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Sample records for potassium titanate whiskers

  1. Synthesis of potassium hexatitanate whiskers starting from metatitanic acid and potassium carbonate and sulfate by calcination method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chunyan; Yin Hengbo Liu Yumin; Ren Min; Wang Aili; Ge Chen; Yao Hengping; Feng Hui; Chen Jun; Jiang Tingshun

    2009-05-06

    Potassium hexatitanate whiskers were synthesized starting from metatitanic acid (H{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}), potassium carbonate and sulfate by calcination method. The effects of mole ratios of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to metatitanic acid (H{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}), content of potassium sulfate, and calcination temperature on the crystallinity and morphology of the resultant potassium titanate whiskers were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Well crystallized potassium hexatitanate whiskers with an average length of 7.3 {mu}m and an average diameter of 0.62 {mu}m were synthesized when the molar ratio of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to metatitanic acid was kept at 1:3.5 and the calcination temperature was up to 1150 deg. C. The presence of K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} favored the formation of thin potassium hexatitanate whiskers as compared to the absence of K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The whiteness and brightness of the synthesized potassium hexatitanate whiskers were comparable to that of rutile TiO{sub 2} pigment.

  2. Histopathological changes in rat lung following intratracheal instillation of silicon carbide whiskers and potassium octatitanate whiskers.

    PubMed

    Ogami, Akira; Morimoto, Yasuo; Myojo, Toshihiko; Oyabu, Takako; Murakami, Masahiro; Nishi, Kenichiro; Kadoya, Chikara; Tanaka, Isamu

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated the pattern of pulmonary inflammation for the assessment of the biological hazards of two man-made mineral fibers. Rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to a 2 mg dose of each of two kinds of man-made mineral fibers (PT1, potassium octatitanate whisker; and SiCW, silicon carbide whisker), or three kinds of comparable respirable particles (crystalline silica, crocidolite asbestos, and titanium dioxide, TiO(2)). The lung tissue was evaluated at 3 day, 1 wk, and 1, 3 and 6 mo after exposure. Digital images taken of the lung sections were examined by morphometric point counting method (PCM). PT1 and SiCW showed a similar inflammatory pattern, which contains temporal inflammation such as moderate alveolitis within 1 wk after the exposure, and in later phase aggregation foci of instilled fibers. Differences in repair patterns of these two man-made mineral fibers showed that the toxicity of these two fibers is less toxic than for crocidolite or crystalline silica. Although SiCW showed a higher inflammation score than TiO(2) within 1 mo after instillation, the inflammation scores and fibrotic changes of PT1 and SiCW were not significant as TiO(2) at 3 mo and 6 mo in this study. Careful use should be recommended when these materials are used in the workplace. PMID:17613083

  3. An improved automotive brake lining using fibrous potassium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansfield, J. A.; Halberstadt, M. L.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Rhee, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    Simultaneous fade reduction and wear improvement of a commercial automotive brake lining were achieved by adding fibrous potassium titanate. The dependence of friction and wear characteristics on quantitative variations in potassium titanate, asbestos, phenolic binder, and organic and inorganic modifiers was evaluated.

  4. A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Makoto; Morita, Masashi; Igarashi, Shota; Sato, Soh

    2013-10-15

    A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst.

  5. Polyethylene/Potassium Titanate Separators For Ni/H2 Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, William E.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental separators fabricated on paper-making machine. Two-layer, paperlike composite of polyethylene fibers and potassium titanate pigment shows promise for replacing asbestos as separator material in nickel/hydrogen electrochemical cells.

  6. Evaluation of potassium titanate as a component of alkaline fuel cell matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Various forms of potassium titanate were found to have almost complete resistance to chemical attack in 45 wt % KOH at 150 C (423 K) for up to 9600 hours. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction disclosed important differences with respect to fibricity and stability. The octatitanate appeared to possess the best combination of properties. It was concluded that potassium titanate could be produced in a more asbestos-like form. Fiber dispersion is important in matrix manufacture.

  7. Formation and structural characterization of potassium titanates and the potassium ion exchange property

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiang; Guo Zhanhu; Chung, Jong Shik

    2009-10-15

    In the present work, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} are synthesized by solid state method. Their structures and morphologies are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and scanning electron microscopy. The binding energies of K, Ti and O in potassium titanates were then evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with those in K/TiO{sub 2}. Finally the corresponding K ion exchange properties are investigated by synthesizing NO oxidation catalysts with Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} precursor. It is found that the binding energy of K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much higher than those in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13}, and because of which, it shows quite different catalytic performances. Compared with other potassium titanates, the K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much easier to be exchanged out.

