Science.gov

Sample records for postulated core melt

  1. Investigations on the Melt Gate Ablation by Ex-Vessel Core Melts in the KAPOOL Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eppinger, Beatrix; Schmidt-Stiefel, Sike; Tromm, Walter

    2002-07-01

    In future Light Water Reactors (LWR) containment failure should be prevented even for very unlikely core meltdown sequences with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. In the case of such a postulated core meltdown accident in a future LWR the ex-vessel melt shall be retained and cooled in a special compartment inside the containment to exclude significant radioactive release to the environment. In such a case, a gate has to be designed to allow the melt release from the reactor cavity into the compartment. A series of transient experiments has been performed to investigate the melt gate ablation using iron and alumina melts as a simulant for the corium melt. The results of the KAPOOL tests are analyzed with the HEATING5 code in order to evaluate realistic cases of internally heated corium melts and melt gates with the same theoretical tool. (authors)

  2. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  3. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  4. The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) postulated limiting event initial and building source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, L F

    1992-08-01

    As part of the update of the Safety analysis Report (SAR) for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), operational limiting events under the category of inadvertent withdrawal of an experiment while at power or during a power pulse were determined to be the most limiting event(s) for this reactor. This report provides a summary of the assumptions, modeling, and results in evaluation of: Reactivity and thermal hydraulics analysis to determine the amount of fuel melt or fuel damage ratios; The reactor inventories following the limiting event; A literature review of post NUREG-0772 release fraction experiment results on severe fuel damages; Decontamination factors due to in-pool transport; and In-building transport modeling and building source term analysis.

  5. Impact of the proposed core melt policy

    SciTech Connect

    Tosch, K.

    1995-12-31

    Recent encounters with FEMA/NRC and New Jersey have focused our attention on the proposed severe core melt policy. Currently, these federal agencies make the supposition that an automatic evacuation out to 5 miles upon a General Emergency declaration would provide greater protection to the public than an independent grounded assessment which would include the option to shelter. This policy appears to be contrary to EPA-400 and supportable decision making. This talk discusses the policy.

  6. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-06-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component.

  7. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component.

  8. Melt propagation in dry core debris beds

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, S.S. )

    1989-10-01

    During severe light water reactor accidents like Three Mile Island Unit 2, the fuel rods can fragment and thus convert the reactor core into a large particle bed. The postdryout meltdown of such debris beds is examined. A two-dimensional model that considers the presence of oxidic (UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}) as well as metallic (e.g., zirconium) constituents is developed. Key results are that a dense metallic crust is created near the bottom of the bed as molten materials flow downward and freeze; liquid accumulates above the blockage and, if zirconium is present, the pool grows rapidly as molten zirconium dissolved both UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} particles; if the melt wets the solid, a fraction of the melt flows radially outward under the action of capillary forces and freezes near the radial boundary; in a nonwetting system, all of the melt flows into the bottom of the bed; and when zirconium and iron are in intimate contact and the zirconium metal atomic fraction is > 0.33, these metals can liquefy and flow out of the bed very early in the meltdown sequence.

  9. Study of fission product loaded aerosols from core melting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moers, H.; Dillard, J. G.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Kirch, G.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H. J.

    A severe nuclear reactor accident may result in the meltdown of the reactor core. The formation of the core melt is accompanied by the appearance of aerosols consisting of vaporized and recondensed core constituents. The investigation of aerosol samples, which were generated in a laboratory scale core melting experiment and collected during a temperature range Of 1200-1900°C of the melting charge, was performed using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and revealed silver, cadmium, indium, tellurium, iodine and cesium as constituents of the aerosol surface. The metal components were present as either oxides or hydroxides with the exception of silver, which remained in its metallic state.

  10. Melting of MORB at core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Gopal K.; Fiquet, Guillaume; Siebert, Julien; Auzende, Anne-Line; Morard, Guillaume; Antonangeli, Daniele; Garbarino, Gaston

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of natural mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. We used in situ X-ray diffraction primarily for phase identification whereas our melting criterion based on laser power versus temperature plateau combined with textural analysis of recovered solidus and subsolidus samples is accurate and unambiguous. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), the MORB solidus temperature is 3970 ( 150) K. Quenched melt textures observed in recovered samples indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition derived from the central melt pool is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such melt pockets may be gravitationally stable at the core mantle boundary.

  11. Melting of Iron Close to the Inner Core Boundary Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, R. G.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J.; Collins, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary places a strong constraint on the thermal profile within the Earth, the heat flux to the mantle, and also the power to drive the geodynamo. Recent static diamond anvil cell measurements by Anzellini et al. 2013 have accurately measured the melting curve of iron to 200 GPa, which is a tremendous improvement in the available data but is still only 60% of the pressure at the inner core boundary, and thus requires significant extrapolation. Nguyen and Holmes, 2004, have used the sound velocity technique to measure the melting transition on the principal Hugoniot, up to 270 GPa, but some still believe that sound velocity is not an accurate diagnostic of melting as it detects a loss of strength and also that kinetics can mitigate the utility of dynamic melting techniques. Here we use in-situ x-ray diffraction to unambiguously measure the melting transition on the principal Hugoniot of iron to 270 GPa. We also show that iron melts from the hcp phase at pressures up to 270 GPa, which is significantly closer to the inner core boundary than any previous melting curve measurement capable of phase discrimination. From comparison of our measurements to those of Nguyen and Holmes, we show that sound velocity measurements can accurately constrain the melting curve and that the kinetics of melting iron are faster than both laser shock and gas gun experimental timescales. Thereby, dynamic techniques should be trusted for probing the melting curve of metals and they also offer the greatest opportunity to probe the melting curve of iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary and also the higher pressures achieved within the interiors of super-Earths. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Percolation of core melts at lower mantle conditions

    PubMed

    Shannon; Agee

    1998-05-15

    Experiments at high pressure and temperature to determine the dihedral angle of core melts in lower mantle phases yielded a value of approximately 71 degrees for perovskite-dominated matrices. This angle, although greater than the 60 degrees required for completely efficient percolation, is considerably less than the angles observed in mineral matrices at upper mantle pressure-temperature conditions in experiments. In other words, molten iron alloy can flow much more easily in lower mantle mineralogies than in upper mantle mineralogies. Accordingly, although segregation of core material by melt percolation is probably not feasible in the upper mantle, core formation by percolation may be possible in the lower mantle. PMID:9582115

  13. Isotope thermometry in melt-affected ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, T.; Marshall, S. J.; Sharp, M. J.

    2011-06-01

    A statistically significant relationship is observed between stable water isotopes (?18O) and melt amounts in a melt-affected firn core (SSummit) taken from the Prince of Wales Icefield, Ellesmere Island, Canada. By contrast, a low-melt firn core taken from a higher-elevation, higher-latitude location on the same icefield shows no relationship between these variables. We interpret this as evidence for meltwater-induced isotopic enrichment at SSummit. A percent melt-based correction slope is applied to isotopic values from SSummit. Uncorrected and corrected temperature records derived from the raw and corrected ?18O values are compared to bias-corrected temperature data from the NCEP Reanalysis. Improvements are observed in the isotopic reconstruction of SSummit annual precipitation-weighted temperatures when we correct for meltwater enrichment, with a reduction from +0.6C to 0.0C in the mean annual error and a decrease in root-mean-square error from 1.8C to 1.6C. The correction factor appears to overcorrect isotopic modification during high melt years such as 1999, during which SSummit experienced nearly 70% more melt than the average from 1975 to 2000. Excluding 1999 data from the correction analysis results in a slight reduction in mean absolute error from 1.4C to 1.3C. These results suggest that melt-induced isotopic modification cannot be corrected in very high melt years.

  14. Melting of subducted basalt at the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Hénot, Jean-Marc; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-05-23

    The geological materials in Earth's lowermost mantle control the characteristics and interpretation of seismic ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the core-mantle boundary. Partial melting of the bulk lower mantle is often advocated as the cause, but this does not explain the nonubiquitous character of these regional seismic features. We explored the melting properties of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), which can reach the lowermost mantle after subduction of oceanic crust. At a pressure representative of the core-mantle boundary (135 gigapascals), the onset of melting occurs at ~3800 kelvin, which is ~350 kelvin below the mantle solidus. The SiO2-rich liquid generated either remains trapped in the MORB material or solidifies after reacting with the surrounding MgO-rich mantle, remixing subducted MORB with the lowermost mantle. PMID:24855266

  15. Melting curves and entropy of melting of iron under Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Jin; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Zhong-Li; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-07-01

    The melting curves of iron are determined up to 365 GPa via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations combining with the embedded atom model (EAM) potential developed by Ackland et al. We simulated the melting with three approaches, the hysteresis, two-phase and recently modified Z methods. All three techniques can produce satisfying results, consistent well with most of static compression measurements and shock experiments. Hence, we recommend that these three techniques and this EAM potential are reliable techniques and potential for simulating melting properties of iron. Fitting the well-known Simon equation to our two-phase data we yield the analytical melting curve for iron: 1825(1 + P/57.723)0.654, which gives a melting point at the inner core boundary of 6345 K, very close to the recent diamond anvil cell (DAC) extrapolated value and other ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the analyses of our entropy of melting and solid-liquid interfacial energy ?sl indicate that at high pressure, the entropy of fusion shows weak pressure effect. The ?sl increases monotonically with pressure, and can be described as a second-order polynomial relation.

  16. Melting the core of giant planets: impact on tidal dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Giant planets are believed to host central dense rocky/icy cores that are key actors in the core-accretion scenario for their formation. In the same time, some of their components are unstable in the temperature and pressure regimes of central regions of giant planets and only ab-initio EOS computations can address the question of the state of matter. In this framework, several works demonstrated that erosion and redistribution of core materials in the envelope must be taken into account. These complex mechanisms thus may deeply modify giant planet interiors for which signatures of strong tidal dissipation have been obtained for Jupiter and Saturn. The best candidates to explain this dissipation are the viscoelastic dissipation in the central dense core and turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in their fluid convective envelope. In this work, we study the consequences of the possible melting of central regions for the efficiency of each of these mechanisms.

  17. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  18. Risk reduction of core-melt accidents in advaned CAPRA burner cores

    SciTech Connect

    Maschek, W.; Struwe, D.; Eigemann, M.

    1997-12-01

    As part of the CAPRA Program (Consommation Accrue de Plutonium dans les RApides) the feasibility of fast reactors is investigated to burn plutonium and also to destruct minor actinides. The design of CAPRA cores shows significant differences compared to conventional cores. Especially the high Pu-enrichment has an important influence on the core melt-down behavior and the associated recriticality risk. To cope with this risk, inherent design features and special measures/devices are investigated for their potential of early fuel discharge to reduce the criticality of the reactor core. An assessment of such measures/devices is given and experimental needs are formulated. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schpbach, S.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-06-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We build an interface between an Infra Red Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (IR-CRDS) and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of ?18O and ?D on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub ?l amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100 % efficiency in a home made oven at a temperature of 170 C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on humidity levels. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 and 0.5 for ?18O and ?D, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of ?18O and ?D, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present data acquired in the framework of the NEEM deep ice core drilling project in Greenland, during the 2010 field season.

  20. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schpbach, S.; Kettner, E.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-11-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of ?18O and ?D on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub ?l amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW-SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 and 0.5 for ?18O and ?D, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of ?18O and ?D, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present data acquired in the field during the 2010 season as part of the NEEM deep ice core drilling project in North Greenland.

  1. Disequilibrium melting and melt migration driven by impacts: Implications for rapid planetesimal core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkins, Andrew G.; Weinberg, Roberto F.; Schaefer, Bruce F.; Langendam, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The ?182W ages of magmatic iron meteorites are largely within error of the oldest solar system particles, apparently requiring a mechanism for segregation of metals to the cores of planetesimals within 1.5 million years of initial condensation. Currently favoured models involve equilibrium melting and gravitational segregation in a static, quiescent environment, which requires very high early heat production in small bodies via decay of short-lived radionuclides. However, the rapid accretion needed to do this implies a violent early accretionary history, raising the question of whether attainment of equilibrium is a valid assumption. Since our use of the Hf-W isotopic system is predicated on achievement of chemical equilibrium during core formation, our understanding of the timing of this key early solar system process is dependent on our knowledge of the segregation mechanism. Here, we investigate impact-related textures and microstructures in chondritic meteorites, and show that impact-generated deformation promoted separation of liquid FeNi into enlarged sulfide-depleted accumulations, and that this happened under conditions of thermochemical disequilibrium. These observations imply that similar enlarged metal accumulations developed as the earliest planetesimals grew by rapid collisional accretion. We suggest that the nonmagmatic iron meteorites formed this way and explain why they contain chondritic fragments in a way that is consistent with their trace element characteristics. As some planetesimals grew large enough to develop partially molten silicate mantles, these enlarged metal accumulations would settle rapidly to form cores leaving sulfide and small metal particles behind, since gravitational settling rate scales with the square of metal particle size. Our model thus provides a mechanism for more rapid core formation with less radiogenic heating. In contrast to existing models of core formation, the observed rarity of sulfide-dominant meteorites is an expected consequence of our model, which promotes early and progressive separation of metal and sulfide. We suggest that the core formation models that assume attainment of equilibrium in the Hf-W system underestimate the core formation time.

  2. Core formation by giant impacts: Conditions for intact melt region formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    Among the many effects of high-speed, giant impacts is widescale melting that can potentially trigger catastrophic core formation. If the projectile is sufficiently large, the melt pools to form an intact melt region. The dense phase then segregates from the melt, forming a density anomoly at the melt region's base. If the anomoly produces a differential stress larger than a certain minimum, it overcomes the mantle's long-term elastic strength and rapidly forms a core. It was previously shown that giant impacts effectively trigger core formation in silicate bodies by the time they grow to the mass of Mercury and in icy bodies by the time they grow larger than Triton. In order for this process to be viable, an intact melt region must be formed. Conditions under which this occurs is examined in more detail than previously published.

  3. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W.

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  4. CORMLT modeling of severe fuel damage in postulated accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, V.E.; Mertol, A.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, the capabilities of the CORMLT code, which was designed to predict heatup, degradation, and meltdown of core and Reactor Pressure VEssel (RPV) internals during postulated severe accidents, were enhanced to enable tracking of individual fission product species during core meltdown. In addition, a mechanistic treatment of the release and flow of molten materials was developed to replace the engineering models developed earlier. In the present paper, the improved models are described and predictions of melt progression for a postullated accident sequence (TMLB') are discussed. A key issue in the new modeling is the mechanical behavior of fuel pellet stacks during run-off of molten cladding. One view is that capillary forces result in ''welding'' of porous fuel, thereby promoting free-standing pellet stacks; another is that rubblization and slumping of fuel take place. Results are reported for the first view point and its impact on the timings for core collapse into the bottom-head is addressed.

  5. Redistribution of Core-forming Melt During Shear Deformation of Partially Molten Peridotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the role of deformation on the distribution of core-forming melt in a partially molten peridotite, samples of olivine-basalt-iron sulfide were sheared to large strains. Dramatic redistribution of sulfide and silicate melts occur during deformation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) to core melt at United States nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Giachetti, R.T. , Ann Arbor, MI )

    1989-09-01

    This report looks at WASH-1400 and several other Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and Probabilistic Safety Studies (PSSs) to determine the contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) events to the total core melt probability at eight nuclear power plants in the United States. After considering each plant individually, the results are compared from plant to plant to see if any generic conclusions regarding ATWS, or core melt in general, can be made. 8 refs., 34 tabs.

  7. Partial melting of a Pb-Sn mushy layer due to heating from above, and implications for regional melting of Earth's directionally solidified inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, James; Bergman, Michael I.; Huguet, Ludovic; Alboussiere, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Superimposed on the radial solidification of Earth's inner core may be hemispherical and/or regional patches of melting at the inner-outer core boundary. Little work has been carried out on partial melting of a dendritic mushy layer due to heating from above. Here we study directional solidification, annealing, and partial melting from above of Pb-rich Sn alloy ingots. We find that partial melting from above results in convection in the mushy layer, with dense, melted Pb sinking and resolidifying at a lower height, yielding a different density profile than for those ingots that are just directionally solidified, irrespective of annealing. Partial melting from above causes a greater density deeper down and a corresponding steeper density decrease nearer the top. There is also a change in microstructure. These observations may be in accordance with inferences of east-west and perhaps smaller-scale variations in seismic properties near the top of the inner core.

  8. Transcrystalline Melt Migration in (Mg,Fe)O Ferropericlase: Implications for Core-Mantle Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, K.; Karato, S.

    2011-12-01

    The nature of chemical interaction between the mantle and core is an important topic of geochemistry and geophysics. In most of previous studies diffusion-controlled chemical reactions were considered. However, the length scale of diffusion is limited except for certain trace elements, and extensive changes in composition in major element chemistry are not expected by these processes. In this presentation, we report the experimental observations of melt migration in single crystals of (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase under isothermal conditions. The rate of melt migration is much faster than diffusion-controlled processes and may provide a clue to some observations on the core-mantle-boundary. Single crystals of (Mg,Fe)O were annealed at 1873 K and 5-15 GPa surrounded by MoO2 encapsulated in Mo and Pt double capsule. Under these conditions, MoO2-rich melt was formed and migrated into the single crystals of (Mg,Fe)O. Chemical composition of solid and melt gradually changed through melt migration such that ferropericlase was enriched in MgO and reduced in FeO. Since melt was undersaturated in solid components in our experimental conditions, the chemical potential change caused the melt and solid boundary to move towards the solid. In this situation, the moving interface was morphologically unstable since the supersaturated segment of the solid exists in front of the melt. Melt pockets were eventually trapped in the (Mg,Fe)O single crystal by necking their rear ends down and migrated through it by dissolving Fe-rich ferropericlase at front and precipitating Mg-rich one at rear. Observed speed of melt migration was significantly faster than bulk diffusion of atoms in ferropericlase. The recent experimental results suggest that the Earth's core is undersaturated in oxygen with respect to the FeO content of the bulk mantle (Frost et al., 2010, JGR). Thus, morphological instability in (Mg,Fe)O at the base of the mantle may cause iron-rich core components to migrate upward. The length scale of melt migration is likely constrained by the balance between chemical potential change by mixing and gravitational potential energy change due to the density difference between melt and solid.

  9. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: Structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.; Champenois, C.; Yurtsever, E.

    2009-12-15

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semianalytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite-size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  10. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted of: (1) comparison to an analytical solution for the dam break problem, (2) water spreading tests in a 1/10 linear scale model of the Mark I containment by Theofanous et al., and (3) steel spreading tests by Suzuki et al. that were also conducted in a geometry similar to the Mark I. The objective of this work was to utilize the MELTSPREAD code to check the assumption of uniform melt spreading in the EPR core catcher design. As a starting point for the project, the code was validated against the worldwide melt spreading database that emerged after the code was originally written in the very early 1990's. As part of this exercise, the code was extensively modified and upgraded to incorporate findings from these various analytical and experiment programs. In terms of expanding the ability of the code to analyze various melt simulant experiments, the options to input user-specified melt and/or substrate material properties was added. The ability to perform invisicid and/or adiabatic spreading analysis was also added so that comparisons with analytical solutions and isothermal spreading tests could be carried out. In terms of refining the capability to carry out reactor material melt spreading analyses, the code was upgraded with a new melt viscosity model; the capability was added to treat situations in which solid fraction buildup between the liquidus-solidus is non-linear; and finally, the ability to treat an interfacial heat transfer resistance between the melt and substrate was incorporated. This last set of changes substantially improved the predictive capability of the code in terms of addressing reactor material melt spreading tests. Aside from improvements and upgrades, a method was developed to fit the model to the various melt spreading tests in a manner that allowed uncertainties in the model predictions to be statistically characterized. With these results, a sensitivity study was performed to investigate the assumption of uniform spreading in the EPR core catcher that addressed parametric variations in: (1) melt pour mass, (2) melt composition, (3) melt pour rate, (4) pour configuration (i.e., homogeneous vs. stratified metal-oxide phases), (5) melt temperature, (6) cavity condition (wet vs. dry), (7) spreading channel inclination angle, and finally (8) uncertainties in the melt viscosity correlation that are based on comparisons with the reactor material melt spreading database. Although differences were found in the rate of spreading and the degree to which the sacrificial concrete in the spreading room is ablated during the transients, in all cases the melt eventually (over a period of minutes) spreads to a uniform depth in the system.

  11. Chemical Convention in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Ironsulfur System

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-26

    By reanalyzing Apollo lunar seismograms using array-processing methods, a recent study suggests that the Moon has a solid inner core and a fluid outer core, much like the Earth. The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, compared with 4% for the Earth. The pressure at the Moon's core-mantle boundary is 4.8 GPa, and that at the ICB is 5.2 GPa. The partially molten state of the lunar core provides constraints on the thermal and chemical states of the Moon: The temperature at the inner core boundary (ICB) corresponds to the liquidus of the outer core composition, and the mass fraction of the solid core allows us to infer the bulk composition of the core from an estimated thermal profile. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo. Sulfur is considered an antifreeze component in the lunar core. Here we investigate the melting behavior of the Fe-S system at the pressure conditions of the lunar core, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our goal is to understand compositionally driven convection in the lunar core and assess its role in generating an internal magnetic field in the early history of the Moon.

  12. Melting phase relations in the system Fe-FeO to the inner core boundary pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komabayashi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen has been a plausible candidate for a light element dissolved in the Earth's core mostly due to its large abundance in the mantle and low eutectic temperature at low pressure. In order to place constraints on the existence/absence of oxygen in the core, which are the key to understand the origin, evolution, and dynamics of the Earth, many experimental efforts have been made on oxygen-bearing iron systems, including measurements of phase relations and of the density and sound velocity of phases. I made thermodynamic analysis on the experimentally constrained melting phase relations in the system Fe-FeO, which helps us to refine the physical properties of the system. From the analysis I found two important issues in the melting relations: (i) the melting temperatures of the end-member systems at 15-16 GPa and (ii) mixing properties for liquids. (i) In order for the thermodynamic calculations to reproduce phase relations determined in multianvil experiments at 15-16 GPa which include an assemblage of FeO + metallic liquid just above the solidus, the melting temperature of iron needs to be lower than that of FeO. If the iron melting temperature is greater, another assemblage of Fe + ionic liquid would be stabilized instead of FeO + metallic liquid. (ii) I tested existing mixing models for liquids by comparing calculated eutectic relations with experimental data to 300 GPa. I found that the Fe-FeO liquids show nonideal mixing behavior at least to 50 GPa and become nearly ideal mixtures under the core pressures. The constructed thermodynamic database to the inner core boundary pressure (330 GPa) yields the eutectic compositions of Fe-7.2-9.1wt% O and eutectic temperatures of 2990-4330 K under the outer core pressures (136-330 GPa). I will also discuss the nature of an oxygen-bearing outer core.

  13. Effect of Hydrogen and Carbon on the Melting Temperature of the Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Sakamaki, K.; Takahashi, E.; Fukai, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Funakoshi, K.

    2007-12-01

    The temperature of the Earth's outer core has been discussed based on the melting temperature of Fe- O-S alloys (e.g., Boehler, 1996). Although hydrogen and carbon are the possible candidates of the core component, their effects on the melting temperature of iron at high-pressures are unclear. Using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus at SPring-8 synchrotron, we carried out a series of melting experiments on FeH and Fe3C up to 20 and 28 GPa, respectively. In the experiments on FeH, Fe sponge mixed with MgO was packed into a NaCl container with a hydrogen source, LiAlH4 (e.g., Fukai et al., 1989). During heating under high-pressures, hydrogenation of iron was observed by volume change. The phase boundary between ɛ'-phase (low-temperature phase) and γ-phase (high-temperature phase) of iron-hydride was determined using both cooling and heating experiments. Hydrogen concentrations in the γ-FeHx and ɛ'-FeHx were calculated based on the excess volume data from that of pure iron. It is found that γ-FeHx and ɛ'-FeHx synthesized in our experiments at pressures between 10 and 20 GPa are nearly stoichiometric FeH. Melting temperature of the γ-FeH was determined by the abrupt change in the X-ray diffraction patterns (crystalline to amorphous). The melting temperatures were determined to be 1473, 1473, 1493, 1573 and 1593 K at 10, 11.5, 15, 18 and 20 GPa, respectively. In the experiments using Fe3C, the synthesized Fe3C powder was encapsulated in a MgO container. In the diffraction sequences during heating, the peaks of Fe3C disappeared, and the new peaks identified as those of Fe7C3 were observed with halo caused by liquid. Finally, the Fe7C3 peaks disappeared, and only the halo pattern was observed. Based on these observations, the incongruent melting of Fe3C to Fe7C3 and liquid is estimated to occur at 1823 and 1923 K at 19.7 and 27.0 GPa, respectively. The liquidus temperatures of the Fe3C composition are found to be at 2098 and 2198 K at 19.5 and 26.8 GPa, respectively. The melting temperatures of Fe3C determined by our experiments are >700 K lower than that of the previous estimation based on thermodynamic calculation (Wood, 1993). Our experimental results show a possibility that the hydrogen and carbon lower the melting temperature of iron (outer core) dramatically. The melting temperatures of γ-FeH and Fe3C at 20 GPa are already 500 K lower than that of pure iron estimated by Anderson and Isaak (2000). Extrapolating our experimental melting curves for FeH and Fe3C to core pressures using Lindemann's melting law, we obtained the melting temperatures to be ~2600 and ~2900 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), respectively. In the presence of both hydrogen and carbon, melting temperature of the Earth's outer core could be >1500 K lower than that of the previous estimates, implying that the temperature gap at CMB could be much smaller than the current estimates.

  14. Containment performance for the core melt accidents in BWRs with Mark I and Mark II containments

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, K.R.; Yang, J.W.; Greene, G.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Hofmayer, C.

    1985-01-01

    Most previous risk assessment studies have assumed catastrophic failure of containments for severe accidents which are predicted to exceed the containment yield stress. This investigation analyzes the progression of a severe accident in order to develop realistic containment temperature and pressure loading, utilizes models for containment leakage estimates for the various loading histories, and assesses the expected failure modes and timing of releases for core melt accidents in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with Mark I and Mark II containments. The results of the investigation indicate that leakage through the seal on the drywell head may be sufficient to prevent catastrophic failure of the containments for a wide range of hypothetical core melt scenarios. In addition, the investigation has indicated the potential for a previously inidentified failure mode (containment liner meltthrough) for Mark I containments in which a large fraction of the core is released from the vessel in a molten state. 14 refs.

  15. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  16. An interconnected network of core-forming melts produced by shear deformation

    PubMed

    Bruhn; Groebner; Kohlstedt

    2000-02-24

    The formation mechanism of terrestrial planetary cores is still poorly understood, and has been the subject of numerous experimental studies. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which metal--mainly iron with some nickel--could have been extracted from a silicate mantle to form the core. Most recent models involve gravitational sinking of molten metal or metal sulphide through a partially or fully molten mantle that is often referred to as a 'magma ocean'. Alternative models invoke percolation of molten metal along an interconnected network (that is, porous flow) through a solid silicate matrix. But experimental studies performed at high pressures have shown that, under hydrostatic conditions, these melts do not form an interconnected network, leading to the widespread assumption that formation of metallic cores requires a magma ocean. In contrast, here we present experiments which demonstrate that shear deformation to large strains can interconnect a significant fraction of initially isolated pockets of metal and metal sulphide melts in a solid matrix of polycrystalline olivine. Therefore, in a dynamic (non-hydrostatic) environment, percolation remains a viable mechanism for the segregation and migration of core-forming melts in a solid silicate mantle. PMID:10706283

  17. Anomalous Melting Scenario of the Two-Dimensional Core-Softened System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudalov, D. E.; Fomin, Yu. D.; Tsiok, E. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2014-04-01

    We present a computer simulation study of the phase behavior of two-dimensional (2D) classical particles repelling each other through an isotropic core-softened potential. As in the analogous three-dimensional (3D) case, a reentrant-melting transition occurs upon compression for not too high pressures, along with a spectrum of waterlike anomalies in the fluid phase. However, in two dimensions in the low density part of the phase diagram melting is a continuous two-stage transition, with an intermediate hexatic phase. All available evidence supports the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young scenario for this melting transition. On the other hand, at the high density part of the phase diagram one first-order transition takes place.

  18. Anomalous melting scenario of the two-dimensional core-softened system.

    PubMed

    Dudalov, D E; Fomin, Yu D; Tsiok, E N; Ryzhov, V N

    2014-04-18

    We present a computer simulation study of the phase behavior of two-dimensional (2D) classical particles repelling each other through an isotropic core-softened potential. As in the analogous three-dimensional (3D) case, a reentrant-melting transition occurs upon compression for not too high pressures, along with a spectrum of waterlike anomalies in the fluid phase. However, in two dimensions in the low density part of the phase diagram melting is a continuous two-stage transition, with an intermediate hexatic phase. All available evidence supports the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young scenario for this melting transition. On the other hand, at the high density part of the phase diagram one first-order transition takes place. PMID:24785074

  19. The melting curve of Ni to 125 GPa: implications for Earth's Fe rich core alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, O. T.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D. P.; Vocadlo, L.; Thomson, A. R.; Wann, E.; Wang, W.; Edgington, A.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, N.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments and two melting criteria: the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions [1]. Our melting curve (Fig. 1) is in good agreement with most theoretical studies [e.g. 2] and the available shock wave data (Fig. 2). It is, however, dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which the determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method [e.g. 3]. We estimate the melting point of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB; 330 GPa) to be 5800700 K (2?), ~2500 K higher than the estimate based on the laser speckle method [3] and within error of Fe (6230500 K) as determined in a similar in situ LH-DAC study [4]. We find that laser speckle based melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as melt convection. Our new melting curve suggests that the reduction in ICB temperature due to the alloying of Ni with Fe is likely to be significantly smaller than would be expected had the earlier experimental Ni melting studies been correct. We have applied our methodology to a range of other transition metals (Mo, Ti, V, Cu). In the case of Mo, Ti and V the melting curves are in good agreement with the shock compression and theoretical melting studies but hotter and steeper than those based on the laser speckle method, as with Ni. Cu is an exception in which all studies agree, including those employing the laser speckle method. These results go a long way toward resolving the the long-standing controversy over the phase diagrams of the transition metals as determined from static LH-DAC studies on the one hand, and theoretical and dynamic compression studies on the other. [1] Lord et al. (2014) Phys Earth Planet Inter [2] Pozzo M, Alf D (2013) Phys Rev B, 88:024111 [3] Errandonea et al. (2001) Phys Rev B, 63:132104 [4] Anzellini et al. (2013) Science, 340:464-466

  20. Estimates of early containment loads from core melt accidents. Draft report for comment

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-01

    The thermal-hydraulic processes and corium debris-material interactions that can result from core melting in a severe accident have been studied to evaluate the potential effect of such phenomena on containment integrity. Pressure and temperature loads associated with representative accident sequences have been estimated for the six various LWR containment types used within the United States. Summaries distilling the analyses are presented and an interpretation of the results provided. 13 refs., 68 figs., 39 tabs.

  1. Large-scale experiments on ex-vessel core melt behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sappok, M.; Steinwarz, W.

    1997-12-01

    In the frame of European research activities on nuclear safety, experimental work on exvessel core melt behaviour under prototypic conditions is being performed. Spreading on various material surfaces and verification of relevant computer codes are the main tasks leading to an improvement of the design basis for corium retention systems. Especially the large-scale spreading test (1:6 with respect to the EPR spreading area) showed the advantageous characteristics of cast iron (GGG-40) as core catching substratum material. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Random pinning changes the melting scenario of a two-dimensional core-softened potential system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiok, E. N.; Dudalov, D. E.; Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    In experiments two-dimensional systems are realized mainly on solid substrates, which introduce quenched disorder due to some inherent defects. The defects of substrates influence the melting scenario of the systems and have to be taken into account in the interpretation of experimental results. We present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of a two-dimensional system with a core-softened potential in which a small fraction of the particles is pinned, inducing quenched disorder. Ppotentials of this type are widely used for the qualitative description of systems with waterlike anomalies. In our previous publications it was shown that the system demonstrates an anomalous melting scenario: at low densities the system melts through two continuous transitions in accordance with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) theory with an intermediate hexatic phase, while at high densities the conventional first-order melting transition takes place. We find that the well-known disorder-induced widening of the hexatic phase occurs at low densities, while in the high-density part of the phase diagram random pinning transforms the first-order melting into two transitions: a continuous KTHNY-like solid-hexatic transition and a first-order hexatic-isotropic liquid transition.

  3. An Interconnected Network of Core-Forming Melts Produced by Shear Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhn, D.; Groebner, N.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The formation mechanism of terrestrial planetary is still poorly understood, and has been the subject of numerous experimental studies. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which metal-mainly iron with some nickel-could have been extracted from a silicate mantle to form the core. Most recent models involve gravitational sinking of molten metal or metal sulphide through a partially or fully molten mantle that is often referred to as a'magma ocean. Alternative models invoke percolation of molten metal along an interconnected network (that is, porous flow) through a solid silicate matrix. But experimental studies performed at high pressures have shown that, under hydrostatic conditions, these melts do not form an interconnected network, leading to the widespread assumption that formation of metallic cores requires a magma ocean. In contrast, here we present experiments which demonstrate that shear deformation to large strains can interconnect a significant fraction of initially isolated pockets of metal and metal sulphide melts in a solid matrix of polycrystalline olivine. Therefore, in a dynamic (nonhydrostatic) environment, percolation remains a viable mechanism for the segregation and migration of core-forming melts in a solid silicate mantle.

  4. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  5. Ice core evidence for extensive melting of the greenland ice sheet in the last interglacial.

    PubMed

    Koerner, R M

    1989-05-26

    Evidence from ice at the bottom of ice cores from the Canadian Arctic Islands and Camp Century and Dye-3 in Greenland suggests that the Greenland ice sheet melted extensively or completely during the last interglacial period more than 100 ka (thousand years ago), in contrast to earlier interpretations. The presence of dirt particles in the basal ice has previously been thought to indicate that the base of the ice sheets had melted and that the evidence for the time of original growth of these ice masses had been destroyed. However, the particles most likely blew onto the ice when the dimensions of the ice caps and ice sheets were much smaller. Ice texture, gas content, and other evidence also suggest that the basal ice at each drill site is superimposed ice, a type of ice typical of the early growth stages of an ice cap or ice sheet. If the present-day ice masses began their growth during the last interglacial, the ice sheet from the earlier (Illinoian) glacial period must have competely or largely melted during the early part of the same interglacial period. If such melting did occur, the 6-meter higher-than-present sea level during the Sangamon cannot be attributed to disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, as has been suggested. PMID:17731883

  6. Platinum partitioning between metal and silicate melts: Core formation, late veneer and the nanonuggets issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Médard, Etienne; Schmidt, Max W.; Wälle, Markus; Keller, Nicole S.; Günther, Detlef

    2015-08-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature experiments have been performed at ∼1.2 GPa and 1360-2100 °C to investigate the partitioning of Pt between a silicate melt and a metallic melt. Our experiments indicate that nanonuggets encountered in previous experiments are experimental artifacts, formed at high temperature by oversaturation caused by high oxygen fugacity during the initial stages of an experiment. Experiments at high-acceleration using a centrifuging piston-cylinder show that nanonuggets can be removed by gravity during the experiment. Formation of nanonuggets can also be avoided by using initially reduced starting materials. The presence of iron is also a key element in reducing the formation of nanonuggets. Our nanonugget-free data are broadly consistent with previous nanonuggets-filtered data, and suggest that Pt partitioning becomes independent of oxygen fugacity below an oxygen fugacity of at least IW+2. Pt is thus possibly dissolved as a neutral species (or even an anionic species) at low fO2, instead of the more common Pt2+ species present at higher fO2. Due to low concentration, the nature of this species cannot be determined, but atomic Pt or Pt- are possible options. Under core-formation conditions, Pt partitioning between metal and silicate is mostly independent of oxygen fugacity, silicate melt composition, and pressure. Partition coefficient during core formation can be expressed by the following equation: log DPtMmetal/silicate = 1.0348 + 14698 / T (in weight units). Calculations indicate that the Pt content (and by extension the Highly Siderophile Elements content) of the Earth's mantle cannot be explained by equilibrium partitioning during core formation, requiring further addition of HSE to the mantle. The mass of this late veneer is approximately 0.4% of the total mass of the Earth (or 0.6% of the mass of the mantle).

  7. Fission product release phenomena during core melt accidents in metal fueled heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, P G; Hyder, M L; Monson, P R; Randolph, H W; Hagrman, D L; McClure, P R; Leonard, M T

    1990-01-01

    The phenomena that determine fission product release rates from a core melting accident in a metal-fueled, heavy water reactor are described in this paper. This information is obtained from the analysis of the current metal fuel experimental data base and from the results of analytical calculations. Experimental programs in place at the Savannah River Site are described that will provide information to resolve uncertainties in the data base. The results of the experiments will be incorporated into new severe accident computer codes recently developed for this reactor design. 47 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  9. Interpretation of experimental results from the CORA core melt progression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from the CORA bundle heatup and melting experiments, performed at Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany, are being analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The analysis is being performed as part of a systematic review of core melt progression experiments for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to (a) develop an improved understanding of important phenomena occurring during a severe accident, (b) to validate existing severe accident models, and (c) where necessary, develop improved models. An assessment of the variations in damage progression behavior because of variations in test parameters (a) bundle design and size, (b) system pressure, (c) slow cooling of the damaged bundles in argon versus rapid quenching in water, and (d) bundle inlet temperatures and flow rates is provided in the paper. The influence of uncertainties in important test conditions is also discussed. Specific results presented include (a) bundle temperature, (b) the onset and movement of the oxidation front within the bundle, (c) fuel rod ballooning and rod failure, and (d) melt relocation and associated material interactions between bundle components and structures. 12 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. How dimensionality changes the anomalous behavior and melting scenario of a core-softened potential system?

    PubMed

    Dudalov, D E; Fomin, Y D; Tsiok, E N; Ryzhov, V N

    2014-07-21

    We present a computer simulation study of the phase diagram and anomalous behavior of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) classical particles repelling each other through an isotropic core-softened potential. As in the analogous three-dimensional case, in 2D a reentrant-melting transition occurs upon compression under not too high pressure, along with a spectrum of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the fluid phase. However, in two dimensions the order of the region of anomalous diffusion and the region of structural anomaly is inverted in comparison with the 3D case, where there exists a water-like sequence of anomalies, and has a silica-like sequence. In the low density part of the 2D phase diagram, melting is a continuous two-stage transition, with an intermediate hexatic phase. All available evidence supports the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) scenario for this melting transition. On the other hand, at high density part of the phase diagram one first-order transition takes place. PMID:24888366

  11. Fate of MgSiO3 melts at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Kupenko, Ilya; Hennet, Louis; Harries, Dennis; Dane, Thomas; Burghammer, Manfred; Rubie, Dave C

    2015-11-17

    One key for understanding the stratification in the deep mantle lies in the determination of the density and structure of matter at high pressures, as well as the density contrast between solid and liquid silicate phases. Indeed, the density contrast is the main control on the entrainment or settlement of matter and is of fundamental importance for understanding the past and present dynamic behavior of the deepest part of the Earth's mantle. Here, we adapted the X-ray absorption method to the small dimensions of the diamond anvil cell, enabling density measurements of amorphous materials to unprecedented conditions of pressure. Our density data for MgSiO3 glass up to 127 GPa are considerably higher than those previously derived from Brillouin spectroscopy but validate recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A fourth-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reproduces our experimental data over the entire pressure regime of the mantle. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, the density of MgSiO3 glass is 5.48 ± 0.18 g/cm(3), which is only 1.6% lower than that of MgSiO3 bridgmanite at 5.57 g/cm(3), i.e., they are the same within the uncertainty. Taking into account the partitioning of iron into the melt, we conclude that melts are denser than the surrounding solid phases in the lowermost mantle and that melts will be trapped above the CMB. PMID:26578761

  12. Nickel and helium evidence for melt above the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Claude; Asimow, Paul D; Ionov, Dmitri A; Vidito, Chris; Jackson, Matthew G; Geist, Dennis

    2013-01-17

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios in some basalts have generally been interpreted as originating in an incompletely degassed lower-mantle source. This helium source may have been isolated at the core-mantle boundary region since Earth's accretion. Alternatively, it may have taken part in whole-mantle convection and crust production over the age of the Earth; if so, it is now either a primitive refugium at the core-mantle boundary or is distributed throughout the lower mantle. Here we constrain the problem using lavas from Baffin Island, West Greenland, the Ontong Java Plateau, Isla Gorgona and Fernandina (Galapagos). Olivine phenocryst compositions show that these lavas originated from a peridotite source that was about 20 per cent higher in nickel content than in the modern mid-ocean-ridge basalt source. Where data are available, these lavas also have high (3)He/(4)He. We propose that a less-degassed nickel-rich source formed by core-mantle interaction during the crystallization of a melt-rich layer or basal magma ocean, and that this source continues to be sampled by mantle plumes. The spatial distribution of this source may be constrained by nickel partitioning experiments at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary. PMID:23302797

  13. Solubility of palladium in silicate melts: Implications for core formation in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.

    1994-01-01

    Palladium solubilities in silicate melts of anorthite-diopside-eutectic composition were determined at a wide range of oxygen fugacities, from pure O 2 to fo2 slightly below the iron-wstite buffer and at temperatures ranging from 1343 to 1472C. Experiments were performed by heating palladiumloops with silicates inside a gas controlled furnace. Palladium concentrations were determined by neutron activation analysis. Repeated analyses of the glasses after removal of the outer layers and several reversed experiments with initially high Pd in the glass showed that equilibrium was attained in the experiments. At 1350C concentrations of Pd in silicate melts range from 428 ppm to 1.2 ppm with decreasing palladium content at decreasing oxygen fugacities. The dependence of log Pd on log fo2 indicates a change in valence of the dominant palladium species in the silicate melt. The data can be explained by the presence of complexes containing Pd 2+ and Pd 0. Alternatively, a good fit is obtained by assuming mixtures of Pd 2+, Pd 1+and Pd 0 in the melt with increasing contributions of the lower valence species at increasingly reducing conditions. Solubilities increase with temperature at fixed oxygen fugacities independent of the absolute fugacity. This is an unexpected result. From the solubility data, metal/silicate partition coefficients were calculated using known activity coefficients of Pd in Fe-metal. Extrapolations were made to higher temperatures and lower oxygen fugacities. A palladium metal/silicate partition coefficient of 1.6 10 7 is inferred for 1623 K and IW-2. Extrapolation to 3500 K leads to a partition coefficient of 3.8 10 3. From earlier data on Ir solubilits, a metal/silicate partition coefficient of 2 10 8 was estimated for the same conditions. The high absolute metal/silicate partition coefficients for Pd and Ir and the large difference between the two partition coefficients are not compatible with a global core/mantle equilibrium as a source of the highly siderophile elements in the Earth mantle. The data favour models invoking the accretion of a late chondritic veneer after core formation without further metal segregation.

  14. Partitioning of Moderately Siderophile Elements Among Olivine, Silicate Melt, and Sulfide Melt: Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Variations in the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur on the partitioning of first series transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni. and Cu) and W among coexisting sulfide melt, silicate melt, and olivine. Experiments were performed at 1 atm pressure, 1350 C, with the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur controlled by mixing CO2, CO, and SO2 gases. Starting compositions consisted of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Na2O analog for a barred olivine chondrule from an ordinary chondrite and a synthetic komatiite. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2), conditions ranged from log of f(sub O2) = -7.9 to - 10.6, with log of f(sub S2) values ranging from - 1.0 to -2.5. Our experimental results demonstrate that the f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies of sulfide melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for the first series transition metals arc proportional to their valence states. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies for the partitioning of Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu are weaker than predicted on the basis of their valence states. Variations in conditions have no significant effect on olivine/melt partitioning other than those resulting from f(sub O2)-induced changes in the valence state of a given element. The strong f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependence for the olivine/silicate melt partitioning of V is attributable to a change of valence state, from 4+ to 3+, with decreasing f(sub O2). Our experimentally determined partition coefficients are used to develop models for the segregation of sulfide and metal from the silicate portion of the early Earth and the Shergottite parent body (Mars). We find that the influence of S is not sufficient to explain the overabundance of siderophile and chalcophile elements that remained in the mantle of the Earth following core formation. Important constraints on core formation in Mars are provided by our experimental determination of the partitioning of Cu between silicate and sulfide melts. When combined with existing estimates for siderophile element abundances in the Martian mantle and a mass balance constraint from Fe, the experiments allow a determination of the mass of the Martian core (approx. 17 to 22 wt% of the planet) and its S content (approx.0.4 wt%). These modeling results indicate that Mars is depleted in S, and that its core is solid.

  15. (Installation of a boiling water reactor core melt progression phenomena program)

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1990-06-07

    The CORA operational staff at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) requested, under the auspices of the Severe Fuel Damage Partners Program, that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed models, specific to boiling water reactor (BWR) response under severe accident conditions, be applied in support of future BWR experiments to be performed in the CORA facility. Accordingly, the current Statement of Work for the BWR Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program provides for the development of a CORA-specific BWR experimental model to analyze the results of CORA BWR experiments and the planning of future experiments. The traveler installed version 1.0 of the CORA/BWR experiment-specific code on KfK personal computers and assisted the CORA staff in their preliminary pretest analyses for CORA test 18.

  16. Constraints on core formation from molybdenum solubility in silicate melts at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkemper, Laura K.; Agee, Carl B.; Garcia, Kody A.

    2012-06-01

    We report results from 43 new molybdenum solubility experiments performed in order to test molybdenum's compatibility with the magma ocean hypothesis for core formation. A Walker-type multi-anvil press was used for all experiments and we investigated the pressure range of 2.5-12 GPa and temperature range of 1585-2200 C. Eight different silicate compositions were also employed. Our data show that increasing temperature causes solubility to increase, whereas pressure has a negligible effect over the range investigated here. In general, increasing silicate melt polymerization causes solubility to decrease; however, the effect of silicate composition is best addressed by looking at the effects of individual oxides versus a universal melt parameter such as NBO/T (ratio of non-bridging oxygens to tetrahedrally coordinated oxygens). From our solubility data, we calculated metal-silicate partition coefficients at infinite iron dilution. Parameterization of our data plus data from the literature shows that there is no discrepancy between partition coefficients determined directly from experiments and those calculated from solubility data, so long as all variables are taken into account, i.e. changes in metal phase composition. Additionally, most of the experiments in the literature were conducted at pressures below 2 GPa, therefore the addition of our high pressure data set makes extrapolations to deep magma ocean conditions more accurate. We determined that the observed mantle abundance of Mo can be explained by both single-stage and multi-stage magma ocean models. Previous siderophile element studies have suggested a wide range of possible single-stage core formation conditions, from 10 to 60 GPa along the peridotite liquidus. Our results narrowed this range by constraining the P-T conditions to 40-54 GPa and 3050-3400 K. Our results also further constrained the multi-stage core formation models by limiting the depth of metal-silicate equilibration during the final impacts of accretion to 31-42% of the core-mantle boundary depth.

  17. Metal/Silicate Partitioning, Melt Speciation, Accretion, and Core Formation in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, M. J.; Hillgren, V. J.; Dearo, J. A.; Capobianco, C. J.

    1993-07-01

    Core formation in terrestrial planets was concomitant with accretion. Siderophile and chalcophile element signatures in the mantles of planets are the result of these processes. For Earth, abundances of most siderophile and chalcophile elements are elevated relative to predictions from simple metal/silicate equilibria at low pressures [1]. This observation has led to three hypotheses for how these abundances were established: heterogeneous accretion [2], inefficient core formation [3], and metal/silicate equilibria at magma ocean pressures and temperatures [4]. Knowledge of speciation of siderophile elements in silicate melts in equilibrium with metal may help distinguish between these hypotheses. But there is some uncertainty regarding speciation. For example, Ni and Co have been reported to be present as 1+ or zero valence species in silicate melts at redox states appropriate to planetary accretion, rather than the expected 2+ state [5-7]. Independent metal/silicate partitioning experiments by three members of this group using two different experimental designs on both synthetic and natural compositions do not show evidence for Ni and Co in valence states other than 2+ over a wide range of redox states. For example, solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficients for Ni at 1260 degrees C obtained by VJH from experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P are indistinguishable from those obtained by JAD in similar experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Ge, and Sn. Both datasets define a line with the equation: log D(Ni) = - 0.54log fO2 - 3.14 with r^2 > 0.995. (Note that fO2 was calculated in both studies from thermodynamic data and phase compositions. A small, systematic offset from the true fO2 as measured by a solid electrolyte cell affects both equations similarly, but does not diminish their close agreement.) The valence of Ni in the silicate melt is obtained by multiplying the slope of the line by -4, indicating divalent Ni in both studies. Experiments by [8] between 1300 degrees C and 1550 degrees C and fO2 from air to just below iron-wustite in which Ni and Co are partitioned between Pt metal and CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 silicate melt also show evidence only for 2+ valence. Capobianco et al. [1] have noted that reliable extrapolation from current laboratory temperatures (1190 degrees C-1600 degrees C) to magma ocean temperatures is not possible. The hypothesis that siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the mantle of Earth were established by metal/silicate equilibria at magma ocean pressures and temperatures needs to be tested using direct experimental measurements at magma ocean temperatures and pressures. Such experiments are currently being conducted. References: [1] Capobianco et al. (1993) J. Geophys. Res., 98, 5433. [2] Wanke (1981) Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London, A303, 287. [3] Jones and Drake (1986) Nature, 322, 221. [4] Murthy (1991) Science, 253, 303. [5] Schmitt et al. (1989) GCA, 53, 173. [6] Ehlers et al. (1993) GCA, 56, 3733. [7] Colson (1992) Nature, 357, 65. [8] Capobianco and Amelin (1993) GCA, 56 (in press).

  18. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Viscosity measurements on metal melts at high pressure and viscosity calculations for the earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineev, Vladimir N.; Funtikov, Aleksandr I.

    2004-07-01

    A review is given of experimental and calculated data on the viscosity of iron-based melts on the melting curve. The interest in these data originates in the division of opinion on whether viscosity increases rather moderately or considerably in the high-pressure range. This disagreement is especially pronounced in the interpretation of the values of molten iron and its compounds in the environment of the earth's outer core. The conclusion on a substantial rise in viscosity mostly follows from the universal law, proposed by Brazhkin and Lyapin [1], of viscosity changing along the metal melting curve in the high-pressure range. The review analyzes available experimental and computational data, including the most recent ones. Data on viscosity of metals under shock wave compression in the megabar pressure range are also discussed. It is shown that data on viscosity of metal melts point to a small increase of viscosity on the melting curve. Specifics are discussed of the phase diagram of iron made more complex by the presence of several phase transitions and by the uncertainty in the position of the melting curve in the high-pressure range. Inaccuracies that arise in extrapolating the results of viscosity measurements to the pressure range corresponding to the earth's core environment are pointed out.

  19. Melting behavior of the iron-sulfur system and chemical convection in iron-rich planetary cores

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Chen, B.

    2009-03-26

    We present experimental data on the high-pressure melting behavior of the Fe-S system from a synchrotron x-ray radiography study using the large volume press, with implications for the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing planetary cores. At present, Earth, Mercury and Ganymede are the only three solid bodies in the Solar System that possess intrinsic global magnetic fields. Dynamo simulation reveal that chemical buoyancy force associated with the formation of a solid inner core is critical for sustaining the Earth's magnetic field. Fluid motions in Mercury and Ganymede may be partially driven by chemical buoyancy force as well. The style of chemical convection and its influence on the thermal and chemical state and evolution of iron-rich cores are determined in part by the melting behavior of potential core-forming materials. Sulfur is widely accepted as a candidate light element in iron-rich planetary cores. In order to understand the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing cores, we studied the high-pressure melting behavior of Fe-S mixtures containing 9 wt% sulfur using the synchrotron x-ray radiographic method in a large volume press.

  20. Melting Scenario of the Two-Dimensional Core-Softened System: First-Order or Continuous Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudalov, D. E.; Fomin, Yu D.; Tsiok, E. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2014-05-01

    We present a computer simulation study of the phase behavior of two-dimensional classical particles repelling each other through an isotropic core-softened potential. As in the analogous three dimensional case, a reentrant-melting transition occurs upon compression for not too high pressures. However, in two dimensions in the low density part of the phase diagram melting is a continuous two-stage transition, with an intermediate hexatic phase. All available evidence supports the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) scenario for this melting transition. On the other hand, at high density part of the phase diagram one first-order transition takes place. We expect that such a phenomenology can be checked in confined monolayers of charge-stabilized colloids with a softened core and water confined between two hydrophobic plates.

  1. MELT Bibliography. Materials Correlated with the Core Curriculum Competencies of the Mainstream English Language Training Project, Office of Refugee Resettlement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Shirley, Comp.; Sample, Barbara J.

    This bibliography is intended to assist teachers and administrators involved in competency-based, English as a second language (ESL) instruction. The materials included in the bibliography have been correlated with the core curriculum competencies of the Mainstream English Language Training (MELT) Project. The guide is divided into three parts.

  2. Melting Behavior of the Iron-Sulfur System and Chemical Convection in Iron-rich Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.

    2009-03-01

    We present experimental data on the high-pressure melting behavior of the Fe-S system from a synchrotron x-ray radiography study using the large volume press, with implications for the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing planetary cores.

  3. The consequences of melting and melt segregation in the overturned ilmenite-bearing cumulates at the core-mantle boundary of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.

    2012-12-01

    Standard lunar evolution models involve giant impact, lunar magma ocean, and cumulate overturn. One potential outcome of lunar cumulate mantle overturn is the presence of an ilmenite-bearing cumulates (IBC) at the base of the lunar mantle. Because the IBC layer is enriched in heat producing elements, they may become thermally buoyant with respect to the overlying harzburgite cumulate mantle at a later time. Ascending of the ilmenite-bearing cumulate layer has been used to explain the petrogenesis of mare basalts. On the other hand, the ilmenite-rich cumulates may sink to form a stable outer core surrounding the small metallic lunar core. Inversion of lunar free oscillation data indicates a density structure that may be more compatible with a metallic core surrounded by stable ilmenite-rich cumulates. A seismically attenuation region has been shown to exist on the lunar CMB and have been attributed to the presence of partial melt. Here, we explore possible mechanisms that stabilize the overturned ilmenite-rich cumulates. The solidi of ilmenite-bearing harzburgite are considerably lower than those of harzburgites. Presence of high abundance of heat producing elements in the overturned IBC may result in partial melting which will lead to the redistribution of heat producing elements. Due to its high Fe-Ti abundances, the melt is likely denser than the solid matrix and will percolate downward, forming a new liquid layer on the CMB. Meanwhile, because the heat producing elements (U and Th) are incompatible, they will also sink down with the melt. This redistribution of heat producing elements can influence the instability of the IBC and the generation of mare volcanism. We first investigate the thermal evolution of the lunar cumulate mantle using a numerical convection model in a spherical geometry. When the temperature of the IBC exceeds the solidus of ilmenite-bearing harzburgite, the excess temperature is taken to produce the melt source. This melt source is used to estimate the melt segregation rate and the redistribution of the heat producing elements in the IBC. Preliminary calculations show that the melt can sink down to the CMB in 25 Ma, a time scale that is much shorter than the time needed to heat up the ilmenite-rich layer to neutral buoyant (~ 200 Ma). Results from the present study suggest that, given a relatively large radioactive production heat, the ilmenite-rich cumulate layer may be stable due to downward segregation of Fe-Ti rich melt . The melt layer with high concentrations of U and Th may freeze slowly and resulting in a low-velocity region above CMB to the present day. The mare vocalism may be generated from an asymmetrically distributed source in lunar mantle shallower than the ilmenite-rich cumulate layer.

  4. Bayes' postulate for trinomial trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, M. A.; Polpo, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss Bayes' postulate and its interpretation. We extend the binomial trial method proposed by de Finetti [1] to trinomial trials, for which we argue that the consideration of equiprobability a priori for the possible outcomes of the trinomial trials implies that the parameter vector has Dirichlet(1,1) as prior. Based on this result, we agree with Stigler [2] in that the notion in Bayes' postulate stating "absolutely know nothing" is related to the possible outcomes of an experiment and not to "non-information" about the parameter.

  5. Size effect in the melting and freezing behaviors of Al/Ti core-shell nanoparticles using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Ping, Zhang; Yang-Yang, Zhang; Er-Ping, Wang; Cui-Ming, Tang; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Qiu-Hui, Zhang

    2016-03-01

    The thermal stability of Ti@Al core/shell nanoparticles with different sizes and components during continuous heating and cooling processes is examined by a molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. The thermodynamic properties and structure evolution during continuous heating and cooling processes are investigated through the characterization of the potential energy, specific heat distribution, and radial distribution function (RDF). Our study shows that, for fixed Ti core size, the melting temperature decreases with Al shell thickness, while the crystallizing temperature and glass formation temperature increase with Al shell thickness. Diverse melting mechanisms have been discovered for different Ti core sized with fixed Al shell thickness nanoparticles. The melting temperature increases with the Ti core radius. The trend agrees well with the theoretical phase diagram of bimetallic nanoparticles. In addition, the glass phase formation of Al–Ti nanoparticles for the fast cooling rate of 12 K/ps, and the crystal phase formation for the low cooling rate of 0.15 K/ps. The icosahedron structure is formed in the frozen 4366 Al–Ti atoms for the low cooling rate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21401064), the Science & Technology Development Program of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 142300410282), and the Program of Henan Educational Committee, China (Grant No. 13B140986).

  6. QUANTUM MECHANICS WITHOUT STATISTICAL POSTULATES

    SciTech Connect

    G. GEIGER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    The Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics describes the measurement process in an intuitive way without a reduction postulate. Due to the chaotic motion of the hidden classical particle all statistical features of quantum mechanics during a sequence of repeated measurements can be derived in the framework of a deterministic single system theory.

