and recognized a significantly lower percentage of hits and a significantly greater percentage of false memories for both trauma-related and non-trauma-related video scenes, than non-trauma-exposed controls. Among the trauma-exposed participants, those with and without PTSD did not differ significantly in terms of percentage of hits and false memories recalled on the SFM. Those with PTSD were found to recognize significantly fewer hits for both the trauma-related and non-trauma-related videos than those without PTSD. Those with PTSD also recognized significantly more false memories for the trauma video scene than the non-PTSD group. The findings suggest that those with trauma exposure, and in particular those with PTSD, may have a greater susceptibility to visual false memory. PMID:26390193

  18. Prostitution, violence, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Farley, M; Barkan, H

    1998-01-01

    One hundred and thirty people working as prostitutes in San Francisco were interviewed regarding the extent of violence in their lives and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fifty-seven percent reported that they had been sexually assaulted as children and 49% reported that they had been physically assaulted as children. As adults in prostitution, 82% had been physically assaulted; 83% had been threatened with a weapon; 68% had been raped while working as prostitutes; and 84% reported current or past homelessness. We differentiated the types of lifetime violence as childhood sexual assault; childhood physical abuse; rape in prostitution; and other (non-rape) physical assault in prostitution. PTSD severity was significantly associated with the total number of types of lifetime violence (r = .21, p = .02); with childhood physical abuse (t = 2.97, p = .004); rape in adult prostitution (Student's t = 2.77, p = .01); and the total number of times raped in prostitution (Kruskal-Wallace chi square = 13.51, p = .01). Of the 130 people interviewed, 68% met DSM III-R criteria for a diagnosis of PTSD. Eighty-eight percent of these respondents stated that they wanted to leave prostitution, and described what they needed in order to escape. PMID:9698636

  19. Surgical Treatment of Posttraumatic Radioulnar Synostosis

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P.; Casini, C.; De Angelis, C.; Ceruso, M.

    2016-01-01

    Radioulnar synostosis is a rare complication of forearm fractures. The formation of a bony bridge induces functional disability due to limitation of the pronosupination. Although the etiology of posttraumatic synostosis is unknown, it seems that the incidence is higher in patients who have suffered a concomitant neurological or burn trauma, and extensive soft tissue injury, mainly due to high-energy impact. Surgical treatment, such as reinsertion of distal biceps tendon into the radius, seems to be another possible factor. The aim of the surgical treatment is to remove the bony bridge and restore complete range of movement (ROM), thus preventing recurrence. Literature does not indicate a preferred type of surgical procedure for the aforementioned complication; however, it has been shown that surgical interposition of inert material reduces the formation rate of recurrent bony bridge. We describe a surgical technique in two cases in which the radius and ulna were wrapped with allogenic, cadaver fascia lata graft to prevent bony bridge formation. The data from 2 years of follow-up are reported, indicating full restoration of ROM and no recurrence of synostosis. PMID:26977328

  20. Posttraumatic focal dystonia of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Vasileiadis, Georgios I; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Zoubos, Aristeides B

    2012-06-01

    Focal posttraumatic shoulder dystonia is a rare and not easily identifiable entity. Its true pathophysiologic nature, predisposing factors, and disease course remain debatable.This article describes a rare case of a 40-year-old man with late symptoms of focal shoulder dystonia after peripheral trauma of his left shoulder girdle. The shoulder was indirectly injured from the impact of a fall off his motorbike 3 years earlier. He was referred to the authors' institution because remarkable reduction of arm abduction, muscle spasms, and circumscribed hypertrophy of the trapezius muscle were noted while his head and neck were in neutral position and had a full range of motion. The left shoulder had a fixed elevated posture compared with the contralateral shoulder. A continuous burning pain was localized over the area of the hypertrophied trapezius muscle, radiating to the ipsilateral side of the head and neck. Dystonic movements of the trapezius, rhomboid, and supraspinatus muscles were observed. The abduction of the shoulder was significantly decreased, and any repetitive effort for arm abduction induced an exaggeration of his movement disorder, leading to a more pronounced shoulder elevation.Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the left shoulder revealed a suprascapular tendinitis with no other abnormalities. Repeated needle electromyography of the left trapezius muscle and neurography of the accessory nerve on both sides were normal. Injections of botulinum toxin A were effective in the resolution of muscle hypertrophy and abnormal posture. PMID:22691679

  1. Post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage: A review.

    PubMed

    Modi, Nikhilkumar J; Agrawal, Manish; Sinha, Virendra Deo

    2016-01-01

    Head injury has been the leading cause of death and disability in people younger than 40 years and the incidence is rising continuously. Anticipation of the pathological consequences of post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) and an outcome-oriented management are very important in these cases. To encounter the complications pertaining to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and tSAH, various classifications have been proposed and goal-oriented screening strategies have been offered. The role of serial computed tomography (CT) scans, perfusion studies, transcranial Doppler, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and angiographic studies as diagnostic tools, has been described. Recently, MRI fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), gradient reversal echo (GRE), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) have emerged as excellent complimentary MRI sequences, and the authors of this article have evaluated their role in the diagnosis and prognostication of patients with tSAH. Numerous studies have been conducted on the various complications associated with tSAH such as vasospasm, hydrocephalus, and electrolyte disturbances and their management. This article discusses these aspects of tSAH and their management nuances. PMID:26954974