  8. Effects of potassium titanate fiber on the wear of automotive brake linings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, M. L.; Mansfield, J. A.; Rhee, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    Asbestos reinforcing fiber in an automotive friction material was replaced by an experimental ingredient having better thermal stability, and the effects on wear and friction were studied. A friction materials test machine (SAE J661a) was used to determine friction and wear, under constant energy output conditions, as a function of temperature between 121 and 343 C (250 and 650 F). When potassium titanate fiber replaced one half of the asbestos in a standard commercial lining, with a 40 percent upward adjustment of phenolic resin content, wear above 204 C (400 F) was improved by 40% and friction by 30%. Tests on a full-scale inertial dynamometer supported the findings of the sample dynamometer tests. It was demonstrated that the potassium titanate fiber contributes directly to the improvement in wear and friction.

  9. Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias; Gautier, Daniel; Raulin, Francois; Scattergood, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The following topics are discussed with respect to Titan: observations of the atmosphere; laboratory simulations and theoretical models of Titan's atmosphere; endpoints of atmospheric chemistry - aerosols and oceans; exobiology; and the next steps in understanding Titan.

  10. The effect of lung burden on biopersistence and pulmonary effects in rats exposed to potassium octatitanate whiskers by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Oyabu, Takako; Yamato, Hiroshi; Ogami, Akira; Morimoto, Yasuo; Akiyama, Izumi; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo; Hori, Hajime; Tanaka, Isamu

    2004-09-01

    The effect of lung burden on biopersistence and histopathological changes caused by potassium octatitanate whiskers (POW) which is one of the asbestos substitutes were investigated for 1-yr and 4-wk inhalation periods. In the 1-yr inhalation experiment, male Wistar rats were exposed to POW (TW) for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk under the same conditions as a previous study of POW (PT1, JFM fiber) which is made by different manufacturer. The exposure concentration was 1.9 +/- 0.7 mg/m(3) and the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) in the chamber were 1.6 microm and 2.9. Rats were sacrificed at 3 d and 1 yr after the inhalation experiment and TW deposits in the lungs were determined by ICP-AES. Lung burden at 3 d and 1 yr after the inhalation was 2.39 +/- 0.50 mg and 1.37 +/- 0.96 mg, respectively, the deposition fraction was 8.1% and biological half time (BHT) was 15 months. Aggregated dust cells and mild fibrotic changes around these dust cells were observed in the exposed rat lung. These results were almost the same as those obtained in the previous 1-yr PT1 study. In the 4-wk inhalation experiment, to investigate the effect of lung burden on biopersistence and histopathological change, male Wistar rats were exposed to PT1. The exposure concentration was 102 +/- 21 mg/m(3), MMAD (GSD), the geometiric mean length and diameter (GSD) of the PT1 in the chamber were 1.6 microm (3.0), 2.2 microm (1.8) and 0.33 microm (1.5), respectively. Rats were sacrificed at 3 d, 1 wk, and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the inhalation experiment. The lung burden of POW at 3 d after 4 wk inhalation was 1.49 +/- 0.19 mg, which was close to the estimated amount of overload. The BHT of the total mass (4.1 months) was not prolonged, but aggregated dust cells were observed in the subpleural region and around the bronchioles and mild fibrotic changes were observed only around the dust cells at one year after the 4-wk inhalation. It is considered that the excessive

  11. Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena

    Titan, Saturn's biggest satellite (second in size among the satellites in our solar system), has attracted the eye of astronomers preferentially ever since its discovery by Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens on March 25, 1655. Titan orbits around Saturn at a distance of 1,222,000 km (759,478 mi) in a synchronous rotation, taking 15.9 days to complete. As Titan follows Saturn on its trek around the Sun, one Titanian year equals about 30 Earth years. The sunlight that reaches such distances is only 1/100th of that received by the Earth. Titan is therefore a cold and dark place, but a fascinating one.

  12. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  13. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Wodarg, Ingo; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Cravens, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction I. C. F. Müller-Wodarg, C. A. Griffith, E. Lellouch and T. E. Cravens; Prologue 1: the genesis of Cassini-Huygens W.-H. Ip, T. Owen and D. Gautier; Prologue 2: building a space flight instrument: a P.I.'s perspective M. Tomasko; 1. The origin and evolution of Titan G. Tobie, J. I. Lunine, J. Monteux, O. Mousis and F. Nimmo; 2. Titan's surface geology O. Aharonson, A. G. Hayes, P. O. Hayne, R. M. Lopes, A. Lucas and J. T. Perron; 3. Thermal structure of Titan's troposphere and middle atmosphere F. M. Flasar, R. K. Achterberg and P. J. Schinder; 4. The general circulation of Titan's lower and middle atmosphere S. Lebonnois, F. M. Flasar, T. Tokano and C. E. Newman; 5. The composition of Titan's atmosphere B. Bézard, R. V. Yelle and C. A. Nixon; 6. Storms, clouds, and weather C. A. Griffith, S. Rafkin, P. Rannou and C. P. McKay; 7. Chemistry of Titan's atmosphere V. Vuitton, O. Dutuit, M. A. Smith and N. Balucani; 8. Titan's haze R. West, P. Lavvas, C. Anderson and H. Imanaka; 9. Titan's upper atmosphere: thermal structure, dynamics, and energetics R. V. Yelle and I. C. F. Müller-Wodarg; 10. Titan's upper atmosphere/exosphere, escape processes, and rates D. F. Strobel and J. Cui; 11. Titan's ionosphere M. Galand, A. J. Coates, T. E. Cravens and J.-E. Wahlund; 12. Titan's magnetospheric and plasma environment J.-E. Wahlund, R. Modolo, C. Bertucci and A. J. Coates.