  7. Aluminum/uranium fuel foaming/recriticality considerations for production reactor core-melt accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Ellison, P.G. ); Cronenberg, A.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Severe accident studies for the Savannah River production reactors indicate that if coherent fuel melting and relocation occur in the absence of target melting, in-vessel recriticality may be achieved. In this paper, fuel-melt/target interaction potential is assessed where fission gas-induced fuel foaming and melt attack on target material are evaluated and compared with available data. Models are developed to characterize foams for irradiated aluminum-based fuel. Predictions indicate transient foaming, the extent of which is governed by fission gas inventory, heating transient conditions, and bubble coalescence behavior. The model also indicates that metallic foams are basically unstable and will collapse, which largely depends on film tenacity and melt viscosity considerations. For high-burnup fuel, extensive foaming lasting tens of seconds is predicted, allowing molten fuel to contact and cause melt ablation of concentric targets. For low-burnup fuel, contact can not be assured. 9 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Melting and refreezing beneath Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (East Antarctica) inferred from radar, GPS, and ice core data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattyn, F.; Matsuoka, K.; Callens, D.; Conway, H.; Depoorter, M.; Docquier, D.; Hubbard, B.; Samyn, D.; Tison, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Ice-penetrating radar profiles across the grounding line of a small ice-rise promontory located within the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf in the Dronning Maud Land sector of East Antarctica show downward dipping englacial radar-detected reflectors. Model results indicate that this reflector pattern is best fit by including basal melting of at least 15 cm a-1. This rate of melting is low compared with rates observed on larger ice shelves in both West and East Antarctica. Ice cores extracted from a rift system close to the ice-rise promontory show several meters of marine ice accreted beneath the shelf. These observations of low rates of basal melting, and limited distribution of accreted marine ice suggest that either Antarctic surface water may reach the ice shelf base or that circulation beneath the shelf is likely dominated by the production of high salinity shelf water rather than the incursion of circumpolar deep water, implying a weak sub-shelf circulation system here. Many of the ice shelves located along the coast of Dronning Maud Land are, like Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, characterized by frequent ice rises and promontories. Therefore, it is highly likely that these are also of shallow bathymetry and are subject to similarly weak side-shelf basal melting and refreezing.

  9. Rapid, dynamic segregation of core forming melts: Results from in-situ High Pressure- High Temperature X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The timing and mechanisms of core formation in the Earth, as well as in Earth-forming planetesimals is a problem of significant importance in our understanding of the early evolution of terrestrial planets . W-Hf isotopic signatures in meteorites indicate that core formation in small pre-differentiated planetesimals was relatively rapid, and occurred over the span of a few million years. This time scale is difficult to achieve by percolative flow of the metallic phase through a silicate matrix in textural equilibrium. It has been suggested that during this active time in the early solar system, dynamic processes such as impacts may have caused significant deformation in the differentiating planetesimals, which could lead to much higher permeability of the core forming melts. Here, we have measured the change in permeability of core forming melts in a silicate matrix due to deformation. Mixtures of San Carlos olivine and FeS close to the equilibrium percolation threshold (~5 vol%FeS) were pre-synthesized to achieve an equilibrium microstructure, and then loaded into the rotational Drickamer apparatus at GSE-CARS, sector 13-BMD, at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory). The samples were subsequently pressed to ~2GPa, and heated to 1100C. Alternating cycles of rotation to collect X-ray tomography images, and twisting to deform the sample were conducted until the sample had been twisted by 1080. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on the resulting 3-dimensional x-ray tomographic images to evaluate the effect of shear deformation on permeability and migration velocity. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations were conducted, and show a marked increase in the permeability with increasing deformation, which would allow for much more rapid core formation in planetesimals.

  10. Melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system at high pressure and temperature: Implications for the thermal structure of the planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakairi, T.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the Earth's core is mainly composed of iron and contains light elements to account for its density deficit. Alloying with light elements significantly affects the physical properties of iron and depresses its melting temperature. Therefore, the melting relation of the Fe-light elements system is the key to clarify the thermal structure of the Earth's core. Although there are many candidates for light elements in the core, sulfur and silicon are considered to be the major light elements. Some geochemical models predicted that sulfur and silicon could be present not only in the core of the Earth but also in the core of other terrestrial planets such as Mars and Mercury. To better understand the properties of the planetary cores, we investigated the melting relations of the Fe-S-Si system under high-pressure conditions. Here, we report the melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system up to 60 GPa. Melting experiments were performed in the pressure range of 20-60 GPa and the temperature range of 1300-2500 K using a double-sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with X-ray diffraction technique. In situ X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at the BL10XU beamline of the SPring-8 facility. The melting detection was based on disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks of the sample. On the basis of X-ray diffraction patterns, we confirmed that iron-silicon alloy which hcp and fcc structure and Fe3S are stable phases under subsolidus conditions. Both solidus and liquidus temperatures are significantly lower than the melting temperature of pure Fe and increases with pressure in this study. In order to draw the melting curve as a function of pressure, we fitted the present results using the Simon's equation. Our results could provide important constraints on the thermal structure of the planetary cores.

  11. Quantification of Dead-ice Melting in Ice-Cored Moraines at the High-Arctic Glacier Holmströmbreen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomacker, A.; Kjaer, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    An extensive dead-ice area has developed at the stagnant snout of the Holmströmbreen glacier on Svalbard following its Little Ice Age maximum. Dead-ice appears mainly as ice-cored moraines, ice-cored eskers and ice- cored kames. The most common dead-ice landform is sediment gravity flows on ice-cored slopes surrounding a large ice-walled, moraine-dammed lake. The lake finally receives the sediment from the resedimentation processes. Dead-ice melting is described and quantified through field studies and analyses of high-resolution, multi-temporal aerial photographs and satellite imagery. Field measurements of backwasting of ice-cored slopes indicate short-term melting rates of c. 9.2 cm/day. Long-term downwasting rates indicate a surface lowering of ice-cored moraines of c. 0.9 m/yr from 1984-2004. Different measures for dead-ice melting are assessed in relation to the temperature record from Svalbard since the termination of the Little Ice Age. The most prominent impact of dead-ice melting is the evolution of the ice-walled lake with an area increasing near-exponentially over the last 40 years. As long as backwasting and mass movement processes prevent build-up of an insulating debris-cover and expose ice-cores to melting, the de-icing continues even though the area is characterized by continuous permafrost.

  12. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Iron-Sulfur System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results on the liquidus curve of the Fe-S system at the pressures of the lunar core provide constraints on the Moon’s thermal and chemical states and the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo.

  13. A Simple Lab Exercise Demonstrating Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Michael M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which applies Koch's Postulates to a plant disease, bacterial speck. Includes an explanation of Koch's Postulate, list of equipment needed, advance preparation, outline of the three-week activity, and variations of the laboratory exercise. (DS)

  14. Creep rupture behavior of a PWR lower head in a core-melt accident

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Kwang Jin; Lim, Dong Cheol; Hwang, Il Soon

    1997-12-01

    Although the Three Mile Island unit 2 (TMI-2) vessel did not fail, code analyses in support of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project generally predicted creep rupture for these conditions. This fueled speculation that there might be some inherent mechanism not previously recognized that could delay or prevent lower head failure. The most widely held belief is that the relocated melt did not adhere to the lower head; consequently, there should be gaps between the inside surface of the vessel and the relocated melt. These gaps, perhaps widened by temperature-induced creep of the lower head, provide a channel for water intrusion and subsequent quenching of the head, preventing its creep rupture. Therefore, from both accident assessment and accident mitigation considerations, there is a need to understand the mechanism of lower head creep and rupture.

  15. Recovering Paleo-Records from Antarctic Ice-Cores by Coupling a Continuous Melting Device and Fast Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Severi, Mirko; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto

    2015-11-17

    Recently, the increasing interest in the understanding of global climatic changes and on natural processes related to climate yielded the development and improvement of new analytical methods for the analysis of environmental samples. The determination of trace chemical species is a useful tool in paleoclimatology, and the techniques for the analysis of ice cores have evolved during the past few years from laborious measurements on discrete samples to continuous techniques allowing higher temporal resolution, higher sensitivity and, above all, higher throughput. Two fast ion chromatographic (FIC) methods are presented. The first method was able to measure Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) in a melter-based continuous flow system separating the three analytes in just 1 min. The second method (called Ultra-FIC) was able to perform a single chromatographic analysis in just 30 s and the resulting sampling resolution was 1.0 cm with a typical melting rate of 4.0 cm min(-1). Both methods combine the accuracy, precision, and low detection limits of ion chromatography with the enhanced speed and high depth resolution of continuous melting systems. Both methods have been tested and validated with the analysis of several hundred meters of different ice cores. In particular, the Ultra-FIC method was used to reconstruct the high-resolution SO4(2-) profile of the last 10?000 years for the EDML ice core, allowing the counting of the annual layers, which represents a key point in dating these kind of natural archives. PMID:26494022

  16. Melt-grafting for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles with ultra-high dispersant density.

    PubMed

    Zirbs, Ronald; Lassenberger, Andrea; Vonderhaid, Iris; Kurzhals, Steffen; Reimhult, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of applications in e.g. the biomedical field, for which brushes of biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have to be densely grafted to the core. Grafting of such shells to monodisperse iron oxide NPs has remained a challenge mainly due to the conflicting requirements to replace the ligand shell of as-synthesized NPs with irreversibly bound PEG dispersants. We introduce a general two-step method to graft PEG dispersants from a melt to iron oxide NPs first functionalized with nitrodopamine (NDA). This method yields uniquely dense spherical PEG-brushes (?3 chains per nm(2) of PEG(5 kDa)) compared to existing methods, and remarkably colloidally stable NPs also under challenging conditions. PMID:26061616

  17. Modelling micro-level volume expansion during reactive melt infiltration using non-isothermal unreacted-shrinking core models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, G.; Bhagat, R. B.

    1998-11-01

    Reactive melt infiltration is a process used to manufacture silicon carbide fibre-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites. The present stage of research on reactive infiltration is primarily experimental, wherein complete infiltration is rarely achieved and unreacted silicon still remains in the composite. This paper deals with the micro-modelling aspect of reactive melt infiltration and estimates volume expansion due to mass transfer and reaction for cylindrical fibres. The thickness of the reaction product layer forming the matrix in the composite is determined by using an unreacted-shrinking core (URSC) model for cylindrical geometry in terms of physical parameters (diffusivity of the reactants and temperature) and non-dimensional physical quantities (such as the Sherwood number, Nusselt number and Thiele modulus). The effectiveness factors for the chemical reaction are determined as a function of time for various sets of physical parameters. The amount of volume expansion is found by determining the growth of the radius of the reaction product layer. It is concluded that lower initial temperatures of the solid reactant and higher ratios of heat capacity of reaction product to heat of reaction are favourable for infiltration. Determining the volume expansion in a single particle will later help in determining the transient permeability in a fibre preform during infiltration and also in optimizing this process.

  18. Silicate glasses and sulfide melts in the ICDP-USGS Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Horton, J.W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electron-beam petrography of melt-rich suevite and melt-rock clasts from selected samples from the Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, reveal a variety of silicate glasses and coexisting sulfur-rich melts, now quenched to various sulfi de minerals (??iron). The glasses show a wide variety of textures, fl ow banding, compositions, devitrifi cation, and hydration states. Electron-microprobe analyses yield a compositional range of glasses from high SiO2 (>90 wt%) through a range of lower SiO2 (55-75 wt%) with no relationship to depth of sample. Some samples show spherical globules of different composition with sharp menisci, suggesting immiscibility at the time of quenching. Isotropic globules of higher interfacial tension glass (64 wt% SiO2) are in sharp contact with lower-surface-tension, high-silica glass (95 wt% SiO2). Immiscible glass-pair composition relationships show that the immiscibility is not stable and probably represents incomplete mixing. Devitrifi cation varies and some low-silica, high-iron glasses appear to have formed Fe-rich smectite; other glass compositions have formed rapid quench textures of corundum, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, magnetite, K-feldspar, plagioclase, chrome-spinel, and hercynite. Hydration (H2O by difference) varies from ~10 wt% to essentially anhydrous; high-SiO2 glasses tend to contain less H2O. Petrographic relationships show decomposition of pyrite and melting of pyrrhotite through the transformation series; pyrite? pyrrhotite? troilite??? iron. Spheres (~1 to ~50 ??m) of quenched immiscible sulfi de melt in silicate glass show a range of compositions and include phases such as pentlandite, chalcopyrite, Ni-As, monosulfi de solid solution, troilite, and rare Ni-Fe. Other sulfi de spheres contain small blebs of pure iron and exhibit a continuum with increasing iron content to spheres that consist of pure iron with small, remnant blebs of Fe-sulfi de. The Ni-rich sulfi de phases can be explained by melting and/or concentrating targetderived Ni without requiring an asteroid impactor source component. The presence of locally unaltered glasses in these rocks suggests that in some rock volumes, isolation from postimpact hydrothermal systems was suffi cient for glass preservation. Pressure and temperature indicators suggest that, on a thin-section scale, the suevites record rapid mixing and accumulation of particles that sustained widely different peak temperatures, from clasts that never exceeded 300 ?? 50 ??C, to the bulk of the glasses where melted sulfi de and unmelted monazite suggest temperatures of 1500 ?? 200 ??C. The presence of coesite in some glass-bearing samples suggests that pressures exceeded ~3 GPa. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  19. Melt-grafting for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles with ultra-high dispersant density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbs, Ronald; Lassenberger, Andrea; Vonderhaid, Iris; Kurzhals, Steffen; Reimhult, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of applications in e.g. the biomedical field, for which brushes of biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have to be densely grafted to the core. Grafting of such shells to monodisperse iron oxide NPs has remained a challenge mainly due to the conflicting requirements to replace the ligand shell of as-synthesized NPs with irreversibly bound PEG dispersants. We introduce a general two-step method to graft PEG dispersants from a melt to iron oxide NPs first functionalized with nitrodopamine (NDA). This method yields uniquely dense spherical PEG-brushes (~3 chains per nm2 of PEG(5 kDa)) compared to existing methods, and remarkably colloidally stable NPs also under challenging conditions.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of applications in e.g. the biomedical field, for which brushes of biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have to be densely grafted to the core. Grafting of such shells to monodisperse iron oxide NPs has remained a challenge mainly due to the conflicting requirements to replace the ligand shell of as-synthesized NPs with irreversibly bound PEG dispersants. We introduce a general two-step method to graft PEG dispersants from a melt to iron oxide NPs first functionalized with nitrodopamine (NDA). This method yields uniquely dense spherical PEG-brushes (~3 chains per nm2 of PEG(5 kDa)) compared to existing methods, and remarkably colloidally stable NPs also under challenging conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The ESI contains details on additional synthetic protocols and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02313k

  20. Melting and metallization of silica in the cores of gas giants, ice giants, and super Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazevet, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Taniuchi, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Guyot, F.

    2015-07-01

    The physical state and properties of silicates at conditions encountered in the cores of gas giants, ice giants, and of Earth-like exoplanets now discovered with masses up to several times the mass of the Earth remain mostly unknown. Here, we report on theoretical predictions of the properties of silica, SiO2, up to 4 TPa and about 20 000 K by using first principles molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory. For conditions found in the super Earths and in ice giants, we show that silica remains a poor electrical conductor up to 10 Mbar due to an increase in the Si-O coordination with pressure. For Jupiter and Saturn cores, we find that MgSiO3 silicate has not only dissociated into MgO and SiO2, as shown in previous studies, but that these two phases have likely differentiated to lead to a core made of liquid SiO2 and solid (Mg,Fe)O.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations on the melting, crystallization, and energetic reaction behaviors of Al/Cu core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin-Lu; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations combined with the embedded atom method potential, we investigate the heating, cooling, and energetic reacting of core-shell structured Al-Cu nanoparticles. The thermodynamic properties and structure evolution during continuous heating and cooling processes are also investigated through the characterization of the total potential energy distribution, mean-square-distance and radial distribution function. Some behaviors related to nanometer scale Cu/Al functional particles are derived that two-way diffusion of Al and Cu atoms, glass phase formation for the fast cooling rate, and the crystal phase formation for the low cooling rate. Two-way atomic diffusion occurs first and causes the melting and alloying. In the final alloying structure, Cu and Al atoms mixed very well except for the outmost shell which has more Al atoms. For the investigation of the thermal stability and energetic reaction properties, our study show that a localized alloying reaction between the Al core and Cu shell is very slow when the initial temperature is lower than 600 K. But a two-stage reaction may occur when the initial temperature is 700 K. The reaction rate is determined by the solid-state diffusion of Al atoms in the Cu shell at the first stage, yet the reaction rate is much faster at the second stage, due to the alloying reaction between the liquid Al core and the Cu shell. At higher temperatures such as 800 K and 900 K, the alloying reaction occurs directly between the liquid Al core and the Cu shell.

  2. Basal Melt Under the Interior of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Comparison of Models, Deep Ice Cores, and Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvanbehbahani, S.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Basal ice temperature is a critical boundary condition for ice sheet models. It modulates the basal melt rate and sliding conditions, and also affects the ice hardness which alters the deformational velocity. Therefore, in order to obtain reliable estimates on the future mass loss of the ice sheets using numerical models, basal ice temperature is of paramount importance. In this study, the basal temperature and basal melt rate under the Greenland Ice Sheet are estimated using the Robin temperature solution. The analytical Robin solution is obtained by solving the heat conservation equation for steady state conditions, assuming that advection and diffusion are significant only in the vertical direction. In this study, the sensitivity of the basal temperature obtained from the Robin solution to changes in input parameters, including changes in atmospheric conditions, ice thickness, and geothermal heat flux is tested. Although the Robin solution is frequently used in glaciology, there has been no quantitative study to estimate the effect of neglecting the horizontal advection on basal temperatures in regions of higher velocity. Here, a two-dimensional model is applied to quantify the effect of horizontal heat advection on basal temperatures. Overall, horizontal heat advection lowers the basal temperature except in regions where surface mass balance gradients are negative along the flow. Comparing the results from the 2D temperature model to the Robin solution along multiple flowlines of the Greenland Ice Sheet suggest that the horizontal heat advection alters the basal temperatures by less than 3C up to 30-45% of the flow distance away from the ice divide; at greater distances this difference increases rapidly. All simulations using the Robin solution predict substantial basal melting under the northeast drainage basin of the ice sheet. Our 2D model results also show that because of the negative surface mass balance gradient, horizontal heat advection increases the basal temperatures in the northeast basin. Our obtained map of basal melting area matches well with the radar detected basal water under the north and northeast drainage basins. However, low basal temperatures estimated at the Camp Century ice core location in the northwest of the ice sheet is in contrast with the radar observations.

  3. Crystallization Processes in Mercury's Core Inferred from In-situ High-Pressure Melting Experiments in the Fe-S-Si-C System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Van Orman, J. A.; Hauck, S. A., II; Sun, N.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Based upon the high pressure melting temperatures in the Fe-FeS system, an iron "snow" process has been suggested to occur in Mercury's core. However, recent results from the MESSENGER mission indicate very reducing conditions in Mercury, under which a substantial amount of silicon should also dissolve into the core. The presence of Si can significantly modify the chemical and physical properties of Mercury's core (e.g., phase relations, crystallization, density). Moreover, up to 4 wt% C could have been incorporated into the core during the planet formation. In order to test the iron snow hypothesis in a system that is likely to be closer to the actual core composition, we performed in situ high-pressure, high-temperature experiments in the Fe-FeS-Fe2Si-Fe3C system using a multi-anvil press on a synchrotron (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne). To observe low degree eutectic melting, we separated the samples in two parts: (1) an iron rod presaturated with Si and C and (2) a mixture of FeS, Fe2Si and Fe3C. Eutectic melting temperature and phase relations were determined at various pressures between 4.5 and 15.5 GPa using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and imaging. Temperature was quenched soon after melting in order to preserve the eutectic melt composition. The X-ray images, diffraction spectra and back-scattered electron images of the recovered samples show that eutectic melting occurs in the range of 800 - 900°C in all our experiments. These temperatures are close to the eutectic temperatures in the Fe-FeS-Fe3C system, indicating that Si does not change the eutectic temperatures significantly. Melting therefore occurs at much lower temperature than suggested for the Fe-S-Si system at similar pressures. This difference may be explained by the presence of C and by the higher silicon content in our starting composition. Our experimental setup may also be more suitable for detecting the low degrees of melting in metallic systems. Such low eutectic melting temperatures imply that the iron "snow" process may still be valid even if silicon and carbon are present in Mercury's core.

  4. Experimental determination of carbon isotope fractionation between iron carbide melt and carbon: 12C-enriched carbon in the Earth's core?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan; So, Hayato; Yoshino, Takashi; Kato, Mutsumi; Hiroi, Yoshikuni

    2011-10-01

    We report here new experimental data on equilibrium carbon isotope fractionation between graphite/diamond and iron carbide melt at 5 and 10 GPa and in the temperature range between 1200 and 2000 C. Carbon isotope equilibrium was tested using morphological features of graphite and also by performing a longer duration experiment, both of which suggested that equilibrium carbon isotope fractionation is present. The results suggest that iron carbide melt will preferentially accumulate 12C rather than 13C. An equilibrium temperature dependent fractionation between iron carbide melt and graphite/diamond is proposed based on the relation ?C=8.8510/T(K)+0.99. Our results are consistent with the carbon isotope distribution between graphite and cohenite (Fe 3C) observed in iron meteorites. We propose that temperature-dependent fractionation of carbon isotopes between iron carbide melt and graphite/diamond might have created a " 12C-enriched core" with a significant difference in the distribution of carbon isotopes between the carbon in the metallic core and bulk silicate Earth during the accretion and differentiation of early Earth. Recent findings of low ? 13C carbonados and diamonds of deep mantle origin supports the presence of a 12C enriched source. The possible presence of a reservoir of 12C-enriched carbon in the Earth's core implies that it can generate large perturbations in the surface and shallow carbon-isotope system by the flux of lighter carbon from the core-mantle boundary.

  5. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt; a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, C. P.; Pohjola, V. A.; Beaudon, E.; Claremar, B.; van Pelt, W. J. J.; Pettersson, R.; Isaksson, E.; Martma, T.; Schwikowski, M.; Bggild, C. E.

    2015-09-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, the ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Mg2+ > Cl-, K+ > Na+ > Ca2+, with acidic ions being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was in the order of 1 m, with the exception of SO42- showing relocation lengths > 2 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010 which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e. MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution.

  6. Transcrystalline Migration of Metallic Melt in (Mg,Fe)O: Implications for the Core-Mantle Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, K.; Karato, S.

    2012-04-01

    Penetration of metallic materials has been invoked at the core-mantle-boundary to explain relatively strong magnetic coupling and some geochemical signature of core materials. However, all previously proposed models fail to explain an extensive penetration (10s of km) required to explain these phenomena. We report a discovery of a new process of metallic melt entrainment into the mantle minerals that might provide a clue to explain inferred extensive core-mantle chemical interaction. When a mineral and molten metal co-exist at a large scale, the chemical equilibrium is attained only near the interface and the bulk of the system is out of equilibrium. Under these conditions, the gradient in chemical potential exists and the interface between these two phases becomes unstable against some morphological perturbation and one phase may penetrate into another. We found that such a process occurs between (Mg,Fe)O single crystal and molten metals (Mo-rich and Fe-rich metals). When such a system is annealed, morphological instability occurred and the interface became serrated. The serrated region grew and pinched off to become an isolated metal-rich blob. These blobs migrate into a crystal with the speed much faster than expected by diffusion-controlled processes. For example, after annealing at P=15 GPa, T=2000 K for 2 hours, a whole ~1 mm size (Mg,Fe)O was penetrated by metallic blobs. The morphological instability of such an interface was explained by a theory of Mullins and Sekerka (1963, 1964). On the bases of their theory, we developed a model to explain the evolution of a metal-rich layer. In this model, the compositions of both migrating metallic blobs and surrounding mineral will change as a metallic blob migrates, and the migration will terminate when the composition becomes the equilibrium composition. Our model predicts that such a metal-rich layer could extend 10s of km at the core-mantle boundary but the nature of such a layer depends on the properties of mantle minerals and will differ among different planets with different mineralogy.

  7. Lorentzian quantum reality: postulates and toy models.

    PubMed

    Kent, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    We describe postulates for a novel realist version of relativistic quantum theory or quantum field theory in Minkowski space and other background space-times, and illustrate their application with toy models. PMID:26124245

  8. Formation of core-shell and hollow nanospheres through the nanoscale melt-solidification effect in the Sm-Fe(Ta)-N system.

    PubMed

    Sturm, S; Rožman, K Zužek; Markoli, B; Sarantopoulou, E; Kollia, Z; Cefalas, A C; Kobe, S

    2010-12-01

    Sm-Fe-Ta-N-O nanospheres were synthesized by pulsed-laser deposition from a Sm(13.8)Fe(82.2)Ta(4.0) target in a nitrogen atmosphere. Three structurally and compositionally distinct types were identified: amorphous, core-shell and hollow nanospheres. Amorphous spheres were compositionally homogeneous and completely oxidized. The core-shell spheres were composed of an iron-rich crystalline core with up to 10 at.% interstitially incorporated nitrogen, surrounded by an amorphous and oxidized shell. The hollow spheres were characterized by voids filled with N(2) gas. It was found that the formation of either amorphous or complex nanospheres is defined by an initial Fe/Sm ratio within the molten droplet. The formation of hollow spheres is believed to be related to the general affinity of liquid metals for gas intake. During rapid solidification the dissolved gas in the melt is trapped within the surrounding solid rim, preventing the outwards diffusion of gas. As long as the amount of gas atoms in the melt is kept below its solubility limits it can be completely interstitially incorporated into the solid, thus forming crystalline Fe(N)-rich cores. If the melt contains more than an equilibrium amount of nitrogen it is possible that the gas recombines to form N(2) molecules, which are condensed inside the spheres. PMID:21063053

  9. High-pressure melting relations in Fe-C-S systems: Implications for formation, evolution, and structure of metallic cores in planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Buono, Antonio; Whelan, Geoff; Walker, David

    2009-11-01

    We present new high-pressure temperature experiments on melting phase relations of Fe-C-S systems with applications to metallic core formation in planetary interiors. Experiments were performed on Fe-5 wt% C-5 wt% S and Fe-5 wt% C-15 wt% S at 2-6 GPa and 1050-2000 °C in MgO capsules and on Fe-13 wt% S, Fe-5 wt% S, and Fe-1.4 wt% S at 2 GPa and 1600 °C in graphite capsules. Our experiments show that: (a) At a given P- T, the solubility of carbon in iron-rich metallic melt decreases modestly with increasing sulfur content and at sufficiently high concentration, the interaction between carbon and sulfur can cause formation of two immiscible melts, one rich in Fe-carbide and the other rich in Fe-sulfide. (b) The mutual solubility of carbon and sulfur increases with increasing pressure and no super-liquidus immiscibility in Fe-rich compositions is likely expected at pressures greater than 5-6 GPa even for bulk compositions that are volatile-rich. (c) The liquidus temperature in the Fe-C-S ternary is significantly different compared to the binary liquidus in the Fe-C and Fe-S systems. At 6 GPa, the liquidus of Fe-5 wt% C-5 wt% S is 150-200 °C lower than the Fe-5 wt% S. (d) For Fe-C-S bulk compositions with modest concentration of carbon, the sole liquidus phase is iron carbide, Fe 3C at 2 GPa and Fe 7C 3 at 6 GPa and metallic iron crystallizes only with further cooling as sulfur is concentrated in the late crystallizing liquid. Our results suggest that for carbon and sulfur-rich core compositions, immiscibility induced core stratification can be expected for planets with core pressure less than ˜6 GPa. Thus planetary bodies in the outer solar system such as Ganymede, Europa, and Io with present day core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures of ˜8, ˜5, and 7 GPa, respectively, if sufficiently volatile-rich, may either have a stratified core or may have experienced core stratification owing to liquid immiscibility at some stage of their accretion. A similar argument can be made for terrestrial planetary bodies such as Mercury and Earth's Moon, but no such stratification is predicted for cores of terrestrial planets such as Earth, Venus, and Mars with the present day core pressure in the order ⩾136 GPa, ⩾100 GPa, and ⩾23 GPa. (e) Owing to different expected densities of Fe-rich (and carbon-bearing) and sulfur-rich metallic melts, their settling velocities are likely different; thus core formation in terrestrial planets may involve rain of more than one metallic melt through silicate magma ocean. (f) For small planetary bodies that have core pressures <6 GPa and have a molten core or outer core, settling of denser carbide-rich liquid or flotation of lighter, sulfide-rich melt may contribute to an early, short-lived geodynamo.

  10. Black carbon concentrations from a Tibetan Plateau ice core spanning 1843-1982: recent increases due to emissions and glacier melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M.; Kaspari, S.; Kang, S.; Grigholm, B.; Mayewski, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    Black carbon (BC) deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce albedo and lead to accelerated melt. An ice core recovered from Guoqu glacier on Mt. Geladaindong and analyzed using a Single Particle Soot Photometer provides the first long-term (1843-1982) record of BC concentrations from the Central Tibetan Plateau. The highest concentrations are observed from 1975-1982, which corresponds to a 2.0-fold and 2.4-fold increase in average and median values, respectively, relative to 1843-1940. BC concentrations post-1940 are also elevated relative to the earlier portion of the record. Causes for the higher BC concentrations include increased regional BC emissions and subsequent deposition, and melt induced enrichment of BC, with the melt potentially accelerated due to the presence of BC at the glacier surface. A qualitative comparison of the BC and Fe (used as a dust proxy) records suggests that if changes in the concentrations of absorbing impurities at the glacier surface have influenced recent glacial melt, the melt may be due to the presence of BC rather than dust. Guoqu glacier has received no net ice accumulation since the 1980s, and is a potential example of a glacier where an increase in the equilibrium line altitude is exposing buried high impurity layers. That BC concentrations in the uppermost layers of the Geladaindong ice core are not substantially higher relative to deeper in the ice core suggests that some of the BC that must have been deposited on Guoqu glacier via wet or dry deposition between 1983 and 2005 has been removed from the surface of the glacier, potentially via supraglacial or englacial meltwater.

  11. Carbon Solubility in Core Melts in Shallow Magma Ocean Environment and its bearing on Distribution of Carbon between Deep Earth Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Walker, D.

    2007-12-01

    Carbon affects the melting phase relations of mantle rocks [1] and core metal [2], influences the physical properties of molten silicates and metals, and also has significant effect on partitioning of other key elements between various deep Earth phases. But the carbon budget of Earth's deep mantle and core is poorly constrained due to lack of knowledge of behavior of carbon during core formation. In order to determine the storage capacity of dissolved carbon in metallic core melts and to put constraints on partitioning of carbon between silicate mantle and metallic core, we have determined the solubility of carbon in molten core metal at P- T conditions relevant for a shallow magma ocean.Experiments are performed at 2 GPa and to 2500 C using a piston cylinder apparatus. Pure Fe-rod or a mixture of Fe-5.2%Ni loaded into graphite capsules were used as starting materials. Al coated run products are analyzed by EMP. Carbon concentration of 5.8 0.4 wt.% at 2000 C, 6.5 0.9 wt.% at 2250 C, and 7.5 1.2 wt.% at 2500 C are measured in quenched iron melt saturated with graphite. The trend of C solubility versus temperature for Fe-5.2 wt.% Ni melt, within analytical uncertainties, is similar to that of pure Fe.We have compared our solubility data and an estimate of the current carbon content of the mantle with the carbon content of core melts and residual mantle silicates respectively, derived from equilibrium batch or fractional segregation of core liquids, to constrain the partition coefficient of carbon between silicate and metallic melts in a magma ocean, DC. Translation of the limits of DC, derived from our solubility data, on calculation of carbon content of the residual silicate shows that the observed mantle concentration of carbon is too low to be matched by the process of shallow magma ocean fractionation of carbon between metal and silicate in a chondritic protoearth. If carbon solubility in liquid Fe does not change strongly as a function of pressure, this may indicate the presence of a hidden carbon- rich mantle reservoir untapped by oceanic volcanism. For the entire range of possible bulk Earth carbon content from chondritic to subchondritic and for the mantle carbon content of 50-1000 ppm, DC of 10-4- 100 are derived. But for 1000 ppm bulk Earth carbon, DC is 10-2-100. Using the complete range of possible DC for a magma ocean at ~2200 C, we predict maximum carbon content of the Earth's core to be 6-7 wt.% and a preferred value of 0.25 0.15 wt.% carbon for a bulk Earth carbon concentration of 1000 ppm. Based on our estimate, the core is likely one of the most enriched terrestrial reservoirs of carbon with concentration as high as 0.4 wt.%, which likely is at least an order of magnitude higher than that of the average mantle. The higher carbon content of OIBs compared to MORBs thus may derive in part from core contributions to mantle plumes.[1] Dasgupta, R. and Hirschmann, M.M. 2006, Nature 440, 659- 662. [2] Wood, B.J. 1993, Earth Planet Sci Lett 117, 593-607.

  12. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  13. Postulates for measures of genuine multipartite correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles H.; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Ryszard; Horodecki, Pawel

    2011-01-15

    A lot of research has been done on multipartite correlations, but the problem of satisfactorily defining genuine multipartite correlations--those not trivially reducible to lower partite correlations--remains unsolved. In this paper we propose three reasonable postulates which each measure or indicator of genuine multipartite correlations (or genuine multipartite entanglement) should satisfy. We also introduce the concept of degree of correlations, which gives partial characterization of multipartite correlations. Then, we show that covariance does not satisfy two postulates and hence it cannot be used as an indicator of genuine multipartite correlations. Finally, we propose a candidate for a measure of genuine multipartite correlations based on the work that can be drawn from a local heat bath by means of a multipartite state.

  14. Principia aetiologica: taking causality beyond Koch's postulates.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J

    2007-11-01

    There is no single accepted method to establish a causal relationship between an infective agent and its corresponding infectious disease. Different biomedical disciplines use a patchwork of distinct but overlapping approaches. To a greater or lesser extent these are based on criteria known as the Koch-Henle postulates, or 'Koch's postulates' for short. Deficiencies in Koch's postulates were recognized by their principal author shortly after their formulation. Now, over a century later, a more rigorous method to test causality has still to be finalized. One contender is a method that uses molecular methods to establish a causal relationship ('molecular Koch's postulates'). Recognizing the wider range of contemporary approaches used to build an argument for a causal relationship, the use of a more inclusive approach to establish proof of causality is proposed. This method uses an argument built from a series of assertions. Assertion 1: congruence or reproducible correlation of a taxonomically defined life form with the clinico-pathological and epidemiological features of infection. Assertion 2: consistency of the demonstrable biological response in the subject to an encounter with the prospective infective agent. Assertion 3: progressive or cumulative dissonance as an explanation for pathophysiological processes at every known level of biological organization in the subject. Assertion 4: curtailment of that pathophysiological process on the deliberate introduction of a specified biomedical intervention. Evidence to implicate the candidate biological entity as an initiator of or primer for cumulative dissonance places it in a subcategory of micro-organisms to be known as 'priobes'. A priobe is the sufficient and necessary antecedent cause of a pathophysiological process evident as an infectious disease. PMID:17965339

  15. A 10 year record of black carbon and dust from a Mera Peak ice core (Nepal): variability and potential impact on melting of Himalayan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginot, P.; Dumont, M.; Lim, S.; Patris, N.; Taupin, J.-D.; Wagnon, P.; Gilbert, A.; Arnaud, Y.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Laj, P.

    2014-08-01

    A shallow ice core was extracted at the summit of Mera Peak at 6376 m a.s.l. in the southern flank of the Nepalese Himalaya range. From this core, we reconstructed the seasonal deposition fluxes of dust and refractory black carbon (rBC) since 1999. This archive presents well preserved seasonal cycles based on a monsoonal precipitation pattern. According to the seasonal precipitation regime in which 80% of annual precipitation falls between June and September, we estimated changes in the concentrations of these aerosols in surface snow. The analyses revealed that mass fluxes are a few orders of magnitude higher for dust (10.4 2.8 g m-2 yr-1 than for rBC (7.9 2.8 mg m-2 yr-1). The relative lack of seasonality in the dust record may reflect a high background level of dust inputs, whether from local or regional sources. Over the 10-year record, no deposition flux trends were detected for any of the species of interest. The data were then used to simulate changes in the surface snow albedo over time and the potential melting caused by these impurities. Mean potential melting caused by dust and rBC combined was 713 kg m-2 yr-1, and for rBC alone, 342 kg m-2 yr-1 for rBC under certain assumptions. Compared to the melting rate measured using the mass and energy balance at 5360 m a.s.l. on Mera Glacier between November 2009 and October 2010, i.e. 3000 kg m-2 yr-1 and 3690 kg m-2 yr-1 respectively, the impact of rBC represents less than 16% of annual potential melting while the contribution of dust and rBC combined to surface melting represents a maximum of 26%. Over the 10-year period, rBC variability in the ice core signal primarily reflected variability of the monsoon signal rather than variations in the intensity of emissions.

  16. Timescales of melt generation and the thermal evolution of the Himalayan metamorphic core, Everest region, eastern Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viskupic, Karen; Hodges, Kip V.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2005-03-01

    In the Everest region of the Nepalese Himalaya, 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb geochronology provide evidence for a complex thermal history marked by multiple episodes of granite intrusion. The oldest mobilized melt formed syn-deformational granitic sills that have U-Pb crystallization ages of 21.33±0.03 and 21.80±0.05 Ma. Preserved in these same granites is a record of earlier magmatic crystallization of xenotime, zircon and monazite between ca. 26 Ma and ca. 23 Ma. This pattern of accessory phase crystallization is interpreted to reflect incremental melting and crystallization in the source region of the sills before ultimate melt migration, and provides the earliest evidence for anatexis in the Everest region. The beginning of crustal melting in the Everest region predates the earliest known movement on both the Main Central Thrust and the South Tibetan fault systems, but is temporally associated with the implied pressure decrease between "Eohimalayan" and "Neohimalayan" metamorphism.

  17. Protoplanetary core formation by rain-out of iron drops. [coalesced melted metal transport to Jovian protoplanet center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Using the stochastic collection equation we find that the time scale for rain out of liquid iron in a Saturn mass protoplanet is rapid compared with other evolutionary time scales and hence iron protoplanetary core formation is inevitable. The survival of this core during subsequent protoplanetary evolution and the consequences of the rain-out on the evolution are also discussed.

  18. Nonlinear damage analysis: Postulate and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to assess the viability of a damage postulate which asserts that the fatigue resistance curve of a metal is history dependent due to inelastic action. The study focusses on OFE copper because this simple model material accentuates the inelastic action central to the damage postulate. Data relevant to damage evolution and crack initiation are developed via a study of surface topography. The effects of surface layer residual stresses are explored via comparative testing as were the effects in initial prestraining. The results of the study very clearly show the deformation history dependence of the fatigue resistance of OFE copper. Furthermore the concept of deformation history dependence is shown to qualitatively explain the fatigue resistance of all histories considered. Likewise quantitative predictions for block cycle histories are found to accurately track the observed results. In this respect the assertion that damage per cycle for a given level of the damage parameter is deformation history dependent appears to be physically justified.

  19. Final results of the XR2-1 BWR metallic melt relocation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, R.O.; Humphries, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the final results of the XR2-1 boiling water reactor (BWR) metallic melt relocation experiment, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the material relocation processes and relocation pathways in a dry BWR core following a severe nuclear reactor accident such as an unrecovered station blackout accident. The imposed test conditions (initial thermal state and the melt generation rates) simulated the conditions for the postulated accident scenario and the prototypic design of the lower core test section (in composition and in geometry) ensured that thermal masses and physical flow barriers were modeled adequately. The experiment has shown that, under dry core conditions, the metallic core materials that melt and drain from the upper core regions can drain from the core region entirely without formation of robust coherent blockages in the lower core. Temporary blockages that suspended pools of molten metal later melted, allowing the metals to continue draining downward. The test facility and instrumentation are described in detail. The test progression and results are presented and compared to MERIS code analyses. 6 refs., 55 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Effect of carbon, sulfur and silicon on iron melting at high pressure: Implications for composition and evolution of the planetary terrestrial cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Liwei; Fei, Yingwei; Liu, Xi; Gong, Zizheng; Shahar, Anat

    2013-08-01

    High-pressure melting experiments in the Fe-S-C ternary and Fe-S-Si-C quaternary systems have been conducted in the range of 3.5-20 GPa and 920-1700 °C in the multi-anvil press. The mutual solubility, melting relations, and crystallization sequences were systematically investigated with changes of pressure, temperature and bulk composition. Five starting materials of Fe(84.69 wt%)-C(4.35 wt%)-S(7.85 wt%), Fe(84.87 wt%)-C(2.08 wt%)-S(11.41 wt%), Fe(86.36 wt%)-C(0.96 wt%)-S(10.31 wt%), Fe(85.71 wt%)-C(0.33 wt%)-S(11.86 wt%) and Fe(82.95 wt%)-C(0.66 wt%)-S(13.7 wt%)-Si(2.89 wt%) were employed. For Fe(84.69 wt%)-C(4.35 wt%)-S(7.85 wt%), the first crystallized phase is Fe3C at 5 GPa and Fe7C3 at 10-20 GPa. For Fe(84.87 wt%)-C(2.08 wt%)-S(11.41 wt%), Fe3C is the stable carbide at subsolidus temperature at 5-15 GPa. For Fe(86.36 wt%)-C(0.96 wt%)-S(10.31 wt%) and Fe(85.71 wt%)-C(0.33 wt%)-S(11.86 wt%), the first crystallized phase is metallic Fe instead of iron carbide at 5-10 GPa. The cotectic curves in Fe-S-C ternary system indicate only a small amount of C is needed to form an iron carbide solid inner core with the presence of S. Experiments on Fe(82.95 wt%)-C(0.66 wt%)-S(13.7 wt%)-Si(2.89 wt%) showed that a small amount of C does not significantly change the closure pressure of miscibility gap compared with that in Fe-S-Si system. It is observed that S preferentially partitions into molten iron while a significant amount of Si enters the solid phase with temperature decrease. Meanwhile, the C concentration in the liquid and solid iron metal changes little with temperature variations. If S, C and Si partitioning behavior between molten iron and solid iron metal with temperature remains the same under Earth's present core pressure conditions, the solid inner core should be iron dominated with dissolved Si. On the other hand, the liquid outer core will be S rich and Si poor. Moderate carbon will be evenly present in both solid and liquid cores. Based on our melting data in a multi-component system, no layered liquid core should exist in the Earth, Mars and Mercury.

  1. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  2. Megablocks and melt pockets in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure constrained by magnetic field measurements and properties of the Eyreville and Cape Charles cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, A.K.; Daniels, D.L.; Kontny, A.; Brozena, J.

    2009-01-01

    We use magnetic susceptibility and remanent magnetization measurements of the Eyreville and Cape Charles cores in combination with new and previously collected magnetic field data in order to constrain structural features within the inner basin of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. The Eyreville core shows the first evidence of several-hundred-meter-thick basement-derived megablocks that have been transported possibly kilometers from their pre-impact location. The magnetic anomaly map of the structure exhibits numerous short-wavelength (<2 km) variations that indicate the presence of magnetic sources within the crater fill. With core magnetic properties and seismic reflection and refraction results as constraints, forward models of the magnetic field show that these sources may represent basementderived megablocks that are a few hundred meters thick or melt bodies that are a few dozen meters thick. Larger-scale magnetic field properties suggest that these bodies overlie deeper, pre-impact basement contacts between materials with different magnetic properties such as gneiss and schist or gneiss and granite. The distribution of the short-wavelength magnetic anomalies in combination with observations of small-scale (1-2 mGal) gravity field variations suggest that basement-derived megablocks are preferentially distributed on the eastern side of the inner crater, not far from the Eyreville core, at depths of around 1-2 km. A scenario where additional basement-derived blocks between 2 and 3 km depth are distributed throughout the inner basin-and are composed of more magnetic materials, such as granite and schist, toward the east over a large-scale magnetic anomaly high and less magnetic materials, such as gneiss, toward the west where the magnetic anomaly is lower-provides a good model fi t to the observed magnetic anomalies in a manner that is consistent with both gravity and seismic-refraction data. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Growth kinetics of FeS melt in partially molten peridotite: An analog for core-forming processes [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Takashi; Watson, E. Bruce

    2005-06-01

    The growth kinetics of molten FeS pools in partially molten peridotite were investigated by time-series experiments in a piston-cylinder apparatus. The starting materials were mixed powders of peridotite + FeS, with FeS = 6%, 12% and 18% by volume in order to characterize the effect of volume fraction on the growth laws of FeS. The initial particle size of FeS was about 3.5 ?m. The samples were annealed at temperatures between 1573 and 1723 K at 1.5 GPa for durations ranging from a few seconds to 100 h. The size of FeS pools was determined by analysis of backscattered electron images. The increase of pool size ( G) of FeS with time ( t) follows a growth law: Gn - G0n = k t ( k = k0 exp(- Q / RT)). Samples with higher FeS volume fraction have larger pool size at the same conditions. The growth exponent ( n) at 1573 K strongly depends on initial volume fraction of FeS and varies between 2.6 and 6.4, whereas those at 1723 K are almost constant (2.3) irrespective of the initial volume fraction. The growth exponent ( n) tends to decrease with increasing temperature and volume fraction of silicate melt for each run series of different initial volume fraction of FeS. Low volume fractions of FeS and silicate melt leads to sluggish growth of the pools due to pinning of the silicate mineral phases. The activation enthalpy for pool growth is 331 40 kJ/mol based on the results from samples with 18 vol.% FeS, which show the smallest variation of growth exponent over a range of temperature. These FeS coarsening experiments may serve as tentative analogs for the behavior of a liquid metal phase in hot proto-planetary objects. Assuming exponential heating of such bodies in the early solar systemand allowing for a significant Zener pinning effect of Fe poolsthe time spent above the silicate solidus may be insufficient to grow the pools beyond the size where diffusive equilibration with the silicate surroundings can be maintained: in other words, diffusive equilibration may assured because of slow coarsening kinetics.

  4. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brooks, Dusty Marie

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  5. Melt transport - a personal cashing-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.

    2005-12-01

    The flow of fluids through rocks transports heat and material and changes bulk composition. The large-scale chemical differentiation of the Earth is related to flow of partial melts. From the perspective of current understanding of tectonic processes, prominent examples of such transport processes are the formation of oceanic crust from ascending basic melts at mid-ocean ridges, melt segregation involved in the solidification of the Earth's core, and dissolution-precipitation creep in subduction channels. Transport and deformation cannot be separated for partially molten aggregates. Permeability is only defined as an instantaneous parameter in the sense that Darcy's law is assumed to be valid; it is not an explicit parameter in the fundamental mechanical conservation laws but can be derived from them in certain circumstances as a result of averaging schemes. The governing, explicit physical properties in the mechanical equations are the shear and bulk viscosities of the solid framework and the fluid viscosity and compressibility. Constraints on the magnitude of these properties are available today from experiments at specific loading configurations, i.e., more or less well constrained initial and boundary conditions. The melt pressure remains the least controlled parameter. While the fluid viscosity is often much lower than the solid's the two-phase aggregate may exhibit considerable strength owing to the difficulty of moving the fluid through the branched pore network. The extremes in behavior depend on the time scale of loading, as known from daily live experiences (spounge, Danish coffee-pot, human tissue between neighboring bones). Several theoretical approaches attempted to formulate mechanical constitutive equations for two-phase aggregates. An important issue is the handling of internal variables in these equations. At experimental conditions, grain size, melt pocket orientation and crystallographic orientation -prime candidates for internal variables- change considerably and potentially contribute significantly to the total dissipation of the external work. Theoretically founded evolution equations for these internal variables are lacking. In experiments, both the kinetics of grain growth but also the resultant shape of grains is affected by the presence of melt. The latter is linked to the alignment of melt pockets with the maximum principle stress. Thus, the melt redistribution causes direct anisotropy but also indirect through a shape-preferred orientation of solid grains. Notably, the foliation is parallel to the maximum principle stress in contrast to deformation controlled by crystal defects alone. Extremum principles developed for dissipation potentials in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics may allow us to postulate evolution equations. Owing to their significant effect on aggregate viscosities understanding the evolution of internal variables is mandatory for substantial large-scale modeling.

  6. A parametric model for analysis of melt progression in U-A1 assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, I.K. ); Kim, S.H.; Leonard, M.T.; Amos, C.N. )

    1990-06-15

    A computational model has been developed that calculates the thermal degradation of the reactor core of the production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) under postulated severe accident conditions. This model addresses heatup and degradation of the U-Al fuel and Li-Al or U-metal target assemblies and neighboring structures. Models included are those for assembly heatup due to decay heat generation, material melting and relocation, volume expansion of fuel due to foaming and melt/debris accumulation in assembly bottom end-fittings. Sample results are presented that illustrate the effect of alternative assumptions regarding the temperature at which U-Al alloy melts and relocates and the extent to which fuel foaming thermally couples adjacent fuel and target tubes. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Modeling of core debris-sodium-concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Pedersen, D.R.; Nguyen, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The interactions between sodium and concrete in the presence of heat-generating core debris resulting from a postulated core meltdown accident in a sodium-cooled fast reactor are complex yet important phenomena relevant to several key safety issues. In particular, the attack of sodium and of core debris on the concrete basemat below the reactor cavity, the generation of hydrogen gas, and the pressurization of the reactor building as a result of the interactions represent, among others, the major sources that provide a challenge to containment integrity. Thus far, no physical model has been developed to describe the nature and the extent of sodium-concrete interactions wth core debris present. It is the purpose of this study to provide a complete physical description of the scenario involved in the core debris-sodium-concrete interactions, starting from the chemical erosion phase through the molten pool formation phase to the long-term melt penetration phase.

  8. Blind Benchmark Calculations for Melt Spreading in the ECOSTAR Project

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, C.; Allelein, H.J.; Foit, J.J.; Alsmeyer, H.; Spindler, B.; Veteau, J.M.; Artnik, J.; Fischer, M.

    2004-07-01

    The Project ECOSTAR (5. EC Framework Programme) on Ex-Vessel Core Melt Stabilisation Research is oriented towards the analysis and mitigation of severe accident sequences that could occur in the ex-vessel phase of a postulated core melt accident. Spreading of the corium melt on the available basement surface is an important process, which defines the initial conditions for concrete attack and for the efficiency of cooling in case of water contact, respectively. The transfer and spreading of the melt on the basement is one of the major issues in ECOSTAR. This is addressed here by a spreading code benchmark involving a large-scale spreading experiment that is used for the validation of the existing spreading codes. The corium melt is simulated by a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, CaO and FeO with a sufficiently wide freezing interval. In the 3-dim benchmark test ECOKATS-1 170 litres of oxide melt are poured onto a 3 m by 4 m concrete surface with a low flow rate of about 2 l/s. From the results of an additional 2-dim channel experiment some basic rheological data (e.g. initial viscosity) are obtained in order to minimise the uncertainty in material properties of the melt. The participating spreading codes CORFLOW (Framatome ANP/FZK), LAVA (GRS), and THEMA (CEA) differ from each other by their focus of modelling and the assumptions made to simplify the relevant transport equations. In a first step both experiments (3-dim/2-dim) are calculated blindly by the participating codes. This serves for an overall assessment of the codes capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with rather unknown material properties. In a second step the 3-dim experiment ECOKATS-1 is recalculated by the codes with the more precise knowledge of the rheological behaviour of the oxide melt in the 2-dim experiment. This, in addition, serves for the validation of the codes' capabilities to predict the spreading of a melt with well-known material properties. Based on the benchmark results and taking the specific validation process for each of the three codes applied into account, it is recommended that the spreading issue for reactor safety research be considered closed. (authors)

  9. A proof of von Neumann's postulate in Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, Elio

    2010-05-04

    A Clifford algebraic analysis is explained. It gives proof of von Neumann's postulate on quantum measurement. It is of basic significance to explain the problem of quantum wave function reduction in quantum mechanics.

  10. One Hair Postulate for Hawking Radiation as Tunneling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Cai, Qing-Yu; Liu, Xu-Feng; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2014-03-01

    For Hawking radiation, treated as a tunneling process, the no-hair theorem of black hole together with the law of energy conservation is utilized to postulate that the tunneling rate only depends on the external qualities (e.g., the mass for the Schwarzschild black hole) and the energy of the radiated particle. This postulate is justified by the WKB approximation for calculating the tunneling probability. Based on this postulate, a general formula for the tunneling probability is derived without referring to the concrete form of black hole metric. This formula implies an intrinsic correlation between the successive processes of the black hole radiation of two or more particles. It also suggests a kind of entropy conservation and thus resolves the puzzle of black hole information loss in some sense.

  11. Melt electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Dalton, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Melt electrospinning is relatively under-investigated compared to solution electrospinning but provides opportunities in numerous areas, in which solvent accumulation or toxicity are a concern. These applications are diverse, and provide a broad set of challenges to researchers involved in electrospinning. In this context, melt electrospinning provides an alternative approach that bypasses some challenges to solution electrospinning, while bringing new issues to the forefront, such as the thermal stability of polymers. This Focus Review describes the literature on melt electrospinning, as well as highlighting areas where both melt and solution are combined, and potentially merge together in the future. PMID:21080400

  12. A Conceptual Derivation of Einstein's Postulates of Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Thomas E.

    This document presents a discussion and conceptual derivation of Einstein's postulates of special relativity. The perceptron approach appears to be a fundamentally new manner of regarding physical phenomena and it is hoped that physicists will interest themselves in the concept. (Author)

  13. Safely Teaching Koch's Postulates on the Causation of Infectious Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which the interactions between a parasite and its host may be demonstrated using the relationship between yogurt and two species of bacteria. Background information on Koch's postulates is provided. Materials, laboratory procedures, and results are discussed. (CW)

  14. How to Teach the Postulates of Quantum Mechanics without Enigma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira-Dias, Jose J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Shows how a statistical approach can help students accept postulates of quantum mechanics. The approach, which also makes students aware of the philosophical/humanistic implications of quantum mechanics, involves the following sequence: (1) important experiments in quantum mechanics; (2) conventional statistical interpretation; (3) mathematical

  15. The Four Postulates of Freudian Unconscious Neurocognitive Convergences

    PubMed Central

    Arminjon, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In the 1980s, the terms “cognitive unconscious” were invented to denominate a perspective on unconscious mental processes independent from the psychoanalytical views. For several reasons, the two approaches to unconscious are generally conceived as irreducible. Nowadays, we are witnessing a certain convergence between both fields. The aim of this paper consists in examining the four basic postulates of Freudian unconscious at the light of neurocognitive sciences. They posit: (1) that some psychological processes are unconsciously performed and causally determine conscious processes, (2) that they are governed by their own cognitive rules, (3) that they set out their own intentions, (4) and that they lead to a conflicting organization of psyche. We show that each of these postulates is the subject of empirical and theoretical works. If the two fields refer to more or less similar mechanisms, we propose that their opposition rests on an epistemological misunderstanding. As a conclusion, we promote a conservative reunification of the two perspectives. PMID:21734896

  16. An analytical assessment of the chemical form of fission products during postulated severe accidents in the SRS production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis has been performed to determine the principal chemical forms for the structural and fission product elements during a postulated severe core damage accident in tritium powered core in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. These reactors are powered with UAl{sub x} fuel and are used for the production of weapons materials. Six core elements, cesium, iodine, tellurium, strontium, barium, and lithium, were emphasized in this analysis. Other elements also included were aluminum, hydrogen, oxygen, uranium, molybdenum, silicon, zirconium, magnesium, iron, chromium, nickel, cadmium, zinc, cooper, manganese, nitrogen, and argon. The masses of each of the constituents used in the analyses were based on end-or-core life masses for the structural and fission product elements and on core gas volume for steam, N, and Ar. A chemical equilibrium analysis was performed using the Facility for Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics (FACT) computer code at three temperatures (800, 1100, 1400 K) and two pressures (1 and 10 atmospheres). These temperatures and pressures are typical for postulated severe core accidents in the ATR.

  17. An analytical assessment of the chemical form of fission products during postulated severe accidents in the SRS production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.

    1991-12-31

    An analysis has been performed to determine the principal chemical forms for the structural and fission product elements during a postulated severe core damage accident in tritium powered core in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. These reactors are powered with UAl{sub x} fuel and are used for the production of weapons materials. Six core elements, cesium, iodine, tellurium, strontium, barium, and lithium, were emphasized in this analysis. Other elements also included were aluminum, hydrogen, oxygen, uranium, molybdenum, silicon, zirconium, magnesium, iron, chromium, nickel, cadmium, zinc, cooper, manganese, nitrogen, and argon. The masses of each of the constituents used in the analyses were based on end-or-core life masses for the structural and fission product elements and on core gas volume for steam, N, and Ar. A chemical equilibrium analysis was performed using the Facility for Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics (FACT) computer code at three temperatures (800, 1100, 1400 K) and two pressures (1 and 10 atmospheres). These temperatures and pressures are typical for postulated severe core accidents in the ATR.

  18. A Postulation of a Concept in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-10-01

    I am postulating that all fermions have a quantum mouth (Planck size) that radiates a flux density of gravitons as a function of the mass of the particle. Nucleons are not hard balls like light bulbs radiating photons challenging Newtonian concepts of centers and surfaces. The hardball analogy is implicit in coupling constants that compare strong force relative to gravity. The radiating mouth is not localized at the center like a hypothetical point size filament of a light bulb with a hard surface. A point invokes mass of zero volume. It is too precise, inconsistent and illogical. Nothing can be localized with more accuracy that Planck length. Substituting the hard glass bulb surface with flexible plastic surface would clearly make the interacting mouths of particles approach each other as close as possible, but no less than the quantum limit of Planck length. Therefore, surface distance in Newtonian gravity would be a close approximation at particle scale and fits Feynman's road map [1]. My postulation reflected by Fig. 2 of gr-qc/0507130 explains observations of increasing values of coupling constants resulting from decreasing values of Planck length (See physics/0210040 v1). Since Planck length is the fundamental unit of length of nature, its variation can impact our observation of the universe and the evolutionary process.

  19. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  20. Time-Scales of Melt Generation in the Ama Drime and Leo Pargil Domes: Quantifying Links Between Mid-Crustal Anatexis and Exhumation in the Core of the Himalayan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, J. M.; Jessup, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    Miocene crustal anatectic events within the core of the Himalayan orogen have been implicated by some researchers as a key driver of rapid, large-scale extrusion and exhumation of mid-crustal rocks from beneath the southern margin of the Tibetan plateau. However, it remains unclear whether melting is the primary driving force behind exhumation, or whether exhumation, forced by orogen-scale tectonic events, triggers melting. Domes exhumed during orogen-parallel extension within the high Himalaya such as Ama Drime Massif (ADM) in southern Tibet and Leo Pargil dome (LPD) in NW India provide a unique opportunity to integrate field, petrologic and geochronologic datasets that link the timing and duration of leucogranite formation to specific structural, thermal and exhumation events. These data also yield detailed knowledge of the temporal- and spatial-scales over which anatexis occurs within the mid-crust. Our data from the ADM, located c. 60km east of Mt. Everest indicate the presence of a relatively simple melt chronology that post-dates anatexis in the overlying Greater Himalayan Series (GHS) by 8 - 3 Ma. Initial syn-kinematic melting of granitic orthogneiss at granulite-facies Pressure-Temperature (P-T) conditions of 750C and 0.8GPA occurred at 13 - 12 Ma. This was immediately followed by emplacement of post-kinematic dykes along steep semi-brittle structures at 12-11 Ma. We interpret these data to record rapid melt-present exhumation of deep crustal material in the footwall of north-striking normal-fault systems. Exhumation occurred concomitantly with, and is directly related to, orogen-parallel flow that post-dates movement on the South Tibetan Detachment system - Main Central Thrust system. Rocks preserved within the ADM may therefore represent a good analogue for modern melt generation that, as argued by some, is potentially occurring beneath the Tibetan plateau today. In contrast, observations from the LPD indicate the presence of multiple (in some cases greater than five) generations of leucogranite at the outcrop-scale. Other key observations include: 1) the density-distribution of leucogranites is heterogeneous throughout the dome; 2) an apparent spread in crystallization ages from c. 26 to 16 Ma; 3) variations in chemical and mineralogical composition of leucogranites; and 4) differences in the timing of leucogranite emplacement relative to major kinematic and metamorphic events. When combined these observations suggest that the LPD has a protracted thermal and structural history with multiple phases of melt-generation under differing P-T conditions and kinematic configurations. At the orogen-scale, data from the ADM and LPD imply that Himalayan leucogranites provide key geologic evidence for changes in mid-crustal rheology (effective bulk viscosity) and therefore offer a proxy for estimating crustal strength through time. These data are therefore crucial input into large-scale geodynamic models that attempt to explain spatial and temporal scales of flow in the mid-crust.

