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Sample records for postulated core melt

  1. Investigations on the Melt Gate Ablation by Ex-Vessel Core Melts in the KAPOOL Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eppinger, Beatrix; Schmidt-Stiefel, Sike; Tromm, Walter

    2002-07-01

    In future Light Water Reactors (LWR) containment failure should be prevented even for very unlikely core meltdown sequences with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. In the case of such a postulated core meltdown accident in a future LWR the ex-vessel melt shall be retained and cooled in a special compartment inside the containment to exclude significant radioactive release to the environment. In such a case, a gate has to be designed to allow the melt release from the reactor cavity into the compartment. A series of transient experiments has been performed to investigate the melt gate ablation using iron and alumina melts as a simulant for the corium melt. The results of the KAPOOL tests are analyzed with the HEATING5 code in order to evaluate realistic cases of internally heated corium melts and melt gates with the same theoretical tool. (authors)

  2. Partial Melting in the Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernlund, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The inner core boundary (ICB) is often considered to be permeable to flow, because solid iron could melt as it upwells across the ICB. Such a mechanism has been proposed to accompany inner core convective processes (including translation from a freezing to melting hemisphere), and has also been invoked to explain the formation of a dense Fe-rich liquid F-layer above the ICB. However, the conceptions of ICB melting invoked thus far are extremely simplistic, and neglect the many lessons learned from melting in other geological contexts. Owing to some degree of solid solution in relatively incompatible light alloys in solid iron, the onset of melting in the inner core will likely occur as a partial melt, with the liquid being enriched in these light alloys relative to the co-existing solid. Such a partial melt is then subject to upward migration/percolation out of the solid matrix owing to the buoyancy of melt relative to solid. Removal of melt and viscous compaction of the pore space results in an iron-enriched dense solid, whose negative buoyancy will oppose whatever buoyancy forces initially gave rise to upwelling. Either the negative buoyancy will balance these other forces and cause upwelling to cease, or else the solid will become so depleted in light alloys that it is unable to undergo further melting. Thus a proper accounting of partial melting results in a very different melting regime in the inner core, and suppression of upwelling across the ICB. Any fluid that is able to escape into the outer core from inner core partial melting will likely be buoyant because in order to be a melt it should be enriched in incompatiable alloys relative to whatever is freezing at the ICB. Therefore inner core melting is unlikely to contribute to the formation of an F-layer, but instead will tend to de-stabilize it. I will present models that illustrate these processes, and propose that the F-layer is a relic of incomplete mixing of the core during Earth's final stages of

  3. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  4. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  5. The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) postulated limiting event initial and building source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, L F

    1992-08-01

    As part of the update of the Safety analysis Report (SAR) for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), operational limiting events under the category of inadvertent withdrawal of an experiment while at power or during a power pulse were determined to be the most limiting event(s) for this reactor. This report provides a summary of the assumptions, modeling, and results in evaluation of: Reactivity and thermal hydraulics analysis to determine the amount of fuel melt or fuel damage ratios; The reactor inventories following the limiting event; A literature review of post NUREG-0772 release fraction experiment results on severe fuel damages; Decontamination factors due to in-pool transport; and In-building transport modeling and building source term analysis.

  6. Melting and Crystallization at Core Mantle Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Pradhan, G. K.; Siebert, J.; Auzende, A. L.; Morard, G.; Antonangeli, D.; Garbarino, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early crystallization of magma oceans may generate original compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Dense basal melts may also be trapped in the lowermost mantle and explain mantle regions with ultralow seismic velocities (ULVZs) near the core-mantle boundary [1]. To test this hypothesis, we first constructed the solidus curve of a natural peridotite between 36 and 140 gigapascals using laser-heated diamond anvil cells. In our experiments, melting at core-mantle boundary pressures occurs around 4100 ± 150 K, which is a value that can match estimated mantle geotherms. Similar results were found for a chondritic mantle [2] whereas much lower pyrolitic melting temperatures were recently proposed from textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples [3]. We also investigated the melting properties of natural mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), we obtain a MORB solidus temperature of 3950 ±150 K. If our solidus temperatures are in good agreement with recent results proposed for a similar composition [4], the textural and chemical characterizations of our recovered samples made by analytical transmission electron microscope indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such partial melts could be gravitationnally stable at the core mantle boundary. Our observations are tested against calculations made using a self-consistent thermodynamic database for the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system from 20 GPa to 140 GPa [5]. These observations and calculations provide a first step towards a consistent thermodynamic modelling of the crystallization sequence of the magma ocean, which shows that the existence of a dense iron rich and fusible layer above the CMB at the end of the crystallization is plausible [5], which is in contradiction with the conclusions drawn in [4]. [1] Williams

  7. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-06-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component.

  8. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component.

  9. Melting of MORB at core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Gopal K.; Fiquet, Guillaume; Siebert, Julien; Auzende, Anne-Line; Morard, Guillaume; Antonangeli, Daniele; Garbarino, Gaston

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of natural mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. We used in situ X-ray diffraction primarily for phase identification whereas our melting criterion based on laser power versus temperature plateau combined with textural analysis of recovered solidus and subsolidus samples is accurate and unambiguous. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), the MORB solidus temperature is 3970 (± 150) K. Quenched melt textures observed in recovered samples indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition derived from the central melt pool is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such melt pockets may be gravitationally stable at the core mantle boundary.

  10. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    PubMed

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination. PMID:11452998

  11. Melting of Iron Close to the Inner Core Boundary Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, R. G.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J.; Collins, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary places a strong constraint on the thermal profile within the Earth, the heat flux to the mantle, and also the power to drive the geodynamo. Recent static diamond anvil cell measurements by Anzellini et al. 2013 have accurately measured the melting curve of iron to 200 GPa, which is a tremendous improvement in the available data but is still only 60% of the pressure at the inner core boundary, and thus requires significant extrapolation. Nguyen and Holmes, 2004, have used the sound velocity technique to measure the melting transition on the principal Hugoniot, up to 270 GPa, but some still believe that sound velocity is not an accurate diagnostic of melting as it detects a loss of strength and also that kinetics can mitigate the utility of dynamic melting techniques. Here we use in-situ x-ray diffraction to unambiguously measure the melting transition on the principal Hugoniot of iron to 270 GPa. We also show that iron melts from the hcp phase at pressures up to 270 GPa, which is significantly closer to the inner core boundary than any previous melting curve measurement capable of phase discrimination. From comparison of our measurements to those of Nguyen and Holmes, we show that sound velocity measurements can accurately constrain the melting curve and that the kinetics of melting iron are faster than both laser shock and gas gun experimental timescales. Thereby, dynamic techniques should be trusted for probing the melting curve of metals and they also offer the greatest opportunity to probe the melting curve of iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary and also the higher pressures achieved within the interiors of super-Earths. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Melting of subducted basalt at the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Hénot, Jean-Marc; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-05-23

    The geological materials in Earth's lowermost mantle control the characteristics and interpretation of seismic ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the core-mantle boundary. Partial melting of the bulk lower mantle is often advocated as the cause, but this does not explain the nonubiquitous character of these regional seismic features. We explored the melting properties of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), which can reach the lowermost mantle after subduction of oceanic crust. At a pressure representative of the core-mantle boundary (135 gigapascals), the onset of melting occurs at ~3800 kelvin, which is ~350 kelvin below the mantle solidus. The SiO2-rich liquid generated either remains trapped in the MORB material or solidifies after reacting with the surrounding MgO-rich mantle, remixing subducted MORB with the lowermost mantle. PMID:24855266

  13. Melting curves and entropy of melting of iron under Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Jin; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Zhong-Li; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-07-01

    The melting curves of iron are determined up to 365 GPa via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations combining with the embedded atom model (EAM) potential developed by Ackland et al. We simulated the melting with three approaches, the hysteresis, two-phase and recently modified Z methods. All three techniques can produce satisfying results, consistent well with most of static compression measurements and shock experiments. Hence, we recommend that these three techniques and this EAM potential are reliable techniques and potential for simulating melting properties of iron. Fitting the well-known Simon equation to our two-phase data we yield the analytical melting curve for iron: 1825(1 + P/57.723)0.654, which gives a melting point at the inner core boundary of 6345 K, very close to the recent diamond anvil cell (DAC) extrapolated value and other ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the analyses of our entropy of melting and solid-liquid interfacial energy γsl indicate that at high pressure, the entropy of fusion shows weak pressure effect. The γsl increases monotonically with pressure, and can be described as a second-order polynomial relation.

  14. Melting the core of giant planets: impact on tidal dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Giant planets are believed to host central dense rocky/icy cores that are key actors in the core-accretion scenario for their formation. In the same time, some of their components are unstable in the temperature and pressure regimes of central regions of giant planets and only ab-initio EOS computations can address the question of the state of matter. In this framework, several works demonstrated that erosion and redistribution of core materials in the envelope must be taken into account. These complex mechanisms thus may deeply modify giant planet interiors for which signatures of strong tidal dissipation have been obtained for Jupiter and Saturn. The best candidates to explain this dissipation are the viscoelastic dissipation in the central dense core and turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in their fluid convective envelope. In this work, we study the consequences of the possible melting of central regions for the efficiency of each of these mechanisms.

  15. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  16. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Popp, T. J.; Blunier, T.; Bigler, M.; Schüpbach, S.; Kettner, E.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-11-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW-SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present

  17. Melting of iron at Earth's inner core boundary based on fast X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Anzellini, S; Dewaele, A; Mezouar, M; Loubeyre, P; Morard, G

    2013-04-26

    Earth's core is structured in a solid inner core, mainly composed of iron, and a liquid outer core. The temperature at the inner core boundary is expected to be close to the melting point of iron at 330 gigapascal (GPa). Despite intensive experimental and theoretical efforts, there is little consensus on the melting behavior of iron at these extreme pressures and temperatures. We present static laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments up to 200 GPa using synchrotron-based fast x-ray diffraction as a primary melting diagnostic. When extrapolating to higher pressures, we conclude that the melting temperature of iron at the inner core boundary is 6230 ± 500 kelvin. This estimation favors a high heat flux at the core-mantle boundary with a possible partial melting of the mantle. PMID:23620049

  18. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R.; Farmer, Mitchell; Francis, Matthew W.

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  19. Modeling of melt retention in EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Granovsky, V. S.; Sulatsky, A. A.; Khabensky, V. B.; Sulatskaya, M. B.; Gusarov, V. V.; Almyashev, V. I.; Komlev, A. A.; Bechta, S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, R. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Song, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    A core catcher is adopted in the EU-APR1400 reactor design for management and mitigation of severe accidents with reactor core melting. The core catcher concept incorporates a number of engineering solutions used in the catcher designs of European EPR and Russian WER-1000 reactors, such as thin-layer corium spreading for better cooling, retention of the melt in a water-cooled steel vessel, and use of sacrificial material (SM) to control the melt properties. SM is one of the key elements of the catcher design and its performance is critical for melt retention efficiency. This SM consists of oxide components, but the core catcher also includes sacrificial steel which reacts with the metal melt of the molten corium to reduce its temperature. The paper describes the required properties of SM. The melt retention capability of the core catcher can be confirmed by modeling the heat fluxes to the catcher vessel to show that it will not fail. The fulfillment of this requirement is demonstrated on the example of LBLOCA severe accident. Thermal and physicochemical interactions between the oxide and metal melts, interactions of the melts with SM, sacrificial steel and vessel, core catcher external cooling by water and release of non-condensable gases are modeled. (authors)

  20. Redistribution of Core-forming Melt During Shear Deformation of Partially Molten Peridotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the role of deformation on the distribution of core-forming melt in a partially molten peridotite, samples of olivine-basalt-iron sulfide were sheared to large strains. Dramatic redistribution of sulfide and silicate melts occur during deformation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) to core melt at United States nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Giachetti, R.T. , Ann Arbor, MI )

    1989-09-01

    This report looks at WASH-1400 and several other Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and Probabilistic Safety Studies (PSSs) to determine the contribution of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) events to the total core melt probability at eight nuclear power plants in the United States. After considering each plant individually, the results are compared from plant to plant to see if any generic conclusions regarding ATWS, or core melt in general, can be made. 8 refs., 34 tabs.

  2. Partial melting of a Pb-Sn mushy layer due to heating from above, and implications for regional melting of Earth's directionally solidified inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, James; Bergman, Michael I.; Huguet, Ludovic; Alboussiere, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Superimposed on the radial solidification of Earth's inner core may be hemispherical and/or regional patches of melting at the inner-outer core boundary. Little work has been carried out on partial melting of a dendritic mushy layer due to heating from above. Here we study directional solidification, annealing, and partial melting from above of Pb-rich Sn alloy ingots. We find that partial melting from above results in convection in the mushy layer, with dense, melted Pb sinking and resolidifying at a lower height, yielding a different density profile than for those ingots that are just directionally solidified, irrespective of annealing. Partial melting from above causes a greater density deeper down and a corresponding steeper density decrease nearer the top. There is also a change in microstructure. These observations may be in accordance with inferences of east-west and perhaps smaller-scale variations in seismic properties near the top of the inner core.

  3. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: Structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.; Champenois, C.; Yurtsever, E.

    2009-12-15

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semianalytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite-size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  4. Melting-induced stratification above the Earth's inner core due to convective translation.

    PubMed

    Alboussière, Thierry; Deguen, Renaud; Melzani, Mickaël

    2010-08-01

    In addition to its global North-South anisotropy, there are two other enigmatic seismological observations related to the Earth's inner core: asymmetry between its eastern and western hemispheres and the presence of a layer of reduced seismic velocity at the base of the outer core. This 250-km-thick layer has been interpreted as a stably stratified region of reduced composition in light elements. Here we show that this layer can be generated by simultaneous crystallization and melting at the surface of the inner core, and that a translational mode of thermal convection in the inner core can produce enough melting and crystallization on each hemisphere respectively for the dense layer to develop. The dynamical model we propose introduces a clear asymmetry between a melting and a crystallizing hemisphere which forms a basis for also explaining the East-West asymmetry. The present translation rate is found to be typically 100 million years for the inner core to be entirely renewed, which is one to two orders of magnitude faster than the growth rate of the inner core's radius. The resulting strong asymmetry of buoyancy flux caused by light elements is anticipated to have an impact on the dynamics of the outer core and on the geodynamo. PMID:20686572

  5. Chemical Convention in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Ironsulfur System

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-26

    By reanalyzing Apollo lunar seismograms using array-processing methods, a recent study suggests that the Moon has a solid inner core and a fluid outer core, much like the Earth. The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, compared with 4% for the Earth. The pressure at the Moon's core-mantle boundary is 4.8 GPa, and that at the ICB is 5.2 GPa. The partially molten state of the lunar core provides constraints on the thermal and chemical states of the Moon: The temperature at the inner core boundary (ICB) corresponds to the liquidus of the outer core composition, and the mass fraction of the solid core allows us to infer the bulk composition of the core from an estimated thermal profile. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo. Sulfur is considered an antifreeze component in the lunar core. Here we investigate the melting behavior of the Fe-S system at the pressure conditions of the lunar core, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our goal is to understand compositionally driven convection in the lunar core and assess its role in generating an internal magnetic field in the early history of the Moon.

  6. Chemistry and nanoparticulate compositions of a 10,000 year-old ice core melt water.

    PubMed

    Murr, L E; Esquivel, E V; Bang, J J; de la Rosa, G; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2004-11-01

    Particulates extracted from a single section of a 10,000 year-old ice core melt sample exhibited characteristics of contemporary, airborne fine particulates: a majority were microcrystalline particulates and aggregated microcrystals, including some mixtures of microcrystals and carbonaceous matter. Particularly significant were the presence of carbon nanotubes and fullerene nanocrystals composing aggregated particulates reflecting global combustion products similar to contemporary, airborne carbon nanocrystal aggregates. ICP elemental analysis of the melt water showed significant concentrations of Ca, K and especially Na (corresponding to K, NaCl), S, Si, Se, and Zn. Overall, the elemental analysis of the melt water is similar to local tap water. However, lead was absent in the local tap water and only half the concentration of selenium was present in the tap water in contrast to the ice core water. While these observations cannot be generalized, the methodology illustrates the potential to characterize and compare airborne particulate regimes and water chemistries in antiquity. PMID:15491674

  7. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T .; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-30

    The Evolutionary Power Reactor (EPR) is under consideration by various utilities in the United States to provide base load electrical production, and as a result the design is undergoing a certification review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The severe accident design philosophy for this reactor is based upon the fact that the projected power rating results in a narrow margin for in-vessel melt retention by external cooling of the reactor vessel. As a result, the design addresses ex-vessel core melt stabilization using a mitigation strategy that includes: (1) an external core melt retention system to temporarily hold core melt released from the vessel; (2) a layer of 'sacrificial' material that is admixed with the melt while in the core melt retention system; (3) a melt plug in the lower part of the retention system that, when failed, provides a pathway for the mixture to spread to a large core spreading chamber; and finally, (4) cooling and stabilization of the spread melt by controlled top and bottom flooding. The overall concept is illustrated in Figure 1.1. The melt spreading process relies heavily on inertial flow of a low-viscosity admixed melt to a segmented spreading chamber, and assumes that the melt mass will be distributed to a uniform height in the chamber. The spreading phenomenon thus needs to be modeled properly in order to adequately assess the EPR design. The MELTSPREAD code, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, can model segmented, and both uniform and nonuniform spreading. The NRC is thus utilizing MELTSPREAD to evaluate melt spreading in the EPR design. MELTSPREAD was originally developed to support resolution of the Mark I containment shell vulnerability issue. Following closure of this issue, development of MELTSPREAD ceased in the early 1990's, at which time the melt spreading database upon which the code had been validated was rather limited. In particular, the database that was utilized for initial validation consisted

  8. Effect of Hydrogen and Carbon on the Melting Temperature of the Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Sakamaki, K.; Takahashi, E.; Fukai, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Funakoshi, K.

    2007-12-01

    The temperature of the Earth's outer core has been discussed based on the melting temperature of Fe- O-S alloys (e.g., Boehler, 1996). Although hydrogen and carbon are the possible candidates of the core component, their effects on the melting temperature of iron at high-pressures are unclear. Using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus at SPring-8 synchrotron, we carried out a series of melting experiments on FeH and Fe3C up to 20 and 28 GPa, respectively. In the experiments on FeH, Fe sponge mixed with MgO was packed into a NaCl container with a hydrogen source, LiAlH4 (e.g., Fukai et al., 1989). During heating under high-pressures, hydrogenation of iron was observed by volume change. The phase boundary between ɛ'-phase (low-temperature phase) and γ-phase (high-temperature phase) of iron-hydride was determined using both cooling and heating experiments. Hydrogen concentrations in the γ-FeHx and ɛ'-FeHx were calculated based on the excess volume data from that of pure iron. It is found that γ-FeHx and ɛ'-FeHx synthesized in our experiments at pressures between 10 and 20 GPa are nearly stoichiometric FeH. Melting temperature of the γ-FeH was determined by the abrupt change in the X-ray diffraction patterns (crystalline to amorphous). The melting temperatures were determined to be 1473, 1473, 1493, 1573 and 1593 K at 10, 11.5, 15, 18 and 20 GPa, respectively. In the experiments using Fe3C, the synthesized Fe3C powder was encapsulated in a MgO container. In the diffraction sequences during heating, the peaks of Fe3C disappeared, and the new peaks identified as those of Fe7C3 were observed with halo caused by liquid. Finally, the Fe7C3 peaks disappeared, and only the halo pattern was observed. Based on these observations, the incongruent melting of Fe3C to Fe7C3 and liquid is estimated to occur at 1823 and 1923 K at 19.7 and 27.0 GPa, respectively. The liquidus temperatures of the Fe3C composition are found to be at 2098 and 2198 K at 19.5 and 26.8 GPa

  9. Containment performance for the core melt accidents in BWRs with Mark I and Mark II containments

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, K.R.; Yang, J.W.; Greene, G.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Hofmayer, C.

    1985-01-01

    Most previous risk assessment studies have assumed catastrophic failure of containments for severe accidents which are predicted to exceed the containment yield stress. This investigation analyzes the progression of a severe accident in order to develop realistic containment temperature and pressure loading, utilizes models for containment leakage estimates for the various loading histories, and assesses the expected failure modes and timing of releases for core melt accidents in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with Mark I and Mark II containments. The results of the investigation indicate that leakage through the seal on the drywell head may be sufficient to prevent catastrophic failure of the containments for a wide range of hypothetical core melt scenarios. In addition, the investigation has indicated the potential for a previously inidentified failure mode (containment liner meltthrough) for Mark I containments in which a large fraction of the core is released from the vessel in a molten state. 14 refs.

  10. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  11. Melting of iron at the physical conditions of the Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey H; Holmes, Neil C

    2004-01-22

    Seismological data can yield physical properties of the Earth's core, such as its size and seismic anisotropy. A well-constrained iron phase diagram, however, is essential to determine the temperatures at core boundaries and the crystal structure of the solid inner core. To date, the iron phase diagram at high pressure has been investigated experimentally through both laser-heated diamond-anvil cell and shock-compression techniques, as well as through theoretical calculations. Despite these contributions, a consensus on the melt line or the high-pressure, high-temperature phase of iron is lacking. Here we report new and re-analysed sound velocity measurements of shock-compressed iron at Earth-core conditions. We show that melting starts at 225 +/- 3 GPa (5,100 +/- 500 K) and is complete at 260 +/- 3 GPa (6,100 +/- 500 K), both on the Hugoniot curve-the locus of shock-compressed states. This new melting pressure is lower than previously reported, and we find no evidence for a previously reported solid-solid phase transition on the Hugoniot curve near 200 GPa (ref. 16). PMID:14737164

  12. An interconnected network of core-forming melts produced by shear deformation

    PubMed

    Bruhn; Groebner; Kohlstedt

    2000-02-24

    The formation mechanism of terrestrial planetary cores is still poorly understood, and has been the subject of numerous experimental studies. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which metal--mainly iron with some nickel--could have been extracted from a silicate mantle to form the core. Most recent models involve gravitational sinking of molten metal or metal sulphide through a partially or fully molten mantle that is often referred to as a 'magma ocean'. Alternative models invoke percolation of molten metal along an interconnected network (that is, porous flow) through a solid silicate matrix. But experimental studies performed at high pressures have shown that, under hydrostatic conditions, these melts do not form an interconnected network, leading to the widespread assumption that formation of metallic cores requires a magma ocean. In contrast, here we present experiments which demonstrate that shear deformation to large strains can interconnect a significant fraction of initially isolated pockets of metal and metal sulphide melts in a solid matrix of polycrystalline olivine. Therefore, in a dynamic (non-hydrostatic) environment, percolation remains a viable mechanism for the segregation and migration of core-forming melts in a solid silicate mantle. PMID:10706283

  13. The structure of melting mushy zones, with implications for Earth's inner core (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, M. I.; Huguet, L.; Alboussiere, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismologists have inferred hemispherical differences in the isotropic wavespeed, the elastic anisotropy, the attenuation, and the attenuation anisotropy of Earth's inner core. One hypothesis for these hemispherical differences involves an east-west translation of the inner core, with enhanced solidification on one side and melting on the other. Another hypothesis is that long term mantle control over outer core convection can lead to hemispherical variations in solidification that could even result in melting in some regions of the inner core boundary. It has also been hypothesized that the inner core is growing dendritically, resulting in an inner core that has the structure of a mushy zone (albeit one with a high solid fraction). It would therefore be helpful to understand how the structure of a melting mushy zone might look in comparison with one that is solidifying, in an effort to help interpret the seismic inferences. We have carried out experiments on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone. The experiments run in a centrifuge, in order to reach a more realistic ratio of convective velocity to phase change rate, expected to be very large at the boundary of the inner core. Hypergravity thus increases the experimental solid fraction of the mush. So far the maximum gravity we have achieved is 200 g. A Peltier cell provides cooling at one end of the cell, and after the mushy zone has grown we turn on a heater at the other end. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. As ammonium chloride in the mushy zone melts it produces more dense fluid, which results in convection in the mushy zone, a greater ammonium chloride concentration deeper in the mushy zone, and hence enhanced solidification there. This thus changes the solid fraction profile from that during solidification, which may be observable in the lab experiments using ultrasonic transducers and post-mortem under a microscope. The melting

  14. Earliest step of core-mantle separation: Shock melting experiment of chondrite-like materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiichi, T.; Tsumagari, Y.; Nishio, M.; Sekine, T.

    2009-12-01

    formed even in shortest runs (Fig.1b, 1600C 10 sec). Based on these experiments, we conclude that size of the metal grains formed in each shock melting process in planet building stage depends on the connectivity of Fe-metal phase in the source materials. Pallasite (stony-iron meteorite) may represent the product of local melt pockets formed after impacts, the earliest form of core-mantle separation in planet building stage.

  15. The influence of melting on the kinematic development of the Himalayan crystalline core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Current hypotheses for the development and emplacement of the Himalayan crystalline core are 1) models with intense upper plate out-of-sequence activity (i.e., tunneling of channel flow, and some modes of critical taper wedge behavior) and 2) models in which the upper plate mainly records basal accretion of horses (i.e., duplexing). The two concepts can be considered end-members. A signal difference between these two models is the role of melting. The intense upper plate deformation envisioned in the first set of models has been hypothesized to be largely a product of partial melting, particularly in channel flow models. Specifically, the persistent presence of melt in the middle crust of the upper plate may dramatically lower the viscosity of these rocks, allowing distributed deformation. The second set of models - duplexing - predicts in-sequence thrusting with only minor out-of-sequence deformation. Stacking of a duplex acts like a deli cheese-slicing machine: slice after slice is cut from the intact block to a stack of slices, but neither the block (~down-going plate) nor the stack (~upper plate) features much internal deformation. In this model, partial melting produces no significant kinematic impact. The dominant preserved structural elements across the Himalayan crystalline core rocks are flattening and L-S fabrics. Structurally high portions of the crystalline core locally display complex outcrop-scale deformation associated with migmatitic rocks, and contain km-scale leucogranite bodies; both features developed in the early to middle Miocene. The flattening and L-S fabrics have been interpreted to record either (A) southwards channel tunneling across the upper plate, or (B) fabric development during metamorphism of the down-going plate, prior to accretion to the upper plate. The deformation of migmatitic rock and emplacement of leucogranite have been interpreted in support of widespread distributed deformation. Alternatively, these features may have

  16. Estimates of early containment loads from core melt accidents. Draft report for comment

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-01

    The thermal-hydraulic processes and corium debris-material interactions that can result from core melting in a severe accident have been studied to evaluate the potential effect of such phenomena on containment integrity. Pressure and temperature loads associated with representative accident sequences have been estimated for the six various LWR containment types used within the United States. Summaries distilling the analyses are presented and an interpretation of the results provided. 13 refs., 68 figs., 39 tabs.

  17. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    SciTech Connect

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  18. An Interconnected Network of Core-Forming Melts Produced by Shear Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhn, D.; Groebner, N.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    The formation mechanism of terrestrial planetary is still poorly understood, and has been the subject of numerous experimental studies. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which metal-mainly iron with some nickel-could have been extracted from a silicate mantle to form the core. Most recent models involve gravitational sinking of molten metal or metal sulphide through a partially or fully molten mantle that is often referred to as a'magma ocean. Alternative models invoke percolation of molten metal along an interconnected network (that is, porous flow) through a solid silicate matrix. But experimental studies performed at high pressures have shown that, under hydrostatic conditions, these melts do not form an interconnected network, leading to the widespread assumption that formation of metallic cores requires a magma ocean. In contrast, here we present experiments which demonstrate that shear deformation to large strains can interconnect a significant fraction of initially isolated pockets of metal and metal sulphide melts in a solid matrix of polycrystalline olivine. Therefore, in a dynamic (nonhydrostatic) environment, percolation remains a viable mechanism for the segregation and migration of core-forming melts in a solid silicate mantle.

  19. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  20. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Fe-Ni-S System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y.; Jing, Z.; Li, Z.; Li, J.

    2012-12-01

    The thermal and chemical states of the lunar interior are directly related to the origin and evolution of the Moon. Recent seismic study suggested the lunar core is partially molten, consisting of a liquid outer shell and a solid inner sphere (Weber et al., 2011). The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, which is much higher than that for the Earth (~ 4%). This volume fraction can be used to establish the relation between the bulk composition of the lunar core and its temperature profile if the liquidi of relevant compositions at lunar inner core boundary (ICB) pressure (~ 5.1 GPa) are known. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of compositional convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo (Stegman et al., 2003). We have conducted melting experiments at 5.1 GPa and 900-1600 °C for the Fe-rich portion of Fe-Ni-S system, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our data show that in the iron-rich portion of the Fe-S binary system, the liquidus curve reflects nearly ideal mixing between iron and FeS end-members. In contrast, the liquidus curve of the Fe-Ni-S ternary contains two inflection points with a turning point at a sulfur content of 10 wt.%, resulting from a departure from ideal solution behavior. Given that the compositional buoyancy force scales with the slope of the liquidus curve at the ICB pressure and temperature, the contribution of compositional convection to sustain the early lunar dynamo can be estimated from our data: for a simplified model of Fe-S binary core, the role of chemical convection was probably negligible in the early history of the Moon and would have remained nearly constant since the inception of the inner core. The lunar core, however, likely contains nickel, the turning points in liquidus curve of the Fe-Ni-S ternary system may lead to dynamo initiation if the sulfur content of the bulk lunar core is less than 10 wt

  1. Platinum partitioning between metal and silicate melts: Core formation, late veneer and the nanonuggets issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Médard, Etienne; Schmidt, Max W.; Wälle, Markus; Keller, Nicole S.; Günther, Detlef

    2015-08-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature experiments have been performed at ∼1.2 GPa and 1360-2100 °C to investigate the partitioning of Pt between a silicate melt and a metallic melt. Our experiments indicate that nanonuggets encountered in previous experiments are experimental artifacts, formed at high temperature by oversaturation caused by high oxygen fugacity during the initial stages of an experiment. Experiments at high-acceleration using a centrifuging piston-cylinder show that nanonuggets can be removed by gravity during the experiment. Formation of nanonuggets can also be avoided by using initially reduced starting materials. The presence of iron is also a key element in reducing the formation of nanonuggets. Our nanonugget-free data are broadly consistent with previous nanonuggets-filtered data, and suggest that Pt partitioning becomes independent of oxygen fugacity below an oxygen fugacity of at least IW+2. Pt is thus possibly dissolved as a neutral species (or even an anionic species) at low fO2, instead of the more common Pt2+ species present at higher fO2. Due to low concentration, the nature of this species cannot be determined, but atomic Pt or Pt- are possible options. Under core-formation conditions, Pt partitioning between metal and silicate is mostly independent of oxygen fugacity, silicate melt composition, and pressure. Partition coefficient during core formation can be expressed by the following equation: log DPtMmetal/silicate = 1.0348 + 14698 / T (in weight units). Calculations indicate that the Pt content (and by extension the Highly Siderophile Elements content) of the Earth's mantle cannot be explained by equilibrium partitioning during core formation, requiring further addition of HSE to the mantle. The mass of this late veneer is approximately 0.4% of the total mass of the Earth (or 0.6% of the mass of the mantle).

  2. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  3. Density Affects the Nature of the Hexatic-Liquid Transition in Two-Dimensional Melting of Soft-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Mengjie; Liu, Jun; Tong, Hua; Xu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    We find that both continuous and discontinuous hexatic-liquid transitions can happen in the melting of two-dimensional solids of soft-core disks. For three typical model systems, Hertzian, harmonic, and Gaussian-core models, we observe the same scenarios. These systems exhibit reentrant crystallization (melting) with a maximum melting temperature Tm happening at a crossover density ρm. The hexatic-liquid transition at a density smaller than ρm is discontinuous. Liquid and hexatic phases coexist in a density interval, which becomes narrower with increasing temperature and tends to vanish approximately at Tm. Above ρm, the transition is continuous, in agreement with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory. For these soft-core systems, the nature of the hexatic-liquid transition depends on density (pressure), with the melting at ρm being a plausible transition point from discontinuous to continuous hexatic-liquid transition.

  4. Density Affects the Nature of the Hexatic-Liquid Transition in Two-Dimensional Melting of Soft-Core Systems.

    PubMed

    Zu, Mengjie; Liu, Jun; Tong, Hua; Xu, Ning

    2016-08-19

    We find that both continuous and discontinuous hexatic-liquid transitions can happen in the melting of two-dimensional solids of soft-core disks. For three typical model systems, Hertzian, harmonic, and Gaussian-core models, we observe the same scenarios. These systems exhibit reentrant crystallization (melting) with a maximum melting temperature T_{m} happening at a crossover density ρ_{m}. The hexatic-liquid transition at a density smaller than ρ_{m} is discontinuous. Liquid and hexatic phases coexist in a density interval, which becomes narrower with increasing temperature and tends to vanish approximately at T_{m}. Above ρ_{m}, the transition is continuous, in agreement with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory. For these soft-core systems, the nature of the hexatic-liquid transition depends on density (pressure), with the melting at ρ_{m} being a plausible transition point from discontinuous to continuous hexatic-liquid transition. PMID:27588868

  5. Diverse melting modes and structural collapse of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles: a perspective from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  6. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  7. Fate of MgSiO3 melts at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Kupenko, Ilya; Hennet, Louis; Harries, Dennis; Dane, Thomas; Burghammer, Manfred; Rubie, Dave C

    2015-11-17

    One key for understanding the stratification in the deep mantle lies in the determination of the density and structure of matter at high pressures, as well as the density contrast between solid and liquid silicate phases. Indeed, the density contrast is the main control on the entrainment or settlement of matter and is of fundamental importance for understanding the past and present dynamic behavior of the deepest part of the Earth's mantle. Here, we adapted the X-ray absorption method to the small dimensions of the diamond anvil cell, enabling density measurements of amorphous materials to unprecedented conditions of pressure. Our density data for MgSiO3 glass up to 127 GPa are considerably higher than those previously derived from Brillouin spectroscopy but validate recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A fourth-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reproduces our experimental data over the entire pressure regime of the mantle. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, the density of MgSiO3 glass is 5.48 ± 0.18 g/cm(3), which is only 1.6% lower than that of MgSiO3 bridgmanite at 5.57 g/cm(3), i.e., they are the same within the uncertainty. Taking into account the partitioning of iron into the melt, we conclude that melts are denser than the surrounding solid phases in the lowermost mantle and that melts will be trapped above the CMB. PMID:26578761

  8. Interpretation of experimental results from the CORA core melt progression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from the CORA bundle heatup and melting experiments, performed at Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany, are being analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The analysis is being performed as part of a systematic review of core melt progression experiments for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to (a) develop an improved understanding of important phenomena occurring during a severe accident, (b) to validate existing severe accident models, and (c) where necessary, develop improved models. An assessment of the variations in damage progression behavior because of variations in test parameters (a) bundle design and size, (b) system pressure, (c) slow cooling of the damaged bundles in argon versus rapid quenching in water, and (d) bundle inlet temperatures and flow rates is provided in the paper. The influence of uncertainties in important test conditions is also discussed. Specific results presented include (a) bundle temperature, (b) the onset and movement of the oxidation front within the bundle, (c) fuel rod ballooning and rod failure, and (d) melt relocation and associated material interactions between bundle components and structures. 12 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Nickel and helium evidence for melt above the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Claude; Asimow, Paul D; Ionov, Dmitri A; Vidito, Chris; Jackson, Matthew G; Geist, Dennis

    2013-01-17

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios in some basalts have generally been interpreted as originating in an incompletely degassed lower-mantle source. This helium source may have been isolated at the core-mantle boundary region since Earth's accretion. Alternatively, it may have taken part in whole-mantle convection and crust production over the age of the Earth; if so, it is now either a primitive refugium at the core-mantle boundary or is distributed throughout the lower mantle. Here we constrain the problem using lavas from Baffin Island, West Greenland, the Ontong Java Plateau, Isla Gorgona and Fernandina (Galapagos). Olivine phenocryst compositions show that these lavas originated from a peridotite source that was about 20 per cent higher in nickel content than in the modern mid-ocean-ridge basalt source. Where data are available, these lavas also have high (3)He/(4)He. We propose that a less-degassed nickel-rich source formed by core-mantle interaction during the crystallization of a melt-rich layer or basal magma ocean, and that this source continues to be sampled by mantle plumes. The spatial distribution of this source may be constrained by nickel partitioning experiments at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary. PMID:23302797

  10. In-situ rock melting applied to lunar base construction and for exploration drilling and coring on the moon

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    An excavation technology based upon melting of rock and soil has been extensively developed at the prototype hardware and conceptual design levels for terrestrial conditions. Laboratory and field tests of rock-melting penetration have conclusively indicated that this excavation method is insensitive to rock, soil types, and conditions. Especially significant is the ability to form in-place glass linings or casings on the walls of boreholes, tunnels, and shafts. These factors indicate the unique potential for in situ construction of primary lunar base facilities. Drilling and coring equipment for resource exploration on the moon can also be devised that are largely automated and remotely operated. It is also very likely that lunar melt-glasses will have changed mechanical properties when formed in anhydrous and hard vacuum conditions. Rock melting experiments and prototype hardware designs for lunar rock-melting excavation applications are suggested.

  11. Partitioning of Moderately Siderophile Elements Among Olivine, Silicate Melt, and Sulfide Melt: Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Variations in the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur on the partitioning of first series transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni. and Cu) and W among coexisting sulfide melt, silicate melt, and olivine. Experiments were performed at 1 atm pressure, 1350 C, with the fugacities of oxygen and sulfur controlled by mixing CO2, CO, and SO2 gases. Starting compositions consisted of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO-Na2O analog for a barred olivine chondrule from an ordinary chondrite and a synthetic komatiite. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2), conditions ranged from log of f(sub O2) = -7.9 to - 10.6, with log of f(sub S2) values ranging from - 1.0 to -2.5. Our experimental results demonstrate that the f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies of sulfide melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for the first series transition metals arc proportional to their valence states. The f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependencies for the partitioning of Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu are weaker than predicted on the basis of their valence states. Variations in conditions have no significant effect on olivine/melt partitioning other than those resulting from f(sub O2)-induced changes in the valence state of a given element. The strong f(sub O2)/f(sub S2) dependence for the olivine/silicate melt partitioning of V is attributable to a change of valence state, from 4+ to 3+, with decreasing f(sub O2). Our experimentally determined partition coefficients are used to develop models for the segregation of sulfide and metal from the silicate portion of the early Earth and the Shergottite parent body (Mars). We find that the influence of S is not sufficient to explain the overabundance of siderophile and chalcophile elements that remained in the mantle of the Earth following core formation. Important constraints on core formation in Mars are provided by our experimental determination of the partitioning of Cu between silicate and sulfide melts. When combined with existing estimates for siderophile

  12. (Installation of a boiling water reactor core melt progression phenomena program)

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1990-06-07

    The CORA operational staff at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) requested, under the auspices of the Severe Fuel Damage Partners Program, that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed models, specific to boiling water reactor (BWR) response under severe accident conditions, be applied in support of future BWR experiments to be performed in the CORA facility. Accordingly, the current Statement of Work for the BWR Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program provides for the development of a CORA-specific BWR experimental model to analyze the results of CORA BWR experiments and the planning of future experiments. The traveler installed version 1.0 of the CORA/BWR experiment-specific code on KfK personal computers and assisted the CORA staff in their preliminary pretest analyses for CORA test 18.

  13. Metal/Silicate Partitioning, Melt Speciation, Accretion, and Core Formation in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, M. J.; Hillgren, V. J.; Dearo, J. A.; Capobianco, C. J.

    1993-07-01

    Core formation in terrestrial planets was concomitant with accretion. Siderophile and chalcophile element signatures in the mantles of planets are the result of these processes. For Earth, abundances of most siderophile and chalcophile elements are elevated relative to predictions from simple metal/silicate equilibria at low pressures [1]. This observation has led to three hypotheses for how these abundances were established: heterogeneous accretion [2], inefficient core formation [3], and metal/silicate equilibria at magma ocean pressures and temperatures [4]. Knowledge of speciation of siderophile elements in silicate melts in equilibrium with metal may help distinguish between these hypotheses. But there is some uncertainty regarding speciation. For example, Ni and Co have been reported to be present as 1+ or zero valence species in silicate melts at redox states appropriate to planetary accretion, rather than the expected 2+ state [5-7]. Independent metal/silicate partitioning experiments by three members of this group using two different experimental designs on both synthetic and natural compositions do not show evidence for Ni and Co in valence states other than 2+ over a wide range of redox states. For example, solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficients for Ni at 1260 degrees C obtained by VJH from experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P are indistinguishable from those obtained by JAD in similar experiments investigating the partitioning of Ni, Ge, and Sn. Both datasets define a line with the equation: log D(Ni) = - 0.54log fO2 - 3.14 with r^2 > 0.995. (Note that fO2 was calculated in both studies from thermodynamic data and phase compositions. A small, systematic offset from the true fO2 as measured by a solid electrolyte cell affects both equations similarly, but does not diminish their close agreement.) The valence of Ni in the silicate melt is obtained by multiplying the slope of the line by -4, indicating divalent Ni in

  14. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts: Experiements relevant to the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigaged at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. A mean K2S/FeS weight ratio of (3.340 + or - 0.015) x 0.001 was determined in these experiments; a K2S/FeS weight ratio of about 0.01 would be sufficient to extract all potassium in a chondritic earth into the core. Application of these results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.

  15. Melting behavior of the iron-sulfur system and chemical convection in iron-rich planetary cores

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Chen, B.

    2009-03-26

    We present experimental data on the high-pressure melting behavior of the Fe-S system from a synchrotron x-ray radiography study using the large volume press, with implications for the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing planetary cores. At present, Earth, Mercury and Ganymede are the only three solid bodies in the Solar System that possess intrinsic global magnetic fields. Dynamo simulation reveal that chemical buoyancy force associated with the formation of a solid inner core is critical for sustaining the Earth's magnetic field. Fluid motions in Mercury and Ganymede may be partially driven by chemical buoyancy force as well. The style of chemical convection and its influence on the thermal and chemical state and evolution of iron-rich cores are determined in part by the melting behavior of potential core-forming materials. Sulfur is widely accepted as a candidate light element in iron-rich planetary cores. In order to understand the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing cores, we studied the high-pressure melting behavior of Fe-S mixtures containing 9 wt% sulfur using the synchrotron x-ray radiographic method in a large volume press.

  16. MELT Bibliography. Materials Correlated with the Core Curriculum Competencies of the Mainstream English Language Training Project, Office of Refugee Resettlement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Shirley, Comp.; Sample, Barbara J.

    This bibliography is intended to assist teachers and administrators involved in competency-based, English as a second language (ESL) instruction. The materials included in the bibliography have been correlated with the core curriculum competencies of the Mainstream English Language Training (MELT) Project. The guide is divided into three parts.…

  17. Melting Behavior of the Iron-Sulfur System and Chemical Convection in Iron-rich Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.

    2009-03-01

    We present experimental data on the high-pressure melting behavior of the Fe-S system from a synchrotron x-ray radiography study using the large volume press, with implications for the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing planetary cores.

  18. Size effect in the melting and freezing behaviors of Al/Ti core-shell nanoparticles using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Ping, Zhang; Yang-Yang, Zhang; Er-Ping, Wang; Cui-Ming, Tang; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Qiu-Hui, Zhang

    2016-03-01

    The thermal stability of Ti@Al core/shell nanoparticles with different sizes and components during continuous heating and cooling processes is examined by a molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. The thermodynamic properties and structure evolution during continuous heating and cooling processes are investigated through the characterization of the potential energy, specific heat distribution, and radial distribution function (RDF). Our study shows that, for fixed Ti core size, the melting temperature decreases with Al shell thickness, while the crystallizing temperature and glass formation temperature increase with Al shell thickness. Diverse melting mechanisms have been discovered for different Ti core sized with fixed Al shell thickness nanoparticles. The melting temperature increases with the Ti core radius. The trend agrees well with the theoretical phase diagram of bimetallic nanoparticles. In addition, the glass phase formation of Al-Ti nanoparticles for the fast cooling rate of 12 K/ps, and the crystal phase formation for the low cooling rate of 0.15 K/ps. The icosahedron structure is formed in the frozen 4366 Al-Ti atoms for the low cooling rate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21401064), the Science & Technology Development Program of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 142300410282), and the Program of Henan Educational Committee, China (Grant No. 13B140986).

  19. Melting of Fe and Fe120Si8 at the Earth's Core Pressures by ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonoshko, A. B.; Rosengren, A.; Burakovsky, L.; Preston, D. L.; Johansson, B.

    2008-12-01

    The solid Earth's inner core (IC) consists mainly of iron likely alloyed with some light elements. At low temperature iron is stable in hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase up to very high pressures. However, there is an accumulating evidence that under pressures (~ 364 GPa) and temperatures (above 6000 K) in the Earth's IC iron, either pure or alloyed with light elements (e.g. Si), might be stable in the body-centred cubic (bcc) phase1,2. The melting temperature of this phase in the IC is unknown. Conditions of the IC are not achieved in experiment. Previous theoretical studies concentrated mostly on the melting of the hcp phase3. We show, by combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and Z-method4 that pure bcc Fe melts at at the pressure in the center of IC at ~7000 K. Iron, alloyed with 6.25% of Si, melts at a temperature of ~7200 K. While light elements depress hcp Fe melting temperatures5, we show that Si addition has opposite effect on bcc Fe. Melting temperatures of bcc and hcp 2,3 are within mutual error bars, even though bcc melts at a higher temperature. However, the melting temperature of Si-alloyed bcc iron is clearly above that of Si-alloyed hcp phase5. This is because of different bonding of Si-Fe within the bcc as compared to the hcp structure. Therefore, the existing estimates of core temperatures have to be corrected upwards. 1. Brown, J.M. & McQueen, R.G. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 7485(1986). 2. Belonoshko, A.B., Ahuja, R. & Johansson, B. Nature 424, 1032(2003); Belonoshko, A.B., Skorodumova, N.V., Rosengren, A. & Johansson, B. Science 319, 797(2008). 3. Belonoshko, A.B., Ahuja, R. & Johansson, B. Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 3638(2000); Alfé, D., Gillan, M.J. & Price, G.D. Nature 401, 462(1999). 4. Kresse, G. & Furthmüller, J. J. Phys. Rev. B 54, 11169(1996); Belonoshko, A.B., Skorodumova, N.V., Rosengren, A. & Johansson, B. Phys. Rev. B 73, 012201(2006). 5. Alfé, D., Price, G.D. & Gillan, M.J. Cont. Phys. 48, 63 (2007).

  20. Reactions between molten iron and silicate melts at high pressure: Implications for the chemical evolution of Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Morooka, K.; Ujike, O.; Katsura, T.

    1995-04-01

    Reactions between molten iron and silicate melt were investigated with mixtures of pure iron and silicates (1Fe + 3MgSiO3 enstatite and 1Fe(+) 3(Mg(sub 0.9)Fe(sub 0.1)2SiO4 olivine in volumetric ratio) as starting materials at pressures of 10-26 GPa and temperatures of about 2500 C. The results show that a certain amount of Si (up to about 2%) dissolves in molten iron from silicate melt and that the dissolution is enhanced with increasing pressure. Many small spherical blobs composed of SiO2 and FeO present in coalesced iron grains were interpreted as quenched immiscible liquid formed during cooling. Therefore O also dissolves in molten iron under the experimental conditions. No evidence for dissolution of Mg was obtained. The present study also indicates that Si and O are important light elements of Earth's core if core segregation occurred in the deep magma ocean. The chemical evolution of Earth's core is discussed on the bases of the current core formation model and the present experimental results.

  1. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-07-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  2. Rapid, dynamic segregation of core forming melts: Results from in-situ High Pressure- High Temperature X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The timing and mechanisms of core formation in the Earth, as well as in Earth-forming planetesimals is a problem of significant importance in our understanding of the early evolution of terrestrial planets . W-Hf isotopic signatures in meteorites indicate that core formation in small pre-differentiated planetesimals was relatively rapid, and occurred over the span of a few million years. This time scale is difficult to achieve by percolative flow of the metallic phase through a silicate matrix in textural equilibrium. It has been suggested that during this active time in the early solar system, dynamic processes such as impacts may have caused significant deformation in the differentiating planetesimals, which could lead to much higher permeability of the core forming melts. Here, we have measured the change in permeability of core forming melts in a silicate matrix due to deformation. Mixtures of San Carlos olivine and FeS close to the equilibrium percolation threshold (~5 vol%FeS) were pre-synthesized to achieve an equilibrium microstructure, and then loaded into the rotational Drickamer apparatus at GSE-CARS, sector 13-BMD, at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory). The samples were subsequently pressed to ~2GPa, and heated to 1100°C. Alternating cycles of rotation to collect X-ray tomography images, and twisting to deform the sample were conducted until the sample had been twisted by 1080°. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on the resulting 3-dimensional x-ray tomographic images to evaluate the effect of shear deformation on permeability and migration velocity. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations were conducted, and show a marked increase in the permeability with increasing deformation, which would allow for much more rapid core formation in planetesimals.

  3. Quantification of Dead-ice Melting in Ice-Cored Moraines at the High-Arctic Glacier Holmströmbreen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomacker, A.; Kjaer, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    An extensive dead-ice area has developed at the stagnant snout of the Holmströmbreen glacier on Svalbard following its Little Ice Age maximum. Dead-ice appears mainly as ice-cored moraines, ice-cored eskers and ice- cored kames. The most common dead-ice landform is sediment gravity flows on ice-cored slopes surrounding a large ice-walled, moraine-dammed lake. The lake finally receives the sediment from the resedimentation processes. Dead-ice melting is described and quantified through field studies and analyses of high-resolution, multi-temporal aerial photographs and satellite imagery. Field measurements of backwasting of ice-cored slopes indicate short-term melting rates of c. 9.2 cm/day. Long-term downwasting rates indicate a surface lowering of ice-cored moraines of c. 0.9 m/yr from 1984-2004. Different measures for dead-ice melting are assessed in relation to the temperature record from Svalbard since the termination of the Little Ice Age. The most prominent impact of dead-ice melting is the evolution of the ice-walled lake with an area increasing near-exponentially over the last 40 years. As long as backwasting and mass movement processes prevent build-up of an insulating debris-cover and expose ice-cores to melting, the de-icing continues even though the area is characterized by continuous permafrost.

  4. A Simple Lab Exercise Demonstrating Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Michael M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which applies Koch's Postulates to a plant disease, bacterial speck. Includes an explanation of Koch's Postulate, list of equipment needed, advance preparation, outline of the three-week activity, and variations of the laboratory exercise. (DS)

  5. Chemical Convection in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Iron-Sulfur System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results on the liquidus curve of the Fe-S system at the pressures of the lunar core provide constraints on the Moon’s thermal and chemical states and the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo.

  6. Light element partitioning between silicate and metallic melts: Insights into the formation and composition of Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhill, R.; Rubie, D. C.; Frost, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The mass deficit of the Earth's core, and the increasing solubility of light elements into metallic iron with increasing pressure demonstrate that the Earth's core must contain several weight percent of light elements such as Si, O, C and S. These light elements place important constraints on the depth of the primordial magma ocean(s), the chemical potentials of many of these elements in coexisting phases during differentiation, the temperature of the inner core boundary, and the composition of the bulk Earth. The P-wave velocity, Earth's mass deficit, and depth of the inner core boundary place two important constraints on the chemical composition of the core, but there are multiple trade-offs which cannot be resolved using seismology alone. In this study, we use a large experimental partitioning dataset to build activity-composition models for light elements in metallic melts in equilibrium with oxide and silicate phases (both solid and liquid). We avoid the use of epsilon models, which commonly fail at solute concentrations above a few weight percent. Instead we employ a modified subregular solution model, using intermediate species to calculate excess free energies of mixing. Flexible models like these are required to fit the experimental data which spans 0 - 100 GPa and 1500 - 5500 K. Several heuristics are used to reduce the number of free parameters where they are not independently constrained. We use our models to investigate the conditions of core formation and the chemical composition of the Earth's core using the approach of Rubie et al. (2015; Icarus v.248; pp 89-108).

  7. Footwall Structure of Oceanic Core Complexes: New Insights from Geophysical Data for Footwall Capture of Ascending Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallows, C.; Searle, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    Oceanic core complexes (OCCs) are the footwalls of long-lived detachment faults which form in response to magma-poor crustal accretion processes along the mid-ocean ridge. Although OCC formation is expected to occur at intermediate levels of melt supply to the ridge axis (e.g. Buck et al., 2005), sidescan sonar data have shown that surficial volcanism is absent during part of the OCC life cycle (MacLeod et al., 2009). This implies that footwall capture of ascending melt is an active process during OCC formation. Here, we present the results of a shipboard gravity and deep-towed magnetic survey across actively forming OCCs on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 12-14°N. Forward modelling of magnetic data show that the oldest parts of OCCs generally have zero magnetisation, and thus we interpret these areas as comprising non- or low-magnetic upper crustal material such as sheeted dikes and gabbros. In contrast, the younger, domal sections of OCCs often record a very heterogeneous magnetisation pattern, indicative of significant local variations in footwall magnetisation and/or composition over distances of < 6 km (our track spacing). Furthermore, 2.5D and 3D modelling of gravity data reveal a zone of relatively low density material within the ultramafic footwalls of near-axis OCCs. For a density of 2900 kg/m^3, this low density zone (LDZ) must extend for ~3-4 km beneath the seafloor. We interpret this LDZ as comprising a mixture (based on magnetic results) of serpentinised peridotite and gabbroic material that has accreted within the OCC footwall as the detachment fault has captured ascending melt beneath the ridge axis. Older near-axis OCCs in the region are generally associated with a thicker LDZ, which most likely represents more pervasive serpentinisation and melt accumulation with age. References: Buck, W. R., L. L. Lavier & A. N. B. Poliakov, 2005. Modes of faulting at mid-ocean ridges, Nature, 434, 719-723. MacLeod, C. J., R. C. Searle, B. J. Murton, J. F. Casey

  8. Constraints on the Nature of Terrestrial Core-Forming Melts: Ultra-High Pressure Transport Property Measurements and X-Ray Computed Tomography Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Kinney, J H; Ryerson, F J

    2006-01-20

    A key issue in models of planetary core formation is the interconnectness and potential percolation of iron-sulfide melts in contact with silicates at high temperature and pressure. To address this issue an integrated study of the electrical conductivity-texture-permeability relationships of olivine-sulfide partial-melt samples was performed. This work has application to the interpretation of high conductivity zones in the Earth as revealed by electromagnetic studies and to the origin and development of the Earth's core. The project consisted of three main tasks. (1) Synthesis and characterization of olivine-sulfide partial-melts. (2) Electrical conductivity measurements of the partial-melt and the individual melt and crystalline phases. (3) X-ray microtomographic determination of the 3-D structure and interconnectedness of the melt phase. The results are used to determine a model of permeability of a partially molten solid that incorporates the melt distribution, a goal that has never before been achieved. Material synthesis was accomplished in the piston cylinder apparatus and electrical conductivity measurements were performed at one atmosphere. X-ray computed tomography was performed on recovered samples at the ALS. This work makes use of and further enhances LLNL's strengths in high-pressure material properties, x-ray micro- and nanoscale imaging and development of transport theory.