  15. Titan!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.

    2010-05-01

    Cassini-Huygens achieved Saturnian orbit on July 1, 2004. The first order of business was the safe delivery of the Huygens atmospheric probe to Titan that took place on January 14, 2005. Huygens descended under parachute obtaining observations all the way down to a safe landing. It revealed Titan for the first time. Stunning are the similarities between Titan and the Earth. Viewing the lakes and seas, the fluvial terrain, the sand dunes and other features through the hazy, nitrogen atmosphere, brings to mind the geological processes that created analogous features on the Earth. On Titan frozen water plays the geological role of rock; liquid methane takes the role of terrestrial water. The atmospheres of both Earth and Titan are predominately nitrogen gas. Titan's atmosphere contains 1.5% methane and no oxygen. The surface pressure on Titan is 1.5 times the Earth's. There are aerosol layers and clouds that come and go. Now, as Saturn proceeds along its solar orbit, the seasons are changing. The effects upon the transport of methane are starting to be seen. A large lake in the South Polar Region seems to be filling more as winter onsets. Will the size and number of the lakes in the South grow during winter? Will the northern lakes and seas diminish or dry up as northern summer progresses? How will the atmospheric circulation change? Much work remains not only for Cassini but also for future missions. Titan has many different environments to explore. These require more capable instruments and in situ probes. This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Method for manufacturing whisker preforms and composites

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    1995-01-01

    A process for manufacturing Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 /SiAlON whiskers by mixing silicon carbide powder with aluminum nitride powder, adding impurities such as calcium oxide or potassium chloride to control whisker characteristics, forming the mixture in a boron nitrogen mold of desired shaped and hot isostatically pressing the formed mixture in a nitrogen environment to produce whiskers comprised substantially of SiAlON at the nucleating end of the whisker and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 at the other end of the whisker. In one embodiment, reinforced composites are formed by impregnating the Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 /SiAlON whisker preform with a matrix material such as resin binders, liquid metals, intermetallics or ceramic materials.

  17. Method for manufacturing whisker preforms and composites

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, P.A.

    1995-11-07

    A process is disclosed for manufacturing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiAlON whiskers by mixing silicon carbide powder with aluminum nitride powder, adding impurities such as calcium oxide or potassium chloride to control whisker characteristics, forming the mixture in a boron nitrogen mold of desired shaped and hot isostatically pressing the formed mixture in a nitrogen environment to produce whiskers comprised substantially of SiAlON at the nucleating end of the whisker and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} at the other end of the whisker. In one embodiment, reinforced composites are formed by impregnating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiAlON whisker preform with a matrix material such as resin binders, liquid metals, intermetallics or ceramic materials.

  18. Potassium

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium is a mineral that the body needs to work normally. It helps nerves and muscles communicate. ... products out of cells. A diet rich in potassium helps to offset some of sodium's harmful effects ...

  19. Potassium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sources of potassium in the diet include Leafy greens, such as spinach and collards Fruit from vines, such as grapes and blackberries Root vegetables, such as carrots and potatoes Citrus fruits, such as oranges and grapefruit

  20. Potassium

    MedlinePlus

    Klor-Con® Powder ... Klor-Con®/25 Powder ... Potassium comes in oral liquid, powder, granules, effervescent tablets, regular tablets, extended-release (long-acting) tablets, and extended-release capsules. It usually is taken two to four ...

  1. Mullite Whiskers and Mullite-whisker Felt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmy, Inna G.; Haught, Deborah A.

    1993-01-01

    The Naval Surface Warfare Center has developed processes for the preparation of mullite (3(Al2O3)(dot)2(SiO2)) whiskers and mullite-whisker felt. Three patents on the technology were issued in 1990. The processes are based on chemical reactions between AlF3, Al2O3, and SiO2. The felt is formed in-situ during the processing of shaped powdered precursors. It consists of randomly oriented whiskers which are mutually intergrown forming a rigid structure. The microstructure and properties of the felt and size of the whiskers can be modified by varying the amount of Al2O3 in the starting mixture. Loose mullite whiskers can be used as a reinforcement for polymer-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix composites. The felt can be used as preforms for fabricating composite materials as well as for thermal insulation and high temperature, chemically stable filters for liquids (melts) and gases.