  2. Features of Posttraumatic Distress Among Adolescent Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To examine features of posttraumatic distress related to sport injury among healthy and injured adolescent athletes. Design and Setting: Healthy athletes with and without a prior injury history were screened before their competitive season, and injured and matched control athletes were surveyed at 1 week postinjury. Subjects: We screened 283 athletes during the preseason and categorized them by injury history (n = 43) and no injury history (n = 240) groups. Twenty-four athletes (12 injured, 12 matched uninjured controls) were included in the postinjury analysis. Measurements: The Impact of Events Scale, a 15-item self-report questionnaire, was used to measure athletes' frequency of experiencing intrusive thoughts and engaging in avoidance behavior regarding athletic injury. Results: Athletes with a recent injury history exhibited a greater frequency of intrusive thoughts and avoidance behavior than did those without a recent injury history. Although postinjury findings did not reach statistical significance, injured athletes' scores increased by 35% to 49% from preinjury to postinjury, whereas only minimal changes (<1%) occurred in the control group. Conclusions: Younger athletes may be particularly sensitive to injury-related stimuli, which may result in heightened injury-related distress. PMID:12937529

  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder and vision.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, Joseph N

    2010-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be defined as a memory linked with an unpleasant emotion that results in a spectrum of psychological and physical signs and symptoms. With the expectation of at least 300,000 postdeployment veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan having PTSD, optometrists will be faced with these patients' vision problems. Complicating the diagnosis of PTSD is some overlap with patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The estimated range of patients with TBI having PTSD varies from 17% to 40%, which has recently led the Federal government to fund research to better ascertain their relationship and differences. As a result of the sensory vision system's interconnections with the structures of the limbic system, blurry vision is a common symptom in PTSD patients. A detailed explanation is presented tracing the sensory vision pathways from the retina to the lateral geniculate body, visual cortex, fusiform gyrus, and the hypothalamus. The pathways from the superior colliculus and the limbic system to the eye are also described. Combining the understanding of the afferent and efferent fibers reveal both feedforward and feedback mechanisms mediated by nerve pathways and the neuropolypeptides. The role of the peptides in blurry vision is elaborated to provide an explanation as to the signs and symptoms of patients with PTSD. Although optometrists are not on the front line of mental health professionals to treat PTSD, they can provide the PTSD patients with an effective treatment for their vision disorders. PMID:20435270

  4. Psychosocial therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Foa, Edna B

    2006-01-01

    Immediately after experiencing a traumatic event, many people have symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). If trauma victims restrict their routine and systematically avoid reminders of the incident, symptoms of PTSD are more likely to become chronic. Several clinical studies have shown that programs of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in the management of patients with PTSD. Prolonged exposure (PE) therapy-a specific form of exposure therapy-can provide benefits, as can stress inoculation training (SIT) and cognitive therapy (CT). PE is not enhanced by the addition of SIT or CT. PE therapy is a safe treatment that is accepted by patients, and benefits remain apparent after treatment programs have finished. Nonspecialists can be taught to practice effective CBT. For the treatment of large numbers of patients, or for use in centers where CBT has not been routinely employed previously, appropriate training of mental health professionals should be performed. Methods used for the dissemination of CBT to nonspecialists need to be modified to meet the requirements of countries affected by the Asian tsunami. This will entail the use of culturally sensitive materials and the adaptation of training methods to enable large numbers of mental health professionals to be trained together. PMID:16602814

  5. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Right Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Sugimori, Natsuki; Igarashi, Saya; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Matsui, Osamu

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluated the clinical features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the right lumbar artery. Eleven patients with HCC supplied by the right lumbar artery were treated with chemoembolization. The patients' medical records were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent 6.7 {+-} 3.7 (mean {+-} SD) chemoembolization sessions, and the hepatic arterial branches were noted as being attenuated. The right inferior phrenic artery (IPA) was also embolized in 10 patients. The interval between initial chemoembolization and chemoembolization of the lumbar artery supply was 53.2 {+-} 26.9 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.1 {+-} 2.4 cm and was located at the surface of S7 and S6. The feeding-branch arose proximal to the bifurcation of the dorsal ramus and muscular branches (n = 8) or from the muscular branches (n = 3) of the right first (n = 10) or second lumbar artery (n = 1). The anterior spinal artery originated from the tumor-feeding lumbar artery in one patient. All feeders were selected, and embolization was performed after injection of iodized oil and anticancer drugs (n = 10) or gelatin sponge alone in a patient with anterior spinal artery branching (n = 1). Eight patients died from tumor progression 10.1 {+-} 4.6 months later, and two patients survived 2 and 26 months, respectively. The remaining patient died of bone metastases after 32 months despite liver transplantation 10 months after chemoembolization. The right lumbar artery supplies HCC located in the bare area of the liver, especially in patients who undergo repeated chemoembolization, including chemoembolization by way of the right IPA. Chemoembolization by way of the right lumbar artery may be safe when the feeder is well selected.