  9. Silicate glasses and sulfide melts in the ICDP-USGS Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Horton, J.W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electron-beam petrography of melt-rich suevite and melt-rock clasts from selected samples from the Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, reveal a variety of silicate glasses and coexisting sulfur-rich melts, now quenched to various sulfi de minerals (??iron). The glasses show a wide variety of textures, fl ow banding, compositions, devitrifi cation, and hydration states. Electron-microprobe analyses yield a compositional range of glasses from high SiO2 (>90 wt%) through a range of lower SiO2 (55-75 wt%) with no relationship to depth of sample. Some samples show spherical globules of different composition with sharp menisci, suggesting immiscibility at the time of quenching. Isotropic globules of higher interfacial tension glass (64 wt% SiO2) are in sharp contact with lower-surface-tension, high-silica glass (95 wt% SiO2). Immiscible glass-pair composition relationships show that the immiscibility is not stable and probably represents incomplete mixing. Devitrifi cation varies and some low-silica, high-iron glasses appear to have formed Fe-rich smectite; other glass compositions have formed rapid quench textures of corundum, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, magnetite, K-feldspar, plagioclase, chrome-spinel, and hercynite. Hydration (H2O by difference) varies from ~10 wt% to essentially anhydrous; high-SiO2 glasses tend to contain less H2O. Petrographic relationships show decomposition of pyrite and melting of pyrrhotite through the transformation series; pyrite? pyrrhotite? troilite??? iron. Spheres (~1 to ~50 ??m) of quenched immiscible sulfi de melt in silicate glass show a range of compositions and include phases such as pentlandite, chalcopyrite, Ni-As, monosulfi de solid solution, troilite, and rare Ni-Fe. Other sulfi de spheres contain small blebs of pure iron and exhibit a continuum with increasing iron content to spheres that consist of pure iron with small, remnant blebs of Fe-sulfi de. The Ni-rich sulfi de phases can be explained by

  10. Melt-grafting for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles with ultra-high dispersant density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbs, Ronald; Lassenberger, Andrea; Vonderhaid, Iris; Kurzhals, Steffen; Reimhult, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of applications in e.g. the biomedical field, for which brushes of biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have to be densely grafted to the core. Grafting of such shells to monodisperse iron oxide NPs has remained a challenge mainly due to the conflicting requirements to replace the ligand shell of as-synthesized NPs with irreversibly bound PEG dispersants. We introduce a general two-step method to graft PEG dispersants from a melt to iron oxide NPs first functionalized with nitrodopamine (NDA). This method yields uniquely dense spherical PEG-brushes (~3 chains per nm2 of PEG(5 kDa)) compared to existing methods, and remarkably colloidally stable NPs also under challenging conditions.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of applications in e.g. the biomedical field, for which brushes of biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have to be densely grafted to the core. Grafting of such shells to monodisperse iron oxide NPs has remained a challenge mainly due to the conflicting requirements to replace the ligand shell of as-synthesized NPs with irreversibly bound PEG dispersants. We introduce a general two-step method to graft PEG dispersants from a melt to iron oxide NPs first functionalized with nitrodopamine (NDA). This method yields uniquely dense spherical PEG-brushes (~3 chains per nm2 of PEG(5 kDa)) compared to existing methods, and remarkably colloidally stable NPs also under challenging conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The ESI contains details on additional synthetic protocols and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02313k

  11. Melting and metallization of silica in the cores of gas giants, ice giants, and super Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazevet, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Taniuchi, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Guyot, F.

    2015-07-01

    The physical state and properties of silicates at conditions encountered in the cores of gas giants, ice giants, and of Earth-like exoplanets now discovered with masses up to several times the mass of the Earth remain mostly unknown. Here, we report on theoretical predictions of the properties of silica, SiO2, up to 4 TPa and about 20 000 K by using first principles molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory. For conditions found in the super Earths and in ice giants, we show that silica remains a poor electrical conductor up to 10 Mbar due to an increase in the Si-O coordination with pressure. For Jupiter and Saturn cores, we find that MgSiO3 silicate has not only dissociated into MgO and SiO2, as shown in previous studies, but that these two phases have likely differentiated to lead to a core made of liquid SiO2 and solid (Mg,Fe)O.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations on the melting, crystallization, and energetic reaction behaviors of Al/Cu core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin-Lu; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations combined with the embedded atom method potential, we investigate the heating, cooling, and energetic reacting of core-shell structured Al-Cu nanoparticles. The thermodynamic properties and structure evolution during continuous heating and cooling processes are also investigated through the characterization of the total potential energy distribution, mean-square-distance and radial distribution function. Some behaviors related to nanometer scale Cu/Al functional particles are derived that two-way diffusion of Al and Cu atoms, glass phase formation for the fast cooling rate, and the crystal phase formation for the low cooling rate. Two-way atomic diffusion occurs first and causes the melting and alloying. In the final alloying structure, Cu and Al atoms mixed very well except for the outmost shell which has more Al atoms. For the investigation of the thermal stability and energetic reaction properties, our study show that a localized alloying reaction between the Al core and Cu shell is very slow when the initial temperature is lower than 600 K. But a two-stage reaction may occur when the initial temperature is 700 K. The reaction rate is determined by the solid-state diffusion of Al atoms in the Cu shell at the first stage, yet the reaction rate is much faster at the second stage, due to the alloying reaction between the liquid Al core and the Cu shell. At higher temperatures such as 800 K and 900 K, the alloying reaction occurs directly between the liquid Al core and the Cu shell.

  13. Crystallization Processes in Mercury's Core Inferred from In-situ High-Pressure Melting Experiments in the Fe-S-Si-C System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Van Orman, J. A.; Hauck, S. A., II; Sun, N.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Based upon the high pressure melting temperatures in the Fe-FeS system, an iron "snow" process has been suggested to occur in Mercury's core. However, recent results from the MESSENGER mission indicate very reducing conditions in Mercury, under which a substantial amount of silicon should also dissolve into the core. The presence of Si can significantly modify the chemical and physical properties of Mercury's core (e.g., phase relations, crystallization, density). Moreover, up to 4 wt% C could have been incorporated into the core during the planet formation. In order to test the iron snow hypothesis in a system that is likely to be closer to the actual core composition, we performed in situ high-pressure, high-temperature experiments in the Fe-FeS-Fe2Si-Fe3C system using a multi-anvil press on a synchrotron (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne). To observe low degree eutectic melting, we separated the samples in two parts: (1) an iron rod presaturated with Si and C and (2) a mixture of FeS, Fe2Si and Fe3C. Eutectic melting temperature and phase relations were determined at various pressures between 4.5 and 15.5 GPa using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and imaging. Temperature was quenched soon after melting in order to preserve the eutectic melt composition. The X-ray images, diffraction spectra and back-scattered electron images of the recovered samples show that eutectic melting occurs in the range of 800 - 900°C in all our experiments. These temperatures are close to the eutectic temperatures in the Fe-FeS-Fe3C system, indicating that Si does not change the eutectic temperatures significantly. Melting therefore occurs at much lower temperature than suggested for the Fe-S-Si system at similar pressures. This difference may be explained by the presence of C and by the higher silicon content in our starting composition. Our experimental setup may also be more suitable for detecting the low degrees of melting in metallic systems. Such low eutectic melting

  14. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt: a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Carmen P.; Pohjola, Veijo A.; Beaudon, Emilie; Claremar, Björn; van Pelt, Ward J. J.; Pettersson, Rickard; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Martma, Tõnu; Schwikowski, Margit; Bøggild, Carl E.

    2016-05-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, a partial ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was NO3- > SO42-, Mg2+, Cl-, K+, Na+ with nitrate being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was on the order of 1 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010, which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e., MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period, which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution when weather conditions were similar to those during the 2007-2010 period.

  15. Lorentzian quantum reality: postulates and toy models.

    PubMed

    Kent, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    We describe postulates for a novel realist version of relativistic quantum theory or quantum field theory in Minkowski space and other background space-times, and illustrate their application with toy models. PMID:26124245

  16. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time-integrated synchrotron Mössbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the γ-ɛ-l triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5GPa, 3345 ± 120K and 116 ± 5GPa, 3260 ± 120K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core-mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core-mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  17. Stability and melting relations of Fe3C up to 3 Mbar: Implication for the carbon in the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Mashino, I.; Kamada, S.; Miyahara, M.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's core is regarded as an Fe-Ni alloy but its density is lower than that of pure Fe at the core conditions. Therefore, the Earth's core is supposed to contain light elements and carbon is one of the candidates of the light elements to explain the density deficit of the Earth's core. Nakajima et al. (2009) reported the melting temperature of Fe3C up to around 30 GPa based on textual observations, the chemical analysis of the quenched run products and in situ X-ray diffraction experiments using a Kawai-type multi anvil apparatus. Lord et al. (2009) reported melting temperatures of Fe3C up to 70 GPa, which was determined by the temperature plateau during increasing laser power using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. They also suggested Fe+Fe7C3 is a stable subsolidus phase. There are obvious discrepancies between the melting curve and the stable subsolidus phase reported by Nakajima et al. (2009) and those reported by Lord et al. (2009). In this study, the melting temperatures of Fe3C and a subsolidus phase relation were determined based on in situ X-ray diffraction experiments and observations of the recovered sample. This study aims to reveal the stability field of Fe3C and the melting temperature of Fe3C and to discuss the behaviors of carbon in the Earth's core. We have performed experiments using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with in situ X-ray diffraction experiment at BL10XU beamline, SPring-8 synchrotron facility. We also conducted quench experiments for observation of the recovered sample at Tohoku University. Synthesized Fe3C or Fe+Fe3C (C = 5.2 wt.%) were sandwiched by NaCl or SiO2 glass layers, which were used as the thermal insulator and the pressure medium. Melting of the sample was determined by disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks and textual observations. We determined the melting relation of Fe3C up to 200 GPa by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments and textual observations of recovered samples. The melting temperature

  18. Muscovite-Dehydration Melting: A Textural Study of a Key Reaction in Transforming Continental Margin Strata Into a Migmatitic Orogenic Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, B. J.; St Onge, M. R.; Waters, D. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Metamorphosed continental margin sedimentary sequences, which comprise the dominant tectonostratigraphic assemblage exposed in orogenic hinterlands, are crucial to understanding the architecture and evolution of collisional mountain belts. This study explores the textural effect of anatexis in amphibolite-grade conditions and documents the mineral growth mechanisms that control nucleation and growth of K-feldspar, sillimanite and silicate melt. The constrained textural evolution follows four stages: 1) Nucleation - K-feldspar is documented to nucleate epitaxially on isomorphic plagioclase in quartzofeldspathic (psammitic) domains, whereas sillimanite nucleates in the Al-rich (pelitic) domain, initially on [001] mica planes. The first melt forms at the site of muscovite breakdown. 2) Chemically driven growth - In the quartzofeldspathic domain, K-feldspar progressively replaces plagioclase by a K+ - Na+ cation transfer reaction, driven by the freeing of muscovite-bound K+ during breakdown of the mica. Sillimanite forms intergrowths with the remaining hydrous melt components, contained initially in ovoid clots. 3) Merge and coarsening - With an increase in pressure, melt and sillimanite migrate away from clots along grain boundaries. A melt threshold is reached once the grain-boundary network is wetted by melt, increasing the length-scale of diffusion, resulting in grain boundary migration and grain-size coarsening. The melt threshold denotes the transition to an open-system on the lithology scale, where melt is a transient phase. 4) Residual melt crystallization - Residual melt crystallizes preferentially on existing peritectic grains as anatectic quartz, plagioclase, and K-feldspar. As the system cools and closes, grain growth forces melt into the intersections of grain-boundaries, recognized as irregular shaped melt films, or as intergrowths of the volatile-rich phases (i.e. Tur-Ms-Ap). In the Himalayan metamorphic core these processes result in the formation of

  19. Formation of core-shell and hollow nanospheres through the nanoscale melt-solidification effect in the Sm-Fe(Ta)-N system.

    PubMed

    Sturm, S; Rožman, K Zužek; Markoli, B; Sarantopoulou, E; Kollia, Z; Cefalas, A C; Kobe, S

    2010-12-01

    Sm-Fe-Ta-N-O nanospheres were synthesized by pulsed-laser deposition from a Sm(13.8)Fe(82.2)Ta(4.0) target in a nitrogen atmosphere. Three structurally and compositionally distinct types were identified: amorphous, core-shell and hollow nanospheres. Amorphous spheres were compositionally homogeneous and completely oxidized. The core-shell spheres were composed of an iron-rich crystalline core with up to 10 at.% interstitially incorporated nitrogen, surrounded by an amorphous and oxidized shell. The hollow spheres were characterized by voids filled with N(2) gas. It was found that the formation of either amorphous or complex nanospheres is defined by an initial Fe/Sm ratio within the molten droplet. The formation of hollow spheres is believed to be related to the general affinity of liquid metals for gas intake. During rapid solidification the dissolved gas in the melt is trapped within the surrounding solid rim, preventing the outwards diffusion of gas. As long as the amount of gas atoms in the melt is kept below its solubility limits it can be completely interstitially incorporated into the solid, thus forming crystalline Fe(N)-rich cores. If the melt contains more than an equilibrium amount of nitrogen it is possible that the gas recombines to form N(2) molecules, which are condensed inside the spheres. PMID:21063053

  20. Contrasting Effects of Carbon and Sulfur on Fe-Isotope Fractionation between Metal and Silicate Melt during Planetary Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elardo, S. M.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous studies that show well-resolved Fe isotope fractionations in igneous materials from different planetary bodies. Potential explanations for these fractionations include a non-chondritic bulk planetary Fe isotopic composition, and equilibrium fractionation between Fe-alloys or minerals and silicate melts during planetary differentiation, mantle melting, or fractional crystallization. This is further complicated by the fact that these processes are not mutually exclusive, making the interpretation of Fe isotope data a complex task. Here we present new experimental results investigating the effect of C on Fe isotope fractionation between molten peridotite and an Fe-alloy. Experiments were conducted at 1 GPa and 1850° C for 0.5 - 3 hours on a mixture of an 54Fe-spiked peridotite and Fe-metal with and without Ni metal in an end-loaded piston cylinder at the Geophysical Laboratory. Carbon saturation was achieved with a graphite capsule, and resulted in C contents of the Fe-alloy in our experiments ranging from 3.8 - 4.9 wt. %. The metal and silicate phases from half of each experiment were separated manually and dissolved in concentrated acids. Iron was separated from matrix elements by anion exchange chromatagraphy. Iron-isotopic compositions were determined with the Nu Plasma II MC-ICP-MS at GL. The other half of each experiment was used for quantitative microbeam analysis. Equilibrium was assessed with a time series and the three-isotope exchange method. The Ni-free experiments resulted in no resolvable Fe isotope fractionation between the Fe-C-alloy and molten silicate. This is in contrast to the results of Shahar et al. (2015) which showed a fractionation for Δ57Fe of ~0.18 ‰ between a peridotite and an Fe-alloy with a similar S abundance to C in these experiments. The one experiment thus far that contained Ni (~4 wt. % in the alloy) showed a resolvable fractionation between the Fe-Ni-C alloy and silicate of ~0.10 ‰. Shahar et al. found a

  1. Structure, Frictional Melting and Fault Weakening during the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake Slip: Observation from the WFSD Drilling Core Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Wang, H.; Li, C.; Zhang, J.; Sun, Z.; Si, J.; Liu, D.; Chevalier, M. L.; Han, L.; Yun, K.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake produced two co-seismic surface ruptures along Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (~270 km) and the Guanxian-Anxian fault (~80 km) simultaneously in the Longmen Shan thrust belt. Besides, two surface rupture zones were tracked in the southern segment of the Yingxiu-Beichuan rupture zone, one along the Yingxiu fault, the other along the Shenxigou-Longchi fault, which both converged into one rupture zone at the Bajiaomiao village, Hongkou town, where one distinct fault plane with two striation orientations was exposed. The Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) was carried out right after the earthquake to investigate its faulting mechanisms and rupture process. Six boreholes were drilled along the rupture zones with depths ranging from 600 to 2400 m. WFSD-1 and WFSD-2 are located at the Bajiaomiao area, the southern segment of the Yingxiu-Beichuan rupture zone, while WFSD-4 and WFSD-4S are in the Nanba town area, in the northern part of the rupture zone. Detailed research showed that ~1 mm thick Principal Slip Zone (PSZ) of the Wenchuan earthquake is located at ~589 m-depth in the WFSD-1 cores. Graphite present in the PSZ indicates a low fault strength. Long-term temperature monitoring shows an extremely low fault friction coefficient during the earthquake. Recently, another possible PSZ was found in WFSD-1 cores at ~732 m-depth, with a ~2 mm thick melt layer in the fault gouge, where feldspar was melted but quartz was not, indicating that the frictional melting temperature was 1230°C < T < 1720°C. These two PSZs at depth may correspond to the two co-seismic surface rupture zones. Besides, the Wenchuan earthquake PSZ was also recognized in the WFSD-4S cores, at ~1084 m-depth. About 200-400 μm thick melt layer (fault vein, mainly feldspar), as well as melt injection veins, were observed in the slip zone, where oblique distinct striations were visible on the slip surface. Therefore, there are two PSZs in the shallow

  2. Black carbon concentrations from a Tibetan Plateau ice core spanning 1843-1982: recent increases due to emissions and glacier melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M.; Kaspari, S.; Kang, S.; Grigholm, B.; Mayewski, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    Black carbon (BC) deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce albedo and lead to accelerated melt. An ice core recovered from Guoqu glacier on Mt. Geladaindong and analyzed using a Single Particle Soot Photometer provides the first long-term (1843-1982) record of BC concentrations from the Central Tibetan Plateau. The highest concentrations are observed from 1975-1982, which corresponds to a 2.0-fold and 2.4-fold increase in average and median values, respectively, relative to 1843-1940. BC concentrations post-1940 are also elevated relative to the earlier portion of the record. Causes for the higher BC concentrations include increased regional BC emissions and subsequent deposition, and melt induced enrichment of BC, with the melt potentially accelerated due to the presence of BC at the glacier surface. A qualitative comparison of the BC and Fe (used as a dust proxy) records suggests that if changes in the concentrations of absorbing impurities at the glacier surface have influenced recent glacial melt, the melt may be due to the presence of BC rather than dust. Guoqu glacier has received no net ice accumulation since the 1980s, and is a potential example of a glacier where an increase in the equilibrium line altitude is exposing buried high impurity layers. That BC concentrations in the uppermost layers of the Geladaindong ice core are not substantially higher relative to deeper in the ice core suggests that some of the BC that must have been deposited on Guoqu glacier via wet or dry deposition between 1983 and 2005 has been removed from the surface of the glacier, potentially via supraglacial or englacial meltwater.

  3. Carbon Solubility in Core Melts in Shallow Magma Ocean Environment and its bearing on Distribution of Carbon between Deep Earth Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Walker, D.

    2007-12-01

    Carbon affects the melting phase relations of mantle rocks [1] and core metal [2], influences the physical properties of molten silicates and metals, and also has significant effect on partitioning of other key elements between various deep Earth phases. But the carbon budget of Earth's deep mantle and core is poorly constrained due to lack of knowledge of behavior of carbon during core formation. In order to determine the storage capacity of dissolved carbon in metallic core melts and to put constraints on partitioning of carbon between silicate mantle and metallic core, we have determined the solubility of carbon in molten core metal at P- T conditions relevant for a shallow magma ocean.Experiments are performed at 2 GPa and to 2500 °C using a piston cylinder apparatus. Pure Fe-rod or a mixture of Fe-5.2%Ni loaded into graphite capsules were used as starting materials. Al coated run products are analyzed by EMP. Carbon concentration of 5.8 ± 0.4 wt.% at 2000 °C, 6.5 ± 0.9 wt.% at 2250 °C, and 7.5 ± 1.2 wt.% at 2500 °C are measured in quenched iron melt saturated with graphite. The trend of C solubility versus temperature for Fe-5.2 wt.% Ni melt, within analytical uncertainties, is similar to that of pure Fe.We have compared our solubility data and an estimate of the current carbon content of the mantle with the carbon content of core melts and residual mantle silicates respectively, derived from equilibrium batch or fractional segregation of core liquids, to constrain the partition coefficient of carbon between silicate and metallic melts in a magma ocean, DC. Translation of the limits of DC, derived from our solubility data, on calculation of carbon content of the residual silicate shows that the observed mantle concentration of carbon is too low to be matched by the process of shallow magma ocean fractionation of carbon between metal and silicate in a chondritic protoearth. If carbon solubility in liquid Fe does not change strongly as a function of

  4. Koch's Postulates, Carnivorous Cows, and Tuberculosis Today

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With Koch's announcement in 1882 of his work with the tubercle bacillus, his famous postulates launched the rational world of infectious disease and an abrupt social change—strict patient isolation. The postulates, so successful at their inception, soon began to show some problems, particularly with cholera, which clearly violated some of Koch's requirements. Subsequent studies of other diseases and the discovery of entirely new ones have so altered and expanded the original postulates that they now are little but a precious touch of history. The present additions and replacements of the original concepts are skillful changes that several authors have devised to introduce new order into understanding complex viral and prion diseases. In 1988, this knowledge, with the totally rational response of the British population and its cattle industry, was critical in promptly blocking the threatened epidemic of human prion disease. In contrast, the recent upsurge of tuberculosis (TB) in the worldwide AIDS epidemic in developing countries, and the sudden increase in metabolic syndrome in wealthy ones, suggests the need for focused sociobiologic research seeking ways to affect the damaging lifestyle behavior of many less educated populations in both settings. The world awaits an equivalent of Koch's Postulates in sociobiology to explain and possibly avert large self-destructive behaviors. PMID:21886302

  5. Koch's postulates, carnivorous cows, and tuberculosis today.

    PubMed

    Tabrah, Frank L

    2011-07-01

    With Koch's announcement in 1882 of his work with the tubercle bacillus, his famous postulates launched the rational world of infectious disease and an abrupt social change--strict patient isolation. The postulates, so successful at their inception, soon began to show some problems, particularly with cholera, which clearly violated some of Koch's requirements. Subsequent studies of other diseases and the discovery of entirely new ones have so altered and expanded the original postulates that they now are little but a precious touch of history. The present additions and replacements of the original concepts are skillful changes that several authors have devised to introduce new order into understanding complex viral and prion diseases. In 1988, this knowledge, with the totally rational response of the British population and its cattle industry, was critical in promptly blocking the threatened epidemic of human prion disease. In contrast, the recent upsurge of tuberculosis (TB) in the worldwide AIDS epidemic in developing countries, and the sudden increase in metabolic syndrome in wealthy ones, suggests the need for focused sociobiologic research seeking ways to affect the damaging lifestyle behavior of many less educated populations in both settings. The world awaits an equivalent of Koch's Postulates in sociobiology to explain and possibly avert large self-destructive behaviors. PMID:21886302

  6. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  7. Crustal structure and melt supply variability in the presence of oceanic core complex formation: The Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 13°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallows, C.; Searle, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    The section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between the Fifteen Twenty and Marathon Fracture Zones exhibits a diverse morphology. In one instance, the seafloor displays a terrain typical of that which fits a traditional model of robust magmatism and linear abyssal hill formation. However, temporal and spatial variation in melt supply to the ridge creates oceanic detachment terrains, where plate separation is accommodated predominantly on long-lived (~1 Ma) detachment faults. Lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are transported to the seafloor, forming oceanic core complexes (OCCs). Although widely studied, little is still known about the precise mechanisms by which OCCs initiate, evolve and subsequently terminate. Numerical models predict that OCC formation occurs at a critical melt supply value. Here, we present the results of a deep-towed geophysical and shipboard gravimetry survey, with the aims of placing constraints on the relationship between OCC formation and melt supply, and also to characterise the regional crustal structure. Our high-resolution, deep-towed sidescan sonar data suggest that OCCs actively form without any adjacent seafloor volcanism, which is in contrast to the modelling work of others which suggests that OCCs must form along with some degree of melting persistent throughout. Older, off-axis core complexes co-exist with extensive evidence for renewed magmatism in the axial valley. In some instances surficial volcanism is observed cutting across detachment surfaces, which may act as the temporal control on OCC formation. Furthermore, sidescan sonar data have been carefully mapped so as to illustrate the fault patterns that occur on the tectonic plate conjugate to that of OCC extension (which is characterised by strain partitioning onto a high amount of small offset faults). Crustal thickness variation derived from sea-level gravity measurements are also used to assess the controls on OCC formation, with the youngest OCCs in the region

  8. Postulates for measures of genuine multipartite correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles H.; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Ryszard; Horodecki, Pawel

    2011-01-15

    A lot of research has been done on multipartite correlations, but the problem of satisfactorily defining genuine multipartite correlations--those not trivially reducible to lower partite correlations--remains unsolved. In this paper we propose three reasonable postulates which each measure or indicator of genuine multipartite correlations (or genuine multipartite entanglement) should satisfy. We also introduce the concept of degree of correlations, which gives partial characterization of multipartite correlations. Then, we show that covariance does not satisfy two postulates and hence it cannot be used as an indicator of genuine multipartite correlations. Finally, we propose a candidate for a measure of genuine multipartite correlations based on the work that can be drawn from a local heat bath by means of a multipartite state.

  9. Determination and verification of the electrodynamic postulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Philip Jay

    1998-12-01

    The foundation of this research is a set of fundamental postulates from which electromagnetic theories can be derived. This set includes postulates on the following: (i)Velocity of light in vacuum, (ii)Kinematics of source and/or receiver, (iii)Temporal/spacial differentiation. The objective is to demonstrate which particular postulates will be able to correctly formulate a generalized electrodynamic theory based on Galilean relativity, which is consistent with the concept of universal time. This is significant because classical electromagnetic theory, in its current formulation, is inadequate in many regards: (1)Classical electromagnetism does not permit the establishment of universal time. (2)Explanation of crucial experiments is not postulate unique. (3)Quantities in classical electromagnetic theory are not coordinate invariant. (4) Longitudinal forces in current-carrying wires have been observed. (5)Mathematical problems with taking derivatives of functions with multiple-nested dependency. (i)Velocity of light. In current electromagnetic theory it is tacitly assumed (although not always explicitly stated) that the speed of light is always constant in all co-ordinate systems regardless of the motion of the source or receiver. This particular postulate is known as the velocity invariance of light, and is the cornerstone of special relativity. There is very little directly known about the speed of light and the interpretation of indirect experimental data, which does exist, is ambiguous. Even the often cited landmark experiments, with meson decay and atomic clocks in motion, do not prove the constancy of the speed of light. Rather, they only demonstrate that if the speed of light is invariant, then the conclusion that time ``dilates'' and length ``contracts'' as a function of velocity, must necessarily follow. This is just a consequence of the postulate, and does not prove its validity. (ii)Kinematics of source and/or receiver kinematics. is the study of

  10. Thermodynamics of melting relations in the system Fe-FeO: implications for the oxygen content in the Earth's outer core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komabayashi, T.

    2012-12-01

    Thermodynamics of melting relations in the system Fe-FeO was investigated to the outer core-inner core boundary (ICB) pressure from a self-consistent thermodynamic database for Fe and FeO phases which was evaluated from the latest static high-pressure and -temperature experiments. With the ideal solution model assumed for liquids at the ICB pressure condition, the eutectic temperature is 3680 K, which contradicts the results of the DAC experiments showing a solid assemblage Fe+FeO was stable up to 4200 K. Then, non-ideality of mixing for liquids was assessed to make the eutectic temperature consistent with the experiments. The new solution model predicts that the eutectic composition is about Fe-3.5 wt.%O, almost constant under the core pressures, which compositions would put the limit of the oxygen content in the core because the density of solid FeO is too small to match the inner core density. From the Gibbs free energy for the Fe-FeO liquids, I calculated the density, sound velocity, and adiabatic temperature gradient of a hypothetical oxygen-bearing outer core. Under deep outer core conditions, the addition of oxygen reduces the compressional wave velocity of pure iron liquid, moving it away from seismologically constrained values. An O-rich bulk outer core model is thus exclusive. On the other hand, at the top of the outer core, the addition of oxygen does not significantly change the velocity of iron liquids, which could not explain the low velocity layer with a thickness 60-70 km observed there.

  11. Postulated accident scenarios in weapons disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary of three postulated accident scenarios for weapons disassembly is provided in the paper. The first deals with a tetrahedral configuration of four generic pits; the second, an infinite planar array of generic pits with varying interstitial water density; and the third, a spherical shell with internal mass suspension in water varying the size and mass of the shell. Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code MCNP4A. Preliminary calculations pointed to a need for higher resolution of small pit separation regimes and snapshots of hydrodynamic processes of water/plutonium mixtures.

  12. A 10 year record of black carbon and dust from a Mera Peak ice core (Nepal): variability and potential impact on melting of Himalayan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginot, P.; Dumont, M.; Lim, S.; Patris, N.; Taupin, J.-D.; Wagnon, P.; Gilbert, A.; Arnaud, Y.; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Laj, P.

    2014-08-01

    A shallow ice core was extracted at the summit of Mera Peak at 6376 m a.s.l. in the southern flank of the Nepalese Himalaya range. From this core, we reconstructed the seasonal deposition fluxes of dust and refractory black carbon (rBC) since 1999. This archive presents well preserved seasonal cycles based on a monsoonal precipitation pattern. According to the seasonal precipitation regime in which 80% of annual precipitation falls between June and September, we estimated changes in the concentrations of these aerosols in surface snow. The analyses revealed that mass fluxes are a few orders of magnitude higher for dust (10.4 ± 2.8 g m-2 yr-1 than for rBC (7.9 ± 2.8 mg m-2 yr-1). The relative lack of seasonality in the dust record may reflect a high background level of dust inputs, whether from local or regional sources. Over the 10-year record, no deposition flux trends were detected for any of the species of interest. The data were then used to simulate changes in the surface snow albedo over time and the potential melting caused by these impurities. Mean potential melting caused by dust and rBC combined was 713 kg m-2 yr-1, and for rBC alone, 342 kg m-2 yr-1 for rBC under certain assumptions. Compared to the melting rate measured using the mass and energy balance at 5360 m a.s.l. on Mera Glacier between November 2009 and October 2010, i.e. 3000 kg m-2 yr-1 and 3690 kg m-2 yr-1 respectively, the impact of rBC represents less than 16% of annual potential melting while the contribution of dust and rBC combined to surface melting represents a maximum of 26%. Over the 10-year period, rBC variability in the ice core signal primarily reflected variability of the monsoon signal rather than variations in the intensity of emissions.

  13. Nonlinear damage analysis: Postulate and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to assess the viability of a damage postulate which asserts that the fatigue resistance curve of a metal is history dependent due to inelastic action. The study focusses on OFE copper because this simple model material accentuates the inelastic action central to the damage postulate. Data relevant to damage evolution and crack initiation are developed via a study of surface topography. The effects of surface layer residual stresses are explored via comparative testing as were the effects in initial prestraining. The results of the study very clearly show the deformation history dependence of the fatigue resistance of OFE copper. Furthermore the concept of deformation history dependence is shown to qualitatively explain the fatigue resistance of all histories considered. Likewise quantitative predictions for block cycle histories are found to accurately track the observed results. In this respect the assertion that damage per cycle for a given level of the damage parameter is deformation history dependent appears to be physically justified.

  14. Quantum mechanics without the projection postulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey

    1992-05-01

    I show that the quantum state ω can be interpreted as defining a probability measure on a subalgebra of the algebra of projection operators that is not fixed (as in classical statistical mechanics) but changes with ω and appropriate boundary conditions, hence with the dynamics of the theory. This subalgebra, while not embeddable into a Boolean algebra, will always admit two-valued homomorphisms, which correspond to the different possible ways in which a set of “determinate” quantities (selected by ω and the boundary conditions) can have values. The probabilities defined by ω (via the Born rule) are probabilities over these two-valued homomorphisms or value assignments. So any universe of interacting systems, including those functioning as measuring instruments, can be modelled quantum mechanically without the projection postulate.

  15. Final results of the XR2-1 BWR metallic melt relocation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, R.O.; Humphries, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the final results of the XR2-1 boiling water reactor (BWR) metallic melt relocation experiment, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the material relocation processes and relocation pathways in a dry BWR core following a severe nuclear reactor accident such as an unrecovered station blackout accident. The imposed test conditions (initial thermal state and the melt generation rates) simulated the conditions for the postulated accident scenario and the prototypic design of the lower core test section (in composition and in geometry) ensured that thermal masses and physical flow barriers were modeled adequately. The experiment has shown that, under dry core conditions, the metallic core materials that melt and drain from the upper core regions can drain from the core region entirely without formation of robust coherent blockages in the lower core. Temporary blockages that suspended pools of molten metal later melted, allowing the metals to continue draining downward. The test facility and instrumentation are described in detail. The test progression and results are presented and compared to MERIS code analyses. 6 refs., 55 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Nanometer quartz grains and rapid cooling melt in fault gouge during earthquake process - observed from the WFSD-1 drilling core sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Li, H.; Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.

    2014-12-01

    Drilling into active faults is an effective way to get data and materials at depth that help to understand the material properties, physical mechanisms and healing processes of the faults. The Wenchuan earthquake fault scientific drilling project (WFSD) was conducted immediately after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9). The first borehole of the project (WFSD-1) penetrates the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault with a final depth of 1201.15 m and meet the principal slip zone (PSZ) of Wenchuan earthquake at depth of 589.2 m. About 183.3 m-thick fault rocks are recognized in the WFSD-1 drilling core from 575.7 to 759 m-depth, which was confirmed as the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone with a real thickness of about 100 m due to the borehole inclination of 11°. In this research we got samples from WFSD-1 drilling core at the depth of 732.4-732.8 m, in which black gouge, gray gouge, fine-grained fault breccia and coarse-grained fault breccia layers can be distinguished clearly. Slickensides were developed in the surface of the black gouge layer. The protolith of this segment is sandstone. Based on detailed microstructural analysis using electron optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). An about 1 mm-thick amorphous material layer containing small quartz grains was observed. Circles with different densities were observed in the amorphous material indicate a melt-origin. Cracks are developed in the amorphous material, which are suggested to be caused by general volume reduction as a result of rapid cooling contraction. TEM-EDX analysis of the amorphous material indicates mainly feldspar composition, implying the melting temperature was >1230℃, while quartz grains did not melt indicating a temperature <1700℃. Nano-scale quartz grains were observed in a very small layer showing a different structure at the edge of the amorphous layer, indicating that nano quartz grains were formed by the comminution during earthquake, which

  17. Ringwoodite rim around olivine core in shock-induced melt veins of Antarctic chondrite : Mechanisms of transformation and Fe-Mg diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.; Li, X.; Sharp, T. G.; de Carli, P. S.

    2009-12-01

    Introduction: High-pressure minerals, produced by shock metamorphism, are common in and around melt veins in highly shocked chondrites. The shock duration can be constrained by using transformation kinetics, such as the crystallization rate of the melt-vein matrix[1-2], or growth rate of the high-pressure minerals [3-4], or using elements diffusion rate between two minerals [5]. Using transformation kinetics to constrain shock duration de-pend on the details of the transformation mechanism. For example, growth of topotaxial ringwoodite in olivine with coherent interfaces is slower than growth of inclusions with incoherent interfaces [4-5]. Similarly, diffusion-controlled growth, where rates are determined by long-range diffusion, is generally much slower than interface-controlled growth, which is only dependent on diffusion across the interface [6-8]. The occurrences of the high-pressure mineral rims were recently reported in shock-induced melt veins in several heavily shocked (S6) chondrites, ALH78003, Peace River and GRV052049 [9-11]. Here we report EMAP and Raman results of the ringwoodite rims around olivine cores in shock veins of the Antarctic chondrites GRV 022321, and to elucidate the mechanisms of transformation and Mg-Fe diffusion of the olivine to ringwoodite. Results: GRV022321 has a network of black veins which enclose abundant host-rock fragments. The enclosed fragments have sizes ranging from 5 µm to 30 µm, with a brighter rim up to several µm wide and a dark core in reflected light and BSE image. The Raman data reveal that the rim mineral is ringwoodite signature, and the core minerals are dominated by olivine and mixed minor ringwoodite. EMAP data confirm that the ringwoodite in rim is richer in faylite (Fa) than the olivine core. The Fa values range from 50 to 10 with the outer rim having highest Fa value, and the inside darker area with a lower value. Discussion: The occurrence of the rounded shape grains with smooth edges embedded in the fine

  18. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  19. Testing the ureilite projectile hypothesis for the El'gygytgyn impact: Determination of siderophile element abundances and Os isotope ratios in ICDP drill core samples and melt rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderis, S.; Wittmann, A.; Zaiss, J.; Elburg, M.; Ravizza, G.; Vanhaecke, F.; Deutsch, A.; Claeys, P.

    2013-07-01

    The geochemical nature of the impactites from International Continental Scientific Drilling Project—El'gygytgyn lake drill core 1C is compared with that of impact melt rock fragments collected near the western rim of the structure and literature data. Concentrations of major and trace elements, with special focus on siderophile metals Cr, Co, Ni, and the platinum group elements, and isotope ratios of osmium (Os), were determined to test the hypothesis of an ureilite impactor at El'gygytgyn. Least squares mixing calculations suggest that the upper volcanic succession of rhyolites, dacites, and andesites were the main contributors to the polymict impact breccias. Additions of 2-13.5 vol% of basaltic inclusions recovered from drill core intervals between 391.6 and 423.0 mblf can almost entirely account for the compositional differences observed for the bottom of a reworked fallout deposit at 318.9 mblf, a polymict impact breccia at 471.4 mblf, and three impact melt rock fragments. However, the measured Os isotope ratios and slightly elevated PGE content (up to 0.262 ng g-1 Ir) of certain impactite samples, for which the CI-normalized logarithmic PGE signature displays a relatively flat (i.e., chondritic) pattern, can only be explained by the incorporation of a small meteoritic contribution. This component is also required to explain the exceptionally high siderophile element contents and corresponding Ni/Cr, Ni/Co, and Cr/Co ratios of impact glass spherules and spherule fragments that were recovered from the reworked fallout deposits and from terrace outcrops of the Enmyvaam River approximately 10 km southeast of the crater center. Mixing calculations support the presence of approximately 0.05 wt% and 0.50-18 wt% of ordinary chondrite (possibly type-LL) in several impactites and in the glassy spherules, respectively. The heterogeneous distribution of the meteoritic component provides clues for emplacement mechanisms of the various impactite units.

  20. Megablocks and melt pockets in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure constrained by magnetic field measurements and properties of the Eyreville and Cape Charles cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, A.K.; Daniels, D.L.; Kontny, A.; Brozena, J.

    2009-01-01

    We use magnetic susceptibility and remanent magnetization measurements of the Eyreville and Cape Charles cores in combination with new and previously collected magnetic field data in order to constrain structural features within the inner basin of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. The Eyreville core shows the first evidence of several-hundred-meter-thick basement-derived megablocks that have been transported possibly kilometers from their pre-impact location. The magnetic anomaly map of the structure exhibits numerous short-wavelength (<2 km) variations that indicate the presence of magnetic sources within the crater fill. With core magnetic properties and seismic reflection and refraction results as constraints, forward models of the magnetic field show that these sources may represent basementderived megablocks that are a few hundred meters thick or melt bodies that are a few dozen meters thick. Larger-scale magnetic field properties suggest that these bodies overlie deeper, pre-impact basement contacts between materials with different magnetic properties such as gneiss and schist or gneiss and granite. The distribution of the short-wavelength magnetic anomalies in combination with observations of small-scale (1-2 mGal) gravity field variations suggest that basement-derived megablocks are preferentially distributed on the eastern side of the inner crater, not far from the Eyreville core, at depths of around 1-2 km. A scenario where additional basement-derived blocks between 2 and 3 km depth are distributed throughout the inner basin-and are composed of more magnetic materials, such as granite and schist, toward the east over a large-scale magnetic anomaly high and less magnetic materials, such as gneiss, toward the west where the magnetic anomaly is lower-provides a good model fi t to the observed magnetic anomalies in a manner that is consistent with both gravity and seismic-refraction data. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Boundary pressure of inter-connection of Fe-Ni-S melt in olivine based on in-situ X-ray tomography: Implication to core formation in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Uesugi, K.; Nakatsuka, A.; Funakoshi, K.; Ohtani, E.

    2011-12-01

    Interconnectivity of Fe-alloy melt in crystalline silicates is important property for the core formation mechanism in planetary interior. In previous studies, the interconnectivity of Fe-alloy melt has been studied based on textural observation of recovered samples from high pressure and temperature. However, there is no observation under high pressure and temperature. We have developed 80-ton uni-axial press for X-ray computed micro-tomography (X-CT) and performed X-CT measurement under high pressure (Urakawa et al. 2010). Here we report X-CT measurement of Fe-Ni-S melt in crystalline olivine and interconnectivity of the melt up to 3.5 GPa and 1273 K. X-CT measurements were carried out at BL20B2 beamline, SPring-8 synchrotron facility. The sample was powder mixture of Fe-Ni-S and olivine, which was enclosed in graphite capsule. Heating was performed using a cylindrical graphite furnace. Pressure was generated using opposed toroidal-shape WC anvil. The uni-axial press was set on the rotational stage and X-ray radiography image of the sample was collected using CCD camera from 0°to 180°with 0.3° step. 3-D image of the sample was obtained by reconstructing the 2-D radiography image. The 3-D CT image shows that the size of the Fe-Ni-S melt increased significantly compared to that before melting below 2.5 GPa, suggesting that the melt was interconnected in olivine crystals. On the other hand, 3-D texture of the sample at 3.5 GPa did not show difference from that before melting. Therefore, the boundary of inter-connection of Fe-Ni-S melt is likely to locate between 2.5 and 3.5 GPa. This result is important application for the core formation mechanism especially in small bodies, such as differentiated asteroids.

  2. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brooks, Dusty Marie

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  3. Melt transport - a personal cashing-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.

    2005-12-01

    The flow of fluids through rocks transports heat and material and changes bulk composition. The large-scale chemical differentiation of the Earth is related to flow of partial melts. From the perspective of current understanding of tectonic processes, prominent examples of such transport processes are the formation of oceanic crust from ascending basic melts at mid-ocean ridges, melt segregation involved in the solidification of the Earth's core, and dissolution-precipitation creep in subduction channels. Transport and deformation cannot be separated for partially molten aggregates. Permeability is only defined as an instantaneous parameter in the sense that Darcy's law is assumed to be valid; it is not an explicit parameter in the fundamental mechanical conservation laws but can be derived from them in certain circumstances as a result of averaging schemes. The governing, explicit physical properties in the mechanical equations are the shear and bulk viscosities of the solid framework and the fluid viscosity and compressibility. Constraints on the magnitude of these properties are available today from experiments at specific loading configurations, i.e., more or less well constrained initial and boundary conditions. The melt pressure remains the least controlled parameter. While the fluid viscosity is often much lower than the solid's the two-phase aggregate may exhibit considerable strength owing to the difficulty of moving the fluid through the branched pore network. The extremes in behavior depend on the time scale of loading, as known from daily live experiences (spounge, Danish coffee-pot, human tissue between neighboring bones). Several theoretical approaches attempted to formulate mechanical constitutive equations for two-phase aggregates. An important issue is the handling of internal variables in these equations. At experimental conditions, grain size, melt pocket orientation and crystallographic orientation -prime candidates for internal variables

  4. A parametric model for analysis of melt progression in U-A1 assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, I.K. ); Kim, S.H.; Leonard, M.T.; Amos, C.N. )

    1990-06-15

    A computational model has been developed that calculates the thermal degradation of the reactor core of the production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) under postulated severe accident conditions. This model addresses heatup and degradation of the U-Al fuel and Li-Al or U-metal target assemblies and neighboring structures. Models included are those for assembly heatup due to decay heat generation, material melting and relocation, volume expansion of fuel due to foaming and melt/debris accumulation in assembly bottom end-fittings. Sample results are presented that illustrate the effect of alternative assumptions regarding the temperature at which U-Al alloy melts and relocates and the extent to which fuel foaming thermally couples adjacent fuel and target tubes. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Analysis of Radiological Consequences of Postulated Releases from the IEM Cell

    SciTech Connect

    HIMES, D.A.

    2002-11-06

    The Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell is located inside the Reactor Containment Building (RCB) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The IEM Cell is a shielded, hot-cell complex which houses the remotely operated equipment originally designed for the performance of nondestructive examination of core components and limited maintenance of reactor plant equipment. The cell is currently being used for preparation and packaging of fueled components into Core Component Containers (CCC) for transfer to dry storage. This analysis provides an assessment of radiological consequences onsite and at the site boundary for three bounding postulated accident scenarios.

  6. A proof of von Neumann's postulate in Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, Elio

    2010-05-04

    A Clifford algebraic analysis is explained. It gives proof of von Neumann's postulate on quantum measurement. It is of basic significance to explain the problem of quantum wave function reduction in quantum mechanics.

  7. Koch's postulates, microbial dysbiosis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, V P; Proctor, S D; Willing, B P

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, a growing amount of evidence supports the role of microbes and an imbalanced microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While many reviews have been written on the microbiota in IBD, few have considered how they fulfil the Koch's postulates. In this review, we consider how the Koch's postulates might be modified so that they can be fulfilled for polymicrobial diseases, and we discuss the progress made to date in fulfilling them. PMID:27179648

  8. Pernicious Residues of Foundational Postulates: Their Impact on Women.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognized that many of the original psychoanalytic views of women were derived from misguided theories. Regrettably, residues of the foundational postulates that informed those theories still persist, assuring a pervasive gender bias even in contemporary psychoanalytic investigations. This contribution describes where those postulates reside, while proposing alternates that could prove far more useful for the theory and practice of our profession. PMID:27337810

  9. One Hair Postulate for Hawking Radiation as Tunneling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Cai, Qing-Yu; Liu, Xu-Feng; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2014-03-01

    For Hawking radiation, treated as a tunneling process, the no-hair theorem of black hole together with the law of energy conservation is utilized to postulate that the tunneling rate only depends on the external qualities (e.g., the mass for the Schwarzschild black hole) and the energy of the radiated particle. This postulate is justified by the WKB approximation for calculating the tunneling probability. Based on this postulate, a general formula for the tunneling probability is derived without referring to the concrete form of black hole metric. This formula implies an intrinsic correlation between the successive processes of the black hole radiation of two or more particles. It also suggests a kind of entropy conservation and thus resolves the puzzle of black hole information loss in some sense.

  10. A Conceptual Derivation of Einstein's Postulates of Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Thomas E.

    This document presents a discussion and conceptual derivation of Einstein's postulates of special relativity. The perceptron approach appears to be a fundamentally new manner of regarding physical phenomena and it is hoped that physicists will interest themselves in the concept. (Author)

  11. Safely Teaching Koch's Postulates on the Causation of Infectious Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which the interactions between a parasite and its host may be demonstrated using the relationship between yogurt and two species of bacteria. Background information on Koch's postulates is provided. Materials, laboratory procedures, and results are discussed. (CW)

  12. The four postulates of freudian unconscious neurocognitive convergences.

    PubMed

    Arminjon, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In the 1980s, the terms "cognitive unconscious" were invented to denominate a perspective on unconscious mental processes independent from the psychoanalytical views. For several reasons, the two approaches to unconscious are generally conceived as irreducible. Nowadays, we are witnessing a certain convergence between both fields. The aim of this paper consists in examining the four basic postulates of Freudian unconscious at the light of neurocognitive sciences. They posit: (1) that some psychological processes are unconsciously performed and causally determine conscious processes, (2) that they are governed by their own cognitive rules, (3) that they set out their own intentions, (4) and that they lead to a conflicting organization of psyche. We show that each of these postulates is the subject of empirical and theoretical works. If the two fields refer to more or less similar mechanisms, we propose that their opposition rests on an epistemological misunderstanding. As a conclusion, we promote a conservative reunification of the two perspectives. PMID:21734896

  13. The Four Postulates of Freudian Unconscious Neurocognitive Convergences

    PubMed Central

    Arminjon, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In the 1980s, the terms “cognitive unconscious” were invented to denominate a perspective on unconscious mental processes independent from the psychoanalytical views. For several reasons, the two approaches to unconscious are generally conceived as irreducible. Nowadays, we are witnessing a certain convergence between both fields. The aim of this paper consists in examining the four basic postulates of Freudian unconscious at the light of neurocognitive sciences. They posit: (1) that some psychological processes are unconsciously performed and causally determine conscious processes, (2) that they are governed by their own cognitive rules, (3) that they set out their own intentions, (4) and that they lead to a conflicting organization of psyche. We show that each of these postulates is the subject of empirical and theoretical works. If the two fields refer to more or less similar mechanisms, we propose that their opposition rests on an epistemological misunderstanding. As a conclusion, we promote a conservative reunification of the two perspectives. PMID:21734896

  14. Fission product transport and behavior during two postulated loss of flow transients in the air

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Carboneau, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses fission product behavior during two postulated loss-of-flow accidents (leading to high- and low-pressure core degradation, respectively) in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These transients are designated ATR Transient LCPI5 (high-pressure) and LPP9 (low-pressure). Normally, transients of this nature would be easily mitigated using existing safety systems and procedures. In these analyses, failure of these safety systems was assumed so that core degradation and fission product release could be analyzed. A probabilistic risk assessment indicated that the probability of occurrence for these two transients is of the order of 10{sup {minus}5 }and 10{sup {minus}7} per reactor year for LCP15 and LPP9, respectively.

  15. Fission product transport and behavior during two postulated loss of flow transients in the air

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Carboneau, M.L.

    1991-12-31

    This document discusses fission product behavior during two postulated loss-of-flow accidents (leading to high- and low-pressure core degradation, respectively) in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These transients are designated ATR Transient LCPI5 (high-pressure) and LPP9 (low-pressure). Normally, transients of this nature would be easily mitigated using existing safety systems and procedures. In these analyses, failure of these safety systems was assumed so that core degradation and fission product release could be analyzed. A probabilistic risk assessment indicated that the probability of occurrence for these two transients is of the order of 10{sup {minus}5 }and 10{sup {minus}7} per reactor year for LCP15 and LPP9, respectively.

  16. Trace element partitioning in Earth's lower mantle and implications for geochemical consequences of partial melting at the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Nobumichi; van Westrenen, Wim; Fei, Yingwei

    2004-08-01

    Trace element partitioning data between CaSiO 3-perovskite (CaPv), MgSiO 3-perovskite (MgPv), calcium-aluminum silicate (CAS-phase), and coexisting melts in peridotite and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions were obtained at 25-27 GPa and 2400-2530 °C using multi-anvil apparatus and ion microprobe. Results clearly show that CaPv is the predominant host for large ion lithophile elements (LILE) in the lower mantle. Because of the overwhelmingly high CaPv/melt partition coefficients (>10 for many of the LILE), partial melting in the lower mantle causes strong enrichment of LILE in the CaPv-bearing solid phase residue. CaPv has the following partitioning characteristics: (1) uniformly high partition coefficients for heavy rare earth elements (HREE) (e.g. 15 for Yb), decreasing toward light REE (e.g. 7 for La), (2) systematically lower partition coefficients for high field strength elements (Nb, Zr, Ti) and Sr relative to neighboring REE, (3) high Th and U, and systematically low Pb partition coefficients. Previous high-pressure studies have shown that the stability field of CaPv above solidus temperature is much wider in basaltic composition than in peridotite, indicating that melting of subducted oceanic crust in the lower mantle could produce significant geochemical CaPv signatures. Strong enrichment in Th and U relative to Pb in CaPv would result in radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions of the CaPv-bearing solid residue. Some clinopyroxenes in plume mantle peridotite xenoliths possess trace element patterns closely resembling those of natural CaPv found in diamonds and CaPv from the present experiments, suggesting that they were inherited from the CaPv-bearing precursor. In contrast, CaPv is the first phase to disappear during partial melting of peridotite above 24 GPa, and its geochemical signature may not be observable in nature. (MgPv + CaPv) fractional crystallization from a magma ocean has previously been put forward as a mechanism for Si depletion of the

  17. Fulfilling Koch's postulates in glycoscience: HCELL, GPS and translational glycobiology.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Glycoscience-based research that is performed expressly to address medical necessity and improve patient outcomes is called "translational glycobiology". In the 19th century, Robert Koch proposed a set of postulates to rigorously establish causality in microbial pathogenesis, and these postulates can be reshaped to guide knowledge into how naturally-expressed glycoconjugates direct molecular processes critical to human well-being. Studies in the 1990s indicated that E-selectin, an endothelial lectin that binds sialofucosylated carbohydrate determinants, is constitutively expressed on marrow microvessels, and investigations in my laboratory indicated that human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) uniquely express high levels of a specialized glycoform of CD44 called "hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand" (HCELL) that functions as a highly potent E-selectin ligand. To assess the role of HCELL in directing HSC migration to marrow, a method called "glycosyltransferase-programmed stereosubstitution" (GPS) was developed to custom-modify CD44 glycans to enforce HCELL expression on viable cell surfaces. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are devoid of E-selectin ligands, but GPS-based glycoengineering of CD44 on MSCs licenses homing of these cells to marrow in vivo, providing direct evidence that HCELL serves as a "bone marrow homing receptor". This review will discuss the molecular basis of cell migration in historical context, will describe the discovery of HCELL and its function as the bone marrow homing receptor, and will inform on how glycoengineering of CD44 serves as a model for adapting Koch's postulates to elucidate the key roles that glycoconjugates play in human biology and for realizing the immense impact of translational glycobiology in clinical medicine. PMID:26933169

  18. A Postulation of a Concept in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-10-01

    I am postulating that all fermions have a quantum mouth (Planck size) that radiates a flux density of gravitons as a function of the mass of the particle. Nucleons are not hard balls like light bulbs radiating photons challenging Newtonian concepts of centers and surfaces. The hardball analogy is implicit in coupling constants that compare strong force relative to gravity. The radiating mouth is not localized at the center like a hypothetical point size filament of a light bulb with a hard surface. A point invokes mass of zero volume. It is too precise, inconsistent and illogical. Nothing can be localized with more accuracy that Planck length. Substituting the hard glass bulb surface with flexible plastic surface would clearly make the interacting mouths of particles approach each other as close as possible, but no less than the quantum limit of Planck length. Therefore, surface distance in Newtonian gravity would be a close approximation at particle scale and fits Feynman's road map [1]. My postulation reflected by Fig. 2 of gr-qc/0507130 explains observations of increasing values of coupling constants resulting from decreasing values of Planck length (See physics/0210040 v1). Since Planck length is the fundamental unit of length of nature, its variation can impact our observation of the universe and the evolutionary process.