  1. A random spatial network model based on elementary postulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In contrast to the random topology model, this model ascribes a unique spatial specification to generated drainage networks, a distinguishing property of some network growth models. The simplicity of the postulates creates an opportunity for potential analytic investigations of the probabilistic structure of the drainage networks, while the spatial specification enables analyses of spatially dependent network properties. In the random topology model all drainage networks, conditioned on magnitude (number of first-order streams), are equally likely, whereas in this model all spanning trees of a grid, conditioned on area and drainage density, are equally likely. As a result, link lengths in the generated networks are not independent, as usually assumed in the random topology model. -from Authors

  2. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 1: Postulated models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1994-01-01

    A short theoretical study of aircraft aerodynamic model equations with unsteady effects is presented. The aerodynamic forces and moments are expressed in terms of indicial functions or internal state variables. The first representation leads to aircraft integro-differential equations of motion; the second preserves the state-space form of the model equations. The formulations of unsteady aerodynamics is applied in two examples. The first example deals with a one-degree-of-freedom harmonic motion about one of the aircraft body axes. In the second example, the equations for longitudinal short-period motion are developed. In these examples, only linear aerodynamic terms are considered. The indicial functions are postulated as simple exponentials and the internal state variables are governed by linear, time-invariant, first-order differential equations. It is shown that both approaches to the modeling of unsteady aerodynamics lead to identical models.

  3. Analyses of postulated ALMR containment and steam generator building accidents using the CONTAIN-LMR code

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, T.; Wood, S.A.; Shen, P.K.; Baker, R.B.; Gluekler, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    The development of liquid metal reactor concepts with passive safety characteristics is in progress at the General Electric Company under contract to the US Department of Energy. To assess the performance of these systems under postulated severe accident conditions analyses of containment accidents relating to the breach of the primary coolant boundary of the Department of Energy Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor were completed by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the plant designer General Electric. A series of three accident cases were selected by General Electric for characterizing the containment responding to a hypothetical core disruptive accident. In addition, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Steam Generator Building was also analyzed to demonstrate the acceptability of the Steam Generator Building sodium fire protection strategy related to a design-basis leak.

  4. Melting Behavior of Iron Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Lee, K. K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Earth's core consists of an iron-nickel alloy with approximately ten percent of other light elements (e.g., C, S, Si, O). Therefore, the behavior of iron alloys of similar composition at the temperatures and pressures that resemble the conditions of Earth's core is of fundamental importance to our understanding of the inner workings of our planet. The melting behavior of iron alloys is especially important as it sheds light on the conditions at the boundary between Earth's solid inner core and its liquid outer core, as well as puts constraints on the age of the inner core. Here, we report the melting curve of iron alloys based on laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments. Four-color multi-wavelength imaging radiometry is used to determine the temperature profiles of the heated spot during melting and electron microscopy is used to map the compositional and textural changes of the iron alloys. An automated analysis of the texture, composition and temperature of the hot spots is conducted with an in-house developed image processing script, which identifies the melting point of the alloys and the preferred host phases of minor elements (e.g., Ni, Cr, Mn) at high-pressure/temperature conditions.

  5. Preliminary risks associated with postulated tritium release from production reactor operation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kula, K.R.; Horton, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor operation is assessing the off-site risk due to tritium releases during postulated full or partial loss of heavy water moderator accidents. Other sources of tritium in the reactor are less likely to contribute to off-site risk in non-fuel melting accident scenarios. Preliminary determination of the frequency of average partial moderator loss (including incidents with leaks as small as .5 kg) yields an estimate of /approximately/1 per reactor year. The full moderator loss frequency is conservatively chosen as 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/3/ per reactor year. Conditional consequences, determined with a version of the MACCS code modified to handle tritium, are found to be insignificant. The 95th percentile individual cancer risk is 4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/8/ per reactor year within 16 km of the release point. The full moderator loss accident contributes about 75% of the evaluated risks. 13 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Reconstruction of intra-bundle fission density profile during a postulated LOCA in a CANDU reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, D.; Rahnema, F.; Sarsour, H.; Turinsky, P. J.; Stamm'ler, R.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, results related to the reconstruction of intra-bundle fission density profile for a 37-pin CANDU-6 bundle with the highest enthalpy deposition during a postulated large LOCA stagnation break in a Bruce B core are presented. Bruce B is a nuclear power plant in Kincardine, Ontario (Canada)), on the shores of Lake Huron with 4 CANDU reactors that are rated at about 750 MWe. The reconstruction of the fuel pin fission densities is based on steady-state, three-dimensional simulations with the Monte Carlo code MCNP for a subset of 27 out of 69 time steps during the first two seconds of the power pulse predicted for the fuel bundle at core location V13/8. Two-group cross section data libraries are generated for MCNP at each time step by the lattice depletion neutron transport code HELIOS-1.7. To include the effect of the surrounding core environment, the calculations are performed with time-dependent albedo boundary conditions inferred from a full core simulation of the transient by the nodal diffusion code NESTLE with HELIOS homogenized cross-sections. It is found that the local peaking factor (LPF) in the outer ring varies during the transient, but never exceeds its value before the transient. Inclusion of the core environment increases the LPF in the outer ring. For the analyzed case, the increase is 0.72% with a relative error of 0.01% for the LPF before the transient and 0.55% (with a relative error of 0.01%) for the maximum average LPF during the transient. The latter is based on only four selected transient time points. Note that the immediate environment of the 'hot bundle' does not contain any reactivity devices or other perturbing factors. As a result, the increases observed in the LPF in the outer ring may not be representative of the situations in which 'other' core environment perturbing factors are present. To determine the effect of these factors on the LPF, further analyses of a bundle in the proximity of control devices should be carried out. (authors)

  7. Economic Analysis of a Postulated space Tourism Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Allan S.

    2002-01-01

    Design concepts and associated costs were defined for a family of launch vehicles supporting a space tourism endeavor requiring the weekly transport of space tourists to and from an Earth- orbiting facility. The stated business goal for the Space Tourist Transportation System (STTS) element of the proposed commercial space venture was to transport and return ~50 passengers a week to LEO at a cost of roughly 50 K per seat commencing in 2005. This paper summarizes the economic analyses conducted within a broader Systems Engineering study of the postulated concept. Parametric costs were derived using TransCostSystems' (TCS) Cost Engineering Handbook, version 7. Costs were developed as a function of critical system characteristics and selected business scenarios. Various economic strategies directed toward achieving a cost of ~50 K per seat were identified and examined. The study indicated that with a `nominal' business scenario, the initial cost for developing and producing a fully reusable, 2-stage STTS element for a baseline of 46-passengers was about 15.5 B assuming a plausible `commercialization factor' of 0.333. The associated per-seat ticket cost was ~890 K, more than an order of magnitude higher than desired. If the system is enlarged to 104 passengers for better efficiency, the STTS initial cost for the nominal business scenario is increased to about 19.8 B and the per-seat ticket cost is reduced to ~530 K. It was concluded that achieving the desired ticket cost of 50 K per seat is not feasible unless the size of the STTS, and therefore of the entire system, is substantially increased. However, for the specified operational characteristics, it was shown that a system capacity of thousands of passengers per week is required. This implies an extremely high total system development cost, which is not very realistic as a commercial venture, especially in the proposed time frame. These results suggested that ambitious commercial space ventures may have to rely on sizeable government subsidies for economic viability. For example, in this study a hypothesized government subsidy of half the STTS development cost reduced the per-seat ticket cost by about 35%. A number of other business scenarios were also investigated, including `expensing' the entire program initial cost. These analyses showed that even greater government participation, additional aggressive business strategies and/or very low commercialization factors (in the range of 1/9 to 1/30) must be implemented or attained to achieve the desired per-seat cost of 50 K per passenger with reasonably sized vehicles.

  8. Melting in super-earths.

    PubMed

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses. PMID:24664915

  9. Onaping Formation, Ries Suevite and Melt-Fuel-Coolant-Interaction (MFCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, R. A. F.; Osinski, G. R.; Chanou, A.

    2013-08-01

    The Sudbury Onaping Formation and the Ries suevite Ries have been postulated to form as the result of melt-fuel-coolant-interaction (MFCI), i.e., by the explosive interaction between impact melt and water. Both interpretations canot be correct.

  10. Hidden carbon in Earth's inner core revealed by shear softening in dense Fe7C3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Li, Zeyu; Zhang, Dongzhou; Liu, Jiachao; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Bi, Wenli; Alp, E Ercan; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Li, Jie

    2014-12-16

    Earth's inner core is known to consist of crystalline iron alloyed with a small amount of nickel and lighter elements, but the shear wave (S wave) travels through the inner core at about half the speed expected for most iron-rich alloys under relevant pressures. The anomalously low S-wave velocity (vS) has been attributed to the presence of liquid, hence questioning the solidity of the inner core. Here we report new experimental data up to core pressures on iron carbide Fe7C3, a candidate component of the inner core, showing that its sound velocities dropped significantly near the end of a pressure-induced spin-pairing transition, which took place gradually between 10 GPa and 53 GPa. Following the transition, the sound velocities increased with density at an exceptionally low rate. Extrapolating the data to the inner core pressure and accounting for the temperature effect, we found that low-spin Fe7C3 can reproduce the observed vS of the inner core, thus eliminating the need to invoke partial melting or a postulated large temperature effect. The model of a carbon-rich inner core may be consistent with existing constraints on the Earth's carbon budget and would imply that as much as two thirds of the planet's carbon is hidden in its center sphere. PMID:25453077

  11. Skylab M551 metals melting experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the M551 Metals Melting Experiment were to: (1) study behavior of molten metal, (2) characterize metals melted and solidified in the low gravity space environment compared to one-gravity of earth, and (3) determine feasibility of joining metals in space. The experiment used the electron beam (EB) and chamber of the M512 apparatus to make a dwell puddle and a melt in a rotating disc of varying thickness. Hence, the EB performed cut-through, full and partial penetration melts, in addition to a resolidified button. The three disc materials were aluminum 2219-T87, 304 stainless steel, and pure tantalum to provide a wide range of density and melting conditions. Observations to date include the proof that EB welding, cutting, and melting can be done successfully in low gravity. Earlier, some welding authorities had postulated that without gravity the EB would force the molten puddle out of contact. However, the experiment proved that surface tension forces predominate. From the viewpoint of cast-solidification, small, equiaxed grains in Skylab specimens compared to large, elongated grains in ground based specimens were observed. The former are thought to be associated with constitutional supercooling and nucleation where the latter are associated with dendritic solidification. In further support of the more equiaxed grain growth in Skylab, symmetric subgrain patterns were frequently observed where there was much less symmetry in ground based specimens.

  12. Core formation in asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical and physical aspects of metal segregation in asteroids are considered. Evidence for the existence of metallic cores in asteroids, meteorite parent bodies, and planetesimals and for the amount of melting required to form cores is reviewed, and the physics of metal segregation is discussed. These considerations lead to the conclusion that about 50 percent of melting is required for metal to drain away and form a core. It is pointed out that such high amounts of melting were not always attained in asteroids, indicating that many asteroids might consist of partially differentiated silicates and metallic masses that did not segregate to a core. It is suggested that S asteroids might represent such partially differentiated bodies.

  13. Melting the Divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Presenting Quaternary Environmental Change to students who fall into Widening Participation criteria at the University of Cambridge, gives a unique opportunity to present academic debate in an approachable and entertaining way. Literally by discussing the melting of our ice caps, melts the divide Cambridge has between its reputation and the reality for the brightest, underprivileged, students. There is a balance between presenting cutting edge research with the need to come across as accessible (and importantly valuable to "learning"). Climate change over the Quaternary lends itself well to this aim. By lecturing groups of potential students through the entire Quaternary in an hour, stopping to discuss how our ancestors interacted with past Interglacials and what are the mechanisms driving change (in generalized terms), you are able to introduce cutting edge research (such as the latest NEEM ice core) to the students. This shows the evolution and importance of higher education and academic research. The lecture leads well onto group discussions (termed "supervisions" in Cambridge), to explore their opinions on the concern for present Anthropogenic Climate Change in relation to Past Climate Change after being presented with images that our ancestors "made it". Here discussion thrives off students saying obvious things (or sarcastic comments!) which quickly can lead into a deep technical discussion on their terms. Such discussions give the students a zest for higher education, simply throwing Ruddiman's (2003) "The Anthroprocene Started Several Thousand Years Ago" at them, questions in a second their concept of Anthropogenic Climate Change. Supervisions lend themselves well to bright, articulate, students and by offering these experiences to students of Widening Participation criteria we quickly melt the divide between the reputation of Cambridge ( and higher education as a whole) and the day to day practice. Higher education is not for the privileged, but a free and open environment for the exchange of ideas. Quaternary Environmental Change lends itself, as an engaging and "fun" subject, well to potential students bridging the divide between ability and circumstance.

  14. The effects of sulfur, silicon, water, and oxygen fugacity on carbon solubility and partitioning in Fe-rich alloy and silicate melt systems at 3 GPa and 1600 °C: Implications for core-mantle differentiation and degassing of magma oceans and reduced planetary mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei

    2015-04-01

    The partition coefficient of carbon between Fe-rich alloy melt and silicate melt, D C metal /silicate and solubility of C-O-H volatiles in reduced silicate melts are key parameters that need to be quantified in order to constrain the budget and origin of carbon in different planetary reservoirs and subsequent evolution of volatiles in magma oceans (MO) and silicate mantles. In this study, three sets of graphite-saturated experiments have been performed at 3 GPa and 1600 °C to investigate the effects of oxygen fugacity (fO2), sulfur, silicon, and water on the dissolution and partitioning of carbon between Fe-rich alloy melt and silicate melt. The results show that the presence of 0-5 wt% sulfur in alloy melt does not have considerable effect on carbon solubility (∼5.6 wt%) in alloy melt, determined by electron microprobe, whereas the presence of 0-10 wt% silicon decreases the carbon solubility from ∼5.6 wt% to 1.8 wt%. Carbon solubility (11-192 ppm) in silicate melt, determined by SIMS, is strongly controlled by fO2 and the bulk water content. Decreasing log ⁡ fO2 from IW-0.6 to IW-4.7 or increasing bulk water content from 0.07 to 0.55 wt% results in significant increase of carbon solubility in silicate melt. Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analyses of silicate glasses show that the carbon species is mostly methane, which is further confirmed by the strong, positive correlation between the non-carbonate carbon and non-hydroxyl hydrogen in silicate melt. The D C metal /silicate ranging from 180 to 4600 decreases with decreasing fO2 or increasing bulk water in silicate melt. In addition, increasing Si in alloy melt also decreases D C metal /silicate . Our results demonstrate that fO2 and bulk water contents in silicate melt play an important role in determining the fractionation of carbon in planetary MO. A reduced, hydrous MO may have led to a considerable fraction of carbon retained in the silicate mantle, whereas an oxidized, dry MO may have lost almost its entire carbon into the core. If delivery of bulk Earth carbon predominantly occurred after >90% of accretion, i.e., in a relatively oxidized MO (IW-2 to IW-1), then with applicable D C metal /silicate > 1000, most early Earth carbon would also enter the segregating core. Finally, the predominance of methane in reduced silicate melt with fO2 below IW-1 also indicates that degassing of a hydrous, solidifying MO may have created a reduced early atmosphere, and degassing from lunar and Martian mantle may have released much more methane than carbon dioxide.

  15. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-07-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates downwards a blockage may be formed and grow both radially and axially. The velocity of the melt can be calculated from a force balance between the gravity and frictional losses at the melt-rod interface. When the heater rod is uncovered completely, the melt progression is initiated at the mid-point, which is the hot spot in the rod. However, the melting location is elevated as the water level rises because of the downward heat transfer. Considering the melt flow as a film, the steady-state film thickness on the cylindrical heater rod and the average velocity are computed. The steady-state film flow rate is determined in terms of the density, film thickness, and film velocity. (authors)

  16. "Snowing" Core in Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Cormier, V.; Gao, L.; Gubbins, D.; Kharlamova, S. A.; He, K.; Yang, H.

    2008-12-01

    As a planet cools, an initially molten core gradually solidifies. Solidification occurs at shallow depths in the form of "snow", if the liquidus temperature gradient of the core composition is smaller than the adiabatic temperature gradient in the core. Experimental data on the melting behavior of iron-sulfur binary system suggest that the cores of Mercury and Ganymede are probably snowing at the present time. The Martian core is predicted to snow in the future, provided that the sulfur content falls into the range of 10 to 14 weight percent. Is the Earth's core snowing? If so, what are the surface manifestations? If the Earth's core snowed in the past, how did it affect the formation of the solid inner core and the geodynamo? Here, we evaluate the likelihood and consequences of a snowing core throughout the Earth's history, on the basis of mineral physics data describing the melting behavior, equation-of-state, and thermodynamic properties of iron-rich alloys at high pressures. We discuss if snowing in the present-day Earth can reproduce the shallow gradients of compressional wave velocity above the inner-core boundary, and whether or not snowing in the early Earth may reconcile the apparent young age of the solid inner core with a long-lived geodynamo.

  17. Hidden carbon in Earth’s inner core revealed by shear softening in dense Fe7C3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zeyu; Zhang, Dongzhou; Liu, Jiachao; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Bi, Wenli; Alp, E. Ercan; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Li, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Earth’s inner core is known to consist of crystalline iron alloyed with a small amount of nickel and lighter elements, but the shear wave (S wave) travels through the inner core at about half the speed expected for most iron-rich alloys under relevant pressures. The anomalously low S-wave velocity (vS) has been attributed to the presence of liquid, hence questioning the solidity of the inner core. Here we report new experimental data up to core pressures on iron carbide Fe7C3, a candidate component of the inner core, showing that its sound velocities dropped significantly near the end of a pressure-induced spin-pairing transition, which took place gradually between 10 GPa and 53 GPa. Following the transition, the sound velocities increased with density at an exceptionally low rate. Extrapolating the data to the inner core pressure and accounting for the temperature effect, we found that low-spin Fe7C3 can reproduce the observed vS of the inner core, thus eliminating the need to invoke partial melting or a postulated large temperature effect. The model of a carbon-rich inner core may be consistent with existing constraints on the Earth's carbon budget and would imply that as much as two thirds of the planet's carbon is hidden in its center sphere. PMID:25453077

  18. Effect of boiling regime on melt stream breakup in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed examining the breakup and mixing behavior of an initially coherent stream of high-density melt as it flows downward through water. This work has application to the quenching of molten core materials as they drain downward during a postulated severe reactor accident. The study has included examination of various models of breakup distances based upon interfacial instabilities dominated either by liquid-liquid contact or by liquid-vapor contact. A series of experiments was performed to provide a data base for assessment of the various modeling approaches. The experiments involved Wood's metal (T/sub m/ = 73/sup 0/C, rho = 9.2 g/cm/sup 3/, d/sub j/ = 20 mm) poured into a deep pool of water. The temperature of the water and wood's metal were varied to span the range from single-phase, liquid-liquid contact to the film boiling regime. Experiment results showed that breakup occurred largely as a result of the spreading and entrainment from the leading edge of the jet. However, for streams of sufficient lengths a breakup length could be discerned at which there was no longer a coherent central core of the jet to feed the leading edge region. The erosion of the vertical trailing column is by Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities and related disengagement of droplets from the jet into the surrounding fluid. For conditions of liquid-liquid contact, the breakup length has been found to be about 20 jet diameters; when substantial vapor is produced at the interface due to heat transfer from the jet to the water, the breakup distance was found to range to as high as 50 jet diameters. The former values are close to the analytical prediction of Taylor, whereas the latter values are better predicted by the model of Epstein and Fauske.

  19. MACCS usage at Rocky Flats Plant for consequence analysis of postulated accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Foppe, T.L.; Peterson, V.L.

    1993-10-01

    The MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS) has been applied to the radiological consequence assessment of potential accidents from a non-reactor nuclear facility. MACCS has been used in a variety of applications to evaluate radiological dose and health effects to the public from postulated plutonium releases and from postulated criticalities. These applications were conducted to support deterministic and probabilistic accident analyses for safety analyses for safety analysis reports, radiological sabotage studies, and other regulatory requests.

  20. A spirit of scientific rigour: Koch's postulates in twentieth-century medicine.

    PubMed

    Gradmann, Christoph

    2014-11-01

    This article explores one of a citation classics in medical literature-Koch's postulates. It analyses their creation in the nineteenth century and their popularity in the twentieth century. As a genre of historiography, references to the postulates are anecdotes. In referring to a historical event that never happened, such references serve to remind their audiences of a tradition of experimental medicine that supposedly originated with Robert Koch. PMID:25193030

  1. Melting of Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  2. Melt behavior of aluminum clad rods

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, G.T.; Long, T.A.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Since the Li-Al alloy cores in control rods used to control production reactors are susceptible to corrosion by heavy water, they were clad with Al. This paper reports results of an experimental and numerical study of the behavior of control rods heated to the point of clad and rod-core failure. Results show that the core of the rod melts first; the clad fails only after significant additional heating. Once the rod breaks and drops to the bottom of the quartz tube in the furnace, the lower section of the rod fails by ``poker-chipping`` downward as the topmost portion fails before the portion below it. Part of the core in the remaining top of the rod relocates immediately after rod separation, leaving a hollow tube of Al which also melts upon further heating.

  3. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  4. Studies for the staggered pans core catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Fieg, G.; Moeschke, M.; Werle, H.

    1995-09-01

    Special devices (core catchers) might be required in the future to prevent containment failure by basemat erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce the release of radioactivity. A configuration is investigated that consists essentially of a stack of vertically superimposed melt-resistant ceramic pans and that makes use of the vertical extension of small-diameter cavities to provide a sufficiently large spreading area such that the core melt freezes quickly. Tests with {approximately}100 kg of molten iron and aluminium oxide generated by the thermite reaction give some information on the resistance of various materials against the mixed metal/oxide melt and on the flow and distribution of metallic and oxide melts in such a core-catcher configuration.

  5. Metal-sulfide melt non-interconnectivity in silicates, even at high pressure, high temperature, and high melt fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Minarik, W.G.; Ryerson, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have investigated the textural microstructure of iron-nickel-sulfur melts in contact with olivine, pyroxene, and the modified-spinel polymorph of olivine. The experiments were conducted at 1,500 C and pressures ranging from 1 to 17 GPa. For compositions more metal-rich than the monosulfide, including the eutectic composition, the metal sulfide melt has a dihedral angle greater than 60{degree} and does not form an interconnected grain-edge fluid. Increasing pressure does not measurably alter the dihedral angles. Textural evolution results in coarsening of the sulfide melt pockets, resulting in large pockets surrounded by many silicate grains and separated from one another by melt-free grain edges. Chemical communication between these large pockets is limited to lattice and grain-boundary diffusion. Due to the large interfacial energy between sulfide melt and silicates, sulfide melts are unable to separate from solid silicate via grain-boundary percolation and remain stranded in isolated melt pockets. Sulfide melt in excess of the critical melt fraction (5--25%) will develop a transient interconnectivity as sulfide collects into larger melt pockets and interconnectivity is pinched off. Efficient separation of core-forming sulfide melts from silicate requires either melting of the silicate matrix or a very large fraction of metal-sulfide melt (perhaps as large as 40%).

  6. Melting of peridotite to 140 gigapascals.

    PubMed

    Fiquet, G; Auzende, A L; Siebert, J; Corgne, A; Bureau, H; Ozawa, H; Garbarino, G

    2010-09-17

    Interrogating physical processes that occur within the lowermost mantle is a key to understanding Earth's evolution and present-day inner composition. Among such processes, partial melting has been proposed to explain mantle regions with ultralow seismic velocities near the core-mantle boundary, but experimental validation at the appropriate temperature and pressure regimes remains challenging. Using laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we constructed the solidus curve of a natural fertile peridotite between 36 and 140 gigapascals. Melting at core-mantle boundary pressures occurs at 4180 ± 150 kelvin, which is a value that matches estimated mantle geotherms. Molten regions may therefore exist at the base of the present-day mantle. Melting phase relations and element partitioning data also show that these liquids could host many incompatible elements at the base of the mantle. PMID:20847269

  7. Radiological consequences of a postulated drop of a maximally Lloaded FFTF fuel cask

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.A.

    1995-09-22

    Onsite and site boundary radiological consequences were estimated for a postulated accidental drop of an Interim Storage Cask (ISC) loaded 7 assemblies at the maximum available burnup. The postulated cask drop was assumed to occur from the maximum physically attainable height during crane movement of the cask. The resulting onsite and site boundary doses of 45 mSv and 0.04 mSv are far below the corresponding 1 Sv and 250 mSv risk guidelines for highly unlikely accidents

  8. Low-pressure cutoff for melt dispersal from reactor cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, N.K.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.

    1988-01-01

    Consider a potential core melt accident sequence during which the reactor pressure vessel fails while the primary system is still at high pressure. The molten core material, consisting of oxides and unreacted zirconium and stainless steel, is assumed driven from the reactor vessel under high primary system pressure into the region beneath the vessel (reactor cavity). Steam, which follows the melt discharge from the vessel, flows at high velocity through the reactor cavity region, finely fragments the molten core material into droplets, interacts thermally and chemically (thus producing hydrogen) with the melt, and carries some fraction of melt droplets into the containment subcompartments just above the cavity. Hydrogen produced in the reactor cavity and subcompartments will be transported to the dome where combustion with oxygen would occur if conditions permitted. The core debris, during its flight through the subcompartments and the containment dome, transfers some fraction of its thermal and chemical energy directly to the containment atmosphere. This phenomenon of direct energy exchange between the core melt and containment atmosphere, which leads to rapid containment pressurization, is termed direct containment heating (DCH). This paper describes the results of debris dispersal experiments that were performed to determine the maximum permissible primary system pressure at vessel failure (low-pressure cutoff for debris dispersal) that yields negligible dispersal of core melt from the Surry reactor cavity.

  9. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  10. Melt emplacement induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2015-04-01

    Transport of melt into and through the lithosphere has an essential influence on it's state, evolution and properties. Rock deformation, physically seen as viscous flow, acts on a long time scale compared with the rapid ascent of melt originating in the asthenosphere. In our numerical models the short time scale transfer of melt is replaced by melt extraction and emplacement at a given depth zone above the source region. New findings reveal probably consequential stresses in the high viscous lithosphere. Thermo-mechanical physics of visco-plastic flow is approximated by Finite Difference Method with markers in an Eulerian formulation in two dimensions. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component and two phase system: fluid and matrix. The full compaction formulation is used. The high Prandtl number approximation is applied, elasticity is neglected, and rheology is temperature-, stress- and depth-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. Extraction and emplacement of melt is accounted for. A continental rift scenario serves to define a model comprising asthenosphere and lithosphere under extensional conditions. A temperature anomaly generates deep melt intruding the lithosphere on its way up. We focus on the early phase of melting, forming a first plume and releasing some melt. Above a fraction limit melt extraction induces underpressure at its origin region attracting ambient melt and contracting the matrix. A melt fraction minimum develops in the inital batch. In the emplacement zone above sudden dilatation, immediate freezing, increase of enrichment and heating takes place. The dilatation of the rock matrix generates relative high stresses if it's viscosity is high. The behaviour is not intuitively comprehensible. Results are compared with numerical solutions of Compaction Boussinesq Approximation.

  11. An Inexpensive and Safe Experiment to Demonstrate Koch's Postulates Using Citrus Fruit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobi, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Citrus fruit (oranges, tangerines, grapefruit or lemons) purchased in a grocery store can be experimentally infected with readily-available sources of "Penicillium digitatum" to demonstrate the four basic steps of Koch's postulates, also known as proof of pathogenicity. The mould is isolated from naturally-infected citrus fruit into pure culture…

  12. An Inexpensive and Safe Experiment to Demonstrate Koch's Postulates Using Citrus Fruit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobi, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Citrus fruit (oranges, tangerines, grapefruit or lemons) purchased in a grocery store can be experimentally infected with readily-available sources of "Penicillium digitatum" to demonstrate the four basic steps of Koch's postulates, also known as proof of pathogenicity. The mould is isolated from naturally-infected citrus fruit into pure culture

  13. Fun Microbiology: Using a Plant Pathogenic Fungus To Demonstrate Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Orsted, Kathy M.; Warnes, Carl E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a plant pathogenic fungus in which students learn to follow aseptic techniques, grow and produce spores of a fungus, use a hemacytometer for enumerating spores, prepare serial dilutions, grow and inoculate plants, isolate a pure culture using agar streak plates, and demonstrate the four steps of Koch's postulates.

  14. Application of a postulate based control theory for an artificial arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, S. C.; Jerard, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The biocontroller, remnant of the natural arm, and feedback elements must be considered in designing a controller for an above elbow artificial arm for amputees. This fundamental postulate is used to derive equations for developing the controller, which is shown in block diagrams.

  15. Research and Postulates Related to a Behavioristic Theory of Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewens, William P.

    The postulates for the behavioristic theory of career development are based on ideas that emerged from a systems analysis of career education. The systems analysis was structured to reflect the following definition of career education: Career education is composed of all the planned and incidental learning experiences of the individual that

  16. On Whether One Can(not) Not Communicate: An Examination via Traditional Communication Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motley, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews four traditional communication postulates--namely, that communication is interactive, involves encoding, involves the exchange of symbols, and has a fidelity dimension. Finds each to be a contradiction of the popular axiom which states that one cannot not communicate. (MG)

  17. Free Radical Halogenation, Selectivity, and Thermodynamics: The Polanyi Principle and Hammond's Postulate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scala, Alfred A.

    2004-01-01

    The underlying ideas of the Polanyi principle and Hammond's postulate in relation to the simple free halogenation reactions and their selectivity and thermodynamics is presented. The results indicate that the chlorine atom exhibits a slightly less selectivity in the liquid phase as compared to in the gas phase.

  18. Fun Microbiology: Using a Plant Pathogenic Fungus To Demonstrate Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Orsted, Kathy M.; Warnes, Carl E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a plant pathogenic fungus in which students learn to follow aseptic techniques, grow and produce spores of a fungus, use a hemacytometer for enumerating spores, prepare serial dilutions, grow and inoculate plants, isolate a pure culture using agar streak plates, and demonstrate the four steps of Koch's postulates.…

  19. A Postulated Mechanism That Leads to Materialization and Dematerialization of Matter and to Antigravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Thomas E.

    This document presents a discussion of the postulated mechanism that leads to the materialization and dematerialization of matter and to antigravity. The mechanism also explains why an orbital electron does not radiate energy, in contradiction to classical electromagnetic theory. One of the paradoxes of special relativity is explained. A new model…

  20. Sequence-based identification of microbial pathogens: a reconsideration of Koch's postulates.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, D N; Relman, D A

    1996-01-01

    Over 100 years ago, Robert Koch introduced his ideas about how to prove a causal relationship between a microorganism and a disease. Koch's postulates created a scientific standard for causal evidence that established the credibility of microbes as pathogens and led to the development of modern microbiology. In more recent times, Koch's postulates have evolved to accommodate a broader understanding of the host-parasite relationship as well as experimental advances. Techniques such as in situ hybridization, PCR, and representational difference analysis reveal previously uncharacterized, fastidious or uncultivated, microbial pathogens that resist the application of Koch's original postulates, but they also provide new approaches for proving disease causation. In particular, the increasing reliance on sequence-based methods for microbial identification requires a reassessment of the original postulates and the rationale that guided Koch and later revisionists. Recent investigations of Whipple's disease, human ehrlichiosis, hepatitis C, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, and Kaposi's sarcoma illustrate some of these issues. A set of molecular guidelines for establishing disease causation with sequence-based technology is proposed, and the importance of the scientific concordance of evidence in supporting causal associations is emphasized. PMID:8665474

  1. Experimental melting curve of iron revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Orson L.; Duba, Al

    1997-10-01

    With new experimental data presented in the last 2 years, it becomes possible to resolve conflicts in the data sets used in constructing the melting curve of iron, Tm(P). On the basis of these new data, several data sets have been dropped: the Williams et al. [1987] melting curve up to 100 GPa and the Bass et al [1987] and Yoo et al. [1993] shock-wave-derived Tm(P) in the 200-300 GPa range based on light emissivity measurements. The Boehler [1993] Tm(P) curve to 200 GPa and the Brown and McQueen [1986] shock-wave-determined Tm(240) remain, leaving a gap between 240 and 330 GPa. We fill this gap using the Lindemann law of melting. The Lindemann law and the temperature values along the Brown and McQueen [1986] Hugoniot require the value of the Grneisen ratio, ?; thus ? connects Tm at 330 GPa with Tm found for values of the Hugoniot. It is further shown that the heat of crystallization, ?Hm, is dependent on ?. Thus, through 7, a connection is made between the melting curve and the power generated within the inner core. The effect of all these connections of physical properties through ? leads us to recommend 5600-6500 K as the Tm of iron at inner-outer core boundary conditions. Though argument continues concerning the amount and nature of alloying elements, there remains little ground for doubting that both inner and outer cores consist mainly of iron.

  2. The rock melting approach to drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, G.E.; Goff, S.J.; Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W. Jr.; Dreesen, D.S.; Winchester, W.

    1993-09-01

    During the early and mid-1970`s the Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated practical applications of drilling and coring using an electrically-heated graphite, tungsten, or molybdenum penetrator that melts a hole as it is slowly pushed through the rock or soil. The molten material consolidates into a rugged glass lining that prevents hole collapse; minimizes the potential for cross-flow, lost circulation, or the release of hazardous materials without casing operations; and produces no cuttings in porous or low density (<1.7 g/cc) formations. Because there are no drilling fluids required, the rock melting approach reduces waste handling, treatment and disposal. Drilling by rock melting has been demonstrated to depths up to 30 m in caliche, clay, alluvium, cobbles, sand, basalt, granite, and other materials. Penetrating large cobbles without debris removal was achieved by thermal stress fracturing and lateral extrusion of portions of the rock melt into the resulting cracks. Both horizontal and vertical holes in a variety of diameters were drilled in these materials using modular, self-contained field units that operate in remote areas. Because the penetrator does not need to rotate, steering by several simple approaches is considered quite feasible. Melting is ideal for obtaining core samples in alluvium and other poorly consolidated soils since the formed-in-place glass liner stabilizes the hole, encapsulates volatile or hazardous material, and recovers an undisturbed core. Because of the relatively low thermal conductivity of rock and soil materials, the heat-affected zone beyond the melt layer is very small, <1 inch thick. Los Alamos has begun to update the technology and this paper will report on the current status of applications and designs for improved drills.

  3. Maxwell's macroscopic equations, the energy-momentum postulates, and the Lorentz law of force.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis R

    2009-02-01

    We argue that the classical theory of electromagnetism is based on Maxwell's macroscopic equations, an energy postulate, a momentum postulate, and a generalized form of the Lorentz law of force. These seven postulates constitute the foundation of a complete and consistent theory, thus eliminating the need for actual (i.e., physical) models of polarization P and magnetization M , these being the distinguishing features of Maxwell's macroscopic equations. In the proposed formulation, P(r,t) and M(r,t) are arbitrary functions of space and time, their physical properties being embedded in the seven postulates of the theory. The postulates are self-consistent, comply with the requirements of the special theory of relativity, and satisfy the laws of conservation of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum. One advantage of the proposed formulation is that it sidesteps the long-standing Abraham-Minkowski controversy surrounding the electromagnetic momentum inside a material medium by simply "assigning" the Abraham momentum density E(r,t)xH(r,t)/c2 to the electromagnetic field. This well-defined momentum is thus taken to be universal as it does not depend on whether the field is propagating or evanescent, and whether or not the host medium is homogeneous, transparent, isotropic, dispersive, magnetic, linear, etc. In other words, the local and instantaneous momentum density is uniquely and unambiguously specified at each and every point of the material system in terms of the E and H fields residing at that point. Any variation with time of the total electromagnetic momentum of a closed system results in a force exerted on the material media within the system in accordance with the generalized Lorentz law. PMID:19391864

  4. The Relationship between Lattice Enthalpy and Melting Point in Magnesium and Aluminium Oxides. Science Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Yap, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    This "Science Note" presents a study by Christopher Talbot and Lydia Yap, who teach IB Chemistry at Anglo-Chinese School (Independent), Republic of Singapore, to pre-university students. Pre-university students may postulate the correlation between the magnitude of the lattice enthalpy compound and its melting point, since both…

  5. The Relationship between Lattice Enthalpy and Melting Point in Magnesium and Aluminium Oxides. Science Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Yap, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    This "Science Note" presents a study by Christopher Talbot and Lydia Yap, who teach IB Chemistry at Anglo-Chinese School (Independent), Republic of Singapore, to pre-university students. Pre-university students may postulate the correlation between the magnitude of the lattice enthalpy compound and its melting point, since both

  6. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Audétat A.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  7. Translating Kochs Postulates to Identify Matrix Metalloproteinase Roles in Post-Myocardial Infarction Remodeling: The Cardiac Metalloproteinase Actions (CarMA) Postulates

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; de Castro Brs, Lisandra E.; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2014-01-01

    The first matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was described in 1962; and since the 1990s, cardiovascular research has focused on understanding how MMPs regulate many aspects of cardiovascular pathology from atherosclerosis formation to myocardial infarction and stroke. While much information has been gleaned by these past reports, to a large degree MMP cardiovascular biology remains observational, with few studies homing in on cause and effect relationships. Kochs postulates were first developed in the 19th century as a way to establish microorganism function and were modified in the 20th century to include methods to establish molecular causality. In this review, we outline the concept for establishing a similar approach to determine causality in terms of MMP functions. We use left ventricular remodeling post-myocardial infarction as an example, but this approach will have broad applicability across both the cardiovascular and MMP fields. PMID:24577966

  8. Melting of crystalline Si nanoparticle investigated by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Le Van; Hoang, Vo Van; Tranh, Duong Thi Nhu

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate melting of the crystalline Si nanoparticle. Atoms in the nanoparticle interact with each other via the Stillinger-Weber potential. Two heating rates are used. We find that melting of the nanoparticle occurs via propagation of quasi-liquid layer from the surface into the core of the nanoparticle until this layer reaches the critical thickness. We find heating rate affects on mechanism of melting of Si nanoparticle, i.e. coexistence of the two melting mechanisms (homogeneous and heterogeneous ones) occurs if low heating rate is used and it is unlike that proposed in the past. Size affects on melting of Si nanoparticle are found and discussed. In addition, we find that the global bond order parameters Q l can be used to detect melting of Si system unlike some calculations presented in the past.

  9. Melting of crystalline Si nanoparticle investigated by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Sang, Le; Van Hoang, Vo; Thi Nhu Tranh, Duong

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate melting of the crystalline Si nanoparticle. Atoms in the nanoparticle interact with each other via the Stillinger-Weber potential. Two heating rates are used. We find that melting of the nanoparticle occurs via propagation of quasi-liquid layer from the surface into the core of the nanoparticle until this layer reaches the critical thickness. We find heating rate affects on mechanism of melting of Si nanoparticle, i.e. coexistence of the two melting mechanisms (homogeneous and heterogeneous ones) occurs if low heating rate is used and it is unlike that proposed in the past. Size affects on melting of Si nanoparticle are found and discussed. In addition, we find that the global bond order parameters Ql can be used to detect melting of Si system unlike some calculations presented in the past.

  10. Calculation of SY tank annulus continuous air monitor readings after postulated leak scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, J.L.

    1998-08-01

    The objective of this work was to determine whether or not a continuous air monitor (CAM) monitoring the annulus of one of the SY Tanks would be expected to alarm after three postulated leak scenarios. Using data and references provided by Lockheed Martin`s Tank Farm personnel, estimated CAM readings were calculated at specific times after the postulated scenarios might have occurred. Potential CAM readings above background at different times were calculated for the following leak scenarios: Leak rate of 0.01 gal/min; Leak rate of 0.03 gal/min (best estimate of the maximum probable leak rate from a single-shell tank); and Leak of 73 gal (equivalent to a {1/4}-in. leak on the floor of the annulus). The equation used to make the calculations along with descriptions and/or explanations of the terms are included, as is a list of the assumptions and/or values used for the calculations.

  11. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  12. A test of Hebb's postulate at identified synapses which mediate classical conditioning in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Carew, T J; Hawkins, R D; Abrams, T W; Kandel, E R

    1984-05-01

    In 1949, D. O. Hebb proposed a novel mechanism for producing changes in the strength of synapses that could account for associative learning. According to Hebb , the strength of a synapse might increase when the use of that synapse contributes to the generation of action potentials in a postsynaptic neuron. Thus, an essential feature of this postulate is that action potentials must occur in both a postsynaptic cell and a presynaptic cell for associative synaptic changes to occur. We have directly tested Hebb 's postulate in Aplysia at identified synapses which are known to exhibit a temporally specific increase in efficacy during a cellular analogue of differential conditioning. We find that the mechanism postulated by Hebb is neither necessary nor sufficient to produce the associative change in synaptic strength that underlies conditioning in Aplysia. In contrast, impulse activity in the presynaptic cell must be paired with facilitatory input, supporting the hypothesis that the temporal specificity of classical conditioning in Aplysia can be accounted for by activity-dependent amplification of presynaptic facilitation. PMID:6726327

  13. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  14. Melting of compressed iron by monitoring atomic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jennifer M.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Lerche, Michael; Zhao, Jiyong; Toellner, Thomas S.; Alp, E. Ercan; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Bass, Jay D.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Wicks, June K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for detecting the solid-liquid phase boundary of compressed iron at high temperatures using synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS). Our approach is unique because the dynamics of the iron atoms are monitored. This process is described by the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, which is related to the mean-square displacement of the iron atoms. Focused synchrotron radiation with 1 meV bandwidth passes through a laser-heated 57Fe sample inside a diamond-anvil cell, and the characteristic SMS time signature vanishes when melting occurs. At our highest compression measurement and considering thermal pressure, we find the melting point of iron to be TM=3025±115 K at P=82±5 GPa. When compared with previously reported melting points for iron using static compression methods with different criteria for melting, our melting trend defines a steeper positive slope as a function of pressure. The obtained melting temperatures represent a significant step toward a reliable melting curve of iron at Earth's core conditions. For other terrestrial planets possessing cores with liquid portions rich in metallic iron, such as Mercury and Mars, the higher melting temperatures for compressed iron may imply warmer internal temperatures.

  15. Core catcher device. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, L.; Fourest, B.; Kayser, G.; Martin, R.

    1981-07-28

    In a fast reactor having a diagrid structure supported on the bottom wall of a reactor vessel containing the core and liquid metal coolant, a core catcher serves in the event of core meltdown to prevent hot debris carried down by the liquid metal from coming into contact with the vessel walls. The core catcher comprises a single collecting tray having a large area, a central chimney and a bearing shell extending parallel to the bottom wall of the reactor vessel. An enclosed space is formed between the bottom wall, the diagrid support structure and the diagrid and contains the collecting tray. Under melt-down conditions, the temperature differences produced by the molten fuel deposited on the tray and the presence of the central chimney have the effect of setting up a natural circulation of liquid metal and consequently of cooling the fuel.

  16. The Light-Velocity Postulate: The Essential Difference between the Theories of Lorentz-Poincare and Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiko, Seiya

    2005-01-01

    Einstein, who had already developed the light-quantum theory, knew the inadequacy of Maxwell's theory in the microscopic sphere. Therefore, in writing his paper on special relativity, he had to set up the light-velocity postulate independently of the relativity postulate in order to make the electromagnetic foundation of physics compatible with

  17. The Light-Velocity Postulate: The Essential Difference between the Theories of Lorentz-Poincare and Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiko, Seiya

    2005-01-01

    Einstein, who had already developed the light-quantum theory, knew the inadequacy of Maxwell's theory in the microscopic sphere. Therefore, in writing his paper on special relativity, he had to set up the light-velocity postulate independently of the relativity postulate in order to make the electromagnetic foundation of physics compatible with…

  18. Dislocation theory of melting for iron, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, J.P.; Shankland, T.J.

    1993-11-01

    Melting point T{sub m} of iron at conditions of the Earth`s inner core boundary (ICB) has been calculated from dislocation theory of melting in metals. Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate uncertainties introduced by uncertainty in the geophysical parameters that are used in the calculations. These calculations take into account the effects of pressure at ICB conditions and of possible freezing point depression resulting from dilution of pure iron in the outer core. With this approach T{sub m} of pure {var_epsilon}-Fe at a pressure of 330 GPa and without freezing point depression is 6160 {plus_minus} 250 K; for a 1000 K freezing point depression it is 6110 K. T{sub m} of pure {gamma}-Fe is 6060 K, a value that is not significantly different. A possible {alpha}{prime} phase would melt at 5600 K. These values agree with calculated shock wave determinations of T{sub m}. Although calculated T{sub m} of the pure phase is little affected by assumptions about the extent of freezing point depression, the estimated temperature of the inner core boundary is lower by the breezing point depression, perhaps 500--1000 K less than T{sub m} of a pure phase.

  19. Dislocation theory of melting for iron, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, J. ); Shankland, T.J. )

    1994-07-10

    The melting point T[sub m] of iron at conditions of the Earth's inner core boundary (ICB) has been calculated from the dislocation theory of melting in metals. Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate uncertainties introduced by uncertainty in the geophysical parameters that are used in the calculations. These calculations take into account the effects of pressure at ICB conditions and of possible freezing point depression resulting from dilution of pure iron in the outer core. With this approach T[sub m] of pure [epsilon]-Fe at a pressure of 330 GPa and without freezing point depression is 6160[plus minus]250 K; for a 1000 K freezing point depression it is 6110 K. T[sub m] of pure [gamma]-Fe is 6060 K, a value that is not significantly different. A possible [alpha][prime] phase would melt at 5600 K. These values agree with calculated shock wave determinations of T[sub m]. Although calculated T[sub m] of the pure phase is little affected by assumptions about the extent of freezing point depression, the estimated temperature of the inner core boundary is lower by the freezing point depression, perhaps 500--1000 K less than T[sub m] of a pure phase. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

  20. Coolability of a control rod which has melted and foamed in its septifoil channel

    SciTech Connect

    Walkowiak, D.A.

    1991-10-01

    During a Loss of Control Rod Cooling (LCRC) event, the control rods which are in the affected septifoil can be postulated to melt. Melting of a control rod which has been irradiated creates a special concern since the entrapped gases expand rapidly and cause the melt to manifest itself initially in a foamed state. The foamed material then contacts the septifoil outer housing and the inner septifoil web material, where heat is conducted out of the foamed material. A second concern relating to the foamed melt is that its thermal conductivity is greatly reduced from that of the solid material, and also that of the non-foamed liquid. The purpose of this report is to address how, even in the presence of decreased thermal conductivity, the foamed melt may aid in cooling the control rod material.

  1. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a basis for the efficient development of new models for phenomena such as materials interaction; and these validated phenomenological models (from the results of the experiments) then may be incorporated in the systems-level codes (MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5).

  2. Reactive melt migration in mantle rocks: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, M.; Kohlstedt, D. L.; Zimmerman, M. E.; Holtzman, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    Several physical and chemical driving forces are important during the segregation and focusing of melt from a partially molten mantle toward a mid-oceanic spreading center. We performed a series of experiments to investigate the coupling between stress-driven and reaction-driven melt segregation. A core of melt-rich source material containing olivine, chromite and 20 vol% alkali basalt was placed within a ring of melt-poor sink containing olivine, enstatite, chromite and 4 vol% of alkali basalt. The gradient in silica activity at the source-sink interface provides a chemical driving force for melt migration. These source-sink couples were deformed in torsion in a gas-medium deformation apparatus at 1200C, 300 MPa confining pressure and shear strain rates of ~10-4 s-1 to different finite shear strains (? = 0 - 5). Microstructural observations of tangential sections show that at low strains (? ? 2) melt aligns along grain boundaries in the sink at ~45 antithetic to the shear plane (parallel to ?1). At higher strains (? > 3.5), melt-rich bands develop at 0 to 20 antithetic to the shear direction with a mean spacing between bands of 100 to 250 ?m. The melt-rich bands contain 20 - 30% melt in the form of individual melt pockets (dequ ? 2.5 ?m) aligned 10 - 45 with respect to the applied shear. Typically, a band contains 2 to 10 euhedral to rounded, small, mostly olivine grains (dequ ? 3 ?m) almost entirely surrounded by melt. Bands terminate at melt-depleted lenses (< 1 vol% melt) in a zone 2 - 4 grains wide containing ~2 vol% melt in small (?1 ?m) pockets. Melt-rich zones do not develop in the sink at the source-sink interface after annealing a sample hydrostatically for >9 h. However, once melt bands are well developed by stress-driven melt segregation (? ? 3.5) dissolution of enstatite reaches ~200 ?m into the sink from the source-sink interface. For the pressure-temperature conditions and timescales of our experiments, the observations indicate that segregation of melt is driven by a combination of deformation and chemical driving forces and not by chemical driving force alone.

  3. Dynamic melting of metals in the diamond cell: Clues for melt viscosity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, R.; Karandikar, A.; Yang, L.

    2011-12-01

    From the observed decreasing mobility of liquid iron at high pressure in the laser-heated diamond cell and the gradual decrease in the shear modulus in shock experiments, one may derive high viscosity in the liquid outer core of the Earth. A possible explanation could be the presence of local structures in the liquid as has been observed for several transition metals. In order to bridge the large gap in the timescales between static and dynamic melting experiments, we have developed new experimental techniques to solve the large discrepancies in the melting curves of transition metals (Fe, W, Ta, Mo) measured statically in the laser-heated diamond cell and in shock experiments. The new methods employ "single-shot" laser heating in order to reduce problems associated with mechanical instabilities and chemical reactions of the samples subjected to several thousand degrees at megabar pressures. For melt detection, both synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) on recovered samples are used. A third approach is the measurement of latent heat effects associated with melting or freezing. This method employs simultaneous CW and pulse laser heating and monitoring the temperature-time history with fast photomultipliers. Using the SEM recovery method, we measured first melting temperatures of rhenium, which at high pressure may be one of the most refractory materials. From the melt textures of Re, we did not observe a significant pressure dependence of viscosity.

  4. Test of Antonovsky's postulate: high sense of coherence helps people avoid negative life events.

    PubMed

    Hochwlder, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    This study tested Antonovsky's postulate that a high sense of coherence (SOC) helps people avoid negative life events. It was assumed that negative life events that were uncontrollable would not show this effect, while those events that potentially could be controlled would show a significant relationship with SOC. 1,012 female nurses (M age=46.9 yr.; SD=8.9) participated in this longitudinal study and were divided into groups with low, moderate, and high SOC. Sixteen negative life events were categorized into uncontrollable and controllable events, with the controllable events divided into three sub-categories. Five one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) for independent measures followed up with post hoc tests were performed, with the number of experienced events in a given category by each participant (at Time 2) as the dependent variable and the three SOC groups (formed at Time 1) as the independent variable. The results indicated that the high SOC group reported fewer controllable negative life events, while there was no significant relationship between the SOC level and uncontrollable negative life events. The findings support the postulate in Antonovsky's model, with the distinction between controllable and uncontrollable negative life events. PMID:25799118

  5. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.; Hostick, C.J.; Ross, W.A.; Peterson, R.W.; Smith, R.I.; Stiles, D.L.; Daling, P.M.; Weakley, S.A.; Grinde, R.B.; Young, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    This report contains a system study of estimated radiation doses to the public and workers resulting from the transport of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power reactors to a geologic repository. The report contains a detailed breakdown of activities and a description of time/distance/dose-rate estimates for each activity within the system. Collective doses are estimated for each of the major activities at the reactor site, in transit, and at the repository receiving facility. Annual individual doses to the maximally exposed individuals or groups of individuals are also estimated. A total of 17 alternatives and subalternatives to the postulated reference transportation system are identified, conceptualized, and their dose-reduction potentials and costs estimated. Resulting ratios of ..delta..cost/..delta..collective system dose for each alternative relative to the postulated reference transportation system are given. Most of the alternatives evaluated are estimated to provide both cost and dose reductions. Major reductions in transportation system dose and cost are estimated to result from using higher-capacity rail and truck casks, and particularly when replacing legalweight truck casks with ''advanced design'' overweight truck casks. The greatest annual dose reduction to the highest exposed individual workers (i.e., at the repository) is estimated to be achieved by using remote handling equipment for the cask handling operations at the repository. Additional shielding is also effective in reducing doses to both radiation workers at the reactor and repository and to transport workers. 69 refs., 36 figs., 156 tabs.

  6. Ground motion estimation in Delhi from postulated regional and local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Himanshu; Kumar, Ashok; Kamal

    2013-04-01

    Ground motions are estimated at 55 sites in Delhi, the capital of India from four postulated earthquakes (three regional M w = 7.5, 8.0, and 8.5 and one local). The procedure consists of (1) synthesis of ground motion at a hard reference site (NDI) and (2) estimation of ground motion at other sites in the city via known transfer functions and application of the random vibration theory. This work provides a more extensive coverage than earlier studies (e.g., Singh et al., Bull Seism Soc Am 92:555-569, 2002; Bansal et al., J Seismol 13:89-105, 2009). The Indian code response spectra corresponding to Delhi (zone IV) are found to be conservative at hard soil sites for all postulated earthquakes but found to be deficient for M w = 8.0 and 8.5 earthquakes at soft soil sites. Spectral acceleration maps at four different natural periods are strongly influenced by the shallow geological and soil conditions. Three pockets of high acceleration values are seen. These pockets seem to coincide with the contacts of (a) Aravalli quartzite and recent Yamuna alluvium (towards the East), (b) Aravalli quartzite and older quaternary alluvium (towards the South), and (c) older quaternary alluvium and recent Yamuna alluvium (towards the North).

  7. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  8. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  9. Low melting mesophase pitches

    SciTech Connect

    Diefendorf, R.J.; Chen, S.H.

    1984-04-17

    A low melting point, low molecular weight, heptane insoluble, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene soluble mesophase pitch useful in carbon fiber spinning as such or as a plasticizer in a carbon fiber spinning composition is obtained by heating chrysene, triphenylene or paraterphenyl as well as mixtures thereof and hydrocarbon fractions containing the same, dissolving the resulting heat treated material with 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and separating the insolubles, and then contacting the 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene soluble fraction with a sufficient amount of heptane to precipitate the low melting point, low molecular weight mesophase pitch.

  10. Iron Diffusivity in Water Saturated Rhyolite Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. C.; Bell, A.

    2007-12-01

    We have quantified experimentally the bulk chemical diffusivity of iron and the solubility of magnetite in peraluminous, water-saturated rhyolite melt at 100 MPa and 800C by performing experiments in which we equilibrated a single crystal of magnetite with water-saturated rhyolite melt. The oxygen fugacity of each run was buffered at nickel-nickel oxide (NNO) and the assemblage was saturated with a 1.8 wt. % NaCl eq. NaCl-KCl- FeCl2-HCl-H2O volatile phase. The experimental charge contained a cylinder of magnetite (activity Fe3O4=1), cored from a single crystal of magnetite and placed at the base of a gold capsule, synthetic rhyolite glass placed above the magnetite cylinder and aqueous vapor which occupied the remaining capsule volume. The concentration profiles of FeO (and Na2O, K2O, Al2O3, SiO2 and Cl) in the quenched melt (i.e., glass) were measured over a distance of 400 microns beginning at the magnetite-rhyolite interface and moving orthogonally away from this interface into the glass until the concentration of iron fell below the limit of detection. Diffusion profiles were fit by inverting the measured concentrations of iron in the melt through the error function and solving for the diffusion coefficient assuming a stationary planar boundary; the near-intersection of the error function regression with the origin justifies this assumption. The calculated bulk chemical diffusivity for iron in H2O- saturated rhyolite is 4 E-10 cm2 sec-1; this measured diffusivity is consistent, albeit one-half to one order of magnitude lower than data for other divalent elements (Ca, Mg, Sn) in rhyolite. The Co value used to fit the diffusion profiles is consistent with published data for the equilibrium concentration of iron in rhyolite melt and, thus, the data yield the solubility of iron in water-saturated rhyolite melt. The aluminum saturation index (ASI) of the melt, hence concentrations of Na2O, K2O and Al2O3, remains essentially constant in the melt across the entire measured diffusion length indicating that the bulk diffusivity of iron is not affected by coupled diffusion with these major elements. The chlorine concentration in the melt, however, increases markedly toward the magnetite-glass interface. This finding suggests that iron and chlorine are associated strongly in the melt and that the presence of iron in the melt, owing to magnetite dissolution increases significantly the chlorine "solubility" in the melt. The new results constrain the growth and dissolution rates of iron-bearing minerals during the evolution of hydrous felsic melt, including magma mixing, and the apparent association of iron and chlorine in the melt provides important constraints on the mass transfer of iron, chlorine and other metals, to an exsolved volatile phase and how this impacts the acidity, hence metal-scavenging potential, of the volatile phase.

  11. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and, hence, with the frictional drag acting on the outer sleeve. As the wire cuts toward the center of the core, the inner sleeve rotates farther with respect to the outer sleeve. Once the wire has cut to the center of the core, the tool and the core can be removed from the hole. The proper choice of cutting wire depends on the properties of the core material. For a sufficiently soft core material, a nonmetallic monofilament can be used. For a rubber-like core material, a metal wire can be used. For a harder core material, it is necessary to use an abrasive wire, and the efficiency of the tool can be increased greatly by vacuuming away the particles generated during cutting. For a core material that can readily be melted or otherwise cut by use of heat, it could be preferable to use an electrically heated cutting wire. In such a case, electric current can be supplied to the cutting wire, from an electrically isolated source, via rotating contact rings mounted on the sleeves.