  6. Lumbar pseudarthrosis: a review of current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chun, Danielle S; Baker, Kevin C; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Failed solid bony fusion, or pseudarthrosis, is a well-known complication of lumbar arthrodesis. Recent advances in radiographic technology, biologics, instrumentation, surgical technique, and understanding of the local biology have all aided in the prevention and treatment of pseudarthrosis. Here, the current literature on the diagnosis and management of lumbar pseudarthroses is reviewed. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and Embase databases in order to search for the current radiographie diagnosis and surgical treatment methods published in the literature (1985 to present). Inclusion criteria included: 1) published in English; 2) level of evidence I-III; 3) diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spine conditions and/or history of lumbar spine fusion surgery; and 4) comparative studies of 2 different surgical techniques or comparative studies of imaging modality versus surgical exploration. RESULTS Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for current radiographie imaging used to diagnose lumbar pseudarthrosis. Plain radiographs and thin-cut CT scans were the most common method for radiographie diagnosis. PET has been shown to be a valid imaging modality for monitoring in vivo active bone formation. Eight studies compared the surgical techniques for managing and preventing failed lumbar fusion. The success rates for the treatment of pseudarthrosis are enhanced with the use of rigid instrumentation. CONCLUSIONS Spinal fusion rates have improved secondary to advances in biologies, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and understanding of local biology. Treatment of lumbar pseudarthrosis includes a variety of surgical options such as replacing loose instrumentation, use of more potent biologies, and interbody fusion techniques. Prevention and recognition are important tenets in the algorithm for the management of spinal pseudarthrosis. PMID:26424334

  7. Posttraumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder after Termination of Pregnancy and Reproductive Loss: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Daugirdaitė, Viltė; van den Akker, Olga; Purewal, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aims of this systematic review were to integrate the research on posttraumatic stress (PTS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after termination of pregnancy (TOP), miscarriage, perinatal death, stillbirth, neonatal death, and failed in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Methods. Electronic databases (AMED, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, PubMEd, ScienceDirect) were searched for articles using PRISMA guidelines. Results. Data from 48 studies were included. Quality of the research was generally good. PTS/PTSD has been investigated in TOP and miscarriage more than perinatal loss, stillbirth, and neonatal death. In all reproductive losses and TOPs, the prevalence of PTS was greater than PTSD, both decreased over time, and longer gestational age is associated with higher levels of PTS/PTSD. Women have generally reported more PTS or PTSD than men. Sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., younger age, lower education, and history of previous traumas or mental health problems) and psychsocial factors influence PTS and PTSD after TOP and reproductive loss. Conclusions. This systematic review is the first to investigate PTS/PTSD after reproductive loss. Patients with advanced pregnancies, a history of previous traumas, mental health problems, and adverse psychosocial profiles should be considered as high risk for developing PTS or PTSD following reproductive loss. PMID:25734016

  8. [Should a lumbar puncture be performed in any child with acute peripheral facial palsy and clinical suspicion of Lyme borreliosis?].

    PubMed

    Blin-Rochemaure, N; Quinet, B

    2012-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis should be considered in any child affected with acute peripheral facial palsy without obvious cause in endemic areas, especially if it happens from May to November, with a history of erythema migrans, tick bite, or possible exposure during the previous weeks. The clinical appearance of Lyme borreliosis differs between adults and children and according to the geographical origin of the infection: therefore it is difficult to interpret and follow the recommendations for the management and treatment of this disease. Neuroborreliosis is more frequent in Europe than in the United States, and meningitis associated to facial palsy occurs earlier and is more frequent among the European pediatric population, too. When peripheral facial palsy occurs and there is suspicion of Lyme borreliosis, it seems necessary to perform a lumbar puncture in order to support the diagnosis with detection of intrathecal synthesis of specific antibodies, sometimes more abundant than in the serum, and thus to adapt the antibiotic therapy modalities. Parenteral antibiotherapy is recommended if any involvement is detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, while oral antibiotherapy should be prescribed for isolated facial palsies. Follow-up should be made according to clinical symptoms with a close collaboration between pediatricians, infection disease specialists, and ENT specialists. PMID:23116983

  9. Analysis of the results of routine lumbar puncture after a first febrile convulsion in Hofuf, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Laditan, A A

    1995-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was analysed to determine a lumbar puncture (LP) yield for meningitis in 95 children who presented with their first febrile convulsions between July 1993 and June 1994. There were 52 males and 43 females aged six months to six years with a mean age of 21.9 +/- 13.0 months at presentation. 87(91.6%) had simple febrile convulsions (SFC) while the remaining 8(8.4%) had complex febrile convulsions (CFC). The majority of the subjects presented with a sudden onset of convulsions that were preceded by a day or two history of fever, coryza, cough and respiratory distress while others had their convulsions preceded by fever and passage of bloody stools. The LP yield for meningitis in this series was 6.3%. The CSF analysis revealed six cases of meningitis comprising an eight month old infant with Haemophilus influenzae type B (HIB) meningitis, two partially treated pyogenic meningitis and three aseptic meningitis. All of them had presented with febrile convulsions without signs of meningeal irritation. Excluding aseptic meningitis from this series, a 3.1% LP yield for pyogenic meningitis is significant enough to recommend continued performance of LP in children with first febrile convulsions, especially if under the age of eighteen months. PMID:7498008