  19. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  20. A Bouc-Wen model compatible with plasticity postulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampakis, A. E.; Koumousis, V. K.

    2009-05-01

    The versatile Bouc-Wen model has been used extensively to describe hysteretic phenomena in various fields of engineering. Nevertheless, it is known that it exhibits displacement drift, force relaxation and nonclosure of hysteretic loops when subjected to short unloading-reloading paths. Consequently, it locally violates Drucker's or Ilyushin's postulate of plasticity. In this study, an effective modification of the model is proposed which eliminates these problems. A stiffening factor is introduced into the hysteretic differential equation which enables the distinction between virgin loading and reloading. Appropriate reversal points are utilized effectively to guide the entire process. It is shown that the proposed modification corrects the nonphysical behavior of the model under short unloading-reloading paths without affecting its response in all other cases. It is further demonstrated that the original and modified model exhibit significantly different response under seismic excitation.

  1. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 1: Postulated models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1994-01-01

    A short theoretical study of aircraft aerodynamic model equations with unsteady effects is presented. The aerodynamic forces and moments are expressed in terms of indicial functions or internal state variables. The first representation leads to aircraft integro-differential equations of motion; the second preserves the state-space form of the model equations. The formulations of unsteady aerodynamics is applied in two examples. The first example deals with a one-degree-of-freedom harmonic motion about one of the aircraft body axes. In the second example, the equations for longitudinal short-period motion are developed. In these examples, only linear aerodynamic terms are considered. The indicial functions are postulated as simple exponentials and the internal state variables are governed by linear, time-invariant, first-order differential equations. It is shown that both approaches to the modeling of unsteady aerodynamics lead to identical models.

  2. A random spatial network model based on elementary postulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In contrast to the random topology model, this model ascribes a unique spatial specification to generated drainage networks, a distinguishing property of some network growth models. The simplicity of the postulates creates an opportunity for potential analytic investigations of the probabilistic structure of the drainage networks, while the spatial specification enables analyses of spatially dependent network properties. In the random topology model all drainage networks, conditioned on magnitude (number of first-order streams), are equally likely, whereas in this model all spanning trees of a grid, conditioned on area and drainage density, are equally likely. As a result, link lengths in the generated networks are not independent, as usually assumed in the random topology model. -from Authors

  3. Analysis of postulated events for the revised ALMR/PRISM design

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1991-12-31

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is continuing a pre-application review of the 471 MWt, Liquid Metal Reactor, PRISM by General Electric, with Brookhaven National Laboratory providing technical support. The revised design has been evaluated, using the SSC code, for an unscrammed loss of heat sink (ULOHS), an unscrammed loss of flow (ULOF) with and without the Gas Expansion Modules (GEMs), and a 40{cents} unscrammed transient overpower (UTOP) event. The feedback effects for U-27Pu-10Zr metal fuel were modeled in SSC. The ULOHS accident was determined to be a benign event for the design, with the reactor power transitioning down to a decay heat level within 500s. The power during the postulated ULOF events, with the GEMs functioning, transitioned to decay heat levels without fuel damage, and included a 300K margin to sodium saturation. The case without the GEMs had only a 160K margin to sodium saturation and higher fuel temperatures. In addition, the clad was predicted to quickly pass through the eutectic phase (between fuel and clad), and some clad wastage would result. The 40{cents} UTOP was predicted to raise the power to 1.8 rated, which later stabilized near 1.2 times full power. SSC predicted some localized fuel melting for the event, but the significance of this localized damage has not yet been determined. If necessary, the vendor has options to reduce the maximum reactivity insertion below 40{cents}.

  4. Analysis of postulated events for the revised ALMR/PRISM design

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is continuing a pre-application review of the 471 MWt, Liquid Metal Reactor, PRISM by General Electric, with Brookhaven National Laboratory providing technical support. The revised design has been evaluated, using the SSC code, for an unscrammed loss of heat sink (ULOHS), an unscrammed loss of flow (ULOF) with and without the Gas Expansion Modules (GEMs), and a 40{cents} unscrammed transient overpower (UTOP) event. The feedback effects for U-27Pu-10Zr metal fuel were modeled in SSC. The ULOHS accident was determined to be a benign event for the design, with the reactor power transitioning down to a decay heat level within 500s. The power during the postulated ULOF events, with the GEMs functioning, transitioned to decay heat levels without fuel damage, and included a 300K margin to sodium saturation. The case without the GEMs had only a 160K margin to sodium saturation and higher fuel temperatures. In addition, the clad was predicted to quickly pass through the eutectic phase (between fuel and clad), and some clad wastage would result. The 40{cents} UTOP was predicted to raise the power to 1.8 rated, which later stabilized near 1.2 times full power. SSC predicted some localized fuel melting for the event, but the significance of this localized damage has not yet been determined. If necessary, the vendor has options to reduce the maximum reactivity insertion below 40{cents}.

  5. Economic Analysis of a Postulated space Tourism Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Allan S.

    2002-01-01

    Design concepts and associated costs were defined for a family of launch vehicles supporting a space tourism endeavor requiring the weekly transport of space tourists to and from an Earth- orbiting facility. The stated business goal for the Space Tourist Transportation System (STTS) element of the proposed commercial space venture was to transport and return ~50 passengers a week to LEO at a cost of roughly 50 K per seat commencing in 2005. This paper summarizes the economic analyses conducted within a broader Systems Engineering study of the postulated concept. Parametric costs were derived using TransCostSystems' (TCS) Cost Engineering Handbook, version 7. Costs were developed as a function of critical system characteristics and selected business scenarios. Various economic strategies directed toward achieving a cost of ~50 K per seat were identified and examined. The study indicated that with a `nominal' business scenario, the initial cost for developing and producing a fully reusable, 2-stage STTS element for a baseline of 46-passengers was about 15.5 B assuming a plausible `commercialization factor' of 0.333. The associated per-seat ticket cost was ~890 K, more than an order of magnitude higher than desired. If the system is enlarged to 104 passengers for better efficiency, the STTS initial cost for the nominal business scenario is increased to about 19.8 B and the per-seat ticket cost is reduced to ~530 K. It was concluded that achieving the desired ticket cost of 50 K per seat is not feasible unless the size of the STTS, and therefore of the entire system, is substantially increased. However, for the specified operational characteristics, it was shown that a system capacity of thousands of passengers per week is required. This implies an extremely high total system development cost, which is not very realistic as a commercial venture, especially in the proposed time frame. These results suggested that ambitious commercial space ventures may have to rely on

  6. Hidden carbon in Earth's inner core revealed by shear softening in dense Fe7C3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Li, Zeyu; Zhang, Dongzhou; Liu, Jiachao; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Bi, Wenli; Alp, E Ercan; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Li, Jie

    2014-12-16

    Earth's inner core is known to consist of crystalline iron alloyed with a small amount of nickel and lighter elements, but the shear wave (S wave) travels through the inner core at about half the speed expected for most iron-rich alloys under relevant pressures. The anomalously low S-wave velocity (vS) has been attributed to the presence of liquid, hence questioning the solidity of the inner core. Here we report new experimental data up to core pressures on iron carbide Fe7C3, a candidate component of the inner core, showing that its sound velocities dropped significantly near the end of a pressure-induced spin-pairing transition, which took place gradually between 10 GPa and 53 GPa. Following the transition, the sound velocities increased with density at an exceptionally low rate. Extrapolating the data to the inner core pressure and accounting for the temperature effect, we found that low-spin Fe7C3 can reproduce the observed vS of the inner core, thus eliminating the need to invoke partial melting or a postulated large temperature effect. The model of a carbon-rich inner core may be consistent with existing constraints on the Earth's carbon budget and would imply that as much as two thirds of the planet's carbon is hidden in its center sphere. PMID:25453077

  7. Skylab M551 metals melting experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the M551 Metals Melting Experiment were to: (1) study behavior of molten metal, (2) characterize metals melted and solidified in the low gravity space environment compared to one-gravity of earth, and (3) determine feasibility of joining metals in space. The experiment used the electron beam (EB) and chamber of the M512 apparatus to make a dwell puddle and a melt in a rotating disc of varying thickness. Hence, the EB performed cut-through, full and partial penetration melts, in addition to a resolidified button. The three disc materials were aluminum 2219-T87, 304 stainless steel, and pure tantalum to provide a wide range of density and melting conditions. Observations to date include the proof that EB welding, cutting, and melting can be done successfully in low gravity. Earlier, some welding authorities had postulated that without gravity the EB would force the molten puddle out of contact. However, the experiment proved that surface tension forces predominate. From the viewpoint of cast-solidification, small, equiaxed grains in Skylab specimens compared to large, elongated grains in ground based specimens were observed. The former are thought to be associated with constitutional supercooling and nucleation where the latter are associated with dendritic solidification. In further support of the more equiaxed grain growth in Skylab, symmetric subgrain patterns were frequently observed where there was much less symmetry in ground based specimens.

  8. Liquid metal reactions under postulated accident conditions for fission and fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlestein, L.D.

    1980-04-01

    Sodium and lithium reactions are considered in the context of a postulated breach of a coolant boundary. Specific topics addressed are coolant-atmosphere and coolant-material reactions which may contribute to the overall consequence of a postulated accident scenario, and coolant reaction extinguishment and effluent control which may be desirable for containment of the spilled coolant.

  9. The effects of sulfur, silicon, water, and oxygen fugacity on carbon solubility and partitioning in Fe-rich alloy and silicate melt systems at 3 GPa and 1600 °C: Implications for core-mantle differentiation and degassing of magma oceans and reduced planetary mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei

    2015-04-01

    oxidized, dry MO may have lost almost its entire carbon into the core. If delivery of bulk Earth carbon predominantly occurred after >90% of accretion, i.e., in a relatively oxidized MO (IW-2 to IW-1), then with applicable D C metal /silicate > 1000, most early Earth carbon would also enter the segregating core. Finally, the predominance of methane in reduced silicate melt with fO2 below IW-1 also indicates that degassing of a hydrous, solidifying MO may have created a reduced early atmosphere, and degassing from lunar and Martian mantle may have released much more methane than carbon dioxide.

  10. Melting the Divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Presenting Quaternary Environmental Change to students who fall into Widening Participation criteria at the University of Cambridge, gives a unique opportunity to present academic debate in an approachable and entertaining way. Literally by discussing the melting of our ice caps, melts the divide Cambridge has between its reputation and the reality for the brightest, underprivileged, students. There is a balance between presenting cutting edge research with the need to come across as accessible (and importantly valuable to "learning"). Climate change over the Quaternary lends itself well to this aim. By lecturing groups of potential students through the entire Quaternary in an hour, stopping to discuss how our ancestors interacted with past Interglacials and what are the mechanisms driving change (in generalized terms), you are able to introduce cutting edge research (such as the latest NEEM ice core) to the students. This shows the evolution and importance of higher education and academic research. The lecture leads well onto group discussions (termed "supervisions" in Cambridge), to explore their opinions on the concern for present Anthropogenic Climate Change in relation to Past Climate Change after being presented with images that our ancestors "made it". Here discussion thrives off students saying obvious things (or sarcastic comments!) which quickly can lead into a deep technical discussion on their terms. Such discussions give the students a zest for higher education, simply throwing Ruddiman's (2003) "The Anthroprocene Started Several Thousand Years Ago" at them, questions in a second their concept of Anthropogenic Climate Change. Supervisions lend themselves well to bright, articulate, students and by offering these experiences to students of Widening Participation criteria we quickly melt the divide between the reputation of Cambridge ( and higher education as a whole) and the day to day practice. Higher education is not for the privileged, but a free and

  11. Core formation by giant impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas about the accretion and early evolution of the Earth and the other terrestrial planets have recently undergone a number of revolutionary changes. It has become clear that giant impacts were far from rare events. In the later stages of accretion any given planetary embryo is liable to be struck several times by other bodies of up to half its own diameter. Such an impact may have the ability to trigger core formation. Traditional accretion models have had great difficulty explaining the formation of the core. If one admits the importance of infrequent large events that may melt an entire hemisphere, the core formation difficulty vanishes. Millimeter-size iron blebs in the melted region will rain out due to their density difference with the silicate melt. Core formation may not require the melting of the entire hemisphere of the planet. The conditions are explored under which impact induced core formation may occur.

  12. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-07-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates

  13. "Snowing" Core in Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Cormier, V.; Gao, L.; Gubbins, D.; Kharlamova, S. A.; He, K.; Yang, H.

    2008-12-01

    As a planet cools, an initially molten core gradually solidifies. Solidification occurs at shallow depths in the form of "snow", if the liquidus temperature gradient of the core composition is smaller than the adiabatic temperature gradient in the core. Experimental data on the melting behavior of iron-sulfur binary system suggest that the cores of Mercury and Ganymede are probably snowing at the present time. The Martian core is predicted to snow in the future, provided that the sulfur content falls into the range of 10 to 14 weight percent. Is the Earth's core snowing? If so, what are the surface manifestations? If the Earth's core snowed in the past, how did it affect the formation of the solid inner core and the geodynamo? Here, we evaluate the likelihood and consequences of a snowing core throughout the Earth's history, on the basis of mineral physics data describing the melting behavior, equation-of-state, and thermodynamic properties of iron-rich alloys at high pressures. We discuss if snowing in the present-day Earth can reproduce the shallow gradients of compressional wave velocity above the inner-core boundary, and whether or not snowing in the early Earth may reconcile the apparent young age of the solid inner core with a long-lived geodynamo.

  14. CV and CM chondrite impact melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunning, Nicole G.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; McSween, Harry Y.; Tenner, Travis J.; Kita, Noriko T.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Volatile-rich and typically oxidized carbonaceous chondrites, such as CV and CM chondrites, potentially respond to impacts differently than do other chondritic materials. Understanding impact melting of carbonaceous chondrites has been hampered by the dearth of recognized impact melt samples. In this study we identify five carbonaceous chondrite impact melt clasts in three host meteorites: a CV3red chondrite, a CV3oxA chondrite, and a regolithic howardite. The impact melt clasts in these meteorites respectively formed from CV3red chondrite, CV3oxA chondrite, and CM chondrite protoliths. We identified these impact melt clasts and interpreted their precursors based on their texture, mineral chemistry, silicate bulk elemental composition, and in the case of the CM chondrite impact melt clast, in situ measurement of oxygen three-isotope signatures in olivine. These impact melts typically contain euhedral-subhedral olivine microphenocrysts, sometimes with relict cores, in glassy groundmasses. Based on petrography and Raman spectroscopy, four of the impact melt clasts exhibit evidence for volatile loss: these melt clasts either contain vesicles or are depleted in H2O relative to their precursors. Volatile loss (i.e., H2O) may have reduced the redox state of the CM chondrite impact melt clast. The clasts that formed from the more oxidized precursors (CV3oxA and CM chondrites) exhibit phase and bulk silicate elemental compositions consistent with higher intrinsic oxygen fugacities relative to the clast that formed from a more reduced precursor (CV3red chondrite). The mineral chemistries and assemblages of the CV and CM chondrite impact melt clasts identified here provide a template for recognizing carbonaceous chondrite impact melts on the surfaces of asteroids.

  15. MACCS usage at Rocky Flats Plant for consequence analysis of postulated accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Foppe, T.L.; Peterson, V.L.

    1993-10-01

    The MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS) has been applied to the radiological consequence assessment of potential accidents from a non-reactor nuclear facility. MACCS has been used in a variety of applications to evaluate radiological dose and health effects to the public from postulated plutonium releases and from postulated criticalities. These applications were conducted to support deterministic and probabilistic accident analyses for safety analyses for safety analysis reports, radiological sabotage studies, and other regulatory requests.

  16. Hidden carbon in Earth’s inner core revealed by shear softening in dense Fe7C3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zeyu; Zhang, Dongzhou; Liu, Jiachao; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Bi, Wenli; Alp, E. Ercan; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Li, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Earth’s inner core is known to consist of crystalline iron alloyed with a small amount of nickel and lighter elements, but the shear wave (S wave) travels through the inner core at about half the speed expected for most iron-rich alloys under relevant pressures. The anomalously low S-wave velocity (vS) has been attributed to the presence of liquid, hence questioning the solidity of the inner core. Here we report new experimental data up to core pressures on iron carbide Fe7C3, a candidate component of the inner core, showing that its sound velocities dropped significantly near the end of a pressure-induced spin-pairing transition, which took place gradually between 10 GPa and 53 GPa. Following the transition, the sound velocities increased with density at an exceptionally low rate. Extrapolating the data to the inner core pressure and accounting for the temperature effect, we found that low-spin Fe7C3 can reproduce the observed vS of the inner core, thus eliminating the need to invoke partial melting or a postulated large temperature effect. The model of a carbon-rich inner core may be consistent with existing constraints on the Earth's carbon budget and would imply that as much as two thirds of the planet's carbon is hidden in its center sphere. PMID:25453077

  17. [A matter of methods: the historicity of Koch's postulates 1840-2000].

    PubMed

    Gradmann, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the historical origins and the popularity of 'Koch's Postulates'. In 1884 Friedrich Löffler wrote down the well-known three steps of isolation, cultivation and inoculation as conditions for establishing the existence of a pathogen. These postulates are frequently invoked in textbooks of medical history. Yet they seem to have had little relevance in medical research. Their assumed inventor, Robert Koch, produced numerous variations in his own methodology. However, underlying his work was a sort of trivial ontology of diseases which rendered an experimental reconstruction of human pathologies in animal models practical and meaningful. There were many ways to pursue this end. Koch usually limited his discussion to practical questions related to the course that investigations had to take, while matters of principle were only treated implicitly in his writings. Löffler's achievement was to popularise Koch's views in his postulates. Given that, it is not surprising that the countless references to Koch's postulates which one finds in the 20th century usually refer to the spirit rather than the literal meaning of the postulates. For example, proponents of virology or molecular medicine devise variations of Koch's postulates that serve to relate their own work to Koch's bacteriology. The latter is perceived as the origin of modern experimental medicine. The nature of such references is less historical than anecdotal: referring to a historical object that did not exist as such, these references produce ex traditione credentials for experimental medicine. PMID:18839931

  18. Effect of boiling regime on melt stream breakup in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed examining the breakup and mixing behavior of an initially coherent stream of high-density melt as it flows downward through water. This work has application to the quenching of molten core materials as they drain downward during a postulated severe reactor accident. The study has included examination of various models of breakup distances based upon interfacial instabilities dominated either by liquid-liquid contact or by liquid-vapor contact. A series of experiments was performed to provide a data base for assessment of the various modeling approaches. The experiments involved Wood's metal (T/sub m/ = 73/sup 0/C, rho = 9.2 g/cm/sup 3/, d/sub j/ = 20 mm) poured into a deep pool of water. The temperature of the water and wood's metal were varied to span the range from single-phase, liquid-liquid contact to the film boiling regime. Experiment results showed that breakup occurred largely as a result of the spreading and entrainment from the leading edge of the jet. However, for streams of sufficient lengths a breakup length could be discerned at which there was no longer a coherent central core of the jet to feed the leading edge region. The erosion of the vertical trailing column is by Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities and related disengagement of droplets from the jet into the surrounding fluid. For conditions of liquid-liquid contact, the breakup length has been found to be about 20 jet diameters; when substantial vapor is produced at the interface due to heat transfer from the jet to the water, the breakup distance was found to range to as high as 50 jet diameters. The former values are close to the analytical prediction of Taylor, whereas the latter values are better predicted by the model of Epstein and Fauske.

  19. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  20. Lithologic melt partitioning and transport properties of partially molten harzburgite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. J.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L.; Gaetani, G. A.; Le Roux, V.; Xiao, X.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative constraints on melt transport in upper mantle are critical to understanding various dynamic processes at ocean ridges. In this study, we propose that thermodynamic gradients, resulting from spatial variations in mineralogy, can unevenly partition melt between olivine and orthopyroxene (opx), the two most abundant minerals in the upper mantle. The lithologic melt partitioning leads to higher melt fraction in olivine-rich regions compared to opx-rich regions, which may have important implications for melt transport. Lithologic partitioning has been experimentally confirmed in analogue systems, such as quartz/fluorite-H2O (Watson, 1999), but has never been observed in olivine/opx-melt samples. We synthesized olivine/opx-melt (harzburgite) samples by isostatically pressing oxide-high alumina basalt mixtures at 1350 °C and 1.5 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Nominal melt fractions of 0.02 to 0.20 and a constant 3 to 2 (olivine to opx) volume ratio were tested. Experimental charges were quenched, cored, and imaged using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The resulting 3-D images constitute digital rock samples on which local melt fraction distributions, permeabilities, and electrical conductivities were numerically quantified. Our results are strong evidence for melt partitioning between olivine and opx: local melt fractions are 10 to 50% higher around olivine than opx grains. At the same melt fraction, permeabilities of whole harzburgite samples are lower compared to monomineralic olivine-melt samples (Miller et al., 2014). However, the presence of opx negligibly affects the permeability-porosity relation unless the abundance of opx is more than 40 vol. %. In contrast, electrical conductivities of harzburgites are systematically lower than those of olivine-melt samples. Lithological melt partitioning could be another mechanism responsible for forming high-porosity melt pathways in addition to reaction infiltration instability and deformation melt bands.

  1. Olivine-FeS Partial-Melt

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J; Siebert, J; Ryerson, F J; Kinney, J

    2006-10-02

    The figure shows Fe-S-filled melt channels in olivine created at high temperature and pressure. The 3D image was obtained on Beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with a spatial resolution of better than two microns (bar is 10 microns). Permeability of Fe-S melts in olivine at high temperatures and pressures provides an important constraint on models of planetary core formation. Permeability must be inferred from empirical relationships based on microstructure. To date, estimates of permeability have varied by more than five orders of magnitude. To provide more accurate constraints, we used high-resolution synchrotron radiation computed tomography to image the three-dimensional network of melt-containing pores in an olivine matrix, and calculated the permeability directly by solving the equations of Stokes flow through the actual pore network using a lattice-Boltzmann approach. These calculations provide an independent constraint on models of planetary core formation.

  2. Melting of peridotite to 140 gigapascals.

    PubMed

    Fiquet, G; Auzende, A L; Siebert, J; Corgne, A; Bureau, H; Ozawa, H; Garbarino, G

    2010-09-17

    Interrogating physical processes that occur within the lowermost mantle is a key to understanding Earth's evolution and present-day inner composition. Among such processes, partial melting has been proposed to explain mantle regions with ultralow seismic velocities near the core-mantle boundary, but experimental validation at the appropriate temperature and pressure regimes remains challenging. Using laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we constructed the solidus curve of a natural fertile peridotite between 36 and 140 gigapascals. Melting at core-mantle boundary pressures occurs at 4180 ± 150 kelvin, which is a value that matches estimated mantle geotherms. Molten regions may therefore exist at the base of the present-day mantle. Melting phase relations and element partitioning data also show that these liquids could host many incompatible elements at the base of the mantle. PMID:20847269

  3. Melting relations of the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitz, M. G.; Kushiro, I.

    1974-01-01

    The proportions of major oxides in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite after partial reduction are remarkably similar to those in possible mantle material of the earth. When heated, the Allende meteorite generates a sulfide melt, a ferrobasaltic melt, and olivine with or without pyroxene, over a wide pressure range (5 to 25 kilobar). The silicate melt contains more sodium and less titanium than lunar ferrobasalts. An aggregate of the Allende chondrite rich in calcium and aluminum produces silica-undersaturated, calcium-rich melt and spinel over a wide pressure and temperature range. It is suggested that the earth's core contains significant amounts of both nickel and sulfur and that a 3:2 mixture of Allende bulk sample and calcium- and aluminum-rich agregates is closer in major element abundances than either of these components to the average composition of the moon.

  4. Free Radical Halogenation, Selectivity, and Thermodynamics: The Polanyi Principle and Hammond's Postulate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scala, Alfred A.

    2004-01-01

    The underlying ideas of the Polanyi principle and Hammond's postulate in relation to the simple free halogenation reactions and their selectivity and thermodynamics is presented. The results indicate that the chlorine atom exhibits a slightly less selectivity in the liquid phase as compared to in the gas phase.

  5. Sequence-based identification of microbial pathogens: a reconsideration of Koch's postulates.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, D N; Relman, D A

    1996-01-01

    Over 100 years ago, Robert Koch introduced his ideas about how to prove a causal relationship between a microorganism and a disease. Koch's postulates created a scientific standard for causal evidence that established the credibility of microbes as pathogens and led to the development of modern microbiology. In more recent times, Koch's postulates have evolved to accommodate a broader understanding of the host-parasite relationship as well as experimental advances. Techniques such as in situ hybridization, PCR, and representational difference analysis reveal previously uncharacterized, fastidious or uncultivated, microbial pathogens that resist the application of Koch's original postulates, but they also provide new approaches for proving disease causation. In particular, the increasing reliance on sequence-based methods for microbial identification requires a reassessment of the original postulates and the rationale that guided Koch and later revisionists. Recent investigations of Whipple's disease, human ehrlichiosis, hepatitis C, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, and Kaposi's sarcoma illustrate some of these issues. A set of molecular guidelines for establishing disease causation with sequence-based technology is proposed, and the importance of the scientific concordance of evidence in supporting causal associations is emphasized. PMID:8665474

  6. 76 FR 43356 - Evaluations of Explosions Postulated To Occur at Nearby Facilities and on Transportation Routes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1270, ``Evaluations of Explosions Postulated to Occur at Nearby Facilities and on Transportation Routes Near Nuclear Power Plants''. This draft regulatory guide describes for applicants and licensees of nuclear power reactors some methods and assumptions the NRC's staff......

  7. A Postulated Mechanism That Leads to Materialization and Dematerialization of Matter and to Antigravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Thomas E.

    This document presents a discussion of the postulated mechanism that leads to the materialization and dematerialization of matter and to antigravity. The mechanism also explains why an orbital electron does not radiate energy, in contradiction to classical electromagnetic theory. One of the paradoxes of special relativity is explained. A new model…

  8. Research and Postulates Related to a Behavioristic Theory of Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewens, William P.

    The postulates for the behavioristic theory of career development are based on ideas that emerged from a systems analysis of career education. The systems analysis was structured to reflect the following definition of career education: Career education is composed of all the planned and incidental learning experiences of the individual that…

  9. Fun Microbiology: Using a Plant Pathogenic Fungus To Demonstrate Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Orsted, Kathy M.; Warnes, Carl E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a plant pathogenic fungus in which students learn to follow aseptic techniques, grow and produce spores of a fungus, use a hemacytometer for enumerating spores, prepare serial dilutions, grow and inoculate plants, isolate a pure culture using agar streak plates, and demonstrate the four steps of Koch's postulates.…

  10. An Inexpensive and Safe Experiment to Demonstrate Koch's Postulates Using Citrus Fruit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobi, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Citrus fruit (oranges, tangerines, grapefruit or lemons) purchased in a grocery store can be experimentally infected with readily-available sources of "Penicillium digitatum" to demonstrate the four basic steps of Koch's postulates, also known as proof of pathogenicity. The mould is isolated from naturally-infected citrus fruit into pure culture…

  11. Application of a postulate based control theory for an artificial arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, S. C.; Jerard, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The biocontroller, remnant of the natural arm, and feedback elements must be considered in designing a controller for an above elbow artificial arm for amputees. This fundamental postulate is used to derive equations for developing the controller, which is shown in block diagrams.

  12. Maxwell's macroscopic equations, the energy-momentum postulates, and the Lorentz law of force.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis R

    2009-02-01

    We argue that the classical theory of electromagnetism is based on Maxwell's macroscopic equations, an energy postulate, a momentum postulate, and a generalized form of the Lorentz law of force. These seven postulates constitute the foundation of a complete and consistent theory, thus eliminating the need for actual (i.e., physical) models of polarization P and magnetization M , these being the distinguishing features of Maxwell's macroscopic equations. In the proposed formulation, P(r,t) and M(r,t) are arbitrary functions of space and time, their physical properties being embedded in the seven postulates of the theory. The postulates are self-consistent, comply with the requirements of the special theory of relativity, and satisfy the laws of conservation of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum. One advantage of the proposed formulation is that it sidesteps the long-standing Abraham-Minkowski controversy surrounding the electromagnetic momentum inside a material medium by simply "assigning" the Abraham momentum density E(r,t)xH(r,t)/c2 to the electromagnetic field. This well-defined momentum is thus taken to be universal as it does not depend on whether the field is propagating or evanescent, and whether or not the host medium is homogeneous, transparent, isotropic, dispersive, magnetic, linear, etc. In other words, the local and instantaneous momentum density is uniquely and unambiguously specified at each and every point of the material system in terms of the E and H fields residing at that point. Any variation with time of the total electromagnetic momentum of a closed system results in a force exerted on the material media within the system in accordance with the generalized Lorentz law. PMID:19391864

  13. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  14. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  15. Translating Koch’s Postulates to Identify Matrix Metalloproteinase Roles in Post-Myocardial Infarction Remodeling: The Cardiac Metalloproteinase Actions (CarMA) Postulates

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E.; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2014-01-01

    The first matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was described in 1962; and since the 1990’s, cardiovascular research has focused on understanding how MMPs regulate many aspects of cardiovascular pathology from atherosclerosis formation to myocardial infarction and stroke. While much information has been gleaned by these past reports, to a large degree MMP cardiovascular biology remains observational, with few studies homing in on cause and effect relationships. Koch’s postulates were first developed in the 19th century as a way to establish microorganism function and were modified in the 20th century to include methods to establish molecular causality. In this review, we outline the concept for establishing a similar approach to determine causality in terms of MMP functions. We use left ventricular remodeling post-myocardial infarction as an example, but this approach will have broad applicability across both the cardiovascular and MMP fields. PMID:24577966

  16. The rock melting approach to drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, G.E.; Goff, S.J.; Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W. Jr.; Dreesen, D.S.; Winchester, W.

    1993-09-01

    During the early and mid-1970`s the Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated practical applications of drilling and coring using an electrically-heated graphite, tungsten, or molybdenum penetrator that melts a hole as it is slowly pushed through the rock or soil. The molten material consolidates into a rugged glass lining that prevents hole collapse; minimizes the potential for cross-flow, lost circulation, or the release of hazardous materials without casing operations; and produces no cuttings in porous or low density (<1.7 g/cc) formations. Because there are no drilling fluids required, the rock melting approach reduces waste handling, treatment and disposal. Drilling by rock melting has been demonstrated to depths up to 30 m in caliche, clay, alluvium, cobbles, sand, basalt, granite, and other materials. Penetrating large cobbles without debris removal was achieved by thermal stress fracturing and lateral extrusion of portions of the rock melt into the resulting cracks. Both horizontal and vertical holes in a variety of diameters were drilled in these materials using modular, self-contained field units that operate in remote areas. Because the penetrator does not need to rotate, steering by several simple approaches is considered quite feasible. Melting is ideal for obtaining core samples in alluvium and other poorly consolidated soils since the formed-in-place glass liner stabilizes the hole, encapsulates volatile or hazardous material, and recovers an undisturbed core. Because of the relatively low thermal conductivity of rock and soil materials, the heat-affected zone beyond the melt layer is very small, <1 inch thick. Los Alamos has begun to update the technology and this paper will report on the current status of applications and designs for improved drills.

  17. The Relationship between Lattice Enthalpy and Melting Point in Magnesium and Aluminium Oxides. Science Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Yap, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    This "Science Note" presents a study by Christopher Talbot and Lydia Yap, who teach IB Chemistry at Anglo-Chinese School (Independent), Republic of Singapore, to pre-university students. Pre-university students may postulate the correlation between the magnitude of the lattice enthalpy compound and its melting point, since both…

  18. The Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia—Sampling a rapidly cooled impact melt dike on an H chondrite asteroid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Martin; Kring, David A.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Bond, Jade C.; Moore, Carleton B.

    2016-06-01

    The Gao-Guenie H5 chondrite that fell on Burkina Faso (March 1960) has portions that were impact-melted on an H chondrite asteroid at ~300 Ma and, through later impact events in space, sent into an Earth-crossing orbit. This article presents a petrographic and electron microprobe analysis of a representative sample of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia consisting of a chondritic clast domain, quenched melt in contact with chondritic clasts, and an igneous-textured impact melt domain. Olivine is predominantly Fo80-82. The clast domain contains low-Ca pyroxene. Impact melt-grown pyroxene is commonly zoned from low-Ca pyroxene in cores to pigeonite and augite in rims. Metal-troilite orbs in the impact melt domain measure up to ~2 mm across. The cores of metal orbs in the impact melt domain contain ~7.9 wt% of Ni and are typically surrounded by taenite and Ni-rich troilite. The metallography of metal-troilite droplets suggest a stage I cooling rate of order 10 °C s-1 for the superheated impact melt. The subsolidus stage II cooling rate for the impact melt breccia could not be determined directly, but was presumably fast. An analogy between the Ni rim gradients in metal of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia and the impact-melted H6 chondrite Orvinio suggests similar cooling rates, probably on the order of ~5000-40,000 °C yr-1. A simple model of conductive heat transfer shows that the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia may have formed in a melt injection dike ~0.5-5 m in width, generated during a sizeable impact event on the H chondrite parent asteroid.

  19. The Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia—Sampling a rapidly cooled impact melt dike on an H chondrite asteroid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Martin; Kring, David A.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Bond, Jade C.; Moore, Carleton B.

    2016-04-01

    The Gao-Guenie H5 chondrite that fell on Burkina Faso (March 1960) has portions that were impact-melted on an H chondrite asteroid at ~300 Ma and, through later impact events in space, sent into an Earth-crossing orbit. This article presents a petrographic and electron microprobe analysis of a representative sample of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia consisting of a chondritic clast domain, quenched melt in contact with chondritic clasts, and an igneous-textured impact melt domain. Olivine is predominantly Fo80-82. The clast domain contains low-Ca pyroxene. Impact melt-grown pyroxene is commonly zoned from low-Ca pyroxene in cores to pigeonite and augite in rims. Metal-troilite orbs in the impact melt domain measure up to ~2 mm across. The cores of metal orbs in the impact melt domain contain ~7.9 wt% of Ni and are typically surrounded by taenite and Ni-rich troilite. The metallography of metal-troilite droplets suggest a stage I cooling rate of order 10 °C s-1 for the superheated impact melt. The subsolidus stage II cooling rate for the impact melt breccia could not be determined directly, but was presumably fast. An analogy between the Ni rim gradients in metal of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia and the impact-melted H6 chondrite Orvinio suggests similar cooling rates, probably on the order of ~5000-40,000 °C yr-1. A simple model of conductive heat transfer shows that the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia may have formed in a melt injection dike ~0.5-5 m in width, generated during a sizeable impact event on the H chondrite parent asteroid.

  20. Experimental Phase Relations of Hydrous, Primitive Melts: Implications for variably depleted mantle melting in arcs and the generation of primitive high-SiO2 melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, S.; Wallace, P. J.; Johnston, A.

    2010-12-01

    approximately 2 wt% H2O. Given the estimated crustal thicknesses of these two regions, our data suggest that both samples equilibrate with mantle minerals just below the Moho. Recent viscosity dependent thermal models that account for slab geometry suggest that JR-28 melts last equilibrate with harzburgite in a cooler region of the mantle wedge. In contrast, ID-16 equilibrated with a fertile source near the hotter core of the mantle wedge. Our results support the hypothesis that lherzolite melting (wet or dry) produces essentially basaltic melts, whereas more Si-rich primitive melts require shallow hydrous melting of harzburgite or reequilibration of basaltic melts with harzburgite in the uppermost part of the wedge.

  1. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Audétat A.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  2. Glass Melt Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Helmut A.; Müller-Simon, Hayo

    The employment of sensors during glass melting represents a major prerequisite for an improved process control leading to higher production yields. In situ sensoring techniques can be divided into two groups: on the one hand, techniques which extract information of glass melt properties, e.g., oxidation state and concentrations of relevant polyvalent species (such as iron, sulfur, chromium) and on the other hand, techniques which monitor the furnace atmosphere with respect to toxic emissions (e.g., SO2, NO x ) and combustion species (e.g., CO, CO2, H2O). Nowadays it is feasible not only to install early warning systems indicating deviations from target glass properties, but also to implement process control systems which enforce a stable and reproducible glass melting. Examples are given for the redox control of green glass melting utilizing high portions of recycled cullet and the redox control of amber glass melting.

  3. Thermodynamics of Glass Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradt, Reinhard

    First, a model based on linear algebra is described by which the thermodynamic properties of industrial multi-component glasses and glass melts can be accurately predicted from their chemical composition. The model is applied to calculate the heat content of glass melts at high temperatures, the standard heat of formation of glasses from the elements, and the vapor pressures of individual oxides above the melt. An E-fiber glass composition is depicted as an example. Second, the role of individual raw materials in the melting process of E-glass is addressed, with a special focus on the decomposition kinetics and energetic situation of alkaline earth carriers. Finally, the heat of the batch-to-melt conversion is calculated. A simplified reaction path model comprising heat turnover, content of residual solid matter, and an approach to batch viscosity is outlined.

  4. A test of Hebb's postulate at identified synapses which mediate classical conditioning in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Carew, T J; Hawkins, R D; Abrams, T W; Kandel, E R

    1984-05-01

    In 1949, D. O. Hebb proposed a novel mechanism for producing changes in the strength of synapses that could account for associative learning. According to Hebb , the strength of a synapse might increase when the use of that synapse contributes to the generation of action potentials in a postsynaptic neuron. Thus, an essential feature of this postulate is that action potentials must occur in both a postsynaptic cell and a presynaptic cell for associative synaptic changes to occur. We have directly tested Hebb 's postulate in Aplysia at identified synapses which are known to exhibit a temporally specific increase in efficacy during a cellular analogue of differential conditioning. We find that the mechanism postulated by Hebb is neither necessary nor sufficient to produce the associative change in synaptic strength that underlies conditioning in Aplysia. In contrast, impulse activity in the presynaptic cell must be paired with facilitatory input, supporting the hypothesis that the temporal specificity of classical conditioning in Aplysia can be accounted for by activity-dependent amplification of presynaptic facilitation. PMID:6726327

  5. Melting of crystalline Si nanoparticle investigated by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Sang, Le; Van Hoang, Vo; Thi Nhu Tranh, Duong

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate melting of the crystalline Si nanoparticle. Atoms in the nanoparticle interact with each other via the Stillinger-Weber potential. Two heating rates are used. We find that melting of the nanoparticle occurs via propagation of quasi-liquid layer from the surface into the core of the nanoparticle until this layer reaches the critical thickness. We find heating rate affects on mechanism of melting of Si nanoparticle, i.e. coexistence of the two melting mechanisms (homogeneous and heterogeneous ones) occurs if low heating rate is used and it is unlike that proposed in the past. Size affects on melting of Si nanoparticle are found and discussed. In addition, we find that the global bond order parameters Ql can be used to detect melting of Si system unlike some calculations presented in the past.

  6. Melting of crystalline Si nanoparticle investigated by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Le Van; Hoang, Vo Van; Tranh, Duong Thi Nhu

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate melting of the crystalline Si nanoparticle. Atoms in the nanoparticle interact with each other via the Stillinger-Weber potential. Two heating rates are used. We find that melting of the nanoparticle occurs via propagation of quasi-liquid layer from the surface into the core of the nanoparticle until this layer reaches the critical thickness. We find heating rate affects on mechanism of melting of Si nanoparticle, i.e. coexistence of the two melting mechanisms (homogeneous and heterogeneous ones) occurs if low heating rate is used and it is unlike that proposed in the past. Size affects on melting of Si nanoparticle are found and discussed. In addition, we find that the global bond order parameters Q l can be used to detect melting of Si system unlike some calculations presented in the past.

  7. Signatures of nonthermal melting.

    PubMed

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E

    2015-09-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  8. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Tobias; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Kalitsov, Alan; Theodonis, Ioannis; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting. PMID:26798822

  9. The Light-Velocity Postulate: The Essential Difference between the Theories of Lorentz-Poincare and Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiko, Seiya

    2005-01-01

    Einstein, who had already developed the light-quantum theory, knew the inadequacy of Maxwell's theory in the microscopic sphere. Therefore, in writing his paper on special relativity, he had to set up the light-velocity postulate independently of the relativity postulate in order to make the electromagnetic foundation of physics compatible with…

  10. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The

  11. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  12. Melting of compressed iron by monitoring atomic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jennifer M.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Lerche, Michael; Zhao, Jiyong; Toellner, Thomas S.; Alp, E. Ercan; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Bass, Jay D.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Wicks, June K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for detecting the solid-liquid phase boundary of compressed iron at high temperatures using synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS). Our approach is unique because the dynamics of the iron atoms are monitored. This process is described by the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, which is related to the mean-square displacement of the iron atoms. Focused synchrotron radiation with 1 meV bandwidth passes through a laser-heated 57Fe sample inside a diamond-anvil cell, and the characteristic SMS time signature vanishes when melting occurs. At our highest compression measurement and considering thermal pressure, we find the melting point of iron to be TM=3025±115 K at P=82±5 GPa. When compared with previously reported melting points for iron using static compression methods with different criteria for melting, our melting trend defines a steeper positive slope as a function of pressure. The obtained melting temperatures represent a significant step toward a reliable melting curve of iron at Earth's core conditions. For other terrestrial planets possessing cores with liquid portions rich in metallic iron, such as Mercury and Mars, the higher melting temperatures for compressed iron may imply warmer internal temperatures.

  13. Dislocation theory of melting for iron, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, J.P.; Shankland, T.J.

    1993-11-01

    Melting point T{sub m} of iron at conditions of the Earth`s inner core boundary (ICB) has been calculated from dislocation theory of melting in metals. Monte Carlo calculations were used to estimate uncertainties introduced by uncertainty in the geophysical parameters that are used in the calculations. These calculations take into account the effects of pressure at ICB conditions and of possible freezing point depression resulting from dilution of pure iron in the outer core. With this approach T{sub m} of pure {var_epsilon}-Fe at a pressure of 330 GPa and without freezing point depression is 6160 {plus_minus} 250 K; for a 1000 K freezing point depression it is 6110 K. T{sub m} of pure {gamma}-Fe is 6060 K, a value that is not significantly different. A possible {alpha}{prime} phase would melt at 5600 K. These values agree with calculated shock wave determinations of T{sub m}. Although calculated T{sub m} of the pure phase is little affected by assumptions about the extent of freezing point depression, the estimated temperature of the inner core boundary is lower by the breezing point depression, perhaps 500--1000 K less than T{sub m} of a pure phase.

  14. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a

  15. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.; Hostick, C.J.; Ross, W.A.; Peterson, R.W.; Smith, R.I.; Stiles, D.L.; Daling, P.M.; Weakley, S.A.; Grinde, R.B.; Young, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    This report contains a system study of estimated radiation doses to the public and workers resulting from the transport of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power reactors to a geologic repository. The report contains a detailed breakdown of activities and a description of time/distance/dose-rate estimates for each activity within the system. Collective doses are estimated for each of the major activities at the reactor site, in transit, and at the repository receiving facility. Annual individual doses to the maximally exposed individuals or groups of individuals are also estimated. A total of 17 alternatives and subalternatives to the postulated reference transportation system are identified, conceptualized, and their dose-reduction potentials and costs estimated. Resulting ratios of ..delta..cost/..delta..collective system dose for each alternative relative to the postulated reference transportation system are given. Most of the alternatives evaluated are estimated to provide both cost and dose reductions. Major reductions in transportation system dose and cost are estimated to result from using higher-capacity rail and truck casks, and particularly when replacing legalweight truck casks with ''advanced design'' overweight truck casks. The greatest annual dose reduction to the highest exposed individual workers (i.e., at the repository) is estimated to be achieved by using remote handling equipment for the cask handling operations at the repository. Additional shielding is also effective in reducing doses to both radiation workers at the reactor and repository and to transport workers. 69 refs., 36 figs., 156 tabs.

  16. Viscosity of the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the viscosity of the core at the boundary of the inner and outer core. It is assumed that this boundary is a melting transition and the viscosity limits of the Andrade (1934,1952) hypothesis (3.7 to 18.5 cp) are adopted. The corresponding kinematic viscosities are such that the precessional system explored by Malkus (1968) would be unstable. Whether it would be sufficiently unstable to overcome a severely subadiabatic temperature gradient cannot be determined.

  17. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  18. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, Attilio; Dumberry, Mathieu; Van Hoolst, Tim; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is less steep than the core melting temperature, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steepper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first cross the melting temperature near the core mantle boundary and produce iron-rich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, top down crystallization is expected to generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection. In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials.

  19. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    , hence, with the frictional drag acting on the outer sleeve. As the wire cuts toward the center of the core, the inner sleeve rotates farther with respect to the outer sleeve. Once the wire has cut to the center of the core, the tool and the core can be removed from the hole. The proper choice of cutting wire depends on the properties of the core material. For a sufficiently soft core material, a nonmetallic monofilament can be used. For a rubber-like core material, a metal wire can be used. For a harder core material, it is necessary to use an abrasive wire, and the efficiency of the tool can be increased greatly by vacuuming away the particles generated during cutting. For a core material that can readily be melted or otherwise cut by use of heat, it could be preferable to use an electrically heated cutting wire. In such a case, electric current can be supplied to the cutting wire, from an electrically isolated source, via rotating contact rings mounted on the sleeves.

  20. Fritz Zwicky's Postulate of Freedom from Prejudice Considered from the Standpoint of the Theory of Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Markus

    What can we say about unprejudiced thinking as postulated by Ritz Zwicky? Freedom from prejudice in opposition to stamped by theory. How does knowledge come about? Through sense perception and thought. The phenomenon is always mediated by organs, respectively by technical instruments. Which conclusion can we draw from this fact? Is the organ of knowledge by which we know nature a part of nature? Can the dialectic materialism explain the processes of human consciousness? What is the fundamental difference between think and perceive? Has human consciousness only a share in nature or also in the spiritual world? The role of the observer in the Copenhagen interpretation. Is the quantum theory applicable to psychic phenomena?

  1. OVERVIEW OF MODULAR HTGR SAFETY CHARACTERIZATION AND POSTULATED ACCIDENT BEHAVIOR LICENSING STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J

    2014-06-01

    This report provides an update on modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) accident analyses and risk assessments. One objective of this report is to improve the characterization of the safety case to better meet current regulatory practice, which is commonly geared to address features of today s light water reactors (LWRs). The approach makes use of surrogates for accident prevention and mitigation to make comparisons with LWRs. The safety related design features of modular HTGRs are described, along with the means for rigorously characterizing accident selection and progression methodologies. Approaches commonly used in the United States and elsewhere are described, along with detailed descriptions and comments on design basis (and beyond) postulated accident sequences.

  2. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory

    PubMed Central

    Masanes, Lluís; Müller, Markus P.; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Pérez-García, David

    2013-01-01

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information. PMID:24062431

  3. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Masanes, Lluís; Müller, Markus P; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Pérez-García, David

    2013-10-01

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information. PMID:24062431

  4. A multi-disciplinary assessment of operator action time for mitigating a postulated accident

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.; Fields, C.C.; Hightower, N.T. III ); Buczek, J.A. ); Jenkins, T.B.; Swanson, P.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses mitigation of the postulated Loss of Heat Sink Accident for the Savannah River Site K Reactor which requires operator action to place the plant in a water conservation configuration. In August 1991, concerns were raised about the allowances in the safety analyses for operator action times in an unpowered scenario, where several valves would be manually closed. WSRC management conservatively decided to include explicit consideration of a seismic initiator for this scenario, which introduced the additional concern that operator actions could be hindered by tritium from flange leakage. The revised analyses concluded that the powered case documented in the Safety Analysis Report is limiting and that all acceptance criteria are met.

  5. A multi-disciplinary assessment of operator action time for mitigating a postulated accident

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, C.D.; Fields, C.C.; Hightower, N.T. III; Buczek, J.A.; Jenkins, T.B.; Swanson, P.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses mitigation of the postulated Loss of Heat Sink Accident for the Savannah River Site K Reactor which requires operator action to place the plant in a water conservation configuration. In August 1991, concerns were raised about the allowances in the safety analyses for operator action times in an unpowered scenario, where several valves would be manually closed. WSRC management conservatively decided to include explicit consideration of a seismic initiator for this scenario, which introduced the additional concern that operator actions could be hindered by tritium from flange leakage. The revised analyses concluded that the powered case documented in the Safety Analysis Report is limiting and that all acceptance criteria are met.

  6. Estimation of Downstream Cesium Concentrations Following a Postulated PAR Pond Dam Break

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    2002-07-08

    Following a postulated PAR Pond dam break, some of the PAR Pond sediment including the cesium could be eroded and be transported downstream to the Savannah River through the Lower Three Runs Creek. Studies showed that most of the eroded sediment including the cesium would deposit in the Lower Three Runs Creek and the remainder would discharge to the Savannah River from the mouth of Lower Three Runs Creek. A WASP5 model was developed to simulate the eroded sediment and cesium transport from the Lower Three Runs Creek mouth to the Atlantic coast. The dissolved cesium concentrations at the Highway 301 bridge and near the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic Water Supply Plant are 30 and 27 pCi/l, respectively. The concentrations at both locations are less than the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 200 pCi/l.

  7. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  8. Radiogenic melting of primordial comet interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, M. K.

    1980-04-01

    The melting of the core of a primordial comet due to heat released upon the radioactive decay of Al-26 contained within it is discussed. For a spherical, 10-km comet composed of loose snow and mineral grains in the primordial nebula, it is shown that a large fluid dust, droplet and vapor core could develop surrounded by a 1-km thick icy shell with enhanced conductivity and a further 2 km of snow metamorphosing by sublimation, diffusion and condensation into larger ice crystals. As the radioactivity decays, the comet center would gradually refreeze by the deposition of frost and hail on the interior of the ice shell, resulting in a hollow core which could explain the presumed splitting of some disintegrating comets and could have provided a well-protected environment for elementary biological systems.

  9. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  10. The melting curve of iron to 250 gigapascals - A constraint on the temperature at earth's center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Quentin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Bass, Jay; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The melting curve of iron, the primary constituent of earth's core, has been measured to pressures of 250 gigapascals with a combination of static and dynamic techniques. The melting temperature of iron at the pressure of the core-mantle boundary (136 GPa) is 4800 + or - 200 K, whereas at the inner core-outer core boundary (330 GPa), it is 7600 + or - 500 K. A melting temperature for iron-rich alloy of 6600 K at the inner core-outer core boundary and a maximum temperature of 6900 K at earth's center are inferred. This latter value is the first experimental upper bound on the temperature at earth's center, and these results imply that the temperature of the lower mantle is significantly less than that of the outer core.

  11. Thermoacoustic Streaming and Ultrasonic Processing of Low Melting Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1997-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation allows the processing of low melting materials both in 1 G as well as in microgravity. The free suspension of the melts also facilitates undercooling, permitting the measurements of the physical properties of the metastable liquids.

  12. The extreme melt across the Greenland ice sheet in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Albert, M. R.; Keegan, K.; Shuman, C. A.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Neumann, G.

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of the 2012 extreme melt event across almost the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet is presented. Data from three different satellite sensors - including the Oceansat-2 scatterometer, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder - are combined to obtain composite melt maps, representing the most complete melt conditions detectable across the ice sheet. Satellite observations reveal that melt occurred at or near the surface of the Greenland ice sheet across 98.6% of its entire extent on 12 July 2012, including the usually cold polar areas at high altitudes like Summit in the dry snow facies of the ice sheet. This melt event coincided with an anomalous ridge of warm air that became stagnant over Greenland. As seen in melt occurrences from multiple ice core records at Summit reported in the published literature, such a melt event is rare with the last significant one occurring in 1889 and the next previous one around seven centuries earlier in the Medieval Warm Period. Given its rarity, the 2012 extreme melt across Greenland provides an exceptional opportunity for new studies in broad interdisciplinary geophysical research.

  13. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  14. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  15. Closed-system postulates for predicting waste-package performance in a geological repository

    SciTech Connect

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    In a recent paper we reviewed the need for reliable theory and experiment in making long-term predictions of waste performance in a geologic repository. We discussed uncertainties in postulated techniques of applying closed-system laboratory leach data to predicting the dissolution of waste solids in a geologic repository, and we discussed the use of mass-transfer analysis to unify theory and experiment and to provide a clear theoretical basis for long-term prediction. Comments on our recent paper by Drs. P.B. Macedo and C.J. Montrose provide a welcome opportunity to clarify several issues related to predicting waste performance. Their comments help illustrate the need for reliable and sound theories for predicting waste performance in the long-term future, and they help focus the fundamental differences between waste dissolution in laboratory leach experiments and dissolution in a repository. To aid better understanding and resolution of the differences between mass transfer in the closed systems considered by Macedo et al. and others and mass transfer in the open systems of waste repositories considered in our mass transfer analysis, we comment here in some detail.