  12. Simulation of melting uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welland, Michael Joshua

    In the event of a nuclear fuel element developing a defect in its sheath, coolant can enter the element and negatively affect its thermal performance. In particular, the coolant will flash to steam in the fuel-to-sheath gap, resulting in a reduced gap heat transport coefficient and oxidation of the fuel to UO2+x. Oxidized fuel has a reduced thermal conductivity and lower incipient melting point which, coupled with the reduced gap heat transport coefficient, increases the potential for centreline melting. The goal of the current work is therefore the development of a robust and versatile model to simulate the melting of nuclear fuel, particularly under fuel-failure conditions where oxidation may have occurred. A comprehensive review of recent material properties is performed in order to obtain input parameters for the simulation, and to ensure reasonable extrapolation to temperatures where material properties are not known or have a large degree of uncertainty. The modelling technique used in this work is based on the phase field (diffuse interface) approach, and is compared to a Stefan (sharp interface) formulation. Transient mass and heat transport, coupled with phase stability analysis for a non-congruent phase change, is considered as derived from the theory of irreversible processes. The work is validated and compares well with laser flash experiments from open literature. Furthermore, the applicability of this work to the analysis of in-core irradiation of defected elements and direct electrical heating experiments is demonstrated. The work is then used to predict the potential behaviour of centreline melting in operational, defected nuclear fuel elements. Under the examined conditions, simulation results show that centreline melting is self-regulating such that the melting front will not reach the sheath of the fuel element.

  13. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  14. The melting curve of iron to 250 gigapascals - A constraint on the temperature at earth's center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Quentin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Bass, Jay; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The melting curve of iron, the primary constituent of earth's core, has been measured to pressures of 250 gigapascals with a combination of static and dynamic techniques. The melting temperature of iron at the pressure of the core-mantle boundary (136 GPa) is 4800 + or - 200 K, whereas at the inner core-outer core boundary (330 GPa), it is 7600 + or - 500 K. A melting temperature for iron-rich alloy of 6600 K at the inner core-outer core boundary and a maximum temperature of 6900 K at earth's center are inferred. This latter value is the first experimental upper bound on the temperature at earth's center, and these results imply that the temperature of the lower mantle is significantly less than that of the outer core.

  15. Thermoacoustic Streaming and Ultrasonic Processing of Low Melting Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation allows the processing of low melting materials both in 1 G as well as in microgravity. The free suspension of the melts also facilitates undercooling, permitting the measurements of the physical properties of the metastable liquids.

  16. Estimation of Downstream Cesium Concentrations Following a Postulated PAR Pond Dam Break

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    2002-07-08

    Following a postulated PAR Pond dam break, some of the PAR Pond sediment including the cesium could be eroded and be transported downstream to the Savannah River through the Lower Three Runs Creek. Studies showed that most of the eroded sediment including the cesium would deposit in the Lower Three Runs Creek and the remainder would discharge to the Savannah River from the mouth of Lower Three Runs Creek. A WASP5 model was developed to simulate the eroded sediment and cesium transport from the Lower Three Runs Creek mouth to the Atlantic coast. The dissolved cesium concentrations at the Highway 301 bridge and near the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic Water Supply Plant are 30 and 27 pCi/l, respectively. The concentrations at both locations are less than the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 200 pCi/l.

  17. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Masanes, Lluís; Müller, Markus P; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Pérez-García, David

    2013-10-01

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information. PMID:24062431

  18. [Development of energetics in evolution of the living world. Stage, digits, postulates].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with the current stage of study of energy exchange between living organisms and the environment. In the epoch of molecular biology, study of energy exchange might have seemed a study of old, well known concepts. However, the retrospective insight into the energy exchange of quite a few organisms allows obtaining new data about development of energetics of the living world, approaches to interesting comparisons, opens the earlier unknown quantitative relations in energetics of living organisms, provides a possibility of analyzing causes of very high values of energy consumption by living organisms, causes of different sensitivity of living organisms to deficit of energy, etc. Based on all these data, there have been noted 12 principal moments or postulates in development of energetics of the living world from the most ancient to the present time. PMID:20432714

  19. Fritz Zwicky's Postulate of Freedom from Prejudice Considered from the Standpoint of the Theory of Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Markus

    What can we say about unprejudiced thinking as postulated by Ritz Zwicky? Freedom from prejudice in opposition to stamped by theory. How does knowledge come about? Through sense perception and thought. The phenomenon is always mediated by organs, respectively by technical instruments. Which conclusion can we draw from this fact? Is the organ of knowledge by which we know nature a part of nature? Can the dialectic materialism explain the processes of human consciousness? What is the fundamental difference between think and perceive? Has human consciousness only a share in nature or also in the spiritual world? The role of the observer in the Copenhagen interpretation. Is the quantum theory applicable to psychic phenomena?

  20. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory

    PubMed Central

    Masanes, Llus; Mller, Markus P.; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Prez-Garca, David

    2013-01-01

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information. PMID:24062431

  1. The extreme melt across the Greenland ice sheet in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Albert, M. R.; Keegan, K.; Shuman, C. A.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Neumann, G.

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of the 2012 extreme melt event across almost the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet is presented. Data from three different satellite sensors - including the Oceansat-2 scatterometer, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder - are combined to obtain composite melt maps, representing the most complete melt conditions detectable across the ice sheet. Satellite observations reveal that melt occurred at or near the surface of the Greenland ice sheet across 98.6% of its entire extent on 12 July 2012, including the usually cold polar areas at high altitudes like Summit in the dry snow facies of the ice sheet. This melt event coincided with an anomalous ridge of warm air that became stagnant over Greenland. As seen in melt occurrences from multiple ice core records at Summit reported in the published literature, such a melt event is rare with the last significant one occurring in 1889 and the next previous one around seven centuries earlier in the Medieval Warm Period. Given its rarity, the 2012 extreme melt across Greenland provides an exceptional opportunity for new studies in broad interdisciplinary geophysical research.

  2. Solubility of CH4 in a synthetic basaltic melt, with applications to atmosphere-magma ocean-core partitioning of volatiles and to the evolution of the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardia, P.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Stanley, B. D.

    2013-08-01

    We employ a double capsule technique to determine the solubility of CH4 in haplobasaltic (Fe-free) liquid under conditions of constrained methane fugacity, f, at pressures of 0.7-3 GPa at 1400-1450 C. Dissolved C-O-H species are examined with FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, and CH4 and CH3- are the only C-bearing species detected. Carbon solubilities are quantified using SIMS, range from 70 to 480 ppm when calculated as CH4, and increase with pressure. Concentrations are parameterized with a thermodynamic model and are found to be related to f and pressure. Application of this thermodynamic model shows dissolved CH4 contents of graphite-saturated magmas are little-influenced by pressure for conditions of fixed f relative to metal-oxide buffers and fixed total H content. Because f of graphite-saturated systems increases with the square of hydrogen fugacity, dissolved f increases with decreasing f and increases exponentially with increasing total H content. The experimentally-observed increase with pressure is related to variations in f and H content. Dissolved CH4 contents of Martian magmas in their source regions are small, such that it is unlikely that magmatic CH4 is a principal contributor to greenhouse conditions early in Martian history. Concentrations of dissolved C-O-H volatiles in a magma ocean early in the history of a terrestrial planet may be diminished by reducing conditions, leading to development of a massive atmosphere and a greatly decreased inventory of volatiles stored in planetary interiors at the outset of planetary history. Dissolution of methane may enhance the retention of C in the silicate Earth during core formation, but experimental evaluation of its influence on metal/silicate partitioning of C requires careful matching of the magmatic H concentration between experiments and natural systems.

  3. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  4. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  5. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply

  6. Melt spinning study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Containerless processing of materials provides an excellent opportunity to study nucleation phenomena and produce unique materials, primarily through the formation of metastable phases and deep undercoolings. Deep undercoolings can be readily achieved in falling drops of molten material. Extended solute solubilities and greatly refined microstructures can also be obtained in containerless processing experiments. The Drop Tube Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center has played an important role in enhancing that area of research. Previous experiments performed in the Drop Tube with refractory metals has shown very interesting microstructural changes associated with deep undercoolings. It is apparent also that the microstructure of the deep undercooled species may be changing due to the release of the latent heat of fusion during recalescence. For scientific purposes, it is important to be able to differentiate between the microstructures of the two types of metallic species. A review of the literature shows that although significant advances have been made with respect to the engineering aspects of rapid solidification phenomena, there is still much to be learned in terms of understanding the basic phenomena. The two major ways in which rapid solidification processing provides improved structures and hence improved properties are: (1) production of refined structures such as fine dendrites and eutectics, and (2) production of new alloy compositions, microstructures, and phases through extended solid solubility, new phase reaction sequences, and the formation of metallic-glass microstructures. The objective of this work has been to determine the optimal methodology required to extract this excess energy without affecting the thermo-physical parameters of the under-cooled melt. In normal containerless processing experiments recalescence occurs as the melt returns toward the melting point in order to solidify. A new type of experiment is sought in which the resultant microstructure of the undercooled species is frozen in without going through the melting point regime and subsequent near equilibrium solidification of the remaining liquid. This experimental approach entails the design of an appropriate melt spinning system which is compatible with Drop Tube operations and processing constraints. That work is the goal of this study.

  7. The melting curve of Ni to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, Oliver T.; Wood, Ian G.; Dobson, David P.; Vo?adlo, Lidunka; Wang, Weiwei; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wann, Elizabeth T. H.; Morard, Guillaume; Mezouar, Mohamed; Walter, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of Ni has been determined to 125 GPa using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments in which two melting criteria were used: firstly, the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering (LDS) during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondly, plateaux in temperature vs. laser power functions in both in situ and off-line experiments. Our new melting curve, defined by a Simon-Glatzel fit to the data where TM (K) =[ (PM/18.7810.20 + 1) ] 1 / 2.42 0.66 1726, is in good agreement with the majority of the theoretical studies on Ni melting and matches closely the available shock wave melting data. It is however dramatically steeper than the previous off-line LH-DAC studies in which determination of melting was based on the visual observation of motion aided by the laser speckle method. We estimate the melting point (TM) of Ni at the inner-core boundary (ICB) pressure of 330 GPa to be TM = 5800 700 K (2 ?), within error of the value for Fe of TM = 6230 500 K determined in a recent in situ LH-DAC study by similar methods to those employed here. This similarity suggests that the alloying of 5-10 wt.% Ni with the Fe-rich core alloy is unlikely to have any significant effect on the temperature of the ICB, though this is dependent on the details of the topology of the Fe-Ni binary phase diagram at core pressures. Our melting temperature for Ni at 330 GPa is ?2500 K higher than that found in previous experimental studies employing the laser speckle method. We find that those earlier melting curves coincide with the onset of rapid sub-solidus recrystallization, suggesting that visual observations of motion may have misinterpreted dynamic recrystallization as convective motion of a melt. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of the high-pressure melting behaviour of a number of other transition metals.

  8. Consolidation of zircaloy-4 end crops by induction melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.

    1994-01-25

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is investigating the use of induction melting as a method of consolidating Zircaloy-4, a zirconium alloy used in the fabrication of submarine nuclear reactor cores. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) furnished about 4000 lb of typical core material, also known as hardware, for use in evaluating induction melting as a method of consolidation. Three ingots were produced by the induction melting of hardware in a graphite crucible that was protected by a laminated coating specifically developed for this application. This report includes a description of both the equipment and the crucible coating materials used for this project, a discussion of results, and a production assessment of using this technique for full-scale consolidation.

  9. Chirality in block copolymer melts: mesoscopic helicity from intersegment twist.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Russell, Thomas P; Grason, Gregory M

    2013-02-01

    We study the effects of chirality at the segment scale on the thermodynamics of block copolymer melts using self-consistent field theory. In linear diblock melts where segments of one block prefer a twisted, or cholesteric, texture, we show that melt assembly is critically sensitive to the ratio of random coil size to the preferred pitch of cholesteric twist. For weakly chiral melts (large pitch), mesophases remain achiral, while below a critical value of pitch, two mesoscopically chiral phases are stable: an undulated lamellar phase and a phase of hexagonally ordered helices. We show that the nonlinear sensitivity of mesoscale chiral order to preferred pitch derives specifically from the geometric and thermodynamic coupling of the helical mesodomain shape to the twisted packing of chiral segments within the core, giving rise to a second-order cylinder-to-helix transition. PMID:23414052

  10. Serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate: postulated mechanism of action for management of enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, Bryon W; Burnett, Bruce; Shaw, Audrey L; Weaver, Eric M; Klein, Gerald L

    2014-01-01

    The health and performance of the gastrointestinal tract is influenced by the interaction of a variety of factors, including diet, nutritional status, genetics, environment, stress, the intestinal microbiota, immune status, and gut barrier. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to enteropathy or intestinal disorders that are known to occur in concert with certain disease states or conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Nutritional support in the form of a medical food along with current therapies could help manage the adverse effects of enteropathy, which include effects on nutrient digestion, absorption, and metabolism, as well as utilization of nutrients from foodstuffs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight management, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animals. Recent trials in humans provide preliminary evidence that a serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate is safe and improves symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. This review summarizes data from preclinical and clinical studies with immunoglobulin-containing plasma/serum protein concentrates, with a focus on the postulated mode of action of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate for patients with enteropathy. PMID:24904221

  11. Postulated Mechanisms of Resistance of B-NHL to Rituximab Treatment Regimens: Strategies to Overcome Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonavida, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-mediated immunotherapy has gained significant momentum since the first FDA-approved monoclonal antibody (mAb) in 1997, namely, Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20 mAb) for the treatment of B-NHL cells. Subsequently, over 20 approved mAbs have been in use clinically for the treatment of various cancers and several non-cancer related diseases. Further, the combination treatment of mAbs with chemotherapy, immunotherapy, proteaosome inhibitors and other inhibitors have resulted in synergistic anti-tumor activity with significant objective clinical responses. Despite their successful clinical use, the underlying mechanisms of rituximab in vivo activities remain elusive. Further, it is not clear why a subset of patients is initially unresponsive and many responding patients become refractory and resistant to further treatments; hence, the underlying mechanisms of resistance are not known, Attempts have been made to develop model systems to investigate resistance to mAb therapy with the hope to apply the findings in both the generation of new therapeutics as well as their use as new prognostic biomarkers. This review focuses on the development of resistance to Rituximab treatments and discusses possible underlying mechanisms of action, postulated mechanisms of resistance in model systems and suggested means to overcome resistance. Several prior reviews on the subject of Rituximab resistance have been published and the present review both complements as well as adds new topics of relevance. PMID:25440611

  12. Hammond Postulate Mirroring Enables Enantiomeric Enrichment of Phosphorus Compounds via Two Thermodynamically Interconnected Sequential Stereoselective Processes.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Kamalraj V; Nikitin, Kirill V; Gilheany, Declan G

    2015-07-29

    The dynamic resolution of tertiary phosphines and phosphine oxides was monitored by NMR spectroscopy. It was found that the stereoselectivity is set during the formation of the diastereomeric alkoxyphosphonium salts (DAPS), such that their initial diastereomeric excess (de) limits the final enantiomeric excess (ee) of any phosphorus products derived from them. However, (31)P NMR monitoring of the spontaneous thermal decomposition of the DAPS shows consistent diastereomeric self-enrichment, indicating a higher rate constant for decomposition of the minor diastereomer. This crucial observation was confirmed by reductive trapping of the unreacted enriched DAPS with lithium tri-sec-butylborohydride (commercially distributed as L-Selectride reagent) at different time intervals after the start of reaction, which gives progressively higher ee of the phosphine product with time. It is proposed that the Hammond postulate operates for both formation and decomposition of DAPS intermediate so that the lower rate of formation and faster subsequent collapse of the minor isomer are thermodynamically linked. This kinetic enhancement of kinetic resolution furnishes up to 97% ee product. PMID:26186272

  13. Fuzzy signal detection theory: basic postulates and formulas for analyzing human and machine performance.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, R; Masalonis, A J; Hancock, P A

    2000-01-01

    Signal detection theory (SDT) assumes a division of objective truths or "states of the world" into the nonoverlapping categories of signal and noise. The definition of a signal in many real settings, however, varies with context and over time. In the terminology of fuzzy logic, a real-world signal has a value that falls in a range between unequivocal presence and unequivocal absence. The definition of a response can also be nonbinary. Accordingly the methods of fuzzy logic can be combined with SDT, yielding fuzzy SDT. We describe the basic postulates of fuzzy SDT and provide formulas for fuzzy analysis of detection performance, based on four steps: (a) selection of mapping functions for signal and response; (b) use of mixed-implication functions to assign degrees of membership in hits, false alarms, misses, and correct rejections; (c) computation of fuzzy hit, false alarm, miss, and correct rejection rates; and (d) computation of fuzzy sensitivity and bias measures. Fuzzy SDT can considerably extend the range and utility of SDT by handling the contextual and temporal variability of most real-world signals. Actual or potential applications of fuzzy SDT include evaluation of the performance of human, machine, and human-machine detectors in real systems. PMID:11324856

  14. Therapeutic and preventive interventions for postulated vasoactive neuropeptide autoimmune fatigue-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Staines, Donald R

    2005-01-01

    Major advances have been made in understanding the relatively novel group of vasoactive (vasodilatory) neuropeptides (VNs) in humans. VNs comprise a novel but expanding group of substances having immunoregulation, inflammation modulation, neurotransmitter, neurotrophic, hormonal and metabolic functions. These substances may control gene expression for mRNA for themselves and their receptors. They have complex relationships with gaseous and other neurotransmitters and xenobiotic substances. Theoretical arguments have implicated these substances in autoimmune phenomena resulting in fatigue-related conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), fibromyalgia (FM) and Gulf War syndrome (GWS) but remain unproven. As well as possibly spontaneous onset, the precipitating causes of VN autoimmune dysfunction are likely to be a combination of genetic predisposition, infection and xenobiotic substances. Therapeutic and preventive possibilities for postulated VN autoimmune conditions will be influenced by the complex patholophysiology underpinning them. Some speculative possibilities are VN substitution/replacement, preservation of biological effect, epigenetic DNA modifications, plasma exchange, anti-cholinesterases, e.g., pyridostigmine, corticosteroids and other drug treatments, thymectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin and anti-idiotype antibodies, and CpG/DNA vaccines. Prevention and treatment of possible VN autoimmune fatigue-related disorders may prove to be important areas for future research and development. PMID:16042995

  15. SAS4A: A computer model for the analysis of hypothetical core disruptive accidents in liquid metal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.M.; Birgersson, G.; Cahalan, J.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Kalimullah; Miles, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    To ensure that the public health and safety are protected under any accident conditions in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), many accidents are analyzed for their potential consequences. The SAS4A code system, described in this paper, provides such an analysis capability, including the ability to analyze low probability events such as the Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDAs). The SAS4A code system has been designed to simulate all the events that occur in a LMFBR core during the initiating phase of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident. During such postulated accident scenarios as the Loss-of-Flow and Transient Overpower events, a large number of interrelated physical phenomena occur during a relatively short time. These phenomena include transient heat transfer and hydrodynamic events, coolant boiling and fuel and cladding melting and relocation. During to the strong neutronic feedback present in a nuclear reactor, these events can significantly influence the reactor power. The SAS4A code system is used in the safety analysis of nuclear reactors, in order to estimate the energetic potential of very low probability accidents. The results of SAS4A simulations are also used by reactor designers in order to build safer reactors and eliminate the possibility of any accident which could endanger the public safety.

  16. Lopsided growth of Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Monnereau, Marc; Calvet, Marie; Margerin, Ludovic; Souriau, Annie

    2010-05-21

    Hemispherical asymmetry is a prominent feature of Earth's inner core, but how this asymmetry relates to core growth is unknown. Based on multiple-scattering modeling of seismic velocity and attenuation measurements sampling the whole uppermost inner core, we propose that the growth of the solid core implies an eastward drift of the material, driven by crystallization in the Western Hemisphere and melting in the Eastern Hemisphere. This self-sustained translational motion generates an asymmetric distribution of sizes of iron crystals, which grow during their translation. The invoked dynamical process is still active today, which supports the idea of a young inner core. PMID:20395477

  17. Experimental Investigations of the Deep Earth's Mantle Melting Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesce, G.; Andrault, D.; Manthilake, G. M.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Novella, D.; Chantel, J.; Guignot, N.

    2014-12-01

    Studying the melting properties of the mantle is fundamental to understand the global dynamics of our planet. Already in the early stages of its history, Earth experienced extensive melting events leading to the formation of a magma ocean, due to the massive energy released by large-scale meteoritic impacts, radiogenic decay and core-mantle gravitational segregation. Partial melting however still plays a key role in today's mantle's dynamics. Seismic observations have in fact highlighted the presence of anomalies in the upper mantle, atop the 410 km discontinuity. These regions, called ultra-low velocity zones, show a significant reduction in shear wave velocity, compatible with the presence of partial melting. We studied the melting properties of the mantle using in situ X-ray diffraction experiments and electrical conductivity measurements at high pressure and high temperature. Both technics are very sensitive to the presence of liquid in the sample. They provide accurate information not only on the evolution with pressure of the solidus temperature, but also on the degree of partial melting with increasing temperature. Our samples consisted of a synthetic CI chondrite glass, a "proxy" composition for the primitive mantle after core segregation. Pressures up to 25 GPa (upper/lower mantle limit, at 670 km depth) were generated by the multi-anvil press. Our results suggest that previous studies overestimated by ~300 K the solidus temperature, probably due to a lack of resolution in determining low degrees of partial melting in their experimental procedure, compared to the in situexperiments presented here. Our results imply that partial melting could happen more frequently than initially expected, particularly in mantle regions where incompatible elements and volatiles are concentrated.

  18. Melt Heterogeneity and Degassing at MT Etna from Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, L. C.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Corsaro, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The melts feeding Mt Etna, Italy, are rich in volatiles and drive long-lasting powerful eruptions of basaltic magma in both effusive and explosive styles of activity. The volatile systematics of the volcanic system are well understood through melt inclusion and volcanic gas studies. Etna's melts are generated from a complex mantle setting, with subduction-related chemical modifications as well as OIB-type features, and then the melts must travel through thick carbonate-rich crust. The continual influx of mantle-derived volatile-rich magma controls the major compositional and eruptive features of Mount Etna and magma mixing has been recognized as an important process driving large eruptions [Kamenetsky, 2007]. Our study focusses on the 1669 eruption, the largest in historical times. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions were analyzed for volatile, trace and major elements using electron microprobe and ion probe (SIMS). We use volatile systematics and geochemical data to deconvolve mantle-derived heterogeneity from melt mixing and crystal fractionation. Our data are well described by a mixing trend between two distinct melts: a CO2-rich (CO2~1000ppm), incompatible trace element depleted melt (La/Yb~16), and a CO2-poor, enriched melt. The mixing also generates a strong correlation between Sr and CO2 in the melt inclusions dataset, reflecting the presence of a strong Sr anomaly in one of the end-member melts. We investigate the origin of this Sr anomaly by considering plagioclase dissolution and crustal assimilation. We also investigate degassing processes in the crust and plumbing system of the volcano. We compare our results with similar studies of OIB and arc-related basalts elsewhere and assess the implications for linking eruption size and style with the nature of the mantle-derived melts. Kamenetsky et al. (2007) Geology 35, 255-258.

  19. Silicate melt inclusions in clinopyroxene phenocrysts from mafic dikes in the eastern North China Craton: Constraints on melt evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ya-Chun; Fan, Hong-Rui; Santosh, M.; Hu, Fang-Fang; Yang, Kui-Feng; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Silicate melt inclusions (SMIs) in magmatic minerals provide key information on the chemical and mineralogical evolution of source magmas. The widespread Cretaceous mafic dikes in the Jiaojia region of the eastern North China Craton contain abundant SMIs within clinopyroxene phenocrysts. The daughter minerals in these SMIs include amphibole, plagioclase, pyrite and ilmenite, together with CO2 + CH4 and CH4 as the major volatile phase. The total homogenization temperatures of the SMIs range between 1280 and 1300 C. The host clinopyroxene phenocrysts in these dolerite dikes are dominantly augite with minor diopside. From LA-ICPMS analyses of the SMIs, we identify two compositional groups: (1) low-MgO (6.0-7.6 wt.%) SMIs and (2) high-MgO (11.2-13.9 wt.%) SMIs. The Low-MgO group exhibits higher concentrations of TiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, P2O5 and lower CaO and CaO/Al2O3 ratio as compared to the high-MgO SMIs. The trace element patterns of the two types of SMIs are similar to those of the host mafic dikes. However, the low-MgO SMIs and host mafic dikes are clearly more enriched in all the trace elements as compared to the high-MgO type, especially with regard to the highly incompatible elements. The estimated capture temperatures and pressures are 1351-1400 C and 1.6-2.1 GPa for the high-MgO SMIs and 1177-1215 C and 0.6-1.1GPa for the low-MgO type. The high-MgO and low-MgO SMIs were trapped at depths of ?51-68 km and ?20-35 km, respectively. Computations show that the parental melt is mafic with SiO2 content 49.6 wt% and Mg# 80.0 with relatively low total alkali contents (1.35 wt% Na2O + K2O) and high CaO (15.2 wt%). Exploratory runs with the program MELTS and pMELTS show that the low-MgO and high-MgO SMIs were derived from the same parental melt through different degrees of crystallization. Clinopyroxene and a small amount of olivine were the fractionating phases during the evolution from parental melts to high MgO melts, while the low MgO melts experienced significant fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene. We postulate the newly accreted lithospheric clinopyroxenite as the major source for the Jiaojia dolerite dikes, with melting of the source at a depth of ?68-80 km.

  20. B Alloy Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Xu, Junfeng; Zhang, Di; Jian, Zengyun

    2014-10-01

    The solidification of undercooled Ni-4.5 wt pct B alloy melt was investigated by using the glass fluxing technique. The alloy melt was undercooled up to ? T p ~ 245 K (245 C), where a mixture of ?-Ni dendrite, Ni3B dendrite, rod eutectic, and precipitates was obtained. If ? T p < 175 K 10 K (175 C 10 C), the solidification pathway was found as primary transformation and eutectic transformation (L ? Ni3B and L ? Ni/Ni3B); if ? T p ? 175 K 10 K (175 C 10 C), the pathway was found as metastable eutectic transformation, metastable phase decomposition, and residual liquid solidification (L ? Ni/Ni23B6, Ni23B6 ? Ni/Ni3B, and Lr ? Ni/Ni3B). A high-speed video system was adopted to observe the solidification front of each transformation. It showed that for residual liquid solidification, the solidification front velocity is the same magnitude as that for eutectic transformation, but is an order of magnitude larger than for metastable eutectic transformation, which confirms the reaction as Lr ? Ni/Ni3B; it also showed that this velocity decreases with increasing ? T r, which can be explained by reduction of the residual liquid fraction and decrease of Ni23B6 decomposition rate.

  1. Melting in Martian Snowbanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Sutter, B.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation as snow is an emerging paradigm for understanding water flow on Mars, which gracefully resolves many outstanding uncertainties in climatic and geomorphic interpretation. Snowfall does not require a powerful global greenhouse to effect global precipitation. It has long been assumed that global average temperatures greater than 273K are required to sustain liquid water at the surface via rainfall and runoff. Unfortunately, the best greenhouse models to date predict global mean surface temperatures early in Mars' history that differ little from today's, unless exceptional conditions are invoked. Snowfall however, can occur at temperatures less than 273K; all that is required is saturation of the atmosphere. At global temperatures lower than 273K, H2O would have been injected into the atmosphere by impacts and volcanic eruptions during the Noachian, and by obliquity-driven climate oscillations more recently. Snow cover can accumulate for a considerable period, and be available for melting during local spring and summer, unless sublimation rates are sufficient to remove the entire snowpack. We decided to explore the physics that controls the melting of snow in the high-latitude regions of Mars to understand the frequency and drainage of snowmelt in the high martian latitudes.

  2. DWPF Melt Cell Crawler

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2003-04-08

    On December 2, 2002, Remote and Specialty Equipment Systems (RSES) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested to build a remotely operated crawler to assist in cleaning the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melt cell floor of glass, tools, and other debris. The crawler was to assist a grapple and vacuum system in cleaning the cell. The crawler was designed to push glass and debris into piles so that the grapple could pick up the material and place it in waste bins. The crawler was also designed to maneuver the end of the vacuum hose, if needed. In addition, the crawler was designed to clean the area beneath the cell worktable that was inaccessible to the grapple and vacuum system. Originally, the system was to be ready for deployment by December 17. The date was moved up to December 12 to better utilize the available time for clean up. The crawler was designed and built in 10 days and completed cleaning the melt cell in 8 days. Due to initial problems with the grapple and vacuum system, the crawler completed essentially all of the cleanup tasks by itself. The crawler also cleaned an area on the west side of the cell that was not initially slated for cleaning.

  3. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor. This paper is part of a series of four describing the design and safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. This paper focuses in particular upon the passive safety features and the safety system response of the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR design incorporates many features to minimize the effects of, and in some cases eliminates the possibility of postulated accidents. The small size of the reactor and the low power density limits the potential consequences of an accident relative to a large plant. The integral design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high-pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. The containment is submerged in water which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for AC electrical power for a period of seven days. Frequent faults, such as reactivity insertion events and loss of power events, are protected by first shutting down the nuclear reaction by inserting control rods, then providing cold, borated water through a passive, buoyancy-driven flow. Decay heat removal is provided using a layered approach that includes the passive removal of heat by the steam drum and independent passive heat removal system that transfers heat from the primary system to the environment. Less frequent faults such as loss of coolant accidents are mitigated by passive injection of a large quantity of water that is readily available inside containment. An automatic depressurization system is used to reduce the reactor pressure in a controlled manner to facilitate the passive injection. Long-term decay heat removal is accomplished using the passive heat removal systems augmented by heat transfer through the containment vessel to the environment. The passive injection systems are designed so that the fuel remains covered and effectively cooled throughout the event. Like during the frequent faults, the passive systems provide effective cooling without the need for ac power for seven days following the accident. Connections are available to add additional water to indefinitely cool the plant. The response of the safety systems of the Westinghouse SMR to various initiating faults has been examined. Among them, two accidents; an extended station blackout event, and a LOCA event have been evaluated to demonstrate how the plant will remain safe in the unlikely event that either should occur. (authors)

  4. Acetate kinase-an enzyme of the postulated phosphoketolase pathway in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z.

    PubMed

    Rozova, Olga N; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Gavletdinova, Juliya Z; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2015-10-01

    Recombinant acetate kinase (AcK) was obtained from the aerobic haloalkalitolerant methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and purification by affinity chromatography. The substrate specificity, the kinetics and oligomeric state of the His6-tagged AcK were determined. The M. alcaliphilum AcK (2 45 kDa) catalyzed the reversible phosphorylation of acetate into acetyl phosphate and exhibited a dependence on Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions and strong specificity to ATP/ADP. The enzyme showed the maximal activity and high stability at 70 C. AcK was 20-fold more active in the reaction of acetate synthesis compared to acetate phosphorylation and had a higher affinity to acetyl phosphate (K m 0.11 mM) than to acetate (K m 5.6 mM). The k cat /K m ratios indicated that the enzyme had a remarkably high catalytic efficiency for acetate and ATP formation (k cat/K m = 1.7 10(6)) compared to acetate phosphorylation (k cat/K m = 2.5 10(3)). The ack gene of M. alcaliphilum 20Z was shown to be co-transcribed with the xfp gene encoding putative phosphoketolase. The Blast analysis revealed the ack and xfp genes in most genomes of the sequenced aerobic methanotrophs, as well as methylotrophic bacteria not growing on methane. The distribution and metabolic role of the postulated phosphoketolase shunted glycolytic pathway in aerobic C1-utilizing bacteria is discussed. PMID:26275877

  5. Depression and Disturbed Bone Metabolism: A Narrative Review of the Epidemiological Findings and Postulated Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, J D; Gregory, J M; Carvalho, A F; McIntyre, R S

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a pervasive chronic condition that contributes substantially to the global burden of disease and disability. Adding to the complexity of this disorder are numerous associated medical comorbidities with a bidirectional impact on morbidity and mortality. In recent years, osteoporosis has been increasingly identified as a significant comorbidity of MDD. This narrative review examines the literature to summarize key epidemiological studies and discuss postulated mechanisms of interaction. Epidemiological studies have repeatedly shown an increased co-prevalence of fractures and decreased bone mineral density (BMD) in MDD. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying this interaction is undoubtedly complex and multifactorial, and proposed pathways have varying levels of evidence from preclinical and clinical models. Conceptually, the mechanisms by which depression might influence bone metabolism can be categorized into biological, behavioral, iatrogenic, and comorbidity-related factors. Biological factors include the inflammatory-mood pathway, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, metabolic dysfunction, and serotonin's direct and indirect effects on bone cells. Behavioral factors incorporate lifestyle choices typical in depressed patients, such as increased tobacco use or limited exercise. The prominent iatrogenic factor is the independent effects of anti-depressants on bone metabolism. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities common to both osteoporosis and MDD are also important to consider. Physical activity promotion, vitamin D supplementation, and routine BMD screening of MDD patients are simple interventions that might lead to improved outcomes for both conditions. An improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms may yield insights into novel prevention and treatment strategies to target osteoporosis and fractures in the MDD population. PMID:26812918

  6. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  7. Melting of ice under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schwegler, Eric; Sharma, Manu; Gygi, Franois; Galli, Giulia

    2008-01-01

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 1050 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 and 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above ?45 Gpa, there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve because of the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid before melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid. PMID:18809909

  8. Crustal melts below 400 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbescu, Mona-Liza C.; Nabelek, Peter I.

    2003-08-01

    We propose that the internally zoned, Li-bearing Tin Mountain pegmatite in the Harney Peak granite-pegmatite system of the Black Hills, South Dakota, crystallized from fluid-rich, compositionally complex melts at 400 350 C. The low crystallization temperatures resulted from the combined fluxing effects of Li, B, P, H2O, and carbonate anions. The presence of hydrous silicate melts at temperatures of 350 C is revealed by microthermometric data on primary fluid inclusions cogenetic with crystallized-melt inclusions. Mineral assemblages of the crystallized-melt inclusions and chemistry of bulk-fluid leachates indicate that the melts and fluids contained significant amounts of Li and Na as carbonates and/or borates that acted as powerful fluxes. The low temperatures give a new perspective on the stability of silicate melts in the crust.

  9. Advances in plasma melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, R.; Hoffelner, W.

    The quest for 'defect-free' high performance metals has benefited from the expansion of plasma hearth melting capacity. 'Skull' melting in water-cooled copper containers under an inert gas atmosphere allows elimination of ceramic and refractory metal inclusions when melting reactive metals and superalloys, while retaining the input alloy content. The interactions of operating variables such as furnace pressure, nature of gas, arc current and heat input pattern with product properties such as homogeneity, grain size, and inclusions are described. By proper process control, plasma hearth melting has been qualified as one of only two processes suitable for particularly demanding rotating grade engine parts made of titanium alloy. Costs of plasma hearth melting are less than with electron beam. Extension of plasma processing to other alloys is being actively pursued. Powder production is currently practical with plasma melting and bottom pouring to make powder. Some speculations on future trends in materials and operating temperatures are offered.

  10. An integral approach to investigate planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The same core-mantle differentiation process was in operation during the early formation of the terrestrial planets, but it led to unique cores for the Earth, Venus, Mars, and Mercury, with different magnetic fields, reflecting their different dynamic, physical, and chemical states. Assuming all terrestrial planets shared the same materials of the building block, the differences must be resulted from the different conditions of the early accretion and the subsequent planetary evolution unique to each planet. The pressures at the core-mantle boundary of the terrestrial planets range from as low as 7 GPa to 136 GPa. The physical state (liquid or solid) for each planetary core is closely tied to the melting and chemical composition of the cores. In order to determine the minimal temperature of a liquid core or the maximal temperature of a solid core, we have systematically investigated melting relations in the binary systems Fe-FeS, Fe-C, and Fe-FeSi, move toward unravelling the crystallization sequence and element partitioning between solid and liquid metal in the ternary and quaternary systems up to 25 GPa, using multi-anvil apparatus. We have developed new techniques to analyze the quenched samples recovered from laser-heating diamond-anvil cell experiments using combination of focus ion beam (FIB) milling, high-resolution SEM imaging, and quantitative chemical analysis with silicon drift detector EDS. With precision milling of the laser-heating spot, we determined melting using quenching texture criteria imaged with high-resolution SEM and the sulfur partitioning between solid and liquid at submicron spatial resolution. We have also re-constructed 3D image of the laser-heating spot at multi-megabar pressures to better constrain melting point and understanding melting process. The new techniques allow us to extend precise measurements of melting relations to core pressures in the laser-heating diamond-anvil cell. In addition to the static experiments, we also used shockwave compression to determine density, sound velocity, and melting of core materials up to liquid outer core conditions. The integration of the static and dynamic compression data provides an extensive dataset over a wide pressure and temperature range that is necessary for establishing a comprehensive model of the planetary cores, providing the best fit to the geophysical, cosmochemial, and geochemical observations.

  11. The Infidelity of Melt Inclusions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. R.; Freda, C.

    2007-12-01

    Melt inclusions are routinely used as evidence of magmatic compositions prior to volcanic eruptions. However, it has long been known that kinetic processes can modify melt inclusion compositions during trapping. We investigated the fidelity of melt inclusions as records of magmatic compositions by artificially creating melt inclusions through crystallization of plagioclase and clinopyroxene from a hawaiitic basalt bulk composition at 1.0 GPa, 1150 C, or 75 C undercooling. We compared melt inclusion compositions to those of melts 100's of ?m away from the crystals and found measurable differences in the compositions. We modeled the concentration profiles of Al, Fe, P, S, and Cl in front of the crystals using classical impurity rejection theory during growth at a constant rate followed by a growth hiatus during which diffusive relaxation occurred. The values of the growth rates and times were constrained by measured crystal sizes and the experimental duration. The diffusion coefficients for the elements investigated were either calculated from transition state theory (Al, Fe) or measured in the same bulk composition as that used for this study (S and Cl from the literature, new measurements for P). An envelope of models bracket the observed compositional profiles of the elements studied and predict enrichments, or depletions, at the crystal-melt interface that are quantitatively similar to those seen in the melt inclusions. The differences between the melt far from the crystals and that at the interface are only 20% (relative) for the major elements, Al, Fe, but are about 50% for S and Cl and can exceed 100% for P. These differences correlate with the relative chemical diffusion coefficients of these ions in the melt. Based upon these experiments and models we advise caution in the use of melt inclusions as indicators of pre-eruptive melt compositions.

  12. Experimental constraints on Mercury's core composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Wollack, E. Alex; Klima, Rachel L.; Minitti, Michelle E.

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of high S concentrations on the surface of Mercury by spacecraft measurements from the MESSENGER mission provides the potential to place new constraints on the composition of Mercury's large metallic core. In this work, we conducted a set of systematic equilibrium metal-silicate experiments that determined the effect of different metallic compositions in the Fe-S-Si system on the S concentration in the coexisting silicate melt. We find that metallic melts with a range of S and Si combinations can be in equilibrium with silicate melts with S contents consistent with Mercury's surface, but that such silicate melts contain Fe contents lower than measured for Mercury's surface. If Mercury's surface S abundance is representative of the planet's bulk silicate composition and if the planet experienced metal-silicate equilibrium during planetary core formation, then these results place boundaries on the range of possible combinations of Si and S that could be present as the light elements in Mercury's core and suggest that Mercury's core likely contains Si. Except for core compositions with extreme abundances of Si, bulk Mercury compositions calculated by using the newly determined range of potential S and Si core compositions do not resemble primitive meteorite compositions.

  13. A comment on Experimental determination of carbon isotope fractionation between iron carbide melt and carbon: 12C-enriched carbon in the Earth's core? by M. Satish-Kumar, H. So, T. Yoshino, M. Kato, Y. Hiroi [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 310 (2011) 340-348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutsky, V. N.; Borzdov, Yu. M.

    2013-04-01

    Accounting for the behavior of metastable and stable phases in the Fe-C system at HPHT allows a reconsideration of the results of Satish-Kumar et al. (2011). The occurrence of a metastable Fe-Gr eutectic explains the lowering of the phase boundaries as well as the presence of melt in experiments below the Fe-Fe3C eutectic temperature. Overall, the data reported evidence for graphite interaction with carbon dissolved in the iron melt which does not represent an iron carbide melt. The results are in good agreement with previously published data on carbon isotope effect between crystalline carbon and carbon solution in metal melt.

  14. Rheology and Microstructure of Entangled Polymer Nanocomposite Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2010-03-16

    The rheology and microstructure of 44 nm diameter silica particles suspended in entangled poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) melts are studied through measurement of filled melt viscosity and X-ray scattering measurement of interparticle structure factors, S(q,{phi}{sub c}), where q is the scattering vector and {phi}{sub c} is the silica volume fraction. The particles have a similar refractive index to PEO which minimizes van der Waals attractions acting between particles. The introduction of particles causes an elevation in the viscosity of the nanocomposite melt more than would be expected of particles merely interacting with hard core repulsions. Further addition of particles causes a rise in the elastic and viscous moduli. The rheological characterization of these nanocomposite melts is discussed in terms of several critical particle volume fractions that result from confinement of polymer, adsorption of polymer segments to the particle surface, and overlap and entanglement of adsorbed polymer as the particle volume fraction is increased. Characterization of the particle microstructure shows that the association of the polymer with the particles drives the particles to structure more than would be expected of particles with interactions governed merely by hard core repulsions. Particles show signs of instability in the polymer melt at a common elevated volume fraction independent of polymer molecular weight.

  15. Melt pool dynamics during selective electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharowsky, T.; Osmanlic, F.; Singer, R. F.; Krner, C.

    2014-03-01

    Electron beam melting is a promising additive manufacturing technique for metal parts. Nevertheless, the process is still poorly understood making further investigations indispensable to allow a prediction of the part's quality. To improve the understanding of the process especially the beam powder interaction, process observation at the relevant time scale is necessary. Due to the difficult accessibility of the building area, the high temperatures, radiation and the very high scanning speeds during the melting process the observation requires an augmented effort in the observation equipment. A high speed camera in combination with an illumination laser, band pass filter and mirror system is suitable for the observation of the electron beam melting process. The equipment allows to observe the melting process with a high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper the adjustment of the equipment and results of the lifetime and the oscillation frequencies of the melt pool for a simple geometry are presented.

  16. Determination of the stability and fragmentation length of a melt jet in water

    SciTech Connect

    Melikhov, O.I.

    1995-07-01

    The fragmentation of a high-temperature melt jet in water is one of the principal mechanisms underlying the formation of a coarsely dispersed water-steam-melt mixture in the onset and development of a hypothetical severe nuclear power plant accident with core meltdown. Under certain conditions the melt can mix explosively with the water in such a mixture with potentially detrimental results for the reactor housing. The rate of fragmentation of a melt jet largely governs the characteristics of the resulting mixture and its capacity to detonate.

  17. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re~210^{4}-310^{5} and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface. PMID:26252689

  18. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re 2 104- 3 105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  19. Chicxulub Impact Melts: Geochemical Signatures of Target Lithology Mixing and Post-Impact Hydrothermal Fluid Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, David A.; Zurcher, Lukas; Horz, Freidrich; Mertzmann, Stanley A.

    2004-01-01

    Impact melts within complex impact craters are generally homogeneous, unless they differentiated, contain immiscible melt components, or were hydrothermally altered while cooling. The details of these processes, however, and their chemical consequences, are poorly understood. The best opportunity to unravel them may lie with the Chicxulub impact structure, because it is the world s most pristine (albeit buried) large impact crater. The Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project recovered approx. 100 meters of impactites in a continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 (YAX-1) borehole. This dramatically increased the amount of melt available for analyses, which was previously limited to two small samples N17 and N19) recovered from the Yucatan-6 (Y-6) borehole and one sample (N10) recovered from the Chicxulub-1 (C-1) borehole. In this study, we describe the chemical compositions of six melt samples over an approx. 40 m section of the core and compare them to previous melt samples from the Y-6 and C-1 boreholes.

  20. Core formation by giant impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The present model for the timing and mechanisms of planetary core formation argues that once a planet reaches a certain minimum mass, the large impacts that are typical of late accretion can trigger core formation. This model circumvents the difficulties posed by the large-scale segregation of molten iron into diapirs, and the displacement of the cold, elastic interior of the planet by the iron. The analytical melting model used is based on the Hugoniot equations, the empirical relationship for the decline of particle velocity with distance, and the linear shock-particle velocity relationship.

  1. Lunar highland melt rocks - Chemistry, petrology and silicate mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A selected suite containing several of the largest samples of lunar highland melt rocks includes impact melt specimens (anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro) and volcanic specimens (intermediate-K Fra Mauro). Although previous assumptions of LKFM volcanism have fallen into disfavor, no fatal arguments against this hypothesis have been presented, and the evidence of a possibly 'inherited igneous' olivine-plagioclase cosaturation provides cause for keeping a volcanic LKFM hypothesis viable. Comparisons of silicate mineralogy with melt rock compositions provide information on the specimen's composition and cooling history. Plagioclase-rock compositions can be matched to the experimentally determined equilibria for appropriate samples to identify melt rocks with refractory anorthitic clasts. Olivine-rock compositions indicate that melt rock vitrophyres precipitate anomalously Fe-rich olivine; the cause of this anomaly is not immediately evident. The Al-Ti and Ca-Fe-Mg zonation in pyroxene provide information on relative cooling rates of highland melt rocks, but Cr- and Al-content (where Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene cores are preserved in rapidly cooled samples) can be correlated with composition of the host rock.

  2. Beyond the Melting Pot Reconsidered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elijah

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the 1963 book, "Beyond the Melting Pot," which suggested that eventually the problem of different ethnicities in the U.S. would be resolved and society would become one melting pot. Examines how changes in immigration and economic structures have affected the issue, noting the devastating effect of the dominant culture's denigration of

  3. Magic Polyicosahedral Core-Shell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G.; Rapallo, A.; Mottet, C.; Fortunelli, A.; Baletto, F.; Ferrando, R.

    2004-09-01

    A new family of magic cluster structures is found by genetic global optimization, whose results are confirmed by density functional calculations. These clusters are Ag-Ni and Ag-Cu nanoparticles with an inner Ni or Cu core and an Ag external shell, as experimentally observed for Ag-Ni, and present a polyicosahedral character. The interplay of the core-shell chemical ordering with the polyicosahedral structural arrangement gives high-symmetry clusters of remarkable structural, thermodynamic, and electronic stability, which can have high melting points (they melt higher than pure clusters of the same size), large energy gaps, and (in the case of Ag-Ni) nonzero magnetic moments.

  4. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. ); Medford, G.T. )

    1990-06-01

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

  5. Iron--what is melt?

    SciTech Connect

    Duba, A.G.

    1993-06-01

    The melting point of iron reported from a variety of phenomena observed in the laser-heated diamond-anvil-cell (DAC) and in shock wave studies differs widely. Although three groups of investigators, observing the same phenomena in the DAC are in good agreement to about 40 GPa, they disagree significantly with other measurements of melting point based on observation of different phenomena in the DAC. These latter data are in substantial agreement with some of the reported melting temperatures from two groups of investigators who measured temperature along the Hugoniot. However, a third group of investigators observe a sound velocity discontinuity along the Hugoniot and calculate a significantly lower temperature for melting. Melting point determination in iron is subject to the interpretation of physical phenomena, experimental errors which are probably larger than estimated, and perhaps undetected chemical reactions.

  6. Eutectic melting temperature of the lowermost Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrault, D.; Lo Nigro, G.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bouhifd, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Partial melting of the Earth's deep mantle probably occurred at different stages of its formation as a consequence of meteoritic impacts and seismology suggests that it even continues today at the core-mantle boundary. Melts are important because they dominate the chemical evolution of the different Earth's reservoirs and more generally the dynamics of the whole planet. Unfortunately, the most critical parameter, that is the temperature profile inside the deep Earth, remains poorly constrained accross the planet history. Experimental investigations of the melting properties of materials representative of the deep Earth at relevant P-T conditions can provide anchor points to refine past and present temperature profiles and consequently determine the degree of melting at the different geological periods. Previous works report melting relations in the uppermost lower mantle region, using the multi-anvil press [1,2]. On the other hand, the pyrolite solidus was determined up to 65 GPa using optical observations in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) [3]. Finally, the melting temperature of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine is documented at core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions by shock wave experiments [4]. Solely based on these reports, experimental data remain too sparse to draw a definite melting curve for the lower mantle in the relevant 25-135 GPa pressure range. We reinvestigated melting properties of lower mantle materials by means of in-situ angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements in the LH-DAC at the ESRF [5]. Experiments were performed in an extended P-T range for two starting materials: forsterite and a glass with chondrite composition. In both cases, the aim was to determine the onset of melting, and thus the eutectic melting temperatures as a function of pressure. Melting was evidenced from drastic changes of diffraction peak shape on the image plate, major changes in diffraction intensities in the integrated pattern, disappearance of diffraction rings, and changes in the relation between sample-temperature and laser-power. In this work, we show that temperatures higher than 4000 K are necessary for melting mean mantle at the 135 GPa pressure found at the core mantle boundary (CMB). Such temperature is much higher than that from estimated actual geotherms. Therefore, melting at the CMB can only occur if (i) pyrolitic mantle resides for a very long time in contact with the outer core, (ii) the mantle composition is severely affected by additional elements depressing the solidus such as water or (iii) the temperature gradient in the D" region is amazingly steep. Other implications for the temperature state and the lower mantle properties will be presented. References (1) Ito et al., Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 143-144, 397-406, 2004 (2) Ohtani et al., Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 100, 97-114, 1997 (3) Zerr et al., Science, 281, 243-246, 1998 (4) Holland and Ahrens, Science, 275, 1623-1625, 1997 (5) Schultz et al., High Press. Res., 25, 1, 71-83, 2005.

  7. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  8. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  9. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  10. Commercial Zone Melting Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Xie, Hongyao; Shu, Shengcheng; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Han; Tang, Xinfeng

    2014-06-01

    Bismuth telluride-based compounds have been extensively utilized for commercial application. However, thermoelectric materials must suffer numerous mechanical vibrations and thermal stresses while in service, making it equally important to discuss the mechanical properties, especially at high temperature. In this study, the compressive and bending strengths of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 commercial zone melting (ZM) ingots were investigated at 25, 100, and 200 C, respectively. Due to the obvious anisotropy of materials prepared by ZM method, the effect of anisotropy on the strengths was also explored. Two-parameter Weibull distribution was employed to fit a series of values acquired by a universal testing machine. And digital speckle photography was applied to record the strain field evolution, providing visual observation of surface strain. The compressive and bending strengths along ZM direction were approximately three times as large as those perpendicular to the ZM direction independent of the temperature, indicating a weak van der Waals bond along the c axis.

  11. Formation and characterization of fission-product aerosols under postulated HTGR accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.; Munkelwitz, H.R.

    1982-07-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the formation mechanism and physical characterization of simulated nuclear aerosols that could likely be released during an HTGR core heat-up accident. Experiments were carried out in a high-temperature flow system consisting essentially of an inductively heated release source, a vapor deposition tube, and a filter assembly for collecting particulate matter. Simulated fission products Sr and Ba as oxides are separately impregnated in H451 graphite wafers and released at elevated temperatures into a dry helium flow. In the presence of graphite, the oxides are quantitatively reduced to metals, which subsequently vaporize at temperatures much lower than required for the oxides alone to vaporize in the absence of graphite. A substantial fraction of the released material is associated with particulate matter, which is collected on filters located downstream at ambient temperature. The release and transport of simulated fission product Ag as metal are also investigated.

  12. A Postulated Planetary Collision, the Terrestrial Planets, the Moon and Smaller Solar-System Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolfson, M. M.

    2013-11-01

    In a scenario produced by the Capture Theory of planetary formation, a collision between erstwhile solar-system giant planets, of masses 798.75 and 598.37 M ?, is simulated using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics. Due to grain-surface chemistry that takes place in star-forming clouds, molecular species containing hydrogen, with a high D/H ratio taken as 0.01, form a layer around each planetary core. Temperatures generated by the collision initiate D-D reactions in these layers that, in their turn, trigger a reaction chain involving heavier elements. The nuclear explosion shatters and disperses both planets, leaving iron-plus-silicate stable residues identified as a proto-Venus and proto-Earth. A satellite of one of the colliding planets, captured or retained by the proto-Earth core, gave the Moon; two massive satellites released into heliocentric orbits became Mercury and Mars. For the Moon and Mars, abrasion of their surfaces exposed to collision debris results in hemispherical asymmetry. Mercury, having lost a large part of its mantle due to massive abrasion, reformed to give the present high-density body. Debris from the collision gave rise to asteroids and comets, much of the latter forming an inner reservoir stretching outwards from the inner Kuiper Belt that replenishes the Oort Cloud when it is depleted by a severe perturbation. Other features resulting from the outcome of the planetary collision are the relationship of Pluto and Triton to Neptune, the presence of dwarf planets and light-atom isotopic anomalies in meteorites.

  13. The Human Genomic Melting Map

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Tøstesen, Eivind; Sundet, Jostein K; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Bock, Christoph; Jerstad, Geir Ivar; Thilly, William G; Hovig, Eivind

    2007-01-01

    In a living cell, the antiparallel double-stranded helix of DNA is a dynamically changing structure. The structure relates to interactions between and within the DNA strands, and the array of other macromolecules that constitutes functional chromatin. It is only through its changing conformations that DNA can organize and structure a large number of cellular functions. In particular, DNA must locally uncoil, or melt, and become single-stranded for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription to occur. It has previously been shown that this melting occurs cooperatively, whereby several base pairs act in concert to generate melting bubbles, and in this way constitute a domain that behaves as a unit with respect to local DNA single-strandedness. We have applied a melting map calculation to the complete human genome, which provides information about the propensities of forming local bubbles determined from the whole sequence, and present a first report on its basic features, the extent of cooperativity, and correlations to various physical and biological features of the human genome. Globally, the melting map covaries very strongly with GC content. Most importantly, however, cooperativity of DNA denaturation causes this correlation to be weaker at resolutions fewer than 500 bps. This is also the resolution level at which most structural and biological processes occur, signifying the importance of the informational content inherent in the genomic melting map. The human DNA melting map may be further explored at http://meltmap.uio.no. PMID:17511513

  14. Electrical Conductivity of Cryolite Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, P.; Grjotheim, K.; Kvande, H.

    1985-11-01

    This paper proposes an equation for the electrical conductivity of multicomponent cryolite-based mixtures. The equation is based on a physical model which assumes that the conductivity is proportional to the number density of the effective electric charges in the melt. The various authors in the available literature show a great discrepancy in conductivity data of cryolite-based melts. The equation based on the physical model enables determination of which set of data is preferable. Special consideration in this respect is given to the influence of magnesium flouride and lithium flouride additions to the melt.

  15. New "surface" criterion of melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2013-06-01

    From the assumption that the pressure exerted on the nanocrystal surface under melting passes into the Laplace surface pressure, an expression for a relative volume within which the solid phase of the nanosystem remains stable at different pressures is derived. It is shown that such a "surface" criterion of melting slightly depends on the crystal size and external pressure and is determined solely by the interatomic potential parameters. Calculations for macrocrystals with van der Waals bonding demonstrate good agreement with experimental data for the relative crystal volume at the melting point.

  16. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-12-31

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

  17. Polar basal melting on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, S. M.

    1987-08-01

    The potential importance of basal melting on Mars is illustrated through the discussion of four examples: (1) the origin of the major polar reentrants, (2) the removal and storage of an ancient Martian ice sheet, (3) the mass balance of the polar terrains, and (4) the possibility of basal melting at temperate latitudes. This analysis suggests that the process of basal melting may play a key role in understanding the evolution of the Martian polar terrains and the long-term climatic behavior of water on Mars.

  18. Modeling of residual stresses in core shroud structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Dong, P.; Brust, F.W.; Mayfield, M.; McNeil, M.; Shack, W.J.

    1997-10-01

    A BWR core shroud is a cylindrical shell that surrounds the reactor core. Feedwater for the reactor is introduced into the annulus between the reactor vessel wall and the shroud. The shroud separates the feedwater from the cooling water flowing up through the reactor core. The shroud also supports the top guide which provides lateral support to the fuel assemblies and maintains core geometry during operational transients and postulated accidents to permit control rod insertion and provides the refloodable volume needed to ensure safe shutdown and cooling of the core during postulated accident conditions. Core shrouds were fabricated from welded Type 304 or 304L stainless steel plates and are supported at the top and bottom by forged ring support structures. In 1990, cracking was reported in the core shroud of a non-U.S. BWR. The cracks were located in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a circumferential core shroud weld. Subsequent inspections in U.S. BWRs have revealed the presence of numerous flaw indications in some BWR core shrouds, primarily in weld HAZs. In several instances, this cracking was quite extensive, with the cracks extending 75% or more around the circumference of some welds. However, because the applied stresses on the shroud are low during operation and postulated accidents and because of the high fracture toughness of stainless steel, adequate structural margins can be preserved even in the presence of extensive cracking. Although assessments by the USNRC staff of the potential significance of this cracking have shown that core shroud cracking does not pose a high degree of risk in the short term, the staff concluded that the cracking was a safety concern for the long term because of the uncertainties associated with the behavior of core shrouds with complete 360{degrees} through-wall cracks under accident conditions and because it could eliminate a layer of defense-in-depth.

  19. Granulite Migmatization and Retrogression: Result of Pervasive Melt Influx? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, P.; Štípská, P.; Weinberg, R. F.; Franěk, J.; Schulmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Blanský les granulite massif (BLG) is large (ca. 270 km2) lower crust exposure in Bohemian Massif in Czech Republic. It consists of felsic granulites in various degrees of retrogression and small bodies of eclogites, mafic granulites and ultrabasites. Peak granulitic conditions were estimated at ca. 16-18 kbar and 850-1100°C. This granulite massif was later, during exhumation, heterogeneously retrogressed in amphibolite facies conditions (ca. 5-7 kbar and 700-800°C). The degree of granulite retrogression increases continuously from the core towards the margin of the BLG massif. The question raised in this work is the nature of the retrogression. In core of the massif retrogression is manifested only by plagioclase and spinel coronas around kyanite. Towards the margin granulite gets progressively hydrated, has gneissic look and stable mineral assemblage of Qtz + Kfs + Pl + Bt + Sill × Grt. Retrograde granulite reveals higher amount of biotite, which forms at expanse of garnet and kyanite break down to sillimanite. Along the margin the transformation is accompanied by presence of melt, resulting into formation of migmatitic gneisses. The detailed field and microstructural observations revealed a gradual transition from mylonitic gneiss with only incipient amount of melt to migmatitic gneisses with no relict of gneissosity and high proportion of melt. This transition is accompanied by textural changes as well as changes in mineral chemistry (increase of XFe in biotite and garnet, increase of Na in plagioclase) and mineral proportions (decrease of garnet %, increase of biotite and feldspars %). During the exhumation, the granulite was dry, thus melt present in the granulite cannot be produced in-situ. We suggest that the hot dry granulite released and 'attracted' water from colder underlying metasedimentary sequence. This water flux caused extensive melting along the massif margins. This melt then further pervasively migrated towards the core of the massif causing heterogeneous migmatization and retrogression of the granulite. Moreover, we suggest that at an outcrop-scale leucosome distribution controls the extent of the retrogression. Distribution gradient created by the water-saturated melt in leucosomes is spatially limited. Thus granulite closer to the leucosome will reveal higher degree of retrogression than further from the leucosome. Importantly, melt presence in the granulite will play important role for the rheology at lower-middle crust interface.