  10. The Negligible Influence of Chronic Obesity on Hospitalization, Clinical Status, and Complications in Elective Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kombos, Theodoros; Bode, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a common surgical treatment for degenerative spinal instability, but many surgeons consider obesity a contraindication for elective spinal fusion. The aim of this study was to analyze whether obesity has any influence on hospitalization parameters, change in clinical status, or complications. Methods. In this prospective study, regression analysis was used to analyze the influence of the body mass index (BMI) on operating time, postoperative care, hospitalization time, type of postdischarge care, change in paresis or sensory deficits, pain level, wound complications, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and implant complications. Results. Operating time increased only 2.5 minutes for each increase of BMI by 1. The probability of having a wound complication increased statistically with rising BMI. Nonetheless, BMI accounted for very little of the variation in the data, meaning that other factors or random chances play a much larger role. Conclusions. Obesity has to be considered a risk factor for wound complications in patients undergoing elective PLIF for degenerative instability. However, BMI showed no significant influence on other kinds of peri- or postoperative complications, nor clinical outcomes. So obesity cannot be considered a contraindication for elective PLIF. PMID:27478866

  11. Posttraumatic Distress and Physical Functioning: A Longitudinal Study of Injured Survivors of Community Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.; Jaycox, Lisa H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the cross-lagged relationships between posttraumatic distress symptoms and physical functioning, using a sample of 413 persons who were hospitalized for injuries resulting from community violence. Posttraumatic distress was assessed at 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months postinjury, and posttraumatic physical functioning was…

  12. Performing lumbar punctures for suspected CNS infections: experience and practice of trainee doctors.

    PubMed

    Defres, Sylviane; Mayer, Josephine; Backman, Ruth; Kneen, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar punctures are essential in the management of suspected CNS infections. However, despite clear guidelines their use can be haphazard. This survey investigated the training, knowledge and experience of UK doctors in training in relation to lumbar punctures. PMID:26551497

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of High-Mobility Group Box 1 and Cytochrome C Predict Outcome after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Rajesh K.; Bell, Michael J.; Bayir, Hülya; Feldman, Keri; Adelson, P. David; Fink, Ericka L.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S.B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a ubiquitous nuclear protein that is passively released from damaged and necrotic cells, and actively released from immune cells. In contrast, cytochrome c is released from mitochondria in apoptotic cells, and is considered a reliable biomarker of apoptosis. Thus, HMGB1 and cytochrome c may in part reflect the degree of necrosis and apoptosis present after traumatic brain injury (TBI), where both are felt to contribute to cell death and neurological morbidity. Ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained from children admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) after TBI (n=37). CSF levels of HMGB1 and cytochrome c were determined at four time intervals (0–24 h, 25–48 h, 49–72 h, and>72 h after injury) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Lumbar CSF from children without TBI served as controls (n=12). CSF HMGB1 levels were: control=1.78±0.29, 0–24 h=5.73±1.45, 25–48 h=5.16±1.73, 49–72 h=4.13±0.75,>72 h=3.80±0.90 ng/mL (mean±SEM). Peak HMGB1 levels were inversely and independently associated with favorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 mo (0.49 [0.24–0.97]; OR [5–95% CI]). CSF cytochrome c levels were: control=0.37±0.10, 0–24 h=0.69±0.15, 25–48 h=0.82±0.48, 49–72 h=1.52±1.08,>72 h=1.38±1.02 ng/mL (mean±SEM). Peak cytochrome c levels were independently associated with abusive head trauma (AHT; 24.29 [1.77–334.03]) and inversely and independently associated with favorable GOS scores (0.42 [0.18–0.99]). In conclusion, increased CSF levels of HMGB1 and cytochrome c were associated with poor outcome after TBI in infants and children. These data are also consistent with the designation of HMGB1 as a “danger signal.” Distinctly increased CSF cytochrome c levels in infants and children with AHT and poor outcome suggests that apoptosis may play an important role in this unique patient population. PMID:22540160

  14. Endothelin-1 Is Increased in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Associated with Unfavorable Outcomes in Children after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Empey, Philip E.; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Klamerus, Megan; Ozawa, Haishin; Wagner, Amy K.; Ruppel, Randall; Bell, Michael J.; Feldman, Keri; Adelson, P. David; Clark, Robert S.B.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with unfavorable outcomes secondary to injury from activation of the inflammatory cascade, the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, and changes in the reactivity of cerebral vessels, causing ischemia. Hypoperfusion of injured brain tissues after TBI is also associated with unfavorable outcomes. Therapeutic hypothermia is an investigational treatment strategy for use in patients with severe TBI that has shown differential effects on various cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) mediators in pediatric patients. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a powerful vasoconstrictor that exerts its effects on the cerebrovascular endothelium for sustained periods after TBI. The purpose of this study was to determine if CSF concentrations of ET-1 are increased after severe TBI in children, and if they are associated with demographics and outcomes that are affected by therapeutic hypothermia. This was an ancillary study to a prospective, randomized-controlled trial of early hypothermia in a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit. Children (n = 34, age 3 months–15 years) suffering from severe TBI were randomized to hypothermia (n = 19) and normothermia (n = 15) as part of the efficacy study. Children undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture (n = 11) to rule out infection were used as controls. Patients received either mild to moderate hypothermia (32–33°C) or normothermia as part of their treatment protocol. CSF was serially collected during the first 5 days after TBI. ET-1 concentrations were quantitated in patient and control CSF samples by a validated ELISA in duplicate with a limit of quantification of 0.195 pg/mL. CSF ET-1 concentrations were increased by two- to threefold in children after TBI compared to controls, and the increase was sustained for up to 5 days post-TBI. This relationship was not affected by hypothermia, and there were no differences in ET-1 response between children with inflicted