  16. Hammond Postulate Mirroring Enables Enantiomeric Enrichment of Phosphorus Compounds via Two Thermodynamically Interconnected Sequential Stereoselective Processes.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Kamalraj V; Nikitin, Kirill V; Gilheany, Declan G

    2015-07-29

    The dynamic resolution of tertiary phosphines and phosphine oxides was monitored by NMR spectroscopy. It was found that the stereoselectivity is set during the formation of the diastereomeric alkoxyphosphonium salts (DAPS), such that their initial diastereomeric excess (de) limits the final enantiomeric excess (ee) of any phosphorus products derived from them. However, (31)P NMR monitoring of the spontaneous thermal decomposition of the DAPS shows consistent diastereomeric self-enrichment, indicating a higher rate constant for decomposition of the minor diastereomer. This crucial observation was confirmed by reductive trapping of the unreacted enriched DAPS with lithium tri-sec-butylborohydride (commercially distributed as L-Selectride reagent) at different time intervals after the start of reaction, which gives progressively higher ee of the phosphine product with time. It is proposed that the Hammond postulate operates for both formation and decomposition of DAPS intermediate so that the lower rate of formation and faster subsequent collapse of the minor isomer are thermodynamically linked. This kinetic enhancement of kinetic resolution furnishes up to 97% ee product. PMID:26186272

  17. Analysis of pressurization of plutonium oxide storage vials during a postulated fire

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Kesterson, M.; Hensel, S.

    2015-02-10

    The documented safety analysis for the Savannah River Site evaluates the consequences of a postulated 1000 °C fire in a glovebox. The radiological dose consequences for a pressurized release of plutonium oxide powder during such a fire depend on the maximum pressure that is attained inside the oxide storage vial. To enable evaluation of the dose consequences, pressure transients and venting flow rates have been calculated for exposure of the storage vial to the fire. A standard B vial with a capacity of approximately 8 cc was selected for analysis. The analysis compares the pressurization rate from heating and evaporation of moisture adsorbed onto the plutonium oxide contents of the vial with the pressure loss due to venting of gas through the threaded connection between the vial cap and body. Tabulated results from the analysis include maximum pressures, maximum venting velocities, and cumulative vial volumes vented during the first 10 minutes of the fire transient. Results are obtained for various amounts of oxide in the vial, various amounts of adsorbed moisture, different vial orientations, and different surface fire exposures.

  18. Melt spinning study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Thomas

    1993-04-01

    Containerless processing of materials provides an excellent opportunity to study nucleation phenomena and produce unique materials, primarily through the formation of metastable phases and deep undercoolings. Deep undercoolings can be readily achieved in falling drops of molten material. Extended solute solubilities and greatly refined microstructures can also be obtained in containerless processing experiments. The Drop Tube Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center has played an important role in enhancing that area of research. Previous experiments performed in the Drop Tube with refractory metals has shown very interesting microstructural changes associated with deep undercoolings. It is apparent also that the microstructure of the deep undercooled species may be changing due to the release of the latent heat of fusion during recalescence. For scientific purposes, it is important to be able to differentiate between the microstructures of the two types of metallic species. A review of the literature shows that although significant advances have been made with respect to the engineering aspects of rapid solidification phenomena, there is still much to be learned in terms of understanding the basic phenomena. The two major ways in which rapid solidification processing provides improved structures and hence improved properties are: (1) production of refined structures such as fine dendrites and eutectics, and (2) production of new alloy compositions, microstructures, and phases through extended solid solubility, new phase reaction sequences, and the formation of metallic-glass microstructures. The objective of this work has been to determine the optimal methodology required to extract this excess energy without affecting the thermo-physical parameters of the under-cooled melt. In normal containerless processing experiments recalescence occurs as the melt returns toward the melting point in order to solidify. A new type of experiment is sought in which the resultant

  19. Melt spinning study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Containerless processing of materials provides an excellent opportunity to study nucleation phenomena and produce unique materials, primarily through the formation of metastable phases and deep undercoolings. Deep undercoolings can be readily achieved in falling drops of molten material. Extended solute solubilities and greatly refined microstructures can also be obtained in containerless processing experiments. The Drop Tube Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center has played an important role in enhancing that area of research. Previous experiments performed in the Drop Tube with refractory metals has shown very interesting microstructural changes associated with deep undercoolings. It is apparent also that the microstructure of the deep undercooled species may be changing due to the release of the latent heat of fusion during recalescence. For scientific purposes, it is important to be able to differentiate between the microstructures of the two types of metallic species. A review of the literature shows that although significant advances have been made with respect to the engineering aspects of rapid solidification phenomena, there is still much to be learned in terms of understanding the basic phenomena. The two major ways in which rapid solidification processing provides improved structures and hence improved properties are: (1) production of refined structures such as fine dendrites and eutectics, and (2) production of new alloy compositions, microstructures, and phases through extended solid solubility, new phase reaction sequences, and the formation of metallic-glass microstructures. The objective of this work has been to determine the optimal methodology required to extract this excess energy without affecting the thermo-physical parameters of the under-cooled melt. In normal containerless processing experiments recalescence occurs as the melt returns toward the melting point in order to solidify. A new type of experiment is sought in which the resultant

  20. Magnetic Properties of Melt Particles of Suevitic Samples From the Bosumtwi Impact Structure, Ghana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbra, T.; Pesonen, L. J.; Lehtinen, M.

    2006-12-01

    The magnetic anomaly over Bosumtwi impact structure has recently raised a debate about its origin. Plado et al. (2000) presented a magnetic model where a strongly remanently magnetized melt or melt-rich body was proposed as a source of this anomaly. Recent deep drilling through the Bosumtwi structure, however, failed to penetrate into the expected melt body. Also, the recent investigations of petrophysical parameters of samples from deep drill cores (Elbra et al., 2006) did not yield any strongly magnetic body. In order to find out whether the current drill cores simply lack the melt or the expected highly magnetized body escaped the drilling, we separated individual melt particles from deep drill core samples and from exposed suevitic rocks, and measured their magnetic properties. Preliminary results of our investigation show differences in magnetic properties between the melt from inside and outside the crater. The melt from drill core samples shows merely a paramagnetic signal of magnetic susceptibility and only a weak intensity of remanence. The melt from exposed rocks, however, shows slightly higher magnetizations. Currently, the more detailed rock-magnetic studies of separate melt inclusions, combined with X-ray diffraction measurements, are carried out in order to identify the nature of magnetic minerals in the melt and to verify if the melt is enough highly magnetic to be the source of the magnetic anomaly. References: Elbra T., Pesonen L.J. (2006) Petrophysical and rock-magnetic properties of impactites from deep drill core of Bosumtwi impact structure. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 41, Supplement, August, A49. Plado J., Pesonen L.J., Koeberl C., Elo S. (2000) The Bosumtwi meteorite impact structure, Ghana: A magnetic model. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 35, 723-732.

  1. Consolidation of zircaloy-4 end crops by induction melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.

    1994-01-25

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is investigating the use of induction melting as a method of consolidating Zircaloy-4, a zirconium alloy used in the fabrication of submarine nuclear reactor cores. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) furnished about 4000 lb of typical core material, also known as hardware, for use in evaluating induction melting as a method of consolidation. Three ingots were produced by the induction melting of hardware in a graphite crucible that was protected by a laminated coating specifically developed for this application. This report includes a description of both the equipment and the crucible coating materials used for this project, a discussion of results, and a production assessment of using this technique for full-scale consolidation.

  2. Chirality in block copolymer melts: mesoscopic helicity from intersegment twist.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Russell, Thomas P; Grason, Gregory M

    2013-02-01

    We study the effects of chirality at the segment scale on the thermodynamics of block copolymer melts using self-consistent field theory. In linear diblock melts where segments of one block prefer a twisted, or cholesteric, texture, we show that melt assembly is critically sensitive to the ratio of random coil size to the preferred pitch of cholesteric twist. For weakly chiral melts (large pitch), mesophases remain achiral, while below a critical value of pitch, two mesoscopically chiral phases are stable: an undulated lamellar phase and a phase of hexagonally ordered helices. We show that the nonlinear sensitivity of mesoscale chiral order to preferred pitch derives specifically from the geometric and thermodynamic coupling of the helical mesodomain shape to the twisted packing of chiral segments within the core, giving rise to a second-order cylinder-to-helix transition. PMID:23414052

  3. Glacier melt on the Third Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    With an average elevation above 4,000 metres, the Third Pole (TP) is a unique region with many high mountains centered on the Tibetan Plateau stretching over 5 million square kilometers. Major environmental changes are taking place on the TP characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes. These processes are critical for the well-being of the three billion people inhabiting the plateau and the surrounding regions. Glacier melt is one of the most significant environmental changes observed on the TP. Over the past decade, most of the glaciers on the TP have undergone considerable melt. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) has focused on the causes of the glacier melt by conducting large-scale ground in-situ observation and monitoring, analyzing satellite images and remote sensing data, and applying numerical modeling to environmental research on the TP. The studies of long-term record of water stable isotopes in precipitation and ice core throughout the TP have revealed different features with regions, thus proposing significant influence of atmospheric circulations on spatial precipitation pattern over the TP. Validation of the result by isotope-equipped general circulation models confirms the spatial distribution of different atmospheric circulation dominances on the TP, with northern part dominated by the westerlies, southern part by the summer monsoon, and central part featuring the influences of both circulation systems. Such unique circulation patterns also bear directly on the status of glaciers and lakes over the TP and its surroundings. The studies therefore found the largest glacier melt in the monsoon-dominated southern part, moderate melt in the central part of transition, and the least melt, or even slight advance in the westerlies-dominated northern TP. It is clear that some mountains on the TP are undergoing rapid melt and the consequence of without ice and snow will be very soon. The

  4. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor. This paper is part of a series of four describing the design and safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. This paper focuses in particular upon the passive safety features and the safety system response of the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR design incorporates many features to minimize the effects of, and in some cases eliminates the possibility of postulated accidents. The small size of the reactor and the low power density limits the potential consequences of an accident relative to a large plant. The integral design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high-pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. The containment is submerged in water which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for AC electrical power for a period of seven days. Frequent faults, such as reactivity insertion events and loss of power events, are protected by first shutting down the nuclear reaction by inserting control rods, then providing cold, borated water through a passive, buoyancy-driven flow. Decay heat removal is provided using a layered approach that includes the passive removal of heat by the steam drum and independent passive heat removal system that transfers heat from the primary system to the environment. Less frequent faults such as loss of coolant accidents are mitigated by passive injection of a large quantity of water that is readily available inside containment. An automatic depressurization system is used to

  5. Assessment of potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, M.D.; Farrell, R.F.; Newton, G.J.

    1995-12-01

    The recent 1995 WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) Update provided detailed analyses of potential radiation doses to members of the public at the site boundary during postulated accident scenarios at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The SAR Update addressed the complete spectrum of potential accidents associated with handling and emplacing transuranic waste at WIPP, including damage to waste drums from fires, punctures, drops, and other disruptions. The report focused on the adequacy of the multiple layers of safety practice ({open_quotes}defense-in-depth{close_quotes}) at WIPP, which are designed to (1) reduce the likelihood of accidents and (2) limit the consequences of those accidents. The safeguards which contribute to defense-in-depth at WIPP include a substantial array of inherent design features, engineered controls, and administrative procedures. The SAR Update confirmed that the defense-in-depth at WIPP is adequate to assure the protection of the public and environment. As a supplement to the 1995 SAR Update, we have conducted additional analyses to confirm that these controls will also provide adequate protection to workers at the WIPP. The approaches and results of the worker dose assessment are summarized here. In conformance with the guidance of DOE Standard 3009-94, we emphasize that use of these evaluation guidelines is not intended to imply that these numbers constitute acceptable limits for worker exposures under accident conditions. However, in conjunction with the extensive safety assessment in the 1995 SAR Update, these results indicate that the Carlsbad Area Office strategy for the assessment of hazards and accidents assures the protection of workers, members of the public, and the environment.

  6. Consequences of tritium release to water pathways from postulated accidents in a DOE production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    O`Kula, K.R.; Olson, R.L.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    A full-scale PRA of a DOE production reactor has been completed that considers full release of tritium as part of the severe accident source term. Two classes of postulated reactor accidents, a loss-of-moderator pumping accident and a loss-of-coolant accident, are used to bound the expected dose consequence from liquid pathway release. Population doses from the radiological release associated with the two accidents are compared for aqueous discharge and atmospheric release modes. The expectation values of the distribution of possible values for the societal effective dose equivalent to the general public, given a tritium release to the atmosphere, is 2.8 person-Sv/PBq (9.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} person-rem/Ci). The general public drinking water dose to downstream water consumers is 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} person-Sv/Pbq (2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} person-rem/Ci) for aqueous releases to the surface streams eventually reaching the Savannah River. Negligible doses are calculated for freshwater fish and saltwater invertebrate consumption, irrigation, and recreational use of the river, given that an aqueous release is assumed to occur. Relative to the balance of fission products released in a hypothetical severe accident, the tritium-related dose is small. This study suggests that application of regional models (1610 km radius) will indicate larger dose consequences from short-term tritium release to the atmosphere than from comparable tritium source terms to water pathways. However, the water pathways assessment is clearly site-specific, and the overall aqueous dose will be dependent on downstream receptor populations and uses of the river.

  7. Consequences of tritium release to water pathways from postulated accidents in a DOE production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kula, K.R.; Olson, R.L.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale PRA of a DOE production reactor has been completed that considers full release of tritium as part of the severe accident source term. Two classes of postulated reactor accidents, a loss-of-moderator pumping accident and a loss-of-coolant accident, are used to bound the expected dose consequence from liquid pathway release. Population doses from the radiological release associated with the two accidents are compared for aqueous discharge and atmospheric release modes. The expectation values of the distribution of possible values for the societal effective dose equivalent to the general public, given a tritium release to the atmosphere, is 2.8 person-Sv/PBq (9.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} person-rem/Ci). The general public drinking water dose to downstream water consumers is 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} person-Sv/Pbq (2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} person-rem/Ci) for aqueous releases to the surface streams eventually reaching the Savannah River. Negligible doses are calculated for freshwater fish and saltwater invertebrate consumption, irrigation, and recreational use of the river, given that an aqueous release is assumed to occur. Relative to the balance of fission products released in a hypothetical severe accident, the tritium-related dose is small. This study suggests that application of regional models (1610 km radius) will indicate larger dose consequences from short-term tritium release to the atmosphere than from comparable tritium source terms to water pathways. However, the water pathways assessment is clearly site-specific, and the overall aqueous dose will be dependent on downstream receptor populations and uses of the river.

  8. Implications of dairy systems on enteric methane and postulated effects on total greenhouse gas emission.

    PubMed

    Fredeen, A; Juurlink, S; Main, M; Astatkie, T; Martin, R C

    2013-11-01

    The effects of feeding total mixed ration (TMR) or pasture forage from a perennial sward under a management intensive grazing (MIG) regimen on grain intake and enteric methane (EM) emission were measured using chambers. Chamber measurement of EM was compared with that of SF6 employed both within chamber and when cows grazed in the field. The impacts of the diet on farm gate greenhouse gas (GHG) emission were also postulated using the results of existing life cycle assessments. Emission of EM was measured in gas collection chambers in Spring and Fall. In Spring, pasture forage fiber quality was higher than that of the silage used in the TMR (47.5% v. 56.3% NDF; 24.3% v. 37.9% ADF). Higher forage quality from MIG subsequently resulted in 25% less grain use relative to TMR (0.24 v. 0.32 kg dry matter/kg milk) for MIG compared with TMR. The Fall forage fiber quality was still better, but the higher quality of MIG pasture was not as pronounced as that in Spring. Neither yield of fat-corrected milk (FCM) which averaged 28.3 kg/day, nor EM emission which averaged 18.9 g/kg dry matter intake (DMI) were significantly affected by diet in Spring. However, in the Fall, FCM from MIG (21.3 kg/day) was significantly lower than that from TMR (23.4 kg/day). Despite the differences in FCM yield, in terms of EM emission that averaged 21.9 g/kg DMI was not significantly different between the diets. In this study, grain requirement, but not EM, was a distinguishing feature of pasture and confinement systems. Considering the increased predicted GHG emissions arising from the production and use of grain needed to boost milk yield in confinement systems, EM intensity alone is a poor predictor of the potential impact of a dairy system on climate forcing. PMID:23896042

  9. Supplemental Analysis to Support Postulated Events in Process Hazards Analysis for the HEAF

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, H; Johnson, G

    2001-07-20

    The purpose of this report is to conduct a limit scope risk assessment by generating event trees for the accident scenarios described in table 4-2 of the HEAF SAR, ref 1. Table 4-2 lists the postulated event/scenario descriptions for non-industrial hazards for HEAF. The event tree analysis decomposes accident scenarios into basic causes that appear as branches on the event tree. Bold downward branches indicate paths leading to the accident. The basic causes include conditions, failure of administrative controls (procedural or human error events) or failure of engineered controls (hardware, software or equipment failure) that singly or in combination can cause an accident to occur. Event tree analysis is useful since it can display the minimum number of events to cause an accident. Event trees can address statistical dependency of events such as a sequence of human error events conducted by the same operator. In this case, dependent probabilities are used. Probabilities/frequencies are assigned to each branch. Another example of dependency would be when the same software is used to conduct separate actions such as activating a hard and soft crow bar for grounding detonator circuits. Generally, the first event considered in the event tree describes the annual frequency at which a specific operation is conducted and probabilities are assigned to the remaining branches. An exception may be when the first event represents a condition, then a probability is used to indicate the percentage of time the condition exists. The annual probability (frequency) of the end state leading to the accident scenario in the event tree is obtained by multiplying the branch probabilities together.

  10. Phenocrystal variations in melt rocks from Tenoumer impact crater, Mauretania: indicators for varying target contribution and melt mixing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultze, Dina; Jourdan, Fred; Hecht, Lutz; Reimold, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    , and gabbro). Different pyroxene generations occur including significant compositional zonation with widely variable CaO, MgO and FeO contents (En7-80, Wo4-50, Fs9-41). Pyroxene evolution (core-rim-zonation) changes from En-Di to Di-Hd as CaO content of the melt matrix oversteps 9 wt%. Strong variations in CaO content that do not correlate with increasing MgO and FeO contents are interpreted as incorporation of CaO from carbonate melts into the silicate melt phase. The presents of intermingled carbonate melt schlieren support this hypothesis. New 40Ar/39Ar dating on three of the studied melt rock samples resulted in a - preferred - age of 1.57 ± 0.14 Ma for the Tenoumer impact event. This impact age is significantly different from previous dating results of 21 ± 10 ka and 2.5 ± 0.5 Ma.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic studies on molten core-concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report discusses studies carried out in connection with light water power reactor accidents. Recent assessments have indicated that the consequences of molten-core concrete interactions dominate the considerations of severe accidents. The two areas of interest that have been investigated are interlayer heat and mass transfer and liquid-liquid boiling. Interlayer heat and mass transfer refers to processes that occur within a core melt between the stratified, immiscible phases of core oxides and metals. Liquid-liquid boiling refers to processes that occur at the melt-concrete on melt-coolant interface. (JDH)

  12. Melting in Martian Snowbanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Sutter, B.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation as snow is an emerging paradigm for understanding water flow on Mars, which gracefully resolves many outstanding uncertainties in climatic and geomorphic interpretation. Snowfall does not require a powerful global greenhouse to effect global precipitation. It has long been assumed that global average temperatures greater than 273K are required to sustain liquid water at the surface via rainfall and runoff. Unfortunately, the best greenhouse models to date predict global mean surface temperatures early in Mars' history that differ little from today's, unless exceptional conditions are invoked. Snowfall however, can occur at temperatures less than 273K; all that is required is saturation of the atmosphere. At global temperatures lower than 273K, H2O would have been injected into the atmosphere by impacts and volcanic eruptions during the Noachian, and by obliquity-driven climate oscillations more recently. Snow cover can accumulate for a considerable period, and be available for melting during local spring and summer, unless sublimation rates are sufficient to remove the entire snowpack. We decided to explore the physics that controls the melting of snow in the high-latitude regions of Mars to understand the frequency and drainage of snowmelt in the high martian latitudes.

  13. Melting processes under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Lupulescu, A.; Koss, M. B.

    2003-07-01

    The kinetics of melting pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites was observed under convection-free conditions on STS-87 as part of the United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-4) flown on Columbia in 1997. Analysis of video data show that PVA dendrites melt without relative motion with respect to the quiescent melt phase. Dendritic fragments display shrinking to extinction, with fragmentation occurring at higher initial supercoblings. Individual fragments follow a characteristic time-dependence derived elsewhere. The microgravity melting kinetics against which the experimental observations are compared is based on conduction-limited quasi-static melting under shape-preserving conditions. Agreement between analytic theory and our experiments is found when the melting process occurs under shape-preserving conditions as measured using the C/A ratio of individual needle-like crystal fragments.

  14. Melting of ice under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schwegler, Eric; Sharma, Manu; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2008-01-01

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10–50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 and 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above ≈45 Gpa, there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve because of the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid before melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid. PMID:18809909

  15. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  16. Melting in the Fe-C system to 70 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, O. T.; Walter, M. J.; Dasgupta, R.; Walker, D.; Clark, S. M.

    2009-06-01

    We determined high-pressure melting curves for Fe 3C, Fe 7C 3 and the Fe-Fe 3C eutectic using laser-heated diamond anvil cell techniques. The principal criterion for melting is the observation of plateaus in the temperature vs. laser power function, which is an expected behavior at isobaric invariant points (e.g. congruent, eutectic, or peritectic melting) as increased power provides the latent heat of melting. We verified this technique by reproducing the melting curves of well-studied congruently melting compounds at high pressure (Fe, Pt, FeS, Pb), and by comparison with melting determinations made using thermocouple-based large-volume press techniques. The incongruent melting curve of Fe 3C measured to 70 GPa has an apparent change in slope at ~ 8 GPa, which we attribute to stabilization of Fe 7C 3 at the solidus and the creation of a P- T invariant point. We observe that Fe 7C 3 melts at higher temperatures than Fe 3C between 14 and 52 GPa and has a steep P- T slope, and on this basis predicts an expanding field of Fe 7C 3 + liquid with pressure. The Fe-Fe 3C eutectic melting curve measured to 70 GPa agrees closely with multi-anvil data and thermodynamic calculations. We also measured the eutectic composition as a function of pressure using an in situ X-radiographic imaging technique, and find a rapid drop in carbon in the eutectic composition above about 20 GPa, generally consistent with previous thermodynamic calculations, and predict that the eutectic lies close to pure iron by ~ 50 GPa. We use these observations to extrapolate phase relations to core-relevant pressures. Convergence of the Fe 3C and Fe-Fe 3C eutectic melting curves indicate that Fe 3C is replaced at the solidus by Fe 7C 3 at ~ 120 GPa, forming another P- T invariant point and a new eutectic between Fe and Fe 7C 3. Thus, Fe 3C is unlikely to be an important crystallizing phase at core conditions, whereas Fe 7C 3 could become an important crystallizing phase.

  17. Melt Redistribution in Dynamic Systems: Applications to Core Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Samples of olivine + Fe-S were fabricated by hot-pressing a mechanical mixture of the two phases. Olivine powders with a starting grain size of approx. 10 microns were prepared by crushing crystals of San Carlos olivine followed by pulverization in a fluid energy mill. Iron sulfide powder with a particle size of approx. 5 microns was prepared from a 2:1 mixture of reagent grade iron sulfide (FeS) plus iron. Rods 20 mm in length by 10 mm in diameter were cold-pressed into iron capsules with a uniaxial stress of approx. 200 MPa. These rods were then hot-pressed at 1523 K and 300 MPa for 4 h to obtain a starting material with <2% porosity. Samples for shear experiments were cut perpendicular to the long axis of these rods. The discs were shaped into ellipses approx. 6 mm by approx. 8 mm with a thickness ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 mm. An iron foil strain marker was inserted into a cut made along the minor axis. The sample was placed between two thoriated tungsten pistons cut at 45 deg to the long axis and then placed into an iron sleeve capped by alumina discs. The sample was then sheared in a gas pressure-medium apparatus at a temperature of 1523 K and a confining pressure of 300 MPa.

  18. Investigations on sump cooling after core melt down

    SciTech Connect

    Knebel, J.U.

    1995-09-01

    This article presents the basic physical phenomena and scaling criteria of decay heat removal from a large coolant pool by single-phase and two-phase natural circulation flow. The physical significance of the dimensionless similarity groups derived is evaluated. The above results are applied to the SUCO program that is performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The SUCO program is a three-step series of scaled model experiments investigating the possibility of an optional sump cooling concept for the European Pressurized Water Reactor EPR. This concept is entirely based on passive safety features within the containment. The work is supported by the German utilities and the Siemens dimensional SUCOS-2D test facility. The experimental results of the model geometry are transformed to prototypic conditions.

  19. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt

    SciTech Connect

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.

    1997-02-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. The technical treatment in this assessment includes: (a) new data on energy flow from either volumetrically heated pools or non-heated layers on top, boiling and critical heat flux in inverted, curved geometries, emissivity of molten (superheated) samples of steel, and chemical reactivity proof tests, (b) a simple but accurate mathematical formulation that allows prediction of thermal loads by means of convenient hand calculations, (c) a detailed model programmed on the computer to sample input parameters over the uncertainty ranges, and to produce probability distributions of thermal loads and margins for departure from nucleate boiling at each angular position on the lower head, and (d) detailed structural evaluations that demonstrate that departure from nucleate boiling is a necessary and sufficient criterion for failure. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is {open_quotes}physically unreasonable.{close_quotes} Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings.

  20. Melting line of polymeric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2013-05-01

    We made an attempt to predict location of the melting line of polymeric nitrogen using two equations for Helmholtz free energy: proposed earlier for cubic gauche-structure and developed recently for liquid polymerized nitrogen. The P-T relation, orthobaric densities and latent heat of melting were determined using a standard double tangent construction. The estimated melting temperature decreases with increasing pressure, alike the temperature of molecular-nonmolecular transition in solid. We discuss the possibility of a triple point (solid-molecular fluid-polymeric fluid) at ˜80 GPa and observed maximum of melting temperature of nitrogen.

  1. Melting processes under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, M.; Lupulescu, A.; Koss, M.

    The Rensselaer Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (RIDGE) uses the large data archive amassed through a series of three NASA-supported microgravity experiments (IDGE/USMP-2, -3, and -4), all of which flew aboard the space shuttle Columbia. The IDGE instruments aboard USMP-2 and -3 provided in-flight CCD images, and 35-mm films (postflight). USMP-4 also allowed streaming of near-real-time video. Using 30 fps video data, it became possible for the first time to study both freezing and melting sequences for high-purity pivalic acid (PVA). We report on the melting process observed for PVA crystal fragments, observed under nearly ideal convection-free conditions. Conduction-limited melting processes are of importance in orbital melting of materials, meteoritic genesis, mushy-zone evolution, and in fusion weld pools where length scales for thermal buoyancy are restricted. Microgravity video show clearly that PVA dendrites melt into fragments that shrink at accelerating rates to extinction. The melting paths of individual fragments follow characteristic time dependences derived from theory. The theoretical melting kinetics against which the experimental observations are carefully compared is based on conduction-limited quasi-static melting under shape-preserving conditions. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found for the stable melting of needle-shaped prolate spheroidal PVA crystal fragments with aspect ratios near C /A = 12.

  2. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. ); Medford, G.T. )

    1990-06-01

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

  3. Viscosity of Hydrous Rhyolitic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2002-12-01

    It is critical to understand and to be able to predict viscosity of hydrous silicate melts for understanding magma transport, bubble growth, volcanic eruptions, and magma fragmentation. We report new viscosity data for hydrous rhyolitic melt in the viscosity range of 109 to 1015 Pa s based on the kinetics of hydrous species reaction in the melt upon cooling (i.e., based on the equivalence between the glass transition temperature and the apparent equilibrium temperature). We also report viscosity data obtained from bubble growth experiments. Our data show that the viscosity model of Hess and Dingwell (1996) systematically overestimates the viscosity of hydrous rhyolitic melt at the high viscosity range by a factor of 2 to 4 (still within their stated 2σ uncertainty). Another problem with the model of Hess and Dingwell is that the functional dependence of viscosity on total H2O content cannot be extended to dry melt: as total H2O content decreases to zero, the viscosity would first increase, and then decrease to zero. A zero viscosity for a dry melt makes no sense. Hence we need a mixing law for hydrous melt viscosity that is extendible to dry melts. By examining the viscosity of rhyolitic melts containing 6 ppm to about 8.0 wt% total H2O (both our own data and literature data), we propose the following relation for the dependence of viscosity on total H2O content: 1/η = 1/η 1+(1/η 2-1/η 1)xn ≈ 1/η 1+xn/η 2 where η is viscosity and 1/η is fluidity, η 1 is the viscosity of the dry melt, x is the mole fraction of total dissolved H2O, n and η 2 are two fitting parameters, and η 2 can be identified to be the viscosity of the hypothetical melt consisting of pure H2O (η 2 cannot be directly measured since such a melt does not exist). The above equation appears to work well for the viscosity of hydrous rhyolitic melts. By fitting hydrous rhyolitic melt viscosity with the above equation, we find that rhyolitic melt viscosity vary by 1.2 orders of magnitude

  4. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re ˜2 ×104- 3 ×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  5. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re~2×10^{4}-3×10^{5} and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface. PMID:26252689

  6. Melt pool dynamics during selective electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharowsky, T.; Osmanlic, F.; Singer, R. F.; Körner, C.

    2014-03-01

    Electron beam melting is a promising additive manufacturing technique for metal parts. Nevertheless, the process is still poorly understood making further investigations indispensable to allow a prediction of the part's quality. To improve the understanding of the process especially the beam powder interaction, process observation at the relevant time scale is necessary. Due to the difficult accessibility of the building area, the high temperatures, radiation and the very high scanning speeds during the melting process the observation requires an augmented effort in the observation equipment. A high speed camera in combination with an illumination laser, band pass filter and mirror system is suitable for the observation of the electron beam melting process. The equipment allows to observe the melting process with a high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper the adjustment of the equipment and results of the lifetime and the oscillation frequencies of the melt pool for a simple geometry are presented.

  7. Conduction-limited crystallite melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupulescu, A.; Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.

    2005-04-01

    High-purity pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites were observed growing under convection-free conditions during the isothermal dendritic growth experiment (IDGE) flown on NASA's space shuttle Columbia on STS-87. The IDGE was part of the complement of primary scientific experiments designated as the United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP4) launched late in 1997. The IDGE video data show that PVA dendrites may be melted without exhibiting any detectable relative motion with respect to the surrounding quiescent melt phase. Thus, melting occurs by heat conduction alone. When a small fixed superheating is imposed on pre-existing dendritic fragments, they melt steadily toward extinction. Individual fragments steadily decrease in size according to a square-root of time dependence predicted using quasi-static conduction-limited theory. Agreement between analytic melting theory and microgravity experiments was found originally if the melting process occurs under the restriction of shape-preserving conditions, where needle-like crystal fragments may be approximated as ellipsoids with a constant axial ratio. Among the new results reported here is the influence of capillarity effects on melting in needle-like crystallites, observed as a dramatic change in their axial ratio, when the size scale of a crystallite decreases below a critical value. In microgravity melting experiments, the axial ratio of individual crystallites does not remain constant, because of interactions with neighboring fragments within the mushy zone. The kinetic data were then "sectorized" to divide the total melting process into a series of short intervals. Each melting sector for a crystallite could then be approximated by a constant average value of the axial ratio. Sectorization also allows accurate prediction of melting kinetics by applying quasi-static heat conduction theory, despite the suspected presence of capillarity and the occurrence of fragmentation. These additional processes that accompany

  8. Melting and spheroidization of hexagonal boron nitride in a microwave-powered, atmospheric pressure nitrogen plasma `

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiman, S. S.; Phillips, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a method for producing spherically-shaped, hexagonal phase boron nitride (hBN) particles of controlled diameter in the 10-100 micron size range. Specifically, platelet-shaped hBN particles are passed as an aerosol through a microwave-generated, atmospheric pressure, nitrogen plasma. In the plasma, agglomerates formed by collisions between input hBN particles, melt and forms spheres. We postulate that this unprecedented process takes place in the unique environment of a plasma containing a high N-atom concentration, because in such an environment the decomposition temperature can be raised above the melting temperature. Indeed, given the following relationship [1]: BN{sub (condensed)} {leftrightarrow} B{sub (gas)} + N{sub (gas)}. Standard equilibrium thermodynamics indicate that the decomposition temperature of hBN is increased in the presence of high concentrations of N atoms. We postulate that in our plasma system the N atom concentration is high enough to raise the decomposition temperature above the (undetermined) melting temperature. Keywords Microwave plasma, boron nitride, melting, spherical, thermodynamics, integrated circuit package.

  9. Correlation for downward melt penetration into a miscible low-density substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, L.J.; Cheung, F.B.; Pedersen, D.R.; Linehan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Downward penetration of a sacrificial bed material or a concrete basemat structure by an overlying layer of core melt resulting from a hypothetical core disruptive accident has been a major issue in post accident heat removal studies. One characteristic feature of this problem is that the solid substrate, when molten, is miscible with and lighter than the core melt so that the rate of penetration is strongly dependent upon the motion of natural convection in the melt layer driven by the density difference between the core melt and the molten substrate. This fundamentally interesting and technologically important problem has been investigated by a number of researchers. Significantly different melting rates, however, were observed in these studies. Questions concerning the occurrence of flow transition and its effect on melt penetration remain to be answered. To promote the understanding of the phenomena and to strengthen the data base of melt penetration, simulation experiments were conducted using various kinds of salt solutions (KI, NaCl, CaCl/sub 2/, and MgCl/sub 2/ solutions) as the working fluid and an air-bubble-free ice slab as the solid substrate.

  10. Chicxulub Impact Melts: Geochemical Signatures of Target Lithology Mixing and Post-Impact Hydrothermal Fluid Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, David A.; Zurcher, Lukas; Horz, Freidrich; Mertzmann, Stanley A.

    2004-01-01

    Impact melts within complex impact craters are generally homogeneous, unless they differentiated, contain immiscible melt components, or were hydrothermally altered while cooling. The details of these processes, however, and their chemical consequences, are poorly understood. The best opportunity to unravel them may lie with the Chicxulub impact structure, because it is the world s most pristine (albeit buried) large impact crater. The Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project recovered approx. 100 meters of impactites in a continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 (YAX-1) borehole. This dramatically increased the amount of melt available for analyses, which was previously limited to two small samples N17 and N19) recovered from the Yucatan-6 (Y-6) borehole and one sample (N10) recovered from the Chicxulub-1 (C-1) borehole. In this study, we describe the chemical compositions of six melt samples over an approx. 40 m section of the core and compare them to previous melt samples from the Y-6 and C-1 boreholes.

  11. Mantle Mineral/Silicate Melt Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, E. A.; Drake, M. J.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction: The partitioning of elements among mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. It has been proposed that the elevated Mg/Si ratio of the upper mantle of the Earth is a consequence of the flotation of olivine into the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). Agee and Walker (1988) have generated a model via mass balance by assuming average mineral compositions to generate upper mantle peridotite. This model determines that upper mantle peridotite could result from the addition of 32.7% olivine and 0.9% majorite garnet into the upper mantle, and subtraction of 27.6% perovskite from the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). The present contribution uses experimental data to examine the consequences of such multiple phase fractionations enabling an independent evaluation of the above mentioned model. Here we use Mg-perovskite/melt partition coefficients from both a synthetic and a natural system (KLB-1) obtained from this laboratory. Also used are partition coefficient values for majorite garnet/melt, beta spinel/melt and olivine/melt partitioning (McFarlane et al., 1991b; McFarlane et al., 1992). Multiple phase fractionations are examined using the equilibrium crystallization equation and partition coefficient values. The mineral proportions determined by Agee and Walker (1988) are converted into weight fractions and used to compute a bulk partition coefficient value. Discussion: There has been a significant debate concerning whether measured values of trace element partition coefficients permit large-scale fractionation of liquidus phases from an early terrestrial magma ocean (Kato et al., 1988a,b; Walker and Agee, 1989; Drake, 1989; Drake et al., 1991; McFarlane et al., 1990, 1991). It should be noted that it is unclear which, if any, numerical values of partition coefficients are appropriate for examining this question, and certainly the assumptions for the current model must be more fully

  12. Lunar highland melt rocks - Chemistry, petrology and silicate mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A selected suite containing several of the largest samples of lunar highland melt rocks includes impact melt specimens (anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro) and volcanic specimens (intermediate-K Fra Mauro). Although previous assumptions of LKFM volcanism have fallen into disfavor, no fatal arguments against this hypothesis have been presented, and the evidence of a possibly 'inherited igneous' olivine-plagioclase cosaturation provides cause for keeping a volcanic LKFM hypothesis viable. Comparisons of silicate mineralogy with melt rock compositions provide information on the specimen's composition and cooling history. Plagioclase-rock compositions can be matched to the experimentally determined equilibria for appropriate samples to identify melt rocks with refractory anorthitic clasts. Olivine-rock compositions indicate that melt rock vitrophyres precipitate anomalously Fe-rich olivine; the cause of this anomaly is not immediately evident. The Al-Ti and Ca-Fe-Mg zonation in pyroxene provide information on relative cooling rates of highland melt rocks, but Cr- and Al-content (where Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene cores are preserved in rapidly cooled samples) can be correlated with composition of the host rock.

  13. Beyond the Melting Pot Reconsidered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elijah

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the 1963 book, "Beyond the Melting Pot," which suggested that eventually the problem of different ethnicities in the U.S. would be resolved and society would become one melting pot. Examines how changes in immigration and economic structures have affected the issue, noting the devastating effect of the dominant culture's denigration of…

  14. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  15. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  16. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  17. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Analysis of postulated energetic reactions and resultant aerosol generation in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Dickinson, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report reviews work done to estimate the possible consequences of postulated energetic reactions in ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The issue of explosive reactions was raised in the 1987 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), where a detonation-like explosion was postulated for the purpose of defining an upper bound on dose consequences for various disposal options. A review of the explosion scenario by the General Accounting Office (GAO) indicated that the aerosol generation and consequent radioactive doses projected for the explosion postulated in the EIS were understated by one to two orders of magnitude. The US DOE has sponsored an extensive study of the hazard posed by uncontrolled exothermic reactions in ferrocyanide waste, and results obtained during the past three years have allowed this hazard to be more realistically assessed. The objective of this report is to summarize the improved knowledge base that now indicates that explosive or vigorous chemical reactions are not credible in the ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks. This improved understanding supports the decision not to proceed with further analyses or predictions of the consequences of such an event or with aerosol tests in support of such predictions. 53 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Bulk nanostructured alloys prepared by flux melting and melt solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T.D.; Schwarz, R.B.; Zhang, X.

    2005-10-03

    We have prepared bulk nanostructured Ag{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} alloys by a flux-melting and melt-solidification technique. The flux purifies the melts, leading to a large undercooling and nanometer-sized microstructure. The as-prepared alloys are composed of nanolayered Ag and Cu within micrometer-sized grains. The bulk nanostructured alloys have an ultimate tensile strength of approximately 560 MPa, similar yield strength in tension and compression, elongation of 7% in tension, strain hardening exponent of 0.1, and relatively high mechanical and thermal stability up to 400 deg. C.

  19. Commercial Zone Melting Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Xie, Hongyao; Shu, Shengcheng; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Han; Tang, Xinfeng

    2014-06-01

    Bismuth telluride-based compounds have been extensively utilized for commercial application. However, thermoelectric materials must suffer numerous mechanical vibrations and thermal stresses while in service, making it equally important to discuss the mechanical properties, especially at high temperature. In this study, the compressive and bending strengths of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 commercial zone melting (ZM) ingots were investigated at 25, 100, and 200 °C, respectively. Due to the obvious anisotropy of materials prepared by ZM method, the effect of anisotropy on the strengths was also explored. Two-parameter Weibull distribution was employed to fit a series of values acquired by a universal testing machine. And digital speckle photography was applied to record the strain field evolution, providing visual observation of surface strain. The compressive and bending strengths along ZM direction were approximately three times as large as those perpendicular to the ZM direction independent of the temperature, indicating a weak van der Waals bond along the c axis.

  20. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  1. The Human Genomic Melting Map

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Tøstesen, Eivind; Sundet, Jostein K; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Bock, Christoph; Jerstad, Geir Ivar; Thilly, William G; Hovig, Eivind

    2007-01-01

    In a living cell, the antiparallel double-stranded helix of DNA is a dynamically changing structure. The structure relates to interactions between and within the DNA strands, and the array of other macromolecules that constitutes functional chromatin. It is only through its changing conformations that DNA can organize and structure a large number of cellular functions. In particular, DNA must locally uncoil, or melt, and become single-stranded for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription to occur. It has previously been shown that this melting occurs cooperatively, whereby several base pairs act in concert to generate melting bubbles, and in this way constitute a domain that behaves as a unit with respect to local DNA single-strandedness. We have applied a melting map calculation to the complete human genome, which provides information about the propensities of forming local bubbles determined from the whole sequence, and present a first report on its basic features, the extent of cooperativity, and correlations to various physical and biological features of the human genome. Globally, the melting map covaries very strongly with GC content. Most importantly, however, cooperativity of DNA denaturation causes this correlation to be weaker at resolutions fewer than 500 bps. This is also the resolution level at which most structural and biological processes occur, signifying the importance of the informational content inherent in the genomic melting map. The human DNA melting map may be further explored at http://meltmap.uio.no. PMID:17511513

  2. Melting granites to make granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Bruna B.; Sawyer, Edward W.; Janasi, Valdecir de A.

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale partial melting in the continental crust is widely attributed to fluid-absent incongruent breakdown of hydrous minerals in the case of pelites, greywackes and meta-mafic rocks. Granite is a far more common rock in the continental crust, but fluid-absent hydrate-breakdown melting is unlikely to result in significant melting in granites because of their low modal abundance of mica or amphibole. Experiments show that fluid-present melting can produce ~30% melt at low temperatures (690°C). Thus, granites and leucogranites can be very fertile if H2O-present melting occurs via reactions such as plagioclase + quartz + K-feldspar + H2O = melt, because of their high modal proportions of the reactant phases. Our study investigates the Kinawa Migmatite in the São Francisco Craton, southeastern Brazil. This migmatite is derived from an Archaean TTG sequence and can be divided into; 1) pink diatexites, 2) leucosomes, 3) grey gneisses and 4) amphibolites. The migmatite records upper-amphibolite to beginning of granulite facies metamorphism in a P-T range from 5.1-6.6 kbar and ~650-780°C. Pink diatexites are the most abundant rocks, and their appearance varies depending on the amount of melt they contained. Three types are recognised: residual diatexites (low melt fraction (Mf)), schlieren diatexites (moderate Mf) and homogeneous diatexites (high Mf). They are very closely related spatially in the field, with mostly transitional contacts. There is a sequence with progressive loss of ferromagnesian minerals, schollen and schlieren through the sequence to the most melt-rich parts of the diatexites as magmatic flow became more intense. There are fewer ferromagnesian minerals, thus the melt becomes cleaner (more leucocratic) and, because the schlieren have disaggregated the aspect is more homogeneous. These parts are texturally similar to leucogranites in which the biotite is randomly distributed and pre-melting structures are completely destroyed. The likely protolith

  3. Melting of iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1990-01-01

    The melting of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and commercial vendors is described. The melting processes evaluated includes are melting, air-induction melting (AIM), vacuum-induction melting (VIM), and electroslag remelting (ESR). The quality of the ingots studied are base on internal soundness and the surface finish obtained. The ingots were analyzed for recovery of various elements during melting. The impurity levels observed in the alloys by various melting processes were compared. Recommendations are made for viable processes for commercial melting of these alloys. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Melting of Bridgmanite to 135 Gpa: Toward a Coherent Model for the Melting Behavior in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrault, D.; Pesce, G.; Mezouar, N.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge on the melting behavior in the deep mantle remains based on a limited number of experimental and theoretical works. Today, thanks to (i) availability of very brilliant X-ray synchrotron sources and (ii) improved control of the P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), the experimental results should reach some agreement about the melting diagrams. However, it is not the case and major controversies remain. For example, liquidi of peridotitic (1) and chondritic-type (2) mantles are reported with a temperature difference of ~1000 K at a pressure of ~90 GPa (corresponding to ~2000 km depth), which cannot be explained by the relatively small compositional difference between these two materials. To bring new insights about the melting properties of the deep mantle, our strategy has been to study the melting curve of the end-member liquidus phase, the (Mg,Fe)(Al,Si)O3 bridgmanite (Bg), before applying a basic thermodynamical approach to the mineralogical system made of Bg, CaSiO3-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase. Our approach cannot be as formal as currently done for melting in the shallow mantle, due to lack of major thermodynamical parameters. Still, our analysis yields original information, such as the degree of partial melting as a function of P, T and fraction of Bg in the geological material. The Mg/Si ratio in melts can also be addressed. Concerning the controversy between LH-DAC experiments, it can be solved taking into account migration in the temperature gradient of the pseudo-eutectic melt, when the sample starts to melt. This effect is expected to occur more extensively in absence of an insulating material between the sample and the diamond anvils. It yields an overestimation of the liquidus temperature for a given chemical composition, due to loss of the most fusing elements. References:1. Fiquet et al. (2010) Melting of Peridotite to 140 Gigapascals. Science 329, 1516-1518. 2. Andrault et al. (2011) Melting curve of

  6. Rod bundle thermal-hydraulic and melt progression analysis of CORA severe fuel damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, K.Y. )

    1994-04-01

    An integral, fast-running computational model is developed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic and melt progression behavior in a nuclear reactor rod bundle under severe fuel damage conditions. This consists of the submodels for calculating steaming from the core, hydrogen formation, heat transfer in and out of the core, cooling from core spray or injection, and, most importantly, fuel melting, relocation, and freezing with chemical interactions taking place among the material constituents in a degrading core. The integral model is applied to three German severe fuel damage tests to analyze the core thermal and melt behavior: CORA-16 (18-rod bundle and slow cooling), CORA-17 (18-rod bundle and quenching), and CORA-18 (48-rod bundle and slow cooling). Results of the temperature response of the fuel rods, the channel box, and the absorber blade; hydrogen generation from the fuel rod and the channel box; and core material eutectic formation, melt relocation, and blockage formation are discussed. Reasonable agreement is observed for component temperatures at midelevation where prediction and measurement uncertainties are minimal. However, discrepancies or uncertainties are noticed for hydrogen generation and core-melt progression. The experimentally observed peak generation of hydrogen upon reflooding is not able to be reproduced, and the total amount generated is generally underpredicted primarily because of the early relocation of the Zircaloy fuel channel box and cladding. Also, difficulties are encountered in the process of assessing the core-melt formation and the relocation model because of either modeling uncertainties or a lack of definitive metallurgical data as a function of time throughout the transient.

  7. Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Das, S.K.

    2008-02-15

    The project entitled 'Scaleable Clean Aluminum Melting Systems' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Secat Inc. The three-year project was initially funded for the first year and was then canceled due to funding cuts at the DOE headquarters. The limited funds allowed the research team to visit industrial sites and investigate the status of using immersion heaters for aluminum melting applications. Primary concepts were proposed on the design of furnaces using immersion heaters for melting. The proposed project can continue if the funding agency resumes the funds to this research. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate integrated, retrofitable technologies for clean melting systems for aluminum in both the Metal Casting and integrated aluminum processing industries. The scope focused on immersion heating coupled with metal circulation systems that provide significant opportunity for energy savings as well as reduction of melt loss in the form of dross. The project aimed at the development and integration of technologies that would enable significant reduction in the energy consumption and environmental impacts of melting aluminum through substitution of immersion heating for the conventional radiant burner methods used in reverberatory furnaces. Specifically, the program would couple heater improvements with furnace modeling that would enable cost-effective retrofits to a range of existing furnace sizes, reducing the economic barrier to application.

  8. Circulation and melting beneath the ross ice shelf.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S S; Gordon, A L; Ardai, J L

    1979-02-01

    Thermohaline observations in the water column beneath the Ross Ice Shelf and along its terminal face show significant vertical stratification, active horizontal circulation, and net melting at the ice shelf base. Heat is supplied by seawater that moves southward beneath the ice shelf from a central warm core and from a western region of high salinity. The near-freezing Ice Shelf Water produced flows northward into the Ross Sea. PMID:17734137

  9. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (<1 µm). We prepared cross sections of samples recovered from the DAC using a focused ion beam (FIB) and subsequently performed textural and chemical characterization with field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Quenched liquid alloy was found at the hottest part coexisting with a solid phase (liquidus phase) at the periphery. These results combined with literature data on the melting phase relations in the Fe-FeO binary system demonstrate that the liquidus field of SiO2 is very wide at the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary system at the core pressure range. It indicates that the original Fe-Si-O core liquid should have crystallized a large amount SiO2 until it lost either silicon or oxygen. The recent finding of high thermal conductivity of the core suggests that core thermal convection is difficult to sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  10. Preliminary analysis of the postulated changes needed to achieve rail cask handling capabilities at selected light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Konzek, G.J.

    1986-02-01

    Reactor-specific railroad and crane information for all LWRs in the US was extracted from current sources of information. Based on this information, reactors were separated into two basic groups consisting of reactors with existing, usable rail cask capabilities and those without these capabilities. The latter group is the main focus of this study. The group of reactors without present rail cask handling capabilities was further separated into two subgroups consisting of reactors considered essentially incapable of handling a large rail cask of about 100 tons and reactors where postulated facility changes could result in rail cask handling capabilities. Based on a selected population of 127 reactors, the results of this assessment indicate that usable rail cask capabilities exist at 83 (65%) of the reactors. Twelve (27%) of the remaining 44 reactors are deemed incapable of handling a large rail cask without major changes, and 32 reactors are considered likely candidates for potentially achieving rail cask handling capabilities. In the latter group, facility changes were postulated that would conceptually enable these reactors to handle large rail casks. The estimated cost per plant of required facility changes varied widely from a high of about $35 million to a low of <$0.3 million. Only 11 of the 32 plants would require crane upgrades. Spur track and right-of-way costs would apparently vary widely among sites. These results are based on preliminary analyses using available generic cost data. They represent lower bound values that are useful for developing an initial assessment of the viability of the postulated changes on a system-wide basis, but are not intended to be absolute values for specific reactors or sites.

  11. Surface melting of clusters and implications for bulk matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Ping; Berry, R. Stephen

    1992-06-01

    Surface melting on clusters is investigated by a combination of analytic modeling and computer simulation. Homogeneous argonlike clusters bound by Lennard-Jones forces and Cu-like clusters bound by ``embedded-atom'' potentials are the systems considered. Molecular-dynamics calculations have been carried out for clusters with 40-147 atoms. Well below the bulk melting temperature, the surfaces become very soft, exhibiting well-defined diffusion constants even while the cores remain nearly rigid and solidlike. The simulations, particularly animations, of atomic motion reveal that the surface melting is associated not with amorphous, random surface structures in constant, irregular motion, but rather with large-amplitude, organized, collective motion of most of the surface atoms accompanied by a few detached atoms (``floaters'') and holes. At any time, a few of the surface atoms are out of the surface layer, leaving vacancies; these promoted particles wander diffusively, the holes also but less so; the floaters occasionally exchange with atoms in the surface layer. This result is the basis for an analytic, statistical model. The caloric curves, particularly the latent heats, together with the results from an analytical model, show that surface melting of clusters is a ``phase change'' different from the homogeneous melting of clusters.

  12. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from Exxon Nuclear MOFP, Richland, Washington, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Exxon Nuclear Company Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant (MOFP), Richland, Washington. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, high straight-line winds, and floods. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values most likely to occur offsite are also given.

  13. A discontinuous melt sheet in the Manson impact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izett, G. A.; Reynolds, R. L.; Rosenbaum, J. G.; Nishi, J. M.

    1993-03-01

    Petrologic studies of the core recovered from holes drilled in the Manson, Iowa, buried impact structure may unravel the thermal history of the crater-fill debris. We made a cursory examination of about 200 m of core recovered from the M-1 bore hole. The M-1 bore hole was the first of 12 holes drilled as part of a cooperative drilling program between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Iowa Geological Survey Bureau. The M-1 core hole is about 6 km northeast of the center of the impact structure, apparently on the flank of its central peak. We developed a working hypothesis that a 30-m-thick breccia unit within a 53-m-thick unit previously termed the 'crystalline clast breccia with glassy matrix' is part of a discontinuous melt sheet in the crater-fill impact debris. The 30-m-thick breccia unit reached temperatures sufficient to partially melt some small breccia clasts and convert the fine-grained breccia matrix into a silicate melt that cooled to a greenish-black, flinty, microcrystalline rock. The results of the investigation of this unit are presented.

  14. A discontinuous melt sheet in the Manson impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izett, G. A.; Reynolds, R. L.; Rosenbaum, J. G.; Nishi, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Petrologic studies of the core recovered from holes drilled in the Manson, Iowa, buried impact structure may unravel the thermal history of the crater-fill debris. We made a cursory examination of about 200 m of core recovered from the M-1 bore hole. The M-1 bore hole was the first of 12 holes drilled as part of a cooperative drilling program between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Iowa Geological Survey Bureau. The M-1 core hole is about 6 km northeast of the center of the impact structure, apparently on the flank of its central peak. We developed a working hypothesis that a 30-m-thick breccia unit within a 53-m-thick unit previously termed the 'crystalline clast breccia with glassy matrix' is part of a discontinuous melt sheet in the crater-fill impact debris. The 30-m-thick breccia unit reached temperatures sufficient to partially melt some small breccia clasts and convert the fine-grained breccia matrix into a silicate melt that cooled to a greenish-black, flinty, microcrystalline rock. The results of the investigation of this unit are presented.