  20. Melting granites to make granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Bruna B.; Sawyer, Edward W.; Janasi, Valdecir de A.

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale partial melting in the continental crust is widely attributed to fluid-absent incongruent breakdown of hydrous minerals in the case of pelites, greywackes and meta-mafic rocks. Granite is a far more common rock in the continental crust, but fluid-absent hydrate-breakdown melting is unlikely to result in significant melting in granites because of their low modal abundance of mica or amphibole. Experiments show that fluid-present melting can produce ~30% melt at low temperatures (690C). Thus, granites and leucogranites can be very fertile if H2O-present melting occurs via reactions such as plagioclase + quartz + K-feldspar + H2O = melt, because of their high modal proportions of the reactant phases. Our study investigates the Kinawa Migmatite in the So Francisco Craton, southeastern Brazil. This migmatite is derived from an Archaean TTG sequence and can be divided into; 1) pink diatexites, 2) leucosomes, 3) grey gneisses and 4) amphibolites. The migmatite records upper-amphibolite to beginning of granulite facies metamorphism in a P-T range from 5.1-6.6 kbar and ~650-780C. Pink diatexites are the most abundant rocks, and their appearance varies depending on the amount of melt they contained. Three types are recognised: residual diatexites (low melt fraction (Mf)), schlieren diatexites (moderate Mf) and homogeneous diatexites (high Mf). They are very closely related spatially in the field, with mostly transitional contacts. There is a sequence with progressive loss of ferromagnesian minerals, schollen and schlieren through the sequence to the most melt-rich parts of the diatexites as magmatic flow became more intense. There are fewer ferromagnesian minerals, thus the melt becomes cleaner (more leucocratic) and, because the schlieren have disaggregated the aspect is more homogeneous. These parts are texturally similar to leucogranites in which the biotite is randomly distributed and pre-melting structures are completely destroyed. The likely protolith for the migmatites was a leucocratic granodiorite (with modal K-feldspar up to 30% and biotite up to 5%), and from geochemical modelling the degree of partial melting ranged from 0.21 to 0.25. Furthermore, the residual diatexites show a complementary low modal proportion, or even absence, of K-feldspar, but an increase in modal plagioclase, quartz (up to 56 and 37% respectively) and biotite (5-16%). This suggests that the melting reaction did not involve biotite and that plagioclase and quartz were in excess. As result the melt generated is fairly leucocratic, and most of the mafic phases in it are inherited. Anatectic melts in the Kinawa Migmatite were mildly metaluminous and distinctly leucocratic (A/CNK from 0.97 to 1.01; SiO2 from 72.8 to 75.65%; (FeOT+MgO+TiO2) from 0.49 to 2.3%). Since most granites have a higher (FeOT+MgO+TiO2), additional processes must add the "mafic component" to these melts before they form plutons.

  1. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Analysis of postulated energetic reactions and resultant aerosol generation in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Dickinson, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report reviews work done to estimate the possible consequences of postulated energetic reactions in ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The issue of explosive reactions was raised in the 1987 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), where a detonation-like explosion was postulated for the purpose of defining an upper bound on dose consequences for various disposal options. A review of the explosion scenario by the General Accounting Office (GAO) indicated that the aerosol generation and consequent radioactive doses projected for the explosion postulated in the EIS were understated by one to two orders of magnitude. The US DOE has sponsored an extensive study of the hazard posed by uncontrolled exothermic reactions in ferrocyanide waste, and results obtained during the past three years have allowed this hazard to be more realistically assessed. The objective of this report is to summarize the improved knowledge base that now indicates that explosive or vigorous chemical reactions are not credible in the ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks. This improved understanding supports the decision not to proceed with further analyses or predictions of the consequences of such an event or with aerosol tests in support of such predictions. 53 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. RELAP5/MOD2 analysis of a postulated ``cold leg SBLOCA`` simultaneous to a ``total black-out`` event in the Jose Cabrera Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect

    Rebollo, L.

    1992-04-01

    Several beyond-design bases cold leg small-break LOCA postulated scenarios based on the ``lessons learned`` in the OECD-LOFT LP-SB-3 experiment have been analyzed for the Westinghouse single loop Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant belonging to the Spanish utility UNION ELECTRICA FENOSA, S.A. The analysis has been done by the utility in the Thermal-Hydraulic & Accident Analysis Section of the Engineering Department of the Nuclear Division. The RELAP5/MOD2/36.04 code has been used on a CYBER 180/830 computer and the simulation includes the 6 in. RHRS charging line, the 2 in. pressurizer spray, and the 1.5 in. CVCS make-up line piping breaks. The assumption of a ``total black-out condition`` coincident with the occurrence of the event has been made in order to consider a plant degraded condition with total active failure of the ECCS. As a result of the analysis, estimates of the ``time to core overheating startup`` as well as an evaluation of alternate operator measures to mitigate the consequences of the event have been obtained. Finally a proposal for improving the LOCA emergency operating procedure (E-1) has been suggested.

  3. RELAP5/MOD2 analysis of a postulated cold leg SBLOCA'' simultaneous to a total black-out'' event in the Jose Cabrera Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect

    Rebollo, L. )

    1992-04-01

    Several beyond-design bases cold leg small-break LOCA postulated scenarios based on the lessons learned'' in the OECD-LOFT LP-SB-3 experiment have been analyzed for the Westinghouse single loop Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant belonging to the Spanish utility UNION ELECTRICA FENOSA, S.A. The analysis has been done by the utility in the Thermal-Hydraulic Accident Analysis Section of the Engineering Department of the Nuclear Division. The RELAP5/MOD2/36.04 code has been used on a CYBER 180/830 computer and the simulation includes the 6 in. RHRS charging line, the 2 in. pressurizer spray, and the 1.5 in. CVCS make-up line piping breaks. The assumption of a total black-out condition'' coincident with the occurrence of the event has been made in order to consider a plant degraded condition with total active failure of the ECCS. As a result of the analysis, estimates of the time to core overheating startup'' as well as an evaluation of alternate operator measures to mitigate the consequences of the event have been obtained. Finally a proposal for improving the LOCA emergency operating procedure (E-1) has been suggested.

  4. Secular evolution of partial melting and melt stagnation during the formation of Godzilla Mullion, Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, J. E.; Ohara, Y.; Harigane, Y.; Michibayashi, K.; Hellebrand, E.; von der Handt, A.; Loocke, M.; Ishii, T.

    2009-12-01

    Godzilla Mullion is a large-scale low angle detachment fault (or OCC, Oceanic Core Complex) formed during backarc spreading in the Parece Vela Rift behind the Mariana arc system. Detachment spreading occurred during the time interval 15-12 Ma, before the Parece Vela Rift became extinct and the locus of back arc spreading in the system shifted to the East, to the Mariana Trough. During this time, the spreading rate varied from ~70-88 mm/year to zero (at extinction). The decline in the spreading rate, should have had profound effects on the thermal structure of the lithosphere in the rift, including include progressive thickening, decreasing degree of partial melting, and increasing melt stagnation. We have combined our preliminary data on mantle peridotite mineral chemistry to form a preliminary test of this hypothesis based on mantle peridotites from (currently) 10 sampling stations along the mullion from the cruises CSS33, KR03-01, KH07-02 and YK09-05. This test is for now based primarily on abyssal peridotite spinel chemistry (Dick and Bullen, 1982; Dick 1989). We can distinguish three distinct regions within the mullion based on spinel chemistry: (1) The Distal GM region, including sites KR03-01-D6, KH07-02-D17 and KH07-02-D7. These have a moderately depleted character, with minimum Cr-numbers between 30 and 40, and few samples with high TiO2 (an indicator of melt impregnation). (2) The Medial GM region, including stations KH07-02-D6, KR03-01-D7, KH07-02-D21 and YK09-05-6K#1142. These have a more fertile character, with minimum Cr-numbers between 14 and 22, and with the exception of KH07-02-21 (which may belong to the next group) little evidence of melt stagnation. (3) The Proximal GM region, including sites KR0301-D9 and D10 and CSS33-D1. These spinels show abundant evidence for melt reaction, including plagioclase pseudomorphs (See abstract by Loocke et al., this session) and pervasively elevated TiO2 contents and Cr-numbers in the spinels. We can interpret these variations in the framework of a declining magmatic system as described above. The Distal GM represents the mantle of a robust magmatic system underlying and feeding normal abyssal hill topography to the SW of the GM breakaway. The Medial GM represents mantle that has a lowered melt productivity, but has not yet switched from thin-lithospheric, eruptive magmatism to active melt stagnation. The proximal GM region represents mantle from near the end of Parece Vela Rift spreading, in which the lithosphere has thickened sufficiently to trap some or most of the melts arising from the melting zone, resulting in Cr-numbers that are elevated once again along with pervasive TiO2 enrichments thought to be typical of extensive melt stagnation.

  5. Evidence for broad hotspot melting anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Stoffers, P.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Worthington, T. J.; Jokat, W.

    2006-12-01

    Mantle plumes are widely portrayed as mushroom-like `head` and thin `tail` structures that rise from a deep thermal boundary layer, generally depicted as the core-mantle boundary. This `classic` plume model has been highly successful in explaining age-progressive seamount chains as a reflection of lithospheric plate motion over thin plume `tails`. Much effort has also been spent examining evidence that may link age-progressive seamount chains to Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), the latter being interpreted as relic plume 'head' structures. However, recent numerical modeling of thermo-chemical plumes indicates that not all plumes have simple `head` and `tail` structures (e.g., Farnetani and Samuel, 2006; Lin and van Keken, 2004, 2006). Plumes may be impinging against the base of the lithosphere in a variety of shapes and sizes, possibly episodically. Similarly, our direct age dating of the Foundation Seamount Chain, SE Pacific, suggests that the narrowness of seamount chains might mask far broader underlying hotspots. Furthermore, our geochronological data show that the Galapagos Volcanic Province (GVP) developed via the progression of broad regions of concurrent dispersed volcanism that we link to a correspondingly broad mantle melting anomaly. Evidence from numerical modelling and direct dating of the volcanic record is therefore suggesting that hotspot melting anomalies might be much broader than commonly inferred from seamount chains. Thus, the criteria for sampling the volcanic record as a test of the plume hypothesis may require modification. We present a revised approach based on multiple seamount chains that stretch across broad regions of seafloor. These investigations test 1) the new thinking that plumes differ from the classic `head-tail` structure and 2) the inference from recent dating of Pacific seamount chains that hotspot melting anomalies are much broader than suggested by the dimensions of individual chains of seamounts and ridges.

  6. Rod bundle thermal-hydraulic and melt progression analysis of CORA severe fuel damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, K.Y. )

    1994-04-01

    An integral, fast-running computational model is developed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic and melt progression behavior in a nuclear reactor rod bundle under severe fuel damage conditions. This consists of the submodels for calculating steaming from the core, hydrogen formation, heat transfer in and out of the core, cooling from core spray or injection, and, most importantly, fuel melting, relocation, and freezing with chemical interactions taking place among the material constituents in a degrading core. The integral model is applied to three German severe fuel damage tests to analyze the core thermal and melt behavior: CORA-16 (18-rod bundle and slow cooling), CORA-17 (18-rod bundle and quenching), and CORA-18 (48-rod bundle and slow cooling). Results of the temperature response of the fuel rods, the channel box, and the absorber blade; hydrogen generation from the fuel rod and the channel box; and core material eutectic formation, melt relocation, and blockage formation are discussed. Reasonable agreement is observed for component temperatures at midelevation where prediction and measurement uncertainties are minimal. However, discrepancies or uncertainties are noticed for hydrogen generation and core-melt progression. The experimentally observed peak generation of hydrogen upon reflooding is not able to be reproduced, and the total amount generated is generally underpredicted primarily because of the early relocation of the Zircaloy fuel channel box and cladding. Also, difficulties are encountered in the process of assessing the core-melt formation and the relocation model because of either modeling uncertainties or a lack of definitive metallurgical data as a function of time throughout the transient.

  7. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Influence of Silicate Melt Composition on Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, S. J.; Domanik, K.; Drake, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The depletion of the siderophile elements in the Earth's upper mantle relative to the chondritic meteorites is a geochemical imprint of core segregation. Therefore, metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle. The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. Several recent studies have shown the importance of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of siderophile elements between silicate and metallic liquids. It has been demonstrated that many elements display increased solubility in less polymerized (mafic) melts. However, the importance of silicate melt composition was believed to be minor compared to the influence of oxygen fugacity until studies showed that melt composition is an important factor at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that melt composition is also important for partitioning of high valency siderophile elements. Atmospheric experiments were conducted, varying only silicate melt composition, to assess the importance of silicate melt composition for the partitioning of W, Co and Ga and found that the valence of the dissolving species plays an important role in determining the effect of composition on solubility. In this study, we extend the data set to higher pressures and investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid.

  9. Core Formation in Asteroid-sized Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimer, J. W.

    1995-09-01

    Iron meteorites are generally thought to be fragments of asteroid cores. The mechanism by which cores might form via melting and gravitational segregation in internally heated chondritic parent bodies has been modeled. Physical and chemical data drawn from experiments have been used in the modeling. Experimentally determined dihedral angles between silicates and metallic melts of appropriate composition are used to understand the fluid dynamics of the process. Experimentally measured distribution coefficients are used to track the variation in composition as the cores evolve. In bodies with FeS and FeNi metal contents and S/Fe ratios similar to those observed in E, H and L chondrites, segregation will begin when the temperature at the center reaches the Fe-FeS eutectic, about 1000 degrees C. In a body with less total FeS + metal, such the LL body, or in a body with a S/Fe ratio substantially lower than chondritic, somewhat higher temperatures will be required to initiate segregation because the volume fraction of melt will be too small (< 5%) to allow interconnection. When the melt becomes interconnected, the segregation process can be described by using Darcy's Law [1]. The rate of melt segregation as inferred from either theoretical estimates or experimental observations is sufficiently rapid that segregation will proceed as rapidly as melt forms. The rate controlling factor will thus be the rate at which the 1000 degrees C isotherm migrates upward through the body. As the 1000 degrees C isotherm migrates, each increment of new melt will have the composition of the eutectic. At greater depths, where the temperature is now higher than the eutectic, larger fractions of FeNi metal will melt. Although more metal in the melt increases the surface tension, this effect is offset by a temperature effect which simultaneously decreases the surface tension. In addition, since the volume fraction of melt with the eutectic composition increases as a function of R^3, the effective melting point of the metal + sulfide inside the 1000 degrees C isotherm will approach the eutectic, where the surface tension effects are minimized. The region of the body inside this 1000 degrees C isotherm therefore will be swept clean of its metal as well as its sulfide. References: [1] Turcott D. L. and Schubert G. (1982) Geodynamics.

  10. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K.

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  11. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  12. Circulation and melting beneath the ross ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S S; Gordon, A L; Ardai, J L

    1979-02-01

    Thermohaline observations in the water column beneath the Ross Ice Shelf and along its terminal face show significant vertical stratification, active horizontal circulation, and net melting at the ice shelf base. Heat is supplied by seawater that moves southward beneath the ice shelf from a central warm core and from a western region of high salinity. The near-freezing Ice Shelf Water produced flows northward into the Ross Sea. PMID:17734137

  13. The NiSi melting curve to 70 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, Oliver T.; Wann, Elizabeth T. H.; Hunt, Simon A.; Walker, Andrew M.; Santangeli, James; Walter, Michael J.; Dobson, David P.; Wood, Ian G.; Vo?adlo, Lidunka; Morard, Guillaume; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    The melting curve of NiSi has been determined to 70 GPa on the basis of laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) experiments in which changes in the gradient of temperature vs. laser power functions were used as the melting criterion. The melting curve was corroborated with in situ X-ray diffraction experiments in both the LH-DAC and multi-anvil press in which the appearance of liquid diffuse scattering in the diffraction patterns was used as the melting criterion. At all pressures, the NiSi melting curve is lower than that of FeSi, with the difference in melting temperature reaching a maximum of 900 K at 14 GPa. The location of the B31 + B20 + L triple point has been constrained to 12 2 GPa and 1550 100 K and the B20 + B2 + L triple point to 28.5 1.5 GPa and 2165 60 K. On the basis of the in situ LH-DAC experiments the Clapeyron slope of the B20 ? B2 transition is estimated at -67 MPa K-1. Extrapolation of the B2-NiSi liquidus to core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions (135 GPa) suggests the melting point of NiSi (3700 400 K) will be only marginally lower than that of isostructural FeSi (4000 200 K). Thus any (Fe,Ni)Si solid solution present within the D? layer is expected to remain solid, with the possible exception of the very hottest region adjacent to the CMB.

  14. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOEpatents

    Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  15. Evidence for fractional crystallization of wadsleyite and ringwoodite from olivine melts in chondrules entrained in shock-melt veins.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Masaaki; El Goresy, Ahmed; Ohtani, Eiji; Nagase, Toshiro; Nishijima, Masahiko; Vashaei, Zahra; Ferroir, Tristan; Gillet, Philippe; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Simionovici, Alexandre

    2008-06-24

    Peace River is one of the few shocked members of the L-chondrites clan that contains both high-pressure polymorphs of olivine, ringwoodite and wadsleyite, in diverse textures and settings in fragments entrained in shock-melt veins. Among these settings are complete olivine porphyritic chondrules. We encountered few squeezed and flattened olivine porphyritic chondrules entrained in shock-melt veins of this meteorite with novel textures and composition. The former chemically unzoned (Fa(24-26)) olivine porphyritic crystals are heavily flattened and display a concentric intergrowth with Mg-rich wadsleyite of a very narrow compositional range (Fa(6)-Fa(10)) in the core. Wadsleyite core is surrounded by a Mg-poor and chemically stark zoned ringwoodite (Fa(28)-Fa(38)) belt. The wadsleyite-ringwoodite interface denotes a compositional gap of up to 32 mol % fayalite. A transmission electron microscopy study of focused ion beam slices in both regions indicates that the wadsleyite core and ringwoodite belt consist of granoblastic-like intergrowth of polygonal crystallites of both ringwoodite and wadsleyite, with wadsleyite crystallites dominating in the core and ringwoodite crystallites dominating in the belt. Texture and compositions of both high-pressure polymorphs are strongly suggestive of formation by a fractional crystallization of the olivine melt of a narrow composition (Fa(24-26)), starting with Mg-rich wadsleyite followed by the Mg-poor ringwoodite from a shock-induced melt of olivine composition (Fa(24-26)). Our findings could erase the possibility of the resulting unrealistic time scales of the high-pressure regime reported recently from other shocked L-6 chondrites. PMID:18562280

  16. Quantifying melting and mobilistaion of interstitial melts in crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Humphreys, Madeleine

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of crystals mushes and separation of melts and crystals in is critical to understanding the development of physical and chemical heterogeneity in magma chambers and has been invoked as an eruption trigger mechanism. Here we investigate the behaviour of the melt in the well characterised, classic crystal mush system of the Skaergaard intrusion by combining experimental petrology and the non-destructive 3D imaging methods. Starting materials for partial melting experiments were four samples from the upper Middle Zone of the Layered Series. Cylinders, 15 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length, were drilled out of the rock samples, placed in alumina crucibles and held for 5 days in electric furnaces at atmospheric pressure and 1050-1100 C. Redox conditions set by the CO-CO2 gas mixture were kept close to those of the FMQ buffer. We then use spatially registered 3D x-ray computed tomography images, collected before and after the experiment, to determine the volume and distribution of the crystal framework and interstitial phases, and the volume, distribution and connectivity the interstitial phases that undergo melting and extraction while at elevated temperature. Image analysis has allowed us to quantify these physical changes with high spatial resolution. Our work is a first step towards quantitative understanding of the melt mobilisation and migration processes operating in notionally locked crystal rich magmatic systems.

  17. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which the melting temperature is a design criterion. We present in detail two examples of refractory materials. First, we demonstrate how key material properties that provide guidance in the design of refractory materials can be accurately determined via ab initio thermodynamic calculations in conjunction with experimental techniques based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis under laser-heated aerodynamic levitation. The properties considered include melting point, heat of fusion, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficients, thermal stability, and sublattice disordering, as illustrated in a motivating example of lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7). The close agreement with experiment in the known but structurally complex compound La2Zr 2O7 provides good indication that the computation methods described can be used within a computational screening framework to identify novel refractory materials. Second, we report an extensive investigation into the melting temperatures of the Hf-C and Hf-Ta-C systems using ab initio calculations. With melting points above 4000 K, hafnium carbide (HfC) and tantalum carbide (TaC) are among the most refractory binary compounds known to date. Their mixture, with a general formula TaxHf 1-xCy, is known to have a melting point of 4215 K at the composition Ta4HfC 5, which has long been considered as the highest melting temperature for any solid. Very few measurements of melting point in tantalum and hafnium carbides have been documented, because of the obvious experimental difficulties at extreme temperatures. The investigation lets us identify three major chemical factors that contribute to the high melting temperatures. Based on these three factors, we propose and explore a new class of materials, which, according to our ab initio calculations, may possess even higher melting temperatures than Ta-Hf-C. This example also demonstrates the feasibility of materials screening and discovery via ab initio calculations for the optimization of "higher-level" properties whose determination requires extensive sampling of atomic configuration space.

  18. Natural spherulite crystallization kinetics in rhyolitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, K. S.; Kitajima, K.; Valley, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Crystals and crystal textures contain a wealth of information concerning their host igneous systems (e.g., P-T conditions, age, dynamics). Crystal nucleation and growth occurs in response to supersaturation caused by either cooling or changes in melt composition. Because natural constraints on such kinetic information is rare and difficult to extract, much of our understanding comes from theory and experiments. Using techniques to draw parallels to natural systems has limitations, thus kinetic information extracted from natural systems is noteworthy. Recent work using diffusion modeling to replicate trace element gradients outside of spherulites may provide one method to naturally assess crystallization kinetics in rhyolitic melts. That work constrains spherulite nucleation to an interval of 650 to 500 C with growth ongoing to temperatures as cool as ~400 C. Max growth rates were estimated to be ~1 ?m hr-1, which exponentially decreased with time. To test those results, we measured the 18O/16O ratios of quartz and alkali feldspar crystals using WiscSIMS (2 S.D. precision was 0.2 to 0.4) at targeted positions across spherulites. The spherulites are 500 to 5000 ?m in diameter and are internally comprised of radiating, intergrown alkali feldspar and quartz crystals, which decrease in size from core to rim. Isotopic fractionation between quartz and alkali feldspar (?Qtz-Kfs) is temperature dependent, and is predicted to be ~1 at magmatic temperatures and increases with decreasing temperature. If quartz and sanidine indeed crystallized at less than 700 C, then ?Qtz-Kfs values should be greater than ~1 and increase in crystals nearer spherulite rims. Measured ?Qtz-Kfs in phenocrysts is 0.60.2, whereas spherulite cores have ?Qtz-Kfs of 1.40.4, which increases to 1.80.4 near the midpoint of transects, and finally to 2.40.3 at the spherulite rims (uncertainty is 1 S.D. of Qtz and Kfs populations). Assuming equilibrium fractionation, those values indicate nucleation occurred at 570100 C and growth continued to temperatures as cold as 36050 C. These estimates imply nucleation was unable to initiate until the melt was undercooled by ~500 C. Furthermore, crystal growth was able to continue until undercoolings of ~700 C were reached, at which point slow diffusion likely prohibited growth.

  19. Frictional melting and stick-slip behavior in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie Evan; Lavallee, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; di Toro, Giulio; Hornby, Adrian Jakob; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Dome-building eruptions have catastrophic potential, with dome collapse leading to devastating pyroclastic flows with almost no precursory warning. During dome growth, the driving forces of the buoyant magma may be superseded by controls along conduit margins; where brittle fracture and sliding can lead to formation of lubricating cataclasite and gouge. Under extreme friction, pseudotachylyte may form at the conduit margin. Understanding the conduit margin processes is vital to understanding the continuation of an eruption and we postulate that pseudotachylyte generation could be the underlying cause of stick-slip motion and associated seismic "drumbeats", which are so commonly observed at dome-building volcanoes. This view is supported by field evidence in the form of pseudotachylytes identified in lava dome products at Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) and Mount St. Helens (USA). Both eruptions were characterised by repetitive, periodic seismicity and lava spine extrusion of highly viscous magma. High velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments demonstrate the propensity for melting of the andesitic and dacitic material (from Soufrière Hills and Mount St. Helens respectively) at upper conduit stress conditions (<10 MPa). Starting from room temperature, frictional melting of the magmas occurs in under 1 s (<< 1 m) at 1.5 m/s (a speed that is achievable during stick-slip motion). At lower velocities melting occurs comparatively later due to dissipation of heat from the slip zone (e.g. 8-15 m at 0.1 m/s). Hence, given the ease with which melting is achieved in volcanic rocks, and considering the high ambient temperatures in volcanic conduits, frictional melting may thus be an inevitable consequence of viscous magma ascent. The shear resistance of the slip zone during the experiment is also monitored. Frictional melting induces a higher resistance to sliding than rock on rock, and viscous processes control the slip zone properties. Variable-rate HVR experiments which mimic rapid velocity fluctuations in stick-slip behavior demonstrate velocity-weakening behavior of melt, with a tendency for unstable slip. During ascent, magma may slip and undergo melting along the conduit margin. In the process the shear resistance of the slip zone is increased, acting as a viscous brake halting slip (the "stick" of stick-slip motion). Sufficient buoyancy-driven pressures from ascending magma below eventually overcome resistance to produce a rapid slip event (the "slip") along the melt-bearing slip zone, which is temporarily lubricated due to velocity-weakening. New magma below experiences the same slip event more slowly (as the magma decompresses) to produce a viscous brake and the process is repeated. This allows a fixed spatial locus that explains the repetitive drumbeat seismicity and the occurrence of "families" of similar seismic events. We conclude that stick-slip motion in volcanic conduits is a self-driving, frictional-melt-regulated force common to many dome building volcanoes.

  20. Partial melting of fertile peridotite fluxed by hydrous rhyolitic melt at 2-3 GPa: implications for mantle wedge hybridization by sediment melt and generation of ultrapotassic magmas in convergent margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Ananya; Nelson, Jared; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the melting behavior of peridotite fluxed with 25 wt% of H2O-bearing rhyolitic sediment melt (1.8 wt% bulk H2O), by performing experiments from 1100 to 1300 C at 2 GPa and 1050-1350 C at 3 GPa. The apparent solidus of our bulk composition lies between 1100 and 1150 C at both pressures, which is at a higher temperature than the vapor-saturated solidus and close to the pargasite dehydration solidus of peridotite. With increasing temperature, reacted melt fraction increases from 20 to 36 wt% from 1200 to 1300 C at 2 GPa and 7 to 24 wt% from 1225 to 1350 C at 3 GPa. Orthopyroxene is present as a residual phase in all the experiments, while olivine is present as a residual phase in all the experiments at 2 GPa only. Amphibole is absent above 1100 C at both pressures, clinopyroxene disappears above 1200 and 1300 C at 2 and 3 GPa, respectively, and garnet (only present at 3 GPa) melts out above 1300 C. Upon reaction with the mantle wedge and subsequent melting of the hybrid rock, subducted sediment-derived rhyolites evolve in composition to a nepheline-normative ultrapotassic leucitite, similar in major element composition to ultrapotassic lavas from active arcs such as Sunda and inactive arcs such as in the Roman Magmatic Province. Fluxing peridotite with H2O versus H2O-bearing sediment melt at similar pressures does not appear to have an effect on isobaric melt productivity, but does have significant effect on melting reactions and resultant melt composition, with influx of sediment melt adding K2O to the system, thereby stabilizing phlogopite, which in turn buffers the reacted melt to ultrapotassic compositions. Previous experimental studies, along with this study, find that phlogopite can be stable near the hotter core of the mantle wedge and, hence, is likely to be subducted to deeper mantle, thereby influencing deeper cycling of volatiles and large ion lithophile elements. Also, because D {Rb/phl/melt} ? D {Sr/phl/melt} and D {Nd/phl/melt}, D {Sm/phl/melt} ? 1, long-term stability of phlogopite in the mantle can create `enriched mantle' domains (?Sr and ?Nd ? 0).

  1. Core transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good news for all petroleum geoscientists, mining and environmental scientists, university researchers, and the like: Shell Oil Company has deeded its Midland core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at the University of Texas at Austin. The Midland repository includes more than 1 million linear meters of slab, whole core, and prepared cuttings. Data comprising one of the largest U.S. core collectionsthe geologic samples from wells drilled in Texas and 39 other statesare now public data and will be incorporated into the existing BEG database. Both Shell and the University of Texas at Austin are affiliated with the American Geological Institute, which assisted in arranging the transfer as part of its goal to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System at regional centers across the United States.

  2. Cracks preserve kimberlite melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, R. C.; Vigouroux-Caillibot, N.; Donovan, J. J.; Russell, K.

    2009-12-01

    The chemical composition of kimberlite melts has previously been estimated by measuring aphanitic intrusive rocks (deposit composition) or by partial melting experiments on carbonated lherzolites (source composition). Pervasively altered, degassed and contaminated material preclude the determination of the primitive melt composition. Here we present data on melt compositions trapped in unaltered olivine cracks that have been healed and overgrown prior to shallow level emplacement. During the ascent of kimberlite magma the prograding crack tip samples mantle peridotite xenoliths. Xenoliths rapidly disaggregate over the first few kilometers of transport producing a population of olivine xenocrysts that are released to the fluid-rich melt. Rapid ascent of the kimberlite magma causes depressurization and creates internal elastic stresses in the olivine crystals that can only be alleviated by volumetric expansion or brittle failure. On the time scales operative during kimberlite ascent volume expansion is negligible and brittle failure occurs. Small wetting angles between the fluid-rich melt and olivine allow infiltration of the melt into the crack. These very thin cracks (<5 m) heal rapidly and preserve primary kimberlitic material en route to the surface. We use the electron microprobe with a focused beam (interaction volume less than 2 m) to analyze the small volumes of material found in the healed cracks of the olivine. We analyzed for 18 elements including oxygen, which we obtained by utilizing a non-linear time dependent intensity acquisition and empirically determined mass absorption coefficients. By accurately knowing the amount of oxygen in a sample, we assign oxygen molecules to all other analyzed elements (e.g. MgO, Al2O3) and the remaining oxygen is assigned to hydrogen and carbon. The analysis total is used as a constraint on the proportion of each species. Mg/Ca ratios of the cracks vary from 0.6-5 indicating a compositional continuum between alkali-poor, carbonate-rich melt and Mg-rich silicate melt. OH/CO2 ratios (0-7) and other volatiles (S, F, Cl) are variable and do not correlate with any of the other major elements, consistent with a variably degassed fluid phase. Element associations indicated that Ca, Ni, Ba and Sr co-vary and are inversely related to Mg, Si, Fe, (and several other minor elements). In summary, crack-filling material is Ca and Mg-rich (up to 55 wt.% CaO+MgO), silica-poor (11-32 wt.% SiO2) and are volatile rich ( up to 28 wt.%).

  3. Modeling energy balance and melt layer formation on the Kahiltna Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winski, D. A.; Kreutz, K. J.; Osterberg, E. C.; Campbell, S. W.; Denali Ice Core Team

    2010-12-01

    Understanding melt on alpine glaciers is required both for accurate mass balance modeling and ice core paleoclimate reconstruction. In alpine regions with complex meteorology and topography, modeling melt through the quantification and balance of all identifiable energy fluxes is the most complete way of describing how local meteorology influences melt layer formation and snowpack evolution. To meet this goal at our field site on the Kahiltna glacier, located in the Central Alaska Range, Denali National Park, we have developed an energy balance model from two years of meteorological data from Kahiltna Base Camp (2100 m elevation, 63.25 degrees N, 151 degrees W). Current model results show the dominance of turbulent heat transfer at the study site and the importance of surface roughness and albedo in controlling melt. Preliminary data show a 30 percent overestimation of melt flux from the surface into the snowpack although an albedo submodel is being developed which may address this. Sampling of the snowpack across the glacier for analysis of stratigraphic and chemical evolution shows an isothermal near surface snowpack (to at least 1m) at 2100 meters in elevation in the early melt season with increasing density and melt layer abundance as the summer progresses. This suggests that a large amount of the meltwater remains in the snowpack after surface melting. We will discuss further the models accuracy in relation to ablation stake measurements as well as the major environmental controls on physical and chemical snowpack evolution into the melt season as additional results are processed.

  4. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from Exxon Nuclear MOFP, Richland, Washington, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Exxon Nuclear Company Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant (MOFP), Richland, Washington. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, high straight-line winds, and floods. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values most likely to occur offsite are also given.

  5. Melting of Sodium Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorberger, Jan; Cohen, Ronald E.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2007-03-01

    The bcc, fcc, and liquid phases of sodium are investigated with density functional molecular dynamic (DFT-MD) simulations. We focus on the behavior of the melting curve at high pressure. Diamond anvil cell experiments have determined a melting line with a negative slope at pressures above 33GPa [1]. In the bcc phase, the melting temperature drops from around 1000K to 700K. It decreases even further to 300K in the fcc phase. We have performed simulations for sodium in a range from zero to 100 GPa, temperatures ranging from 300K to 2000K. Equations of State (EOS) for the bcc, fcc and liquid phase are obtained. To investigate the underlying principles of melting in sodium, we study ionic and electronic structure of solid and fluid. Using our EOS, we reproduce positive and negative slopes of the melting line in the proposed pressure regions for the bcc as well as for the fcc phase. [1] E. Gregorianz, O. Degtyarewa, M. Somayazulu, R.J. Hemley, H. Mao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 185502 (2005)

  6. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form ?ss = ?n1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress ?n, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for ?n in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with ?n, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  7. Impact melt generation and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orphal, D. L.; Borden, W. F.; Larson, S. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The results from the first two calculations in a series of continuum mechanics computer code calculations, investigating the effects of variations in impactor mass and velocity on the generation and transport of impact melt, are reported. In the present calculations, the impactor is modeled as a spherical iron projectile with a mass of one trillion grams, and the target as a gabbroic anorthosite (GA) half-space, where the cases calculated have impact velocities of 5 and 15.8 km/sec. Early-time ejection velocities are 1-2 km/sec in both cases. The first calculation results in 0.07 projectile masses of GA being partly or completely melted, with all the melted GA being ejected from the crater, and a maximum impact range for the ejected melted material of 30 km. The second calculation yields 10.4 projectile masses of melted GA, 50% of which is ejected from the crater to ranges of up to about 130 km. Peak shock pressure attenuation with depth is reported for both cases, and transient cavity dynamics are described and compared to that for surface and near-surface explosions.

  8. Biological Ice Core Analysis in Russian Altai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetake, J.; Nakazawa, F.; Kohshima, S.; Miyake, T.; Narita, H.; Fujita, K.; Takeuchi, N.; Nakawo, M.

    2007-12-01

    In July 2003, a 171m long ice core was excavated from top of Belukha glacier (4,200m a. s. l.) in the Russian Altai Mountains. We examined vertical distributions of microorganisms (unicellular green algae, fungal spore, yeast) and pollens for potential use of ice core dating and reconstruction of past climate. Microorganisms have no seasonal variation in pit samples, however 5 genus of pollen (Fir, Spruce, Pine, Birch tree and Mugwort) have seasonality of each dispersed season. Therefore, this ice core can be identified past seasonal layers by pollen distribution. Pollen dating analysis of ice core estimate upper 48m ice core contain 86 years snow and ice, and this dating method well correspond to the 1963 peak in Tritium. This dating analysis is more accurate than other markers (oxygen isotope, dust, chemical concentration and melt percentage). Oxygen isotope trend from 1917 and temperature record of meteorological station near the glacier slightly increased and melt percentage have some anomalies from 1950s show recent temperature rising in this region. Otherwise, microorganisms and pollen have no trend except yeast. Vertical distribution of yeast peaks are well correspond to peaks of melt percentage show that yeast cell can grow in surface snow only in the warm period when liquid water available. In 1970s and 1980s, Nitrate increased and peaked because of anthropogenic emissions. Nitrate is major nutrient of photosynthetic microorganism, however, no clear relationship nitrate between unicellular green algae.

  9. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-09-29

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa. PMID:26371317

  10. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa. PMID:26371317

  11. Generalized melting criterion for amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, R. |; Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1992-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of solid-state amorphization based on a generalization of the well-known Lindemann criterion. The original Lindemann criterion proposes that melting occurs when the root-mean-square amplitude of thermal displacement exceeds a critical value. This criterion can be generalized to include solid-state amorphization by taking into account the static displacements. In an effort to verify the generalized melting criterion, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of radiation-induced amorphization in NiZr, NiZr{sub 2}, NiTi and FeTi using embedded-atom potentials. The average shear elastic constant G was calculated as a function of the total mean-square atomic displacement following random atom-exchanges and introduction of Frenkel pairs. Results provide strong support for the generalized melting criterion.

  12. Core Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This document focuses on Core Algebra, a course offered in the Hawaii State Department of Education's "Mathematics Program Guide." This algebra option is designed to be less theoretical and more application-oriented than Algebra IA and IB. The text opens with a list of twenty minimum learner objectives of the course. The next section presents an

  13. Partial Melting of the Indarch (EH4) Meteorite : A Textural, Chemical and Phase Relations View of Melting and Melt Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, Timothy J.; Dickinson, Tamara L.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    To Test whether Aubrites can be formed by melting of enstatite Chondrites and to understand igneous processes at very low oxygen fugacities, we have conducted partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) chondrite at 1000-1500 C. Silicate melting begins at 1000 C. Substantial melt migration occurs at 1300-1400 C and metal migrates out of the silicate change at 1450 C and approx. 50% silicate partial melting. As a group, our experiments contain three immiscible metallic melts 9Si-, and C-rich), two immiscible sulfide melts(Fe-and FeMgMnCa-rich) and Silicate melt. Our partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) enstatite Chondrite suggest that igneous processes at low fO2 exhibit serveral unique features. The complete melting of sulfides at 1000 C suggest that aubritic sulfides are not relicts. Aubritic oldhamite may have crystallized from Ca and S complexed in the silicate melt. Significant metal-sulfide melt migration might occur at relatively low degrees of silicate partial melting. Substantial elemental exchange occurred between different melts (e.g., between sulfide and silicate, Si between silicate and metal), a feature not observed during experiments at higher fO2. This exchange may help explain the formation of aubrites from known enstatite chondrites.

  14. Challenges in Melt Furnace Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, Cynthia

    2014-09-01

    Measurement is a critical part of running a cast house. Key performance indicators such as energy intensity, production (or melt rate), downtime (or OEE), and melt loss must all be understood and monitored on a weekly or monthly basis. Continuous process variables such as bath temperature, flue temperature, and furnace pressure should be used to control the furnace systems along with storing the values in databases for later analysis. While using measurement to track furnace performance over time is important, there is also a time and place for short-term tests.

  15. Thermodynamics of minerals and melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, Mark S.

    The thermochemical properties of earth materials and models of fundamental geodetic processes are discussed, along with the energetics of mineral-melt systems and microscopic-level processes contributing to thermodynamic quantities, in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Consideration is given to compilations of thermodynamic data; computational methods; links between thermodynamics and kinetics; thermometry, bathymetry, and the estimation of intensive variables; mineral basic data, phase transitions, and solid solutions; and melt and fluid modeling, macroscopic properties, and spectroscopy. A comprehensive bibliography is provided.

  16. Evolutions of lamellar structure during melting and solidification of Fe9577 nanoparticle from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongquan; Shen, Tong; Lu, Xionggang

    2013-03-01

    A structural evolution during solidification and melting processes of nanoparticle Fe9577 was investigated from MD simulations. A perfect lamellar structure, consisting alternately of fcc and hcp layers, was obtained from solidification process. A structural heredity of early embryo is proposed to explain the structural preference of solidification. Defects were found inside the solid core and play the same role as surface premelting on melting. hcp was found more stable than fcc in high temperature. The difference between melting and solidification points can be deduced coming fully from the overcoming of thermodynamic energy barrier, instead of kinetic delay of structural relaxation.

  17. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  18. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Kaitlin M.; Albert, Mary R.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Baker, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting. PMID:24843158

  19. Melting Curves of Tin, Iron, and Tantalum from In-Situ X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Richard; Coppari, Federica; Fratanduono, Dayne; Lazicki, Amy; Swift, Damian; Eggert, Jon; Collins, Gilbert

    2015-06-01

    The melting curve represents a tremendous rheological transition, from a material with strength to one without. This transition is critical to the evolution of the Earth, as the latent heat from solidification of Earth's inner core helps to drive the magneto-dynamo in the liquid outer-core. The sound velocity along the Hugoniot has been used as a diagnostic of melting, however, the interpretation of the data has sometimes come into question and diamond anvil cells are limited in pressure and temperature. Here we present melting and re-solidification experiments at the Omega and Omega EP laser facilities. We use in-situ x-ray diffraction as a diagnostic of melting along the principal Hugoniots of iron and tantalum. We also present data on the re-crystallization of tin on the nanosecond timescale after re-compression from the Hugoniot state. We use signal from both solid diffraction and diffuse scattering from the liquid to constrain melting and solidification. We are able to show that melting and solidification can occur on nanosecond timescales and that these techniques can be used to determine the equilibrium ultra-high pressure melting curves of a wide range of materials. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-01

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting. PMID:24843158

  1. Analysis and Historical Perspective of the Extensive Surface Melting on Greenland in July 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, T. L.; Albert, M. R.; Hall, D. K.; Nghiem, S. V.; Shuman, C. A.; Tedesco, M.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Neumann, G.

    2012-12-01

    The analysis of multiple remote sensing data sources revealed a surface melt event across almost the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet by mid July of 2012, which was a unique event in the satellite record. Data from three different satellite sensors - including the Oceansat-2 scatterometer, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder - are combined to obtain composite melt area, representing the most complete melt conditions detectable across the ice sheet. Satellite observations reveal that at least 97% of the Greenland ice sheet surface was undergoing melting, including areas at high altitudes like Summit in the dry snow zone of the Greenland ice sheet. This melt event coincided with an anomalous ridge across Greenland, following a period of persistent positive mid-tropospheric height anomalies, and was confirmed by NOAA air temperature data on 11-12 July at Summit. This event is compared to observations from 33 years of satellite data and to other events from the ice core record from Summit. Melt events at Summit are uncommon, with the last significant melt identified by ice core data in 1889, and the previous occurring around 680 years earlier, as reported in the published literature.

  2. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    SciTech Connect

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  3. Explosive volcanism and the compositions of cores of differentiated asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Klaus; Wilson, Lionel

    1993-01-01

    Eleven iron meteorite groups show correlations between Ni and siderophile trace elements that are predictable by distribution coefficients between liquid and solid metal in fractionally crystallizing metal magmas. These meteorites are interpreted to be fragments of the fractionally crystallized cores of eleven differentiated asteroids. Many of these groups crystallized from S-depleted magmas which we propose resulted from removal of the first partial melt (the Fe,Ni-FeS cotectic melt) by explosive pyroclastic volcanism of the type envisaged by Wilson and Keil (1991). We show that these dense, negatively buoyant melts can be driven to asteroidal surfaces due to the presence of excess pressure in the melt and the presence of buoyant bubbles of gas which decrease the density of the melt. We also show that, in typical asteroidal materials, veins will form which grow into dikes and serve as pathways for migration of melt and gas to asteroidal surfaces. Since cotectic Fe, Ni-FeS melt consists of about 85 wt pct FeS and 15 wt pct Fe, Ni, removal of small volumes of eutectic melts results in major loss of S but only minor loss of Fe,Ni, thus leaving sufficient Fe,Ni to form sizeable asteroidal cores.

  4. Transcrystalline melt migration in clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, Yann; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Glass inclusions in clinopyroxene phenocrysts from La Sommata (Vulcano Island, Aeolian Arc) were reheated and submitted to a sustained thermal gradient. Each remelted inclusion undergoes a transient textural and chemical reequilibration and concomitantly begins to migrate along a crystallographic direction, at a small angle with the thermal gradient. The completion of morphological evolution requires a characteristic time that is governed by chemical diffusion. Chemical reequilibration results in the formation of a colored halo that delineates the former location and shape of the inclusion after it has migrated away. Transcrystalline migration proceeds by dissolution of the host clinopyroxene ahead and precipitation astern. Its rate is not limited by Fick's law, but by the crystal-melt interface kinetics. Clinopyroxene dissolution and growth are slower than for olivine in similar conditions but obey the same analytical law, which can be transposed to equally or more sluggish melting or crystallization events in nature. When a gas bubble is initially present, it responds to elastic forces by quickly shifting toward the cold end of the inclusion, where it soon becomes engulfed as an isolated fluid inclusion in the reprecipitated crystal. This study confirms that transcrystalline melt migration, beside its possible implications for small-scale melt segregation and fluid-inclusion generation in the Earth's mantle, provides an experimental access to interfacial kinetic laws in near-equilibrium conditions.

  5. Plama Torches Melt the Rock

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Plasma torches at Zybek Advanced Products blaze at over 37,000 degrees Fahrenheit, melting the rock mixture. __________ The USGS has created man-made moon dirt, or regolith, to help NASA prepare for upcoming moon explorations. Four tons of the simulant is expected to be made by this summer of 2009...

  6. Magnetic Biocomposites for Remote Melting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mengbo; Liebert, Tim; Mller, Robert; Dellith, Andrea; Grfe, Christine; Clement, Joachim H; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-08-10

    A new approach toward the fabrication of biocompatible composites suitable for remote melting is presented. It is shown that magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) can be embedded into a matrix of biocompatible thermoplastic dextran esters. For that purpose, fatty acid esters of dextran with adjustable melting points in the range of 30-140 C were synthesized. Esterification of the polysaccharide by activation of the acid as iminium chlorides guaranteed mild reaction conditions leading to high quality products as confirmed by FTIR- and NMR spectroscopy as well as by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). A method for the preparation of magnetically responsive bionanocomposites was developed consisting of combined dissolution/suspension of the dextran ester and hydrophobized MNPs in an organic solvent followed by homogenization with ultrasonication, casting of the solution, drying and melting of the composite for a defined shaping. This process leads to a uniform distribution of MNPs in nanocomposite as revealed by scanning electron microscope. Samples of different geometries were exposed to high frequency alternating magnetic field. It could be shown that defined remote melting of such biocompatible nanocomposites is possible for the first time. This may lead to a new class of magnetic remote control systems, which are suitable for controlled release applications or self-healing materials. PMID:26134099

  7. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dumberry, M.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is shallower than the core liquidus, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steeper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first enter a solid stability field near the core mantle boundary and produce ironrich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, crystallization initiated near the top might generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection.In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for an internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high-pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials. We use a 1-dimensional parametrized thermal evolution model in the stagnant lid regime for the mantle (e.g. [1]) that is coupled to the core. The model for the mantle takes into account the formation of the crust due to melting at depth. Mantle convection is driven by heat producing radioactive elements, heat loss from secular cooling and from the heat supplied by the core. The heat generated inside the core is mainly provided from secular cooling, from the latent heat released at iron freezing, and from gravitational energy resulting form the release of light elements at the inner core-outer core boundary as well as from the sinking of iron-rich snow and subsequent upwellings of light elements in the snow zone. If the heat flow out of the core is smaller than the heat transported along the core isentrope a thermal boundary will from at the top of the outer core. To determine the extension of the convecting region inside the liquid core we calculate the convective power [2]. Finally, we use the entropy budget of the core (e.g. [3]) together with the core mantle boundary heat flow to assess whether a magnetic filed can be generated and sustained inside Mercury's core.

  8. The infidelity of melt inclusions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    Melt inclusions provide important information about magmatic systems and represent unique records of magma composition and evolution. However, it is also clear that melt inclusions do not necessarily constitute a petrological 'magic bullet', and potential exists for trapped melt compositions to be modified by a range of inclusion-specific processes. These include trapping of diffusional boundary layers, crystallization of the host mineral after trapping and dissolution of co-trapped minerals during homogenization, diffusional exchange between trapped liquid and the host mineral and external melt, and cryptic alteration of trapped material during weathering or hydrothermal alteration. It clearly important to identify when melt inclusions are unmodified, and which compositional indices represent the most robust sources of petrogenetic information. In this presentation I review and discuss various approaches for evaluating compositions and compositional variations in inclusion suites. An overriding principle is that the variations evident in melt inclusions should be able to be understood in terms of petrological processes that are known, or can be reasonably inferred to also effect bulk magma compositions. One common approach is to base petrological conclusions on species that should be more robust, and many workers use variations in incompatible trace elements for this purpose. However important information may also be obtained from a comparison of variations in melt inclusions and the lavas that host them, and in most cases this comparison is the key to identifying inclusions and suites that are potentially suspect. Comparisons can be made between individual inclusions and lavas, although comparison of average inclusion composition and the host lava, after correction for differences in crystal fractionation, may also be valuable. An important extension of this is the comparison of the variability of different species in inclusions and host lavas. This also provides a means to directly test for effects of inclusion-specific processes through comparison between variance and diffusivity, partition coefficient or other parameters believed to drive compositional changes. Another test that is becoming more accessible is the direct comparison of trace element compositions of inclusions and host minerals, coupled with known element partitioning behavior.

  9. Seismic detection of the lunar core.

    PubMed

    Weber, Renee C; Lin, Pei-Ying; Garnero, Edward J; Williams, Quentin; Lognonné, Philippe

    2011-01-21

    Despite recent insight regarding the history and current state of the Moon from satellite sensing and analyses of limited Apollo-era seismic data, deficiencies remain in our understanding of the deep lunar interior. We reanalyzed Apollo lunar seismograms using array-processing methods to search for the presence of reflected and converted seismic energy from the core. Our results suggest the presence of a solid inner and fluid outer core, overlain by a partially molten boundary layer. The relative sizes of the inner and outer core suggest that the core is ~60% liquid by volume. Based on phase diagrams of iron alloys and the presence of partial melt, the core probably contains less than 6 weight % of lighter alloying components, which is consistent with a volatile-depleted interior. PMID:21212323

  10. Redox viscometry of ferropicrite melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oryalle Chevrel, Magdalena; Potuzak, Marcel; Dingwell, Donald B.; Hess, Kai-Uwe

    2010-05-01

    The rheology governs the dynamics of magmas at all scales (i.e. partial melting, magmatic chamber emplacement, lava flow behavior). It is also a fundamental constraint on volcanic morphology and landforms. Most terrestrial volcanic flows have moderate iron contents up to 10 wt% but some basalts show contain up to 16 wt%. These ferropicrites range from the Archean to recent, typically forming thin isolated flows near the base of thick lava piles in large igneous provinces, are not well understood. Although ferropicrites are rare on Earth's surface they are believed to be abundant on Mars. Analyses of Martian rocks (from remote sensing data, in situ measurements and meteorite analyses) display up to 20 wt% FeO. Studying these compositions will help to constrain the physical nature and evolution of the volcanism on Mars. The influence of iron on the structure and properties of magmatic melts, remains controversial. Simple system investigations indicate an as yet insufficiently parameterized influence of the oxidation state of iron on the rheology and other properties of silicate melts. The dependence of shear viscosity on the oxidation state of ferrosilicate melts has been measured using the concentric cylinder method and a gas mixing furnace. Previously, two different simple Fe-bearing systems have been studied: (i) anorthite-diopside eutectic composition (AnDi) with variable amount of Fe (up to 20 wt%) as a basalt analog and (ii) sodium disilicate (NS2) with up to 30 wt % Fe. Two natural compositions have been previously investigated, a phonolite and a pantellerite. Here, the compositional range has been extended to the more complex ferropicrite composition using the Adirondack class rock, a typical martian basalt (with low Al content and Fe up to 18,7 wt%). The experimental procedure involves a continuous measurement of viscosity at constant temperature during stepwise reduction state. The melt is reduced by flowing CO2 and then successively reducing mixtures of CO2-CO. The composition and oxidation state of the melt is monitored by obtaining a melt sample after each redox equilibrium step. The melts are sampled by dipping an alumina rod into the sample and drawing out a drop of liquid, which is then plunged into water for quenching. The resulting glasses are analyzed by electron microprobe, and the volumetric potassium dichromate titration is employed to determine FeO content. So far we observed a very low viscosity for high iron content samples and a decrease of the viscosity with increasing Fe content. Moreover, the viscosity of all melts investigated to date decreases with melt reduction. The viscosity decrease is, in general, a nonlinear function of oxidation state expressed as Fe2+/Fetot and can be fitted using logarithmic equation. The range of viscosity is compared to previous experimental studies and will help to understand morphological observations.

  11. A melt viscosity scale for preeruptive magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Shingo

    2015-05-01

    A simplified method to estimate preeruptive melt viscosity by using only melt SiO2 content (groundmass SiO2 content) is proposed for sub-alkaline magmas. Melt viscosity is controlled by many magmatic properties (e.g., melt composition, melt water content, and temperature); however, these properties are linked by phase equilibrium in preeruptive magmas. In this study, the magmatic properties were investigated by compiling data of phase equilibria experiments performed under preeruptive conditions. Negative correlations are found between melt SiO2 contents and liquidus temperatures, and between liquidus temperatures and melt water contents. Both increasing melt SiO2 content and decreasing liquidus temperature have the effect of increasing the melt viscosity, producing a linear positive correlation between logarithmic values of melt viscosity and linear values of melt SiO2 content. For a specific melt SiO2 content, an increase in liquidus temperature causes a decrease in melt viscosity, whereas a decrease in water content causes an increase in melt viscosity. As a result of this opposing effect, the melt viscosity is strongly correlated with the melt SiO2 content (the correlation coefficient of 1). Based on this relationship, an empirical equation predicting logarithmic values of preeruptive melt viscosity is proposed as a linear function of melt SiO2 content, referred to as the melt viscosity scale. The equation reproduces melt viscosities for compiled experimental melts and natural melts with root-mean-square deviation of 0.4 and 0.5 log units, respectively. This method provides order-of-magnitude estimates for preeruptive melt viscosity. Its strength is in being applicable to examples for which a full dataset of preeruptive magmatic properties is lacking or has large uncertainties (e.g., slowly cooled lavas). The simplicity of this method enables us to easily and promptly estimate preeruptive melt viscosity. Combined with rheological models for multiphase magmas, the present method can be applied widely and thus greatly increase the number of case studies which include evidence-based estimates of preeruptive magma viscosity.

  12. Geochemistry: how well can Pb isotopes date core formation?

    PubMed

    Kamber, Balz S; Kramers, Jan D

    2006-11-01

    Timescale and the physics of planetary core formation are essential constraints for models of Earth's accretion and early differentiation. Wood and Halliday use the apparent mismatch in core-formation dates determined from tungsten (W) and lead (Pb) chrono-meters to argue for a two-stage core formation, involving an early phase of metal segregation followed by a protracted episode of sulphide melt addition. However, we show here that crust-;mantle Pb isotope systematics do not require diachronous core formation. Our observations indicate that very early (< or = 35 Myr) core formation and planet accretion remain the most plausible scenario. PMID:17080032

  13. On the Viability of Slab Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.; Magni, V.; Maunder, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Melting subducted mafic crust is commonly assumed to be the main process leading to silicic melts with an adakitic signature, which may form Archaean granitoids and generate early continental crust. Alternatively, melting of the overriding lower mafic crust and near-Moho depth fractional crystallisation of mantle melts can form differentiated magmas with an adakitic signature. Previous work shows how only very young slabs melt through dehydration melting, or depict melting of dry eclogites via water addition from deeper slab dehydration. Alternatively, underplated subducted material via delamination and diapirism may be important in the generation of felsic continental crust. We quantify subduction dehydration and melting reactions in a warm subduction system using a thermo-mechanical subduction model with a thermodynamic database. We find that even young (hot) slabs dehydrate before reaching their solidus, which suppresses any slab dehydration melting and creates significant amounts of mantle wedge melting irrespective of slab age. Significant slab crust melting is only achieved in young slabs via water present melting if metamorphic fluids from the subducted mantle flux through the dry eclogites. These slab melts, however, interfere with massive mantle wedge melting and unlikely to participate in the overriding plate felsic magmatism, unlike the shallower, primitive mantle wedge melts. We also explore the conditions for delaminating the mafic subducted crust. For a wide range of ages, the uppermost part of the subducted slab might delaminate to form compositionally buoyant plumes that rise through the mantle wedge. Thick crust on young slabs (as perhaps representative for a hotter, early Earth) may delaminate entirely and reside in the mantle wedge. Under such conditions, this ponded crust might melts subsequently, forming "adakitic" felsic melts contributing to a significant amount of the overriding plate crustal volumes.

  14. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Marvin; Hoover, Mark D.; Nelson, Robert C.; Templeton, William; Bollinger, Lance; Anspaugh, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later time after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher.

  15. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. ); Nelson, R.C. ); Bollinger, L. ); Hoover, M.D. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. ); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

    1990-11-02

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

  16. Water storage and early hydrous melting of the Martian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Grove, T. L.; Charlier, B.

    2012-06-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the near-solidus phase equilibria of a water-saturated analog of the Martian mantle. Experiments were performed at low temperatures (700-920 C) and high pressure (4-7 GPa) using multi-anvil apparatus and piston cylinder device (4 GPa). The results of this study are used to explore the role of water during early melting and chemical differentiation of Mars, and to further our understanding of the near-solidus behavior in planetary mantle compositions at high pressure. Water has a significant effect on the temperature of melting and, therefore, on accretion and subsequent differentiation processes. Experiments locate the wet solidus at ?800 C, and is isothermal between 4 GPa and 7 GPa. The Martian primitive mantle can store significant amounts of water in hydrous minerals stable near the solidus. Humite-group minerals and phase E represent the most abundant hydrous minerals stable in the 4-7 GPa pressure range. The amount of water that can be stored in the mantle and mobilized during melting ranges from 1 to up to 4 wt% near the wet solidus. We discuss thermal models of Mars accretion where the planet formed very rapidly and early on in solar system history. We incorporate the time constraint of Dauphas and Pourmand (2011) that Mars had accreted to 50% of its present mass in 1.8 Myr and include the effects of 26Al radioactive decay and heat supplied by rapid accretion. When accretion has reached 30% of Mars current mass (?70% of its present size), melting starts, and extends from 100 to 720 km depth. Below this melt layer, water can still be bound in crystalline solids. The critical stage is at 50% accretion (?80% of its size), where Mars is above the wet and dry solidi with most of its interior melted. This is earlier in the accretion process than what would be predicted from dry melting. We suggest that water may have promoted early core formation on Mars and rapidly extended melting over a large portion of Mars interior.