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after

  16. Antibodies Against Equine Herpesvirus 1 in the Cerebrospinal Fluid in the Horse

    PubMed Central

    Blythe, Linda L.; Mattson, Donald E.; Lassen, E. Duane; Craig, A. Morrie

    1985-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies against equine herpesvirus 1 were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 16 horses and ponies from a closed herd both before and after vaccination with modified live equine herpesvirus 1. These titers were also measured in 22 neurologically normal and 15 neurologically abnormal horses at a teaching hospital. Animals from the closed herd had prevaccination serum titers up to 1:8 and postvaccination serum titers up to 1:128. Horses from the teaching hospital had serum titers up to 1:64. Cerebrospinal fluid titers were not detected in the vaccinated horses or the neurologically normal horses but a low titer (1:8) was noted in one neurologically abnormal horse. This titer probably resulted from hemorrhage into the cerebrospinal fluid following trauma. PMID:17422553

  17. A corny cause of cerebrospinal fluid ascites: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Hira; Abrams, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report a rare cause of cerebrospinal fluid ascites. Methods: A 37-year-old female with history of intracranial hypertension and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was referred to liver clinic for evaluation of newly developed ascites. Results: Initially, the cause of ascites was thought to be secondary to a liver etiology. However, this was excluded after a comprehensive evaluation including portal pressure measurements. We determined the ascites to be infected cerebrospinal fluid secondary to a rare commensal organism, Corynebacterium non-Jeikeium, which resolved after removing ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, appropriate antibiotics and conversion to a ventriculo-atrial shunt. Conclusion: Cerebrospinal fluid ascites is a rare complication of VP shunts and since 1976 only 8 cases of Corynebacterium non jk VP shunt infections have been reported in the literature but none associated with ascites. Also this report highlights the beneficial role of transjugular portal pressure measurements in the evaluation of ascites. PMID:27489721

  18. Penetration of aztreonam into cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Modai, J; Vittecoq, D; Decazes, J M; Wolff, M; Meulemans, A

    1986-01-01

    The penetration of aztreonam into the cerebrospinal fluid was determined in 16 patients with bacterial meningitis undergoing treatment with other antibiotics. Three aztreonam doses of 30 mg/kg were infused intravenously over 30 to 45 min at 8-h intervals, first between days 2 and 4 and again between days 11 and 20 after onset of the disease. Concentrations of aztreonam in serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained at 60, 90, 120, and 240 min after the third aztreonam dose were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The concentrations of aztreonam in cerebrospinal fluid ranged from 3.5 to 62 micrograms/ml, depending on the sampling time and the time elapsed since the onset of the disease. These concentrations were equal to or higher than the MICs for most of the gram-negative bacilli (including Pseudomonas aeruginosa). PMID:3717933

  19. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN; LIU, XIAO-HUI; WU, JIAN-JUN; REN, HUI-MING; WANG, JIAN; DING, ZHENG-TONG; JIANG, YU-PING

    2016-01-01

    The present study used comparative proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients in order to identify proteins that may act as diagnostic biomarkers and indicators of the pathogenesis of ALS. This analysis was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology, coupled with 2-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software was utilized for bioinformatic analysis of the data. Following this, western blotting was performed in order to examine the expression of 3 candidate proteins in ALS patients compared with healthy individuals [as a normal control (NC) group] or patients with other neurological disease (OND); these proteins were insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-2), glutamate receptor 4 (GRIA4) and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein 1 (LRG1). Clinical data, including gender, age, disease duration and ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) score, were also collected in the ALS patients. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed between the clinical data and the results of western blot analysis. A total of 248 distinct proteins were identified in the ALS and NC groups, amongst which a significant difference could be identified in 35 proteins; of these, 21 proteins were downregulated and 14 were upregulated. These differentially-expressed proteins were thus revealed to be associated with ALS. The western blot analysis confirmed a proportion of the data attained in the iTRAQ analysis, revealing the differential protein expression of IGF-2 and GRIA4 between the ALS and NC groups. IGF-2 was significantly downregulated in ALS patients (P=0.017) and GRIA4 was significantly upregulated (P=0.016). These results were subsequently validated in the 35-patient ALS and OND groups (P=0.002), but no significant difference was identified in LRG1 expression between these groups. GRIA4 protein expression was higher