  15. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOEpatents

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  16. Evidence for fractional crystallization of wadsleyite and ringwoodite from olivine melts in chondrules entrained in shock-melt veins

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Masaaki; El Goresy, Ahmed; Ohtani, Eiji; Nagase, Toshiro; Nishijima, Masahiko; Vashaei, Zahra; Ferroir, Tristan; Gillet, Philippe; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Simionovici, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Peace River is one of the few shocked members of the L-chondrites clan that contains both high-pressure polymorphs of olivine, ringwoodite and wadsleyite, in diverse textures and settings in fragments entrained in shock-melt veins. Among these settings are complete olivine porphyritic chondrules. We encountered few squeezed and flattened olivine porphyritic chondrules entrained in shock-melt veins of this meteorite with novel textures and composition. The former chemically unzoned (Fa24–26) olivine porphyritic crystals are heavily flattened and display a concentric intergrowth with Mg-rich wadsleyite of a very narrow compositional range (Fa6–Fa10) in the core. Wadsleyite core is surrounded by a Mg-poor and chemically stark zoned ringwoodite (Fa28–Fa38) belt. The wadsleyite–ringwoodite interface denotes a compositional gap of up to 32 mol % fayalite. A transmission electron microscopy study of focused ion beam slices in both regions indicates that the wadsleyite core and ringwoodite belt consist of granoblastic-like intergrowth of polygonal crystallites of both ringwoodite and wadsleyite, with wadsleyite crystallites dominating in the core and ringwoodite crystallites dominating in the belt. Texture and compositions of both high-pressure polymorphs are strongly suggestive of formation by a fractional crystallization of the olivine melt of a narrow composition (Fa24–26), starting with Mg-rich wadsleyite followed by the Mg-poor ringwoodite from a shock-induced melt of olivine composition (Fa24–26). Our findings could erase the possibility of the resulting unrealistic time scales of the high-pressure regime reported recently from other shocked L-6 chondrites. PMID:18562280

  17. Quantifying melting and mobilistaion of interstitial melts in crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Humphreys, Madeleine

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of crystals mushes and separation of melts and crystals in is critical to understanding the development of physical and chemical heterogeneity in magma chambers and has been invoked as an eruption trigger mechanism. Here we investigate the behaviour of the melt in the well characterised, classic crystal mush system of the Skaergaard intrusion by combining experimental petrology and the non-destructive 3D imaging methods. Starting materials for partial melting experiments were four samples from the upper Middle Zone of the Layered Series. Cylinders, 15 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length, were drilled out of the rock samples, placed in alumina crucibles and held for 5 days in electric furnaces at atmospheric pressure and 1050-1100 °C. Redox conditions set by the CO-CO2 gas mixture were kept close to those of the FMQ buffer. We then use spatially registered 3D x-ray computed tomography images, collected before and after the experiment, to determine the volume and distribution of the crystal framework and interstitial phases, and the volume, distribution and connectivity the interstitial phases that undergo melting and extraction while at elevated temperature. Image analysis has allowed us to quantify these physical changes with high spatial resolution. Our work is a first step towards quantitative understanding of the melt mobilisation and migration processes operating in notionally locked crystal rich magmatic systems.

  18. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  19. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  20. Frictional melting and stick-slip behavior in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie Evan; Lavallee, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; di Toro, Giulio; Hornby, Adrian Jakob; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Dome-building eruptions have catastrophic potential, with dome collapse leading to devastating pyroclastic flows with almost no precursory warning. During dome growth, the driving forces of the buoyant magma may be superseded by controls along conduit margins; where brittle fracture and sliding can lead to formation of lubricating cataclasite and gouge. Under extreme friction, pseudotachylyte may form at the conduit margin. Understanding the conduit margin processes is vital to understanding the continuation of an eruption and we postulate that pseudotachylyte generation could be the underlying cause of stick-slip motion and associated seismic "drumbeats", which are so commonly observed at dome-building volcanoes. This view is supported by field evidence in the form of pseudotachylytes identified in lava dome products at Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) and Mount St. Helens (USA). Both eruptions were characterised by repetitive, periodic seismicity and lava spine extrusion of highly viscous magma. High velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments demonstrate the propensity for melting of the andesitic and dacitic material (from Soufrière Hills and Mount St. Helens respectively) at upper conduit stress conditions (<10 MPa). Starting from room temperature, frictional melting of the magmas occurs in under 1 s (<< 1 m) at 1.5 m/s (a speed that is achievable during stick-slip motion). At lower velocities melting occurs comparatively later due to dissipation of heat from the slip zone (e.g. 8-15 m at 0.1 m/s). Hence, given the ease with which melting is achieved in volcanic rocks, and considering the high ambient temperatures in volcanic conduits, frictional melting may thus be an inevitable consequence of viscous magma ascent. The shear resistance of the slip zone during the experiment is also monitored. Frictional melting induces a higher resistance to sliding than rock on rock, and viscous processes control the slip zone properties. Variable-rate HVR experiments which mimic

  1. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1977-07-19

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

  2. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P. [Trafford, PA; Tilbrook, Roger W. [Monroeville, PA; Heylmun, Neal F. [Pittsburgh, PA

    1977-07-19

    Apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed.

  3. Melting chocolate and melting snowmen: analogical reasoning and causal relations.

    PubMed

    Goswami, U; Brown, A L

    1990-04-01

    Children's performance in the classical a:b::c:d analogy task is traditionally very poor prior to the Piagetian stage of formal operations. The interpretation has been that the ability to reason about higher-order relations (the relations between the a:b and c:d parts of the analogy) is late-developing. However, an alternative possibility is that the relations used to date in the analogies are too difficult for younger children. Two experiments presented children aged 3, 4 and 6 years with a:b::c:d analogies which were based on relations of physical causality such as melting and cutting, for example chocolate bar:melted chocolate::snowman:melted snowman. Understanding of these particular causal relations is known to develop between the ages of 3 and 4 years. It was found that even 3-year-olds could solve the classical analogies if they understood the causal relations on which they were based. PMID:2340713

  4. Development of a phenomena identification and ranking table for a postulated double-ended guillotine break in a production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.G.; Wilson, G.E.; Ortiz, M.G. ); Griggs, D.P. )

    1989-11-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl accident, production reactors in the United States have come under increasing scrutiny with respect to safe operation. Because of additional design features, the U.S. reactors are considered inherently more safe than was the Chernobyl design. However, demonstration of their safety margins is required. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed a generic methodology (code scaling, applicability, and uncertainty (CSAU)) to quantify the uncertainty in computer codes used to license commercial light water reactors. At the process level, the method is generic to any application that relies on computer code simulations to determine safe operating margins. The CSAU is being applied to a postulated double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in a U.S. Department of Energy production reactor. The first three steps of the method, producing phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRTs), have been completed to identify phenomena that are important to the postulated accident. The selected scenario is the hypothesized, but limiting, DEGB in the Savannah River site L reactor.

  5. Impact melt generation and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orphal, D. L.; Borden, W. F.; Larson, S. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The results from the first two calculations in a series of continuum mechanics computer code calculations, investigating the effects of variations in impactor mass and velocity on the generation and transport of impact melt, are reported. In the present calculations, the impactor is modeled as a spherical iron projectile with a mass of one trillion grams, and the target as a gabbroic anorthosite (GA) half-space, where the cases calculated have impact velocities of 5 and 15.8 km/sec. Early-time ejection velocities are 1-2 km/sec in both cases. The first calculation results in 0.07 projectile masses of GA being partly or completely melted, with all the melted GA being ejected from the crater, and a maximum impact range for the ejected melted material of 30 km. The second calculation yields 10.4 projectile masses of melted GA, 50% of which is ejected from the crater to ranges of up to about 130 km. Peak shock pressure attenuation with depth is reported for both cases, and transient cavity dynamics are described and compared to that for surface and near-surface explosions.

  6. Melting in temperature sensitive suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    We describe two experimental studies about melting in colloidal systems. In particular we studied melting of 1-dimensional lamellar phases and 3-dimensional colloidal crystals. In the first set of experiments we prepared suspensions composed of rodlike fd virus and the thermosensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). The phase diagram of this systems is temperature and concentration dependent. Using video microscopy, we directly observed melting of lamellar phases and single lamellae into nematic phase. We found that lamellar phases swell with increasing temperature before melting into the nematic phase. The highly swollen lamellae can be superheated as a result of topological nucleation barriers that slow the formation of the nematic phase. In another set of experiments we prepared colloidal crystals from thermally responsive microgel spheres. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed three-dimensional structures. Upon increasing the temperature slightly above room temperature, particle volume fraction decreased from 0.74 to less than 0.5. Using video microscopy, we observed premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals. Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at sample volume fractions above the bulk melting transition. Particle tracking revealed increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. In total these observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and in atomic scale crystals.

  7. Counterrotating core in IC 1459

    SciTech Connect

    Franx, M.; Illingworth, G.D.

    1988-04-01

    The radio elliptical IC 1459 is shown to have a massive rapidly counterrotating stellar core. Along the major axis a strong peak in the rotational velocity is observed at a distance of 2 arcsec (0.3 kpc) from the center. The velocity reaches 170 + or - 20 km/s. The rotational velocity in the outer parts rises to 45 + or - 8 km/s, but in the opposite sense to the rotation of the center. Along the minor axis, no significant rotation is measured, neither in the center nor in the outer parts. Line profiles derived from cross-correlated spectra along the major axis in the core show a clear asymmetry. Ionized gas rotates around the minor axis in the same sense as the outer part of the galaxy. The other properties are typical of normal ellipticals. The galaxy has a regular color gradient and line strength gradient. The mass of the counterrotating component is estimated to be about 10 to the 10th solar masses. It is postulated that such a core could form, following the merger of two galaxies, either by the tidal disruption of the victim or through a starburst-like event. 27 references.

  8. The Effect of Inner Core Translation on Outer Core Flow and the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mound, J. E.; Davies, C. J.; Silva, L.

    2015-12-01

    Bulk translation of the inner core has been proposed to explain quasi-hemispheric patterns of seismic heterogeneity. Such a translation would result in differential melting and freezing at the inner core boundary (ICB) and hence a heterogeneous pattern of buoyancy flux that could influence convection in the outer core. This heterogeneous flux at the ICB will tend to promote upwelling on the trailing hemisphere, where enhanced inner core growth results in increased latent heat and light element release, and inhibit upwelling on the leading hemisphere, where melting of the inner core occurs. If this difference in convective driving between the two hemispheres propagated across the thickness of the outer core, then flows near the surface of the core could be linked to the ICB heterogeneity and result in a hemispheric imbalance in the geomagnetic field. We have investigated the influence of such ICB boundary conditions on core flows and magnetic field structure in numerical geodynamo models and analysed the resultant hemispheric imbalance relative to the hemispheric structure in models constructed from observations of Earth's field. Inner core translation at rates consistent with estimates for the Earth produce a strong hemispheric bias in the field, one that should be readily apparent in averages of the field over tens of thousands of years. Current models of the field over the Holocene may be able to rule out the most extreme ICB forcing scenarios, but more information on the dynamic structure of the field over these time scales will be needed to adequately test all cases.

  9. Novel melting investigations of iron at high-pressure using synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Lerche, M.; Zhao, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lakshtanov, D. L.; Bass, J. D.; Murakami, M.

    2005-12-01

    Seismological observations show that Earth's iron-dominated core consists of a solid inner region surrounded by a liquid outer core. The melting temperature of iron at high-pressure therefore provides a bound on the temperature regime of the core. Previously, melting studies of iron metal at high-pressures were performed by shock-compression, resistive- and laser-heating in diamond anvil cells using visual observations or synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and theoretical methods. However, the melting curve of iron is still controversial, especially at very high pressures. Here we present a novel method of detecting the solid-liquid phase boundary of iron at high-pressure using 57Fe synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS). Focused synchrotron radiation with 1 meV bandwidth passes through a laser-heated sample inside a diamond anvil cell. The characteristic SMS time signature is observed by fast detectors and vanishes suddenly when melting occurs. This process is described by the Lamb-Mössbauer factor f = exp(-k2), where k is the wave number of the resonant x-rays and is the mean-square displacement of the iron atoms. We will discuss our melting results in comparison with previous data and also discuss future applications of this method to the study of melting of Earth materials under pressure. In addition to the detection of melt, the Lamb-Mössbauer factor is related to the phonon density of states (PDOS) of the material investigated. Results thus far indicate that the phonon density of states of fcc-structured iron softens with increasing temperature at high-pressure. We propose that the softening of the PDOS is related to a reduction of the shear modulus. This behavior that occurs at high-pressure near the melting point of iron should be considered when extrapolating the behavior of iron to the outermost inner core conditions.

  10. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa. PMID:26371317

  11. Compositions of group IVB iron meteorites and their parent melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Andrew J.; Humayun, Munir

    2005-10-01

    The concentrations of P, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ga, Ge, As, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au in the group IVB iron meteorites Cape of Good Hope, Hoba, Skookum, Santa Clara, Tawallah Valley, Tlacotepec, and Warburton Range have been measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The data were fitted to a model of fractional crystallization of the IVB parent body core, from which the composition of the parent melt and metal/melt distribution coefficients for each element in the system were determined, for a chosen value of D(Ni). Relative to Ni and chondritic abundances, the parent melt was enriched in refractory siderophiles, with greatest enrichment of 5× chondritic in the most refractory elements, and was strongly volatile-depleted, down to 0.00014× chondritic in Ge. Comparison to an equilibrium condensation sequence from a gas of solar composition indicates that no single temperature satisfactorily explains the volatility trend in the IVB parent melt; a small (<1%) complement of ultrarefractory components added to metal that is volatile-depleted but otherwise has nearly chondritic abundances (for Fe, Co and Ni) best explains the volatility trend. In addition to this volatility processing, which probably occurred in a nebular setting, there was substantial oxidation of the metal in the IVB parent body, leading to loss of Fe and other moderately siderophile elements such as Cr, Ga, and W, and producing the high Ni contents that are observed in the IVB irons. By assuming that the entire IVB parent body underwent a similar chemical history as its core, the composition of the silicate that is complementary to the IVB parent melt was also estimated, and appears to be similar to that of the angrite parent.

  12. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature–pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  13. Generalized melting criterion for amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, R. |; Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1992-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of solid-state amorphization based on a generalization of the well-known Lindemann criterion. The original Lindemann criterion proposes that melting occurs when the root-mean-square amplitude of thermal displacement exceeds a critical value. This criterion can be generalized to include solid-state amorphization by taking into account the static displacements. In an effort to verify the generalized melting criterion, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of radiation-induced amorphization in NiZr, NiZr{sub 2}, NiTi and FeTi using embedded-atom potentials. The average shear elastic constant G was calculated as a function of the total mean-square atomic displacement following random atom-exchanges and introduction of Frenkel pairs. Results provide strong support for the generalized melting criterion.

  14. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ulf R; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas P; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature-pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio), and the liquid's diffusion constant and viscosity. The framework developed, which applies for the sizable class of systems characterized by hidden scale invariance, is validated by computer simulations of the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones system. PMID:27530064

  15. Partial Melting of the Indarch (EH4) Meteorite : A Textural, Chemical and Phase Relations View of Melting and Melt Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, Timothy J.; Dickinson, Tamara L.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    To Test whether Aubrites can be formed by melting of enstatite Chondrites and to understand igneous processes at very low oxygen fugacities, we have conducted partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) chondrite at 1000-1500 C. Silicate melting begins at 1000 C. Substantial melt migration occurs at 1300-1400 C and metal migrates out of the silicate change at 1450 C and approx. 50% silicate partial melting. As a group, our experiments contain three immiscible metallic melts 9Si-, and C-rich), two immiscible sulfide melts(Fe-and FeMgMnCa-rich) and Silicate melt. Our partial melting experiments on the Indarch (EH4) enstatite Chondrite suggest that igneous processes at low fO2 exhibit serveral unique features. The complete melting of sulfides at 1000 C suggest that aubritic sulfides are not relicts. Aubritic oldhamite may have crystallized from Ca and S complexed in the silicate melt. Significant metal-sulfide melt migration might occur at relatively low degrees of silicate partial melting. Substantial elemental exchange occurred between different melts (e.g., between sulfide and silicate, Si between silicate and metal), a feature not observed during experiments at higher fO2. This exchange may help explain the formation of aubrites from known enstatite chondrites.

  16. Melting of a spin domain wall in the context of recent experiments with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, Lev; Iyer, Deepak; Rigol, Marcos

    When a one-dimensional spin domain wall of the form |up ...up up down down ...down>is melting, transverse spin correlations in the XX model exhibit a power-law decay in the melted region. This model can be mapped to hard-core bosons via Jordan-Wigner transformation. For hard-core bosons, these emerging power-law correlations correspond to singularities in the quasimomentum distribution at finite quasimomenta +/- pi/2, resulting in a dynamical quasicondensation with the emerging phase order different from the ground-state order. This phenomenon has been recently observed experimentally with ultracold bosons in optical lattices. Here we study the emergence of correlations in melting domain walls for hard-core bosons, spinless fermions and the Fermi-Hubbard model at infinite onsite repulsion. In all cases, the density dynamics exhibit identical ballistic expansion, while the correlations show strikingly different features.

  17. Origins of ultralow velocity zones through slab-derived metallic melt.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Jie; Hrubiak, Rostislav; Smith, Jesse S

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) places constraints on the chemical composition and thermal structure of deep Earth and provides critical information on the dynamics of large-scale mantle convection, but their origin has remained enigmatic for decades. Recent studies suggest that metallic iron and carbon are produced in subducted slabs when they sink beyond a depth of 250 km. Here we show that the eutectic melting curve of the iron-carbon system crosses the current geotherm near Earth's core-mantle boundary, suggesting that dense metallic melt may form in the lowermost mantle. If concentrated into isolated patches, such melt could produce the seismically observed density and velocity features of ULVZs. Depending on the wetting behavior of the metallic melt, the resultant ULVZs may be short-lived domains that are replenished or regenerated through subduction, or long-lasting regions containing both metallic and silicate melts. Slab-derived metallic melt may produce another type of ULVZ that escapes core sequestration by reacting with the mantle to form iron-rich postbridgmanite or ferropericlase. The hypotheses connect peculiar features near Earth's core-mantle boundary to subduction of the oceanic lithosphere through the deep carbon cycle. PMID:27143719

  18. Evolutions of lamellar structure during melting and solidification of Fe9577 nanoparticle from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongquan; Shen, Tong; Lu, Xionggang

    2013-03-01

    A structural evolution during solidification and melting processes of nanoparticle Fe9577 was investigated from MD simulations. A perfect lamellar structure, consisting alternately of fcc and hcp layers, was obtained from solidification process. A structural heredity of early embryo is proposed to explain the structural preference of solidification. Defects were found inside the solid core and play the same role as surface premelting on melting. hcp was found more stable than fcc in high temperature. The difference between melting and solidification points can be deduced coming fully from the overcoming of thermodynamic energy barrier, instead of kinetic delay of structural relaxation.

  19. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  20. Challenges in Melt Furnace Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, Cynthia

    2014-09-01

    Measurement is a critical part of running a cast house. Key performance indicators such as energy intensity, production (or melt rate), downtime (or OEE), and melt loss must all be understood and monitored on a weekly or monthly basis. Continuous process variables such as bath temperature, flue temperature, and furnace pressure should be used to control the furnace systems along with storing the values in databases for later analysis. While using measurement to track furnace performance over time is important, there is also a time and place for short-term tests.

  1. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-01

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting. PMID:24843158

  2. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Kaitlin M.; Albert, Mary R.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Baker, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting. PMID:24843158

  3. Explosive volcanism and the compositions of cores of differentiated asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Klaus; Wilson, Lionel

    1993-01-01

    Eleven iron meteorite groups show correlations between Ni and siderophile trace elements that are predictable by distribution coefficients between liquid and solid metal in fractionally crystallizing metal magmas. These meteorites are interpreted to be fragments of the fractionally crystallized cores of eleven differentiated asteroids. Many of these groups crystallized from S-depleted magmas which we propose resulted from removal of the first partial melt (the Fe,Ni-FeS cotectic melt) by explosive pyroclastic volcanism of the type envisaged by Wilson and Keil (1991). We show that these dense, negatively buoyant melts can be driven to asteroidal surfaces due to the presence of excess pressure in the melt and the presence of buoyant bubbles of gas which decrease the density of the melt. We also show that, in typical asteroidal materials, veins will form which grow into dikes and serve as pathways for migration of melt and gas to asteroidal surfaces. Since cotectic Fe, Ni-FeS melt consists of about 85 wt pct FeS and 15 wt pct Fe, Ni, removal of small volumes of eutectic melts results in major loss of S but only minor loss of Fe,Ni, thus leaving sufficient Fe,Ni to form sizeable asteroidal cores.

  4. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dumberry, M.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is shallower than the core liquidus, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steeper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first enter a solid stability field near the core mantle boundary and produce ironrich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, crystallization initiated near the top might generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection.In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for an internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high-pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials. We use a 1-dimensional parametrized thermal evolution model in the stagnant lid regime for the mantle (e.g. [1]) that is coupled to the core. The model for the mantle takes into account the formation of the crust due to melting at depth. Mantle convection is driven by heat producing radioactive elements, heat loss from secular cooling and from the heat supplied by the core. The heat generated inside the core is mainly provided from secular cooling, from the latent heat released at iron freezing, and from gravitational energy resulting form the release of light elements at the inner core-outer core boundary as well as from the sinking of iron-rich snow and subsequent upwellings of light elements in the snow zone. If the heat flow out of the core is smaller than the heat transported along the core isentrope a thermal boundary will from at the top of the outer core. To determine the extension of the convecting region inside the liquid core we calculate the convective power [2]. Finally, we

  5. Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs

    SciTech Connect

    M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

    2005-04-26

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

  6. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. ); Nelson, R.C. ); Bollinger, L. ); Hoover, M.D. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. ); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

    1990-11-02

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

  7. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Marvin; Hoover, Mark D.; Nelson, Robert C.; Templeton, William; Bollinger, Lance; Anspaugh, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later time after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher.

  8. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. ); Nelson, R.C. ); Bollinger, L. ); Hoover, M.D. ); Templeton, W. ); Anspaugh, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher.

  9. Comparative Reaction Diagrams for the SN2 Reaction Formulated According to the Leffler Analysis and the Hammond Postulate.

    PubMed

    Haddon, Robert C; Tian, Ziqi; Jiang, De-En

    2016-05-01

    The Hammond Postulate and the Leffler analysis have provided a cornerstone in the understanding of reaction processes in organic chemistry for over 60 years, yet quantitative applications of these methodologies over the range of reactions envisaged in the original works remain elusive. In the present paper, we analyze a series of SN2 reactions in three solvents that lead to endothermic and exothermic reaction processes, and we show that within the hybridization reaction coordinate the SN2 reaction is fully consistent with both treatments. We give new presentations of the reaction energies as a function of reaction progress, which allow the generation of unified reaction coordinate diagrams that show a linear relationship between the hybridization metric of reaction progress and the relative energies of the stationary points on the potential surface as a function of structure and solvent as originally envisaged by Leffler and Hammond. PMID:27064935

  10. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M.; Nelson, R. C.; Bollinger, L.; Hoover, M. D.

    1990-11-01

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher.

  11. Silicate melt inclusions in clinopyroxene phenocrysts from mafic dikes in the eastern North China Craton: Constraints on melt evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ya-Chun; Fan, Hong-Rui; Santosh, M.; Hu, Fang-Fang; Yang, Kui-Feng; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    significant fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene. We postulate the newly accreted lithospheric clinopyroxenite as the major source for the Jiaojia dolerite dikes, with melting of the source at a depth of ∼68-80 km.

  12. Investigation of reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2′-azido-2′-deoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Thao P.; Sobczak, Adam J.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.

    2012-01-01

    Model 3′-azido-3′-deoxynucleosides with thiol or vicinal dithiol substituents at C2′ or C5′ were synthesized to study reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2′-azido-2′-deoxynucleotides. Esterification of 5′-(tert-butyldiphenylsilyl)-3′-azido-3′-deoxyadenosine and 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine (AZT) with 2,3-S-isopropylidene-2,3-dimercaptopropanoic acid or N-Boc-S-trityl-L-cysteine and deprotection gave 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-2′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)adenosine and the 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-5′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)thymidine analogs. Density functional calculations predicted that intramolecular reactions between generated thiyl radicals and an azido group on such model compounds would be exothermic by 33.6-41.2 kcal/mol and have low energy barriers of 10.4-13.5 kcal/mol. Reduction of the azido group occurred to give 3′-amino-3′-deoxythymidine, which was postulated to occur with thiyl radicals generated by treatment of 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-5′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl)thymidine with 2,2′-azobis-(2-methyl-2-propionamidine) dihydrochloride. Gamma radiolysis of N2O-saturated aqueous solutions of AZT and cysteine produced 3′-amino-3′-deoxythymidine and thymine most likely by both radical and ionic processes. PMID:22711937

  13. Symmetrizing the symmetrization postulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Michael

    2000-11-01

    Reasonable requirements of (a) physical invariance under particle permutation and (b) physical completeness of state descriptions [1], enable us to deduce a Symmetric Permutation Rule(SPR): that by taking care with our state descriptions, it is always possible to construct state vectors (or wave functions) that are purely symmetric under pure permutation for all particles, regardless of type distinguishability or spin. The conventional exchange antisymmetry for two identical half-integer spin particles is shown to be due to a subtle interdependence in the individual state descriptions arising from an inherent geometrical asymmetry. For three or more such particles, however, antisymmetrization of the state vector for all pairs simultaneously is shown to be impossible and the SPR makes observably different predictions, although the usual pairwise exclusion rules are maintained. The usual caveat of fermion antisymmetrization—that composite integer spin particles (with fermionic constituents) behave only approximately like bosons—is no longer necessary.

  14. Thermal properties of defect melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, S.; Hofsäss, T.; Horsley, R.

    1984-03-01

    Using mean field theory and high temperature expansions the transition temperature, entropy jump and heat capacity are calculated in the recent microscopic model of defect melting proposed by Kleinert. The results are compared with the experimental data for almost isotropic substances.

  15. Melt inclusions in augite from the nakhlite meteorites: A reassessment of nakhlite parental melt and implications for petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; Toplis, Michael J.; Lorand, Jean-Pierre; Macri, Michele

    2012-03-01

    The nakhlites, a subgroup of eight clinopyroxenites thought to come from a single geological unit at the Martian surface, show melt inclusions in augite and olivine. In contrast to olivine-hosted melt inclusions, augite-hosted melt inclusions are not surrounded by fractures, and are thus considered preferential candidates for reconstructing parent liquid compositions. Furthermore, two types of augite-hosted melt inclusion have been defined and characterized in four different nakhlites (Northwest Africa [NWA] 817, Nakhla, Governador Valadares, and NWA 998): Type-I isolated inclusions in augite cores that contain euhedral to subhedral augite, Ti-magnetite, and pigeonite plus silica-rich glass and a gas bubble; Type-II microinclusions that form trails crosscutting host augite crystals. Fast-heating experiments were performed on selected pristine primary augite-hosted melt inclusions from these four samples. Of these, only data from Nakhla were considered robust for reconstruction of a nakhlite parental magma composition (NPM). Based upon careful petrographic selection and consideration of iron-magnesium ratios, our data are used to propose an NPM, which is basaltic (49.1 wt% SiO2), of high Ca/Al (1.95), and K2O-poor (0.32 wt%). Thermodynamic modeling at an oxygen fugacity one log unit below the QFM buffer using the MELTS and PETROLOG programs implies that Mg-rich olivine was not a liquidus phase for this composition. Our analysis is used to suggest that olivine megacrysts found in the nakhlites are unlikely to have coprecipitated with augite, and thus may have been introduced during or subsequent to accumulation in the magma chamber, possibly from more evolved portions of the same chamber.

  16. Elongational rheology of polyethylene melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfzadeh, Bijan

    Elongational melt flow behavior is an important and fundamental concept underlying many industrial plastics operations which involve a rapid change of shape as for example fiber spinning and stretching, bottle blow molding, and film blowing and stretching. Under high process loads polymeric materials experience enormous stresses causing the molecular structure to gain considerable orientation. This event has significant effects on the melt flow behavior and can be measured in terms of elongational viscosity and changes in enthalpy and entropy. Different polymeric materials with unique molecular characteristics are expected to respond uniquely to the elongational deformation; hence, molecular parameters such as molecular weight and degree of branching were related to the measurable elongational flow variables. Elongational viscosities were measured for high and low density polyethylenes using an advanced capillary extrusion rheometer fitted with semi-hyperbolic dies. Said dies establish a purely elongational. flow field at constant elongational strain rate. The elongational viscosities were evaluated under influence of process strain rate, Hencky strain (natural logarithm of area reduction of the extrusion die), and temperature. Enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the orientation development of semi-hyperbolic processed melts were also determined. Results showed that elongational viscosities were primarily affected by differences in weight average molecular weight rather than degree of branching. This effect was process strain rate as well as temperature dependent. An investigation of melt relaxation and the associated first decay time constants revealed that with increasing strain rate the molecular field of the melt asymptotically gained orientation in approaching a limit. As a result of this behavior molecular uniqueness vanished at high process strain rates, yielding to orientation development and the associated restructuring of the melt's molecular

  17. The infidelity of melt inclusions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    Melt inclusions provide important information about magmatic systems and represent unique records of magma composition and evolution. However, it is also clear that melt inclusions do not necessarily constitute a petrological 'magic bullet', and potential exists for trapped melt compositions to be modified by a range of inclusion-specific processes. These include trapping of diffusional boundary layers, crystallization of the host mineral after trapping and dissolution of co-trapped minerals during homogenization, diffusional exchange between trapped liquid and the host mineral and external melt, and cryptic alteration of trapped material during weathering or hydrothermal alteration. It clearly important to identify when melt inclusions are unmodified, and which compositional indices represent the most robust sources of petrogenetic information. In this presentation I review and discuss various approaches for evaluating compositions and compositional variations in inclusion suites. An overriding principle is that the variations evident in melt inclusions should be able to be understood in terms of petrological processes that are known, or can be reasonably inferred to also effect bulk magma compositions. One common approach is to base petrological conclusions on species that should be more robust, and many workers use variations in incompatible trace elements for this purpose. However important information may also be obtained from a comparison of variations in melt inclusions and the lavas that host them, and in most cases this comparison is the key to identifying inclusions and suites that are potentially suspect. Comparisons can be made between individual inclusions and lavas, although comparison of average inclusion composition and the host lava, after correction for differences in crystal fractionation, may also be valuable. An important extension of this is the comparison of the variability of different species in inclusions and host lavas. This also provides

  18. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form τss = σn1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress σn, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for σn in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with σn, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  19. Double-diffusive inner core translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguen, Renaud; Alboussière, Thierry; Labrosse, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    The hemispherical asymmetry of the inner core has recently been interpreted as resulting form a high-viscosity mode of inner core convection, consisting in a translation of the inner core. With melting on one hemisphere and crystallization on the other one, inner core translation would impose a strongly asymmetric buoyancy flux at the bottom of the outer core, with likely strong implications for the dynamics of the outer core and the geodynamo. The main requirement for convective instability in the inner core is an adverse radial density gradient. While older estimates of the inner core thermal conductivity favored a superadiabatic temperature gradient and the existence of thermal convection, the much higher values recently proposed make thermal convection unlikely. Compositional convection might be a viable alternative to thermal convection: an unstable compositional gradient may arise in the inner core either because the light elements present in the core are predicted to become increasingly incompatible as the inner core grows (Gubbins et al. 2013), or because of a possibly positive feedback of the development of the F-layer on inner core convection. Though the magnitude of the destabilizing effect of the compositional field is predicted to be similar to or smaller than the stabilizing effect of the thermal field, the huge difference between thermal and chemical diffusivities implies that double-diffusive instabilities may still arise even if the net density decreases upward. We propose here a theoretical (linear stability analysis) and numerical study of double diffusive convection in the inner core, focusing on the translation mode, and discuss in what conditions inner core translation can develop.

  20. Transport properties of liquid metals and viscosity of the earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Coefficients expressing transport properties of liquid metals (viscosity and diffusivity) can be scaled to the absolute melting temperature. A systematic review of the published experimental data leads to the conclusion that the effect of pressure on viscosity and diffusivity can be taken into account through its effect on the melting temperature. Hence the viscosity and diffusivity at the melting temperature are constants for a given metal. The viscosity of the earth's liquid core, near the inner core boundary, is probably close to 6 centipoises. It is suggested that the diffusivity of sulfur in the core is probably of the order of 0.0001 sq cm/sec.

  1. Experimental constraints on the sulfur content in the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Y.; Huang, H.; Leng, C.; Hu, X.; Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Any core formation models would lead to the incorporation of sulfur (S) into the Earth's core, based on the cosmochemical/geochemical constraints, sulfur's chemical affinity for iron (Fe), and low eutectic melting temperature in the Fe-FeS system. Preferential partitioning of S into the melt also provides petrologic constraint on the density difference between the liquid outer and solid inner cores. Therefore, the center issue is to constrain the amount of sulfur in the core. Geochemical constraints usually place 2-4 wt.% S in the core after accounting for its volatility, whereas more S is allowed in models based on mineral physics data. Here we re-examine the constraints on the S content in the core by both petrologic and mineral physics data. We have measured S partitioning between solid and liquid iron in the multi-anvil apparatus and the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, evaluating the effect of pressure on melting temperature and partition coefficient. In addition, we have conducted shockwave experiments on Fe-11.8wt%S using a two-stage light gas gun up to 211 GPa. The new shockwave experiments yield Hugoniot densities and the longitudinal sound velocities. The measurements provide the longitudinal sound velocity before melting and the bulk sound velocity of liquid. The measured sound velocities clearly show melting of the Fe-FeS mix with 11.8wt%S at a pressure between 111 and 129 GPa. The sound velocities at pressures above 129GPa represent the bulk sound velocities of Fe-11.8wt%S liquid. The combined data set including density, sound velocity, melting temperature, and S partitioning places a tight constraint on the required sulfur partition coefficient to produce the density and velocity jumps and the bulk sulfur content in the core.

  2. On the Viability of Slab Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.; Magni, V.; Maunder, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Melting subducted mafic crust is commonly assumed to be the main process leading to silicic melts with an adakitic signature, which may form Archaean granitoids and generate early continental crust. Alternatively, melting of the overriding lower mafic crust and near-Moho depth fractional crystallisation of mantle melts can form differentiated magmas with an adakitic signature. Previous work shows how only very young slabs melt through dehydration melting, or depict melting of dry eclogites via water addition from deeper slab dehydration. Alternatively, underplated subducted material via delamination and diapirism may be important in the generation of felsic continental crust. We quantify subduction dehydration and melting reactions in a warm subduction system using a thermo-mechanical subduction model with a thermodynamic database. We find that even young (hot) slabs dehydrate before reaching their solidus, which suppresses any slab dehydration melting and creates significant amounts of mantle wedge melting irrespective of slab age. Significant slab crust melting is only achieved in young slabs via water present melting if metamorphic fluids from the subducted mantle flux through the dry eclogites. These slab melts, however, interfere with massive mantle wedge melting and unlikely to participate in the overriding plate felsic magmatism, unlike the shallower, primitive mantle wedge melts. We also explore the conditions for delaminating the mafic subducted crust. For a wide range of ages, the uppermost part of the subducted slab might delaminate to form compositionally buoyant plumes that rise through the mantle wedge. Thick crust on young slabs (as perhaps representative for a hotter, early Earth) may delaminate entirely and reside in the mantle wedge. Under such conditions, this ponded crust might melts subsequently, forming "adakitic" felsic melts contributing to a significant amount of the overriding plate crustal volumes.

  3. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  4. Water storage and early hydrous melting of the Martian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Grove, T. L.; Charlier, B.

    2012-06-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the near-solidus phase equilibria of a water-saturated analog of the Martian mantle. Experiments were performed at low temperatures (700-920 °C) and high pressure (4-7 GPa) using multi-anvil apparatus and piston cylinder device (4 GPa). The results of this study are used to explore the role of water during early melting and chemical differentiation of Mars, and to further our understanding of the near-solidus behavior in planetary mantle compositions at high pressure. Water has a significant effect on the temperature of melting and, therefore, on accretion and subsequent differentiation processes. Experiments locate the wet solidus at ∼800 °C, and is isothermal between 4 GPa and 7 GPa. The Martian primitive mantle can store significant amounts of water in hydrous minerals stable near the solidus. Humite-group minerals and phase E represent the most abundant hydrous minerals stable in the 4-7 GPa pressure range. The amount of water that can be stored in the mantle and mobilized during melting ranges from 1 to up to 4 wt% near the wet solidus. We discuss thermal models of Mars accretion where the planet formed very rapidly and early on in solar system history. We incorporate the time constraint of Dauphas and Pourmand (2011) that Mars had accreted to 50% of its present mass in 1.8 Myr and include the effects of 26Al radioactive decay and heat supplied by rapid accretion. When accretion has reached 30% of Mars current mass (∼70% of its present size), melting starts, and extends from 100 to 720 km depth. Below this melt layer, water can still be bound in crystalline solids. The critical stage is at 50% accretion (∼80% of its size), where Mars is above the wet and dry solidi with most of its interior melted. This is earlier in the accretion process than what would be predicted from dry melting. We suggest that water may have promoted early core formation on Mars and rapidly extended melting over a large portion of Mars

  5. Fluid/Melt Partition Coefficients Of Halogens In Basaltic Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alletti, M.; Baker, D.; Scaillet, B.; Aiuppa, A.; Moretti, R.; Ottolini, L.

    2007-12-01

    Despite the importance of halogens (F, Cl) in volcanic degassing, solubility and fluid/melt partitioning of these elements have not been comprehensively studied in natural basaltic melts. Experimental determinations of halogen solubility in Mount Etna melts are lacking, despite this volcano being one of the most active and intensively monitored on Earth with an estimated output of thousands tonnes of halogens per day. In order to better understand halogen degassing, we present the results of a series of halogen partitioning experiments performed at different pressures (1-200 MPa), redox conditions (from Δ NNO = + 2 to Δ NNO = - 0.3) and fluid compositions. Experiments used a hawaiitic, glassy, alkaline basalt with Mg# = 0.59, sampled during the July 2001 eruption of Mount Etna. A series of experiments were conducted using H2O-NaCl or H2O-NaF solutions. The effect of CO2 in multi-component fluid H2O-CO2-NaCl or H2O-CO2-NaF was also investigated. The experimental run products were mostly glasses, but a few run products contained less than 10% crystals. The concentration of halogens in the fluid phase after the experiment was calculated from mass balance, and the partition coefficients for both Cl and F at the studied conditions determined. Using these measurements and thermodynamical models, the dependence of these partition coefficients on the fugacities of various gaseous species was investigated.

  6. Searching for Nectaris Basin Impact Melt Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, B. A.

    2015-07-01

    Because Nectaris Basin is a key stratigraphic marker for lunar bombardment, we are conducting an effort to identify Nectaris basin impact-melt rocks, to model their emplacement, and to examine sites where Nectaris impact melt is abundant.

  7. Differentiation, mineralogy and melting of Rhea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Losiak, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Rhea is a medium sized icy satellite (MIS) of Saturn. It is built of mixtures of rocks and ices. The rocky component is believed to be of chondritic composition. The main component of ices is frozen H2O. Initially Rhea was built from a homogenous mixture of those two components. After accretion the temperature of the satellites increased that allowed for the separation of rocky component from the ices. During this differentiation the high density silicate grains sink in the liquid, eventually forming the central core. The low density matter forms an upper layer. Analysis of the Doppler data acquired by the Cassini spacecraft yields the mass of Rhea and its gravity field with unprecedented accuracy - Iess, et al., 2007, Icarus 190, 585-593. Eventually they conclude: "The one model that fits the gravity data and is self-consistent […] is an "almost undifferentiated" Rhea, in which a very large uniform core is surrounded by a relatively thin ice shell containing no rock at all". In the present paper we try to find explanation of these observations by thermal model of evolution. Comparing to our previous models, we include here also the influence of the chemical reactions. Our numerical model is based on the parameterized theory of convection combined with FDM (Finite Difference Method). The approach is based on the 1 dimensional equation of the heat transfer in spherical coordinates. The model includes sources and sinks of the heat: radiogenic heat resulting from the decay of isotopes, latent heat of melting, latent heat of solidification, and chemical reactions. The heat of accretion is included as initial temperature of the accreted layer. The heat transported by convection is included by multiplying the coefficient of the heat conduction in the considered layer by the Nusselt number. We found that partial differentiation followed by uprising of light component is consistent with observations of gravity and surface of Rhea if silicate density is high (i.e. 3500 kg

  8. The nature of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the earth's core are overviewed with emphasis on seismologically determined regions and pressures and seismologically measured density, elastic wave velocities, and gravitational acceleration. Attention is given to solid-state convection of the inner core, and it is noted that though seismological results do not conclusively prove that the inner core is convective, the occurrence and magnitude of seismic anisotropy are explained by the effects of solid-state convection. Igneous petrology and geochemistry of the inner core, a layer at the base of the mantle and contact metasomatism at the core-mantle boundary, and evolution of the core-mantle system are discussed. It is pointed out that high-pressure melting experiments indicate that the temperature of the core is ranging from 4500 to 6500 K, and a major implication of such high temperature is that the tectonics and convection of the mantle, as well as the resulting geological processes observed at the surface, are powered by heat from the core. As a result of the high temperatures, along with the compositional contrast between silicates and iron alloy, the core-mantle boundary is considered to be most chemically active region of the earth.

  9. Osmium Solubility in Silicate Melts: New Efforts and New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Walker, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper, Borisov and Palme reported the first experimental results on the partitioning of Os between metal (Ni-rich OsNi alloys) and silicate melt of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at 1400 C and 1 atm total pressure and and at function of O2 from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -12) atm. Experiments were done by equilibrating OsNi metal loops with silicate melt. Metal and glass were analyzed separately by INAA. D(sup 0s) ranged from 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7), which is inconsistent with core/ mantle equilibrium for HSEs and favors the late veneer hypothesis. Unfortunately, there was practically no function of O2 dependence of Os partitioning, and the scatter of experimental results was quite serious, so the formation of Os nuggets was suspected. This new set of experiments was specifically designed to avoid of at least minimize the nugget problem

  10. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  11. Water freezing and ice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid, with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  12. Dynamic crystallization of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of furnaces with differing temperature range capabilities were used to provide variations in melt temperatures and cooling rates in a study of the effects of heterogeneous nucleation on crystallization. Materials of chondrule composition were used to further understanding of how the disequilibrium features displayed by minerals in rocks are formed. Results show that the textures of natural chondrules were duplicated. It is concluded that the melt history is dominant over cooling rate and composition in controlling texture. The importance of nuclei, which are most readily derived from preexisting crystalline material, support an origin for natural chondrules based on remelting of crystalline material. This would be compatible with a simple, uniform chondrule forming process having only slight variations in thermal histories resulting in the wide range of textures.

  13. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  14. Viscoelastic properties of Ionomer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    Viscoelastic prperties of a model telechelic ionomer, i.e., a melt of non-polar polymers with a charge at each chain end along with neutralizing counterions, have been examined using molecular dynamics simulation. Equlibrium calculation of the loss modulus G^''(φ) and storage modulus G^'(φ) shows plateau at lower temperatures when the systems are not relaxed. In this situation the specific heat (Cv) peak corresponds to the self-assembly of the system, at lower temperatures the specific heat begins to plateau. Similarities of the dynamic features found for telechelic melts with those observed in glass-forming liquids and entangled polymers have been shown. Furthremore, using an athermal 'probe', the properties of these materials is being distinctly classified as 'strong' glass or physical gels.

  15. Formation of pseudotachylitic breccias in the central uplifts of very large impact structures: Scaling the melt formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr-Westheide, Tanja; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2011-04-01

    The processes leading to formation of sometimes massive occurrences of pseudotachylitic breccia (PTB) in impact structures have been strongly debated for decades. Variably an origin of these pseudotachylite (friction melt)-like breccias by (1) shearing (friction melting); (2) so-called shock compression melting (with or without a shear component) immediately after shock propagation through the target; (3) decompression melting related to rapid uplift of crustal material due to central uplift formation; (4) combinations of these processes; or (5) intrusion of allochthonous impact melt from a coherent melt body has been advocated. Our investigations of these enigmatic breccias involve detailed multidisciplinary analysis of millimeter- to meter-sized occurrences from the type location, the Vredefort Dome. This complex Archean to early Proterozoic terrane constitutes the central uplift of the originally >250 km diameter Vredefort impact structure in South Africa. Previously, results of microstructural and microchemical investigations have indicated that formation of very small veinlets involved local melting, likely during the early shock compression phase. However, for larger veins and networks it was so far not possible to isolate a specific melt-forming mechanism. Macroscopic to microscopic evidence for friction melting is very limited, and so far chemical results have not directly supported PTB generation by intrusion of impact melt. On the other hand, evidence for filling of dilational sites with melt is abundant. Herein, we present a new approach to the mysterium of PTB formation based on volumetric melt breccia calculations. The foundation for this is the detailed analysis of a 1.5 × 3 × 0.04 m polished granite slab from a dimension-stone quarry in the core of the Vredefort Dome. This slab contains a 37.5 dm3 breccia zone. The pure melt volume in 0.1 m3 PTB-bearing granitic target rock outside of the several-decimeter-wide breccia zone in the granite slab was

  16. Melting And Purification Of Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Salles Moura, Hernane R.; Moura, Lourenco de

    2007-08-09

    The aspects involved in the purification of niobium in Electron Beam Furnaces will be outlined and correlated with practical experience accumulated over 17 years of continuously producing high purity niobium metal and niobium-zirconium ingots at CBMM, meeting the needs for a wide range of uses. This paper also reports some comments regarding raw material requirements, the experience on cold hearth operation melting niobium and the production of large grains niobium ingots by CBMM with some comments of their main characteristics.

  17. Melting And Purification Of Niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Hernane R. Salles; de Moura, Lourenço

    2007-08-01

    The aspects involved in the purification of niobium in Electron Beam Furnaces will be outlined and correlated with practical experience accumulated over 17 years of continuously producing high purity niobium metal and niobium-zirconium ingots at CBMM, meeting the needs for a wide range of uses. This paper also reports some comments regarding raw material requirements, the experience on cold hearth operation melting niobium and the production of large grains niobium ingots by CBMM with some comments of their main characteristics.

  18. The postulations á la D’Alembert and á la Cauchy for higher gradient continuum theories are equivalent: a review of existing results

    PubMed Central

    Seppecher, P.

    2015-01-01

    In order to found continuum mechanics, two different postulations have been used. The first, introduced by Lagrange and Piola, starts by postulating how the work expended by internal interactions in a body depends on the virtual velocity field and its gradients. Then, by using the divergence theorem, a representation theorem is found for the volume and contact interactions which can be exerted at the boundary of the considered body. This method assumes an a priori notion of internal work, regards stress tensors as dual of virtual displacements and their gradients, deduces the concept of contact interactions and produces their representation in terms of stresses using integration by parts. The second method, conceived by Cauchy and based on the celebrated tetrahedron argument, starts by postulating the type of contact interactions which can be exerted on the boundary of every (suitably) regular part of a body. Then it proceeds by proving the existence of stress tensors from a balance-type postulate. In this paper, we review some relevant literature on the subject, discussing how the two postulations can be reconciled in the case of higher gradient theories. Finally, we underline the importance of the concept of contact surface, edge and wedge s-order forces. PMID:26730215

  19. Fulfilling Koch's postulates for beet curly top Iran virus and proposal for consideration of new genus in the family Geminiviridae.

    PubMed

    Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Keyvani, Nahid; Razavinejad, Sara; Massumi, Hossain; Varsani, Arvind

    2013-02-01

    Beet curly top Iran virus (BCTIV) is a divergent geminivirus with biological properties similar to those of curtoviruses; however, the virus is distinct from curtoviruses phylogenetically and in its genome organisation. The replication-associated protein is phylogenetically more closely related to those of mastreviruses than to those of curtoviruses whereas the capsid protein shares high amino acid sequence identity (77-83 %) with those of curtoviruses. The 17 BCTIV genomes from Iran share ~77 % pairwise nucleotide sequence identity with spinach curly top Arizona virus (SCTAV) from Arizona, USA, which was characterised recently. To demonstrate the infectivity of the monopartite BCTIV genome and to fulfil Koch's postulates, an infectious clone was constructed using a dimer of the full-length genome of an isolate from this study - BCTIV-[IR:Neg:B33P:Sug:08]. Agroinoculation with the cloned DNA resulted in the efficient infection of 74 % of sugar beet plants, which resulted in curly top symptoms. The curly top infection of agroinoculated plants was successfully transmitted to 80 % of healthy sugar beet plants by the natural BCTIV vector, Circulifer haematoceps. Since BCTIV and SCTAV share <62 % pairwise nucleotide sequence identity with all other geminiviruses and have unique genome architectures and properties, and since this is coupled with phylogenetic support at the full-genome level and that of it proteins, we propose that they should be re-classified as members of a new genus, "Becurtovirus", in the family Geminiviridae. PMID:23081676

  20. Risk assessment of K basin twelve-inch drain valve failure from a postulated seismic initiating event

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-04-06

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project will transfer metallic SNF from the Hanford 105 K-East and 105 K-West Basins to safe interim storage in the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The initial basis for design, fabrication, installation, and operation of the fuel removal systems was that the basin leak rates which could result from a postulated accident condition would not be excessive relative to reasonable recovery operations. However, an additional potential K Basin water leak path is through the K Basin drain valves. Three twelve-inch drain valves are located in the main basin bays along the north wall. The sumps containing the valves are filled with concrete which covers the drain valve body. Visual observations suggest that only the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor. It was recognized, however, that damage of the drain valve bonnet or stem during a seismic initiating event could provide a potential K Basin water leak path. The objectives of this activity are to: (1) evaluate the risk of damaging the three twelve-inch drain valves located along the north wall of the main basin from a seismic initiating event, and (2) determine the associated potential leak rate from a damaged valve.

  1. Melting Processes at the Base of the Mantle Wedge: Melt Compositions and Melting Reactions for the First Melts of Vapor-Saturated Lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Till, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Vapor-saturated melting experiments have been performed at pressures near the base of the mantle wedge (3.2 GPa). The starting composition is a metasomatized lherzolite containing 3 wt. % H2O. Near-solidus melts and coexisting mineral phases have been characterized in experiments that span 925 to 1100 oC with melt % varying from 6 to 9 wt. %. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and garnet coexist with melt over the entire interval and rutile is also present at < 1000 oC. Melt is andesitic in composition and varies from 60 wt. % SiO2 at 950 oC to 52 wt. % at 1075 oC. The Al2O3 contents of the melt are 13 to 14 wt. %, and CaO contents range from 1 and 4 wt. %. Melting is peritectic with orthopyroxene + liquid produced by melting of garnet + olivine + high-Ca pyroxene. In addition to quenched melt, we observe a quenched silicate component that is rhyolitic (>72 % SiO2) that we interpret as a precipitate from the coexisting supercritical H2O-rich vapor. Extrapolation of the measured compositional variation toward the solidus suggests that the first melt may be very SiO2 rich (i.e., granitic). We suggest that these granitic melts are the first melts of the mantle near the slab-wedge interface. As these SiO2-rich melts ascend into shallower, hotter overlying mantle, they continue to interact with the surrounding mantle and evolve in composition. These first melts may elucidate the geochemical and physical processes that accompany the beginnings of H2O flux melting.

  2. Rheology of Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Orman, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    Here I use mineral physics constraints to evaluate the viscosity and creep mechanisms of iron at the conditions of the inner core. At low to intermediate stresses and temperatures near the melting point solid materials may deform by any of three mechanisms: power law creep, diffusion creep and Harper-Dorn creep. Both power law and Harper-Dorn creep are dislocation processes, and the transition between the two occurs at a stress level on the order of the Peierls stress, with power law creep dominating at higher stresses. The transition stress is predicted to be ~3 MPa for hcp-Fe at inner core conditions, which is far higher than the stresses of ~102 to 103 Pa expected from magnetic or gravitational forces. Harper-Dorn creep dominates diffusion creep above a certain grain size, which is predicted to be ~200 microns for hcp-Fe. At the high temperatures and low stresses of the inner core the grain size is expected to be several orders of magnitude larger than the transition value. Harper-Dorn creep is therefore predicted to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the inner core. Harper-Dorn creep is accomplished by the motion of dislocations and can lead to strong lattice preferred orientation. The viscosity in this regime is Newtonian and is given by μ = (kT)/(ADb) where k is Boltzmann's constant, T is temperature, D is the self-diffusion coefficient, b is the Burgers vector and A is a dimensionless constant predicted to have a value of ~1.7 x 1011 for hcp-Fe. No diffusion data exist for hcp-Fe, but metals with similar structure all have nearly the same self-diffusion coefficient at the same homologous temperature. Assuming an inner core temperature of 5700 K and melting temperature for pure iron of 6200 K, the diffusivity is predicted to be ~4 × 10-13 m2 s-1 and the viscosity ~6 × 1013 Pa s. The corresponding strain rate for a shear stress of 100 Pa is ~2 × 10-12 s-1, implying that large strains are possible on timescales less than 100,000 years. It is therefore

  3. Fingered core structure of nematic boojums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Rosso, Riccardo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2008-09-01

    Using the Landau-de Gennes phenomenological approach, we study the fine biaxial core structure of a boojum residing on the surface of a nematic liquid crystal phase. The core is formed by a negatively uniaxial finger, surrounded by a shell with maximal biaxiality. The characteristic finger’s length and the shell’s width are comparable to the biaxial correlation length. The finger tip is melted for topological reasons. Upon decreasing the surface anchoring strength below a critical value, the finger gradually leaves the bulk and it is expelled through the surface.