  2. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  3. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  4. Modeling tin whisker growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Christopher Robert

    2013-08-01

    Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

  5. A novel route for synthesis of UV-resistant hydrophobic titania-containing silica aerogels by using potassium titanate as precursor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Lü, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Deli; Yan, Zaoxue; Chen, Min; Xie, Jimin

    2014-07-01

    Developing a novel and facile way to synthesize composite aerogels plays an important role in the applications of aerogels. UV-resistant hydrophobic titania-containing silica aerogels are prepared for the first time using potassium titanate as precursor by a modified ambient pressure drying method. The well established silica-titania networks, which can be tuned from 10 to 30 nm by adjusting the precursor content in the preparation process, provide effective confinement of spherical solid clusters. The UV-resistant hydrophobic composite aerogels show excellent photocatalytic dye degradation activity under visible light irradiation. This can be ascribed to the insert of suitable titania into the silica organizational structure. The present work gives a promising method of one pot synthesis and surface modification of aerogel composite structures, which have a broader application as photocatalyst. PMID:24825183

  6. Electronic properties of whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidukov, Iu. P.

    1984-04-01

    Size effects on the electronic properties of metals are examined, summarizing the results of recent experiments on metal whiskers of thickness about 1 micron. Whisker-growth techniques, the general properties of whiskers, and the theoretical principles of size effects on metal resistivity in general and on the resistance of whiskers in particular are reviewed. The experiments discussed are performed at low temperatures so that the mean-free path length of the conductance electrons is much greater than the whisker diameter. Findings presented include the temperature dependence of resistance (deviation from Matthiessen's rule and the angular dependence of the specular-reflection probability), magnetoresistance (size and temperature effects and quantum oscillations), and the effect of tensile stress on whisker electrical properties. Special consideration is given to a dc skin effect (in a layer about one Larmor radius thick) and quantum changes (when the Larmor radius is greater than the whisker diameter) observed in a magnetic field. Graphs and diagrams are provided, and the feasibility of experiments on whiskers less than 100 nm thick is considered.

  7. WHISKER LAKE WILDERNESS, WISCONSIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral-resource potential of the Whisker Lake Wilderness in northeastern Wisconsin was evaluated. Only a strip along the southwest corner of the wilderness is assessed as having probable mineral-resource potential. If mineral deposits exist, they probably are of the massive sulfide type. The geologic terrain precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources. Sand and gravel and peat in swampy lowlands are the only resources of the Whisker lake Wilderness.

  8. Buckling of C60 whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Koji; Kato, Ryoei; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2006-08-01

    The authors demonstrated the mechanics of materials for crystalline whiskers composed of C60 molecules; compressive deformation of the whiskers was observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy with simultaneous force measurement by means of an optical cantilever method, as used in atomic force microscopy. In response to compression along the long axis, the whiskers bent first elastically, then buckled. A whisker with 160nm diameter fractured brittlely at a strain of 0.08. According to Euler's formula, Young's modulus of the whisker was estimated to be 32-54GPa, which is 160%-650% of that of C60 bulk crystals.

  9. Titan's Methane Cycle is Closed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft determined a polar moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al., 2010, Science, 327, 1367). Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, one interpretation is that Titan's silicate core is partially hydrated (Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L20205). These authors point out that for the core to have avoided complete thermal dehydration to the present day, at least 30% of the potassium content of Titan must have leached into an overlying water ocean by the end of the core overturn. We calculate that for probable ammonia compositions of Titan's ocean (compositions with greater than 1% ammonia by weight), that this amount of potassium leaching is achievable via the substitution of ammonium for potassium during the hydration epoch. Formation of a hydrous core early in Titan's history by serpentinization results in the loss of one hydrogen molecule for every hydrating water molecule. We calculate that complete serpentinization of Titan's core corresponds to the release of more than enough hydrogen to reconstitute all of the methane atoms photolyzed throughout Titan's history. Insertion of molecular hydrogen by double occupancy into crustal clathrates provides a storage medium and an opportunity for ethane to be converted back to methane slowly over time--potentially completing a cycle that extends the lifetime of methane in Titan's surface atmosphere system by factors of several to an order of magnitude over the photochemically-calculated lifetime.

  10. Box-and-Whisker Plots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Russell D.

    1985-01-01

    Box-and-whisker plots (which give rapid visualization of batches of data) can be effectively used to present diverse collections of data used in traditional first-year chemistry courses. Construction of box-and-whisker plots and their use with bond energy data and data on heats of formation and solution are discussed. (JN)

  11. Hollow tin/chromium whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Li, James C. M.

    2010-05-01

    Tin whiskers have been an engineering challenge for over five decades. The mechanism has not been agreed upon thus far. This experiment aimed to identify a mechanism by applying compressive stresses to a tin film evaporated on silicon substrate with an adhesion layer of chromium in between. A phenomenon was observed in which hollow whiskers grew inside depleted areas. Using focused ion beam, the hollow whiskers were found to contain both tin and chromium. At the bottom of the depleted areas, thin tin/tin oxide film remained over the chromium layer. It indicates that tin transport occurred along the interface between tin and chromium layers.