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Canine Cervical Spondylomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Allen, Matthew J.; Moore, Sarah A.; Keirsey, Jeremy K.; Green, Kari B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Objective To identify proteins with differential expression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 15 clinically normal (control) dogs and 15 dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). Summary of Background Data Canine CSM is a spontaneous, chronic, compressive cervical myelopathy similar to human cervical spondylotic myelopathy. There is a limited knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these conditions. Differentially expressed CSF proteins may contribute with novel information about the disease pathogenesis in both dogs and humans. Methods Protein separation was performed with two-dimensional electrophoresis. A Student’s t-test was used to detect significant differences between groups (P < 0.05). Three comparisons were made: 1) control versus CSM-affected dogs, 2) control versus non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs, and 3) non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected versus corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs. Protein spots exhibiting at least a statistically significant 1.25-fold change between groups were selected for subsequent identification with capillary-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results A total of 96 spots had a significant average change of at least 1.25-fold in one of the three comparisons. Compared to the CSF of control dogs, CSM-affected dogs demonstrated increased CSF expression of eight proteins including vitamin D-binding protein, gelsolin, creatine kinase B-type, angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, SPARC, calsyntenin-1, and complement C3, and decreased expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor, prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin. In the CSF of CSM-affected dogs, corticosteroid treatment increased the expression of haptoglobin, transthyretin isoform 2, cystatin C-like, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin, and decreased the expression of angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, and gelsolin. Conclusions Many of the differentially expressed

  1. Case report of lumbar intradural capillary hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Unnithan, Ajaya Kumar Ayyappan; Joseph, T. P.; Gautam, Amol; Shymole, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangioma is a rare tumor in spinal intradural location. Despite the rarity, early recognition is important because of the risk of hemorrhage. This is a case report of a woman who had capillary hemangioma of cauda equina. Case Description: A 54 -year-old woman presented with a low backache, radiating to the left leg for 2 months. She had left extensor hallucis weakness, sensory impairment in left L5 dermatome, and mild tenderness in lower lumbar spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LS spine showed L4/5 intradural tumor, completely occluding canal in myelogram, enhancing with contrast, s/o benign nerve sheath tumor. L4 laminectomy was done. Reddish tumor was seen originating from a single root. It was removed preserving the root. Postoperatively, she was relieved of symptoms. MRI showed no residue. Histopathology showed lobular proliferation of capillary-sized blood vessels and elongated spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed CD34 positivity in endothelial cell lining of blood vessel and smooth muscle actin positivity in blood vessel muscle cells. HPR-capillary hemangioma. Conclusion: Although rare, capillary hemangioma should be in the differential diagnosis of intradural tumors. It closely mimics nerve sheath tumor. PMID:27069745

  2. Fractures of the thoraco-lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lifeso, R M; Arabie, K M; Kadhi, S K

    1985-08-01

    A personal prospective study of 98 consecutive patients presenting with neurological impairment and fractures or dislocations between the 9th thoracic and 2nd lumbar vertebrae bodies. Fifty-three patients underwent Harrington instrumentation, and 45 patients were treated recumbently. Neurological improvement was much better following Harrington rods in the complete paraplegia group but there was no difference in neurological recovery between the two groups in those with incomplete paraplegia. Forty-two patients who had been stabilised with Harrington rods underwent post-operative myelography or tomography to assess the adequacy of spinal decompression. The best results were in patients with adequate neural canal decompression. In 21 cases decompression had not been adequate, usually due to a stereotyped pattern in which the postero-superior aspect of the fractured body remained in the neural canal. All 21 underwent anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete paraplegics (nine patients) regained the ability to walk, three of the 12 complete paraplegics improved and regained the ability to walk with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses. Neurological improvement was dependent upon the adequacy of spinal cord decompression and not upon Harrington rods. per se. Harrington rods alone were not adequate to decompress the spinal canal in 50 per cent of cases. The best results after anterior decompression occurred where neural compression was caused by a minimally displaced wedge fracture distal to T12. PMID:4047711

  3. Lumbar puncture refusal in febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Ling, S G; Boey, C C

    2000-10-01

    A descriptive study was carried out on patients admitted for febrile convulsion over a two-year period to determine rate of lumbar puncture (LP) refusal, factors associated with LP refusal and outcome of such patients. From 77 patients indicated and requested for LP, 19 (25%) patients refused the procedure. Refusal of LP was significantly more common among the Malay ethnic group (p = 0.01) but not significantly associated with age,gender or whether the patient was admitted for a first or recurrent febrile convulsion. Half of the patients who refused LP had to be started empirically on antibiotics for meningitis. Patients who refused LP were also 8.5 times more likely to discharge themselves "at own risk" (AOR), compared to other patients with febrile convulsion (p = 0.004). In conclusion, LP refusal is a common problem in the local setting and is a hindrance to the proper management of patients with fever and seizure. Appropriate measures must be carried out to educate the public, particularly those from the Malay ethnic group on the safety and usefulness of the procedure. Reasons for patients discharging AOR following LP refusal also need to be addressed and problems rectified. PMID:11281439

  4. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  5. Osteolytic lumbar discal cyst: case report.

    PubMed

    Marushima, Aiki; Uemura, Kazuya; Sato, Naoaki; Maruno, Toru; Matsumura, Akira

    2008-08-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with left lumboischialgia refractory to medical treatment. Neurological examination revealed L5 and S1 radiculopathy which rapidly worsened over a short period. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated disk bulging with a discal cyst at the L4-5 intervertebral space and disk herniation at the L5-S1 intervertebral space. Computed tomography showed osteolytic change of the L5 vertebral body adjacent to the cyst. Resection of the cyst and removal of the herniated disk were performed following fenestration of the L4-5 and L5-S1 interlaminar spaces. Bloody serous fluid followed by clear serous fluid was recognized during the aspiration and partial resection of the cyst at the L4-5 level. Histological examination demonstrated a cyst wall consisting of fibrous connective tissue without a single-layer lining of cells, and fibrin deposits. The patient's symptoms disappeared immediately after the operation. This osteolytic lumbar discal cyst possibly occurred subsequent to hemorrhage from the epidural venous plexus following intervertebral disk injury, hematoma encapsulation by connective fibrous tissue, and cyst wall formation in reaction to the disk injury and hemorrhage. The cyst may have enlarged due to the inflow of the serous fluid from the water-containing degenerated disk. PMID:18719328