  4. Core and early crust formation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Keller, T.; Gerya, T.; Tackley, P. J.; Connolly, J.; Zhu, G.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most striking surface features on Mars is the crustal dichotomy. It is the oldest geological feature on Mars and was formed more than 4.1 Ga ago by either exogenic or endogenic processes [1,2]. In order to find an internal origin of the crustal dichotomy, located within a maximum of 400 Ma of planetary differentiation, the thermal state of the planet resulting from core formation needs to be considered. Additionally, it was suggested that a primordial crust with up to 45 km thickness can be formed already during the Martian core formation [3]. We suggest that the sinking of iron diapirs delivered by predifferentiated impactors induced impact- and shear heating-related temperature anomalies in the mantle that fostered the formation of early Martian crust. Thus, the crustal thickness distribution would largely be a result of planetary core formation, late impact history and the onset of mantle convection. To test this hypothesis we use numerical models to simulate the formation of the Martian iron core and the resulting mantle convection pattern, while peridotite melting is enabled to track melting caused by shear and radioactive heating. We perform 2D simulations using the spherical-Cartesian code I2ELVIS for planetary accretion and the spherical code STAGYY for the consequent onset of mantle convection. We apply a temperature-, stress- and melt-fraction dependent viscoplastic rheology. Radioactive and shear heating as well as consumption of latent heat by silicate melting are taken into account. The depth of neutral buoyancy of silicate melt with respect to solid silicates is determined by the difference in compressibility of the liquid and solid phase. To self-consistently simulate the silicate phase changes expected inside a Mars-sized body, we use the thermodynamical database Perple_X. As initial condition for core formation, we apply randomly distributed iron diapirs with 75 km radius inside the planet, representing the cores of stochastically

  5. String melting in a photon bath

    SciTech Connect

    Karouby, Johanna

    2013-10-01

    We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

  6. Melting by temperature-modulated calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, Iwao; Ishikiriyama, Kazuhiko; Boller, A. |

    1997-09-01

    Well-crystallized macromolecules melt irreversibly due to the need of molecular nucleation, while small molecules melt reversibly as long as crystal nuclei are present to assist crystallization. Furthermore, imperfect crystals of low-molar-mass polymers may have a sufficiently small region of metastability between crystallization and melting to show a reversing heat-flow component due to melting of poor crystals followed by crystallization of imperfect crystals which have insufficient time to perfect before the modulation switches to heating and melts the imperfect crystals. Many metals, in turn. melt sharply and reversibly as long as nuclei remain after melting for subsequent crystallization during the cooling cycle. Their analysis is complicated, however, due to thermal conductivity limitations of the calorimeters. Polymers of sufficiently high molar mass, finally, show a small amount of reversible. local melting that may be linked to partial melting of individual molecules. Experiments by temperature-modulated calorimetry and model calculations are presented. The samples measured included poly(ethylene terephthalate)s, poly(ethylene oxide)s, and indium. Two unsolved problems that arose from this research involve the origin of a high, seemingly stable, reversible heat capacity of polymers in the melting region, and a smoothing of melting and crystallization into a close-to-elliptical Lissajous figure in a heat-flow versus sample-temperature plot.

  7. Small particle melting of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. L.; Bayles, R. A.; Gile, W. W.; Jesser, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    Submicron-sized crystallites of lead, tin, indium and bismuth were melted in situ in the modified specimen chamber of a Siemens transmission e lectron microscope. Melting point and size determinations were made directly from the dark field images of the crystallites. Particles exhibited melting points that decreased with decreasing particle size. A near-linear relationship was observed for the melting point as a function of the reciprocal of the radius. Thermodynamnic expressions based on the significant contributions of the surface energy to the free energy of the system also suggest a linear relation. Other factors, such as shape and surface contamination, were also observed to affect the size-dependent melting of particles. Crystallites of extended platelet shape did not exhibit a significant depression in melting point. Elevated residual gas pressures were found to lessen the melting point depression of spherical particles.

  8. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyue; Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren

    2013-12-01

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si15.5B7 alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  9. Melting and shock wave creation in uranium oxide due to Coulomb explosion after a pulsed ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongyu; Chen, Di; Shao, Lin

    2015-09-01

    By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we study the effects of pulsed ionization in uranium oxide (UO2), which occurs when UO2 is bombarded with swift ions or fission fragments. A general formula is developed to predict melting radius under various conditions due to electron stripping and Coulomb explosion (CE). A critical density model is suggested in which the melting volume is proportional to ionization period, if the period is above a critical value. The maximum melting radius depends on the time period of structural relaxation above the melting temperature, which increases with increasing initial substrate temperatures due to a lower heat dissipation rate. Furthermore, shock waves are observed to emit from CE core but the kinetic energy wave peak exists only in U sublattices. The absence of kinetic energy waves in O sublattices is explained by their relatively higher thermal vibration which cancels the work done from the compression waves.

  10. Downward heat transfer in a miscible melting system

    SciTech Connect

    Farhadieh, R.

    1981-01-01

    The integrity of an ex-vessel core-retention system in the event of core meltdown is of concern in PAHR safety assessment. Several ex-vessel core retention concepts incorporate sacrificial beds. The integrity of the ex-vessel core-retention system is dependent on the directional growth of the molten pool into soluble boundaries of the sacrificial bed. Mutual dissolution of the molten pool of core-debris and the sacrificial material is expected to change the thermal characteristics of the pool and thus affect the heat transfer to the boundaries. The two-dimensional simulation study of the penetration of a dense, hot liquid pool into the boundaries of a meltable, soluble solid revealed the dependency of the directional pool growth on the density ratio, rho*, of the liquid pool to the meltable solid. In the one-dimensional study of the downward penetration of the hot pool into a soluble boundary four different hydrodynamic flow regimes were identified that occurred at different ranges of rho*. The downward heat transfer enhanced beyond rho* approx. = 1.1. The present study investigates the effect of test cell geometry and material properties on the downward heat transfer in a horizontal melting system.

  11. The behavior of ANGRA 2 nuclear power plant core for a small break LOCA simulated with RELAP5 code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabundjian, Gaianê; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Belchior, Antonio, Jr.; da Silva Rocha, Marcelo; Conti, Thadeu N.; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Mesquita, Roberto N.; Masotti, Paulo H. F.; de Souza Lima, Ana Cecília

    2013-05-01

    This work discusses the behavior of Angra 2 nuclear power plant core, for a postulate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the primary circuit for Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). A pipe break of the hot leg Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) was simulated with RELAP 5 code. The considered rupture area is 380 cm2, which represents 100% of the ECCS pipe flow area. Results showed that the cooling is enough to guarantee the integrity of the reactor core.

  12. An experimental study of partial melting and fractional crystallization on the HED parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Helen O.; Wood, Bernard J.

    2015-11-01

    We have performed an experimental and modeling study of the partial melting behavior of the HED parent body and of the fractional crystallization of liquids derived from its mantle. We estimated the mantle composition by assuming chondritic ratios of refractory lithophile elements, adjusting the Mg# and core size to match the density and moment of inertia of Vesta, and the compositions of Mg-rich olivines found in diogenites. The liquidus of a mantle with Mg# (=100*[Mg/(Mg+Fe)]) 80 is ~1625 °C and, under equilibrium conditions, the melt crystallizes olivine alone until it is joined by orthopyroxene at 1350 °C. We synthesized the melt from our 1350 °C experiment and simulated its fractional crystallization path. Orthopyroxene crystallizes until it is replaced by pigeonite at 1200 °C. Liquids become eucritic and crystal assemblages resemble diogenites below 1250 °C. MELTS correctly predicts the olivine liquidus but overestimates the orthopyroxene liquidus by ~70 °C. Predicted melt compositions are in reasonable agreement with those generated experimentally. We used MELTS to determine that the range of mantle compositions that can produce eucritic liquids and diogenitic solids in a magma ocean model is Mg# 75-80 (with chondritic ratios of refractory elements). A mantle with Mg# ~ 70 can produce eucrites and diogenites through sequential partial melting.

  13. A Monazite-bearing clast in Apollo 17 melt breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.

    1993-01-01

    A phosphate-rich clast in a pigeonite-plagioclase mineral assemblage occurs in Apollo 17 impact-melt breccia 76503,7025. The clast, measuring 0.9 x 0.4 mm in thin section, contains 3.3 percent (volume) apatite (Ca5P3O12(F,Cl)), 0.8 percent whitlockite (Ca16(Mg,Fe)2REE2P14O56), and trace monazite ((LREE)PO4). Major minerals include 26 percent pigeonite, En53-57FS34-35W08-13, and 69 percent plagioclase, An84-92Ab7-15Oro.6-1.1. Troilite, ilmenite, and other accessory minerals constitute less than 1 percent of the assemblage and Fe-metal occurs along fractures. Also present in the melt breccia as a separate clast is a fragment of felsite. Based on the association of these clasts and their assemblages, a parent lithology of alkali-anorthositic monzogabbro is postulated. Monazite occurs in the phosphate-bearing clast as two less than 10 micron grains intergrown with whitlockite. The concentration of combined REE oxides in monazite is 63.5 percent and the chondrite-normalized REE pattern is strongly enriched in LREE, similar to lunar monazite in 10047,68 and terrestrial monazite. Thorium concentration was not measured in monazite, but based on oxide analyses of approximately 100 percent (including interpolated values for REE not measured), substantial Th concentration is not indicated, similar to monazite in 10047,68. Measured monazite/whitlockite REE ratios are La: 11, Ce: 8, Sm: 3.6, Y: 0.9, and Yb: 0.5. Compositions of monazite and coexisting whitlockite and apatite are given.

  14. A massively parallel adaptive scheme for melt migration in geodynamics computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Heister, Timo; Grove, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    Melt generation and migration are important processes for the evolution of the Earth's interior and impact the global convection of the mantle. While they have been the subject of numerous investigations, the typical time and length-scales of melt transport are vastly different from global mantle convection, which determines where melt is generated. This makes it difficult to study mantle convection and melt migration in a unified framework. In addition, modelling magma dynamics poses the challenge of highly non-linear and spatially variable material properties, in particular the viscosity. We describe our extension of the community mantle convection code ASPECT that adds equations describing the behaviour of silicate melt percolating through and interacting with a viscously deforming host rock. We use the original compressible formulation of the McKenzie equations, augmented by an equation for the conservation of energy. This approach includes both melt migration and melt generation with the accompanying latent heat effects, and it incorporates the individual compressibilities of the solid and the fluid phase. For this, we derive an accurate and stable Finite Element scheme that can be combined with adaptive mesh refinement. This is particularly advantageous for this type of problem, as the resolution can be increased in mesh cells where melt is present and viscosity gradients are high, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. Together with a high-performance, massively parallel implementation, this allows for high resolution, 3d, compressible, global mantle convection simulations coupled with melt migration. Furthermore, scalable iterative linear solvers are required to solve the large linear systems arising from the discretized system. Finally, we present benchmarks and scaling tests of our solver up to tens of thousands of cores, show the effectiveness of adaptive mesh refinement when applied to melt migration and compare the

  15. Rotation of melting ice disks due to melt fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, S.; Adami, N.; Dubois, C.; Caps, H.; Vandewalle, N.; Darbois-Texier, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments concerning the melting of ice disks (85 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height) at the surface of a thermalized water bath. During the melting, the ice disks undergo translational and rotational motions. In particular, the disks rotate. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. We investigated the flow under the bottom face of the ice disks by a particle image velocimetry technique. We find that the flow goes downwards and also rotates horizontally, so that a vertical vortex is generated under the ice disk. The proposed mechanism is the following. In the vicinity of the bottom face of the disk, the water eventually reaches the temperature of 4°C for which the water density is maximum. The 4°C water sinks and generates a downwards plume. The observed vertical vorticity results from the flow in the plume. Finally, by viscous entrainment, the horizontal rotation of the flow induces the solid rotation of the ice block. This mechanism seems generic: any vertical flow that generates a vortex will induce the rotation of a floating object.

  16. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates

    PubMed Central

    Ajjampur, Sitara S. R.; Png, Chin Wen; Chia, Wan Ni; Zhang, Yongliang; Tan, Kevin S. W.

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), isolate B (ST7-B) and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H), we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch’s postulates for this parasite. PMID:27508942

  17. Melt spinning study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, G.L.; Rathz, T.

    1993-04-01

    Containerless processing of materials provides an excellent opportunity to study nucleation phenomena and produce unique materials, primarily through the formation of metastable phases and deep undercoolings. Deep undercoolings can be readily achieved in falling drops of molten material. Extended solute solubilities and greatly refined microstructures can also be obtained in containerless processing experiments. The Drop Tube Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center has played an important role in enhancing that area of research. Previous experiments performed in the Drop Tube with refractory metals have shown very interesting microstructural changes associated with deep undercoolings. It is apparent also that the microstructure of the deep undercooled species may be changing due to the release of the latent heat of fusion during recalescence. For scientific purposes, it is important to be able to differentiate between the microstructures of the two types of metallic species. A review of the literature shows that although significant advances have been made with respect to the engineering aspects of rapid solidification phenomena, there is still much to be learned in terms of understanding the basic phenomena. The two major ways in which rapid solidification processing provides improved structures and hence improved properties are: (1) production of refined structures such as fine dendrites and eutectics, and (2) production of new alloy compositions, microstructures, and phases through extended solid solubility, new phase reaction sequences, and the formation of metallic-glass microstructures. The objective of this work has been to determine the optimal methodology required to extract this excess energy without affecting the thermo-physical parameters of the under-cooled melt. In normal containerless processing experiments recalescence occurs as the melt returns toward the melting point in order to solidify.

  18. Morphology of melt-rich channels formed during reaction infiltration experiments on partially molten mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, Matej; Holtzman, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    planar and no channels develop. However, if the melt migration velocity exceeds ˜5 μm/s the reaction layer locally protrudes into the partially molten rock forming finger-like melt-rich channels. The morphology and spacing of the channels depends on the initial melt fraction. With 20 vol% melt, multiple and voluminous channels with an elliptical core formed of pure melt develop. At lower melt contents, fewer and thinner channels develop. Our experiments demonstrate that melt-rock reactions can lead to melt channelization in mantle lithologies. The morphology of the channels seems to depend on the initial permeability perturbations present in the starting material. The observed lithological transformations are in broad agreement with natural observations. However, the resulting channels lack the tabular anastomozing shapes which are likely caused by shear deformation in nature. Therefore, both reaction-driven as well as stress-driven melt segregation have to interact in nature to form the observed dunite channels. Szymczak, P., and A. J. C. Ladd (2014), Reactive-infiltration instabilities in rocks. Part 2. Dissolution of a porous matrix, J. Fluid Mech., 738, 591-630. Pec, M., B. K. Holtzman, M. Zimmerman, and D. L. Kohlstedt (2015), Reaction infiltration instabilities in experiments on partially molten mantle rocks, Geology, 43(7), 575-578, doi:10.1130/G36611.1.

  19. Applicability of BWR SFD experiments and codes for advanced core component designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-12-01

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1986, no experimental database existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper presents the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core on of SFD code.

  20. Charge Transport in Dendrimer Melts Using Multiscale Modeling Simulation.

    PubMed

    Bag, Saientan; Jain, Manish; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we present a theoretical calculation of the charge carrier mobility in two different dendrimeric melt systems (dendritic phenylazomethine with a triphenyl amine core and dendritic carbazole with cyclic phenylazomethine as the core), which have recently been reported1 to increase the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells by interface modification. Our mobility calculation, which is a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, first-principles calculation, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, leads to mobilities that are in quantitative agreement with available experimental data. We also show how the mobility depends on dendrimer generation. Furthermore, we examine the variation of mobility with an external electric field and external reorganization energy. Physical mechanisms behind the observed electric field and generation dependencies of mobility are also explored. PMID:27479077

  1. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material Through Porous Debris in Lower Head

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, Larry James; Harvego, Edwin Allan

    2000-04-01

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material may permeate to near the bottom of a 1m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material was calculated to cause a 12% increase in the heat flux on the external surface of the lower head.

  2. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of movement of melted material through porous debris in lower head

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Siefken; E. A. Harvego

    2000-04-02

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material may permeate to near the bottom of a 1m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material was calculated to cause a 12% increase in the heat flux on the external surface of the lower head.

  3. Late-phase melt progression experiment: MP-2. Results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, R.D.; Gauntt, R.O.; Bourcier, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    In-pile experiments addressing late-phase processes in Light Water Reactors (LWRs) were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. Melt Progression (MP) experiments were designed to provide information to develop and verify computer models for analysis of LWR core damage in severe accidents. Experiments examine the formation and motion of ceramic molten pools in disrupted reactor core regions. The MP-2 experiment assembly consisted of: (1) a rubble bed of enriched UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} simulating severely disrupted reactor core regions, (2) a ceramic/metallic crust representing blockage formed by early phase melting, relocation, and refreezing of core components, and (3) an intact rod stub region that remained in place below the blockage region. The test assembly was fission heated in the central cavity of the ACRR at an average rate of about 0.2 KA, reaching a peak molten pool temperature around 3400 K. Melting of the debris bed ceramic components was initiated near the center of the bed. The molten material relocated downward, refreezing to form a ceramic crust near the bottom of the rubble bed. As power levels were increased, the crust gradually remelted and reformed at progressively lower positions in the bed until late in the experiment when it penetrated into and attacked the ceramic/metallic blockage. The metallic components of the blockage region melted and relocated to the bottom of the intact rod stub region before the ceramic melt penetrated the blockage region from above. The ceramic pool penetrated halfway into the blockage region by the end of the experiment. Measurements of thermal response and material relocation are compared to the results of the computer simulations. Postexperiment examination of the assembly with the associated material interactions and metallurgy are also discussed in detail with the analyses and interpretation of results. 16 refs., 206 figs., 24 tabs.

  4. Probing depth dependencies of melt emplacement on time dependent quantities in a continental rift scenario with melting and melt extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2014-05-01

    Since some years seismological observations provide increasing evidence of a discontinuity near the mid of older mantle lithosphere. Explanation may be a melt infiltration front (MIF) as upper margin of an evolving network of veins. These are formed by crystallized melt supplied by episodic melting events in the asthenosphere. To test this concept geodynamically we performed numerical modelling applying melting, extraction of melt and emplacement in a viscous matrix. Thereupon, we were faced to the problem defining an intrusion level for the melt. Findings of prior studies led to the need of movable, process dependent boundaries of the emplacement zone additionally making the process probably more self-consistent. Here we present a preliminary study exploring several empirical attempts to relate time dependent states to an upward moving boundary for intrusion. Modeled physics is based on thermo-mechanics of visco-plastic flow. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component (crust-mantle) and two phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature-, pressure-, and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation and the high Prandtl number approximation are used, elasticity is neglected and geometry is restricted to 2D. Approximation is done with the Finite Difference Method with markers in an Eulerian formulation (FDCON). Model guiding scenario is a extending thick lithosphere associated to by updoming asthenosphere probably additionally heated by a plume nearby. As the P-T conditions in the asthenosphere are near the solidus caused changes may increase melting and generate partial melt. Against conventional expectations on permeability at lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth a fast melt transport into and sometimes through the lithosphere often is observed. The

  5. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1997-02-24

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation.

  6. Greenland ice sheet melting during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebroek, Petra M.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.

    2016-04-01

    During the last interglacial period (LIG) peak temperatures over Greenland were several degrees warmer than today. The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) retreated causing a global sea-level rise in the order of several meters. Large uncertainties still exist in the exact amount of melt and on the source location of this melt. Here we examine the GIS response to LIG temperature and precipitation patterns using the SICOPOLIS ice sheet model. The LIG climate was simulated by forcing the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) with the appropriate greenhouse gases and orbital settings. The resulting LIG ice volume evolution strongly depends on the chosen value of uncertain model parameters for the ice sheet (e.g. basal sliding parameter, PDD factors, and atmospheric temperature lapse rate). We reduce the uncertainty by evaluating an ensemble of model results against present-day observations of ice sheet size, elevation and stability, together with paleo information from deep ice cores. We find a maximum GIS reduction equivalent to 0.8 to 2.2m of global sea-level rise. In this model set-up most of the melting occurs in southwestern Greenland.

  7. Simulation studies on architecture dependence of unentangled polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2015-02-21

    The dependences of the properties of linear, ring, star, and H-shaped polymer melts on architecture are investigated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that zero-shear viscosities η0 for various architectures follow a universal relation, η0=Cη〈Rg0 (2)〉, where Cη is a constant and 〈Rg0 (2)〉 the equilibrium mean-square radius of gyration, in the unentangled regime. This law is also found valid for asymmetrical polymers but invalid for polymers with a hard core, such as stars with many arms and short arm lengths. In the unentangled regime, from the point of view of polymer size, the relaxation times show weak dependences on architecture, but the architecture dependence of the diffusion coefficient is still apparent. Then, we examine unentangled melts of various architectures having the same size over a wide range of shear rates covering linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regimes and find that the rheological quantities, namely, viscosity, first and second normal stress differences, are independent of architecture. In contrast, the polymer deformation shows an apparent dependence on architecture in the nonlinear regime. These findings shall shed significant light on the nature of rheological behaviors of unentangled melts. PMID:25702027

  8. Optical properties of melting first-year Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Bonnie; Perovich, Donald K.; Webster, Melinda A.; Polashenski, Christopher; Dadic, Ruzica

    2015-11-01

    The albedo and transmittance of melting, first-year Arctic sea ice were measured during two cruises of the Impacts of Climate on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) project during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Spectral measurements were made for both bare and ponded ice types at a total of 19 ice stations in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. These data, along with irradiance profiles taken within boreholes, laboratory measurements of the optical properties of core samples, ice physical property observations, and radiative transfer model simulations are employed to describe representative optical properties for melting first-year Arctic sea ice. Ponded ice was found to transmit roughly 4.4 times more total energy into the ocean, relative to nearby bare ice. The ubiquitous surface-scattering layer and drained layer present on bare, melting sea ice are responsible for its relatively high albedo and relatively low transmittance. Light transmittance through ponded ice depends on the physical thickness of the ice and the magnitude of the scattering coefficient in the ice interior. Bare ice reflects nearly three-quarters of the incident sunlight, enhancing its resiliency to absorption by solar insolation. In contrast, ponded ice absorbs or transmits to the ocean more than three-quarters of the incident sunlight. Characterization of the heat balance of a summertime ice cover is largely dictated by its pond coverage, and light transmittance through ponded ice shows strong contrast between first-year and multiyear Arctic ice covers.

  9. Intelligent control of cupola melting

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.D.; Clark, D.E.; Moore, K.L.; King, P.E.

    1997-05-01

    The cupola is a furnace used for melting steel scrap, cast iron scrap, and ferroalloys to produce cast iron. Its main energy source is coal coke. It is one of the oldest methods of producing cast iron, and it remains the dominate method because of its simplicity and low fuel cost. Cupolas range in size from 18 inches to 13 feet in diameter, and can produce up to 100 tons per hour of cast iron. Although cupola melting has a long history, automatic control has been elusive because the process has been poorly understood. Most foundries rely on the intuition of experienced operators to make control decisions. The purpose of this work, which has been underway for three years of an anticipated four year program, is to develop a controller for the cupola using intelligent and conventional control methods. The project is a cooperative effort between the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Department of Energy Albany Research Center, Idaho State University, and the American Foundrymen`s Society.

  10. Dynamical meson melting in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Kinoshita, Shunichiro; Murata, Keiju; Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2014-04-01

    We discuss mesons in thermalizing gluon backgrounds in the = 2 super-symmetric QCD using the gravity dual. We numerically compute the dynamics of a probe D7-brane in the Vaidya-AdS geometry that corresponds to a D3-brane background thermalizing from zero to finite temperatures by energy injection. In static backgrounds, it has been known that there are two kinds of brane embeddings where the brane intersects the black hole or not. They correspond to the phases with melted or stable mesons. In our dynamical setup, we obtain three cases depending on final temperatures and injection time scales. The brane stays outside of the black hole horizon when the final temperature is low, while it intersects the horizon and settles down to the static equilibrium state when the final temperature is high. Between these two cases, we find the overeager case where the brane dynamically intersects the horizon although the final temperature is not high enough for a static brane to intersect the horizon. The interpretation of this phenomenon in the dual field theory is meson melting due to non-thermal effects caused by rapid energy injection. In addition, we comment on the late time evolution of the brane and a possibility of its reconnection.

  11. Melting a Sample within TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the final runs of the TEMPUS experiment shows heating of a sample on STS-94, July 15, 1997, MET:14/11:01 (approximate) and the flows on the surface. At the point this image was taken, the sample was in the process of melting. The surface of the sample is begirning to flow, looking like the motion of plate tectonics on the surface of a planet. During this mission, TEMPUS was able to run than 120 melting cycles with zirconium, with a maximum temperature of 2,000 degrees C, and was able to undercool by 340 degrees -- the highest temperature and largest undercooling ever achieved in space. The TEMPUS investigators also have provided the first measurements of viscosity of palladium-silicon alloys in the undercooled liquid alloy which are not possible on Earth. TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station.(176KB JPEG, 1350 x 1516 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300193.html.

  12. Early core formation in Earth aided by shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromiley, G. D.; Berg, M.; Redfern, S. A.; Le Godec, Y.; Butler, I. B.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of how metallic cores formed in Earth and other terrestrial bodies is constrained by our knowledge of mechanisms for metal-silicate segregation. Equilibrium experiments conducted under conditions of core formation generally preclude that metallic melts segregated from a crystalline silicate mantle by grain percolation, and it is widely held that extensive silicate melting (formation of a magma ocean) was required to kick-start core formation in the Earth. By contrast, experiments conducted in dynamic systems suggest that deformation aids segregation of Fe-rich melts in a solid silicate matrix1. Deformation may have played an important role in young, vigorously convecting bodies undergoing rapid accretion, although the efficiency of deformation-aided percolation directly under conditions of core-formation in Earth remains largely untested. We present results of experiments performed at ESRF using the recently developed roPEC2, which allows in-situ investigation under high-PT conditions (currently up to 6 GPa, 2000K) during torsional deformation. Sample volumes in the roPEC are sufficient to permit detailed and statistically meaningful textural analysis of samples by high resolution X-ray microtomography (CT) and electron microscopy (SEM). Experiments in the system olivine-Fe3S are used to assess the efficiency of deformation-aided percolation under variable P/T conditions of core-formation and for variable strain rates. CT and SEM imaging clearly demonstrate that even small amounts of shear result in mobilisation of Fe-rich melts which would otherwise remain trapped in a silicate matrix. This process operates at much lower T than previously suggested; below the Fe3S liquidus deformation results in segregation of very low fraction S-rich melts, with compositions ranging from FeS to Fe3S with increasing T. Analysis of CT data provides clear evidence of melt ‘ponding’ in high-strain and high-T regions during deformation. We note no evidence for

  13. An idealized transient model for melt dispersal from reactor cavities during pressurized melt ejection accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, N.K.

    1991-06-01

    The direct Containment Heating (DCH) calculations require that the transient rate at which the melt is ejected from the reactor cavity during hypothetical pressurized melt ejection accident scenarios be calculated. However, at present no models, that are able to predict the available melt dispersal data from small scale reactor cavity models, are available. In this report, a simple idealized model of the melt dispersal process within a reactor cavity during a pressurized melt ejection accident scenario is presented. The predictions from the model agree reasonably well with the integral data obtained from the melt dispersal experiments using a small scale model of the Surry reactor cavity. 17 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Melting properties of iron alloys at high pressure determined by in situ X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Andrault, D.; Guignot, N.; Antonangeli, D.; Siebert, J.; Garbarino, G.

    2010-12-01

    It is well established that the Earth’s liquid outer core is less dense than a pure Fe-Ni liquid alloy. The so-called “core density deficit” is currently estimated around 5-10 wt % 1 and is attributed to the presence of light elements dissolved in an iron-rich liquid alloy. Melting temperature of pure Fe can be largely affected by the addition of light elements. In the case of S, depression for the eutectic point at ambient pressure is almost 30%. On the contrary, Si does not significantly affect pure Fe melting, at least at ambient pressure. As a matter of fact, the melting temperature depression (ΔTm) can be tracked as a function of pressure and related with the light element content. Comparison between melting properties of alloys and temperature profile calculated for the Earth’s interior can thus help discriminating between the different light elements suggested to be present in the Earth’s core. The melting properties of several alloys of high geophysical interest 2 were investigated up to megabar pressures: Fe-5%wtNi-15%wtSi ; Fe-5%wtNi-12%wtS ; Fe-10%wtO ; Fe-2%wtC. Scrupulous attention in the synthesis and characterization of the starting material is fundamental to accurately control the chemical composition in the laser-heated spot. The appearance of a diffuse signal around 30 nm-1 has been used to determine the onset of melting as in previous experiments 3,4. This data set provides new insights on the melting curve of iron and on the effect of each specific element on the melting temperature depression. Accordingly, the temperature of the Inner Outer Core Boundary can be look at as a function of the Outer core composition. References 1 O.L. Anderson and D.G. Isaak, Phys. Earth Plan. Int. 131, 19 (2002). 2 J.P. Poirier, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 85, 319 (1994). 3 G. Morard, C. Sanloup, G. Fiquet et al., Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 263 (1-2), 128 (2007). 4 G. Morard, D. Andrault, N. Guignot et al., Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 272 (3-4), 620 (2008).

  15. Translation and convection of Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnereau, M.; Calvet, M.; Margerin, L.; Mizzon, H.; Souriau, A.

    2012-12-01

    The image of the inner core growing slowly at the center of the Earth by gradual cooling and solidification of the surrounding liquid outer core is being replaced by the more vigorous image of a ``deep foundry'', where melting and crystallization rates exceed by many times the net growth rate. Recently, a particular mode of convection, called translation, has been put forward as an important mode of inner core dynamics because this mechanism is able to explain the observed East-West asymmetry of P-wave velocity and attenuation (Monnereau et al. 2010). Translation is a pure solid displacement of the inner core material (solid iron) within its envelop, implying crystallization of entering iron on one side of the inner core and melting on the opposite side. Translation is consistent with multiple scattering models of wave propagation. If they do not experience deformation, iron crystals grow as they transit from one hemisphere to the other. Larger crystals constituting a faster and more attenuating medium, a translation velocity of some cm/yr (about ten times the growth rate) is enough to account for the superficial asymmetry observed for P-wave velocity and attenuation, with grains of a few hundred meters on the crystallizing side (West) growing up to a few kilometers before melting on the East side, and a drift direction located in the equatorial plane. Among all hypotheses that have been proposed to account for the seismic asymmetry, translation is the only one based on a demonstrated link between the seismic data and the proposed dynamics, notably through a model of seismic wave propagation. This mechanism was also proposed to be responsible for the formation of a dense layer at the bottom of the outer core, since the high rate of melting and crystallization would release a liquid depleted in light elements at the surface of the inner core (Alboussiere et al 2010). This would explain the anomalously low gradient of P wave velocity in the lowermost 200 km of the

  16. Transient melting of an ESR electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharicha, A.; Karimi-Sibaki, E.; Bohacek, J.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2016-07-01

    Melting parameters of ESR process such as melt rate and immersion depth of electrode are of great importance. In this paper, a dynamic mesh based simulation framework is proposed to model melt rate and shape of electrode during the ESR process. Coupling interactions between turbulent flow, temperature, and electromagnetic fields are fully considered. The model is computationally efficient, and enables us to directly calculate melting parameters. Furthermore, dynamic change of electrode shape by melting can be captured. It is necessary to control the feeding velocity of electrode due to melting instabilities in the ESR process. As such, a numerical control is implemented based on the immersion depth of electrode to achieve the steady state in the simulation. Furthermore, the modeling result is evaluated against an experiment.

  17. Impact melt products of chondritic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data concerning impact melting processes in chondritic material are reviewed. It is shown that a large variety of objects in chondritic meteorites could have formed as a result of impact melting, including: shock veins; metal-troilite mixtures; metal and sulfide nodules; melt pockets and vugs. The type of object produced in an impact melt is related to the interaction of the shock waves with the particular target rock. It is suggested that various iron meteorites (including groups IAB, IIICD, and IIE, as well as several ungrouped irons) were formed from individual melt pools in chondritic regoliths. The small-scale structure of impact-melted metallic Fe,Ni and troilite in Weston (H chondrite regolith breccia) is illustrated in a photograph.

  18. Transcrystalline melt migration and Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Schiano, Pierre; Provost, Ariel; Clocchiatti, Roberto; Faure, François

    2006-11-10

    Plate tectonics and volcanism involve the formation, migration, and interaction of magma and gas. Experiments show that melt inclusions subjected to a thermal gradient migrate through olivine crystals, under the kinetic control of crystal-melt interface mechanisms. Exsolved gas bubbles remain fixed and eventually separate from the melt. Scaled to thermal gradients in Earth's mantle and geological times, our results account for the grain-scale segregation of primitive melts, reinterpret CO2-rich fluid inclusions as escaped from melt, and question the existence of a free, deeply percolating fluid phase. Melt migration experiments also allow us to quantify crystal growth kinetics at very low undercoolings in conditions appropriate to many natural systems. PMID:17095697

  19. Morphology and Melting Behavior of Polypropylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamo, R. G.; Mandelkern, L.

    1997-03-01

    The double melting of isothermally crystallized polypropylenes (metallocenes or Ziegler fractions) of a low defect content, is found to be associated with the presence of dominant (usually thicker) and daughter lamellae. A double population of lamellae thicknesses that adheres to the formulated epitaxial crystallization is seen by TEM even in samples crystallized at temperatures above 160 degC. Mixed and positive spherulites are also observed to grow linearly at these temperatures. During the melting process, positive or mixed spherulites show a well defined change to a negative character at a temperature corresponding to the low temperature endotherm in agreement with the melting of the daughter lamellae at this temperature. It is also found that the melting and stability of the dominant lamellae are influenced by the presence of epitaxial transversal lamellae. The kinetics of the melting process are investigated in relation to the initial morphology. Higher defected polypropylenes with a high concentration of gamma crystals do not show associated melting kinetics.

  20. 450 kW plasma melting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, M. N.; Sahashrabuddhe, S. N.; Murthy, P. S. S.; Bapat, A. V.; Das, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    Plasma melting technology can be used to meet the scrap recycle needs of reactive metals, superalloys and refractory materials such as titanium, zirconium and uranium alloys. Fabrication involving these reactive metals, share the common problem of generating a large amount of scrap where both low and high density inclusions become highly prevalent. Plasma melting technology can be used for re-melting, refining and production of premium grade metal ingot. 450kW multi-torch plasma melting furnace is developed and commissioned by Laser & Plasma Technology Division for the re-melting and refining of metals and scraps under controlled environment. This paper presents the vacuum system design for 450 kW plasma melting furnace. The efficacy of vacuum system in cold condition is also tested and the results are included in the paper. The vacuum feed through design for the plasma torch handling mechanism is also discussed.

  1. Fulfillment of Koch’s postulates and partial host range of Septoria lepidii Desm., a fungal pathogen for potential biological control of hoary cress (Lepidium spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have fulfilled Koch’s postulates and conducted host range tests with Septoria lepidii Desm. on five geographical accessions of hoary cress. Host range results showed the fungus specific to Lepidium spp. and damaging to hoary cress. This fungus is potentially an important biological control agent ...

  2. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters. PMID:27464191

  3. Oxygen Coordination Transformation in MgSiO3 Melts in the Earth’s Interior

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Lin, J; Cai, Y; Hiraoka, N; Eng, P; Okuchi, T; Mao, H; Hu, M; Li, B; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of Coulomb explosion, melting and shock wave creation in silicon after an ionization pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhongyu; Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Wang, Jing

    2014-04-14

    Strong electronic stopping power of swift ions in a semiconducting or insulating substrate can lead to localized electron stripping. The subsequent repulsive interactions among charged target atoms can cause Coulomb explosion. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we simulate Coulomb explosion in silicon by introducing an ionization pulse lasting for different periods, and at different substrate temperatures. We find that the longer the pulse period, the larger the melting radius. The observation can be explained by a critical energy density model assuming that melting required thermal energy density is a constant value and the total thermal energy gained from Coulomb explosion is linearly proportional to the ionization period. Our studies also show that melting radius is larger at higher substrate temperatures. The temperature effect is explained due to a longer structural relaxation above the melting temperature at original ionization boundary due to lower heat dissipation rates. Furthermore, simulations show the formation of shock waves, created due to the compression from the melting core.

  5. Devon island ice cap: core stratigraphy and paleoclimate.

    PubMed

    Koerner, R M

    1977-04-01

    Valuable paleoclimatic information can be gained by studying the distribution of melt layers in deep ice cores. A profile representing the percentage of ice in melt layers in a core drilled from the Devon Island ice cap plotted against both time and depth shows that the ice cap has experienced a period of very warm summers since 1925, following a period of colder summers between about 1600 and 1925. The earlier period was coldest between 1680 and 1730. There is a high correlation between the melt-layer ice percentage and the mass balance of the ice cap. The relation between them suggests that the ice cap mass balance was zero (accumulation equaled ablation) during the colder period but is negative in the present warmer one. There is no firm evidence of a present cooling trend in the summer conditions on the ice cap. A comparison with the melt-layer ice percentage in cores from the other major Canadian Arctic ice caps shows that the variation of summer conditions found for the Devon Island ice cap is representative for all the large ice caps for about 90 percent of the time. There is also a good correlation between melt-layer percentage and summer sea-ice conditions in the archipelago. This suggests that the search for the northwest passage was influenced by changing climate, with the 19th-century peak of the often tragic exploration coinciding with a period of very cold summers. PMID:17733504

  6. Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase as a hygrometer of arc basaltic melts: Approaches from melt inclusion analyses and hydrous melting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Morihisa; Ushioda, Masashi; Fujii, Toshitsugu; Takahashi, Eiichi

    2013-03-01

    The partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt were determined by two approaches. For the first part of this study, plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) from the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean were analyzed. The hydrogen concentration in plagioclase is less than 60 wt ppm water, and the average H2O concentration in melt inclusions is 0.3 wt%. Therefore, the apparent partition coefficient of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt is ≈0.01 on a molar basis. For the second part of this study, hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma were performed at 0.35 GPa using an internally-heated pressure vessel at f≈NNO+3. The starting material was hydrous basaltic glass with H2O ranging from 0.8 to 5.5 wt%. A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈1 mg) and 10 mg of powdered basaltic glass were sealed in a Au80Pd20 alloy capsule, and then kept at near the crystallization temperature of plagioclase as a liquidus phase to attain an equilibrium of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt. Combining the results of these two parts of this study, we formulated two linear equations to correlate the hydrogen concentration in plagioclase and the H2O concentration in melt. When H2O in melt is ≤1 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈80×H2O in melt (wt%). When H2O in melt is≥4 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈40×H2O in melt (wt%). Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase lies between two equations when H2O in melt ranges from 1 to 4 wt%. In accordance with these formulations, the partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt switches from 0.01±0.005 under H2O-poor conditions (≤100 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≤1 wt% H2O in melt) to 0.005±0.001 under H2O-rich conditions (≥150 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≥4 wt% H2O in melt). Such switches of hydrogen partitioning with an increase in H2O can be related to change of the atomic site for hydrogen in the

  7. Melt inclusions in Luna 24 soil fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, W.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    Optical examinations of 28 slides of Luna 24 soil fragments revealed melt inclusions in grains of olivine, plagioclase, spinel, and ilmenite as well as interstitial inclusions. In contrast with Apollo samples, the Luna 24 samples contain sulfide melt inclusions, which indicates that saturation with respect to an iron sulfide melt took place throughout much of the crystallization history, even while olivine was crystallizing. The Luna 24 silicate-melt inclusions have recorded a more extensive differentiation toward higher iron magmas than have the Apollo inclusions, but they have also recorded some inexplicably low aluminum values.

  8. Lunar Simple Crater Impact Melt Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, Jeffrey B.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Impact melt is observed in simple lunar craters having diameters as small as less than 200 m. The presence of ponds of impact melt on the floor of such small craters is interpreted to indicate vertical impacts. Data from the LRO LROC and LOLA experiments allow quantitative estimates of the volume of impact melt in simple crater. Such estimates allow for validation of theoretical models of impact melt generation and examination of target effects. Preliminary data have considerable scatter but are broadly consistent with the models.

  9. Low Melt Height Solidification of Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montakhab, Mehdi; Bacak, Mert; Balikci, Ercan

    2016-06-01

    Effect of a reduced melt height in the directional solidification of a superalloy has been investigated by two methods: vertical Bridgman (VB) and vertical Bridgman with a submerged baffle (VBSB). The latter is a relatively new technique and provides a reduced melt height ahead of the solidifying interface. A low melt height leads to a larger primary dendrite arm spacing but a lower mushy length, melt-back transition length, and porosity. The VBSB technique yields up to 38 pct reduction in the porosity. This may improve a component's mechanical strength especially in a creep-fatigue type dynamic loading.

  10. Imaging transient melting of a nanocrystal using an X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Jesse N.; Beitra, Loren; Xiong, Gang; Fritz, David M.; Lemke, Henrik T.; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Matthieu; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Abbey, Brian; Harder, Ross J.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Wark, Justin S.; Reis, David A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-06-01

    There is a fundamental interest in studying photoinduced dynam- ics in nanoparticles and nanostructures as it provides insight into their mechanical and thermal properties out of equilibrium and during phase transitions. Nanoparticles can display significantly different properties from the bulk, which is due to the interplay between their size, morphology, crystallinity, defect concentra- tion, and surface properties. Particularly interesting scenarios arise when nanoparticles undergo phase transitions, such as melting induced by an optical laser. Current theoretical evidence suggests that nanoparticles can undergo reversible nonhomogenous melt- ing with the formation of a core-shell structure consisting of a liquid outer layer. To date, studies from ensembles of nanoparticles have tentatively suggested that such mechanisms are present. Here we demonstrate imaging transient melting and softening of the acoustic phonon modes of an individual gold nanocrystal, using an X-ray free electron laser. The results demonstrate that the transient melting is reversible and nonhomogenous, consistent with a core-shell model of melting. The results have implications for understanding transient processes in nanoparticles and determining their elastic properties as they undergo phase transitio

  11. Imaging transient melting of a nanocrystal using an X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jesse N.; Beitra, Loren; Xiong, Gang; Fritz, David M.; Lemke, Henrik T.; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Matthieu; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Abbey, Brian; Harder, Ross J.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Wark, Justin S.; Reis, David A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-01-01

    There is a fundamental interest in studying photoinduced dynamics in nanoparticles and nanostructures as it provides insight into their mechanical and thermal properties out of equilibrium and during phase transitions. Nanoparticles can display significantly different properties from the bulk, which is due to the interplay between their size, morphology, crystallinity, defect concentration, and surface properties. Particularly interesting scenarios arise when nanoparticles undergo phase transitions, such as melting induced by an optical laser. Current theoretical evidence suggests that nanoparticles can undergo reversible nonhomogenous melting with the formation of a core-shell structure consisting of a liquid outer layer. To date, studies from ensembles of nanoparticles have tentatively suggested that such mechanisms are present. Here we demonstrate imaging transient melting and softening of the acoustic phonon modes of an individual gold nanocrystal, using an X-ray free electron laser. The results demonstrate that the transient melting is reversible and nonhomogenous, consistent with a core-shell model of melting. The results have implications for understanding transient processes in nanoparticles and determining their elastic properties as they undergo phase transitions. PMID:26034277

  12. Fragmentation and quench behavior of corium melt streams in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Wang, K.; Blomquist, C.A.; McUmber, L.M.; Schneider, J.P.

    1994-02-01

    The interaction of molten core materials with water has been investigated for the pour stream mixing mode. This interaction plays a crucial role during the later stages of in-vessel core melt progression inside a light water reactor such as during the TMI-2 accident. The key issues which arise during the molten core relocation include: (i) the thermal attack and possible damage to the RPV lower head from the impinging molten fuel stream and/or the debris bed, (ii) the molten fuel relocation pathways including the effects of redistribution due to core support structure and the reactor lower internals, (iii) the quench rate of the molten fuel through the water in the lower plenum, (iv) the steam generation and hydrogen generation during the interaction, (v) the transient pressurization of the primary system, and (vi) the possibility of a steam explosion. In order to understand these issues, a series of six experiments (designated CCM-1 through {minus}6) was performed in which molten corium passed through a deep pool of water in a long, slender pour stream mode. Results discussed include the transient temperatures and pressures, the rate and magnitude of steam/hydrogen generation, and the posttest debris characteristics.

  13. Crystallization kinetics of rhyolitic melts using oxygen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Crystals provide the means to understand igneous systems, but natural constraints on crystallization kinetics are rare because thermal conditions and crystallization timescales are typically unknown. Oxygen isotope ratios in quartz and alkali feldspar crystals in spherulites provide a natural record of the temperature interval of crystallization and crystal growth rates in rhyolitic melts. Oxygen isotope compositions in both phases change progressively with position from the spherulite core to rim. Quartz δ18O increases from 5.0 ± 0.3‰ in the core to 5.6 ± 0.3‰ at the rims, whereas alkali feldspar decreases from 3.7 ± 0.4‰ in the core to 2.7 ± 0.9‰ at the rims. Fractionation therefore increases from 1.3 ± 0.7‰ in the cores to 2.9 ± 1.1‰ at the rims. Oxygen isotope thermometry tracks crystallization temperature with position. Spherulites nucleate at 578 ± 160°C and continue to grow until 301 ± 88°C. The in situ analyses demonstrate that spherulites self-contain a record of their thermal history and that of the host lava.

  14. Drug solubilisation in lipid nanoparticles containing high melting point triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Wasutrasawat, Prawarisa; Al-Obaidi, Hisham; Gaisford, Simon; Lawrence, M Jayne; Warisnoicharoen, Warangkana

    2013-11-01

    The effect of lipid (either the triglyceride trilaurin or tripalmitin, melting points of 43 and 64 °C, respectively) on the properties of lipid nanoparticles (LN) stabilised by the surfactant, polyoxyethylene-10-oleyl ether (C18:1E10) at a temperature of 22 °C, has been determined. LN were prepared by heating lipid, surfactant and water to 70 °C and cooling to ambient temperature with constant stirring. While lipid type influenced LN formation in that trilaurin-containing LN formed over the greatest range of compositions, phase inversion studies suggested that both lipids formed a core within the LN while light scattering studies indicated that the size of both types of LN varied with lipid concentration: in an approximately linear fashion for clear or opalescent LN and exponentially for cloudy LN. Additionally, both types of preformed LN exhibited an increase in solubilisation capacity of the hydrophobic drug, testosterone propionate compared to C18:1E10 micelles, although the trilaurin-containing LN exhibited the greatest increase. Differential scanning calorimetry studies demonstrated that trilaurin formed a 'fluid-like' core and therefore liquefied-lipid nanoparticles, which allowed dissolution of testosterone propionate in the lipid core. In contrast, tripalmitin was present in a 'solid-like' state forming solid lipid nanoparticles which did not allow testosterone propionate dissolution in the core. PMID:23688806

  15. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column as the driving force of stick-slip motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; Hirose, T.; Di Toro, G.; Hornby, A.; De Angelis, S.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Hess, K.; Leonhardt, R.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and of thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. A combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of shear bands from Mount St. Helens (MSH) and Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveal evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. High velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments demonstrate the propensity for melting of andesitic and dacitic material (from SHV and MSH respectively) at upper conduit stress conditions. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) seismicity. Using a source duration calculated from the waveforms at seismic stations around SHV, and slip distance per drumbeat calculated from extrusion rate, frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus can be achieved at small slip distances (<15cm) in 0.15 s from 800°C magma (at 10MPa). The shear resistance of the slip zone during the experiments is also monitored. Frictional melting induces a higher resistance to sliding than rock on rock, and viscous processes control the slip zone properties. Variable-rate HVR experiments which mimic rapid velocity fluctuations in stick-slip behavior demonstrate velocity-weakening behavior of melt, with a tendency for unstable slip. We postulate that pseudotachylyte generation could be the underlying cause of stick-slip motion and associated seismic 'drumbeats', which are so commonly observed at dome-building volcanoes, allowing for a fixed spatial locus and the occurrence of 'families' of similar

  16. Polymer Micelles with Crystalline Cores for Thermally Triggered Release

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Amanda L.; Nikles, Sarah M.; Nikles, Jacqueline A.; Brazel, Christopher S.; Nikles, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the use of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polycaprolactone diblock copolymers in a targeted, magnetically triggered drug delivery system has led to this study of the phase behavior of the polycaprolactone core. Four different diblock copolymers were prepared by the ring opening polymerization of caprolactone from the alcohol terminus of poly(ethylene glycol) monomethylether, Mn ~ 2,000. The critical micelle concentration depended on the degree of polymerization for the polycaprolactone block and was in the range of 2.9 to 41 mg/L. Differential scanning calorimetry curves for polymer solutions with a concentration above the critical micelle concentration showed a melting endotherm in the range of 40 to 45°C, indicating the polycaprolactone core was semicrystalline. Pyrene was entrapped in the micelle core without interfering with the ability of the polycaprolactone to crystallize. When the polymer solution was heated above the melting point of the micelle core, the pyrene was free to leave the core. Temperature dependent measurements of the critical micelle concentration and temperature dependent dynamic light scattering showed the micelles remain intact at temperatures above the melting point of the polycaprolactone core. PMID:22726124

  17. Impact of gneissic layering and localized incipient melting upon melt flow during experimental deformation of migmatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzhorn, A. C.; Trap, P.; Arbaret, L.; Champallier, R.; Fauconnier, J.; Labrousse, L.; Prouteau, G.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we test experimentally the role of compositional layering as a key parameter for controlling melt flow in a natural migmatite during coaxial deformation. We performed in - situ pure-shear experiments on two natural gneisses. The first gneiss is weakly foliated with minerals homogenously distributed. The second gneiss shows a pronounced compositional layering of alternating quartz - feldspar - rich and biotite - muscovite - rich layers. Experimental conditions were selected to obtain homogeneous melt distribution in the homogeneous gneiss and heterogeneous melt distribution in the layered gneiss. Initial melt distribution is not modified by deformation in experiments on the homogeneous gneiss, implying that melting products did not migrate from their initiation sites. In contrast, melt flowed in shear zones or in inter-boudin positions during experimental deformation of the heterogeneous gneiss. These experiments attest to the strong influence of initial gneissic layering on melting pattern, melt segregation and flow during deformation of partially molten rocks.

  18. Thermocapillary flow and natural convection in a melt column with an unknown melt/solid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. W.; Kou, Sindo

    1991-01-01

    A vertical melt column set up between an upper heating rod and a lower sample rod, i.e., the so-called half-zone system, is a convenient experimental tool for studying convection in the melt in floating-zone crystal growth. In order to help understand the convection observed in the melt column, a computer model has been developed to describe steady state, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow and natural convection in the melt. The governing equations and boundary conditions are expressed in general non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates in order to accurately treat the unknown melt/solid interface as well as all other physical boundaries in the system. The effects of key dimensionless variables on the following items are discussed: (1) convection and temperature distribution in the melt; (2) the shape of the melt/solid interface; (3) the height of the melt column. These dimensionless variables are the Grashof, Marangoni and Prandtl numbers.

  19. M551 metals melting experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, G.

    1977-01-01

    Electron beam welding studies were conducted in the Skylab M551 metals melting experiment, on three different materials; namely 2219-T87 aluminum alloy, 304L stainless steel, and commercially pure tantalum (0.5 wt % columbium). Welds were made in both one gravity and zero gravity (Skylab) environments. Segments from each of the welds were investigated by microhardness, optical microscopy, scanning microscopy, and electron probe techniques. In the 2219-T87 aluminum alloy samples, macroscopic banding and the presence of an eutectic phase in the grain boundaries of the heat affected zone were observed. The stainless steel samples exhibited a sharp weld interface and macroscopic bands. The primary microstructural features found in the tantalum were the presence of either columnar grains (ground base) or equiaxed grains (Skylab). The factors contributing to these effects are discussed and the role of reduced gravity in welding is considered.

  20. Electrolysis of simulated lunar melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. H.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Haskin, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electrolysis of molten lunar soil or rock is examined as an attractive means of wresting useful raw materials from lunar rocks. It requires only hat to melt the soil or rock and electricity to electrolyze it, and both can be developed from solar power. The conductivities of the simple silicate diopside, Mg CaSi2O6 were measured. Iron oxide was added to determine the effect on conductivity. The iron brought about substantial electronic conduction. The conductivities of simulated lunar lavas were measured. The simulated basalt had an AC conductivity nearly a fctor of two higher than that of diopside, reflecting the basalt's slightly higher total concentration of the 2+ ions Ca, Mg, and Fe that are the dominant charge carriers. Electrolysis was shown to be about 30% efficient for the basalt composition.

  1. Surface melting of electronic order.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. B.; Liu, X.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Ryan, P. J.; Mitchell, J. F.; Hill, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report temperature-dependent surface x-ray scattering studies of the orbital ordered surface in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. We find that as the bulk ordering temperature is approached from below the thickness of the interface between the electronically ordered and electronically disordered regions at the surface grows, though the bulk correlation length remains unchanged. Close to the transition, the surface is so rough that there is no well-defined electronic surface, despite the presence of bulk electronic order. That is, the electronic ordering at the surface has melted. Above the bulk transition, long-range ordering in the bulk is destroyed but finite-sized isotropic fluctuations persist, with a correlation length roughly equal to that of the low-temperature in-plane surface correlation length.

  2. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  3. Structure of a bottlebrush melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturej, Jaroslaw; Sheiko, Sergei; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2014-03-01

    A bottlebrush polymer is a branched macromolecule composed of a linear chain (backbone) with side chains densely tethered to it. High grafting density of side chains gives rise to various unique structural properties, such as highly extended conformations of their backbones and tunable character of their stiffness and rheological properties with degree of polymerization of the side chains. We conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to determine how the number of Kuhn segments in a bottlebrush backbone L and in the side chains N affect size, stiffness, and structure of these molecules. We found that the size (root-mean-squared radius of gyration and end-to-end distance) and persistence length of bottlebrushes in a melt state scales as N 1 / 2.

  4. Applications of liquid state physics to the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    New results derived for application to the earth's outer core using the modern theory of liquids and the hard-sphere model of liquid structure are presented. An expression derived in terms of the incompressibility and pressure is valid for a high-pressure liquid near its melting point, provided that the pressure is derived from a strongly repulsive pair potential; a relation derived between the melting point and density leads to a melting curve law of essentially the same form as Lindemann's law. Finally, it is shown that the 'core paradox' of Higgins and Kennedy (1971) can occur only if the Gruneisen parameter is smaller than 2/3, and this constant is larger than this value in any liquid for which the pair potential is strongly repulsive.