  12. The Advantages of a Tapered Whisker

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher M.; Kramer, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    The role of facial vibrissae (whiskers) in the behavior of terrestrial mammals is principally as a supplement or substitute for short-distance vision. Each whisker in the array functions as a mechanical transducer, conveying forces applied along the shaft to mechanoreceptors in the follicle at the whisker base. Subsequent processing of mechanoreceptor output in the trigeminal nucleus and somatosensory cortex allows high accuracy discriminations of object distance, direction, and surface texture. The whiskers of terrestrial mammals are tapered and approximately circular in cross section. We characterize the taper of whiskers in nine mammal species, measure the mechanical deflection of isolated felid whiskers, and discuss the mechanics of a single whisker under static and oscillatory deflections. We argue that a tapered whisker provides some advantages for tactile perception (as compared to a hypothetical untapered whisker), and that this may explain why the taper has been preserved during the evolution of terrestrial mammals. PMID:20098714

  13. The advantages of a tapered whisker.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher M; Kramer, Eric M

    2010-01-01

    The role of facial vibrissae (whiskers) in the behavior of terrestrial mammals is principally as a supplement or substitute for short-distance vision. Each whisker in the array functions as a mechanical transducer, conveying forces applied along the shaft to mechanoreceptors in the follicle at the whisker base. Subsequent processing of mechanoreceptor output in the trigeminal nucleus and somatosensory cortex allows high accuracy discriminations of object distance, direction, and surface texture. The whiskers of terrestrial mammals are tapered and approximately circular in cross section. We characterize the taper of whiskers in nine mammal species, measure the mechanical deflection of isolated felid whiskers, and discuss the mechanics of a single whisker under static and oscillatory deflections. We argue that a tapered whisker provides some advantages for tactile perception (as compared to a hypothetical untapered whisker), and that this may explain why the taper has been preserved during the evolution of terrestrial mammals. PMID:20098714

  14. Sensing Device with Whisker Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Mitra J. (Inventor); Solomon, Joseph H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A sensing device includes an elongated whisker element having a flexible cantilever region and a base region where a change in moment or curvature is generated by bending of the cantilever region when it contacts an object. One or more sensor elements cooperatively associated with the whisker element provide one or more output signals that is/are representative of two orthogonal components of change in moment or curvature at the whisker base region to permit determination of object distance, fluid velocity profile, or object contour (shape) with accounting for lateral slip of the whisker element and frictional characteristics of the object. Multiple sensing devices can be arranged in arrays in a manner to sense object contour without or with adjustment for lateral slip.

  15. Sensing device with whisker elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Mitra J. (Inventor); Solomon, Joseph H. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A sensing device includes an elongated whisker element having a flexible cantilever region and a base region where a change in moment or curvature is generated by bending of the cantilever region when it contacts an object. One or more sensor elements cooperatively associated with the whisker element provide one or more output signals that is/are representative of two orthogonal components of change in moment or curvature at the whisker base region to permit determination of object distance, fluid velocity profile, or object contour (shape) with accounting for lateral slip of the whisker element and frictional characteristics of the object. Multiple sensing devices can be arranged in arrays in a manner to sense object contour without or with adjustment for lateral slip.

  16. Whisker reinforced glass ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, D.A.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1996-06-03

    The process for making an in-situ whisker reinforced glass-ceramic that is up to 1.5 times as strong as conventional glass-ceramics was developed at Virginia Tech and patented in 1993. This technology has been identified as having commercial potential for use in high temperature heat exchanger applications for the electric power generation field by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT). This technology was licensed by MATVA, Inc., a small Virginia business, for further development. In particular, the goal of this project was to develop a property database and conduct initial testing of heat exchanger prototypes to demonstrate its potential application. This final report describes how the glass precursor was formed, physical properties of the glass-ceramic, techniques for making heat exchanger prototypes.

  17. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, A. C.; Karpov, V. G.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-28

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  18. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, A. C.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  19. Flow sensing by pinniped whiskers.

    PubMed

    Miersch, L; Hanke, W; Wieskotten, S; Hanke, F D; Oeffner, J; Leder, A; Brede, M; Witte, M; Dehnhardt, G

    2011-11-12

    Beside their haptic function, vibrissae of harbour seals (Phocidae) and California sea lions (Otariidae) both represent highly sensitive hydrodynamic receptor systems, although their vibrissal hair shafts differ considerably in structure. To quantify the sensory performance of both hair types, isolated single whiskers were used to measure vortex shedding frequencies produced in the wake of a cylinder immersed in a rotational flow tank. These measurements revealed that both whisker types were able to detect the vortex shedding frequency but differed considerably with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While the signal detected by sea lion whiskers was substantially corrupted by noise, harbour seal whiskers showed a higher SNR with largely reduced noise. However, further analysis revealed that in sea lion whiskers, each noise signal contained a dominant frequency suggested to function as a characteristic carrier signal. While in harbour seal whiskers the unique surface structure explains its high sensitivity, this more or less steady fundamental frequency might represent the mechanism underlying hydrodynamic reception in the fast swimming sea lion by being modulated in response to hydrodynamic stimuli impinging on the hair. PMID:21969689

  20. Process for making whiskers, fibers and flakes of transition metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1992-01-01

    A process for making titanium and chromium nitrides of known morphology by reacting potassium titanate and chromium oxide in the gas phase with NH.sub.3. The products exhibit the same morphology as the starting material.