  17. Composition of Apollo 17 core 76001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Bishop, Kaylynn M.

    1993-01-01

    Core 76001 is a single drive tube containing a column of regolith taken at the base of the North Massif, station 6, Apollo 17. The core material is believed to have accumulated through slow downslope mass wasting from the massif. As a consequence, the core soil is mature throughout its length. Results of INAA for samples taken every half centimeter along the length of the core indicate that there is only minor systematic compositional variation with depth. Concentrations of elements primarily associated with mare basalt (Sc, Fe) and noritic impact melt breccia (Sm) decrease slightly with depth, particularly between 20 cm and the bottom of the core at 32 cm depth. This is consistent with petrographic studies that indicate a greater proportion of basalt and melt breccia in the top part of the core. However, Sm/Sc and La/Sm ratios are remarkably constant with depth, indicating no variation in the ratio of mare material to Sm-rich highlands material with depth. Other than these subtle changes, there is no compositional evidence for the two stratigraphic units (0-20 cm and 20-32 cm) defined on the basis of modal petrography, although all samples with anomalously high Ni concentrations (Fe-Ni metal nuggets) occur above 20 cm depth.

  18. Osmium Solubility in Silicate Melts: New Efforts and New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Walker, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper, Borisov and Palme reported the first experimental results on the partitioning of Os between metal (Ni-rich OsNi alloys) and silicate melt of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at 1400 C and 1 atm total pressure and and at function of O2 from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -12) atm. Experiments were done by equilibrating OsNi metal loops with silicate melt. Metal and glass were analyzed separately by INAA. D(sup 0s) ranged from 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7), which is inconsistent with core/ mantle equilibrium for HSEs and favors the late veneer hypothesis. Unfortunately, there was practically no function of O2 dependence of Os partitioning, and the scatter of experimental results was quite serious, so the formation of Os nuggets was suspected. This new set of experiments was specifically designed to avoid of at least minimize the nugget problem

  19. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re-equilibration is also suggested by mantle siderophile abundances [13], though simple partitioning models do not capture the likely complex P,T evolution during successive giant impacts. The timescale of Martian core formation is currently uncertain (0-10 My) [14], though it is clear that Martian core formation ended before that of the Earth. [1] Stevenson, in Origin of the Earth, 1990. [2] Groebner and Kohlstedt, EPSL 2006. [3] Rubie et al., Treatise Geophys. 2007. [4] Kleine et al., GCA submitted. [5] Weiss et al., LPSC 39, 2008. [6] Keil and Wilson, EPSL 1993 [7] Wanke and Dreibus, PTRSL, 1984. [8] Agnor et al. Icarus 1999 [9] Canup and Asphaug, Nature 2001 [10] Nimmo and Agnor, EPSL 2006. [11] Rubie et al., EPSL 2003 [12] O'Brien et al, Icarus 2006 [13] Righter, AREPS 2003. [14] Nimmo and Kleine, Icarus 2007.

  20. Melting curve of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deemyad, Shanti

    2009-06-01

    More than 70 years ago Wigner and Huntington predicted that at sufficiently high pressures hydrogen will become an atomic metallic solid. Metallic hydrogen has not yet been observed at pressures exceeding 3 Mbar at low temperatures. Recent calculations predict a maximum in the melting line of hydrogen. Extrapolations to higher pressures suggest that metallic hydrogen may be a liquid at T=0 K with interesting quantum properties. Confining hydrogen at elevated temperatures is challenging as hydrogen tends to diffuse out of the cell. Combination of static pressure techniques with dynamic temperature variations can be used to suppress the diffusion of the sample out of the pressure cell. We have extended the melting line of hydrogen and observed the predicted peak and shall discuss this, the unusual properties of hydrogen, and it's various phases.

  1. Dynamic crystallization of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of furnaces with differing temperature range capabilities were used to provide variations in melt temperatures and cooling rates in a study of the effects of heterogeneous nucleation on crystallization. Materials of chondrule composition were used to further understanding of how the disequilibrium features displayed by minerals in rocks are formed. Results show that the textures of natural chondrules were duplicated. It is concluded that the melt history is dominant over cooling rate and composition in controlling texture. The importance of nuclei, which are most readily derived from preexisting crystalline material, support an origin for natural chondrules based on remelting of crystalline material. This would be compatible with a simple, uniform chondrule forming process having only slight variations in thermal histories resulting in the wide range of textures.

  2. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Ma?olepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ? liquid and cubic ice ? liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  3. Melt-spinning (Materials Preparation Center)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Melt-spinning is a method used for producing amorphous ribbon, which can then be converted to powder. The quality of the ribbon is controlled by several processing factors. This video shows the melt stream, melt pool, and ribbon formation in slow motion.

  4. Direct writing by way of melt electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Brown, Toby D; Dalton, Paul D; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2011-12-15

    Melt electrospun fibers of poly(?-caprolactone) are accurately deposited using an automated stage as the collector. Matching the translation speed of the collector to the speed of the melt electrospinning jet establishes control over the location of fiber deposition. In this sense, melt electrospinning writing can be seen to bridge the gap between solution electrospinning and direct writing additive manufacturing processes. PMID:22095922

  5. The nature of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the earth's core are overviewed with emphasis on seismologically determined regions and pressures and seismologically measured density, elastic wave velocities, and gravitational acceleration. Attention is given to solid-state convection of the inner core, and it is noted that though seismological results do not conclusively prove that the inner core is convective, the occurrence and magnitude of seismic anisotropy are explained by the effects of solid-state convection. Igneous petrology and geochemistry of the inner core, a layer at the base of the mantle and contact metasomatism at the core-mantle boundary, and evolution of the core-mantle system are discussed. It is pointed out that high-pressure melting experiments indicate that the temperature of the core is ranging from 4500 to 6500 K, and a major implication of such high temperature is that the tectonics and convection of the mantle, as well as the resulting geological processes observed at the surface, are powered by heat from the core. As a result of the high temperatures, along with the compositional contrast between silicates and iron alloy, the core-mantle boundary is considered to be most chemically active region of the earth.

  6. Some aspects of core formation in Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Some questions dealing with the nature and history of a large metallic core within Mercury are considered. These include the existence of a core, its size, whether it is fluid or solid, the timescale for core formation, the geological consequences of core formation, and whether such consequences are consistent with the surface geology. Several indirect lines of evidence are discussed which suggest the presence of a large iron-rich core. A core-formation model is examined in which core infall is accompanied by an increase of 17 km in planetary radius, an increase of 700 K in mean internal temperature, and substantial melting of the mantle. It is argued that if the core differentiated from an originally homogeneous planet, that event must have predated the oldest geological units comprising most of the planetary surface. A convective dynamo model for the source of Mercury's magnetic field is shown to conflict with cosmochemical models that do not predict a substantial radiogenic heat source in the core.

  7. Melting And Purification Of Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Salles Moura, Hernane R.; Moura, Lourenco de

    2007-08-09

    The aspects involved in the purification of niobium in Electron Beam Furnaces will be outlined and correlated with practical experience accumulated over 17 years of continuously producing high purity niobium metal and niobium-zirconium ingots at CBMM, meeting the needs for a wide range of uses. This paper also reports some comments regarding raw material requirements, the experience on cold hearth operation melting niobium and the production of large grains niobium ingots by CBMM with some comments of their main characteristics.

  8. Crystal growing from the melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties of crystals produced by a unidirectional process depend strongly on the temperature and flow fields since these control the concentration of solute at the melt-crystal interface. The solute gradient there drives morphological instabilities that lead to cellular or dendritic interfaces. In the presentation several features of flow-solidification interactions will be discussed. These will include the effects of convection driven by density changes and buoyancy and the imposition of forced flow.

  9. Water Storage and Early Hydrous Melting of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Grove, T. L.; Charlier, B.

    2011-12-01

    We present an experimental investigation of a water-saturated analogue of the Martian mantle at low temperature (700-920C) and high pressure (4-7GPa) using a multi-anvil apparatus. The results of this study are used to explore the role of water in the early chemical differentiation of the planet, and to further our understanding of the near-solidus behavior in planetary mantle compositions at high pressure. Water has a significant effect on the temperature of melting and therefore, on accretion and subsequent differentiation processes. Results show that the wet solidus reaction, located at ~800C, remains at that temperature between 4GPa and 7GPa. The Martian primitive mantle can store significant amounts of water in hydrous minerals stable near the solidus. Humite minerals and phase E represent the most abundant hydrated minerals stable under pressure. The amount of water that can be stored in the mantle and mobilized during melting ranges from 1 to up to 4wt% at the wet solidus. Hydrous melt has also been analyzed in an experiment at 920C and 5.2GPa and is roughly andesitic, consistent with the findings of others that partial melting of peridotite produces high silica melts. Based on our experimental data and considering both impact and radioactive heat sources, we propose a thermal model of Mars accretion. We assume that Mars formed very rapidly (3.6 Myr or less according to recent studies) and accreted initially from a mix of chondrites (85%H, 11%CV, 4%CI) that contain a bulk water content of 1.1 wt.% H2O. Because Mars accreted quickly and early in solar system history, 26Al decay played an important role in the thermal evolution of the planet. We found that at 20% of its present mass (corresponding to ~60% of its size), the planet is cool enough to retain the water stored in hydrous minerals. At 30% (~70% of its size), melting starts at -but is not limited to- a shallow depth (1-3GPa) and water can still be bound in crystalline solids. The critical stage is at 50% (~80% of its size), where Mars is now above the wet and dry solidi with most of its interior melted. Water allows melting to occur earlier in the accretion process and the presence of water promotes the formation of a significant amount of melt, contrasting with dry accretion scenarios. Interestingly, the 50 % accretion step matches with the time estimated for core formation by recent Hf/W isotopic studies [1]. Therefore, we suggest that water may have promoted early core formation on Mars and rapidly extended melting over a large portion of Mars interior. [1] Dauphas, N., Pourmand, A., 2011. Hf-W-Th evidence for rapid growth of Mars and its status as a planetary embryo. Nature, 473, doi:10.1038/nature10077.

  10. Melting scenario in metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, P. J.; Luo, J. S.; Lai, S. K.; Wax, J. F.; Bretonnet, J.-L.

    2008-11-01

    The isothermal Brownian-type molecular dynamics simulation has been applied to study the melting behavior of bimetallic clusters. It was found that the specific heat and Lindermann-like parameter customarily used in bulk system to describe solid-liquid transition show incongruity in the predicted melting temperature Tmelt. The underlying mechanisms that lead to the incompatibility of Tmelt separately deduced from these two quantities were analyzed further. To gain insight into the melting behavior, we calculated in addition the velocity autocorrelation function and its Fourier transform, the power spectrum, and extracted from them the Tmelt. It appears that the Tmelt inferred from the latter quantities is closer to that deduced from the principal peak position of specific heat. Two bimetallic clusters, namely, Ag1Cu13 and Au1Cu13, were selected for a thorough investigation. In the context of cluster morphology, we scrutinized the atomic distributions of Ag1Cu13, Au1Cu13, and Cu14 and effected a comparative study between a bimetallic cluster and a pure cluster so as to learn from comparison the differences in the thermal reaction of atoms, in particular, the impurity atom in the bimetallic cluster. On analyzing the dynamical data, we observed at a lower temperature (T?Tmelt) migrational relocation of atoms whose dynamics was superimposed at an intermediate temperature (T

  11. Earth's Building Blocks: The "Core Spyglass"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Siebert, J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The details of Earth's accretion, and the nature of Earth's building blocks in particular, are still poorly understood. One way to constrain accretionary processes is to understand the major differentiation event that took place during accretion: core formation. Earth's core formed during accretion as a result of melting, phase-separation, and segregation of accretionary building blocks (meteorites, planetesimals, protoplanets). Extensive melting lead to the formation of a Magma Ocean, and the bulk compositions of the core and mantle depend on it evolution (pressure, temperature, composition) during accretion. The entire process left a compositional imprint on both reservoirs: in the silicate Earth, in terms of siderophile trace-element concentrations (a record that is observed in present-day mantle rocks); and on the core, in terms of major element composition and light elements dissolved in the metal (a record that is observed by seismology through the core density-deficit). Constraining accretionary processes by looking at the core has been studied for almost ten years. Based on partitioning of slightly siderophile elements, the current paradigm is that Earth must have formed under very reducing conditions, followed by a complex oxidation mechanism to reach the present-day redox state. In the light of new partitioning data under extreme conditions, we will show here that Earth can form at a constant redox state (the present-day value), or even form in relatively oxidized conditions (that of carbonaceous or ordinary chondrites). This paradigm shift is strengthened by the fact that oxidizing conditions favour oxygen solubility in the core, which is a requirement both for the inner-core density jump and outer core density deficit.

  12. The influence of melting and melt drainage on crustal rheology during orogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Johann F. A.; Fagereng, ke

    2014-08-01

    Partial melting significantly weakens crustal rocks by introducing a low-viscosity liquid phase. However, near-concomitant melt drainage can remove this weak phase, potentially reversing the rheological effects such that the strength of a specific lithology depends on when the prograde pressure-temperature path intersects a melting reaction, how much melt is produced, and how long this melt is retained before it is lost. Phase equilibria and mixed rheology modeling of typical metapelite and metagreywacke compositions indicate that these rocks undergo continuous but pulsed melt production during prograde metamorphism. Depending on whether melt removal is continuous or episodic, and assuming geological strain rates, the lithologies can retain a very low strength less than 1 MPa or transiently strengthen to 5 MPa following melt loss. Lithologies undergoing episodic melt loss can therefore cycle between being relatively weak and relatively strong components within a composite crustal section. Melt production, retention, and weakening in the middle to lower crust as a whole is more sustained during heating and melt production, consistent with geodynamic inferences of weak, melt-bearing lower crust. However, the long-term consequence of melting and melt loss is a 50-400% increase in the strength of residual lithologies. The strengthening is more pronounced in metapelite than metagreywacke and is achieved through a combination of dehydration and the removal of the weak mica framework coupled to increased proportions of strong feldspars and garnet. Despite prolonged weakness, melting and melt loss therefore ultimately result in a dry and elastic lower crust.

  13. Dynamics of upper mantle rocks decompression melting above hot spots under continental plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepechko, Yury; Sorokin, Konstantin; Sharapov, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Numeric 2D simulation of the decompression melting above the hot spots (HS) was accomplished under the following conditions: initial temperature within crust mantle section was postulated; thickness of the metasomatized lithospheric mantle is determined by the mantle rheology and position of upper asthenosphere boundary; upper and lower boundaries were postulated to be not permeable and the condition for adhesion and the distribution of temperature (1400-2050°C); lateral boundaries imitated infinity of layer. Sizes and distribution of lateral points, their symmetry, and maximum temperature varied between the thermodynamic condition for existences of perovskite - majorite transition and its excess above transition temperature. Problem was solved numerically a cell-vertex finite volume method for thermo hydrodynamic problems. For increasing convergence of iterative process the method of lower relaxation with different value of relaxation parameter for each equation was used. The method of through calculation was used for the increase in the computing rate for the two-layered upper mantle - lithosphere system. Calculated region was selected as 700 x (2100-4900) km. The time step for the study of the asthenosphere dynamics composed 0.15-0.65 Ma. The following factors controlling the sizes and melting degree of the convective upper mantle, are shown: a) the initial temperature distribution along the section of upper mantleb) sizes and the symmetry of HS, c) temperature excess within the HS above the temperature on the upper and lower mantle border TB=1500-2000oC with 5-15% deviation but not exceed 2350oC. It is found, that appearance of decompression melting with HS presence initiate primitive mantle melting at TB > of 1600oC. Initial upper mantle heating influence on asthenolens dimensions with a constant HS size is controlled mainly by decompression melting degree. Thus, with lateral sizes of HS = 400 km the decompression melting appears at TB > 1600oC and HS temperature (THS) > 1900oC asthenolens size ~700 km. When THS = of 2000oC the maximum melting degree of the primitive mantle is near 40%. An increase in the TB > 1900oC the maximum degree of melting could rich 100% with the same size of decompression melting zone (700 km). We examined decompression melting above the HS having LHS = 100 km - 780 km at a TB 1850- 2100oC with the thickness of lithosphere = 100 km.It is shown that asthenolens size (Lln) does not change substantially: Lln=700 km at LHS = of 100 km; Lln= 800 km at LHS = of 780 km. In presence of asymmetry of large HS the region of advection is developed above the HS maximum with the formation of asymmetrical cell. Influence of lithospheric plate thicknesses on appearance and evolution of asthenolens above the HS were investigated for the model stepped profile for the TB ≤ of 1750oS with Lhs = 100km and maximum of THS =2350oC. With an increase of TB the Lln difference beneath lithospheric steps is leveled with retention of a certain difference to melting degrees and time of the melting appearance a top of the HS. RFBR grant 12-05-00625.

  14. Climate variability, warming and ice melt on the Antarctic Peninsula over the last millennium (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abram, N.; Mulvaney, R.; Wolff, E. W.; Triest, J.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Trusel, L. D.; Vimeux, F.; Fleet, L.; Arrowsmith, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced rapid warming over the past 50 years, which has led to extensive summer ice melt, the collapse of ice shelves and the acceleration of glacial outflow. But the short observational records of Antarctic climate don't allow for an understanding of how unusual the recent conditions may be. We present reconstructions of temperature and melt history since 1000 AD from a highly resolved ice core record from James Ross Island on the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula. The spatial pattern of temperature variability across networks of palaeoclimate reconstructions demonstrates that the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) has been an important driver of Antarctic Peninsula climate variability over a range of time scales. Rapid warming of the Antarctic Peninsula since the mid-20th century is consistent with strengthening of the SAM by a combination of greenhouse and later ozone forcing. The rare reconstruction of summer melting, from visible melt layers in the ice core, demonstrates the non-linear response of ice melt to increasing summer temperatures. Melting in the region is now more intense than at any other time over the last 1000 years and suggests that the Antarctic Peninsula is now particularly susceptible to rapid increases in ice loss in response to relatively small increases in mean temperature.

  15. Liquid jet breakup characterization with application to melt-water mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, T.

    1986-01-01

    Severe accidents in light-water reactors could lead to the flow of molten core material from the initial core region of the reactor vessel to the lower plenum. Steam explosions have been predicted to occur as a result of the contact of the melt with water available in the plenum. It is presently judged by many workers, that the magnitude of the energy released during such an in-vessel explosion would be insufficient to lead to failure of the containment building (SERG, 1985). A major contributing factor in this judgment is that the mass of melt which would participate in the interaction would be limited by the quantity of melt delivered to the lower plenum to the time of the explosion and by the limited breakup of the molten pour stream as it flows through the plenum prior to the explosion. Limited pour stream breakup would lead to limited melt-water mixing and, in addition, to the existence of ''large-scale'' melt masses which may lead to very inefficient thermal-to-mechanical energy conversion. The objective of this paper is to assess the available literature relevant to liquid jet breakup and to assess its implications with respect to the behavior of molten corium pour streams as they would flow from the core region through the lower plenum. Uncertainties in application of the available literature are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Melting Processes at the Base of the Mantle Wedge: Melt Compositions and Melting Reactions for the First Melts of Vapor-Saturated Lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Till, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Vapor-saturated melting experiments have been performed at pressures near the base of the mantle wedge (3.2 GPa). The starting composition is a metasomatized lherzolite containing 3 wt. % H2O. Near-solidus melts and coexisting mineral phases have been characterized in experiments that span 925 to 1100 oC with melt % varying from 6 to 9 wt. %. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and garnet coexist with melt over the entire interval and rutile is also present at < 1000 oC. Melt is andesitic in composition and varies from 60 wt. % SiO2 at 950 oC to 52 wt. % at 1075 oC. The Al2O3 contents of the melt are 13 to 14 wt. %, and CaO contents range from 1 and 4 wt. %. Melting is peritectic with orthopyroxene + liquid produced by melting of garnet + olivine + high-Ca pyroxene. In addition to quenched melt, we observe a quenched silicate component that is rhyolitic (>72 % SiO2) that we interpret as a precipitate from the coexisting supercritical H2O-rich vapor. Extrapolation of the measured compositional variation toward the solidus suggests that the first melt may be very SiO2 rich (i.e., granitic). We suggest that these granitic melts are the first melts of the mantle near the slab-wedge interface. As these SiO2-rich melts ascend into shallower, hotter overlying mantle, they continue to interact with the surrounding mantle and evolve in composition. These first melts may elucidate the geochemical and physical processes that accompany the beginnings of H2O flux melting.

  17. Analysis of the continuous melting of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A R

    1984-01-01

    Some historical aspects of continuous glass melting are recalled. Then, an overall heat balance of the process is used to illustrate that future improvements will be achieved by different means than those which have been successful in the past. The heat balance also permits comparison of ohmic melting with combustion melting when the primary energy source in both cases is coal. A simplified analysis of batch melting begins by defining a melted batch according to its effective viscosity and proceeds to calculate the temperature distribution in a cold tap batch blanket. Then, the fraction liquid as a function of temperature is determined. 15 references, 7 figures.

  18. String melting in a photon bath

    SciTech Connect

    Karouby, Johanna

    2013-10-01

    We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

  19. Martian mantle primary melts - An experimental study of iron-rich garnet lherzolite minimum melt composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertka, Constance M.; Holloway, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum melt composition in equilibrium with an iron-rich garnet lherzolite assemblage is ascertained from a study of the liquidus relations of iron-rich basaltic compositions at 23 kb. The experimentally determined primary melt composition and its calculated sodium content reveal that Martian garnet lherzolite minimum melts are picritic alkali olivine basalts. Martian primary melts are found to be more picritic than terrestrial garnet lherzolite primary melts.

  20. Melting by temperature-modulated calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, Iwao; Ishikiriyama, Kazuhiko; Boller, A. |

    1997-09-01

    Well-crystallized macromolecules melt irreversibly due to the need of molecular nucleation, while small molecules melt reversibly as long as crystal nuclei are present to assist crystallization. Furthermore, imperfect crystals of low-molar-mass polymers may have a sufficiently small region of metastability between crystallization and melting to show a reversing heat-flow component due to melting of poor crystals followed by crystallization of imperfect crystals which have insufficient time to perfect before the modulation switches to heating and melts the imperfect crystals. Many metals, in turn. melt sharply and reversibly as long as nuclei remain after melting for subsequent crystallization during the cooling cycle. Their analysis is complicated, however, due to thermal conductivity limitations of the calorimeters. Polymers of sufficiently high molar mass, finally, show a small amount of reversible. local melting that may be linked to partial melting of individual molecules. Experiments by temperature-modulated calorimetry and model calculations are presented. The samples measured included poly(ethylene terephthalate)s, poly(ethylene oxide)s, and indium. Two unsolved problems that arose from this research involve the origin of a high, seemingly stable, reversible heat capacity of polymers in the melting region, and a smoothing of melting and crystallization into a close-to-elliptical Lissajous figure in a heat-flow versus sample-temperature plot.

  1. Small particle melting of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. L.; Bayles, R. A.; Gile, W. W.; Jesser, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    Submicron-sized crystallites of lead, tin, indium and bismuth were melted in situ in the modified specimen chamber of a Siemens transmission e lectron microscope. Melting point and size determinations were made directly from the dark field images of the crystallites. Particles exhibited melting points that decreased with decreasing particle size. A near-linear relationship was observed for the melting point as a function of the reciprocal of the radius. Thermodynamnic expressions based on the significant contributions of the surface energy to the free energy of the system also suggest a linear relation. Other factors, such as shape and surface contamination, were also observed to affect the size-dependent melting of particles. Crystallites of extended platelet shape did not exhibit a significant depression in melting point. Elevated residual gas pressures were found to lessen the melting point depression of spherical particles.

  2. Garnet melt viscosity, surface tension and drainage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luther, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Good surface morphology and layer uniformity of LPE-grown Bi YIG films are favored by fast melt removal after growth. Three flux modifying oxides: MoO3, V2O3, and WO3 are compared with respect to their effect on viscosity, surface tension and melt drainage. All three oxides increased the viscosities of Bi-garnet melts, but the viscosities and drainage times of V2O3 and MoO3 modified melts were smaller than those of WO3 modified melts. The liquid-gas surface tension was found to be temperature independent. The drainage process was strongly temperature dependent, 40 to 60 kcal/mol, whereas the viscosities of melts had activation energies of 11 to 16 kcal/mol. Contact angles of 16 + or - 2 deg were measured on frozen melt drops.

  3. Garnet melt viscosity, surface tension and drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, L. C.

    1986-06-01

    Good surface morphology and layer uniformity of LPE-grown Bi YIG films are favored by fast melt removal after growth. Three flux modifying oxides: MoO3, V2O3, and WO3 are compared with respect to their effect on viscosity, surface tension and melt drainage. All three oxides increased the viscosities of Bi-garnet melts, but the viscosities and drainage times of V2O3 and MoO3 modified melts were smaller than those of WO3 modified melts. The liquid-gas surface tension was found to be temperature independent. The drainage process was strongly temperature dependent, 40 to 60 kcal/mol, whereas the viscosities of melts had activation energies of 11 to 16 kcal/mol. Contact angles of 16 + or - 2 deg were measured on frozen melt drops.

  4. Geochemistry of spinel-hosted amphibole inclusions in abyssal peridotite: insight into secondary melt formation in melt-peridotite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Akihiro; Morishita, Tomoaki; Ishimaru, Satoko; Arai, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    Spinel-hosted hydrous silicate mineral inclusions are often observed in dunite and troctolite as well as chromitite. Their origin has been expected as products associated with melt-peridotite reaction, based on the host rock origin. However, the systematics in mineralogical and geochemical features are not yet investigated totally. In this study, we report geochemical variations of the spinel-hosted pargasite inclusions in reacted harzburgite and olivine-rich troctolite collected from Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex, in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The studied samples are a good example to examine geochemical variations in the inclusions because the origin and geological background of the host rocks have been well constrained, such as the reaction between MORB melt and depleted residual harzburgite beneath the mid-ocean ridge spreading center. The trace-element compositions of the pargasite inclusions are characterized by not only high abundance of incompatible elements but also the LREE and HFSE enrichments. Distinctive trace-element partitioning between the pargasite inclusion and the host-rock clinopyroxene supports that the secondary melt instantaneously formed by the reaction is trapped in spinel and produces inclusion minerals. While the pargasite geochemical features can be interpreted by modal change reaction of residual harzburgite, such as combination of orthopyroxene decomposition and olivine precipitation, degree of the LREE enrichment as well as variation of HREE abundance is controlled by melt/rock ratio in the reaction. The spinel-hosted hydrous inclusion could be embedded evidence indicating melt-peridotite reaction even if reaction signatures in the host rock were hidden by other consequent reactions.

  5. Experimental investigation of stress-driven melt segregation and electrical conductivity of partially molten mantle rocks with low carbonated melt fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Leila; Gaillard, Fabrice; Gardes, Emmanuel; Scaillet, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical and thermal properties of the mantle are of prime concern since they play a major part in Earth's global geodynamics such as mantle convection, crustal flow and plate shifting. Several magnetotelluric and seismic campaigns, such as the MELT experiment, have shown high conductivity and low velocity zones that can be interpreted in terms of partial melting. Depending on the geological context, interactions between partial melting, deformation and melt-rock reactions can influence the nature of the produced melt and its segregation from the host rock. Recent experimental studies have shown that the high conductivity zones beneath mid-ocean ridges are best explained by low carbonated melt fractions (< 1 wt.%). Although recent experimental and theoretical studies have shown that shear stress gradients in initially homogeneous basaltic melt-bearing aggregates promote melt redistribution (Takei and Holtzman, 2009; Caricchi et al., 2011), little is known on the impact of shear stress gradients in samples containing less than 1 wt. % carbonated melts. All these studies lead to unanswered questions: how do these gradients influence melt mobility and therefore melt interconnectivity in partially molten samples with < 1 wt. % melt? How do low melt fractions impact on physical properties such as the bulk viscosity of partially molten rocks, on the deformation regime? How does melt segregation resulting from an applied shear stress impact on electrical and seismic anisotropy? To answer these questions, we have synthesized by spark plasma sintering large volume samples of forsterite and enstatite aggregates containing an initial homogeneous distribution of Na-rich carbonated melts (1 wt. %), which will be deformed under torsion in an internally heated Paterson-type apparatus coupled to an impedance spectrometer. These experiments will enable us to directly measure the bulk viscosity of these partially molten samples as well as collect continuous electrical measurements during deformation. We will similarly investigate carbonated melt migration velocities by deforming samples under torsion in a source/sink geometry. The source consisting of Na-rich carbonated melt, which will form the inner core, will be coupled with a nominally melt-free sink of forsterite and enstatite forming the outer ring. Our novel approach consisting in an internally coherent set of petrological-geophysical-rheological constraints will enable us to better interpret the anomalies detected by geophysical probing beneath mid-ocean ridges. Takei, Y., Holtzman, B., 2009. Viscous constitutive relations of solid-liquid composites in terms of grain boundary contiguity: 3. Causes and consequences of viscous anisotropy, J. Geophys. Res. 114, B06207, doi:10.1029/2008JB005852. Caricchi, L., Gaillard, F., Mecklenburgh, J., Le Trong, E., 2011. Experimental determination of electrical conductivity during deformation of melt-bearing olivine aggregates: Implications for electrical anisotropy in the oceanic low velocity zone. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 302, 81-94.

  6. Shock compression of stishovite and melting of silica at planetary interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, M.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; ?ernok, A.; Blaha, S.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Braun, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Eggert, J. H.; Jeanloz, R.

    2015-01-01

    Deep inside planets, extreme density, pressure, and temperature strongly modify the properties of the constituent materials. In particular, how much heat solids can sustain before melting under pressure is key to determining a planets internal structure and evolution. We report laser-driven shock experiments on fused silica, ?-quartz, and stishovite yielding equation-of-state and electronic conductivity data at unprecedented conditions and showing that the melting temperature of SiO2 rises to 8300 K at a pressure of 500 gigapascals, comparable to the core-mantle boundary conditions for a 5-Earth mass super-Earth. We show that mantle silicates and core metal have comparable melting temperatures above 500 to 700 gigapascals, which could favor long-lived magma oceans for large terrestrial planets with implications for planetary magnetic-field generation in silicate magma layers deep inside such planets.

  7. Rheology of Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Orman, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    Here I use mineral physics constraints to evaluate the viscosity and creep mechanisms of iron at the conditions of the inner core. At low to intermediate stresses and temperatures near the melting point solid materials may deform by any of three mechanisms: power law creep, diffusion creep and Harper-Dorn creep. Both power law and Harper-Dorn creep are dislocation processes, and the transition between the two occurs at a stress level on the order of the Peierls stress, with power law creep dominating at higher stresses. The transition stress is predicted to be ~3 MPa for hcp-Fe at inner core conditions, which is far higher than the stresses of ~102 to 103 Pa expected from magnetic or gravitational forces. Harper-Dorn creep dominates diffusion creep above a certain grain size, which is predicted to be ~200 microns for hcp-Fe. At the high temperatures and low stresses of the inner core the grain size is expected to be several orders of magnitude larger than the transition value. Harper-Dorn creep is therefore predicted to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the inner core. Harper-Dorn creep is accomplished by the motion of dislocations and can lead to strong lattice preferred orientation. The viscosity in this regime is Newtonian and is given by μ = (kT)/(ADb) where k is Boltzmann's constant, T is temperature, D is the self-diffusion coefficient, b is the Burgers vector and A is a dimensionless constant predicted to have a value of ~1.7 x 1011 for hcp-Fe. No diffusion data exist for hcp-Fe, but metals with similar structure all have nearly the same self-diffusion coefficient at the same homologous temperature. Assuming an inner core temperature of 5700 K and melting temperature for pure iron of 6200 K, the diffusivity is predicted to be ~4 × 10-13 m2 s-1 and the viscosity ~6 × 1013 Pa s. The corresponding strain rate for a shear stress of 100 Pa is ~2 × 10-12 s-1, implying that large strains are possible on timescales less than 100,000 years. It is therefore likely that the anisotropy in the inner core is the result of lattice preferred orientation developed during active or very recent deformation.

  8. Modeling of transient turbulent natural convection in a melt layer with solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, T.H.; Cheung, F.B.

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of turbulent natural convection in a horizontal heat-generating melt layer with solidification taking place at the cooled upper and lower boundaries is investigated theoretically. The objective is to determine the transient behavior of the crust at the upper and lower surfaces and the effect of crust formation on the turbulent natural convection process in the melt layer. Various surface temperatures, latent heats, and the heat source strengths are considered along with the effects of the Stefan number and Rayleigh number. Special attention is given to the interaction between the melt pool heat transfer and the crust dynamics. Numerical results are presented for the transient crust thickness, transient temperature distribution, eddy heat transport, and the heat transfer characteristics at the solid liquid interface during the freezing process. The present study provides basic information needed to predict the transient behavior of a melt pool in a reactor lower head following a severe core-meltdown accident.

  9. Melting and shock wave creation in uranium oxide due to Coulomb explosion after a pulsed ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongyu; Chen, Di; Shao, Lin

    2015-09-01

    By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we study the effects of pulsed ionization in uranium oxide (UO2), which occurs when UO2 is bombarded with swift ions or fission fragments. A general formula is developed to predict melting radius under various conditions due to electron stripping and Coulomb explosion (CE). A critical density model is suggested in which the melting volume is proportional to ionization period, if the period is above a critical value. The maximum melting radius depends on the time period of structural relaxation above the melting temperature, which increases with increasing initial substrate temperatures due to a lower heat dissipation rate. Furthermore, shock waves are observed to emit from CE core but the kinetic energy wave peak exists only in U sublattices. The absence of kinetic energy waves in O sublattices is explained by their relatively higher thermal vibration which cancels the work done from the compression waves.

  10. Core and early crust formation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Keller, T.; Gerya, T.; Tackley, P. J.; Connolly, J.; Zhu, G.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most striking surface features on Mars is the crustal dichotomy. It is the oldest geological feature on Mars and was formed more than 4.1 Ga ago by either exogenic or endogenic processes [1,2]. In order to find an internal origin of the crustal dichotomy, located within a maximum of 400 Ma of planetary differentiation, the thermal state of the planet resulting from core formation needs to be considered. Additionally, it was suggested that a primordial crust with up to 45 km thickness can be formed already during the Martian core formation [3]. We suggest that the sinking of iron diapirs delivered by predifferentiated impactors induced impact- and shear heating-related temperature anomalies in the mantle that fostered the formation of early Martian crust. Thus, the crustal thickness distribution would largely be a result of planetary core formation, late impact history and the onset of mantle convection. To test this hypothesis we use numerical models to simulate the formation of the Martian iron core and the resulting mantle convection pattern, while peridotite melting is enabled to track melting caused by shear and radioactive heating. We perform 2D simulations using the spherical-Cartesian code I2ELVIS for planetary accretion and the spherical code STAGYY for the consequent onset of mantle convection. We apply a temperature-, stress- and melt-fraction dependent viscoplastic rheology. Radioactive and shear heating as well as consumption of latent heat by silicate melting are taken into account. The depth of neutral buoyancy of silicate melt with respect to solid silicates is determined by the difference in compressibility of the liquid and solid phase. To self-consistently simulate the silicate phase changes expected inside a Mars-sized body, we use the thermodynamical database Perple_X. As initial condition for core formation, we apply randomly distributed iron diapirs with 75 km radius inside the planet, representing the cores of stochastically distributed impactors. Additionally, we explore the effect of one giant impactor core on the planetary evolution. Results indicate that the presence of a large impactor core induces hemispherically asymmetrical core formation. The amplitude of shear heating anomalies often exceeds the solidus of primitive mantle material and thus, the formation of a considerable amount of silicate melt is observed. The resulting temperature field after core formation is then read into the mantle convection code STAYY. The hemispherical magma ocean induced by one late giant impactor favours a dichotomous crust formation during and shortly after core formation. Afterwards, the extraction of excess heat produced by the sinking of the giant impactor through the mantle leads to a localized region of massive magmatism, comparable to Tharsis, which is sustained during later evolution by a single plume forming beneath the province. The rest of the mantle is dominated by a sluggish convection pattern with limited crust formation that preserves the early formed dichotomous crustal structure until recent time. References [1] Nimmo, F. et al., Nature, 453, 1220-1223, 2008. [2] Keller, T. & Tackley, P.J., Icarus, 202, 429-443, 2009. [3] Norman, M.D., Meteorit. Planet. Sci., 34, 439-449, 1999.

  11. Lower Mantle melting model and it's geodynamical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, I.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Model of solid-liquid equilibrium laws and substances properties in lower mantle conditions is important to understand the early stages of evolution of terrestrial planets, such as core formation and magma ocean crystallization. This model is also necessary to prove theories on some modern seismic features of the Earth (e.g. ultra-low velocity zones) and petrological observations (e.g. lower mantle mineral assemblage inclusions in diamonds). Numerous experimental and numerical studies of the lower mantle phases provide sufficient amount of data to build up a thermodynamic model, which can be used in geophysical fluid dynamics research. Experimental studies are the direct source of soliduses values, but other thermodynamic parameters stay unclear. Molecular Dynamics modeling provides data on thermodynamic properties of solids and liquids (density, heat capacity, latent heat of melting etc.). But absence of minor components (iron, alkali etc.) and some numerical issues (e.g. [Belonoshko, 2001]) make it to overestimate melting temperatures significantly (up to 20-30%). Our approach is to develop a model based on MD data by [de Koker et al., 2013] with evaluation of all important parameters according to classical thermodynamic equations. But melting temperatures (especially at eutectic points) are corrected along Clausius-Clapeyron slopes to agree with modern experimental data ([Andrault et al., 2011], [Andrault et al., 2014], [Fiquet et al., 2010], [Hirose et al., 1999], [Mosenfelder et al., 2007], [Nomura et al., 2014],[Ozawa et al., 2011], [Zerr et al., 1998]). Notable effect on melt and solid densities has iron partitioning, so KD value reported by [Andrault et al., 2012] was used. Proposed model was implemented into StagYY software (e.g. [Tackley, 2008]). It is a finite-volume discretization code for advection of solid and liquid in a planetary scale. CMB temperature was set to be 4000-4400 K. Calculations predict appearing and disappearing batches containing up to 5-7% of melt. Amount of FeO in liquid is up to 18%, so melts are 2 % denser than solid counterpart, resulting in total density increase up to 1 %. This data fits properties proposed for Ultra-Low Velocity Zones (melt fraction between 5 and 30 % [Garnero et al., 1998], and density increase of at least 1% [Beuchert & Schmeling, 2013]).

  12. Deep mantle melting-solidifying and produced heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Ilya; Tackley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Model for solid-liquid equilibrium and substance properties in lower mantle conditions is important to understand the early stages of evolution of terrestrial planets, such as core formation and magma ocean crystallization. This model is also necessary to prove theories on some modern seismic features of the Earth (e.g. ultra-low velocity zones) and petrological observations (e.g. lower mantle mineral assemblage inclusions in diamonds). Numerous experimental and numerical studies of the lower mantle phases provide sufficient amount of data to build up a thermodynamic model, which can be used in geophysical fluid dynamics research. Molecular Dynamics modeling provides data on thermodynamic properties of solids and liquids (density, heat capacity, thermal expansion, latent heat of melting etc.). Absence of minor components (iron, alkali etc.) makes it to overestimate melting temperatures significantly (up to 20-30%), so experimental data are also very important. Our model is based on MD data by [de Koker et al., 2013] with evaluation of all important parameters according to classical thermodynamic equations. Melting temperatures (especially at eutectic points) are corrected along Clausius-Clapeyron slopes to agree with modern experimental data ([Andrault et al., 2011], [Andrault et al., 2014], [Fiquet et al., 2010], [Hirose et al., 1999], [Mosenfelder et al., 2007], [Nomura et al., 2014], [Ozawa et al., 2011], [Zerr et al., 1998]). KD value for iron reported by [Andrault et al., 2012] was used. Proposed model was implemented into StagYY software (e.g. [Tackley, 2008]). It is a finite-volume discretization code for advection of solid and liquid in a planetary scale. A principal new feature of the used code modification is that we use separated variables for chemical compounds: SiO2, FeO, MgO and other (list can be extended). So it is possible to trace mantle heterogeneities produced by melting and solidifying events. Calculations predict appearing and disappearing batches containing up to 5-7% of melt (CMB temperature 4000-4400 K). Amount of FeO in liquid is up to 18%, so melts are 2 % denser than solid counterpart, resulting in total density increase up to 1 %. This data fits properties proposed for Ultra-Low Velocity Zones (melt fraction between 5 and 30 % [Garnero et al., 1998], and density increase of at least 1% [Beuchert & Schmeling, 2013]).

  13. The postulations á la D’Alembert and á la Cauchy for higher gradient continuum theories are equivalent: a review of existing results

    PubMed Central

    Seppecher, P.

    2015-01-01

    In order to found continuum mechanics, two different postulations have been used. The first, introduced by Lagrange and Piola, starts by postulating how the work expended by internal interactions in a body depends on the virtual velocity field and its gradients. Then, by using the divergence theorem, a representation theorem is found for the volume and contact interactions which can be exerted at the boundary of the considered body. This method assumes an a priori notion of internal work, regards stress tensors as dual of virtual displacements and their gradients, deduces the concept of contact interactions and produces their representation in terms of stresses using integration by parts. The second method, conceived by Cauchy and based on the celebrated tetrahedron argument, starts by postulating the type of contact interactions which can be exerted on the boundary of every (suitably) regular part of a body. Then it proceeds by proving the existence of stress tensors from a balance-type postulate. In this paper, we review some relevant literature on the subject, discussing how the two postulations can be reconciled in the case of higher gradient theories. Finally, we underline the importance of the concept of contact surface, edge and wedge s-order forces. PMID:26730215

  14. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyue; Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren

    2013-12-01

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si15.5B7 alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  15. Risk assessment of K basin twelve-inch drain valve failure from a postulated seismic initiating event

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-04-06

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project will transfer metallic SNF from the Hanford 105 K-East and 105 K-West Basins to safe interim storage in the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The initial basis for design, fabrication, installation, and operation of the fuel removal systems was that the basin leak rates which could result from a postulated accident condition would not be excessive relative to reasonable recovery operations. However, an additional potential K Basin water leak path is through the K Basin drain valves. Three twelve-inch drain valves are located in the main basin bays along the north wall. The sumps containing the valves are filled with concrete which covers the drain valve body. Visual observations suggest that only the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor. It was recognized, however, that damage of the drain valve bonnet or stem during a seismic initiating event could provide a potential K Basin water leak path. The objectives of this activity are to: (1) evaluate the risk of damaging the three twelve-inch drain valves located along the north wall of the main basin from a seismic initiating event, and (2) determine the associated potential leak rate from a damaged valve.

  16. An experimental study of partial melting and fractional crystallization on the HED parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Helen O.; Wood, Bernard J.

    2015-11-01

    We have performed an experimental and modeling study of the partial melting behavior of the HED parent body and of the fractional crystallization of liquids derived from its mantle. We estimated the mantle composition by assuming chondritic ratios of refractory lithophile elements, adjusting the Mg# and core size to match the density and moment of inertia of Vesta, and the compositions of Mg-rich olivines found in diogenites. The liquidus of a mantle with Mg# (=100*[Mg/(Mg+Fe)]) 80 is ~1625 C and, under equilibrium conditions, the melt crystallizes olivine alone until it is joined by orthopyroxene at 1350 C. We synthesized the melt from our 1350 C experiment and simulated its fractional crystallization path. Orthopyroxene crystallizes until it is replaced by pigeonite at 1200 C. Liquids become eucritic and crystal assemblages resemble diogenites below 1250 C. MELTS correctly predicts the olivine liquidus but overestimates the orthopyroxene liquidus by ~70 C. Predicted melt compositions are in reasonable agreement with those generated experimentally. We used MELTS to determine that the range of mantle compositions that can produce eucritic liquids and diogenitic solids in a magma ocean model is Mg# 75-80 (with chondritic ratios of refractory elements). A mantle with Mg# ~ 70 can produce eucrites and diogenites through sequential partial melting.

  17. A Monazite-bearing clast in Apollo 17 melt breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.

    1993-01-01

    A phosphate-rich clast in a pigeonite-plagioclase mineral assemblage occurs in Apollo 17 impact-melt breccia 76503,7025. The clast, measuring 0.9 x 0.4 mm in thin section, contains 3.3 percent (volume) apatite (Ca5P3O12(F,Cl)), 0.8 percent whitlockite (Ca16(Mg,Fe)2REE2P14O56), and trace monazite ((LREE)PO4). Major minerals include 26 percent pigeonite, En53-57FS34-35W08-13, and 69 percent plagioclase, An84-92Ab7-15Oro.6-1.1. Troilite, ilmenite, and other accessory minerals constitute less than 1 percent of the assemblage and Fe-metal occurs along fractures. Also present in the melt breccia as a separate clast is a fragment of felsite. Based on the association of these clasts and their assemblages, a parent lithology of alkali-anorthositic monzogabbro is postulated. Monazite occurs in the phosphate-bearing clast as two less than 10 micron grains intergrown with whitlockite. The concentration of combined REE oxides in monazite is 63.5 percent and the chondrite-normalized REE pattern is strongly enriched in LREE, similar to lunar monazite in 10047,68 and terrestrial monazite. Thorium concentration was not measured in monazite, but based on oxide analyses of approximately 100 percent (including interpolated values for REE not measured), substantial Th concentration is not indicated, similar to monazite in 10047,68. Measured monazite/whitlockite REE ratios are La: 11, Ce: 8, Sm: 3.6, Y: 0.9, and Yb: 0.5. Compositions of monazite and coexisting whitlockite and apatite are given.

  18. 3D spherical models of Martian mantle convection constrained by melting history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, Pavithra; King, Scott D.

    2014-02-01

    While most of Tharsis rise was in place by end of the Noachian period, at least one volcano on Tharsis swell (Arsia Mons) has been active within the last 2 Ma. This places an important constraint on mantle convection and on the thermal evolution of Mars. The existence of recent volcanism on Mars implies that adiabatic decompression melting and, hence, upwelling convective flow in the mantle remains important on Mars at present. The thermal history on Mars can be constrained by the history of melt production, specifically generating sufficient melt in the first billion years of the planets history to produce Tharsis rise as well as present day melt to explain recent volcanism. In this work, mantle convection simulations were performed using finite element code CitcomS in a 3D sphere starting from a uniformly hot mantle and integrating forward in time for the age of the solar system. We implement constant and decaying radioactive heat sources; and vary the partitioning of heat sources between the crust and mantle, and consider decreasing core-mantle boundary temperature and latent heat of melting. The constant heat source calculations produce sufficient melt to create Tharsis early in Martian history and continue to produce significant melt to the present. Calculations with decaying radioactive heat sources generate excessive melt in the past, except when all the radiogenic elements are in the crust, and none produce melt after 2 Gyr. Producing a degree-1 or degree-2 structure may not be pivotal to explain the Tharsis rise: we present multi-plume models where not every plume produces melt. The Rayleigh number controls the timing of the first peak of volcanism while late-stage volcanism is controlled more by internal mantle heating. Decreasing the Rayleigh number increases the lithosphere thickness (i.e., depth), and increasing lithosphere thickness increases the mean mantle temperature. Increasing pressure reduces melt production while increasing temperature increases melt production; hence predicting melt production from convection parameters is not straightforward. Generating enough melt in the mantle to create Tharsis early on and also to explain recent volcanism may require other mechanisms such as small-scale convection or lowering the thermal conductivity of the crust.

  19. The behavior of ANGRA 2 nuclear power plant core for a small break LOCA simulated with RELAP5 code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabundjian, Gaian; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Belchior, Antonio, Jr.; da Silva Rocha, Marcelo; Conti, Thadeu N.; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Mesquita, Roberto N.; Masotti, Paulo H. F.; de Souza Lima, Ana Ceclia

    2013-05-01

    This work discusses the behavior of Angra 2 nuclear power plant core, for a postulate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the primary circuit for Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). A pipe break of the hot leg Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) was simulated with RELAP 5 code. The considered rupture area is 380 cm2, which represents 100% of the ECCS pipe flow area. Results showed that the cooling is enough to guarantee the integrity of the reactor core.

  20. Fe 2+-Mg partitioning between olivine and basaltic melts: Applications to genesis of olivine-phyric shergottites and conditions of melting in the Martian interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2011-04-01

    Fe 2+-Mg partitioning between olivine and basaltic melt, expressed by the exchange coefficient, K Dol - melt Fe - Mg [=( XmeltMg/ XolivineMg)/( XmeltFe 2 + / XolivineFe 2 + )] is widely used to check if a rock composition may represent a mantle-derived magma, to demonstrate equilibrium between coexisting olivine and groundmass in mafic-ultramafic systems, both in experiments and in natural assemblages, and to constrain liquid lines of descent where olivine is the dominant fractionating phase. However, K Dol - melt Fe - Mg of 0.30, which is appropriate for understanding most terrestrial basalts petrogenesis may not apply for Martian basalts as K Dol - melt Fe - Mg is known to depend strongly on the melt compositions and Martian systems produce basalts that are distinctly richer in iron than terrestrial basalts. Here we compiled experimental data on olivine-melt equilibria of Martian and terrestrial basalt compositions to parameterize the effect of magma composition on K Dol - melt Fe - Mg and derive the K Dol - melt Fe - Mg applicable for Martian magmatic systems. We find that the equilibrium relationship between olivine and basaltic melt in Martian systems is described by K Dol - melt Fe - Mg of 0.35 0.01. Applying the newly parameterized values of K Dol - melt Fe - Mg to olivine-phyric shergottites suggest that the only known Martian meteorites where the olivine cores and the bulk composition are in equilibrium and therefore could represent magma compositions are: Yamato 980459, NWA 5789, and NWA 2990. LAR 06319, which has been suggested to represent a near magma composition, actually contains ~ 11 wt.% excess olivine. All other ol-phyric shergottites contain significant excess olivine (20-52 wt.%). Further, assuming that the basalts analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rovers at Gusev crater and the Bounce Rock in Meridiani Planum lie on olivine control lines, we have used our newly parameterized K Dol - melt Fe - Mg to estimate primary magmas in equilibrium with the model Martian mantle. Application of geothermobarometers to new primitive magma compositions suggest that basalt generation in the Martian mantle occurs at greater depths and higher temperatures than previously thought.

  1. Course 2: Melting of Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, H.

    Contents 1 Introduction 2 Cluster calorimetry 2.1 The bulk limit 2.2 Calorimetry for free clusters 3 Experiment 3.1 The source for thermalized cluster ions 4 Caloric curves 4.1 Melting temperatures 4.2 Latent heats 4.3 Other experiments measuring thermal properties of free clusters 5 A closer look at the experiment 5.1 Beam preparation 5.2 Analysis of the fragmentation process 5.3 Canonical or microcanonical data evaluation 6 Results obtained from a closer look 6.1 Negative heat capacity 6.2 Entropy 7 Unsolved problems 8 Summary and outlook

  2. Modelling melting rates in upwelling mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Ian J.

    2010-12-01

    Upwelling regions of the mantle can undergo partial melting as a result of decompression. Many models for the dynamics of these regions have largely ignored the actual melting process or have prescribed a uniform melting rate proportional to the upwelling velocity. This paper uses a simple model for an upwelling column to calculate the melting rate from conservation principles. The model rock comprises two chemical components, and is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium. For idealized linear phase constraints the melting rate can be calculated analytically, and is found to be proportional to the average upwelling velocity of both the matrix and melt. A secondary aim is to discuss reactive instabilities; the model predicts that the one dimensional state will be linearly stable, whereas previous models have suggested that reactive infiltration instability should occur. This is argued to be a result of the 'background' melting rate which has not usually been fully accounted for, but which has a stabilizing effect. The model here can also be applied to a column in which some melt is already present, and in that case it does exhibit a channeling instability. It is concluded that accounting for melt production consistently in mid-ocean ridge models is important when assessing the likely modes of melt transport.

  3. Is formation segregation melts in basaltic lava flows a viable analogue to melt generation in basaltic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Hartley, Margaret E.; Miller, Jay

    2010-05-01

    Pahoehoe sheet lobes commonly exhibit a three-fold structural division into upper crust, core and lower crust, where the core corresponds to the liquid portion of an active lobe sealed by crust. Segregations are common in pahoehoe lavas and are confined to the core of individual lobes. Field relations and volume considerations indicate that segregation is initiated by generation of volatile-rich melt at or near the lower crust to core boundary via in-situ crystallization. Once buoyant, the segregated melt rises through the core during last stages of flow emplacement and accumulates at the base of the upper crust. The segregated melt is preserved as vesicular and aphyric, material within well-defined vesicle cylinders and horizontal vesicle sheets that make up 1-4% of the total lobe volume. We have undertaken a detailed sampling and chemical analysis of segregations and their host lava from three pahoehoe flow fields; two in Iceland and one in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The Icelandic examples are: the olivine-tholeiite Thjorsa lava (24 cubic km) of the Bardarbunga-Veidivotn volcanic system and mildly alkalic Surtsey lavas (1.2 cubic km) of the Vestmannaeyjar volcanic system. The CRBG example is the tholeiitic ‘high-MgO group' Levering lava (>100? cubic km) of the N2 Grande Ronde Basalt. The thicknesses of the sampled lobes ranges from 2.3 to 14 m and each lobe feature well developed network of segregation structures [1,2,3]. Our whole-rock analyses show that the segregated melt is significantly more evolved than the host lava, with enrichment factors of 1.25 (Thjorsa) to 2.25 (Surtsey) for incompatible trace elements (Ba, Zr). Calculations indicate that the segregation melt was formed by 20 to 50% closed-system fractional crystallization of plagioclase (plus minor pyroxene and/or olivine). A more striking feature is the whole-rock composition of the segregations. In the olivine-tholeiite Thjorsa lava the segregations exhibit quartz tholeiite composition that is identical to the magma compositions produced by the nearby Grimsvotn and Kverkfjoll volcanic systems during the Holocene. The Surtsey segregations have whole-rock composition remarkably similar to the FeTi basalts from adjacent Katla volcanic system, whereas the segregations of the Levering flow are identical to the ‘low-MgO group' basalts of the CRBG. Is this a coincidence or does volatile induced liquid transfer, as inferred for the formation of the segregations, play an important role in magma differentiation in basaltic systems? [1]Thordarson & Self The Roza Member, Columbia River Basalt Group. J Geophys Res - Solid Earth [2] Sigmarsson, et al, 2009. Segregations in Surtsey lavas (Iceland). In Studies in Volcanology: The Legacy of George Walker. Special Publication of IAVCEI No 3. [3] Hartley & Thordarson, 2009, Melt segregations in a Columbia River Basalt lava flow. Lithos

  4. The Role of Shear Deformation in Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2006-05-01

    The problem of understanding the formation of metallic cores in terrestrial planets has received renewed interest recently. Electrical conductivity tests indicate that iron sulfide melt in an olivine matrix forms an interconnected network only if the melt fraction exceeds φ>0.05. Recent plastic deformation experiments on aggregates of solid olivine containing an iron sulfide melt with φ>0.05 demonstrate that, in response to an applied shear stress, a metallic melt can segregate from the silicate matrix by grain-boundary percolation through an interconnected network to form melt-rich bands. This segregation occurs despite the non-wetting behavior of the metallic melt, that is, despite the fact that the dihedral angle, θ, is greater than 60°. However, the average dihedral angle of a melt-solid interface decreases as oxygen fugacity increases. Hence, systematically varying the oxygen fugacity of the olivine-iron sulfide system alters the wetting characteristics. Previous plastic deformation experiments were performed in an experimental geometry that limited shear strains to γ ≤ 5 and led to low-pressure regions at either end of the sample as well as in the grooves of the simple-shear pistons. In torsion, much larger shear strains can be attained, and no geometry- dependent low-pressure regions develop in the sample that would permit melt to escape from the sample. Experiments are underway to investigate the relationship between the oxygen fugacity and the formation and evolution of metallic melt-rich bands. In this talk, we report the results of a series of high-strain torsion experiments on samples of olivine + iron sulfide melt performed in torsion in which the sample sleeve (either Fe or Ni) buffers the oxygen fugacity and thus controls the dihedral angle and associated grain-scale melt distribution.

  5. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of movement of melted material through porous debris in lower head

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Siefken; E. A. Harvego

    2000-04-02

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material may permeate to near the bottom of a 1m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material was calculated to cause a 12% increase in the heat flux on the external surface of the lower head.

  6. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material Through Porous Debris in Lower Head

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, Larry James; Harvego, Edwin Allan

    2000-04-01

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material may permeate to near the bottom of a 1m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material was calculated to cause a 12% increase in the heat flux on the external surface of the lower head.

  7. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Late Cretaceous rift-related upwelling and melting of the Trindade starting mantle plume head beneath western Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Thompson, R. N.; Weska, R. K.; Dickin, A. P.; Leonardos, O. H.

    High mantle potential temperatures and local extension, associated with the Late-Cretaceous impact of the Trindade mantle plume, produced substantial widespread and voluminous magmatism around the northern half of the Paran sedimentary basin. Our previous studies have shown that, above the central and eastern portions of the postulated impact zone where lithosphere extension is minimal, heat conducted by the plume caused large-scale melting of the more fusible parts of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath the margin of the So Francisco craton and the surrounding Brasila mobile belt. Here we combine geochemical data and field evidence from the Poxoreu Igneous Province, western Brazil to show how more intense lithospheric extension above the western margin of the postulated impact zone permitted greater upwelling and melting of the Trindade plume than further east. Laser 40Ar/39Ar age determinations indicate that rift-related basaltic magmas of the Poxoreu Igneous Province were emplaced at 84 Ma. Our detailed geochemical study of the mafic magmas shows that the parental melts underwent polybaric crystal fractionation within the crust prior to final emplacement. Furthermore, some magmas (quartz-normative) appear to have assimilated upper crust whereas others (nepheline- and hypersthene-normative) appear to have been unaffected by open-system crustal magma chamber processes. Incompatible trace element ratios (e.g. chondrite-normalised La/Nb=1) and isotopic ratios (87Sr/86Sr=0.704 and 143Nd/144Nd=0.51274) of the Hy-normative basalts resemble those of oceanic islands (OIB). We therefore propose that these ``OIB-like'' magmas were predominantly derived from convecting-mantle-source melts (i.e. Trindade mantle plume). Inverse modelling of rare-earth element (REE) abundances suggests that the initial melts were predominantly generated within the depth range of 80-100 km, in mantle with a potential temperature of 1500 C.