  6. Three-dimensional static modeling of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents three-dimensional static modeling of the human lumbar spine to be used in the formation of anatomically-correct movement patterns for a fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The mathematical model incorporates five lumbar vertebrae between the first lumbar vertebra and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. The vertebrae are connected to each other by elastic elements, torsional springs and a spherical joint located at the inferoposterior corner in the mid-sagittal plane of the vertebral body. Elastic elements represent the ligaments that surround the facet joints and the torsional springs represent the collective effect of intervertebral disc which plays a major role in balancing torsional load during upper body motion and the remaining ligaments that support the spinal column. The elastic elements and torsional springs are considered to be nonlinear. The nonlinear stiffness constants for six motion types were solved using a multiobjective optimization technique. The quantitative comparison between the angles of rotations predicted by the proposed model and in the experimental data confirmed that the model yields angles of rotation close to the experimental data. The main contribution is that the new model can be used for all motions while the experimental data was only obtained at discrete measurement points. PMID:22938364

  7. Mechanical contribution to lumbar stress injuries in female gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Hall, S J

    1986-12-01

    Because female gymnasts as a group display higher than average incidences of stress-related pathologies of the lumbar spine, it was of interest to evaluate mechanical factors which are potential contributors. Lumbar hyperextension and impact forces were quantified for performances of five commonly executed gymnastics skills by four competitive collegiate women gymnasts. The skills performed were the front walkover, the back walkover, and the front handspring, the back handspring, and the handspring vault. Wielke's (1983) radius method was used to quantify lumbar curvatures from film data during normal relaxed standing postures and during subject performances of the five selected skills. A force platform was used to monitor vertical and lateral ground reaction forces at the terminations of the respective skill performances. Of the skills examined, the handspring vault produced the highest vertical and lateral impact forces, and the back handspring and back walkover required the greatest amounts of lumbar hyperextension. During the front and back walkovers and during the back handspring, maximum lumbar hyperextension occurred very close to the time that impact force was sustained by either the hands or the feet. PMID:3784872

  8. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil; Doddakashi, Satish; Bahramipour, Philip; Schubert, Johanna

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men) suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery.

  9. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin; Park, Moon Soo

    2015-10-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  10. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients at the Department of Neurosurgery in Colmar (France) who had been operated on by lumbar spine arthroplasty (Prodisc) between April 2002 and October 2008. Results Among the 104 patients, 67 were female and 37 were male with an average age of 33.1 years. We followed the cases for a mean of 20 months. The most frequent level of discopathy was L4-L5 with 62 patients (59.6%) followed by L5-S1 level with 52 patients (50%). Eighty-three patients suffered from low back pain, 21 of which were associated with radiculopathy. The status of 82 patients improved after surgery according to the Oswestry Disability Index score, and 92 patients returned to work. Conclusions The results indicate that TDA is a good alternative treatment for lumbar spine disk disease, particularly for patients with disabling and chronic low back pain. This technique contributes to improve living conditions with correct patient selection for surgery. PMID:25705336

  11. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  12. Microsurgical approach to lumbar synovial cysts. Technical notes.

    PubMed

    Cipri, S; Cafarelli, F; Ielo, A; Gambardella, G

    2004-03-01

    Intraspinal extradural synovial cysts are quite common in the lumbar spine. With respect to clinical presentation and surgical treatment, juxta-facet cysts (ganglion and synovial cysts) share identical characteristics and results. Nowadays, current treatment strategies of intraspinal juxta-facet cysts continue to inspire controversy regarding appropriate surgical approaches, and include many technical options. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the advantage of minimally invasive approaches in 3 cases of lumbar synovial cysts. We performed a small flavectomy in the 1st case, a transarticular partial facectomy, followed by etherologous bone graft fusion in the 2nd case, and a flavectomy and partial facectomy in the 3rd case. In our cases, a microsurgical approach to lumbar synovial cysts yielded to complete excision of the lesions and excellent pain relief, with early mobilization and hospital discharge of the patients. In our opinion, minimally invasive approaches and microsurgical excision of lumbar juxta-facet cysts are advantageous over conventional lumbar laminectomy because they reduce later development of segmental instability at the operative level, and therefore a less invasive strategy for intraspinal synovial cysts removal should be recommended. PMID:15257263

  13. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  14. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  15. Human African trypanosomiasis: a latex agglutination field test for quantifying IgM in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Lejon, V.; Büscher, P.; Sema, N. H.; Magnus, E.; Van Meirvenne, N.