  1. Process for making whiskers, fibers and flakes of transition metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1992-06-02

    A process for making titanium and chromium nitrides of known morphology by reacting potassium titanate and chromium oxide in the gas phase with NH[sub 3]. The products exhibit the same morphology as the starting material.

  2. Material factors influencing metallic whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodekohr, Chad L.

    Whiskering refers to the formation of slender, long, metallic filaments, much thinner than a human hair, that grow on a metallic thin film surface. They are readily observed for pure and alloyed zinc (Zn), silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), indium (In), and tin (Sn) surfaces. The longest reported whisker length is 4.5 mm long but most high-aspect ratio whiskers range from 1-500 mum. The focus of this research is upon Sn whiskers. Sn whiskers pose serious reliability problems for the electronics industry and are known to be the source of failure in a wide range of electronic devices, such as nuclear power facilities, heart pacemakers, commercial satellites, aviation radar, telecommunication equipment, and desktop computers. The problem with whiskering has been recently exacerbated by the worldwide shift to lead (Pb) free electronics and the continuing reduction in electrical contact pitches. A thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of Sn whiskers is urgently needed. Currently, there is no universally accepted model that explains the broad range of observations on whiskering. The goals of this research are: (1) to develop a more detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms leading to the initiation and growth of Sn whiskers and (2) to outline reasonable mitigation strategies that could be followed to reduce or eliminate the problem of Sn whiskers. The major contributions of this work are: (1) A reliable method for growing Sn whiskers with predictable incubation times has been developed and tested. (2) A surface oxide is not necessary for whisker growth. (3) Intermetallic compounds (IMC) are not necessary for whisker growth. (4) Smoother, not rougher, substrate surfaces promote whisker growth. (5) Whiskers grow under both compressive and tensile thin film stress states. (6) Whisker growth increases with externally applied compression and tension forces. (7) Sn whiskers are composed of pure Sn except for the expected thin, native Sn oxide on their surface. (8) For

  3. Graphene Oxide Modified TiO2 Micro Whiskers and Their Photo Electrochemical Performance.

    PubMed

    Rambabu, Y; Jaiswal, Manu; Roy, Somnath C

    2016-05-01

    Harnessing the solar energy and producing clean fuel hydrogen through efficient photo-electrochemical water splitting has remained one of the most challenging endeavors in materials science. The core problem is to develop a suitable photo-catalyst material that absorbs a significant part of the solar spectrum and produces electron-hole pairs that can be easily separated without recombination. In the recent times, the composite of Titanium dioxide with graphene have been investigated to explore the advantages of both class of materials. Here we report on the photo-electrochemical properties of reduced graphene oxide functionalised TiO2 whiskers. The TiO2 whiskers are obtained from potassium titanium oxide (KTi8O16) synthesized through hydrothermal technique followed by ion exchange method and heat treatment. Graphene oxide was deposited on the as prepared TiO2 whiskers using hydrothermal method. As formed samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to confirm the presence of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) attached to TiO2 whiskers. Comparative photo electrochemical studies were carried out for TiO2 and reduced graphene oxide modified TiO2 whiskers. Among these, RGO modified TiO2 whiskers show significantly higher photo current density possibly due to enhancement in charge separation ability and longer electron life times. PMID:27483830

  4. Whisker reinforced structural ceramics: Progress in the VLS growth and use of long silicon carbide whiskers. [Vapor-liquid-solid

    SciTech Connect

    Gac, F.D.; Shalek, P.D.; Parkinson, W.J.; Edwards, C.; Price, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) whisker growth process, optimized for the production of short (approx.10 mm lengths) SiC whiskers, was modified to produce greater than or equal to 25 mm long whiskers. In conjunction with this modification, a plan was developed for incorporating an artificial-intelligence system to enhance the whisker growth process. An oriented whisker ribbon was produced from the long whiskers, as a step toward the development of a staple whisker yarn.