  9. Thermodynamics of Minerals and Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, Douglas

    The book, Thermodynamics of Minerals and Melts, edited by R. C. Newton, A. Navrotsky, and B . J . Wood, is volume 1 in the series Advances in Physical Geochemistry, with S. K. Saxena as series editor. The volume is divided into three parts: (1) general principles, (2) thermodynamic analysis of mineral systems, and (3) thermodynamics of melt systems. Part 1 had one paper on the derivation of J. Willard Gibbs' mathematical formulation of the combined first and second laws of thermodynamics for an open system by G. Tunell. Part 2 covers the following topics, listed with authors: thermodynamics of devolatilization reactions (T. J. B. Holland), ‘lambda’ transitions in minerals (A. B. Thompson and E. H. Perkins), crystal-field effects on thermodynamic properties of iron-bearing minerals (B.J. Wood), stable isotope geothermometry (R. N. Clayton), calculation of thermodynamic properties of minerals from natural parageneses (L. L. Perchuk, K. K. Podlesskii, and L. Y. Aranovich), thermodynamics of the garnet-plagioclase-Al2O3-quartz geobarometer (R. C. Newton and H. T. Haselton), and thermodynamics of diopside and enstatite solid solutions (D. H. Lindsley, T. E. Grover, and P. M. Davidson).

  10. Dynamical meson melting in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Kinoshita, Shunichiro; Murata, Keiju; Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2014-04-01

    We discuss mesons in thermalizing gluon backgrounds in the = 2 super-symmetric QCD using the gravity dual. We numerically compute the dynamics of a probe D7-brane in the Vaidya-AdS geometry that corresponds to a D3-brane background thermalizing from zero to finite temperatures by energy injection. In static backgrounds, it has been known that there are two kinds of brane embeddings where the brane intersects the black hole or not. They correspond to the phases with melted or stable mesons. In our dynamical setup, we obtain three cases depending on final temperatures and injection time scales. The brane stays outside of the black hole horizon when the final temperature is low, while it intersects the horizon and settles down to the static equilibrium state when the final temperature is high. Between these two cases, we find the overeager case where the brane dynamically intersects the horizon although the final temperature is not high enough for a static brane to intersect the horizon. The interpretation of this phenomenon in the dual field theory is meson melting due to non-thermal effects caused by rapid energy injection. In addition, we comment on the late time evolution of the brane and a possibility of its reconnection.

  11. Intelligent control of cupola melting

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.D.; Clark, D.E.; Moore, K.L.; King, P.E.

    1997-05-01

    The cupola is a furnace used for melting steel scrap, cast iron scrap, and ferroalloys to produce cast iron. Its main energy source is coal coke. It is one of the oldest methods of producing cast iron, and it remains the dominate method because of its simplicity and low fuel cost. Cupolas range in size from 18 inches to 13 feet in diameter, and can produce up to 100 tons per hour of cast iron. Although cupola melting has a long history, automatic control has been elusive because the process has been poorly understood. Most foundries rely on the intuition of experienced operators to make control decisions. The purpose of this work, which has been underway for three years of an anticipated four year program, is to develop a controller for the cupola using intelligent and conventional control methods. The project is a cooperative effort between the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Department of Energy Albany Research Center, Idaho State University, and the American Foundrymen`s Society.

  12. Conformal quivers and melting molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Anous, Tarek; de Lange, Paul; Konstantinidis, George

    2015-03-01

    Quiver quantum mechanics describes the low energy dynamics of a system of wrapped D-branes. It captures several aspects of single and multicentered BPS black hole geometries in four-dimensional = 2 supergravity such as the presence of bound states and an exponential growth of microstates. The Coulomb branch of an Abelian three node quiver is obtained by integrating out the massive strings connecting the D-particles. It allows for a scaling regime corresponding to a deep AdS2 throat on the gravity side. In this scaling regime, the Coulomb branch is shown to be an SL(2, ℝ) invariant multi-particle superconformal quantum mechanics. Finally, we integrate out the strings at finite temperature — rather than in their ground state — and show how the Coulomb branch `melts' into the Higgs branch at high enough temperatures. For scaling solutions the melting occurs for arbitrarily small temperatures, whereas bound states can be metastable and thus long lived. Throughout the paper, we discuss how far the analogy between the quiver model and the gravity picture, particularly within the AdS2 throat, can be taken.

  13. Melting a Sample within TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the final runs of the TEMPUS experiment shows heating of a sample on STS-94, July 15, 1997, MET:14/11:01 (approximate) and the flows on the surface. At the point this image was taken, the sample was in the process of melting. The surface of the sample is begirning to flow, looking like the motion of plate tectonics on the surface of a planet. During this mission, TEMPUS was able to run than 120 melting cycles with zirconium, with a maximum temperature of 2,000 degrees C, and was able to undercool by 340 degrees -- the highest temperature and largest undercooling ever achieved in space. The TEMPUS investigators also have provided the first measurements of viscosity of palladium-silicon alloys in the undercooled liquid alloy which are not possible on Earth. TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station.(176KB JPEG, 1350 x 1516 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300193.html.

  14. Applicability of BWR SFD experiments and codes for advanced core component designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-12-01

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1986, no experimental database existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper presents the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core on of SFD code.

  15. Probing depth dependencies of melt emplacement on time dependent quantities in a continental rift scenario with melting and melt extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2014-05-01

    Since some years seismological observations provide increasing evidence of a discontinuity near the mid of older mantle lithosphere. Explanation may be a melt infiltration front (MIF) as upper margin of an evolving network of veins. These are formed by crystallized melt supplied by episodic melting events in the asthenosphere. To test this concept geodynamically we performed numerical modelling applying melting, extraction of melt and emplacement in a viscous matrix. Thereupon, we were faced to the problem defining an intrusion level for the melt. Findings of prior studies led to the need of movable, process dependent boundaries of the emplacement zone additionally making the process probably more self-consistent. Here we present a preliminary study exploring several empirical attempts to relate time dependent states to an upward moving boundary for intrusion. Modeled physics is based on thermo-mechanics of visco-plastic flow. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component (crust-mantle) and two phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature-, pressure-, and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation and the high Prandtl number approximation are used, elasticity is neglected and geometry is restricted to 2D. Approximation is done with the Finite Difference Method with markers in an Eulerian formulation (FDCON). Model guiding scenario is a extending thick lithosphere associated to by updoming asthenosphere probably additionally heated by a plume nearby. As the P-T conditions in the asthenosphere are near the solidus caused changes may increase melting and generate partial melt. Against conventional expectations on permeability at lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth a fast melt transport into and sometimes through the lithosphere often is observed. The intruded or infiltrated, solidified melt modifies composition and physical properties of the affected lithosphere. Above a critical fraction limit melt is extracted and intruded above. The uppermost front of extraction, petrophysically seen as LAB, defines the lower boundary of the emplacement zone. The upper boundary is related to various quantities, particularly temperature, melt curve, melt front, stress, dynamic pressure and more. Changes of intrusion level imply different convection patterns affecting intensity of erosion of the lower lithosphere, doming rate of asthenosphere and melt-induced weakening. Thus, the shape and location and therefore its dependence influences intensively the dynamics of rifting.

  16. Simulation studies on architecture dependence of unentangled polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2015-02-01

    The dependences of the properties of linear, ring, star, and H-shaped polymer melts on architecture are investigated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that zero-shear viscosities ?0 for various architectures follow a universal relation, ? 0 = C ? < Rg 0 2 > , where C? is a constant and < Rg 0 2 > the equilibrium mean-square radius of gyration, in the unentangled regime. This law is also found valid for asymmetrical polymers but invalid for polymers with a hard core, such as stars with many arms and short arm lengths. In the unentangled regime, from the point of view of polymer size, the relaxation times show weak dependences on architecture, but the architecture dependence of the diffusion coefficient is still apparent. Then, we examine unentangled melts of various architectures having the same size over a wide range of shear rates covering linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regimes and find that the rheological quantities, namely, viscosity, first and second normal stress differences, are independent of architecture. In contrast, the polymer deformation shows an apparent dependence on architecture in the nonlinear regime. These findings shall shed significant light on the nature of rheological behaviors of unentangled melts.

  17. Optical properties of melting first-year Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Bonnie; Perovich, Donald K.; Webster, Melinda A.; Polashenski, Christopher; Dadic, Ruzica

    2015-11-01

    The albedo and transmittance of melting, first-year Arctic sea ice were measured during two cruises of the Impacts of Climate on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) project during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Spectral measurements were made for both bare and ponded ice types at a total of 19 ice stations in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. These data, along with irradiance profiles taken within boreholes, laboratory measurements of the optical properties of core samples, ice physical property observations, and radiative transfer model simulations are employed to describe representative optical properties for melting first-year Arctic sea ice. Ponded ice was found to transmit roughly 4.4 times more total energy into the ocean, relative to nearby bare ice. The ubiquitous surface-scattering layer and drained layer present on bare, melting sea ice are responsible for its relatively high albedo and relatively low transmittance. Light transmittance through ponded ice depends on the physical thickness of the ice and the magnitude of the scattering coefficient in the ice interior. Bare ice reflects nearly three-quarters of the incident sunlight, enhancing its resiliency to absorption by solar insolation. In contrast, ponded ice absorbs or transmits to the ocean more than three-quarters of the incident sunlight. Characterization of the heat balance of a summertime ice cover is largely dictated by its pond coverage, and light transmittance through ponded ice shows strong contrast between first-year and multiyear Arctic ice covers.

  18. Modeling non-linear variations in melt productivity in mantle melt regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, L. J.; Sims, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    Efforts to better understand the dynamic mantle processes that lead to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) generation and the formation of new crust require robust constraints on factors that influence variations in the melting process. Here we apply existing and new numerical modeling methods to the complex problem of mantle melting to better understand the role of variations in mineral/melt partitioning behavior and melt productivity in the generation of melts. Through this work we can place new constraints on the MORB melting process. Using a one-dimensional continuous dynamic melting model code, as well as existing code for one-dimensional reactive porous flow melting provided by Spiegelman [2000, Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. v. 1, 10.1029/1999GC000030], we calculate time-dependent {^238}U-{^230}Th-{^226}Ra and {^235}U-{^231}Pa disequilibria resulting from melting both peridotitic and eclogitic mantle sources in a series of upwelling mantle columns, over a range of solid upwelling rates and maximum residual porosity values. We explicitly consider the effects of non-linear changes in mineral mode and melt fraction during melting for both porous flow and continuous dynamic melting. Preliminary results from continuous and incremental models suggest that previously observed effects of porous flow melting in two layer peridotitic models, namely the inability to preserve high ({^230}Th/{^238}U) activity ratios in a progressive melt column that enters the spinel peridotite melt regime, are enhanced by expected variations in melt productivity. This outcome demonstrates that two-dimensional approaches are necessary for the porous flow melt regime. This effect is less substantial for dynamic melts, but does still lead to difficulties generating sufficiently high ({^230}Th/{^238}U) ratios to explain global MORB data. We find that the {^235}U-{^231}Pa system is particularly sensitive to the presence of eclogite in the source: both porous flow and dynamic melts of eclogitic sources generate lower ({^231}Pa/{^235}U) ratios than peridotitic melts due to the increased melt rates and overall melt fractions invoked by eclogite melting. Further work should explore two-dimensional regimes while explicitly considering both lithologic heterogeneity and expected variations in melt productivity and partition coefficients.

  19. Melting properties of iron alloys at high pressure determined by in situ X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Guignot, N.; Antonangeli, D.; Siebert, J.; Garbarino, G.

    2010-12-01

    It is well established that the Earth’s liquid outer core is less dense than a pure Fe-Ni liquid alloy. The so-called “core density deficit” is currently estimated around 5-10 wt % 1 and is attributed to the presence of light elements dissolved in an iron-rich liquid alloy. Melting temperature of pure Fe can be largely affected by the addition of light elements. In the case of S, depression for the eutectic point at ambient pressure is almost 30%. On the contrary, Si does not significantly affect pure Fe melting, at least at ambient pressure. As a matter of fact, the melting temperature depression (ΔTm) can be tracked as a function of pressure and related with the light element content. Comparison between melting properties of alloys and temperature profile calculated for the Earth’s interior can thus help discriminating between the different light elements suggested to be present in the Earth’s core. The melting properties of several alloys of high geophysical interest 2 were investigated up to megabar pressures: Fe-5%wtNi-15%wtSi ; Fe-5%wtNi-12%wtS ; Fe-10%wtO ; Fe-2%wtC. Scrupulous attention in the synthesis and characterization of the starting material is fundamental to accurately control the chemical composition in the laser-heated spot. The appearance of a diffuse signal around 30 nm-1 has been used to determine the onset of melting as in previous experiments 3,4. This data set provides new insights on the melting curve of iron and on the effect of each specific element on the melting temperature depression. Accordingly, the temperature of the Inner Outer Core Boundary can be look at as a function of the Outer core composition. References 1 O.L. Anderson and D.G. Isaak, Phys. Earth Plan. Int. 131, 19 (2002). 2 J.P. Poirier, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 85, 319 (1994). 3 G. Morard, C. Sanloup, G. Fiquet et al., Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 263 (1-2), 128 (2007). 4 G. Morard, D. Andrault, N. Guignot et al., Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 272 (3-4), 620 (2008).

  20. Experimental studies of core formation: Application to asteroidal bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpfer, M. A.; Larimer, J. W.

    1994-07-01

    The question of how metallic cores form reduces to the fluid dynamic problem of understanding the surface tension between metallic melts and silicates. This problem was addressed by performing experiments to determine the surface tensions between metallic melts with variable S contents and silicate phases; olivine, for which data were presented last year; and orthopyroxene, for which we now have complete data. Experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus at P = 1 GPa and T = 1250 - 1450 C. Textural and chemical equilibration was confirmed in several ways. The dihedral 'wetting' angles (Theta) were measured from high-resolution photomicrographs using a 10x optical protractor; 100-400 measurements were made for each experiment. The dihedral angle is related to the ratio of interfacial energies. The extent to which a melt is interconnected along grain boundaries, and hence able to flow and segregate, depends on the value of (Theta) and the fraction of melt present. In the experiments where dense metallic melt drained away, the disconnect (Theta) values match the theoretical predictions. Since data exist for the pertinent solid-solid energies, the liquid interfacial energies can be computed from measured (Theta) values. Moreover, similar data exist on the systems: olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene in contact with basalt liquid. Ratios of the three solid-solid energies can be computed and the ratios are in good agreement with our data. This indicates a negligible effect due to gross difference in melt composition. The clinopyroxene-metallic melt systems can be extrapolated to acquire a complete set of data for the major silicate phases expected in planetary interiors. Ordinary chondrites typically contain about 4 vol% FeS. For this volume percentage, the system will interconnect at (Theta) values of 75 deg, very close to that predicted for eutectic melts in contact with silicates at 1000 C. Element distributions between mantle and core should therefore be computed on the basis of metallic melt-solid silicate in most cases.

  1. Transcrystalline melt migration and Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Schiano, Pierre; Provost, Ariel; Clocchiatti, Roberto; Faure, Franois

    2006-11-10

    Plate tectonics and volcanism involve the formation, migration, and interaction of magma and gas. Experiments show that melt inclusions subjected to a thermal gradient migrate through olivine crystals, under the kinetic control of crystal-melt interface mechanisms. Exsolved gas bubbles remain fixed and eventually separate from the melt. Scaled to thermal gradients in Earth's mantle and geological times, our results account for the grain-scale segregation of primitive melts, reinterpret CO2-rich fluid inclusions as escaped from melt, and question the existence of a free, deeply percolating fluid phase. Melt migration experiments also allow us to quantify crystal growth kinetics at very low undercoolings in conditions appropriate to many natural systems. PMID:17095697

  2. Entropic Interactions in Semiflexible Polymer Nanocomposite Melts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; He, Linli; Zhang, Linxi

    2016-01-28

    By employing molecular dynamics simulations, we explored the effective depletion zone for nanoparticles (NP) immersed in semiflexible polymer melts and calculated the entropic depletion interactions between a pair of NPs in semiflexible polymer nanocomposite melts. The average depletion zone volumes rely mainly on polymer chain stiffness and increase with chain stiffness increasing. In the semiflexible polymer nanocomposite melts, the entropic depletion interactions are attractive and anisotropic, and increase with chain stiffness increasing. Meanwhile, the attractive interactions between NPs and polymers can also affect strongly the entropic depletion interactions. For the semiflexible polymer nanocomposite melts in the athermal system, the entropic depletion interactions change from anisotropic to isotropic when the NP/polymer interactions increase. For NPs in the rodlike polymer melts, a mixture structure of contact/"bridging" aggregations for NPs is formed at a strong attractive NP/polymer interaction. Our calculations can provide an effective framework to predict the morphology of NPs immersed in semiflexible polymer melts. PMID:26720713

  3. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1997-02-24

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation.

  4. The importance of silica activity on melt-rock reaction processes in the oceanic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Handt, A.; Hellebrand, E.; Snow, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Plagioclase peridotites are widespread on the ocean floor along slow-spreading ridges and in the mantle section of ophiolites. They are usually characterized by (a) LREE depleted plagioclase, with variable but low Sr concentrations and high anorthite contents (~70-95), (b) LREE depleted and MREE-HREE enriched cpx rims relative to their cores, (c) highly variable spinel compositions on grain and thin section scale, (d) textures indicating cpx+ol dissolution and concomitant opx+plag crystallization. Their origin has usually been attributed to subsolidus breakdown, melt entrapment and/or fractional crystallization from a transient melt. However, existing models cannot account for all observed features combined, and seem to suggest extensive melt-rock reaction at high melt-rock ratios prior to the formation of plagioclase peridotites. Gakkel Ridge plagioclase peridotites originate from the "Sparsely Magmatic Zone", a magma-starved environment where only mantle rocks have been recovered. The exceptional freshness of these samples allowed a very detailed, texturally controlled study of the major and trace element mineral compositions. The studied samples share all the aforementioned characteristics. Furthermore, complex zoning has been preserved in all minerals (probably because of the early onset of rapid cooling at the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge) that record various stages of reaction progress. We show that all salient features of these plagioclase peridotites are best explained by partial equilibration with infiltrating melt(s) characterized by relatively high aSiO2 (inherited from relatively fertile peridotite) into a more depleted peridotite (or harzburgite) with lower silica activity. Depending on the reactivity of the system, this may continue to complete consumption of the melt (leading to reactive melt stagnation), or until equilibrium is reached. This process can operate at minimal melt-rock ratios and will occur at all pressures. It can be applied to other environments as well, with potentially wider applications to mantle petrology.

  5. Crystallization and melting kinetics of oligomer under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradys, Arkadiusz; Arinstein, Arkadii; Zussman, Eyal

    2012-02-01

    Crystallization and melting kinetics of oligomer of polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mn=400 g/mol) under confinement was studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Liquid oligomer was surrounded by polysulfone sheath in core-shell configuration of co-electrospun nanofibers with core diameters in the range of 0.5-1;?m. Oligomer under confinement demonstrates a noticeable decrease in the crystallization and melting temperatures in comparison to the bulk: from -15^oC to -45^oC and from 8^oC to 5^oC, respectively (cooling rate of 5^oC/min). These temperature shifts increase with a decrease in fiber internal diameter. Repeated cooling of the oligomer confined inside nanofibers, after heating up to room temperature results in a decrease in crystallization temperature, whereas bulk oligomer demonstrates an opposite behavior, i.e. an increase of the crystallization temperature. Annealing at 70^oC of bulk oligomer for 5 min results in the same crystallization kinetics at each consequent cooling, thus the thermal history of the system is erased. However, in case of oligomer under confinement annealing even for a period of 30 min at 70^oC did not result in full relaxation of the system. These observations demonstrate suppressed mobility of oligomer molecules within nanofibers, caused by confinement effect.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of Coulomb explosion, melting and shock wave creation in silicon after an ionization pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhongyu; Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Wang, Jing

    2014-04-14

    Strong electronic stopping power of swift ions in a semiconducting or insulating substrate can lead to localized electron stripping. The subsequent repulsive interactions among charged target atoms can cause Coulomb explosion. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we simulate Coulomb explosion in silicon by introducing an ionization pulse lasting for different periods, and at different substrate temperatures. We find that the longer the pulse period, the larger the melting radius. The observation can be explained by a critical energy density model assuming that melting required thermal energy density is a constant value and the total thermal energy gained from Coulomb explosion is linearly proportional to the ionization period. Our studies also show that melting radius is larger at higher substrate temperatures. The temperature effect is explained due to a longer structural relaxation above the melting temperature at original ionization boundary due to lower heat dissipation rates. Furthermore, simulations show the formation of shock waves, created due to the compression from the melting core.

  7. Impact Melt in Small Lunar Highlands Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Cintala, M. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Barnouin, O.; Hawke, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    Impact-melt deposits are a typical characteristic of complex impact craters, occurring as thick pools on the crater floor, ponds on wall terraces, veneers on the walls, and flows outside and inside the rim. Studies of the distribution of impact melt suggested that such deposits are rare to absent in and around small (km to sub-km), simple impact craters. noted that the smallest lunar crater observed with impact melt was approximately 750 m in diameter. Similarly, theoretical models suggest that the amount of melt formed is a tiny fraction (<1%) of the total crater volume and thus significant deposits would not be expected for small lunar craters. LRO LROC images show that impact-melt deposits can be recognized associated with many simple craters to diameters down to approximately 200 m. The melt forms pools on the crater floor, veneer on the crater walls or ejecta outside the crater. Such melt deposits are relatively rare, and can be recognized only in some fresh craters. These observations indicate that identifiable quantities of impact melt can be produced in small impacts and the presence of such deposits shows that the material can be aggregated into recognizable deposits. Further, the present of such melt indicates that small craters could be reliably radiometrically dated helping to constrain the recent impact flux.

  8. Water diffusion in a basaltic melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Youxue; Stolper, E. M.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of water diffusivity in a basaltic liquid are reported. The concentration-dependent total water diffusivities in the basaltic melt at 1300-1500 C are 30-50 times as large as those in rhyolitic melts and are greater than the total CO2 diffusivity in basaltic melts, contrary to previous expectations. These results suggest that diffusive fractionation would increase the ratio of water to CO2 in growing bubbles relative to equilibrium partitioning and decrease the ratio in interface melts near an advancing anhydrous phenocryst.

  9. Melt inclusions in Luna 24 soil fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, W.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    Optical examinations of 28 slides of Luna 24 soil fragments revealed melt inclusions in grains of olivine, plagioclase, spinel, and ilmenite as well as interstitial inclusions. In contrast with Apollo samples, the Luna 24 samples contain sulfide melt inclusions, which indicates that saturation with respect to an iron sulfide melt took place throughout much of the crystallization history, even while olivine was crystallizing. The Luna 24 silicate-melt inclusions have recorded a more extensive differentiation toward higher iron magmas than have the Apollo inclusions, but they have also recorded some inexplicably low aluminum values.

  10. Fragmentation and quench behavior of corium melt streams in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Wang, K.; Blomquist, C.A.; McUmber, L.M.; Schneider, J.P.

    1994-02-01

    The interaction of molten core materials with water has been investigated for the pour stream mixing mode. This interaction plays a crucial role during the later stages of in-vessel core melt progression inside a light water reactor such as during the TMI-2 accident. The key issues which arise during the molten core relocation include: (i) the thermal attack and possible damage to the RPV lower head from the impinging molten fuel stream and/or the debris bed, (ii) the molten fuel relocation pathways including the effects of redistribution due to core support structure and the reactor lower internals, (iii) the quench rate of the molten fuel through the water in the lower plenum, (iv) the steam generation and hydrogen generation during the interaction, (v) the transient pressurization of the primary system, and (vi) the possibility of a steam explosion. In order to understand these issues, a series of six experiments (designated CCM-1 through {minus}6) was performed in which molten corium passed through a deep pool of water in a long, slender pour stream mode. Results discussed include the transient temperatures and pressures, the rate and magnitude of steam/hydrogen generation, and the posttest debris characteristics.

  11. Crystallization kinetics of rhyolitic melts using oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Crystals provide the means to understand igneous systems, but natural constraints on crystallization kinetics are rare because thermal conditions and crystallization timescales are typically unknown. Oxygen isotope ratios in quartz and alkali feldspar crystals in spherulites provide a natural record of the temperature interval of crystallization and crystal growth rates in rhyolitic melts. Oxygen isotope compositions in both phases change progressively with position from the spherulite core to rim. Quartz δ18O increases from 5.0 ± 0.3‰ in the core to 5.6 ± 0.3‰ at the rims, whereas alkali feldspar decreases from 3.7 ± 0.4‰ in the core to 2.7 ± 0.9‰ at the rims. Fractionation therefore increases from 1.3 ± 0.7‰ in the cores to 2.9 ± 1.1‰ at the rims. Oxygen isotope thermometry tracks crystallization temperature with position. Spherulites nucleate at 578 ± 160°C and continue to grow until 301 ± 88°C. The in situ analyses demonstrate that spherulites self-contain a record of their thermal history and that of the host lava.

  12. Aluminium control of argon solubility in silicate melts under pressure.

    PubMed

    Bouhifd, M Ali; Jephcoat, Andrew P

    2006-02-23

    Understanding of the crystal chemistry of the Earth's deep mantle has evolved rapidly recently with the gradual acceptance of the importance of the effect of minor elements such as aluminium on the properties of major phases such as perovskite. In the early Earth, during its formation and segregation into rocky mantle and iron-rich core, it is likely that silicate liquids played a large part in the transport of volatiles to or from the deep interior. The importance of aluminium on solubility mechanisms at high pressure has so far received little attention, even though aluminium has long been recognized as exerting strong control on liquid structures at ambient conditions. Here we present constraints on the solubility of argon in aluminosilicate melt compositions up to 25 GPa and 3,000 K, using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The argon contents reach a maximum that persists to pressures as high as 17 GPa (up to 500 km deep in an early magma ocean), well above that expected on the basis of Al-free melt experiments. A distinct drop in argon solubility observed over a narrow pressure range correlates well with the expected void loss in the melt structure predicted by recent molecular dynamics simulations. These results provide a process for noble gas sequestration in the mantle at various depths in a cooling magma ocean. The concept of shallow partial melting as a unique process for extracting noble gases from the early Earth, thereby defining the initial atmospheric abundance, may therefore be oversimplified. PMID:16495996

  13. Imaging transient melting of a nanocrystal using an X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jesse N.; Beitra, Loren; Xiong, Gang; Fritz, David M.; Lemke, Henrik T.; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Matthieu; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Abbey, Brian; Harder, Ross J.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Wark, Justin S.; Reis, David A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-01-01

    There is a fundamental interest in studying photoinduced dynamics in nanoparticles and nanostructures as it provides insight into their mechanical and thermal properties out of equilibrium and during phase transitions. Nanoparticles can display significantly different properties from the bulk, which is due to the interplay between their size, morphology, crystallinity, defect concentration, and surface properties. Particularly interesting scenarios arise when nanoparticles undergo phase transitions, such as melting induced by an optical laser. Current theoretical evidence suggests that nanoparticles can undergo reversible nonhomogenous melting with the formation of a core-shell structure consisting of a liquid outer layer. To date, studies from ensembles of nanoparticles have tentatively suggested that such mechanisms are present. Here we demonstrate imaging transient melting and softening of the acoustic phonon modes of an individual gold nanocrystal, using an X-ray free electron laser. The results demonstrate that the transient melting is reversible and nonhomogenous, consistent with a core-shell model of melting. The results have implications for understanding transient processes in nanoparticles and determining their elastic properties as they undergo phase transitions. PMID:26034277

  14. Devon island ice cap: core stratigraphy and paleoclimate.

    PubMed

    Koerner, R M

    1977-04-01

    Valuable paleoclimatic information can be gained by studying the distribution of melt layers in deep ice cores. A profile representing the percentage of ice in melt layers in a core drilled from the Devon Island ice cap plotted against both time and depth shows that the ice cap has experienced a period of very warm summers since 1925, following a period of colder summers between about 1600 and 1925. The earlier period was coldest between 1680 and 1730. There is a high correlation between the melt-layer ice percentage and the mass balance of the ice cap. The relation between them suggests that the ice cap mass balance was zero (accumulation equaled ablation) during the colder period but is negative in the present warmer one. There is no firm evidence of a present cooling trend in the summer conditions on the ice cap. A comparison with the melt-layer ice percentage in cores from the other major Canadian Arctic ice caps shows that the variation of summer conditions found for the Devon Island ice cap is representative for all the large ice caps for about 90 percent of the time. There is also a good correlation between melt-layer percentage and summer sea-ice conditions in the archipelago. This suggests that the search for the northwest passage was influenced by changing climate, with the 19th-century peak of the often tragic exploration coinciding with a period of very cold summers. PMID:17733504

  15. Impact of gneissic layering and localized incipient melting upon melt flow during experimental deformation of migmatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzhorn, A. C.; Trap, P.; Arbaret, L.; Champallier, R.; Fauconnier, J.; Labrousse, L.; Prouteau, G.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we test experimentally the role of compositional layering as a key parameter for controlling melt flow in a natural migmatite during coaxial deformation. We performed in - situ pure-shear experiments on two natural gneisses. The first gneiss is weakly foliated with minerals homogenously distributed. The second gneiss shows a pronounced compositional layering of alternating quartz - feldspar - rich and biotite - muscovite - rich layers. Experimental conditions were selected to obtain homogeneous melt distribution in the homogeneous gneiss and heterogeneous melt distribution in the layered gneiss. Initial melt distribution is not modified by deformation in experiments on the homogeneous gneiss, implying that melting products did not migrate from their initiation sites. In contrast, melt flowed in shear zones or in inter-boudin positions during experimental deformation of the heterogeneous gneiss. These experiments attest to the strong influence of initial gneissic layering on melting pattern, melt segregation and flow during deformation of partially molten rocks.

  16. Low melting urethane linked toluenediisocyanates

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, B.; Starner, W.E.; Grandin, R.E.; Casey, J.P.

    1987-07-28

    A process is described for producing a low melting urethane linked toluenediisocyanate which comprises the steps: (a) reacting an isomer mix of 2,4- and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate with a short chain diol selected from the group consisting of dipropylene glycol, diethylene glycol 1,2-butanediol, 1,4-but-2-ene diol, triethylene glycol and tripropylene glycol; (b) maintaining a temperature sufficient to effect reaction between a first isocyanate group of the toluenediisocyanate and a hydroxy group of the short chain diol, but insufficient for effecting reaction with a second isocyanate group on the toluenediisocyanate ring and a hydroxy group; (c) maintaining a stoichiometric excess of toluenediisocyanate to the diol; (d) utilizing an isomer mix such that the reaction product contains from about 45 to 90% by weight of the 2,4-isomer and 10 to 55% of the 2,6-isomer,; and (e) isolating the reaction product from the reaction medium.

  17. Surface melting of electronic order.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. B.; Liu, X.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Ryan, P. J.; Mitchell, J. F.; Hill, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report temperature-dependent surface x-ray scattering studies of the orbital ordered surface in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. We find that as the bulk ordering temperature is approached from below the thickness of the interface between the electronically ordered and electronically disordered regions at the surface grows, though the bulk correlation length remains unchanged. Close to the transition, the surface is so rough that there is no well-defined electronic surface, despite the presence of bulk electronic order. That is, the electronic ordering at the surface has melted. Above the bulk transition, long-range ordering in the bulk is destroyed but finite-sized isotropic fluctuations persist, with a correlation length roughly equal to that of the low-temperature in-plane surface correlation length.

  18. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  19. M551 metals melting experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, G.

    1977-01-01

    Electron beam welding studies were conducted in the Skylab M551 metals melting experiment, on three different materials; namely 2219-T87 aluminum alloy, 304L stainless steel, and commercially pure tantalum (0.5 wt % columbium). Welds were made in both one gravity and zero gravity (Skylab) environments. Segments from each of the welds were investigated by microhardness, optical microscopy, scanning microscopy, and electron probe techniques. In the 2219-T87 aluminum alloy samples, macroscopic banding and the presence of an eutectic phase in the grain boundaries of the heat affected zone were observed. The stainless steel samples exhibited a sharp weld interface and macroscopic bands. The primary microstructural features found in the tantalum were the presence of either columnar grains (ground base) or equiaxed grains (Skylab). The factors contributing to these effects are discussed and the role of reduced gravity in welding is considered.

  20. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column as the driving force of stick-slip motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; Hirose, T.; Di Toro, G.; Hornby, A.; De Angelis, S.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Hess, K.; Leonhardt, R.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and of thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. A combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of shear bands from Mount St. Helens (MSH) and Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveal evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. High velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments demonstrate the propensity for melting of andesitic and dacitic material (from SHV and MSH respectively) at upper conduit stress conditions. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) seismicity. Using a source duration calculated from the waveforms at seismic stations around SHV, and slip distance per drumbeat calculated from extrusion rate, frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus can be achieved at small slip distances (<15cm) in 0.15 s from 800°C magma (at 10MPa). The shear resistance of the slip zone during the experiments is also monitored. Frictional melting induces a higher resistance to sliding than rock on rock, and viscous processes control the slip zone properties. Variable-rate HVR experiments which mimic rapid velocity fluctuations in stick-slip behavior demonstrate velocity-weakening behavior of melt, with a tendency for unstable slip. We postulate that pseudotachylyte generation could be the underlying cause of stick-slip motion and associated seismic 'drumbeats', which are so commonly observed at dome-building volcanoes, allowing for a fixed spatial locus and the occurrence of 'families' of similar seismic events. We conclude that, given the ease with which melting is achieved in volcanic rocks, and considering the high ambient temperatures in volcanic conduits, frictional melting is a highly probable consequence of viscous magma ascent.

  1. Fulfillment of Kochs postulates and partial host range of Septoria lepidii Desm., a fungal pathogen for potential biological control of hoary cress (Lepidium spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have fulfilled Kochs postulates and conducted host range tests with Septoria lepidii Desm. on five geographical accessions of hoary cress. Host range results showed the fungus specific to Lepidium spp. and damaging to hoary cress. This fungus is potentially an important biological control agent ...

  2. Partitioning REE between minerals and coexisting melts during partial melting of a garnet lherzolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Partition coefficients for Ce, Sm, and Tm between garnet, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, olivine, and melt are determined at 35 kbar for 2.3, 8, 20, and 37.7% melting of a garnet lherzolite nodule with chondritic REE abundances. Partition coefficients are found to increase as the degree of partial melting increases. From 2.3 to 8% melting, this increase is for the most part a consequence of non-Henry's law behavior of REE in minerals.

  3. The body has a brake: micrin is a postulated new gonadal hormone curbing tissue overgrowth and restricting reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hart, John E

    2014-12-01

    There is evidence for an unrecognised classical hormone secreted by the mammalian gonad. This postulated hormone--'micrin' (pronounced 'my-crin')--represents the body's brake against tissue overgrowth. When oestrogens are administered in high doses to female rats there is a considerable (non-artefactual) increase in the relative size and weight of organs such as the pituitary, adrenals, uterus and liver--suggesting an organotrophic (organ-building) role for endogenous oestrogens. This effect is exaggerated if the animals are first ovariectomized, indicating the removal of a negative ovarian factor, micrin. These organ enlargements can be reduced by pretreating the rats with large doses of antioestrogens such as clomiphene and tamoxifen. This antiestrogenic blockade of exogenous oestrogens is itself blunted by prior removal of the ovaries. It is proposed that antioestrogens (e.g. tamoxifen in breast cancer treatment) antagonize the organotrophic effects of oestrogens by competing for the oestrogen receptor peripherally and centrally and via an increase in the secretion of ovarian micrin. It is deduced that micrin is the testicular 'inhibin' proposed in the 1930s, not the molecule that now bears that name, which acts at the pituitary tier as a downregulator of follicle-stimulating hormone. The hallmark of micrin deficiency in the male rat is a pituitary hypertrophy that follows castration. This is reversible with a steroid-depleted aqueous bovine testicular extract, the micrin within which suppresses the hypothalamus, normalizing the pituitary. Micrin probably acts as a brake on peripheral tissues directly but also indirectly at the meta-level via the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, resetting a hypothalamic 'organostat' controlling organ and tissue masses, part of the 'organotrophic system' of internal size regulation. Besides endocrine (circulating) micrin from the gonads there is probably paracrine (locally acting) micrin produced in the brain. This is involved in a somatic cueing system for puberty: the brake comes off at an appropriate body tissue mass disinhibiting the hypothalamus and accelerating the organism towards sexual maturity and full adult stature. This suggests the use in reproductive disorders of micrin-related drugs. These could also be inhibitors of breast, prostate and other cancers, while protecting the bone marrow via a trophic effect on the adrenals (the lack of which protection causes lethal bone marrow depression in oestrogen-treated ferrets and dogs). Benign prostatic hyperplasia is asserted to be a micrin deficiency disorder, involving insufficiently opposed androgen. The rise in cancers with age could be associated with a reduction in micrin protection and a relative lack of this hormone could partly explain why men die younger than women. Micrin is dissimilar in activity to any known molecule and could usefully be isolated, characterised and exploited therapeutically. PMID:25456786

  4. Applications of liquid state physics to the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    New results derived for application to the earth's outer core using the modern theory of liquids and the hard-sphere model of liquid structure are presented. An expression derived in terms of the incompressibility and pressure is valid for a high-pressure liquid near its melting point, provided that the pressure is derived from a strongly repulsive pair potential; a relation derived between the melting point and density leads to a melting curve law of essentially the same form as Lindemann's law. Finally, it is shown that the 'core paradox' of Higgins and Kennedy (1971) can occur only if the Gruneisen parameter is smaller than 2/3, and this constant is larger than this value in any liquid for which the pair potential is strongly repulsive.

  5. Low-Degree Partial Melting Experiments of CR and H Chondrite Compositions: Implications for Asteroidal Magmatism Recorded in GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of differentiated meteorites have revealed a diversity of differentiation processes on their parental asteroids; these differentiation mechanisms range from whole-scale melting to partial melting without the core formation [e.g., 1]. Recently discovered paired achondrites GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 (hereafter referred to as GRA) represent unique asteroidal magmatic processes. These meteorites are characterized by high abundances of sodic plagioclase and alkali-rich whole-rock compositions, implying that they could originate from a low-degree partial melt from a volatile-rich oxidized asteroid [e.g., 2, 3, 4]. These conditions are consistent with the high abundances of highly siderophile elements, suggesting that their parent asteroid did not segregate a metallic core [2]. In this study, we test the hypothesis that low-degree partial melts of chondritic precursors under oxidizing conditions can explain the whole-rock and mineral chemistry of GRA based on melting experiments of synthesized CR- and H-chondrite compositions.

  6. Temperature and melting of laser-shocked iron releasing into an LiF window

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Henry, E.; Vinci, T.; Faral, B.; Tomasini, M.; Telaro, B.; Batani, D.

    2005-06-15

    Absolute reflectivity and self-emission diagnostics are used to determine the gray-body equivalent temperature of laser-shocked iron partially releasing into a lithium fluoride window. Pressure and reflectivity are measured simultaneously by means of velocity interferometer system for any reflector interferometers. In the temperature-pressure plane, a temperature plateau in the release is observed which is attributed to iron's melting line. Extrapolation of data leads to a melting temperature at Earth's inner-outer core boundary of 7800{+-}1200 K, in good agreement with previous works based on dynamic compression. Shock temperatures were calculated and found to be in the liquid phase.

  7. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE: New ultrasonic probes for in-line monitoring of polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mller, Jan; Kummer, Sven; Fischer, Dieter

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, new in-line ultrasonic probes for monitoring of polymer melts in polymer processing are described. The probes are designed to half inch thread as industry standard with high temperature and pressure stability. The application of a buffer rod system with a glassy carbon core material provides high signal intensity and a high signal-to-noise ratio. With these probes, we are able to measure ultrasonic attenuation spectra. First results for in-line monitoring of the content of fillers in polymers in the melt under processing conditions are presented.

  8. Tomographic location of potential melt-bearing phenocrysts in lunar glass spherules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, D.S.; Fogel, R.A.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-02-04

    Apollo 17 orange glass spherules contain olivine phenocrysts with melt inclusions from depth. Tomography (<2micron/pxl) of >200 spherules located 1 phenocryst. We will try to find melt inclusions and obtain original magma volatiles and compositions. In 1971, Apollo 17 astronauts collected a 10 cm soil sample (74220) comprised almost entirely of orange glass spherules. Below this, a double drive-tube core sampled a 68 cm thick horizon comprised of orange glass and black beads (crystallized equivalents of orange glass). Primitive lunar glass spherules (e.g.-A17 orange glasses) are thought to represent ejecta from lunar mare fire fountains. The fire-fountains were apparently driven by a combination of C-O gas exsolution from orange glass melt and the oxidation of graphite. Upon eruption, magmas lost their volatiles (e.g., S, CO, CO{sub 2}) to space. Evidence for volatile escape remains as volatile-rich coatings on the exteriors of many spherules. Moreover, it showed that Type I and II Fe-Ni-rich metal particles found within orange glass olivine phenocrysts, or free-floating in the glass itself, are powerful evidence for the volatile driving force for lunar fire fountains. More direct evidence for the volatile mechanism has yet to be uncovered. Issues remaining include: the exact composition of magmatic volatiles; the hypothesized existence of graphite in the magma; the oxygen fugacity of the magma and of the lunar interior. In 1996 reported a single {approx}450 micron, equant olivine phenocryst, containing four glassy melt inclusions (or inclusion cores), the largest {approx}30micron in size, in a thin section of the 74001/2 drill core. The melt is assumed to sample the parent magma of the lunar basalts at depth, evidenced by the S content of the inclusion (600 ppm) which is 400 ppm greater than that of the orange glass host. Such melts potentially contain a full complement of the volatile components of the parent magma, which can be analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. Although the A17 orange glass magma is thought to derive from {approx} 400 km depth, the calculations imply a 4 km depth of graphite oxidation (and melt saturation in C-O volatiles) during ascent. We have imaged several hundred similar orange glass spherules, from sample 74220,764, using synchrotron x-ray computer-aided microtomography (XRCMT). Our goals: (1) locate similar phenocrysts containing melt inclusions; (2) analyze phenocrysts to understand the evolution of the magma; (3) analyze melt and fluid inclusions using EPMA and FTIR to obtain direct evidence of magmatic volatiles and pristine bulk compositions.

  9. Geochemical variations at intraplate hot spots caused by variable melting of a veined mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Todd Anthony; Ito, Garrett; van Hunen, Jeroen; Ballmer, Maxim D.; Mahoney, John J.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional geodynamic models of plume-lithosphere interaction were used to explore the causes of spatial patterns of magmatic compositions at intraplate hot spots. The models couple mantle flow, heat transfer, and the melting of multiple components present in the mantle as small blobs or veins with different solidi and composition. Predicted magma compositions evolve from having a strong signature from the deepest-melting component in the early stages of volcanism to a strong signature from the shallowest-melting component in the later stages. This compositional trend arises by progressive melt extraction of the different components and a horizontal displacement of their melting zones due to shear flow associated with plate motion. When three or more components are present, the composition of a volcano evolves along arrays in isotope space that trend toward mixed compositions of the components rather than the components themselves. Models explain the average Pb isotope trends in the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Program core at Mauna Kea volcano. Observed scatter about the average trends and the distinction between the Kea and Loa subchains are explained by spatial variability in the relative proportions of the components in the mantle. Monte Carlo simulations show that linear Pb isotope arrays are unlikely to originate from nonsystematic, binary mixing if the scale of the magma capture zone is much larger than the scale of isotopic heterogeneity. However, systematic sampling by progressive melt extraction naturally generates such linear arrays if the capture zone is large compared to the scale of heterogeneity.

  10. NREL Scientists Reveal Origin of Diverse Melting Behaviors of Aluminum Nanoclusters (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Research reveals active role of cluster symmetries on the size-sensitive, diverse melting behaviors of metallic nanoclusters, providing insight to understanding phase changes of nanoparticles for thermal energy storage. Unlike macroscopic bulk materials, intermediate-sized nanoclusters with around 55 atoms inherently exhibit size-sensitive melting changes: adding just a single atom to a nanocluster can cause a dramatic change in melting behavior. Microscopic understanding of thermal behaviors of metal nanoclusters is important for nanoscale catalysis and thermal energy storage applications. However, it is a challenge to obtain a structural interpretation at the atomic level from measured thermodynamic quantities such as heat capacity. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) revealed a clear correlation between the diverse melting behaviors of aluminum nanoclusters and cluster core symmetries. These simulations reproduced, for the first time, the size-sensitive heat capacities of aluminum nanoclusters, which exhibit several distinctive shapes associated with the diverse melting behaviors of the clusters. The size-dependent, diverse melting behaviors of the aluminum clusters are attributed to the reduced symmetry (from Td {yields} D2d {yields} Cs) with increasing the cluster sizes and can be used to help design thermal storage materials.

  11. Method and apparatus for melting glass batch

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G. (Kennewick, WA); Walkup, Paul C. (Richland, WA); Mudge, Lyle K. (Richland, WA)

    1988-01-01

    A glass melting system involving preheating, precalcining, and prefluxing of batch materials prior to injection into a glass furnace. The precursors are heated by convection rather than by radiation in present furnaces. Upon injection into the furnace, batch materials are intimately coated with molten flux so as to undergo or at least begin the process of dissolution reaction prior to entering the melt pool.

  12. Natural melting within a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed on the melting of a phase change medium in a spherical shell. Free expansion of the medium into a void space within the sphere was permitted. A step function temperature jump on the outer shell wall was imposed and the timewise evolution of the melting process and the position of the solid-liquid interface was photographically recorded. Numerical integration of the interface position data yielded information about the melted mass and the energy of melting. It was found that the rate of melting and the heat transfer were significantly affected by the movement of the solid medium to the base of the sphere due to gravity. The energy transfer associated with melting was substantially higher than that predicted by the conduction model. Furthermore, the radio of the measured values of sensible energy in the liquid melt to the energy of melting were nearly proportional to the Stefan number. The experimental results are in agreement with a theory set forth in an earlier paper.

  13. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanuel M. (42 Old Middlesex Rd., Belmont, MA 02178)

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  14. Shock-induced melting and rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Gourdin, W.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    Model calculations are presented to estimate that approx.50 GPa is required to completely shock melt metal powders with quenching at rates up to 10/sup 8/ K/s. Experiments are discussed for powders of a Cu-Zr alloy compacted in the usual way at 16 GPa and melted by shocking to 60 GPa. 12 refs.

  15. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, P.S.; Korzekwa, D.R.

    1999-10-26

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting is disclosed. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  16. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  17. Recent Changes in the Arctic Melt Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Markus, Thorsten; Meier, Walter N.; Miller, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Melt-season duration, melt-onset and freeze-up dates are derived from satellite passive microwave data and analyzed from 1979 to 2005 over Arctic sea ice. Results indicate a shift towards a longer melt season, particularly north of Alaska and Siberia, corresponding to large retreats of sea ice observed in these regions. Although there is large interannual and regional variability in the length of the melt season, the Arctic is experiencing an overall lengthening of the melt season at a rate of about 2 weeks decade(sup -1). In fact, all regions in the Arctic (except for the central Arctic) have statistically significant (at the 99% level or higher) longer melt seasons by greater than 1 week decade(sup -1). The central Arctic shows a statistically significant trend (at the 98% level) of 5.4 days decade(sup -1). In 2005 the Arctic experienced its longest melt season, corresponding with the least amount of sea ice since 1979 and the warmest temperatures since the 1880s. Overall, the length of the melt season is inversely correlated with the lack of sea ice seen in September north of Alaska and Siberia, with a mean correlation of -0.8.

  18. Melting property of Mo at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongmu, Zhang; Haifeng, Liu; Haifeng, Song; Suqing, Duan; Xiangeng, Zhao

    2011-06-01

    DAC experiments showed Mo is stable in a bcc structure up to the pressure of at least 500 GPa at normal temperature. Shock wave experiment identified the first transition at 200GPa as that of bcc to a new solid phase(perhaps fcc). We conducted ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the effect of different solid structures for melting temperature. We use three methods: Z method, single phase method and two phase coexistence MD simulation, the simulations at different volumes and atoms arranged initially in an ideal bcc or fcc lattice. The Z method and two phase MD method can avoid superheating. The results show that the melting temperature of bcc solid is higher than fcc about 500K-1000K, the Z method and two phase MD simulation describe the two mechanisms (homogeneous and heterogeneous) of melting but with the same melt temperatures,which are lower than single phase method about 10%, this result indicates that melting mechanisms don't impact the melting temperature in equilibrium melting. Our melting curve is substantially higher than the one determined in diamond anvil cell experiments, agree with the shock wave measurement.

  19. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one. PMID:11838241

  20. Summer Melts Immigrant Students' College Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naranjo, Melissa M.; Pang, Valerie Ooka; Alvarado, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Many college-intending students find themselves dealing with the undermatch and summer melt phenomena. Undermatch refers to the situation where academically-successful high-school graduates choose not to go to any college or to go to a local community college not commensurate with their academic achievements. Summer melt describes how students may…

  1. Sludge melting: Japan's method of treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Masuta, Takashi ); Ohshima, Yoshio

    1991-07-01

    This article describes the drying, incinerating and melting of sewage sludge to produce construction materials and other products such as road base materials and aggregate for concrete blocks. The process, including different types of melting furnaces and cost optimization, is discussed. Improving the efficiency of the process by cogeneration is also discussed.

  2. Stabilizing Crystal Oscillators With Melting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Miller, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Heat of fusion provides extended period of constant temperature and frequency. Crystal surrounded by metal in spherical container. As outside temperature rises to melting point of metal, metal starts to liquefy; but temperature stays at melting point until no solid metal remains. Potential terrestrial applications include low-power environmental telemetering transmitters and instrumentation transmitters for industrial processes.

  3. Core Forensics: Earth's Accretion and Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Siebert, J.; Piet, H.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's accretion and its primitive differentiation are intimately interlinked processes. One way to constrain accretionary processes is by looking at the major differentiation event that took place during accretion: core formation. Understanding core formation and core composition can certainly shed a new light on early and late accretionary processes. On the other hand, testing certain accretionary models and hypothesis (fluxes, chemistries, timing) allows -short of validating them- at the very least to unambiguously refute them, through the 'filter'' of core formation and composition. Earth's core formed during accretion as a result of melting, phase-separation, and segregation of accretionary building blocks (from meteorites to planetesimals). The bulk composition of the core and mantle depends on the evolution (pressure, temperature, composition) of core extraction during accretion. The entire process left a compositional imprint on both reservoirs: (1) in the silicate Earth, in terms of siderophile trace-element (Ni, Co, V, Cr, among others) concentrations and isotopic fractionation (Si, Cu, among others), a record that is observed in present-day mantle rocks; and (2) on the core, in terms of major element composition and light elements dissolved in the metal, a record that is observed by seismology through the core density-deficit. This imprint constitutes actually a fairly impressive set of evidence (siderophile element concentration and fractionation, volatile and siderophile element isotopic fractionation), can be used today to trace back the primordial processes that occurred 4.5 billion years ago. We are seeking to provide an overhaul of the standard core formation/composition models, by using a new rationale that bridges geophysics and geochemistry. The new ingredients are (1) new laser-heated diamond anvil cell partitioning data, dramatically extending the previous P-T conditions for experimental work, (2) ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to estimate outer-core density and bulk sound velocity, and combine it with seismology to define a range of possible compositions of the core that satisfies the observations, (3) a refined core formation model bringing together the continuousness of the overall process with the discreetness of the final impacts, and equilibrium thermodynamics with the non-equilibrium nature of certain processes (giant impacts, deep magma ocean). We propose a few strong constraints that come out from our models: (1) the Earth accreted in a rather oxidizing environment, (2) yielding an oxygen-rich core, in a (3) deep magma ocean (~1500 km) that could have (4) never been fully molten or fully equilibrated, at least during core extraction, despite the giant impacts.

  4. Metallic Recovery and Ferrous Melting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Luis Trueba

    2004-05-30

    The effects of melting atmosphere and charge material type on the metallic and alloy recovery of ferrous charge materials were investigated in two sets of experiments (Tasks 1 and 2). In addition, thermodynamic studies were performed (Task 3) to determine the suitability of ladle treatment for the production of ductile iron using scrap charge materials high in manganese and sulfur. Task 1--In the first set of experiments, the charge materials investigated were thin steel scrap, thick steel scrap, cast iron scrap, and pig iron in the rusty and clean states. Melting atmospheres in this set of experiments were varied by melting with and without a furnace cover. In this study, it was found that neither covered melting nor melting clean (non-rusty) ferrous charge materials improved the metallic recovery over the recovery experienced with uncovered melting or rusty charge materials. However, the silicon and manganese recoveries were greater with covered melting and clean materials. Silicon and manganese in the molten iron react with oxygen dissolved in the iron from uncovered melting and oxidized iron (surface rust). Silica and manganese silicates are formed which float to the slag decreasing recoveries of silicon and manganese. Cast iron and pig iron had higher metallic recoveries than steel scrap. Carbon recovery was affected by the carbon content of the charge materials, and not by the melting conditions. Irons with higher silicon contents had higher silicon recovery than irons with lower silicon contents. Task 2--In the second set of experiments, briquetted turnings and borings were used to evaluate the effects of briquette cleanliness, carbon additions, and melting atmosphere on metallic and alloy recovery. The melting atmosphere in this set of experiments was varied by melting in air and with an argon atmosphere using the SPAL process. In this set of experiments, carbon additions to the briquettes were found to have the greatest effect on metallic and alloy recovery. The use of an argon atmosphere was also found to increase recoveries, but to a lesser extent than with carbon additions to the briquettes. Task 3--Finally, thermodynamic studies were carried out to evaluate the potential for removing manganese and sulfur from iron melts for the production of ferritic ductile iron. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that manganese and sulfur might be removed from iron melts by careful control of the temperature and slag. In laboratory tests however, it was shown that the removal of sulfur was much less successful than that indicated by the thermodynamic analyses.

  5. High-pressure melting curve of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Vincent; Dewaele, Agns; Bouchet, Johann; Bottin, Franois; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    The high-pressure melting curve of titanium has been studied up to 120 GPa and 3500 K using both laser-heated diamond anvil cells and ab initio molecular dynamic simulations. Several theoretical and experimental melting diagnostics, including x-ray diffraction, are tested and compared. Using the most accurate on both sides, a fair agreement can be reached between experiments and simulations. The observation of temperature plateaus, a melting diagnostic proposed for laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments, is not reliable here. The melting curve obtained here is higher (by 450 K at most) than previously reported by Errandonea et al. [Phys. Rev. B 63, 132104 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevB.63.132104] using laser-heated diamond anvil cell with optical detection of melting but also significantly lower than the one estimated in multiphase thermodynamic models based on shock compression data.

  6. Shape evolution of a melting nonspherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintea, Daniel M.; Hauk, Tobias; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-09-01

    In this study melting of irregular ice crystals was observed in an acoustic levitator. The evolution of the particle shape is captured using a high-speed video system. Several typical phenomena have been discovered: change of the particle shape, appearance of a capillary flow of the melted liquid on the particle surface leading to liquid collection at the particle midsection (where the interface curvature is smallest), and appearance of sharp cusps at the particle tips. No such phenomena can be observed during melting of spherical particles. An approximate theoretical model is developed which accounts for the main physical phenomena associated with melting of an irregular particle. The agreement between the theoretical predictions for the melting time, for the evolution of the particle shape, and the corresponding experimental data is rather good.

  7. Kinetic Limit of Heterogeneous Melting in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Dmitriy S.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2007-05-11

    The velocity and nanoscale shape of the melting front are investigated in a model that combines the molecular dynamics method with a continuum description of the electron heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling. The velocity of the melting front is strongly affected by the local drop of the lattice temperature, defined by the kinetic balance between the transfer of thermal energy to the latent heat of melting, the electron heat conduction from the overheated solid, and the electron-phonon coupling. The maximum velocity of the melting front is found to be below 3% of the room temperature speed of sound in the crystal, suggesting a limited contribution of heterogeneous melting under conditions of fast heating.

  8. Microscopy of Si films during laser melting

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, R.A.; Boesch, M.A.

    1982-04-15

    By using an optical microscope to directly observe thin Si films as they are melted with a cw argon laser beam, the crystallization process can be better understood. In an environment containing oxygen, stable filaments of solid silicon precipitate from the molten pool at low laser power. The surrounding melt may contain dissolved oxygen which reduces the melting point, allowing the liquid and solid to coexist. As laser power is increased a uniform molten pool is achieved. In emitted light the pool is dark compared to the surrounding solid due to the melt's low emissivity. The spectrum of this emitted thermal radiation accurately fits the Planck law at 1740 /sup 0/K, confirming the temperature of the melt.

  9. The contribution of glacier melt to streamflow

    SciTech Connect

    Schaner, Neil; Voisin, Nathalie; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-09-13

    Ongoing and projected future changes in glacier extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies. However, the current magnitude of glacier contributions to river runoff is not well known, nor is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities are computed as a fraction of total streamflow simulated using a hydrology model and the melt fraction is tracked down the stream network. In general, our estimates of the glacier melt contribution to streamflow are lower than previously published values. Nonetheless, we find that globally an estimated 225 (36) million people live in river basins where maximum seasonal glacier melt contributes at least 10% (25%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region.

  10. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  11. F and Cl Diffusion in Phonolitic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcone, H.; Baker, D.; Villemant, B.; Boudon, G.