  5. Water loss from olivine hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Provost, A.; Schiano, P.; Cluzel, N.

    2009-12-01

    Water content in melt inclusions has long been used as an important index for the water content of the hosting magma. However, many studies have shown that post-entrapment diffusive re-equilibration can affect the water content of melt inclusions. This process must be considered when using melt inclusions to infer water content of the hosting magma. Theoretical model on the diffusive re-equilibration between melt inclusions and external melts showed that the re-equilibration rate depends on the diffusivity of the re-equilibrating species in the host mineral, the partition coefficient of this species between the host mineral and melt, and the geometry of the melt inclusion and host mineral. The water diffusivity in olivine and water partition coefficient between melt and olivine have been measured by recent studies, therefore the diffusive re-equilibration model can be tested by experiments. In this study, we carried out in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements on the water content of olivine hosted melt inclusions at high temperatures. Initial water content of the melt inclusions is about 4 wt%. A heating stage system is combined with a microscope FTIR and the absorption spectrum through the olivine and melt inclusion is repeatedly measured. Although the absorption band at around 3540 cm-1 has not be calibrated at high temperatures, it is assumed that the absorbance is linearly related to the total water concentration in the melt inclusion, and the relative water content can be inferred. Cautions have been exercised to maintain a consistent measurement spot such that the thickness of the melt inclusion within the beam path did not change significantly during each experiment. Oxygen fugacity in the heating stage is controlled by Zr purified Ar gas to be about 7 logarithm units below the QFM buffer and about 1 logarithm unit above the QIF buffer at 1473 K. Preliminary results showed that at 1430 and 1581 K, the total water content of the

  6. Core Forensics: Earth's Accretion and Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Siebert, J.; Piet, H.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's accretion and its primitive differentiation are intimately interlinked processes. One way to constrain accretionary processes is by looking at the major differentiation event that took place during accretion: core formation. Understanding core formation and core composition can certainly shed a new light on early and late accretionary processes. On the other hand, testing certain accretionary models and hypothesis (fluxes, chemistries, timing) allows -short of validating them- at the very least to unambiguously refute them, through the 'filter'' of core formation and composition. Earth's core formed during accretion as a result of melting, phase-separation, and segregation of accretionary building blocks (from meteorites to planetesimals). The bulk composition of the core and mantle depends on the evolution (pressure, temperature, composition) of core extraction during accretion. The entire process left a compositional imprint on both reservoirs: (1) in the silicate Earth, in terms of siderophile trace-element (Ni, Co, V, Cr, among others) concentrations and isotopic fractionation (Si, Cu, among others), a record that is observed in present-day mantle rocks; and (2) on the core, in terms of major element composition and light elements dissolved in the metal, a record that is observed by seismology through the core density-deficit. This imprint constitutes actually a fairly impressive set of evidence (siderophile element concentration and fractionation, volatile and siderophile element isotopic fractionation), can be used today to trace back the primordial processes that occurred 4.5 billion years ago. We are seeking to provide an overhaul of the standard core formation/composition models, by using a new rationale that bridges geophysics and geochemistry. The new ingredients are (1) new laser-heated diamond anvil cell partitioning data, dramatically extending the previous P-T conditions for experimental work, (2) ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to

  7. Double-diffusive inner core convective translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguen, Renaud; Alboussière, Thierry; Labrosse, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    The hemispherical asymmetry of the inner core has been interpreted as resulting form a high-viscosity mode of inner core convection, consisting in a translation of the inner core. With melting on one hemisphere and crystallization on the other one, inner core translation would impose a strongly asymmetric buoyancy flux at the bottom of the outer core, with likely strong implications for the dynamics of the outer core and the geodynamo. The main requirement for convective instability in the inner core is an adverse radial density gradient. While older estimates of the inner core thermal conductivity favored a superadiabatic temperature gradient and the existence of thermal convection, the much higher values recently proposed makes thermal convection very unlikely. Compositional convection might be a viable alternative to thermal convection: an unstable compositional gradient may arise in the inner core either because the light elements present in the core are predicted to become increasingly incompatible as the inner core grows (Gubbins et al. 2013), or because of a possibly positive feedback of the development of the F-layer on inner core convection. Though the magnitude of the destabilizing effect of the compositional field is predicted to be similar to or smaller than the stabilizing effect of the thermal field, the huge difference between thermal and chemical diffusivities implies that double-diffusive instabilities can still arise even if the net density decreases upward. We propose here a theoretical and numerical study of double diffusive convection in the inner core that demonstrate that a translation mode can indeed exist if the compositional field is destabilizing, even if the temperature profile is subadiabatic, and irrespectively of the relative magnitude of the destabilizing compositional gradient and stabilizing temperature field. The predicted inner core translation rate is similar to the mean inner core growth rate, which is more consistent with

  8. Low-Degree Partial Melting Experiments of CR and H Chondrite Compositions: Implications for Asteroidal Magmatism Recorded in GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of differentiated meteorites have revealed a diversity of differentiation processes on their parental asteroids; these differentiation mechanisms range from whole-scale melting to partial melting without the core formation [e.g., 1]. Recently discovered paired achondrites GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 (hereafter referred to as GRA) represent unique asteroidal magmatic processes. These meteorites are characterized by high abundances of sodic plagioclase and alkali-rich whole-rock compositions, implying that they could originate from a low-degree partial melt from a volatile-rich oxidized asteroid [e.g., 2, 3, 4]. These conditions are consistent with the high abundances of highly siderophile elements, suggesting that their parent asteroid did not segregate a metallic core [2]. In this study, we test the hypothesis that low-degree partial melts of chondritic precursors under oxidizing conditions can explain the whole-rock and mineral chemistry of GRA based on melting experiments of synthesized CR- and H-chondrite compositions.

  9. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dannberg, Juliane; Dohmen, Janik; Kalousova, Klara; Maurice, Maxim; Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana; Soucek, Ondrej; Spiegelman, Marc; Thieulot, Cedric; Tosi, Nicola; Wallner, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we carry out a benchmark comparison. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, cases 1a to 1c (Blankenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and Rayleigh numbers of 104 to 10^6. Melting is modelled using a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) five cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 is identical to case 1 except that latent heat is switched on. Case 3 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm) and depletion buoyancy, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms), the maximum and the total melt volume and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 4 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases are carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. For cases 1 - 3 very good agreement

  10. NREL Scientists Reveal Origin of Diverse Melting Behaviors of Aluminum Nanoclusters (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Research reveals active role of cluster symmetries on the size-sensitive, diverse melting behaviors of metallic nanoclusters, providing insight to understanding phase changes of nanoparticles for thermal energy storage. Unlike macroscopic bulk materials, intermediate-sized nanoclusters with around 55 atoms inherently exhibit size-sensitive melting changes: adding just a single atom to a nanocluster can cause a dramatic change in melting behavior. Microscopic understanding of thermal behaviors of metal nanoclusters is important for nanoscale catalysis and thermal energy storage applications. However, it is a challenge to obtain a structural interpretation at the atomic level from measured thermodynamic quantities such as heat capacity. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) revealed a clear correlation between the diverse melting behaviors of aluminum nanoclusters and cluster core symmetries. These simulations reproduced, for the first time, the size-sensitive heat capacities of aluminum nanoclusters, which exhibit several distinctive shapes associated with the diverse melting behaviors of the clusters. The size-dependent, diverse melting behaviors of the aluminum clusters are attributed to the reduced symmetry (from Td {yields} D2d {yields} Cs) with increasing the cluster sizes and can be used to help design thermal storage materials.

  11. Origins of ultralow velocity zones through slab-derived metallic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Jie; Hrubiak, Rostislav; Smith, Jesse S.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) places constraints on the chemical composition and thermal structure of deep Earth and provides critical information on the dynamics of large-scale mantle convection, but their origin has remained enigmatic for decades. Recent studies suggest that metallic iron and carbon are produced in subducted slabs when they sink beyond a depth of 250 km. Here we show that the eutectic melting curve of the iron‑carbon system crosses the current geotherm near Earth’s core‑mantle boundary, suggesting that dense metallic melt may form in the lowermost mantle. If concentrated into isolated patches, such melt could produce the seismically observed density and velocity features of ULVZs. Depending on the wetting behavior of the metallic melt, the resultant ULVZs may be short-lived domains that are replenished or regenerated through subduction, or long-lasting regions containing both metallic and silicate melts. Slab-derived metallic melt may produce another type of ULVZ that escapes core sequestration by reacting with the mantle to form iron-rich postbridgmanite or ferropericlase. The hypotheses connect peculiar features near Earth's core‑mantle boundary to subduction of the oceanic lithosphere through the deep carbon cycle.

  12. Tomographic location of potential melt-bearing phenocrysts in lunar glass spherules

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, D.S.; Fogel, R.A.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-02-04

    Apollo 17 orange glass spherules contain olivine phenocrysts with melt inclusions from depth. Tomography (<2micron/pxl) of >200 spherules located 1 phenocryst. We will try to find melt inclusions and obtain original magma volatiles and compositions. In 1971, Apollo 17 astronauts collected a 10 cm soil sample (74220) comprised almost entirely of orange glass spherules. Below this, a double drive-tube core sampled a 68 cm thick horizon comprised of orange glass and black beads (crystallized equivalents of orange glass). Primitive lunar glass spherules (e.g.-A17 orange glasses) are thought to represent ejecta from lunar mare fire fountains. The fire-fountains were apparently driven by a combination of C-O gas exsolution from orange glass melt and the oxidation of graphite. Upon eruption, magmas lost their volatiles (e.g., S, CO, CO{sub 2}) to space. Evidence for volatile escape remains as volatile-rich coatings on the exteriors of many spherules. Moreover, it showed that Type I and II Fe-Ni-rich metal particles found within orange glass olivine phenocrysts, or free-floating in the glass itself, are powerful evidence for the volatile driving force for lunar fire fountains. More direct evidence for the volatile mechanism has yet to be uncovered. Issues remaining include: the exact composition of magmatic volatiles; the hypothesized existence of graphite in the magma; the oxygen fugacity of the magma and of the lunar interior. In 1996 reported a single {approx}450 micron, equant olivine phenocryst, containing four glassy melt inclusions (or inclusion cores), the largest {approx}30micron in size, in a thin section of the 74001/2 drill core. The melt is assumed to sample the parent magma of the lunar basalts at depth, evidenced by the S content of the inclusion (600 ppm) which is 400 ppm greater than that of the orange glass host. Such melts potentially contain a full complement of the volatile components of the parent magma, which can be analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

  13. Sulfur's impact on core evolution and magnetic field generation on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, S. A.; Aurnou, J. M.; Dombard, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of the melting relationships of potential core forming materials in Ganymede indicate that convective motions capable of generating the satellite's magnetic field may be driven, in-part, either by iron "snow" forming below the core-mantle boundary or solid iron sulfide floating upward from the deep core. Eutectic melting temperatures in the binary Fe-FeS system decrease with increasing pressure over the interval of core pressures on Ganymede (<14 GPa). Comparison of melting temperatures to adiabatic temperature gradients in the core suggest that solid iron is thermodynamically stable at shallow levels for bulk core compositions more iron-rich than eutectic (i.e., <21 wt % S). Calculations based on high-pressure solid-liquid phase relationships in the Fe-FeS system indicate that Fe snow or floatation of solid FeS, depending on whether the core composition is more or less Fe-rich than eutectic, is an inevitable consequence of cooling Ganymede's core. Our results demonstrate that these conclusions are robust over a wide-range of plausible three-layer internal structures and thermal evolution scenarios. Using scaling arguments based on recent experimental work we estimate core Rossby and magnetic Reynolds numbers plausibly consistent with a dynamo being generated in Ganymede's core via Fe-snow. Depending on core composition, either shallow formation of Fe snow or deep precipitation and subsequent floatation of FeS is an important mechanism for driving the moon's strong internally-generated magnetic field.

  14. Natural melting within a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed on the melting of a phase change medium in a spherical shell. Free expansion of the medium into a void space within the sphere was permitted. A step function temperature jump on the outer shell wall was imposed and the timewise evolution of the melting process and the position of the solid-liquid interface was photographically recorded. Numerical integration of the interface position data yielded information about the melted mass and the energy of melting. It was found that the rate of melting and the heat transfer were significantly affected by the movement of the solid medium to the base of the sphere due to gravity. The energy transfer associated with melting was substantially higher than that predicted by the conduction model. Furthermore, the radio of the measured values of sensible energy in the liquid melt to the energy of melting were nearly proportional to the Stefan number. The experimental results are in agreement with a theory set forth in an earlier paper.

  15. Recent Changes in the Arctic Melt Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Markus, Thorsten; Meier, Walter N.; Miller, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Melt-season duration, melt-onset and freeze-up dates are derived from satellite passive microwave data and analyzed from 1979 to 2005 over Arctic sea ice. Results indicate a shift towards a longer melt season, particularly north of Alaska and Siberia, corresponding to large retreats of sea ice observed in these regions. Although there is large interannual and regional variability in the length of the melt season, the Arctic is experiencing an overall lengthening of the melt season at a rate of about 2 weeks decade(sup -1). In fact, all regions in the Arctic (except for the central Arctic) have statistically significant (at the 99% level or higher) longer melt seasons by greater than 1 week decade(sup -1). The central Arctic shows a statistically significant trend (at the 98% level) of 5.4 days decade(sup -1). In 2005 the Arctic experienced its longest melt season, corresponding with the least amount of sea ice since 1979 and the warmest temperatures since the 1880s. Overall, the length of the melt season is inversely correlated with the lack of sea ice seen in September north of Alaska and Siberia, with a mean correlation of -0.8.

  16. Method and apparatus for melting glass batch

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.; Walkup, Paul C.; Mudge, Lyle K.

    1988-01-01

    A glass melting system involving preheating, precalcining, and prefluxing of batch materials prior to injection into a glass furnace. The precursors are heated by convection rather than by radiation in present furnaces. Upon injection into the furnace, batch materials are intimately coated with molten flux so as to undergo or at least begin the process of dissolution reaction prior to entering the melt pool.

  17. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanuel M.

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  18. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  19. Stabilizing Crystal Oscillators With Melting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Miller, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Heat of fusion provides extended period of constant temperature and frequency. Crystal surrounded by metal in spherical container. As outside temperature rises to melting point of metal, metal starts to liquefy; but temperature stays at melting point until no solid metal remains. Potential terrestrial applications include low-power environmental telemetering transmitters and instrumentation transmitters for industrial processes.

  20. Oxidation and melting of aluminum nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Trunov, Mikhaylo A; Umbrajkar, Swati M; Schoenitz, Mirko; Mang, Joseph T; Dreizin, Edward L

    2006-07-01

    Recently, nanometer-sized aluminum powders became available commercially, and their use as potential additives to propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics has attracted significant interest. It has been suggested that very low melting temperatures are expected for nanosized aluminum powders and that such low melting temperatures could accelerate oxidation and trigger ignition much earlier than for regular, micron-sized aluminum powders. The objective of this work was to investigate experimentally the melting and oxidation behavior of nanosized aluminum powders. Powder samples with three different nominal sizes of 44, 80, and 121 nm were provided by Nanotechnologies Inc. The particle size distributions were measured using small-angle X-ray scattering. Melting was studied by differential scanning calorimetry where the powders were heated from room temperature to 750 degrees C in an argon environment. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to measure the mass increase indicative of oxidation while the powders were heated in an oxygen-argon gas mixture. The measured melting curves were compared to those computed using the experimental particle size distributions and thermodynamic models describing the melting temperature and enthalpy as functions of the particle size. The melting behavior predicted by different models correlated with the experimental observations only qualitatively. Characteristic stepwise oxidation was observed for all studied nanopowders. The observed oxidation behavior was well interpreted considering the recently established kinetics of oxidation of micron-sized aluminum powders. No correlation was found between the melting and oxidation of aluminum nanopowders. PMID:16805619

  1. Summer Melts Immigrant Students' College Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naranjo, Melissa M.; Pang, Valerie Ooka; Alvarado, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Many college-intending students find themselves dealing with the undermatch and summer melt phenomena. Undermatch refers to the situation where academically-successful high-school graduates choose not to go to any college or to go to a local community college not commensurate with their academic achievements. Summer melt describes how students may…

  2. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, P.S.; Korzekwa, D.R.

    1999-10-26

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting is disclosed. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  3. Purification of Niobium by Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, M.; Mirji, K. V.; Prasad, V. V. Satya; Baligidad, R. G.; Gokhale, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure niobium metal, produced by alumino-thermic reduction of niobium oxide, contains various impurities which need to be reduced to acceptable levels to obtain aerospace grade purity. In the present work, an attempt has been made to refine niobium metals by electron beam drip melting technique to achieve purity confirming to the ASTM standard. Input power to the electron gun and melt rate were varied to observe their combined effect on extend of refining and loss of niobium. Electron beam (EB) melting is shown to reduce alkali metals, trace elements and interstitial impurities well below the specified limits. The reduction in the impurities during EB melting is attributed to evaporation and degassing due to the combined effect of high vacuum and high melt surface temperature. The % removal of interstitial impurities is essentially a function of melt rate and input power. As the melt rate decreases or input power increases, the impurity levels in the solidified niobium ingot decrease. The EB refining process is also accompanied by considerable amount of niobium loss, which is attributed to evaporation of pure niobium and niobium sub-oxide. Like other impurities, Nb loss increases with decreasing melt rate or increase in input power.

  4. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one. PMID:11838241

  5. Metallic Recovery and Ferrous Melting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Luis Trueba

    2004-05-30

    The effects of melting atmosphere and charge material type on the metallic and alloy recovery of ferrous charge materials were investigated in two sets of experiments (Tasks 1 and 2). In addition, thermodynamic studies were performed (Task 3) to determine the suitability of ladle treatment for the production of ductile iron using scrap charge materials high in manganese and sulfur. Task 1--In the first set of experiments, the charge materials investigated were thin steel scrap, thick steel scrap, cast iron scrap, and pig iron in the rusty and clean states. Melting atmospheres in this set of experiments were varied by melting with and without a furnace cover. In this study, it was found that neither covered melting nor melting clean (non-rusty) ferrous charge materials improved the metallic recovery over the recovery experienced with uncovered melting or rusty charge materials. However, the silicon and manganese recoveries were greater with covered melting and clean materials. Silicon and manganese in the molten iron react with oxygen dissolved in the iron from uncovered melting and oxidized iron (surface rust). Silica and manganese silicates are formed which float to the slag decreasing recoveries of silicon and manganese. Cast iron and pig iron had higher metallic recoveries than steel scrap. Carbon recovery was affected by the carbon content of the charge materials, and not by the melting conditions. Irons with higher silicon contents had higher silicon recovery than irons with lower silicon contents. Task 2--In the second set of experiments, briquetted turnings and borings were used to evaluate the effects of briquette cleanliness, carbon additions, and melting atmosphere on metallic and alloy recovery. The melting atmosphere in this set of experiments was varied by melting in air and with an argon atmosphere using the SPAL process. In this set of experiments, carbon additions to the briquettes were found to have the greatest effect on metallic and alloy

  6. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  7. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  8. Ice-shelf melting around Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Rignot, E; Jacobs, S; Mouginot, J; Scheuchl, B

    2013-07-19

    We compare the volume flux divergence of Antarctic ice shelves in 2007 and 2008 with 1979 to 2010 surface accumulation and 2003 to 2008 thinning to determine their rates of melting and mass balance. Basal melt of 1325 ± 235 gigatons per year (Gt/year) exceeds a calving flux of 1089 ± 139 Gt/year, making ice-shelf melting the largest ablation process in Antarctica. The giant cold-cavity Ross, Filchner, and Ronne ice shelves covering two-thirds of the total ice-shelf area account for only 15% of net melting. Half of the meltwater comes from 10 small, warm-cavity Southeast Pacific ice shelves occupying 8% of the area. A similar high melt/area ratio is found for six East Antarctic ice shelves, implying undocumented strong ocean thermal forcing on their deep grounding lines. PMID:23765278

  9. The contribution of glacier melt to streamflow

    SciTech Connect

    Schaner, Neil; Voisin, Nathalie; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-09-13

    Ongoing and projected future changes in glacier extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies. However, the current magnitude of glacier contributions to river runoff is not well known, nor is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities are computed as a fraction of total streamflow simulated using a hydrology model and the melt fraction is tracked down the stream network. In general, our estimates of the glacier melt contribution to streamflow are lower than previously published values. Nonetheless, we find that globally an estimated 225 (36) million people live in river basins where maximum seasonal glacier melt contributes at least 10% (25%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region.

  10. Shape evolution of a melting nonspherical particle.

    PubMed

    Kintea, Daniel M; Hauk, Tobias; Roisman, Ilia V; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-09-01

    In this study melting of irregular ice crystals was observed in an acoustic levitator. The evolution of the particle shape is captured using a high-speed video system. Several typical phenomena have been discovered: change of the particle shape, appearance of a capillary flow of the melted liquid on the particle surface leading to liquid collection at the particle midsection (where the interface curvature is smallest), and appearance of sharp cusps at the particle tips. No such phenomena can be observed during melting of spherical particles. An approximate theoretical model is developed which accounts for the main physical phenomena associated with melting of an irregular particle. The agreement between the theoretical predictions for the melting time, for the evolution of the particle shape, and the corresponding experimental data is rather good. PMID:26465561

  11. Ice-Shelf Melting Around Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Jacobs, S.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.

    2013-07-01

    We compare the volume flux divergence of Antarctic ice shelves in 2007 and 2008 with 1979 to 2010 surface accumulation and 2003 to 2008 thinning to determine their rates of melting and mass balance. Basal melt of 1325 ± 235 gigatons per year (Gt/year) exceeds a calving flux of 1089 ± 139 Gt/year, making ice-shelf melting the largest ablation process in Antarctica. The giant cold-cavity Ross, Filchner, and Ronne ice shelves covering two-thirds of the total ice-shelf area account for only 15% of net melting. Half of the meltwater comes from 10 small, warm-cavity Southeast Pacific ice shelves occupying 8% of the area. A similar high melt/area ratio is found for six East Antarctic ice shelves, implying undocumented strong ocean thermal forcing on their deep grounding lines.

  12. Shape evolution of a melting nonspherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintea, Daniel M.; Hauk, Tobias; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-09-01

    In this study melting of irregular ice crystals was observed in an acoustic levitator. The evolution of the particle shape is captured using a high-speed video system. Several typical phenomena have been discovered: change of the particle shape, appearance of a capillary flow of the melted liquid on the particle surface leading to liquid collection at the particle midsection (where the interface curvature is smallest), and appearance of sharp cusps at the particle tips. No such phenomena can be observed during melting of spherical particles. An approximate theoretical model is developed which accounts for the main physical phenomena associated with melting of an irregular particle. The agreement between the theoretical predictions for the melting time, for the evolution of the particle shape, and the corresponding experimental data is rather good.

  13. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Deforming Dunitic Rocks: Applications to Core Formation in Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Core formation is an important event in the evolution of a planetary body, affecting both the geochemical and geophysical properties of the body. Metal-silicate segregation could have proceeded either by settling of liquid metal through a magma ocean or by percolation of liquid metal through a solid silicate mantle. Percolation of metallic melt had previously been excluded as a viable segregation mechanism because metallic melts do not form an interconnected network under hydrostatic conditions, except at high melt fraction (>5 vol%), due to the high dihedral angle between metals and silicates (>60 ). Without an interconnected network, porous flow of metallic melt is impossible, leaving the magma ocean scenario as the only mechanism to form the core. Moment-of-inertia measurements of Europa and Ganymede from the Galileo probe indicate that they are differentiated. This evidence suggests that a method for segregating metals and silicates at temperatures low enough to retain volatile compounds must exist. We have investigated the effect of deformation on the distribution of metallic melts in silicates. We have deformed samples of olivine + 5-9 vol% Fe-S to strains of 2.5 in simple shear and find that the metallic melt segregates into melt-rich planes oriented at 20 to the shear plane. These metallic melt-rich bands are similar in structure to the silicate melt-rich bands reported by Holtzman, indicating that deformation can interconnect isolated metallic melt pockets and allow porous flow of non-wetting melts. Such a core formation process could have occurred in the jovian satellites.

  14. Partial melting in amphibolites in a deep section of the Sveconorwegian Orogen, SW Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Edward; Johansson, Leif; Andersson, Jenny; LaBarge, Leah; Harlov, Daniel; Möller, Charlotte; Vincent, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Garnet amphibolite metataxites at the Steningekusten Nature Reserve in southwestern Sweden contain tonalitic patches and veins. Whole rock chemistry suggests that the protoliths were mafic igneous rocks with alkaline affinities. Orthopyroxene megacrysts are present in leucosome in parts of these garnet amphibolites but absent in others. Orthopyroxene megacrysts were formed by vapor-absent melting initiated by incongruent melting of biotite followed by the breakdown of hornblende. The net reaction was Bt + Hbl + Pl +/- Qtz ↔ Opx + Melt + Cpx + Gt. Melting occurred at pressures of approximately 1 GPa and temperatures which probably exceeded 800 °C. Pyroxenes are surrounded by hornblende-quartz symplectites, and hornblende in these coronas has distinctly lower concentrations of (Na + K) and Ti than that in adjacent mesosome. The hornblende rims formed upon cooling and reaction with crystallizing melt. This created a barrier to further reaction thus preserving the orthopyroxene megacrysts. Garnet amphibolite metatexites lacking pyroxene megacrysts have features characteristic of vapor-present melting including lack of peritectic phases predicted by vapor-absent melting reactions, larger amounts of leucosome (14 versus 7%), and less distinct melanosomes. The variation in these migmatites reflects open system behavior, either on a regional scale with the migration of aqueous fluids into the amphibolites or on a local scale with the migration of melt within the amphibolites. Zircons from all units have CL-dark core domains that are dated at 1415-1390 Ma. The core zones are cut and overgrown by CL-dark and CL-bright rims that are dated at 975-965 Ma. The zircon rims are thin in the mesosome but are thicker in the leucosome suggesting that they formed during migmatization. New growth of zircon associated with migmatization at ca. 970 Ma corresponds to the timing of crustal scale partial melting in the deep regions of the Sveconorwegian orogen, synchronous with east

  15. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Melt Rate Furnace Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-07-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) would like to increase its canister production rate. The goal of this study is to improve the melt rate in DWPF specifically for Macrobatch 3. However, the knowledge gained may result in improved melting efficiencies translating to future DWPF macrobatches and in higher throughput for other Department of Energy's (DOE) melters. Increased melting efficiencies decrease overall operational costs by reducing the immobilization campaign time for a particular waste stream. For melt rate limited systems, a small increase in melting efficiency translates into significant hard dollar savings by reducing life cycle operational costs.

  16. Solid-liquid boundaries in iron-rich alloys and the age of the Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Gao, L.

    2006-05-01

    Melting and solidification cause major chemical differentiation in the Earth. As the Earth cools, the liquid core solidifies from the center and the inner core grows at the expense of the outer core. The timing of the onset of core solidification remains poorly constrained. Labrosse et al. (2001) estimated the age of the Earth's inner core based on energy budget considerations. In their analysis, the latent heat and gravitational energy are calculated according to dislocation melting theory. We have conducted melting experiments on pure iron and an iron-sulfur alloy containing 15 at.% sulfur, in order to determine the effect of pressure on the Clapeyron slopes of the solid-liquid boundaries. Our results allow a critical examination of the energy estimates, hence the age of the inner core. The implications for the budget of radioactive elements will be discussed.

  17. Dynamics of Melting and Melt Migration as Inferred from Incompatible Trace Element Abundance in Abyssal Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    To better understand the melting processes beneath the mid-ocean ridge, we developed a simple model for trace element fractionation during concurrent melting and melt migration in an upwelling steady-state mantle column. Based on petrologic considerations, we divided the upwelling mantle into two regions: a double- lithology upper region where high permeability dunite channels are embedded in a lherzolite/harzburgite matrix, and a single-lithology lower region that consists of partially molten lherzolite. Melt generated in the single lithology region migrates upward through grain-scale diffuse porous flow, whereas melt in the lherzolite/harzburgite matrix in the double-lithology region is allowed to flow both vertically through the overlying matrix and horizontally into its neighboring dunite channels. There are three key dynamic parameters in our model: degree of melting experienced by the single lithology column (Fd), degree of melting experienced by the double lithology column (F), and a dimensionless melt suction rate (R) that measures the accumulated rate of melt extraction from the matrix to the channel relative to the accumulated rate of matrix melting. In terms of trace element fractionation, upwelling and melting in the single lithology column is equivalent to non-modal batch melting (R = 0), whereas melting and melt migration in the double lithology region is equivalent to a nonlinear combination of non-modal batch and fractional melting (0 < R < 1). Given the nonlinear nature of the melting model and uncertainties in trace element data for the abyssal peridotite, we showed, with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, that it is difficult to invert for all three dynamic parameters from a set of incompatible trace element data with confidence. However, given Fd, it is quite possible to constrain F and R from incompatible trace element abundances in residual peridotite. As an illustrative example, we used the simple melting model developed in this study and

  18. Melting and phase relations in the Fe-C-S-O system at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Yingwei

    2010-05-01

    The physical state of the core (liquid outer core and solid inner core) could provide tight constraint on the core temperature if melting temperature of core materials is precisely determined at high pressure. On the other hand, the density of the Earth's core is significantly lower than that of pure iron measured experimentally at high pressure and temperature. The density deficit in the core (both liquid outer core and solid inner core) provides inside into the chemistry of the core, suggesting that the core must contain several weight percent of one or more light elements (lighter than iron) in addition to Fe-Ni alloy. Sulfur (S), carbon (C), and oxygen (O) are the prominent candidates among the proposed light elements, because of their high solar abundance and strong chemical affinity for Fe. Determining the effect of pressure on melting relations in the Fe-S, Fe-C, and Fe-O binary systems and multi-component system is crucial for understanding the chemistry, temperature, and evolution of planetary cores. There has been significant progress in determining the melting relations in the system Fe-FeS at high pressure, using multi-anvil apparatus and laser-heating diamond-anvil cell. These studies have revealed new iron-sulfur compounds (Fe3S2, Fe2S, and Fe3S) stable at high pressures, change of melting relations, and pressure effect on eutectic temperature and composition. The behaviors of the Fe-C and Fe-O systems have also been experimentally investigated recently. Experimental data in the Fe-C-S-O system at high pressure have just emerged. In parallel, there are high-quality data on density measurements of solid and liquid phases at high pressure and temperature. In this study, I present recent advances in experimental techniques and melting relations in the Fe-C-S-O system. The emphasis will be on the need to develop thermodynamic models by synthesis of thermochemical, thermophysical, and phase equilibrium data. The systematic approach provides a better

  19. Rheology of Melt-bearing Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, C. L.; Medvedev, S.; Handy, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    A review and reinterpretation of previous experimental data on the deformation of melt-bearing crustal rocks (Rosenberg and Handy, 2005) revealed that the relationship of aggregate strength to melt fraction is non-linear, even if plotted on a linear ordinate and abscissa. At melt fractions, Φ 0.07, the dependence of aggregate strength on Φ is significantly greater than at Φ > 0.07. This melt fraction (Φ= 0.07) marks the transition from a significant increase in the proportion of melt-bearing grain boundaries up to this point to a minor increase thereafter. Therefore, we suggest that the increase of melt-interconnectivity causes the dramatic strength drop between the solidus and a melt fraction of 0.07. A second strength drop occurs at higher melt fractions and corresponds to the breakdown of the solid (crystal) framework, corresponding to the well-known "rheologically critical melt percentage" (RCMP; Arzi, 1978). Although the strength drop at the RCMP is about 4 orders of magnitude, the absolute value of this drop is small compared to the absolute strength of the unmelted aggregate, rendering the RCMP invisible in a linear aggregate strength vs. melt fraction diagram. Predicting the rheological properties and thresholds of melt-bearing crust on the basis of the results and interpretations above is very difficult, because the rheological data base was obtained from experiments performed at undrained conditions in the brittle field. These conditions are unlikely to represent the flow of partially melted crust. The measured strength of most of the experimentally deformed, partially-melted samples corresponds to their maximum differential stress, before the onset of brittle failure, not to their viscous strength during "ductile" (viscous) flow. To overcome these problems, we extrapolated a theoretically-derived flow law for partially melted granite deforming by diffusion-accommodated grain-boundary sliding (Paterson, 2001) and an experimentally-derived flow law for

  20. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  1. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  2. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    PubMed Central

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youn Cheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon; Sakellariou, George; Allgaier, Jürgen; Takano, Atsushi; Brás, Ana R.; Chang, Taihyun; Gooßen, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Richter, Dieter; Rubinstein, Michael; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/η0,ring=2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of rings viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1

  3. Olivine flotation in mantle melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, Carl B.; Walker, David

    1993-01-01

    Molten komatiite and peridotite have been compressed in an octahedral multi-anvil device up to 10 GPa. Densities of the melts were measured at pressure intervals in the range 7 to 10 GPa by observing sinking and floating San Carlos olivines and synthetic forsterite marker spheres. The multi-anvil results for komatiite, when combined with piston-cylinder measurements done at 4 to 6 GPa and a calculated reference density at 10 5 Pa, yield a Birch-Murnaghan isothermal bulk modulus of (K 1900C) = 26 GPa and pressure derivative K' = 4.25. The pressure of neutral buoyancy for olivine in komatiite is confirmed to be near 8 GPa as predicted in earlier work. Olivine flotation in the experimental komatiite commences at a pressure close to where the liquidus phase changes from olivine to denser garnet, leading to the possibility of density driven crystal sorting during fractionation. Molten peridotite (KLB-1) shows an isothermal compression (2000°C) of 0.065 g cm -3 GPa -1 in the interval 10 5 Pa to 8.2 GPa. The olivine/liquid peridotite density crossover is predicted to lie between 9 and 11 GPa, indicating that olivine flotation can operate at depths of 300-500 km in a molten peridotitic mantle.

  4. Water diffusion in phonolite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Blum-Oeste, Nils; Flagmeier, Jens

    2013-04-01

    We report an experimental study of total water diffusion (irrespective of water speciation) in two different phonolite melts, which are representative of Montaña Blanca, Tenerife, Spain (MBP) and Laacher See, East Eifel, Germany (LSP-II). Both phonolites have Na-rich compositions, but differ in their alumina saturation index, with MBP being peralkaline and LSP-II being slightly peraluminous. Diffusion couple experiments for MBP were performed at 200-250 MPa in the temperature range of 800-1050 °C and water contents between 1 and 6.5 wt.%. Due to higher liquidus temperatures of LSP-II, the accessible temperature and water concentration range was reduced to 875-1050 °C and 3-6.5 wt.% water. All experiments were performed in rapid quench cold-seal pressure vessels, which enabled rapid heating and quenching of the samples within seconds. Compared to the run durations of 30-90 min, these short heating and cooling periods can be neglected and no corrections needed to be applied for the calculation of the diffusion coefficients. Water diffusion profiles were determined by FT-IR micro-spectroscopy on doubly polished glass sections and the diffusion coefficients were determined by Boltzmann-Matano analysis. Water diffusion increases with increasing water content and temperature and follows the empirical relations:

  5. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material through Porous Debris in Lower Head (Rev. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, Larry James

    1999-10-01

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material my permeate in about 120 s to the bottom of a 1 m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material at the bottom of the debris bed decreases the thermal resistance of the interface between the debris bed and the lower head. This report is a revision of the report with the identifier of INEEL/EXT-98-01178 REV 1, entitled "SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material Through Porous Debris in Lower Head."

  6. Metamorphism and partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Calculated phase equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. E.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the metamorphic pressures (P) and temperatures (T) recorded by meteorites is key to understanding the size and thermal history of their asteroid parent bodies. New thermodynamic models calibrated to very low P for minerals and melt in terrestrial mantle peridotite permit quantitative investigation of high-T metamorphism in ordinary chondrites using phase equilibria modelling. Isochemical P-T phase diagrams based on the average composition of H, L and LL chondrite falls and contoured for the composition and abundance of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and chromite provide a good match with values measured in so-called equilibrated (petrologic type 4-6) samples. Some compositional variables, in particular Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, exhibit a strong pressure dependence when considered over a range of several kilobars, providing a means of recognising meteorites derived from the cores of asteroids with radii of several hundred kilometres, if such bodies existed at that time. At the low pressures (<1 kbar) that typify thermal metamorphism, several compositional variables are good thermometers. Although those based on Fe-Mg exchange are likely to have been reset during slow cooling, those based on coupled substitution, in particular Ca and Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, are less susceptible to retrograde diffusion and are potentially more faithful recorders of peak conditions. The intersection of isopleths of these variables may allow pressures to be quantified, even at low P, permitting constraints on the minimum size of parent asteroid bodies. The phase diagrams predict the onset of partial melting at 1050-1100 °C by incongruent reactions consuming plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, whose compositions change abruptly as melting proceeds. These predictions match natural observations well and support the view that type 7 chondrites represent a suprasolidus continuation of the established petrologic

  7. TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel.

  8. Calorie restriction lowers body temperature in rhesus monkeys, consistent with a postulated anti-aging mechanism in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, M A; Baer, D J; Rumpler, W V; Weindruch, R; Ingram, D K; Tilmont, E M; Cutler, R G; Roth, G S

    1996-01-01

    Many studies of caloric restriction (CR) in rodents and lower animals indicate that this nutritional manipulation retards aging processes, as evidenced by increased longevity, reduced pathology, and maintenance of physiological function in a more youthful state. The anti-aging effects of CR are believed to relate, at least in part, to changes in energy metabolism. We are attempting to determine whether similar effects occur in response to CR in nonhuman primates. Core (rectal) body temperature decreased progressively with age from 2 to 30 years in rhesus monkeys fed ad lib (controls) and is reduced by approximately 0.5 degrees C in age-matched monkeys subjected to 6 years of a 30% reduction in caloric intake. A short-term (1 month) 30% restriction of 2.5-year-old monkeys lowered subcutaneous body temperature by 1.0 degrees C. Indirect calorimetry showed that 24-hr energy expenditure was reduced by approximately 24% during short-term CR. The temporal association between reduced body temperature and energy expenditure suggests that reductions in body temperature relate to the induction of an energy conservation mechanism during CR. These reductions in body temperature and energy expenditure are consistent with findings in rodent studies in which aging rate was retarded by CR, now strengthening the possibility that CR may exert beneficial effects in primates analogous to those observed in rodents. PMID:8633033

  9. Terrestrial impact melt rocks and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    2001-12-01

    The effects of meteorite and comet impact on Earth are rock brecciation, the formation of shock metamorphic features, rock melting, and the formation of impact structures, i.e. simple craters, complex craters, and multi-ring basins. Large events, such as the 65-Ma Chicxulub impact, are believed to have had catastrophic environmental effects that profoundly influenced the development of life on Earth. In this review, an attempt is made to summarize some of the voluminous literature on impact melting, one important aspect of planetary impact, provide some comments on this process, and to make suggestions for future research. The products of impact melting are glasses, impact melt rocks, and pseudotachylites. Our treatise deals mainly with the geological setting, petrography, and major-element chemistry of melt rocks and glasses. Impact glasses, in several petrographic aspects, are similar to volcanic glasses, but they are associated with shock metamorphosed mineral and rock fragments and, in places, with siderophile element anomalies suggestive of meteoritic contamination. They are found in allogenic breccia deposits within (fall-back 'suevite') and outside (fall-out 'suevite') impact craters and, as spherules, in distal ejecta. Large events, such as the K/T boundary Chicxulub impact, are responsible for the formation of worldwide ejecta horizons which are associated with siderophile element anomalies and shock metamorphosed mineral and rock debris. Impact glasses have a bulk chemical composition that is homogeneous but exemptions to this rule are common. On a microscopic scale, however, impact glasses are commonly strikingly heterogeneous. Tektites are glasses ejected from craters over large distances. They are characterized by very low water and volatile contents and element abundances and ratios that are evidence that tektites formed by melting of upper crustal, sedimentary rocks. Four tektite strewn-fields are known, three of which can be tied to specific impact

  10. Mixed burden softening and melting phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Pallav

    The blast furnace (BF) will remain the major iron producing unit for the foreseeable future. The cohesive zone, where ferrous materials soften and melt, affects the productivity of the BF. This research was focused on expanding the current understanding of the mechanism of softening and melting of the ferrous materials. The other objective of this project was to examine the potential use of direct reduced iron (DRI) and hot briquetted iron (HBI) as the BF burden. The materials used in this study were DRI, HBI, lump iron ore and pellets. A wide variety of experimental procedures were employed to completely understand the process phenomena. The softening and melting (SM) experiments were conducted under load and X-Ray fluoroscopy was used to visualize the process. The results of these experiments were conducive in determining a suitable mechanism of softening and melting of the burden. For single burdens of DRI and HBI, softening occurred when metal began to melt. For mixed burdens of DRI and pellets/lump ore, the initial deformation was not affected by DRI; however DRI dominated as the temperature increased and melting occurred only when DRI melted. Melt dripping was observed at temperatures close to meltdown. A FactSage slag model was used to obtain the evolution of liquid with temperature. It was compared with the bed shrinkage which indicated that the most likely reason of the softening of the burden is the deformation of solid, phases, especially iron. The bulk SM experiments were interrupted at temperatures of interest and samples were examined for the morphological changes. These experiments were instrumental in studying the burden interaction at different stages during softening and melting of the burden. In addition, in separate experiments (without load), the melting structure of DRI/HBI samples was studied. The results of these experiments were expanded to include viscosity, surface energy and deformation rate calculations which were helpful in

  11. Melt segregation in plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewins, R. H.; Harriott, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Budalan and Mincy mesosiderites contain a poikilitic-plagioclase matrix with orthopyroxene chadacrysts and interstitial-subophitic inverted pigeonite. Orthopyroxene chadacrysts in both mesosiderites are uniformly more aluminous than orthopyroxene clasts, suggesting that they were not derived from clasts by metamorphism. Interstitial inverted pigeonite is more ferroan than adjacent orthopyroxene in the matrix, consistent with the crystallization of a melt with the sequence orthopyroxene followed by pigeonite. The magnesium chadcrysts in Mincy could not have formed from a melt in equilibrium with the clasts but could have crystallized from impact melt. The most Mg chadacrysts are enclosed in large reversely zoned plagioclase crystals as a result of the undercooling in melt-lacking plagioclase clasts and associated nuclei. Mincy contains both plagioclase-poor and plagioclase-rich regions, explained by a separation of silicate melt into pools. Reckling Peak A80258, a plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderite with a very high chadacryst/plagioclase ratio, resembles Mincy material from which melt has been extracted. It is suggested that the origin of the plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites is impact melting of a metal-silicate mixture.

  12. Partial melting of subducting oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Simon M.; Rushmer, Tracy; Thompson, Alan Bruce

    1994-01-01

    The conditions under which partial melting of subducting oceanic crust occurs can be determined by combining a partial melting model for basaltic compositions with two-dimensional thermal models of subduction zones. For porosities of approximately 1% containing H2O the amount of partial melt generated at the wet basaltic solidus is limited to less than 5 vol%. At higher temperatures (approximately 1000 C at 1.5 GPa) large amounts of partial melt, up to 50 vol%, form by the breakdown of amphibole and the release of structurally bound H2O. In most subduction zones, substantial partial melting of subducting oceanic crust will only occur if high shear stresses (greater than approximately 100 MPa) can be maintained by rocks close to, or above, their melting temperatures. In the absence of high shear stresses, substantial melting of the oceanic crust will only occur during subduction of very young (less than 5 Ma) oceanic lithosphere. Partial melting of hydrated basalt (amphibolites) derived from the mid-ocean ridge has been proposed as being responsible for the generation of certain recent high-Al andesitic to dacitic volcanic rocks (adakites). Three of these volcanic suites (Mount St. Helens, southern Chile, and Panama) occur in volcanic arcs where oceanic crust less than 25 Ma is being subducted at rates of 1 - 3 cm/yr and the calculated thermal regime is several hundreds of degrees hotter than more typical subduction zone environments. However, oceanic lithosphere is not currently being subducted beneath Baja and New Guinea, where recent adakites are also present, suggesting that some adakite magmas may form by water-undersaturated partial melting of underplated mafic lower crust or previously subducted oceanic crust. Further experimental work on compositions representative of oceanic crust is required to define the depth of possible adakite source regions more accurately.

  13. Kinetics of Melting and Applications to Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, James Paul

    1997-12-01

    The congruent melting kinetics of Amelia albite were experimentally determined at 1125o C,/ 1150o C,/ 1175o C, and 1200o C. It was determined that congruent melting is a heterogeneous process. Melting is initiated at external surfaces and cleavage planes. Melting kinetics of albite are best described using a normal growth model. Congruent melting of albite was found to be interface controlled, and rates of melting are directly proportional to the amount of superheat, and inversely proportional to viscosity. Comparison of the results obtained here with previous studies of melting kinetics on other materials (oxides and silicates) finds that the normal growth model can be used to predict melting rates within an order of magnitude. The normal growth model was used to predict congruent melting rates of forsterite and enstatite as well as other minerals which may have been present in the chondrule forming region of the solar nebula. Constraints on the peak temperatures of chondrule formation are thus obtained. Specifically, chondrules containing relict grains of forsteritic olivine and enstatitic pyroxene could not have been heated above 1901o C and 1577o C, respectively, for more than a few seconds. Reanalyses of Na-Al-rich chondrule glasses by EPMA have found that previous EPMA work resulted in loss of Na from the activated volume due to migration in an electrical potential gradient. The Na-Al-rich chondrules have Na/Al ratios of unity, suggesting that they did not lose alkalis during flash heating. Experiments reproduced the chondrule glasses and determined the formational constraints of these chondrules. Specifically, the chondrules needed to have been cooled at low rates (<6o C/hr) at the lower temperature end of chondrule formation.

  14. Melt migration through Io's convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, C. M.; Showman, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The extensive volcanism occurring on the surface of Io suggests that its interior must contain at least some partial melt. Unlike Earth, Io cannot lose its internal heat through convection alone [1]. Instead, melt moving through the solid mantle helps remove heat from Io's interior by carrying its latent heat towards the surface as it buoyantly ascends through the mantle. We investigate this process by considering melt migration in a column of rock rising through the mantle between downwelling plumes. Convective scaling laws provide the upwelling velocity and the temperature of the rising mantle. Properties of melt migration in this rising mantle are calculated using porous flow equations and an equation for the conservation of energy which includes latent heat consumption, heat advection and heat conduction [2]. This combination of convective scaling laws and porous flow laws allows us to self-consistently determine the radial melt fraction profile in Io's interior, the average melt fraction in Io's interior and the heat flux due to advection of melt. The average melt fraction can be compared to the melt fraction constraints calculated by [3] from Galileo magnetometer measurements. The surface heat flux calculations can be compared to the value of Io's observed surface heat flux which ranges with observation from 1.5-4 W m-2 [4]. [1] Moore W. B. (2003) J. Geophys. Res., 108, E8, 15-1. [2] Hewitt I. J. and Fowler A. C. (2008) Proc. R. Soc. A., 464, 2467-2491. [3] Khurana K. K. et al. (2011) Science, 332, 1186-1189. [4] Moore, W. B. et al. (2007) In: Io After Galileo, Springer-Praxis, 89-108.

  15. The parent magma of the nakhlite meteorites - Clues from melt inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Ralph P.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Several forms of trapped liquid found within nakhlite meteorites have been examined, including interstitial melt and magmatic inclusions within the cores of large olivine grains. Differences in the mineralogy and texture between two types of trapped melt inclusions, and between these inclusions and the mesostasis, indicate that vitrophyric inclusions are most appropriate for estimating the composition of a nakhlite parental magma in equilibrium with early-forming olivine and augite. Parent liquids were calculated from the mineralogy of large inclusions in Nakhla and Governador Valadares, using a system of mass-balance equations solved by linear regression methods. The chosen parental liquids were cosaturated in olivine and augite and had Mg/Fe values consistent with measured augite/liquid Kds. These parental magma compositions are similar to other published compositions for Nakhla, Chassigny, and Shergotty parental melts, and may correspond to a significant magma type on Mars.

  16. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas A.; Bruce, Thomas J., Jr.; Hackman, Lloyd E.; Brasmer, Susan E.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Baeslack, William A., III

    1989-01-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  17. Retention of sodium during chondrule melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewins, R. H.

    1991-04-01

    Using published data, the differences in Na concentrations in different groups of porphyritic olivine chondrules are analyzed. The results show that Na was incorporated into type II chondrule precursors as albite and was not significantly lost during melting. Type I chondrules, which contain very low concentrations of Na, were also not depleted in Na during melting, as indicated by the lack of correlation between the Na/Al ratios and the liquidus temperatures in type I chondrules. It is concluded that the difference in Na concentration is caused by the abundance of precursor albite in type II chondrules, rather than the loss of Na from the melt.

  18. Melt Segregation and Tidal Heating at Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendar, A.; Dufek, J.; Roberts, J. H.; Paty, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence of melt beneath Io's surface (Khurana et al., 2010) and repeated observation of volcanic activity and features consistent with volcanic activity at the surface (e.g. Veeder et al, 1994; Rathbun et al., 2004; Lopes-Gautier et al., 1999; Smith et al., 1979) has raised further questions about the structure of the Galilean moon and the processes that shape it. In this study we examine the thermal state, melt fraction, and multiphase dynamics of melt segregation within Io's interior. Using a coupled multiphase dynamics and tidal heating model we explore the location, spatial extent, and temporal residence times of melt in Io's subsurface, as well as response to orbital parameters. In a thermally evolving body subject to tidal forcing, in which melt production and migration takes place, feedback can occur with respect to the physical and thermal properties. We explore this feedback to produce a thermal model of Io, taking into account the rate of tidal heating and fluid motion within the interior. First, a layered model of the internal structure is assumed. The equations of motion for forced oscillations in a layered spherical body are then solved using the propagator matrix method (Sabadini and Vermeesen, 2004) to obtain the displacements and strains due to tidal motion (Roberts and Nimmo, 2008). From this, the radial distribution of tidal heat generation within Io is calculated. This radial heating profile is then used as input for a multi-phase fluid model in order to obtain an estimate of the radial temperature distribution and thus the material properties and melt fractions. In the multiphase model individual phases (melt and solid residue) separately conserve mass, momentum and enthalpy (Dufek and Bachmann, 2010) allowing us to explore melt segregation phenomena. Enthalpy closure is provided by the MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995) thermodynamics algorithm, which is called at each point in space. This accounts for the partitioning between latent and

  19. Inverse melting in stressed fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchut, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The emissive properties of proton implanted fused silica surfaces have been studied by laser beam annealing. When submitted to a high thermal step from a focused CO2 laser, an intense near infra-red thermoluminescence peak rises at a heating rate threshold. The in plane tensile stress relaxes and silica melts. We show that in the irreversible inverse melting of stressed fused silica, the protons exo-diffuse through internal modes coupling. The heat and mass transfer is one entropy flux whose dynamics are regulated by the mass transport. Inverse melting is the thermodynamic process that initiates the glass transition when heating.

  20. Physics of the Lindemann melting rule

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of melting for 74 distinct chemical elements including several actinides and rare earths. We find that the observed melting points are consistent with a linear relationship between the correlation entropy of the liquid and the Grueneisen constant of the solid, and that the Lindemann rule is well obeyed for the elements with simple structures and less well obeyed for the less symmetric more open structures. No special assumptions are required to explain the melting points of the rare earths or light actinides.

  1. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.A.; Bruce, T.J. Jr.; Hackman, L.E.; Brasmer, S.E.; Dantzig, J.A.; Baeslack, W.A. III.

    1989-09-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  2. Composition of Impact Melt Debris from the Eltanin Impact Strewn Field, Bellingshausen Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of the km-sized Eltanin asteroid into the Bellingshausen Sea produced mm- to cm-sized vesicular impact melt-rock particles found in sediment cores across a large area of the ocean floor. These particles are composed mainly of olivine and glass with minor chromite and traces of NiFe-sulfides. Some particles have inclusions of unmelted mineral and rock fragments from the precursor asteroid. Although all samples of melt rock examined have experienced significant alteration since their deposition in the late Pliocene, a significant portion of these particles have interiors that remain pristine and can be used to estimate the bulk composition of the impact melt. The bulk composition of the melt-rock particles is similar to the composition of basaltic meteorites such as howardites or mesosiderite silicates, with a contribution from seawater salts and a siderophile-rich component. There is no evidence that the Eltanin impact melt contains a significant terrestrial silicate component that might have been incorporated by mixing of the projectile with oceanic crust. If terrestrial silicates were incorporated into the melt, then their contribution must be much less than 10 wt%. Since excess K, Na, and CI are not present in seawater proportions, uptake of these elements into the melt must have been greatest for K and least for CI, producing a K/CI ratio about 4 times that in seawater. After correcting for the seawater component, the bulk composition of the Eltanin impact melt provides the best estimate of the bulk composition of the Eltanin asteroid. Excess Fe in the impact melt, relative to that in howardites, must be from a significant metal phase in the parent asteroid. Although the estimated Fe:Ni:Ir ratios (8:1:4 x 10(exp -5)) are similar to those in mesosiderite metal nodules (10:1:6 x 10(exp -5), excess Co and Au by factors of about 2 and 10 times, respectively, imply a metal component distinct from that in typical mesosiderites. An alternative interpretation

  3. Manufacturing and characterization of encapsulated microfibers with different molecular weight poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) resins using a melt electrospinning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jason K.; Ko, Junghyuk; Jun, Martin B. G.; Lee, Patrick C.

    2016-02-01

    Encapsulated structures of poly(ε-caprolactone) microfibers were successfully fabricated through two distinct melt electrospinning methods: melt coaxial and melt-blending electrospinning methods. Both methods resulted in encapsulated microfibers, but the resultant microfibers had different morphologies. Melt coaxial electrospinning formed a dual, semi-concentric structure, whereas melt-blending electrospinning resulted in an islands-in-a-sea fiber structure (i.e. a multiple-core structure). The encapsulated microfibers were produced using a custom-designed melt coaxial electrospinning device and the microfibers were characterized using a scanning electron microscope. To analyze the properties of the melt blended encapsulated fibers and coaxial fibers, the microfiber mesh specimens were collected. The mechanical properties of each microfiber mesh were analyzed through a tensile test. The coaxial microfiber meshes were post processed with a femtosecond laser machine to create dog-bone shaped tensile test specimens, while the melt blended microfiber meshes were kept as-fabricated. The tensile experiments undertaken with coaxial microfiber specimens resulted in an increase in tensile strength compared to 10 k and 45 k monolayer specimens. However, melt blended microfiber meshes did not result in an increase in tensile strength. The melt blended microfiber mesh results indicate that by using greater amounts of 45 k PCL resin within the microstructure, the resulting fibers obtain a higher tensile strength.