  5. Ceramic whisker reinforcement of dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Martin, T A; Antonucci, J M; Eichmiller, F C

    1999-02-01

    Resin composites currently available are not suitable for use as large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps due to their tendencies toward excessive fracture and wear. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to reinforce dental resins with ceramic single-crystalline whiskers of elongated shapes that possess extremely high strength. A novel method was developed that consisted of fusing silicate glass particles onto the surfaces of individual whiskers for a two-fold benefit: (1) to facilitate silanization regardless of whisker composition; and (2) to enhance whisker retention in the matrix by providing rougher whisker surfaces. Silicon nitride whiskers, with an average diameter of 0.4 microm and length of 5 microm, were coated by the fusion of silica particles 0.04 microm in size to the whisker surface at temperatures ranging from 650 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The coated whiskers were silanized and manually blended with resins by spatulation. Flexural, fracture toughness, and indentation tests were carried out for evaluation of the properties of the whisker-reinforced composites in comparison with conventional composites. A two-fold increase in strength and toughness was achieved in the whisker-reinforced composite, together with a substantially enhanced resistance to contact damage and microcracking. The highest flexural strength (195+/-8 MPa) and fracture toughness (2.1+/-0.3 MPa x m(1/2)) occurred in a composite reinforced with a whisker-silica mixture at whisker:silica mass ratio of 2:1 fused at 800 degrees C. To conclude, the strength, toughness, and contact damage resistance of dental resin composites can be substantially improved by reinforcement with fillers of ceramic whiskers fused with silica glass particles. PMID:10029470

  6. An Investigation into the Effect of a Post-electroplating Electrochemical Oxidation Treatment on Tin Whisker Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, M. A.; Haspel, D.; Wu, L.; Wilcox, G. D.; Mortimer, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the `cracked oxide theory' was proposed by Tu in 1994,1 there has only been a limited number of studies that have sought to investigate the effect of the Sn oxide on whisker growth. The current study has used electrochemical oxidation to produce oxide films, which has enabled the effect of the surface oxide thickness on whisker growth to be established. The effect of oxide thickness on whisker growth has been investigated for tin electrodeposits on both Cu and brass substrates. The influence of applied oxidation potential on the thickness of the Sn oxide film has been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for potassium bicarbonate-carbonate and borate buffer electrolyte solutions. Whisker growth from electrochemically oxidised Sn-Cu deposits on Cu and Sn deposits on brass has been investigated and compared with samples left to develop a native air-formed oxide. XPS studies show that the thickness of the electrochemically formed Sn oxide film is dependent on the applied oxidation potential and the total charge passed. Subsequent whisker growth studies demonstrate that electrochemically oxidised Sn-Cu deposits on Cu and Sn deposits on brass are significantly less susceptible to whisker growth than those having a native oxide film. For Sn deposits on brass, the electrochemically formed Sn oxide greatly reduces Zn oxide formation at the surface of the tin deposit, which results in whisker mitigation. For Sn-Cu deposits on Cu, the reduction in whisker growth must simply derive from the increased thickness of the Sn oxide, i.e. the Sn oxide film has an important role in stemming the development of whiskers.

  7. Growth process of Cu2Al6B4O17 whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengcai; Nai, Xueying; Zhu, Donghai; Guo, Fengqin; Zhang, Yongxing; Li, Wu

    2013-01-01

    The reactions occurred and growth process in the preparation of copper aluminum borate (Cu2Al6B4O17) whiskers based on flux method (Al2(SO4)3/CuSO4/H3BO3 as raw materials, K2SO4 as flux) were investigated. The thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analysis (TG-DSC), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrum analysis (ICP-AES) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results of reactants mixture quenched at various temperatures and phase diagrams of K2SO4-Al2(SO4)3 system and B2O3-Al2O3 system showed that the reaction process proceeds through three steps: the formation and decomposition of two different kinds of potassium aluminum sulfate (K3Al(SO4)3 and KAl(SO4)2); the formation of aluminum borate (Al4B2O9) and decomposition of copper sulfate (CuSO4) and boric acid (H3BO3); growth and formation of copper aluminum borate (Cu2Al6B4O17) whiskers. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis results indicated that morphology in growth of Cu2Al6B4O17 whiskers develops through three stages: nanoparticles, fan-shaped whiskers and agminate-needlelike whiskers.

  8. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Tin Whisker (and Other Metal Whisker) Homepage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay; Sampson, Mike; Leidecker, Henning; Kadesch, Jong

    2004-01-01

    This website provides information about tin whiskers and related research. The independent research performed during the past 50+ years is so vast that it is impractical to cover all aspects of tin whiskers in this one resource. Therefore, the absence of information in this website about a particular aspect of tin whiskers should NOT be construed as evidence of absence.

  9. Sn whiskers removed by energy photo flashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, N.; Yang, M.; Novak, J.; Igor, P.; Osterman, M.

    2012-10-01

    Sn whiskers have been known to be the major issue resulting in electronic circuit shorts. In this study, we present a novel energy photo flashing approach (photosintering) to shorten and eliminate Sn whiskers. It has been found that photosintering is very effective to modify and remove Sn whiskers; only a sub-millisecond duration photosintering can amazingly get rid of over 90 vol.% of Sn whiskers. Moreover, this photosintering approach has also been proved to cause no damages to electronic devices, suggesting it is a potentially promising way to improve Sn-based electronic surface termination.