    1998-01-01

    LATEX/IgM, a rapid agglutination test for the semi-quantitative detection of IgM in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with African trypanosomiasis, is described in this article. The lyophilized reagent has been designed for field use and remains stable at 45 degrees C for one year. The test has been evaluated on cerebrospinal fluid samples from trypanosome-infected and non-infected patients, by comparison with commercial latex agglutination, radial immunodiffusion, and nephelometry. All test systems yielded similar results. PMID:10191550

  16. Antibody and Viral Nucleic Acid Testing of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, David C.; Howard, John J.; Oliver, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis diagnostic serum antibody can appear 6 days after the onset of symptoms, and its numbers can increase 4-fold in 4 days, arguing for early and frequent serum testing. In populations where cerebrospinal fluid viral nucleic acid testing sensitivity and specificity remain undetermined, cerebrospinal antibody testing should also be performed. PMID:26063852

  17. Midline lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst mimicking an epidural tumor: case report and review of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Azzam, C J

    1988-08-01

    A case of a midline lumbar extradural ganglion/synovial cyst causing lumbar canal stenosis and mimicking an epidural tumor is presented. The lesion was demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging study, and relief of symptoms was achieved with decompressive laminectomy and total removal of the mass. The pathogenesis of lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst is reviewed. PMID:2972941

  18. Mortality in late post-traumatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Englander, Jeffrey; Bushnik, Tamara; Wright, Jerry M; Jamison, Laura; Duong, Thao T

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the mortality rates in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were classified as having experienced late post-traumatic seizures (LPTS) in the first 2 years post-TBI compared to those who were seizure-free (non-LPTS). Participants were a pooled sample (n = 508) from two studies which enrolled individuals with TBI who were injured between March 31, 1992 and December 20, 1999. The first sample was made up of individuals enrolled in a study of risk factors for LPTS development; the second sample was composed of individuals enrolled in the TBI National Database from a single rehabilitation center. Seventy-one (14%) participants had LPTS, of which 27% had died at 8-15 years post-injury, as compared to 10% of non-LPTS participants. Individuals with LPTS died at a younger age (54.1 versus 67.7 years; p = 0.01), but there were no statistically significant differences in either time from date of injury to death or highest GCS score in the first 24 h. Causes of death were variable and not specifically related to epilepsy. Of those with LPTS, risk factors for death include advanced age at time of injury and presence of subdural hematoma. The higher mortality rate and death at younger age with variable causes in TBI individuals with LPTS warrant close medical evaluation and monitoring of these individuals, particularly accessibility and compliance with ongoing general medical care, and education of primary care colleagues of the unique needs of this at-risk population. PMID:19508123

  19. Post-traumatic stress disorder: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Chris

    2009-11-01

    Fear is the key emotion of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fear's evolved function is motivating survival via defensive behaviours. Defensive behaviours have been highly conserved throughout mammalian species; hence much may be learned from ethology. Predation pressure drove the early evolution of defences, laying foundations in the more ancient brain structures. Conspecific (same species) pressure has been a more recent evolutionary influence, but along with environmental threats it has dominated PTSD research. Anti-predator responses involve both avoiding a predator's sensory field and avoiding detection if within it, as well as escape behaviours. More effective avoidance results in less need for escape behaviours, suggesting that avoidance is biologically distinct from flight. Recognizing the predation, environmental and conspecific origins of defence may result in clearer definition of PTSD phenomena. Defence can also be viewed in the stages of no threat, potential threat, encounter and circa strike. Specific defences are used sequentially and according to contexts, loosely in the order: avoidance, attentive immobility, withdrawal, aggressive defence, appeasement and tonic immobility. The DSM-IV criteria and PTSD research show substantial congruence with the model proposed: that PTSD is a disorder of heightened defence involving six key defences used in conjunction with vigilance and risk assessment according to contexts. Human research is reviewed in this respect with reference to laboratory and wild animal observations providing new insights. Understanding individual perceptual issues (e.g. predictability and controllability) relevant to these phenomena, combined with defence strategy recalibration and neuronal plasticity research goes some way to explaining why some traumatized individuals develop PTSD when others do not. PMID:20001399

  20. Posttraumatic Growth in Parents and Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Picoraro, Joseph A.; Womer, James W.; Kazak, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pediatric medical experiences are potentially traumatic but may lead to psychological growth. Objective: The study objective was to synthesize the published literature regarding posttraumatic growth (PTG) in parents and patients with serious pediatric illness (SPI) into a conceptual model. Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychInfo, and Sociological Abstracts in December 2012 to identify articles on stress or trauma caused by medical events with PTG as an outcome, reviewing articles pertaining to the pediatric population. We additionally reviewed articles outside pediatric medicine that described a model of PTG. Results: Of the 605 articles identified, 55 met inclusion criteria, 26 of which examined parents or pediatric patients. Parents and children may experience PTG following medical trauma through a combination of cognitive and affective processing of their subjective experience. Components of SPI-PTG are unclear, but may include greater appreciation of life, improved interpersonal relationships, greater personal strength, recognition of new possibilities in one's life course, spiritual or religious growth, and reconstruction of a positive body image. Individual characteristics, and the level of social support, may affect the likelihood that SPI-PTG will occur. SPI-PTG in siblings and other family members has not been well studied. Conclusions: SPI-PTG is an important but understudied and inadequately understood phenomenon affecting children with SPI and their family members. Research should focus on clarifying SPI-PTG domains, creating measurement instruments, assessing SPI-PTG across the pediatric age range and among family members, and improving our understanding of and ability to positively intervene regarding the cognitive processes of rumination, sense making, and benefit finding. PMID:24443768