    2007-12-01

    Halogens discharged into the atmosphere from magma degassing are highly variable from one volcano to another. The impact of their degassing on Earth's climate and their health hazards will mainly depend on initial volatile contents, eruptive style and degassing kinetics. In this study, fluorine and chlorine diffusion were measured in two natural phonolitic melts, one from Vesuvius and the other from Laacher See, at 0.5 and 1.0 GPa, between 1250 and 1450 C at anhydrous conditions and with about 2 and 5wt% of dissolved water. The two different starting materials allow us to investigate the alkali effect, Na vs. K, on halogen diffusion. One composition was a K2O-rich (~10wt%) phonolitic melt corresponding to the white pumice phase of the 79AD eruption of Vesuvius, and the other a Na2O-rich (~10wt%) phonolitic melt corresponding to most differentiated melt of the Laacher See (12 000 BC). The diffusion-couple technique in a piston cylinder was used. Experiments were performed both with only one halogen diffusing and with a mixture of halogens (F, Cl) diffusing in order to evaluate the interactions between the halogens during diffusion. Diffusion coefficients for fluorine range between 4*10-11 m2/s at 1250 C and 8*10-11 m2/s at 1450 C for the Na-rich melt and between 1*10-11 m2/s at 1250 C and 8*10- 11 m2/s at 1450 C for the K-rich melt at anhydrous conditions. Diffusion coefficients for chlorine range between 2*10-12 m2/s at 1250 C and 1*10-11 m2/s at 1450 C for the Na-rich melt and between 9*10-11 m2/s at 1250 C C and 7*10-11 m2/s at 1450 C for the K-rich melt at anhydrous conditions. Fluorine diffusivity is typically higher than chlorine in the Na-rich phonolitic melt by one order of magnitude, whereas in the K-rich phonolitic melt fluorine and chlorine diffusivity are similar. At low temperature fluorine diffusion is more rapid in the Na-rich phonolitic melt; conversely chlorine diffuses faster in the K-rich phonolitic melt. Compared to the results obtained for fluorine and chlorine in a basaltic melt and in a rhyolitic melt, chlorine diffusivity is similar in both rhyolitic and phonolitic melts, and significantly lower than in basaltic melt, contrary to F diffusion coefficients which are comparable and only weakly dependent on the melt composition. F and Cl diffusion depend upon the dominant alkali and always differ from one another in the same phonolitic melt composition. These results will help us to better understand the degassing or the lack of degassing of theses species during syn-eruptive melt decompression and vesiculation. The contrasting volatile diffusivities in magmatic melts during magma vesiculation may be a key controlling factor of the composition of the vapour phase (bubbles) produced.

  12. Microwave melting of ion-conducting glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, D.J.; Terjak, M.J.E.; Risbud, S.H.; Phillips, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    Glasses of the system AgI-Ag{sub 2}O-(0.95B{sub 2}O{sub 3}:0.05SiO{sub 2}) have been formed by microwave processing using a domestic multi-mode oven operating at 900 watts and 2.45 GHz. Microwave heating resulted in rapid melting times with homogeneity in the quenched glasses equivalent to or better than conventional melting at 730 C. The glass forming region in this pseudo-ternary system is compared with the conventionally melted glass forming region in the system AgI-Ag{sub 2}O-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A reversible color difference has been observed between glasses conventionally melted and those melted by microwave for all glass compositions in the system.

  13. Shape evolution of a melting nonspherical particle.

    PubMed

    Kintea, Daniel M; Hauk, Tobias; Roisman, Ilia V; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-09-01

    In this study melting of irregular ice crystals was observed in an acoustic levitator. The evolution of the particle shape is captured using a high-speed video system. Several typical phenomena have been discovered: change of the particle shape, appearance of a capillary flow of the melted liquid on the particle surface leading to liquid collection at the particle midsection (where the interface curvature is smallest), and appearance of sharp cusps at the particle tips. No such phenomena can be observed during melting of spherical particles. An approximate theoretical model is developed which accounts for the main physical phenomena associated with melting of an irregular particle. The agreement between the theoretical predictions for the melting time, for the evolution of the particle shape, and the corresponding experimental data is rather good. PMID:26465561

  14. Ice-Shelf Melting Around Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Jacobs, S.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.

    2013-07-01

    We compare the volume flux divergence of Antarctic ice shelves in 2007 and 2008 with 1979 to 2010 surface accumulation and 2003 to 2008 thinning to determine their rates of melting and mass balance. Basal melt of 1325 235 gigatons per year (Gt/year) exceeds a calving flux of 1089 139 Gt/year, making ice-shelf melting the largest ablation process in Antarctica. The giant cold-cavity Ross, Filchner, and Ronne ice shelves covering two-thirds of the total ice-shelf area account for only 15% of net melting. Half of the meltwater comes from 10 small, warm-cavity Southeast Pacific ice shelves occupying 8% of the area. A similar high melt/area ratio is found for six East Antarctic ice shelves, implying undocumented strong ocean thermal forcing on their deep grounding lines.

  15. Simulating the melt blowing of viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunfeng; Tan, Dawud H.; Kumar, Satish; Macosko, Christopher W.; Bates, Frank S.

    2010-11-01

    This work is motivated by recent experimental developments in melt blowing that enable the production of nanofibers. In contrast to electrospinning, which is another method for producing nanofibers, melt blowing is potentially faster and environmentally friendlier. Using a slender-jet approximation, we obtain a set of one-dimensional equations governing the fiber area, centerline velocity, and temperature. The upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model and the Phan-Thien and Tanner (PTT) model are used to describe the viscoelastic rheology of the melts. Key to melt blowing is the shear stress on the fiber surface from the external air flow that attenuates the fiber to small diameter. Larger shear stresses or higher air flowrates produce fibers with smaller diameter. Our results show a significant influence of viscoelasticity on melt blowing, especially on fiber diameter. The fiber diameter is found to increase with polymer elasticity, which agrees qualitatively with experimental observations.

  16. Viscosity of flux-rich pegmatitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Alexander; Vetere, Francesco; Holtz, Francois; Behrens, Harald; Linnen, Robert L.

    2011-07-01

    Viscosity experiments were conducted with two flux-rich pegmatitic melts PEG0 and PEG2. The Li2O, F, B2O3 and P2O5 contents of these melts were 1.04, 4.06, 2.30 and 1.68 and 1.68, 5.46, 2.75 and 2.46 wt%, respectively. The water contents varied from dry to 9.04 wt% H2O. The viscosity was determined in internally heated gas pressure vessels using the falling sphere method in the temperature range 873-1,373 K at 200 and 320 MPa pressure. At 1,073 K, the viscosity of water-rich (~9 wt% H2O) melts is in the range of 3-60 Pa s, depending on the melt composition. Extrapolations to lower temperature assuming an Arrhenian behavior indicate that highly fluxed pegmatite melts may reach viscosities of ~30 Pa s at 773 K. However, this value is a minimum estimation considering the strongly non-Arrhenian behavior of hydrous silicate melts. The experimentally determined melt viscosities are lower than the prediction of current models taking compositional parameters into account. Thus, these models need to be improved to predict accurately the viscosity of flux-rich water bearing melts. The data also indicate that Li influences significantly the melt viscosity. Decreasing the molar Al/(Na + K + Li) ratio results in a strong viscosity decrease, and highly fluxed melts with low Al/(Na + K + Li) ratios (~0.8) have a rheological behavior which is very close to that of supercritical fluids.

  17. Partial melting in amphibolites in a deep section of the Sveconorwegian Orogen, SW Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Edward; Johansson, Leif; Andersson, Jenny; LaBarge, Leah; Harlov, Daniel; Möller, Charlotte; Vincent, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Garnet amphibolite metataxites at the Steningekusten Nature Reserve in southwestern Sweden contain tonalitic patches and veins. Whole rock chemistry suggests that the protoliths were mafic igneous rocks with alkaline affinities. Orthopyroxene megacrysts are present in leucosome in parts of these garnet amphibolites but absent in others. Orthopyroxene megacrysts were formed by vapor-absent melting initiated by incongruent melting of biotite followed by the breakdown of hornblende. The net reaction was Bt + Hbl + Pl +/- Qtz ↔ Opx + Melt + Cpx + Gt. Melting occurred at pressures of approximately 1 GPa and temperatures which probably exceeded 800 °C. Pyroxenes are surrounded by hornblende-quartz symplectites, and hornblende in these coronas has distinctly lower concentrations of (Na + K) and Ti than that in adjacent mesosome. The hornblende rims formed upon cooling and reaction with crystallizing melt. This created a barrier to further reaction thus preserving the orthopyroxene megacrysts. Garnet amphibolite metatexites lacking pyroxene megacrysts have features characteristic of vapor-present melting including lack of peritectic phases predicted by vapor-absent melting reactions, larger amounts of leucosome (14 versus 7%), and less distinct melanosomes. The variation in these migmatites reflects open system behavior, either on a regional scale with the migration of aqueous fluids into the amphibolites or on a local scale with the migration of melt within the amphibolites. Zircons from all units have CL-dark core domains that are dated at 1415-1390 Ma. The core zones are cut and overgrown by CL-dark and CL-bright rims that are dated at 975-965 Ma. The zircon rims are thin in the mesosome but are thicker in the leucosome suggesting that they formed during migmatization. New growth of zircon associated with migmatization at ca. 970 Ma corresponds to the timing of crustal scale partial melting in the deep regions of the Sveconorwegian orogen, synchronous with east-west extension and the intrusion of mafic dykes. If partial melting was driven by an influx of aqueous fluids, they were probably derived from a relatively cool source region, which would indicate tectonic juxtaposition of hotter and cooler terranes.

  18. Melting and phase relations in the Fe-C-S-O system at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Yingwei

    2010-05-01

    The physical state of the core (liquid outer core and solid inner core) could provide tight constraint on the core temperature if melting temperature of core materials is precisely determined at high pressure. On the other hand, the density of the Earth's core is significantly lower than that of pure iron measured experimentally at high pressure and temperature. The density deficit in the core (both liquid outer core and solid inner core) provides inside into the chemistry of the core, suggesting that the core must contain several weight percent of one or more light elements (lighter than iron) in addition to Fe-Ni alloy. Sulfur (S), carbon (C), and oxygen (O) are the prominent candidates among the proposed light elements, because of their high solar abundance and strong chemical affinity for Fe. Determining the effect of pressure on melting relations in the Fe-S, Fe-C, and Fe-O binary systems and multi-component system is crucial for understanding the chemistry, temperature, and evolution of planetary cores. There has been significant progress in determining the melting relations in the system Fe-FeS at high pressure, using multi-anvil apparatus and laser-heating diamond-anvil cell. These studies have revealed new iron-sulfur compounds (Fe3S2, Fe2S, and Fe3S) stable at high pressures, change of melting relations, and pressure effect on eutectic temperature and composition. The behaviors of the Fe-C and Fe-O systems have also been experimentally investigated recently. Experimental data in the Fe-C-S-O system at high pressure have just emerged. In parallel, there are high-quality data on density measurements of solid and liquid phases at high pressure and temperature. In this study, I present recent advances in experimental techniques and melting relations in the Fe-C-S-O system. The emphasis will be on the need to develop thermodynamic models by synthesis of thermochemical, thermophysical, and phase equilibrium data. The systematic approach provides a better understanding of the correlation between physical state and composition with different thermal models of the planetary cores.

  19. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Deforming Dunitic Rocks: Applications to Core Formation in Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Core formation is an important event in the evolution of a planetary body, affecting both the geochemical and geophysical properties of the body. Metal-silicate segregation could have proceeded either by settling of liquid metal through a magma ocean or by percolation of liquid metal through a solid silicate mantle. Percolation of metallic melt had previously been excluded as a viable segregation mechanism because metallic melts do not form an interconnected network under hydrostatic conditions, except at high melt fraction (>5 vol%), due to the high dihedral angle between metals and silicates (>60 ). Without an interconnected network, porous flow of metallic melt is impossible, leaving the magma ocean scenario as the only mechanism to form the core. Moment-of-inertia measurements of Europa and Ganymede from the Galileo probe indicate that they are differentiated. This evidence suggests that a method for segregating metals and silicates at temperatures low enough to retain volatile compounds must exist. We have investigated the effect of deformation on the distribution of metallic melts in silicates. We have deformed samples of olivine + 5-9 vol% Fe-S to strains of 2.5 in simple shear and find that the metallic melt segregates into melt-rich planes oriented at 20 to the shear plane. These metallic melt-rich bands are similar in structure to the silicate melt-rich bands reported by Holtzman, indicating that deformation can interconnect isolated metallic melt pockets and allow porous flow of non-wetting melts. Such a core formation process could have occurred in the jovian satellites.

  20. Terrestrial impact melt rocks and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    2001-12-01

    The effects of meteorite and comet impact on Earth are rock brecciation, the formation of shock metamorphic features, rock melting, and the formation of impact structures, i.e. simple craters, complex craters, and multi-ring basins. Large events, such as the 65-Ma Chicxulub impact, are believed to have had catastrophic environmental effects that profoundly influenced the development of life on Earth. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize some of the voluminous literature on impact melting, one important aspect of planetary impact, provide some comments on this process, and to make suggestions for future research. The products of impact melting are glasses, impact melt rocks, and pseudotachylites. Our treatise deals mainly with the geological setting, petrography, and major-element chemistry of melt rocks and glasses. Impact glasses, in several petrographic aspects, are similar to volcanic glasses, but they are associated with shock metamorphosed mineral and rock fragments and, in places, with siderophile element anomalies suggestive of meteoritic contamination. They are found in allogenic breccia deposits within (fall-back 'suevite') and outside (fall-out 'suevite') impact craters and, as spherules, in distal ejecta. Large events, such as the K/T boundary Chicxulub impact, are responsible for the formation of worldwide ejecta horizons which are associated with siderophile element anomalies and shock metamorphosed mineral and rock debris. Impact glasses have a bulk chemical composition that is homogeneous but exemptions to this rule are common. On a microscopic scale, however, impact glasses are commonly strikingly heterogeneous. Tektites are glasses ejected from craters over large distances. They are characterized by very low water and volatile contents and element abundances and ratios that are evidence that tektites formed by melting of upper crustal, sedimentary rocks. Four tektite strewn-fields are known, three of which can be tied to specific impact craters. Impact melt rocks form sheets, lenses, and dike-like bodies within or beneath allogenic fallback breccia deposits in the impact crater and possibly on crater terraces and flanks. Dikes of impact melt rocks also intrude the rocks of the crater floor. They commonly contain shock metamorphosed target rock and mineral fragments in various stages of assimilation and are glassy or fine- to coarse-grained. Chemically, they are strikingly homogeneous, but as with impact glasses, exemptions to this rule do exist. Large and thick melt bodies, such as the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC), are differentiated or may represent a combination of impact melt rocks sensu-strictu and impact-triggered, deep-crustal melts. A concerted, multidisciplinary approach to future research on impact melting and on other aspects of meteorite and comet impact is advocated. Impact models are models only and uncritical reliance on their validity will not lead to a better understanding of impact processes—especially of melting, excavation, and deposition of allogenic breccias and the spatial position of breccias in relation to sheets and lenses of melt rocks within the crater. Impact-triggered pressure-release melting of target rocks beneath the excavation cavity may be responsible for the existence of melt rocks beneath the impact melt rocks sensu-strictu. This controversial idea needs to be tested by a re-evaluation of existing data and models, be they based on field or laboratory research. Only a relatively small number of terrestrial impact structures has been investigated in sufficient detail as it relates to geological and geophysical mapping. In this review, we summarize observations made on impact melt rocks and impact glasses in a number of North American (Brent, Haughton, Manicouagan, New Quebec, Sudbury, Wanapitei, all in Canada), Asian (Popigai, Russia; Zhamanshin, Kazakhstan), two South African structures (Morokweng and Vredefort), the Henbury crater field of Australia, and one European crater (Ries, Germany). Our tables listing major-element chemical compositions of impact glasses and melt rocks, however, include also data from structures not dealt with in further detail.

  1. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  2. Water diffusion in phonolite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Blum-Oeste, Nils; Flagmeier, Jens

    2013-04-01

    We report an experimental study of total water diffusion (irrespective of water speciation) in two different phonolite melts, which are representative of Montaña Blanca, Tenerife, Spain (MBP) and Laacher See, East Eifel, Germany (LSP-II). Both phonolites have Na-rich compositions, but differ in their alumina saturation index, with MBP being peralkaline and LSP-II being slightly peraluminous. Diffusion couple experiments for MBP were performed at 200-250 MPa in the temperature range of 800-1050 °C and water contents between 1 and 6.5 wt.%. Due to higher liquidus temperatures of LSP-II, the accessible temperature and water concentration range was reduced to 875-1050 °C and 3-6.5 wt.% water. All experiments were performed in rapid quench cold-seal pressure vessels, which enabled rapid heating and quenching of the samples within seconds. Compared to the run durations of 30-90 min, these short heating and cooling periods can be neglected and no corrections needed to be applied for the calculation of the diffusion coefficients. Water diffusion profiles were determined by FT-IR micro-spectroscopy on doubly polished glass sections and the diffusion coefficients were determined by Boltzmann-Matano analysis. Water diffusion increases with increasing water content and temperature and follows the empirical relations:

  3. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    PubMed Central

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youn Cheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon; Sakellariou, George; Allgaier, Jrgen; Takano, Atsushi; Brs, Ana R.; Chang, Taihyun; Gooen, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Richter, Dieter; Rubinstein, Michael; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts ?0,linear to their ring counterparts ?0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime ?0,linear/?0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation ?0,linear/?0,ring=2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of rings viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1

  4. MELTING, a flexible platform to predict the melting temperatures of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computing accurate nucleic acid melting temperatures has become a crucial step for the efficiency and the optimisation of numerous molecular biology techniques such as in situ hybridization, PCR, antigene targeting, and microarrays. MELTING is a free open source software which computes the enthalpy, entropy and melting temperature of nucleic acids. MELTING 4.2 was able to handle several types of hybridization such as DNA/DNA, RNA/RNA, DNA/RNA and provided corrections to melting temperatures due to the presence of sodium. The program can use either an approximative approach or a more accurate Nearest-Neighbor approach. Results Two new versions of the MELTING software have been released. MELTING 4.3 is a direct update of version 4.2, integrating newly available thermodynamic parameters for inosine, a modified adenine base with an universal base capacity, and incorporates a correction for magnesium. MELTING 5 is a complete reimplementation which allows much greater flexibility and extensibility. It incorporates all the thermodynamic parameters and corrections provided in MELTING 4.x and introduces a large set of thermodynamic formulae and parameters, to facilitate the calculation of melting temperatures for perfectly matching sequences, mismatches, bulge loops, CNG repeats, dangling ends, inosines, locked nucleic acids, 2-hydroxyadenines and azobenzenes. It also includes temperature corrections for monovalent ions (sodium, potassium, Tris), magnesium ions and commonly used denaturing agents such as formamide and DMSO. Conclusions MELTING is a useful and very flexible tool for predicting melting temperatures using approximative formulae or Nearest-Neighbor approaches, where one can select different sets of Nearest-Neighbor parameters, corrections and formulae. Both versions are freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/melting/and at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/compneur-srv/melting/under the terms of the GPL license. PMID:22591039

  5. Mathematical modeling of granite melt extraction in lower crustal partial melt zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, Vassili O.

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this study is to obtain quantitative understanding of processes that lead to extraction of granitic melt in the continental lower crust and evaluate the relative importance of such factors as melt fraction, melt and matrix viscous properties, water content, heterogeneity of the crust, and others on the rate and very possibility of melt separation. To accomplish this task, two different mathematical models have been constructed utilizing our most up-to-date knowledge on rheological properties of the lower crust in conditions of elevated temperature and pressure. One of these models, the buoyancy model, builds on results obtained in this area by McKenzie (1984), Fountain et al. (1989), and others. Another model addresses the possibility of extraction of silicic melts from the low porosity melting zones by force of volume increase associated with water-absent melting. Numerical experiments allowed us to calculate the rate of melt movement under lower crustal conditions using combinations of different parameters to evaluate the effectiveness of separation process in realistic periods of time. Using a range of representative values for viscosity parameters (10sp4-10sp7 Pa* s for melt viscosity and 10sp{18}-10sp{19}\\ Pa* s for matrix viscosity) typical for conditions of low melt fraction (2-15%) it was determined that only the most favorable combination of viscosities allows the large scale extraction of silicic material. Extraction of melt can occur in a period of time typical for the duration of an anatectic event only for melts with high water content with viscosities around 10sp4\\ Pa* s. In such case extraction can occur in less than a million years even in conditions of low porosity (below 10%). For higher viscosities extraction of melt by buoyancy cannot occur in geologically realistic periods of time unless the degree of melting reaches higher levels-more than 15-20%. Granitic melt extraction by flow through a network of thin fractures in conditions of elevated non-hydrostatic pressure created by water-absent melting can occur substantially faster. The following conditions are shown to be favorable for this process: small thickness of the reservoir, low melt viscosity, high matrix viscosity, high degree of melting within limits imposed by model rheology (experimental data suggests that melt fractions higher than 12-15% can make existence of fractures impossible). It is also demonstrated why Darcy's law should not be applied for modeling multiphase flows.

  6. Solid-liquid boundaries in iron-rich alloys and the age of the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Gao, L.

    2006-05-01

    Melting and solidification cause major chemical differentiation in the Earth. As the Earth cools, the liquid core solidifies from the center and the inner core grows at the expense of the outer core. The timing of the onset of core solidification remains poorly constrained. Labrosse et al. (2001) estimated the age of the Earth's inner core based on energy budget considerations. In their analysis, the latent heat and gravitational energy are calculated according to dislocation melting theory. We have conducted melting experiments on pure iron and an iron-sulfur alloy containing 15 at.% sulfur, in order to determine the effect of pressure on the Clapeyron slopes of the solid-liquid boundaries. Our results allow a critical examination of the energy estimates, hence the age of the inner core. The implications for the budget of radioactive elements will be discussed.

  7. Metamorphism and partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Calculated phase equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. E.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the metamorphic pressures (P) and temperatures (T) recorded by meteorites is key to understanding the size and thermal history of their asteroid parent bodies. New thermodynamic models calibrated to very low P for minerals and melt in terrestrial mantle peridotite permit quantitative investigation of high-T metamorphism in ordinary chondrites using phase equilibria modelling. Isochemical P-T phase diagrams based on the average composition of H, L and LL chondrite falls and contoured for the composition and abundance of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and chromite provide a good match with values measured in so-called equilibrated (petrologic type 4-6) samples. Some compositional variables, in particular Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, exhibit a strong pressure dependence when considered over a range of several kilobars, providing a means of recognising meteorites derived from the cores of asteroids with radii of several hundred kilometres, if such bodies existed at that time. At the low pressures (<1 kbar) that typify thermal metamorphism, several compositional variables are good thermometers. Although those based on Fe-Mg exchange are likely to have been reset during slow cooling, those based on coupled substitution, in particular Ca and Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, are less susceptible to retrograde diffusion and are potentially more faithful recorders of peak conditions. The intersection of isopleths of these variables may allow pressures to be quantified, even at low P, permitting constraints on the minimum size of parent asteroid bodies. The phase diagrams predict the onset of partial melting at 1050-1100 °C by incongruent reactions consuming plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, whose compositions change abruptly as melting proceeds. These predictions match natural observations well and support the view that type 7 chondrites represent a suprasolidus continuation of the established petrologic types at the extremes of thermal metamorphism. The results suggest phase equilibria modelling has potential as a powerful quantitative tool in investigating, for example, progressive oxidation during metamorphism, the degree of melting and melt loss or accumulation required to produce the spectrum of differentiated meteorites, and whether the onion shell or rubble pile model best explains the metamorphic evolution of asteroid parent bodies in the early solar system.

  8. Si and O partitioning between core metal and lower mantle minerals during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Frost, D. J.; Rubie, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    In addition to Fe and Ni, the Earth’s core contains light alloying elements (e.g., H, C, O, Si, and/or S) in order to explain the 10% core density deficit (e.g., Birch, 1964, JGR). Experimental data on the partitioning behavior of siderophile elements such as Ni and Co between liquid Fe and mantle minerals indicate that equilibration between core-forming metal and a silicate magma ocean likely occurred at lower-mantle pressures (e.g., Li and Agee, 1996 Nature). If core-mantle differentiation has occurred under such conditions, significant quantities of O or Si could have entered the core. At these conditions the nature of the dominant light element in the core will depend strongly on the oxygen fugacity at which equilibration occurred. High pressure experiments were carried out at 25 GPa and 2400-2950 K using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus in order to investigate the partitioning of Si and O between liquid Fe and (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (Pv), silicate melt, and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlace (Fp). Starting materials consisting of metallic Fe (+-Si) and olivine (Fo70-95) were contained in single-crystal MgO capsules. Over the oxygen fugacity range IW-0.5 to -3, the Si molar partition coefficient D* (= [Si]metal /[Si]silicate) between metal and Pv increases linearly with decreasing oxygen fugacity at a fixed given temperature. The partition coefficient between metal and silicate melt is of a similar magnitude but is less dependent on the oxygen fugacity. The obtained oxygen distribution coefficient Kd (= [Fe]metal[O]metal /[FeO]Fp) is in agreement with that determined in the Fe-Fp binary system (Asahara et al., 2007 EPSL) below the silicate liquidus temperature. In contrast, a correlation between the O partitioning and Si concentration in Fe is observed above 2700 K where liquid metal coexists with silicate melt + Fp. With an increasing concentration of Si in the liquid metal, O partitioning into Fp is strongly enhanced. Five atomic% Si in the metal reduces the metal-silicate O partition coefficient by about 1 order magnitude. Near the base of a deep magma ocean where pressures exceed 20 GPa, liquid metal could have coexisted with silicate melt, Pv, and Fp. Our results show that Si would readily partitioned into core-forming metal from both perovskite and silicate liquid at a relevant oxygen fugacity (e.g., IW-2). Simultaneously, the Si solubility would hinder the dissolution of O in the liquid metal. This implies that the presence of Si in liquid metal must be included in models of O partitioning.

  9. Global distribution of lunar impact melt flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, C. D.; Madden, J.; Carter, L. M.; Hawke, B. R.; Giguere, T.; Bray, V. J.; Osinski, G. R.; Cahill, J. T. S.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed the distribution and properties of 146 craters with impact melt deposits exterior to their rims. Many of these craters were only recently discovered due to their unusual radar properties in the near-global Mini-RF data set. We find that most craters with exterior deposits of impact melt are small, ⩽20 km, and that the smallest craters have the longest melt flows relative to their size. In addition, exterior deposits of impact melt are more common in the highlands than the mare. This may be the result of differing target properties in the highlands and mare, the difference in titanium content, or the greater variation of topography in the highlands. We find that 80% of complex craters and 60% of simple craters have melt directions that are coincident or nearly coincident with the lowest point in their rim, implying that pre-existing topography plays a dominant role in melt emplacement. This is likely due to movement during crater modification (complex craters) or breached crater rims (simple craters). We also find that impact melt flows have very high circular polarization ratios compared to other features on the Moon. This suggests that their surfaces are some of the roughest material on the Moon at the centimeter to decimeter scale, even though they appear smooth at the meter scale.

  10. Melt segregation in plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewins, R. H.; Harriott, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Budalan and Mincy mesosiderites contain a poikilitic-plagioclase matrix with orthopyroxene chadacrysts and interstitial-subophitic inverted pigeonite. Orthopyroxene chadacrysts in both mesosiderites are uniformly more aluminous than orthopyroxene clasts, suggesting that they were not derived from clasts by metamorphism. Interstitial inverted pigeonite is more ferroan than adjacent orthopyroxene in the matrix, consistent with the crystallization of a melt with the sequence orthopyroxene followed by pigeonite. The magnesium chadcrysts in Mincy could not have formed from a melt in equilibrium with the clasts but could have crystallized from impact melt. The most Mg chadacrysts are enclosed in large reversely zoned plagioclase crystals as a result of the undercooling in melt-lacking plagioclase clasts and associated nuclei. Mincy contains both plagioclase-poor and plagioclase-rich regions, explained by a separation of silicate melt into pools. Reckling Peak A80258, a plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderite with a very high chadacryst/plagioclase ratio, resembles Mincy material from which melt has been extracted. It is suggested that the origin of the plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites is impact melting of a metal-silicate mixture.

  11. Manganese partitioning during hydrous melting of peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. Brian; Asimow, Paul D.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.

    2011-10-01

    Manganese contents and the iron/manganese ratio of igneous rocks have been used as a method of probing the heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle during melting of peridotite and pyroxenite lithologies. Most previous work has assumed that changes in these parameters require differences in either source lithology or composition based on experiments indicating that manganese is slightly incompatible during melting and that the iron/manganese ratio is fixed by the presence of olivine. However, the presence of volatiles in the mantle drives melting at lower temperatures and with different compositions than in volatile-free systems, and thus the partitioning of Fe and Mn may in fact vary. We have produced silicate liquids in equilibrium with a peridotite assemblage under hydrous conditions at 3 GPa that show that Mn can also be unexpectedly compatible in garnet at 1375 C and that Mn partitioning between solids and liquids can be strongly affected by temperature and liquid composition. The compatibility of Mn in garnet provides a mechanism for large variations of Mn contents and the Fe/Mn ratio in silicate melts that solely involves melting of mantle peridotite with only small compositional changes. Correlations between Mn variations and other indices indicative of melting in the presence of garnet may provide a means of more completely understanding the role of garnet at high pressures in peridotite melting.

  12. Global Distribution of Lunar Impact Melt Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, C.D.; Madden, J.; Carter, L. M.; Hawke, B. R.; Giguere, T.; Bray, V. J.; Osinski, G. R.; Cahill, J. T. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the distribution and properties of 146 craters with impact melt deposits exterior to their rims. Many of these craters were only recently discovered due to their unusual radar properties in the near-global Mini-RF data set. We find that most craters with exterior deposits of impact melt are small, less than 20 kilometers, and that the smallest craters have the longest melt flows relative to their size. In addition, exterior deposits of impact melt are more common in the highlands than the mare. This may be the result of differing target properties in the highlands and mare, the difference in titanium content, or the greater variation of topography in the highlands. We find that 80 percent of complex craters and 60 percent of simple craters have melt directions that are coincident or nearly coincident with the lowest point in their rim, implying that pre-existing topography plays a dominant role in melt emplacement. This is likely due to movement during crater modification (complex craters) or breached crater rims (simple craters). We also find that impact melt flows have very high circular polarization ratios compared to other features on the Moon. This suggests that their surfaces are some of the roughest material on the Moon at the centimeter to decimeter scale, even though they appear smooth at the meter scale.

  13. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  14. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  15. Investigation of the melting of shock compressed Iron with XANES technique at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravasio, A.; Harmand, M.; Denoeud, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Vinci, T.; Mazevet, S.; Musella, R.; Guyot, F.; Morard, G.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Gaudin, J.; Feng, Y.; Zhu, D.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Galtier, E. C.; Ozaki, N.; Miyanishi, K.; Toleikis, S.; Bouchet, J.; Recoules, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Zastrau, U.

    2014-10-01

    X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy is a powerful technique of both the electronic structure and the atomic short-range order in various media, from molecules to condensed matter. In a recent experiment performed at LCLS-MEC, we have applied this technique to study the melting of Iron under shock compression. An accurate knowledge of its properties at high pressures and temperatures is indeed crucial for geophysics and planetary science. In particular, detailed information on melting curves and solid phases are required to anchor the Earth's thermal profile and assess the solid or liquid nature of exoplanets' cores. Here we will present the obtained results and discuss how XANES data unambiguously evidenced the melting of iron on the high pressure Hugoniot.

  16. The melting curve of CaSiO perovskite under lower mantle pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Jiang; Yan, Jun; Duan, Su-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Guo, Yuan

    2010-05-01

    The high pressure melting curve of CaSiO 3 perovskite is simulated by using the constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics method combined with effective pair potentials for the first time. The simulated results for the partial radial distribution function all compare well with experiment. The calculated equation of state is very successful in accurately reproducing the recent experimental data over a wide pressure range. The predicted high pressure melting curve is in good agreement with the experimental ones, and the melting curve up to the core-mantle boundary pressure, being very steep at lower pressures, rapidly flattens on increasing pressure. The present results also suggest the validity of the experimental data of Zerr and Boehler.

  17. TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel.

  18. Physics of deep plume melting: komatiitic melt accumulation and segregation in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Arndt, Nick; Kohl, Svenja

    2014-05-01

    Komatiites are assumed to be produced in very hot mantle upwellings or plumes. Under such conditions, melting will take place deep within the upper mantle or even within or below the mantle transition zone. Due to its compressibility at such pressures, melt has a higher density than olivine. Whether it would remain buoyant with respect to a peridotitic mantle both above and below the olivine-wadsleyite phase boundary because of the presence of denser garnet remains an open issue, particularly in view of recent X-ray refraction data on molten basalts by Sanloup et al. (2013). We studied the physics of melting and melt segregation within hot upwelling mantle passing through the transition zone, with particular emphasis on the effect of depth-dependent density contrasts between melt and the ambient mantle. Assuming a 1D plume, we solved the two-phase flow equations of the melt-matrix system accounting for matrix compaction and porosity-dependent shear and bulk viscosity. We assumed a constant ascent velocity leading to a constant rate of melt generation. In a first model series, the level of neutral buoyancy zneutral is assumed to lie above the depth of onset of melting, i.e. there exists a region where dense melt may lag behind the solid phases within the rising plume. Depending on two non-dimensional numbers (accumulation number Ac, compaction resistance number Cr) we find four regimes: 1) time-dependent melt accumulation in standing and broadening porosity waves that scale with the compaction length, 2) steady-state weak melt accumulation near zneutral, 3) no melt accumulation due to small density contrast, 4) no melt accumulation due to high matrix viscosity. In regime 4 the high mantle viscosity prevents the opening of pore space and the accumulation of melt. In a second series, the rising mantle crosses the olivine-wadsleyite phase boundary, which imposes a jump in density contrast between melt and ambient mantle. In this case, a sharp melt fraction contrast develops and a large melt fraction accumulates immediately above the phase boundary. In a third set of models, a hot 1D plume head is assumed to move through the transition zone. The top of the plume head remains below the solidus temperature and the melt density is always less than that of the ambient mantle. In this case melt percolates upwards and accumulates near the top of the plume head within a very thin layer, reaching up to 100% melt fraction. These models show 1) that not only melt density, but also porosity dependent matrix viscosity controls the melt ascent or accumulation, 2) that there are parameter ranges and physical conditions which may lead to the accumulation of very large melt fractions (> degree of melting), 3) that in spite of melt being denser than olivine at some depths, in general these melts escape these regions and continue to percolate upward faster than the rising mantle.

  19. Physics of the Lindemann melting rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of melting for 74 distinct chemical elements including several actinides and rare earths. We find that the observed melting points are consistent with a linear relationship between the correlation entropy of the liquid and the Grueneisen constant of the solid, and that the Lindemann rule is well obeyed for the elements with simple structures and less well obeyed for the less symmetric more open structures. No special assumptions are required to explain the melting points of the rare earths or light actinides.

  20. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas A.; Bruce, Thomas J., Jr.; Hackman, Lloyd E.; Brasmer, Susan E.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Baeslack, William A., III

    1989-01-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  1. Local ice melting by an antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Höfinger, Siegfried; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins, AFP, impede freezing of bodily fluids and damaging of cellular tissues by low temperatures. Adsorption-inhibition mechanisms have been developed to explain their functioning. Using in silico Molecular Dynamics, we show that type I AFP can also induce melting of the local ice surface. Simulations of antifreeze-positive and antifreeze-negative mutants show a clear correlation between melting induction and antifreeze activity. The presence of local melting adds a function to type I AFPs that is unique to these proteins. It may also explain some apparently conflicting experimental results where binding to ice appears both quasipermanent and reversible. PMID:22657839

  2. Electrohydrodynamic quenching in polymer melt electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmayev, Eduard; Cho, Daehwan; Lak Joo, Yong

    2011-07-01

    Infrared thermal measurements on polymer melt jets in electrospinning have revealed rapid quenching by ambient air, an order of magnitude faster than predicted by the classical Kase and Matsuo correlation. This drastic heat transfer enhancement can be linked to electrohydrodynamic (EHD) effects. Analysis of EHD-driven air flow was performed and included into a comprehensive model for polymer melt electrospinning. The analysis was validated by excellent agreement of both predicted jet radius and temperature profiles with experimental results for electrospinning of Nylon-6 (N6), polypropylene (PP), and polylactic acid (PLA) melts. Based on this analysis, several methods that can be used to inhibit or enhance the quenching are described.

  3. Composition of Impact Melt Debris from the Eltanin Impact Strewn Field, Bellingshausen Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of the km-sized Eltanin asteroid into the Bellingshausen Sea produced mm- to cm-sized vesicular impact melt-rock particles found in sediment cores across a large area of the ocean floor. These particles are composed mainly of olivine and glass with minor chromite and traces of NiFe-sulfides. Some particles have inclusions of unmelted mineral and rock fragments from the precursor asteroid. Although all samples of melt rock examined have experienced significant alteration since their deposition in the late Pliocene, a significant portion of these particles have interiors that remain pristine and can be used to estimate the bulk composition of the impact melt. The bulk composition of the melt-rock particles is similar to the composition of basaltic meteorites such as howardites or mesosiderite silicates, with a contribution from seawater salts and a siderophile-rich component. There is no evidence that the Eltanin impact melt contains a significant terrestrial silicate component that might have been incorporated by mixing of the projectile with oceanic crust. If terrestrial silicates were incorporated into the melt, then their contribution must be much less than 10 wt%. Since excess K, Na, and CI are not present in seawater proportions, uptake of these elements into the melt must have been greatest for K and least for CI, producing a K/CI ratio about 4 times that in seawater. After correcting for the seawater component, the bulk composition of the Eltanin impact melt provides the best estimate of the bulk composition of the Eltanin asteroid. Excess Fe in the impact melt, relative to that in howardites, must be from a significant metal phase in the parent asteroid. Although the estimated Fe:Ni:Ir ratios (8:1:4 x 10(exp -5)) are similar to those in mesosiderite metal nodules (10:1:6 x 10(exp -5), excess Co and Au by factors of about 2 and 10 times, respectively, imply a metal component distinct from that in typical mesosiderites. An alternative interpretation, that siderophiles have been highly fractionated from a mesosiderite source, would require loss of about 90% of the original metal from the impact melt and the sediments, and is unsupported by any observational data. More likely, the excess Fe in the melt rocks is 'representative of the amount of metal in the impacting asteroid, which is estimated to be 4+/- 1 wt%.

  4. Manufacturing and characterization of encapsulated microfibers with different molecular weight poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) resins using a melt electrospinning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jason K.; Ko, Junghyuk; Jun, Martin B. G.; Lee, Patrick C.

    2016-02-01

    Encapsulated structures of poly(ε-caprolactone) microfibers were successfully fabricated through two distinct melt electrospinning methods: melt coaxial and melt-blending electrospinning methods. Both methods resulted in encapsulated microfibers, but the resultant microfibers had different morphologies. Melt coaxial electrospinning formed a dual, semi-concentric structure, whereas melt-blending electrospinning resulted in an islands-in-a-sea fiber structure (i.e. a multiple-core structure). The encapsulated microfibers were produced using a custom-designed melt coaxial electrospinning device and the microfibers were characterized using a scanning electron microscope. To analyze the properties of the melt blended encapsulated fibers and coaxial fibers, the microfiber mesh specimens were collected. The mechanical properties of each microfiber mesh were analyzed through a tensile test. The coaxial microfiber meshes were post processed with a femtosecond laser machine to create dog-bone shaped tensile test specimens, while the melt blended microfiber meshes were kept as-fabricated. The tensile experiments undertaken with coaxial microfiber specimens resulted in an increase in tensile strength compared to 10 k and 45 k monolayer specimens. However, melt blended microfiber meshes did not result in an increase in tensile strength. The melt blended microfiber mesh results indicate that by using greater amounts of 45 k PCL resin within the microstructure, the resulting fibers obtain a higher tensile strength.

  5. Cu refertilization of abyssal harzburgites by melt percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciazela, Jakub; Dick, Henry; Koepke, Juergen; Botcharnikov, Roman; Muszynski, Andrzej; Kuhn, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Primitive mantle is depleted in many elements by partial melting processes, but it can be subsequently refertilized by impregnation with percolating melts. It is known that Cu can be enriched in primitive melts, depleting mantle residue, due to the former process (Patten et al. 2013). However, the behavior of Cu in the processes of mantle-melt interaction is poorly understood. The only comprehensive study is based on compositions of orogenic peridotites, representing the subcontinental mantle (Lorand et al. 1993; 2013), where a moderate enrichment of the mantle in Cu (up to ~50 ppm) has been observed. Here, we present the first results obtained for a suite of rocks from an oceanic core complex (OCC), the Kane Megamullion at 22°30'N at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Dick et al. 2008). OCC's provide large exposures of mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor on detachment fault footwalls at slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. The mantle rocks are composed of spinel and plagioclase harzburgites. The spinel harzburgites represent depleted mantle, whereas the plagioclase harzburgites were formed by subsequent late-stage melt impregnation in the depleted mantle (Dick et al. 2010). We have determined Cu concentrations in 22 residual spinel harzburgites and 4 plagioclase harzburgites using total digestion ICP-MS. The average Cu concentration in spinel harzburgites is 35±11 ppm Cu (2σ). The average Cu concentration obtained for plagioclase harzburgites is 131±33 ppm Cu (2σ). Additionally, we have analyzed one 1.5 cm thick contact zone between an oxide gabbro vein and residual peridotite. The contact zone, which has been heavily impregnated by the melt, contains 284 ppm Cu. In contrast, the neighboring oxide gabbro vein and the hosting peridotite contain 147 and 68 ppm Cu, respectively. Furthermore, we have determined the concentration of Cu in a dunite (118 ppm), formed in a reaction between the mantle and melt ascending through the lithosphere (Dick et al. 2010). Magmatic processes in the rocks coming from OCCs can be obscured by deformation and alteration. Plastically deformed rocks are common in the damaged zone related to the detachment fault. Metaperidotites from these zones, which show protomylonitic to ultramylonitic textures, are systematically depleted in Cu (15±5 ppm, 2σ) in comparison to non-deformed spinel harzburgites. We have not included the values obtained from non-deformed harzburgites in the calculation of the averages presented above. Thus, the effect of deformation processes does not influence our results. The relatively narrow 0.95 confidence intervals of the means obtained for non-deformed spinel and plagioclase harzburgite species and a large difference between the two means indicate a relatively low influence of alteration. Therefore, we believe the significant enrichment in Cu exhibited by the refertilized mantle rocks is caused exclusively by mantle impregnation with late-stage melts. Enhanced Cu concentrations indicate that the scale of this enrichment can be significantly underestimated in previous studies (Lorand et al. 2013). Dick, H.J.B., Tivey, M.A. & Tucholke, B.E., 2008. Plutonic foundation of a slow-spreading ridge segment: Oceanic core complex at Kane Megamullion, 23°30'N, 45°20'W. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 9, Q05014. Dick, H.J.B., Lissenberg, C.J., & Warren, J.M., 2010. Mantle melting, melt transport, and delivery beneath a slow-spreading ridge: The paleo-MAR from 23°15'N to 23°45'N. Journal of Petrology 51, 425-467. Lorand, J.P., Keays, R.R. & Bodinier, J.L., 1993. Copper and noble metal enrichments across the lithosphere-astenosphere boundary of mantle diapirs: evidence from the Lanzo Lherzolite Massif. Journal of Petrology 34, 1111-1140. Lorand, J.P., Luguet, A. & Alard, O., 2013. Platinum-group element systematics and petrogenetics processing of the upper mantle: A review. Lithos 164-167, 2-21. Patten, C., Barnes, S.-J., Mathez, E.A. & Jenner, F.E., 2013. Partition coefficients of chalcophile elements between sulfide and silicate melts and the early crystallization history of sulfide liquid: LA-ICP-MS analysis of MORB sulfide droplets. Chemical Geology 358, 170-188.

  6. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

  7. Generation of liquid water on Mars through the melting of a dusty snowpack

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that snowmelt could have provided liquid water for valley network formation early in the history of Mars is investigated using an optical-thermal model developed for dusty snowpacks at temperate latitudes. The heating of the postulated snow is assumed to be driven primarily by the absorption of solar radiation during clear sky conditions. Radiative heating rates are predicted as a function of depth and shown to be sensitive to the dust concentration and the size of the ice grains while the thermal conductivity is controlled by temperature, atmospheric pressure, and bulk density. Rates of metamorphism indicate that fresh fine-grained snow on Mars would evolve into moderately coarse snow during a single summer season. Results from global climate models are used to constrain the mean-annual surface temperatures for snow and the atmospheric exchange terms in the surface energy balance. Mean-annual temperatures within Martian snowpacks fail to reach the melting point for all atmospheric pressures below 1000 mbar despite a predicted temperature enhancement beneath the surface of the snowpacks. When seasonal and diurnal variations in the incident solar flux are included in the model, melting occurs at midday during the summer for a wide range of snow types and atmospheric pressures if the dust levels in the snow exceed 100 ppmw (parts per million by weight). The optimum dust concentration appears to be about 1000 ppmw. With this dust load, melting can occur in the upper few centimeters of a dense coarse-grained snow at atmospheric pressures as low as 7 mbar. Snowpack thickness and the thermal conductivity of the underlying substrate determine whether the generated snow-melt can penetrate to the snowpack base, survive basal ice formation, and subsequently become available for runoff. Under favorable conditions, liquid water becomes available for runoff at atmospheric pressures as low as 30 to 100 mbar if the substrate is composed of regolith, as is expected in the ancient cratered terrain of Mars. ?? 1987.

  8. The Role of Black Carbon from Wildfires in Accelerating Snow and Glacier Melt in Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Delaney, I.; Pittenger, D.; Skiles, M.

    2014-12-01

    In Washington, snow and glacier melt provide an important source of water resources, however spring snowpack levels are declining and glaciers are retreating. While warming temperatures are a well-recognized factor contributing to snowpack decline and glacier retreat, another cause may be the deposition of black carbon (BC) onto snow and glacier surfaces. Since 2010 we have collected snow and ice core samples to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of BC deposited in Washington snow and glacier ice. BC concentrations in the winter snowpack are relatively low, with BC concentrations increasing in spring and summer due to melt induced enrichment and increased dry deposition. BC induced melt may accelerate the timing of spring snowmelt at lower elevations, however BC induced melt is likely largest at relatively high elevations where the snowpack persists into the summer months when BC concentrations were observed to be highest. Based on our research to date, the highest BC concentrations in Washington snow and ice are linked to forest fires. A shallow ice core retrieved from Mt. Olympus demonstrated that BC deposition was a magnitude higher during the 2011 Big Hump forest fire, resulting in a threefold increase in the rate of change of river discharge due to glacier melt. An ice core from South Cascade Glacier spanning the 20th century also suggests that the highest BC concentrations are associated with forest fires. Furthermore, burned areas can continue to provide a source of BC to the snowpack post-fire. We measured BC concentrations in snow at a study site from 2010-2013 in Washington State. The surrounding forest burned in 2012, after which BC deposited on the snowpack post-fire was at least four-fold higher than pre-fire. This research has implications for projected climate change, as forest fires are projected to increase and the seasonal snowpack is projected to decrease, both of which contribute to higher BC concentrations in the snowpack.

  9. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  10. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. Variations of cases 1 - 3 may be tested, particularly studying the effect of melt extraction. The motivation of this presentation is to summarize first experiences, suggest possible modifications of the case definitions and call interested modelers to join this benchmark exercise. References: Blanckenbach, B., Busse, F., Christensen, U., Cserepes, L. Gunkel, D., Hansen, U., Harder, H. Jarvis, G., Koch, M., Marquart, G., Moore D., Olson, P., and Schmeling, H., 1989: A benchmark comparison for mantle convection codes, J. Geophys., 98, 23 38. Schmeling, H., 2000: Partial melting and melt segregation in a convecting mantle. In: Physics and Chemistry of Partially Molten Rocks, eds. N. Bagdassarov, D. Laporte, and A.B. Thompson, Kluwer Academic Publ., Dordrecht, pp. 141 - 178.

  11. Liquidus Temperatures in the Iron - Sulfur System and Melting of Fe3S at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagle, C. T.; Heinz, D. L.; Campbell, A. J.; Miller, N.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2007-12-01

    The details of binary iron-light element systems at pressures relevant to the core can be used to constrain core composition and temperature. We have conducted several experiments in the iron-sulfur system using the diamond anvil cell. Compositions of 10 and 16 weight percent sulfur were used with angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and double-sided laser heating at Sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source. Melting was determined by the disappearance of diffraction lines associated with the liquidus phase upon raising the temperature above the liquidus, and the reappearance of those reflections upon lowering the temperature below the liquidus. Fe3S melts incongruently at 21 GPa and continues this behavior up to higher pressures. Liquidus temperatures at 10 wt. % sulfur have been determined up to 155 GPa.

  12. Impact melting of carbonates from the Chicxulub crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.; Claeys, P.; Heuschkel, S.

    We have recently interpreted distinctive feathery-textured spinifex carbonate in the upper part of the Chicxulub suevite breccia as quenched carbonate melts (Jones et al. 1998); these distinctive fragments make up to 10 vol% of the breccia. Carbonate clasts and spherules occurring in the ejecta-rich basal part of the coarse clastic sequence, which marks the K/T boundary all around the Gulf of Mexico, may represent distal quenched droplets of carbonate liquids. In seeking to explain this widespread carbonate impact-melting phenomenon, we have re-examined the available experimental evidence. The important decarbonation reaction for calcite CaCO3=CaO+CO2 is inhibited by very small pressures up to temperatures >2000 K. We conclude that massive decarbonation by direct shock pressure is unlikely without attainment of temperatures >4000 K. Therefore, decarbonation generally can only occur during post-shock cooling for carbonates at low pressure (< 10 bars). We assume that post-shock cooling is quasi-thermodynamic, and provide a general P-T model for carbonate spanning 11 orders of magnitude in pressure (atmosphere to core). Subtle differences in sample preconditioning can probably explain the wildly divergent experimental shock data. A major planetary implication for the formation of the Earth's early atmosphere is that impacts on limestone would be less likely to have contributed substantial CO2 than has previously been assumed. Lastly, we note that carbonate melts at high pressures serve as excellent catalysts for diamond growth, and may have contributed to the widespread formation of some impact diamond.

  13. Analysis of Melt Undercooling and Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepezko, John H.; Hoffmeyer, Mark K.; De Cicco, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    While melt undercooling is often observed during solidification, the study of nucleation is challenging due to the numerous possible heterogeneous sites present in even high-purity melts. Identification of active nucleation sites requires developing well-planned experimentation. In samples with well-defined and controlled undercooling the identification can be established for the active sites. The successful identification of nucleation sites reveals that there are a number of possible sites and mechanisms that can act to catalyze nucleation. The sites and mechanisms that have been identified involve primary phases developed during cooling of alloy melts, liquid-added particle interfaces being modified ( e.g., by adsorption or reaction) creating a particle type-independent nucleation potency, dissolved impurities precipitating out of the melt at high undercoolings to catalyze nucleation, and nucleation sites resulting from residual solid preserved in cavities in inclusions or surface coatings.

  14. Melting of monatomic glass with free surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vo Van; Dong, To Quy

    2012-03-14

    Melting of monatomic glass with free surfaces has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations in models with Lennard-Jones-Gauss interatomic potential. Models have been heated up from a glassy state toward a normal liquid state. Atomic mechanism of melting has been analyzed via monitoring spatio-temporal arrangements of liquid-like atoms occurred during heating process. Liquid-like atoms are detected via the Lindemann criterion of melting. It is clear that the transition from glass into supercooled liquid of our "ordinary" glass with free surfaces exhibits a non-heterogeneous behavior, i.e., although liquid-like atoms initiate/grow mainly in the surface shell, significant amount of liquid-like atoms also initiates/grows simultaneously in the interior during heating process. We found three characteristic temperatures of melting of glass with a free surface. Temperature dependence of structure and various thermodynamic quantities of the system upon heating is also presented and discussed. PMID:22423847

  15. Energy-Efficient Glass Melting: Submerged Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Oxy-gas-fired submerged combustion melter offers simpler, improved performance. For the last 100 years, the domestic glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass on an industrial scale.

  16. QuikScat Captures an Early Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The SeaWinds instrument on NASA's Quick Scatterometer (QuikScat) spacecraft captured these near-real-time backscatter images of melting on the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica's Weddell Sea between October 27 (left) and October 29 (right), 2002--the earliest documented melting event on the ice shelf since radar data began to be collected in the late 1970s. The melting extended as far south as 68 degrees South and resulted from a cyclone that delivered warm air to the region. The image on the right also shows a noticeable recession in the sea-ice margin to the west of the Antarctic peninsula. The darker grey values of the melt region indicate radar backscatter coefficients that are reduced by approximately 10 decibels from their typical end of winter values.

  17. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass.

    PubMed

    Molgaard, Joshua J; Auxier, John D; Giminaro, Andrew V; Oldham, Colton J; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition. PMID:26779720

  18. Beyond the Melting Pot: 35 Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alba, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a set of essays that revisit, "Beyond the Melting Pot," a book about ethnicity, race, and the American city, first published in 1963. The essays assess how well the book's interpretations apply to the contemporary immigration metropolis. (SM)

  19. Geochemical Comparison of Four Cores from the Manson Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Rockow, Kaylynn M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Haskin, Larry A.; McCarville, Peter; Crossey, Laura J.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of 33 elements were determined in relatively unaltered, matrix-rich samples of impact breccia at approximately 3-m-depth intervals in the M-1 core from the Manson impact structure, Iowa. In addition, 46 matrix-rich samples from visibly altered regions of the M-7, M-8, and M-10 cores were studied, along with 42 small clasts from all four cores. Major element compositions were determined for a subset of impact breccias from the M-1 core, including matrix-rich impact-melt breccia. Major- and trace-element compositions were also determined for a suite of likely target rocks. In the M-1 core, different breccia units identified from lithologic examination of cores are compositionally distinct. There is a sharp compositional discontinuity at the boundary between the Keweenawan-shale-clast breccia and the underlying unit of impact-melt breccia (IMB) for most elements, suggesting minimal physical mixing between the two units during emplacement. Samples from the 40-m-thick IMB (M-1) are all similar to each other in composition, although there are slight increases in concentration with depth for those elements that have high concentrations in the underlying fragmental-matrix suevite breccia (SB) (e.g., Na, Ca, Fe, Sc), presumably as a result of greater clast proportions at the bottom margin of the unit of impact-melt breccia. The high degree of compositional similarity we observe in the impact-melt breccias supports the interpretation that the matrix of this unit represents impact melt. That our analyses show such compositional similarity results in part from our technique for sampling these breccias: for each sample we analyzed a few small fragments (total mass: approximately 200 mg) selected to be relatively free of large clasts and visible signs of alteration instead of subsamples of powders prepared from a large mass of breccia. The mean composition of the matrix-rich part of impact-melt breccia from the M-1 core can be modeled as a mixture of approximately 35% shale and siltstone (Proterozoic "Red Clastics"), 23% granite, 40% hornblende-biotite gneiss, and a small component (less than 2%) of mafic-dike rocks.

  20. Crystallization experiments of intercumulus melts for nakhlites under QFM 2 at 1 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imae, Naoya; Ikeda, Yukio

    2008-08-01

    Crystallization of parent melts for nakhlites was experimentally studied under QFM 2 at one bar. Isothermal experiments suggest that melts having parent magma composition for nakhlites crystallize both augites and titanomagnetites at liquidus temperatures of 1144-1154 C. Compositions of the augites are identical to those of phenocrystic core augites (En36-38Fs22-25Wo39-40) in nakhlites. No olivines crystallize from the isothermal runs, and solidus temperature is about 1000 C. Linear-cooling experiments were carried out at various cooling rates (1-17 C/h) ranging from liquidus to solidus temperatures under similar pressure conditions to the isothermal runs. Augites, titanomagnetites, and fayalites crystallized in the cooling runs, but magnesian olivines never crystallized there. Magnesian core augite in the cooling runs has the same composition as those of nakhlites. Rims of augite crystals from the cooling runs of 1-4 C/h consist of two layers, ferroan augite inner rim and hedenbergite outer rim, which are very similar to those in the Miller Range (MIL) 03346 nakhlite. Small amounts of pyroxferroite crystallized in mesostasis and augite rims from two cooling runs. Titanomagnetites from cooling runs never accompany ilmenite lamellae as seen in nakhlites, suggesting that the subsolidus cooling rate of the cooling runs was much more rapid than those of nakhlite intercumulus melts. The cooling experiments reproduce the crystallization processes of pyroxenes and the compositional change of residual melt for a rapidly cooled magma such as MIL 03346.

  1. Experimental alteration of artificial and natural impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Declercq, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, P.; Jahren, J.; Ferrell, R.E., Jr.; Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The alteration or transformation of impact melt rock to clay minerals, particularly smectite, has been recognized in several impact structures (e.g., Ries, Chicxulub, Mj??lnir). We studied the experimental alteration of two natural impact melt rocks from suevite clasts that were recovered from drill cores into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and two synthetic glasses. These experiments were conducted at hydrothermal temperature (265 ??C) in order to reproduce conditions found in meltbearing deposits in the first thousand years after deposition. The experimental results were compared to geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) of the same alteration and to original mineral assemblages in the natural melt rock samples. In the alteration experiments, clay minerals formed on the surfaces of the melt particles and as fine-grained suspended material. Authigenic expanding clay minerals (saponite and Ca-smectite) and vermiculite/chlorite (clinochlore) were identified in addition to analcime. Ferripyrophyllite was formed in three of four experiments. Comparable minerals were predicted in the PHREEQC modeling. A comparison between the phases formed in our experiments and those in the cores suggests that the natural alteration occurred under hydrothermal conditions similar to those reproduced in the experiment. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  2. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only

  3. Sound velocities and melting of Fe-Ni-Si system at high pressures under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Sekine, T.; He, H.; Yu, Y.; Liu, F.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is dominantly composed of iron and nickel (~5-10%), with a density lower by ~8% than that of the liquid iron at the core conditions [e.g., 1], requiring the presence of light element(s) [e.g., 2]. Silicon, geochemically abundant, has long been considered as a major potential light element in the Earth's outer core because of its high solubility in iron, iron-silicate interactions at core-mantle boundary, the Si isotope data, and core formation modeling [3]. To examine effects of Si on physical properties of Fe-Ni system, we directly measured densities, sound velocities, and melting of Fe-9Ni-10Si (in weight percent) system up to ~280 GPa by shock experiments using a two-stage light-gas gun. The sound velocities were determined by the optical analyzer technique [4]. The results, compared with the seismic observations, show that silicon-rich liquid Fe-Ni system can satisfy the observed density deficit and seismological data simultaneously at the physical conditions of the outer core. Analyses of the melting temperatures of Fe-9Ni-10Si system imply the Fe-Ni-Si core will be at lower temperatures by ~600-1000 K than the pure iron core at ~330 GPa of the inner-core boundary. [1]. Anderson, O. and D. Isaak, Another look at the core density deficit of Earth's outer core. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 2002. 131(1): p. 19-27.[2]. Poirier, J.-P., Light elements in the Earth's outer core: A critical review. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 1994. 85(3): p. 319-337.[3]. Hirose, K., S. Labrosse, and J. Hernlund, Composition and State of the Core. Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 2013. 41: p. 657-691.[4]. Huang, H., et al., Evidence for an oxygen-depleted liquid outer core of the Earth. Nature, 2011. 479(7374): p. 513-516.

  4. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI’s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  5. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The