  4. Structural, petro-geochemical and modelling constraints on melt migration by porosity waves in sub-arc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, P.; Connolly, J. A.; Schaltegger, U.; Burg, J.; Chiaradia, M.

    2009-12-01

    Petrographic and structural observations in the mantle lithospheres provided evidence for two end-member processes of melt migration in natural rocks: (1) impregnation features indicate pervasive flow and (2) dykes denote fully segregated flow. Replacive dunite represents an intermediate mode in which porous flow has been channelized. Because the retrograde thermal regime in the upper portion of the mantle wedge is hostile to melt transport, the dominant mechanism by which melts ascend from their source through the mantle remains uncertain. We studied the petro-structural features of melt percolation in a exhumed sub-arc mantle section of the Sapat area in the Kohistan Paleo-Island Arc (NE Pakistan). Our observations indicate a continuum of transport mechanisms ranging from pervasive to fully segregated melt flow: The dominantly harzburgitic mantle section of Sapat exposes tens to hundred of meters size dunitic domains, which comprises clinopyroxene-rich cores associated with gabbroic lenses. The clinopyroxene zones show isolated Cpx blasts, aligned Cpx “trails” and Cpx bands. Gabbro lenses are 3-dimensional lenses terminated horizontally and vertically by clinopyroxene proto-lenses. Proto-lenses refer to Cpx bands prior to plagioclase appearance. Based on bulk and mineral composition, dunite zones formed by orthopyroxene dissolution and olivine crystallization via the peritectic reaction opx + melt = ol; and clinopyroxene-rich parts and gabbros were recognized to have formed from the same melt as dunite. The melt forming gabbros and cpx-rich parts were in near-equilibrium with dunite, but not with the surrounding harzburgite. The structural relationships (i.e parallelism of gabbroic lenses and cpx-trails, and 3D evolution of trails into gabbroic lenses) strengthen the co-genetic origin of the lithologies. Isolated clinopyroxene porphyroblasts evolve into trails that turn into bands in which plagioclase appears. From these observations we infer that the

  5. The axial melt lens as a processor of evolved melts at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loocke, M. P.; Lissenberg, J. C. J.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The axial melt lens is a steady-state, generally magma-rich body located at the dyke-gabbro transition at mid-crustal levels beneath intermediate- and fast-spreading ridges. It is widely believed to be the reservoir from which mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupts. Using a remotely-operated vehicle, cruise JC21 to the Hess Deep Rift recovered the first comprehensive sample suite of the uppermost plutonics from a fast-spreading ridge. We present the results of a detailed microanalytical investigation of 23 samples (8 dolerites, 14 gabbronorites, and 1 gabbro) recovered by ROV dive 78 from a section traversing the transition from the uppermost gabbros into the sheeted dykes. With the exception of a single olivine-bearing sample (78R-6), dive 78 is dominated by evolved, varitextured (both in hand sample and thin section) oxide gabbronorites. Full thin section quantitative element maps were acquired on serial thin sections from each sample using the analytical scanning electron microscope in the at Cardiff University. The resulting maps were post-processed in MatlabTM to determine the full distribution of plagioclase compositions across entire thin sections (typically 500,000 analyses per sample); an approach we term 'quantitative assessment of compositional distribution' (QACD). By so doing we are able to conduct the first fully rigorous assessment of gabbro compositions, and, by extension, melt compositions present at this level beneath the ridge axis. Critically, we only found 2 grains of high-An plagioclase (An>80) in all of the samples (N = 51). These occur as cores within a sample dominated by lower-An plagioclase. Instead, the vast majority (75%) of plagioclase within the samples have compositions of An65 or lower; compositions too evolved to be in equilibrium with MORB. The most primitive sample, 78R-6, is an olivine-bearing gabbronorite with Fo67 olivine, and plagioclase ranging from An52-77 (median An = 65). These data are difficult to reconcile with models in

  6. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  7. Generation of liquid water on Mars through the melting of a dusty snowpack

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that snowmelt could have provided liquid water for valley network formation early in the history of Mars is investigated using an optical-thermal model developed for dusty snowpacks at temperate latitudes. The heating of the postulated snow is assumed to be driven primarily by the absorption of solar radiation during clear sky conditions. Radiative heating rates are predicted as a function of depth and shown to be sensitive to the dust concentration and the size of the ice grains while the thermal conductivity is controlled by temperature, atmospheric pressure, and bulk density. Rates of metamorphism indicate that fresh fine-grained snow on Mars would evolve into moderately coarse snow during a single summer season. Results from global climate models are used to constrain the mean-annual surface temperatures for snow and the atmospheric exchange terms in the surface energy balance. Mean-annual temperatures within Martian snowpacks fail to reach the melting point for all atmospheric pressures below 1000 mbar despite a predicted temperature enhancement beneath the surface of the snowpacks. When seasonal and diurnal variations in the incident solar flux are included in the model, melting occurs at midday during the summer for a wide range of snow types and atmospheric pressures if the dust levels in the snow exceed 100 ppmw (parts per million by weight). The optimum dust concentration appears to be about 1000 ppmw. With this dust load, melting can occur in the upper few centimeters of a dense coarse-grained snow at atmospheric pressures as low as 7 mbar. Snowpack thickness and the thermal conductivity of the underlying substrate determine whether the generated snow-melt can penetrate to the snowpack base, survive basal ice formation, and subsequently become available for runoff. Under favorable conditions, liquid water becomes available for runoff at atmospheric pressures as low as 30 to 100 mbar if the substrate is composed of regolith, as is expected

  8. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  9. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to

  10. Cu refertilization of abyssal harzburgites by melt percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciazela, Jakub; Dick, Henry; Koepke, Juergen; Botcharnikov, Roman; Muszynski, Andrzej; Kuhn, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Primitive mantle is depleted in many elements by partial melting processes, but it can be subsequently refertilized by impregnation with percolating melts. It is known that Cu can be enriched in primitive melts, depleting mantle residue, due to the former process (Patten et al. 2013). However, the behavior of Cu in the processes of mantle-melt interaction is poorly understood. The only comprehensive study is based on compositions of orogenic peridotites, representing the subcontinental mantle (Lorand et al. 1993; 2013), where a moderate enrichment of the mantle in Cu (up to ~50 ppm) has been observed. Here, we present the first results obtained for a suite of rocks from an oceanic core complex (OCC), the Kane Megamullion at 22°30'N at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Dick et al. 2008). OCC's provide large exposures of mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor on detachment fault footwalls at slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. The mantle rocks are composed of spinel and plagioclase harzburgites. The spinel harzburgites represent depleted mantle, whereas the plagioclase harzburgites were formed by subsequent late-stage melt impregnation in the depleted mantle (Dick et al. 2010). We have determined Cu concentrations in 22 residual spinel harzburgites and 4 plagioclase harzburgites using total digestion ICP-MS. The average Cu concentration in spinel harzburgites is 35±11 ppm Cu (2σ). The average Cu concentration obtained for plagioclase harzburgites is 131±33 ppm Cu (2σ). Additionally, we have analyzed one 1.5 cm thick contact zone between an oxide gabbro vein and residual peridotite. The contact zone, which has been heavily impregnated by the melt, contains 284 ppm Cu. In contrast, the neighboring oxide gabbro vein and the hosting peridotite contain 147 and 68 ppm Cu, respectively. Furthermore, we have determined the concentration of Cu in a dunite (118 ppm), formed in a reaction between the mantle and melt ascending through the lithosphere (Dick et al. 2010

  11. Geochemical Comparison of Four Cores from the Manson Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Rockow, Kaylynn M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Haskin, Larry A.; McCarville, Peter; Crossey, Laura J.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of 33 elements were determined in relatively unaltered, matrix-rich samples of impact breccia at approximately 3-m-depth intervals in the M-1 core from the Manson impact structure, Iowa. In addition, 46 matrix-rich samples from visibly altered regions of the M-7, M-8, and M-10 cores were studied, along with 42 small clasts from all four cores. Major element compositions were determined for a subset of impact breccias from the M-1 core, including matrix-rich impact-melt breccia. Major- and trace-element compositions were also determined for a suite of likely target rocks. In the M-1 core, different breccia units identified from lithologic examination of cores are compositionally distinct. There is a sharp compositional discontinuity at the boundary between the Keweenawan-shale-clast breccia and the underlying unit of impact-melt breccia (IMB) for most elements, suggesting minimal physical mixing between the two units during emplacement. Samples from the 40-m-thick IMB (M-1) are all similar to each other in composition, although there are slight increases in concentration with depth for those elements that have high concentrations in the underlying fragmental-matrix suevite breccia (SB) (e.g., Na, Ca, Fe, Sc), presumably as a result of greater clast proportions at the bottom margin of the unit of impact-melt breccia. The high degree of compositional similarity we observe in the impact-melt breccias supports the interpretation that the matrix of this unit represents impact melt. That our analyses show such compositional similarity results in part from our technique for sampling these breccias: for each sample we analyzed a few small fragments (total mass: approximately 200 mg) selected to be relatively free of large clasts and visible signs of alteration instead of subsamples of powders prepared from a large mass of breccia. The mean composition of the matrix-rich part of impact-melt breccia from the M-1 core can be modeled as a mixture of approximately

  12. The Role of Black Carbon from Wildfires in Accelerating Snow and Glacier Melt in Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Delaney, I.; Pittenger, D.; Skiles, M.

    2014-12-01

    In Washington, snow and glacier melt provide an important source of water resources, however spring snowpack levels are declining and glaciers are retreating. While warming temperatures are a well-recognized factor contributing to snowpack decline and glacier retreat, another cause may be the deposition of black carbon (BC) onto snow and glacier surfaces. Since 2010 we have collected snow and ice core samples to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of BC deposited in Washington snow and glacier ice. BC concentrations in the winter snowpack are relatively low, with BC concentrations increasing in spring and summer due to melt induced enrichment and increased dry deposition. BC induced melt may accelerate the timing of spring snowmelt at lower elevations, however BC induced melt is likely largest at relatively high elevations where the snowpack persists into the summer months when BC concentrations were observed to be highest. Based on our research to date, the highest BC concentrations in Washington snow and ice are linked to forest fires. A shallow ice core retrieved from Mt. Olympus demonstrated that BC deposition was a magnitude higher during the 2011 Big Hump forest fire, resulting in a threefold increase in the rate of change of river discharge due to glacier melt. An ice core from South Cascade Glacier spanning the 20th century also suggests that the highest BC concentrations are associated with forest fires. Furthermore, burned areas can continue to provide a source of BC to the snowpack post-fire. We measured BC concentrations in snow at a study site from 2010-2013 in Washington State. The surrounding forest burned in 2012, after which BC deposited on the snowpack post-fire was at least four-fold higher than pre-fire. This research has implications for projected climate change, as forest fires are projected to increase and the seasonal snowpack is projected to decrease, both of which contribute to higher BC concentrations in the snowpack.

  13. Cloud screening and melt water detection over melting sea ice using AATSR/SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With the onset of melt in the Arctic Ocean, the fraction of melt water on sea ice, the melt pond fraction, increases. The consequences are: the reduced albedo of sea ice, increased transmittance of sea ice and affected heat balance of the system with more heat passing through the ice into the ocean, which facilitates further melting. The onset of melt, duration of melt season and melt pond fraction are good indicators of the climate state of the Arctic and its change. In the absence of reliable sea ice thickness retrievals in summer, melt pond fraction retrieval from satellite is in demand as input for GCM as an indicator of melt state of the sea ice. The retrieval of melt pond fraction with a moderate resolution radiometer as AATSR is, however, a non-trivial task due to a variety of subpixel surface types with very different optical properties, which give non-unique combinations if mixed. In this work this has been solved by employing additional information on the surface and air temperature of the pixel. In the current work, a concept of melt pond detection on sea ice is presented. The basis of the retrieval is the sensitivity of AATSR reflectance channels 550nm and 860nm to the amount of melt water on sea ice. The retrieval features extensive usage of a database of in situ surface albedo spectra. A tree of decisions is employed to select the feasible family of in situ spectra for the retrieval, depending on the melt stage of the surface. Reanalysis air temperature at the surface and brightness temperature measured by the satellite sensor are analyzed in order to evaluate the melting status of the surface. Case studies for FYI and MYI show plausible retrieved melt pond fractions, characteristic for both of the ice types. The developed retrieval can be used to process the historical AATSR (2002-2012) dataset, as well as for the SLSTR sensor onboard the future Sentinel-3 mission (scheduled for launch in 2015), to keep the continuity and obtain longer time sequence

  14. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction

  15. Liquidus Temperatures in the Iron - Sulfur System and Melting of Fe3S at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagle, C. T.; Heinz, D. L.; Campbell, A. J.; Miller, N.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2007-12-01

    The details of binary iron-light element systems at pressures relevant to the core can be used to constrain core composition and temperature. We have conducted several experiments in the iron-sulfur system using the diamond anvil cell. Compositions of 10 and 16 weight percent sulfur were used with angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and double-sided laser heating at Sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source. Melting was determined by the disappearance of diffraction lines associated with the liquidus phase upon raising the temperature above the liquidus, and the reappearance of those reflections upon lowering the temperature below the liquidus. Fe3S melts incongruently at 21 GPa and continues this behavior up to higher pressures. Liquidus temperatures at 10 wt. % sulfur have been determined up to 155 GPa.

  16. Experimental alteration of artificial and natural impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Declercq, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, P.; Jahren, J.; Ferrell, R.E., Jr.; Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The alteration or transformation of impact melt rock to clay minerals, particularly smectite, has been recognized in several impact structures (e.g., Ries, Chicxulub, Mj??lnir). We studied the experimental alteration of two natural impact melt rocks from suevite clasts that were recovered from drill cores into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and two synthetic glasses. These experiments were conducted at hydrothermal temperature (265 ??C) in order to reproduce conditions found in meltbearing deposits in the first thousand years after deposition. The experimental results were compared to geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) of the same alteration and to original mineral assemblages in the natural melt rock samples. In the alteration experiments, clay minerals formed on the surfaces of the melt particles and as fine-grained suspended material. Authigenic expanding clay minerals (saponite and Ca-smectite) and vermiculite/chlorite (clinochlore) were identified in addition to analcime. Ferripyrophyllite was formed in three of four experiments. Comparable minerals were predicted in the PHREEQC modeling. A comparison between the phases formed in our experiments and those in the cores suggests that the natural alteration occurred under hydrothermal conditions similar to those reproduced in the experiment. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  17. Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Faul, U. H.; Garnero, E. J.

    2012-09-01

    We calculate viscoelastic dissipation in the Moon using a rheological (extended Burgers) model based on laboratory deformation of melt-free polycrystalline olivine. Lunar temperature structures are calculated assuming steady state conduction with variable internal heat production and core heat flux. Successful models can reproduce the dissipation factor (Q) measured at both tidal and seismic frequencies, and the tidal Love numbers h2 and k2, without requiring any mantle melting. However, the frequency-dependence of our model Q at tidal periods has the opposite sign to that observed. Using the apparently unrelaxed nature of the core-mantle boundary (CMB), the best fit models require mantle grain sizes of ˜1 cm and CMB temperatures of ≈1700 K. If melt or volatiles are present, the lunar temperature structure must be colder than our melt-free models. We estimate a present-day mantle heat production rate of 9-10 nWm-3, suggesting that roughly half of the Moon's radiogenic elements are in the crust.

  18. Sierra Nevada snow melt from SMS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Mcmillan, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    A film loop from SMS-2 imagery shows snow melt over the Sierra Nevadas from May 10 to July 8, 1975. The sequence indicates a successful application of geostationary satellite data for monitoring dynamic hydrologic conditions.

  19. Skull melting of fluorophosphate glass results

    SciTech Connect

    Wenckus, J.F.

    1982-06-07

    The results are presented of the third fluorophosphate glass skull-melting experiment which was carried out on July 30th. Details of the experimental procedures used were described in the report dated March 10, 1981.

  20. QuikScat Captures an Early Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The SeaWinds instrument on NASA's Quick Scatterometer (QuikScat) spacecraft captured these near-real-time backscatter images of melting on the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica's Weddell Sea between October 27 (left) and October 29 (right), 2002--the earliest documented melting event on the ice shelf since radar data began to be collected in the late 1970s. The melting extended as far south as 68 degrees South and resulted from a cyclone that delivered warm air to the region. The image on the right also shows a noticeable recession in the sea-ice margin to the west of the Antarctic peninsula. The darker grey values of the melt region indicate radar backscatter coefficients that are reduced by approximately 10 decibels from their typical end of winter values.

  1. Energy-Efficient Glass Melting: Submerged Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Oxy-gas-fired submerged combustion melter offers simpler, improved performance. For the last 100 years, the domestic glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass on an industrial scale.

  2. Melt Stirring by Horizontal Crucible Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. F.; Elwell, D.; Feigelson, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Horizontal vibration suggested as technique for more effective stirring of melts in crystal-growth apparatus. Vibrational technique may replace accelerated crucible rotation. Potential superiority of vibrational technique shown by preliminary experiments in which ink stirred into water.

  3. Melt Crystallization in Microfluidics for Sample Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif-Kashani, Pooria; Pirouz Kavehpour, H.

    2010-11-01

    Melt crystallization in microfluidics is a novel approach to concentrate/purify a diverse range of samples from particles to ions. In this technique, the difference in solubility of solutes in the liquid and solid phase of the solvent drives the transport of the solutes. Consequently, this method has the advantage of being non-invasive and entirely thermally-actuated with no moving parts. A fluid sample is frozen in a microchannel and melting zones are passed repeatedly through the stationary sample to increase the concentration of solute at one end. The device is constructed using a thermoelectric cooler to freeze the sample and thin-film resistive heaters to create melting zones. The heaters are operated independently, allowing them to be switched on or off to create a localized melting zone in the channel. The performance of the system is successfully tested for a variety of samples including aqueous solutions and water containing micro-particles.

  4. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass.

    PubMed

    Molgaard, Joshua J; Auxier, John D; Giminaro, Andrew V; Oldham, Colton J; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition. PMID:26779720

  5. A Short Course in The Melting Pot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuff, Bill; Churchard, Tim

    1983-01-01

    Describes how the events of a week of outdoor education for 40 migrant teenagers of various cultural backgrounds moved from racial and geographic discord to cooperation, proving that the melting pot is still working. (SB)

  6. ESR melting under constant voltage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-02-01

    Typical industrial ESR melting practice includes operation at a constant current. This constant current operation is achieved through the use of a power supply whose output provides this constant current characteristic. Analysis of this melting mode indicates that the ESR process under conditions of constant current is inherently unstable. Analysis also indicates that ESR melting under the condition of a constant applied voltage yields a process which is inherently stable. This paper reviews the process stability arguments for both constant current and constant voltage operation. Explanations are given as to why there is a difference between the two modes of operation. Finally, constant voltage process considerations such as melt rate control, response to electrode anomalies and impact on solidification will be discussed.

  7. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI’s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  8. Arctic Warming, Greenland Melt and Moulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, K.; Huff, R.; Behar, A.

    2007-12-01

    Air temperatures on the Greenland ice sheet have increased by 4 deg. C since 1991. The ice sheet melt area increased by 30% for the western part between 1979-2006, with record melt years in 1987, 1991, 1998, 2002, 2005, and possibly the most extreme melt year in 2007. The increasing trend in the total area of melting bare ice is unmistakable at 13% per year, significant at a probability of 0.99. Hence, the bare ice region, the wet snow region, and the equilibrium line altitude have moved further inland and resulting in increased melt water flux towards the coast. Warm and extended air temperatures are to blame for 1.5 m water equivalent surface reduction at the long-term equilibrium line altitude, 1100 m elevation at 70 deg. N during summer 2007. Increase in ice velocity in the ablation region and the concurrent increase in melt water suggests that water penetrates to great depth through moulins and cracks, lubricating the bottom of the ice sheet. New insight was gained of subsurface hydrologic channels and cavities using new instrumentation and a video system during the melt peak in August 2007. Volume and geometry of a 100 m deep moulin were mapped with a rotating laser, and photographs with digital cameras. Sub-glacial hydrologic channels were investigated and filmed using a tethered, autonomous system, several hundred meters into the ice. These new results will be discussed in view of the rapid increase in melt area and mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet due to increasing air temperatures.

  9. Ice-shelf melting around Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Jacobs, S.

    2008-12-01

    The traditional view on the mass balance of Antarctic ice shelves is that they loose mass principally from iceberg calving with bottom melting a much lower contributing factor. Because ice shelves are now known to play a fundamental role in ice sheet evolution, it is important to re-evaluate their wastage processes from a circumpolar perspective using a combination of remote sensing techniques. We present area average rates deduced from grounding line discharge, snow accumulation, firn depth correction and ice shelf topography. We find that ice shelf melting accounts for roughly half of ice-shelf ablation, with a total melt water production of 1027 Gt/yr. The attrition fraction due to in-situ melting varies from 9 to 90 percent around Antarctica. High melt producers include the Ronne, Ross, Getz, Totten, Amery, George VI, Pine Island, Abbot, Dotson/Crosson, Shackleton, Thwaites and Moscow University Ice Shelves. Low producers include the Larsen C, Princess Astrid and Ragnhild coast, Fimbul, Brunt and Filchner. Correlation between melt water production and grounding line discharge is low (R2 = 0.65). Correlation with thermal ocean forcing from the ocean are highest in the northern parts of West Antarctica where regressions yield R2 of 0.93-0.97. Melt rates in the Amundsen Sea exhibit a quadratic sensitivity to thermal ocean forcing. We conclude that ice shelf melting plays a dominant role in ice shelf mass balance, with a potential to change rapidly in response to altered ocean heat transport onto the Antarctic continental shelf.

  10. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  11. Congruent Melting Kinetics: Constraints on Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, James P.; Hess, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms of melting and their applications to chondrule formation are discussed A model for the kinetics of congruent melting is developed and used to place constraints on the duration and maximum temperature experienced by the interiors of relict-bearing chondrules. Specifically, chondrules containing relict forsteritic olivine or enstatitic pyroxene cannot have been heated in excess of 1901 C or 1577 C, respectively, for more than a few seconds.

  12. DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-01-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Homogeneous Crystallization in Polymer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth from the melt of polyethylene-like polymer were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The crystallinity was determined by using the site order parameter method (SOP), which described local order degree around an atom. Snapshots of the simulations showed evolution of the nucleation and the crystal growth through SOP images clearly. The isothermal crystallization kinetics was determined at different temperatures. The rate of crystallization, Kc, and the Avrami exponents, n, were determined as a function of temperature. The forming of nucleis was traced to reveal that the nucleis were formed with more ordered cores and less ordered shells. A detailed statistical analysis of the MD snapshots and trajectories suggested conformations of the polymer chains changed smoothly from random coil to chain folded lamella in the crystallization processes.

  14. (Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The first year of this three year renewal award has been used to continue data collection and analysis of thermal (Soret) diffusion in silicate liquid and explore the related process of thermal migration in subliquidus magmas and isothermal interdiffusion. Data collection efforts have been materially aided by advances in thermal insulation in the pressure media outside our pressurized cylindrical heaters. BaCO{sub 3} is very effective in protecting the pressure vessel core from thermal deterioration with the result that the heater inside and outside diameters can be substantially increased. This permits several charges to be run simultaneously in an axisymmetric cluster around a double or triple junction thermocouple which can measure axial thermal gradients in situ. Research during the past year has concentrated in four major areas: Modelling thermal diffusion in multi-component silicate liquids, Soret fractionation of major and minor chemical components, characterization of thermal diffusion in naturally-occurring magmas with an emphasis on volatile bearing rhyolitic melts, and the effects of thermal gradients on silicate magma in the melting interval.

  15. Grain-boundary-induced melting in quenched polycrystalline monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutschländer, Sven; Boitard, Charlotte; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Melting in two dimensions can successfully be explained with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) scenario which describes the formation of the high-symmetry phase with the thermal activation of topological defects within an (ideally) infinite monodomain. With all state variables being well defined, it should hold also as freezing scenario where oppositely charged topological defects annihilate. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism, on the other hand, shows that spontaneous symmetry breaking alongside a continuous phase transition cannot support an infinite monodomain but leads to polycrystallinity. For any nonzero cooling rate, critical fluctuations will be frozen out in the vicinity of the transition temperature. This leads to domains with different director of the broken symmetry, separated by a defect structure, e.g., grain boundaries in crystalline systems. After instantaneously quenching a colloidal monolayer from a polycrystalline to the isotropic fluid state, we show that such grain boundaries increase the probability for the formation of dislocations. In addition, we determine the temporal decay of defect core energies during the first few Brownian times after the quench. Despite the fact that the KTHNY scenario describes a continuous phase transition and phase equilibrium does not exist, melting in polycrystalline samples starts at grain boundaries similar to first-order phase transitions.

  16. Descriptions and preliminary interpretations of cores recovered from the Manson Impact Structure (Iowa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Witzke, B. J.; Hartung, J. B.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Roddy, D. J.

    1993-03-01

    A core drilling program initiated by the Iowa Geological Survey Bureau and U.S. Geological Survey in 1991 and 1992 collected 12 cores totalling over 1200 m from the Manson Impact Structure, a probable K-T boundary structure located in north-central Iowa. Cores were recovered from each of the major structural terranes, with 2 cores (M-3 and M-4) from the Terrace Terrane, 4 cores (M-2, M-2A, M-6, and M-9) from the Crater Moat, and 6 cores (M-1, M-5, M-7, M-8, M-10, and M-11) from the Central Peak. These supplemented 2 central peak cores (1-A and 2-A) drilled in 1953. The cores penetrated five major impact lithologies: (1) sedimentary clast breccia; (2) impact ejecta; (3) central peak crystallite rocks; (4) crystalline clast breccia with sandy matrix; and (5) crystallite clast breccia with a melt matrix. Descriptions and preliminary interpretations of these cores are presented.

  17. Descriptions and preliminary interpretations of cores recovered from the Manson Impact Structure (Iowa)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Witzke, B. J.; Hartung, J. B.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Roddy, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    A core drilling program initiated by the Iowa Geological Survey Bureau and U.S. Geological Survey in 1991 and 1992 collected 12 cores totalling over 1200 m from the Manson Impact Structure, a probable K-T boundary structure located in north-central Iowa. Cores were recovered from each of the major structural terranes, with 2 cores (M-3 and M-4) from the Terrace Terrane, 4 cores (M-2, M-2A, M-6, and M-9) from the Crater Moat, and 6 cores (M-1, M-5, M-7, M-8, M-10, and M-11) from the Central Peak. These supplemented 2 central peak cores (1-A and 2-A) drilled in 1953. The cores penetrated five major impact lithologies: (1) sedimentary clast breccia; (2) impact ejecta; (3) central peak crystallite rocks; (4) crystalline clast breccia with sandy matrix; and (5) crystallite clast breccia with a melt matrix. Descriptions and preliminary interpretations of these cores are presented.

  18. Partial melting of TTG gneisses: crustal contamination and the production of granitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, F. C.; Masotta, M.; Troll, V. R.; Freda, C.; Johnson, T. E.; Dahren, B.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding partial melting of ancient TTG gneiss terranes is crucial when considering crustal contamination in volcanic systems, as these rocks are unlikely to melt completely at magmatic temperatures (1000-1200 °C) and crustal pressures (<500 MPa). Variations in the bulk composition of the gneiss, magma temperature, pressure (depth) and the composition and abundance of any fluids present will produce a variety of melt compositions, from partial melts enriched in incompatible elements to more complete melts, nearing the bulk chemistry of the parent gneiss. We have used piston cylinder experiments to simulate partial melting in a suite of 12 gneisses from NW Scotland (Lewisian) and Eastern Greenland (Ammassalik, Liverpool Land) under magma chamber temperature and pressure conditions (P=200 MPa, T=975 °C). These gneisses form the basement to much of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, where crustal contamination of magmas was commonplace but the composition of the crustal partial melts are poorly constrained [1]. The experiments produced partial melts in all samples (e.g. Fig 1). Electron microprobe analyses of glasses indicate they are compositionally heterogeneous and are significantly different from the whole rock chemistry of the parent gneisses. The melts have variably evolved compositions but are typically trachy-dacitic to rhyolitic (granitic). This integrated petrological, experimental and in-situ geochemical approach allows quantification of the processes of partial melting of TTG gneiss in a volcanic context, providing accurate major/trace element and isotopic (Sr, Pb) end-members for modeling crustal contamination. The experimental melts and restites will be compared geochemically with a suite of natural TTG gneisses, providing constraints on the extent to which the gneisses have produced and subsequently lost melt. [1] Geldmacher et al. (2002) Scottish Journal of Geology, v.38, p.55-61.

  19. Manufacturing laser glass by continuous melting

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Suratwala, T; krenitsky, S; Takeuchi, K

    2000-07-01

    A novel, continuous melting process is being used to manufacture meter-sized plates of laser glass at a rate 20-times faster, 5-times cheaper, and with 2-3 times better optical quality than with previous one-at-a-time, ''discontinuous'' technology processes. This new technology for manufacturing laser glass, which is arguably the most difficult continuously-melted optical material ever produced, comes as a result of a $60 million, six-year joint R&D program between government and industry. The glasses manufactured by the new continuous melting process are Nd-doped phosphate-based glasses and are marketed under the product names LG-770 (Schott Glass Technologies) and LHG-8 (Hoya Corporation USA). With this advance in glass manufacturing technology, it is now possible to construct high-energy, high-peak-power lasers for use in fusion energy development, national defense, and basic physics research that would have been impractical to build using the old melting technology. The development of continuously melted laser glass required technological advances that have lead to improvements in the manufacture of other optical glass products as well. For example, advances in forming, annealing, and conditioning steps of the laser glass continuous melting process are now being used in manufacture of other large-size optical glasses.

  20. A multiphysics phase field model on melting and kinetic superheating of aluminum nanolayer and nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yong Seok

    It has been found during the last decade that a nanoscale melting of metal has very distinctive features compared to its microscale counterpart. It has been observed that a highly non-equilibrium state can result in extreme superheating of a solid state, which cannot be explained well by thermodynamic theories based on equilibrium or nucleation. An endeavor to find the superheating limit and mechanisms of melting and superheating becomes more complicated when various physical phenomena are involved at the similar scales. The main goal of this research is to establish a multiphysics model and to reveal the mechanism of melting and kinetic superheating of a metal nanostructure at high heating rates. The model includes elastodynamics, a fast heating of metal considering a delayed heat transfer between electron gas and lattice phonon and couplings among physical phenomena, and phase transformation incorporated with thermal fluctuation. The model successfully reproduces two independent experiments and several novel nanoscale physical phenomena are discovered. For example, the depression of the melting temperature of Al nanolayer under plane stress condition, the threshold heating rate, 1011 K/s, for kinetic superheating, a large temperature drop in a 5 nm collision region of the two solid-melt interfaces, and a strong effect of geometry on kinetic superheating in Al core-shell nanostructure at high heating rate.

  1. Models and correlations of the DEBRIS Late-Phase Melt Progression Model

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.C.; Gasser, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    The DEBRIS Late Phase Melt Progression Model is an assembly of models, embodied in a computer code, which is designed to treat late-phase melt progression in dry rubble (or debris) regions that can form as a consequence of a severe core uncover accident in a commercial light water nuclear reactor. The approach is fully two-dimensional, and incorporates a porous medium modeling framework together with conservation and constitutive relationships to simulate the time-dependent evolution of such regions as various physical processes act upon the materials. The objective of the code is to accurately model these processes so that the late-phase melt progression that would occur in different hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accidents can be better understood and characterized. In this report the models and correlations incorporated and used within the current version of DEBRIS are described. These include the global conservation equations solved, heat transfer and fission heating models, melting and refreezing models (including material interactions), liquid and solid relocation models, gas flow and pressure field models, and the temperature and compositionally dependent material properties employed. The specific models described here have been used in the experiment design analysis of the Phebus FPT-4 debris-bed fission-product release experiment. An earlier DEBRIS code version was used to analyze the MP-1 and MP-2 late-phase melt progression experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  2. Sulfur's impact on core evolution and magnetic field generation on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Steven A.; Aurnou, Jonathan M.; Dombard, Andrew J.

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the melting relationships of potential core forming materials in Ganymede indicate that fluid motions, a requirement for a dynamo origin for the satellite's magnetic field, may be driven, in part, either by iron (Fe) ``snow'' forming below the core-mantle boundary or solid iron sulfide (FeS) floating upward from the deep core. Eutectic melting temperatures and eutectic sulfur contents in the binary Fe-FeS system decrease with increasing pressure within the interval of core pressures on Ganymede (<14 GPa). Comparison of melting temperatures to adiabatic temperature gradients in the core suggests that solid iron is thermodynamically stable at shallow levels for bulk core compositions more iron-rich than eutectic (i.e., <21 wt % S). Calculations based on high-pressure solid-liquid phase relationships in the Fe-FeS system indicate that iron snow or floatation of solid iron sulfide, depending on whether the core composition is more or less iron-rich than eutectic, is an inevitable consequence of cooling Ganymede's core. These results are robust over a wide range of plausible three-layer internal structures and thermal evolution scenarios. For precipitation regimes that include Fe-snow, we present scaling arguments that give typical Rossby and magnetic Reynolds numbers consistent with dynamo action occurring in Ganymede's core. Furthermore, by applying recently derived scaling relationships relating magnetic field strength to buoyancy flux, we obtain estimates of surface magnetic field strength comparable with observed values.

  3. Wet melting along the Tonga Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, L. B.; Plank, T.; Arculus, R. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Hall, P.

    2010-12-01

    Melting in the mantle at convergent margins is driven by water from the subducting slab. Previous work has found a strong role for water-fluxed melting from correlations between the concentration of water in the mantle source, (H2O)o, and the extent of melting beneath backarcs, Fba. Here we explore how wet melting beneath the Lau Backarc Basin relates to that beneath the Tonga Arc, Farc, by providing the first systematic study of water contents in Tonga arc magmas. We have measured volatiles and major and trace elements in melt inclusions, glasses, and whole rocks obtained from recently sampled submarine and subaerial Tonga arc volcanoes. The compositions are varied and range mostly between andesite and basalt/boninite, and least-degassed water contents range from 2 to 5 wt%. We estimate (H2O)o and Farc independently by combining pressure (P) and temperature (T) estimates from an olivine-orthopyroxene-melt thermobarometer with a wet melting productivity model. When P, T, and (H2O)o are known, Farc is uniquely constrained. Results for the volcanoes in the Tonga Arc are bimodal with respect to T: volcanoes located near active backarc spreading centers reflect cooler melting (~1275°C) than those located far from active spreading centers (~1365°C). The cooler primary T’s may result from removal of the heat of fusion during prior melting beneath the Lau backarc, Fba. In the northern portion of the arc, the warmest primary T’s may be due to proximity to the Samoan mantle plume. Farc varies non-systematically along-strike, indicating that Fba is the primary driver of along-arc variability in primary melt compositions. Farc can also be used to calculate the TiO2 concentration of the arc mantle source, (TiO2)o (a proxy for source depletion), which varies monotonically along the Tonga Arc. Arc volcanoes adjacent to the Southern Lau Rifts and Valu Fa Ridge melt mantle with a fertile N-MORB TiO2, while those adjacent to the northern extent of the Eastern Lau Spreading

  4. Monoclinic tridymite in clast-rich impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, J.C.; Horton, J.W., Jr.; Chou, I.-Ming; Belkin, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirm a rare terrestrial occurrence of monoclinic tridymite in clast-rich impact melt rock from the Eyreville B drill core in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. The monoclinic tridymite occurs with quartz paramorphs after tridymite and K-feldspar in a microcrystalline groundmass of devitrified glass and Fe-rich smectite. Electron-microprobe analyses revealed that the tridymite and quartz paramorphs after tridymite contain different amounts of chemical impurities. Inspection by SEM showed that the tridymite crystal surfaces are smooth, whereas the quartz paramorphs contain irregular tabular voids. These voids may represent microporosity formed by volume decrease in the presence of fluid during transformation from tridymite to quartz, or skeletal growth in the original tridymite. Cristobalite locally rims spherulites within the same drill core interval. The occurrences of tridymite and cristobalite appear to be restricted to the thickest clast-rich impact melt body in the core at 1402.02-1407.49 m depth. Their formation and preservation in an alkali-rich, high-silica melt rock suggest initially high temperatures followed by rapid cooling.

  5. Volcanism by melt-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and possible consequences of melting for admittance ratios on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Stevenson, D. J.; Scott, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    A large number of volcanic features exist on Venus, ranging from tens of thousands of small domes to large shields and coronae. It is difficult to reconcile all these with an explanation involving deep mantle plumes, since a number of separate arguments lead to the conclusion that deep mantle plumes reaching the base of the lithosphere must exceed a certain size. In addition, the fraction of basal heating in Venus' mantle may be significantly lower than in Earth's mantle reducing the number of strong plumes from the core-mantle boundary. In three-dimensional convection simulations with mainly internal heating, weak, distributed upwellings are usually observed. We present an alternative mechanism for such volcanism, originally proposed for the Earth and for Venus, involving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities driven by melt buoyancy, occurring spontaneously in partially or incipiently molten regions.

  6. Microstructures and petrology of melt inclusions in the anatectic sequence of Jubrique (Betic Cordillera, S Spain): Implications for crustal anatexis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barich, Amel; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Garrido, Carlos J.; Cesare, Bernardo; Tajčmanová, Lucie; Bartoli, Omar

    2014-10-01

    We report a new occurrence of melt inclusions in polymetamorphic granulitic gneisses of the Jubrique unit, a complete though strongly thinned crustal section located above the Ronda peridotite slab (Betic Cordillera, S Spain). The gneissic sequence is composed of mylonitic gneisses at the bottom and in contact with the peridotites, and porphyroblastic gneisses on top. Mylonitic gneisses are strongly deformed rocks with abundant garnet and rare biotite. Except for the presence of melt inclusions, microstructures indicating the former presence of melt are rare or absent. Upwards in the sequence, garnet decreases whereas biotite increases in modal proportion. Melt inclusions are present from cores to rims of garnets throughout the entire sequence. Most of the former melt inclusions are now totally crystallized and correspond to nanogranites, whereas some of them are partially made of glass or, more rarely, are totally glassy. They show negative crystal shapes and range in size from ≈ 5 to 200 μm, with a mean size of ≈ 30-40 μm. Daughter phases in nanogranites and partially crystallized melt inclusions include quartz, feldspars, biotite and muscovite; accidental minerals include kyanite, graphite, zircon, monazite, rutile and ilmenite; glass has a granitic composition. Melt inclusions are mostly similar throughout all the gneissic sequence. Some fluid inclusions, of possible primary origin, are spatially associated with melt inclusions, indicating that at some point during the suprasolidus history of these rocks granitic melt and fluid coexisted. Thermodynamic modeling and conventional thermobarometry of mylonitic gneisses provide peak conditions of ≈ 850 °C and 12-14 kbar, corresponding to cores of large garnets with inclusions of kyanite and rutile. Post-peak conditions of ≈ 800-850 °C and 5-6 kbar are represented by rim regions of large garnets with inclusions of sillimanite and ilmenite, cordierite-quartz-biotite coronas replacing garnet rims, and the

  7. Microstructures and Petrology of Melt Inclusions in the Anatectic Sequence of Jubrique (Betic Cordillera, S Spain): Implications for Crustal Anatexis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-vigil, A.; Barich, A.; Garrido, C. J.; Cesare, B.; Tajčmanová, L.; Bartoli, O.

    2014-12-01

    We report a new occurrence of melt inclusions in polymetamorphic granulitic gneisses of the Jubrique unit, a complete though thinned crustal section located above the Ronda peridotite slab (Betic Cordillera, S Spain). The gneissic sequence is composed of mylonitic gneisses at the bottom and porphyroblastic gneisses on top. Mylonitic gneisses are strongly deformed rocks with abundant garnet and rare biotite. Except for the presence of melt inclusions, microstructures indicating the former presence of melt are rare or absent. Upwards in the sequence garnet decreases whereas biotite increases in proportion. Melt inclusions are present from cores to rims of garnets throughout the entire sequence. Most of the former melt inclusions are now totally crystallized and correspond to nanogranites, whereas some of them are partially made of glass or, more rarely, are totally glassy. They show negative crystal shapes and range in size from ≈5 to 200 micrometers, with a mean size of ≈30-40 micrometers. Daughter phases in nanogranites and partially crystallized melt inclusions include quartz, feldspars, biotite and muscovite; accidental minerals include kyanite, graphite, zircon, monazite, rutile and ilmenite; glass has a granitic composition. Melt inclusions are mostly similar throughout all the gneissic sequence. Some fluid inclusions, of possible primary origin, are spatially associated with melt inclusions, indicating that at some point during the suprasolidus history of these rocks granitic melt and fluid coexisted. Thermodynamic modeling and conventional thermobarometry of mylonitic gneisses provide peak conditions of ≈850 ºC and 12-14 kbar, corresponding to cores of large garnets with inclusions of kyanite and rutile. Post-peak conditions of ≈800-850 ºC and 5-6 kbar are represented by rim regions of large garnets with inclusions of sillimanite and ilmenite, cordierite-quartz-biotite coronas replacing garnet rims, and the matrix with oriented sillimanite. Previous

  8. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  9. The Core Skills Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    A British initiative that aims to identify, develop, and assess core skills in post-16 courses and qualifications is summarized in this bulletin. The first section discusses expectations regarding what core skills can achieve. The following section focuses on other purposes to which core skills could contribute, such as broadening the post-16…

  10. Core Competence and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  11. Core Design Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  12. A Study of Melt Inclusions in Tin-Mineralized Granites From Zinnwald, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sookdeo, C. A.; Webster, J. D.; Eschen, M. L.; Tappen, C. M.

    2001-12-01

    We have analyzed silicate melt inclusions from drill core samples from the eastern Erzgebirge region, Germany, to investigate magmatic-hydrothermal and mineralizing processes in compositionally evolved, tin-bearing granitic magmas. Silicate melt inclusions are small blebs of glass that are trapped or locked within phenocrysts and may contain high concentrations of volatiles that usually leave magma via degassing. Quartz phenocrysts were carefully hand picked from crushed samples of albite-, zinnwaldite- +/- lepidolite-bearing granitic dikes from Zinnwald and soaked in cold dilute HF to remove any attached groundmass. The cleaned phenocrysts were loaded into precious metal capsules with several drops of immersion oil to create a reducing environment at high temperature. The quartz-bearing capsules were inserted into quartz glass tubes, loaded into a furnace for heating at temperatures of 1025\\deg and 1050\\deg C (1atm) for periods of 20 to 30 hours, and subsequently the inclusions were quenched to glass. The inclusions were analyzed for major and minor elements (including F, Cl, and P) by electron microprobe and for H2O, trace elements, and ore elements by ion microprobe. The melt inclusion compositions are similar to that of the whole-rock sample from which the quartz separates were extracted. The average melt inclusion and whole-rock compositions are peraluminous, high in silica and rare alkalis, and low in MgO, CaO, FeO, MnO, and P2O5. Unlike the whole-rock sample, the melt inclusions contain from 0.5 to more than 4 wt.% F. The Cl contents of the inclusions are variable and range from hundreds of ppm to several thousand ppm. The variable and strong enrichments in F of the melt inclusions may correlate with (Na2O/Na2O+K2O) in the inclusions which is consistent with crystal fractionation of feldspars which drives the residual melt to increasing Na contents. Overall, the compositions of these melt inclusions are different from melt inclusions extracted from the

  13. Structure of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguen, R.; Huguet, L.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S.; Alboussiere, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone, under hyper-gravity. A commercial centrifuge has been equipped with a slip-ring so that electric power, temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. A Peltier element provides cooling at the bottom of the cell. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. Ultrasound measurements (2 to 6 MHz) is used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. A significant increase of solid fraction (or decrease of mushy layer thickness) and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core, which has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in solid fraction and a decrease in attenuation. It is hence possible that surface seismic velocity

  14. Physical mechanisms of planetary core formation: Constraints from in-situ X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Van Deusen, J.; Shi, K.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Segregation of the metallic core from a silicate mantle is a crucial aspect of early planetary evolution. Although a magma ocean scenario is often used to explain differentiation of large planets such as Earth, smaller planets and planetesimals likely never achieved the high temperatures necessary for wide scale melting. In these smaller bodies, silicates may have only partially melted, or not melted at all. Furthermore, isotopic signatures in meteorites suggest that some planetesimals differentiated within just a few million years. Achieving core segregation on this time scale whereby core material drains through a solid silicate mantle via an interconnected network of melt faces two major problems: (1) in a hydrostatic situation, the percolation threshold is above 5 vol% melt, so the process would lead to inefficient core formation, and (2) the permeability of fully connected melts at microstructural equilibrium is low enough that some planetesimals may still not be able to differentiate on this short time scale. It has been suggested that shear deformation can cause isolated melt pockets to become connected even at low melt fractions. Here, we have measured the change in permeability of core forming melts in solid silicate and partially molten silicate matrix due to deformation. Mixtures of olivine or KLB-1 peridotite and FeS close to the equilibrium percolation threshold (~5 vol% FeS) were pre-synthesized to achieve an equilibrium microstructure, and then loaded into the high pressure X-ray tomography apparatus at GSECARS, sector 13-BMD, at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory). The samples were then pressed to ~2GPa, and heated to ~1100°C. Alternating cycles of rotation to collect X-ray tomography images, and twisting to deform the sample were conducted. Starting materials and run products have also been analysed at high resolution in three dimensions using FIB/SEM cross-beam tools. Quantitative analyses have been performed on the resulting

  15. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  16. Wet Melting in the Oceanic Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Kelley, K.

    2003-12-01

    Mantle melting beneath spreading centers is driven by adiabatic decompression, but the amount of melt generated is a function of both mantle potential temperature (Tp) and water content. Separating these two effects, while a petrological challenge, is of fundamental consequence to the structure and rheology of the oceanic plate and upper mantle. Back-arc basin spreading centers provide a natural setting to quantify the effects of water and Tp on mantle melting. In one view, back-arc basins are like small mid-ocean ridges, where the volume and composition of mantle melts is well explained by Tp variations. Viewed another way, back-arc basins tap regions of mantle that have been recently hydrated by subduction, and so should reflect water-fluxed melting systematics. Here we try to reconcile these two views, and quantify the melting systematics of the oceanic mantle. Almost ten years ago, Stolper & Newman (EPSL, 1994) illustrated a linear relationship between the amount of water (H2Oo) and the fraction of melting (F) in the mantle beneath the Mariana back-arc. Here we extend their approach to several back-arc basins where recent studies have determined water contents in submarine basaltic glasses. We use Ti as a proxy for F after correcting for crystal fractionation, and account for Ti source composition with a model based on Ti/Y variations in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). We use F then to calculate H2Oo, which varies from low values typical of average MORB mantle (100's ppm) to 0.5 wt% H2O. Each back-arc basin forms a distinct, nominally linear trend in F vs. H2Oo, where the F intercept at zero H2Oo reflects dry, decompression melting driven by Tp variations similar to global MORB (Tp = 1300 - 1500° C, in the order of Scotia, Marianas, Manus and Lau). The slopes of the trends also appear to vary with Tp, with more productive wet melting at higher Tp (dF/dH2O =25-75 wt% melting/ wt% H2O). These systematics should also apply to melting beneath mid-ocean ridges

  17. Paradise Lost: Uncertainties in melting and melt extraction processes beneath oceanic spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    In many ways, decompression melting and focused melt transport beneath oceanic spreading ridges is the best understood igneous process on Earth. However, there are remaining - increasing - uncertainties in interpreting residual mantle peridotites. Indicators of degree of melting in residual peridotite are questionable. Yb concentration and spinel Cr# are affected by (a) small scale variations in reactive melt transport, (b) variable extents of melt extraction, and (c) "impregnation", i.e. partial crystallization of cooling melt in pore space. Roughly 75% of abyssal peridotites have undergone major element refertilization. Many may have undergone several melting events. The following three statements are inconsistent: (1) Peridotite melt productivity beyond cpx exhaustion is > 0.1%/GPa. (2) Crustal thickness is independent of spreading rate at rates > 2 cm/yr full rate (excluding ultra-slow spreading ridges). (3) Thermal models predict, and observations confirm, thick thermal boundary layers beneath slow spreading ridges. If (a) melt productivity is << 0.1%/GPa beyond cpx-out, and (b) cpx-out occurs > 15 km below the seafloor beneath most ridges, then the independence of crustal thickness with spreading rate can be understood. Most sampled peridotites from ridges melted beyond cpx-out. Cpx in these rocks formed via impregnation and/or exsolution during cooling. Most peridotites beneath ridges may undergo cpx exhaustion during decompression melting. This would entail an upward modification of potential temperature estimates. Alternatively, perhaps oceanic crustal thickness does vary with spreading rate but this is masked by complicated tectonics and serpentinization at slow-spreading ridges. Dissolution channels (dunites) are predicted to coalesce downstream, but numerical models of these have not shown why > 95% of oceanic crust forms in a zone < 5 km wide. There may be permeability barriers guiding deeper melt toward the ridge, but field studies have not identified

  18. Melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 alloy at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Toellner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Cosmochemical studies suggest that the cores of terrestrial planets are primarily composed of Fe alloyed with about 5 to 10 wt% Ni, plus some light elements (e.g., McDonough and Sun 1995). Thus, the high pressure melting curve of Fe0.9Ni0.1 is considered to be an important reference for characterizing the cores of terrestrial planets. We have determined the melting points of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 up to 86 GPa using an in-situ method that monitors the atomic dynamics of the Fe atoms in the sample, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (Jackson et al. 2013). A laser heated diamond anvil cell is used to provide the high pressure-high temperature environmental conditions, and in-situ X-ray diffraction is used to constrain the pressure of the sample. To eliminate the influence of temperature fluctuations experienced by the sample on the determination of melting, we develop a Fast Temperature Readout (FasTeR) spectrometer. The FasTeR spectrometer features a fast reading rate (>100 Hz), a high sensitivity, a large dynamic range and a well-constrained focus. By combining the melting curve of fcc-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 alloy determined in our study and the fcc-hcp phase boundary from Komabayashi et al. (2012), we calculate the fcc-hcp-liquid triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1. Using this triple point and the thermophysical parameters from a nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering study on hcp-Fe (Murphy et al. 2011), we compute the melting curve of hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1. We will discuss our new experimental results with implications for the cores of Venus, Earth and Mars. Select references: McDonough & Sun (1995): The composition of the Earth. Chem. Geol. 120, 223-253. Jackson et al. (2013): Melting of compressed iron by monitoring atomic dynamics, EPSL, 362, 143-150. Komabayashi et al. (2012): In situ X-ray diffraction measurements of the fcc-hcp phase transition boundary of an Fe-Ni alloy in an internally heated diamond anvil cell, PCM, 39, 329-338. Murphy et al

  19. Ab initio melting curve of osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakovsky, L.; Burakovsky, N.; Preston, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    The melting curve of osmium up to a pressure P of 500 GPa is obtained from an extensive suite of ab initio quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations using the Z method. The ab initio P =0 melting point of Os is 3370 ±75 K; this range encompasses all of the available data in the literature and corroborates the conclusion of J. W. Arblaster [Platinum Metals Rev. 49, 166 (2005)], 10.1595/147106705X70264 that the melting temperature of pure Os is 3400 ±50 K and that the 3300 K typically quoted in the literature is the melting point of impure Os. The T =0 equation of state (EOS) of Os and the P dependence of the optimized c /a ratio for the hexagonal unit cell, both to pressures ˜900 GPa, are obtained in the ab initio approach as validation of its use. Although excellent agreement with the available experimental data (P ≲80 GPa) is found, it is the third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS with B0'=5 rather than the more widely accepted B0'=4 that describes the QMD data to higher pressures, in agreement with the more recent experimental EOS by Godwal et al. The theoretical melting curve of Os obtained earlier by Joshi et al. is shown to be inconsistent with our QMD results, and the possible reason for this discrepancy is suggested. Regularities in the melting curves of Os and five other third-row transition metals (Ta, W, Re, Pt, Au) could be used to estimate the currently unknown melting curves of Hf and Ir.

  20. Melt migration modeling in partially molten upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Abdolreza

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the importance of melt migration in shaping major characteristics of geological features associated with the partial melting of the upper mantle, such as sea-floor spreading, continental flood basalts and rifting. The partial melting produces permeable partially molten rocks and a buoyant low viscosity melt. Melt migrates through the partially molten rocks, and transfers mass and heat. Due to its much faster velocity and appreciable buoyancy, melt migration has the potential to modify dynamics of the upwelling partially molten plumes. I develop a 2-D, two-phase flow model and apply it to investigate effects of melt migration on the dynamics and melt generation of upwelling mantle plumes and focusing of melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges. Melt migration changes distribution of the melt-retention buoyancy force and therefore affects the dynamics of the upwelling plume. This is investigated by modeling a plume with a constant initial melt of 10% where no further melting is considered. Melt migration polarizes melt-retention buoyancy force into high and low melt fraction regions at the top and bottom portions of the plume and therefore results in formation of a more slender and faster upwelling plume. Allowing the plume to melt as it ascends through the upper mantle also produces a slender and faster plume. It is shown that melt produced by decompressional melting of the plume migrates to the upper horizons of the plume, increases the upwelling velocity and thus, the volume of melt generated by the plume. Melt migration produces a plume which lacks the mushroom shape observed for the plume models without melt migration. Melt migration forms a high melt fraction layer beneath the sloping base of the impermeable oceanic lithosphere. Using realistic conditions of melting, freezing and melt extraction, I examine whether the high melt fraction layer is able to focus melt from a wide partial melting zone to a narrow region