  10. Metal Whiskers: Failure Modes and Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay A.; Leidecker, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Metal coatings especially tin, zinc and cadmium are unpredictably susceptible to the formation of electrically conductive, crystalline filaments referred to as metal whiskers. The use of such coatings in and around electrical systems presents a risk of electrical shorting. Examples of metal whisker formation are shown with emphasis on optical inspection techniques to improve probability of detection. The failure modes (i.e., electrical shorting behavior) associated with metal whiskers are described. Based on an almost 9- year long study, the benefits of polyurethane conformal coat (namely, Arathane 5750) to protect electrical conductors from whisker-induced short circuit anomalies is discussed.

  11. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers and method for modifying the whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-02-19

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  12. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers and method for modifying the whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  13. Electric field stimulated growth of Zn whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, D.; McCulloch, J.; Warrell, G. R.; Irving, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the impact of strong (˜104 V/cm) electric fields on the development of Zn whiskers. The original samples, with considerable whisker infestation were cut from Zn-coated steel floors and then exposed to electric fields stresses for 10-20 hours at room temperature. We used various electric field sources, from charges accumulated in samples irradiated by: (1) the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), (2) the electron beam of a medical linear accelerator, and (3) the ion beam of a linear accelerator; we also used (4) the electric field produced by a Van der Graaf generator. In all cases, the exposed samples exhibited a considerable (tens of percent) increase in whiskers concentration compared to the control sample. The acceleration factor defined as the ratio of the measured whisker growth rate over that in zero field, was estimated to approach several hundred. The statistics of lengths of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution known previously for metal whiskers. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  14. Rapid whisker movements in sleeping newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Uitermarkt, Brandt D; Fanning, Alexander S; Sokoloff, Greta; Blumberg, Mark S

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous activity in the sensory periphery drives infant brain activity and is thought to contribute to the formation of retinotopic and somatotopic maps. In infant rats during active (or REM) sleep, brainstem-generated spontaneous activity triggers hundreds of thousands of skeletal muscle twitches each day; sensory feedback from the resulting limb movements is a primary activator of forebrain activity. The rodent whisker system, with its precise isomorphic mapping of individual whiskers to discrete brain areas, has been a key contributor to our understanding of somatotopic maps and developmental plasticity. But although whisker movements are controlled by dedicated skeletal muscles, spontaneous whisker activity has not been entertained as a contributing factor to the development of this system. Here we report in 3- to 6-day-old rats that whiskers twitch rapidly and asynchronously during active sleep; furthermore, neurons in whisker thalamus exhibit bursts of activity that are tightly associated with twitches but occur infrequently during waking. Finally, we observed barrel-specific cortical activity during periods of twitching. This is the first report of self-generated, sleep-related twitches in the developing whisker system, a sensorimotor system that is unique for the precision with which it can be experimentally manipulated. The discovery of whisker twitching will allow us to attain a better understanding of the contributions of peripheral sensory activity to somatosensory integration and plasticity in the developing nervous system. PMID:23084988

  15. Platelet Composite Coatings for Tin Whisker Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-11-01

    Reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results for several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.

  16. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results formore » several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.« less

  17. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results for several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.

  18. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  19. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Junqing (Inventor); Newman, Aron (Inventor); Lennhoff, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber can have a surface and include at least one crystalline whisker extending from the surface of the carbon nanofiber. A battery anode composition can be formed from a plurality of carbon nanofibers each including a plurality of crystalline whiskers.

  20. Properties of whisker-reinforced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Hsueh, C.H.; Lin, H.T.; Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Warwick, W.H.; Waters, S.B.

    1994-09-01

    The paper summarizes studies of SiC whisker-reinforced alumina composites their properties and the influence of composition and microstructure. Both steady-state toughness and R-curve response increase with whisker content and diameter. Room temperature flexure strength of aluminas with different grain sizes also increases with whisker content. Resistance to slow crack growth under both monotonic and cyclic loading is improved by whisker reinforcement compared to alumina and other ceramics. The thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity exhibit a substantial increase and decrease, respectively, with whisker loadings above 10 vol %. Thermal expansion coefficients decrease in a systematic fashion with increase in whisker content. However, the expansion coefficients are greater parallel to hot pressing axis compared to perpendicular direction owing to internal stresses and preferred orientation of whiskers. The changes in mechanical and thermal properties due to SiC whisker additions result in substantial improvement in thermal shock resistance for samples of various sizes. At elevated temperatures, tests in air show that improvements in strength and resistance to strength degradation are associated with SiC whisker reinforcement. The limiting factors in elevated temperature mechanical response of the composite at 1200C and above are related to surface oxidation-reaction processes and creep. On the other hand, the creep resistance of the composite is far greater than alumina with a similar fine grain size at temperatures {le} 1200C. Furthermore by increasing the grain size of the alumina matrix, creep resistance of the composite can be increased. In essence, SiC whisker reinforced alumina composites provide an example of a system whose properties can be tailored through control of microstructure and composition.

  1. Tin Whiskers: A History of Documented Electrical System Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Brusse, Jay

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of tin and other metal whiskers, and the damage they have caused equipment. There are pictures of whiskers on various pieces of electronic equipment, and microscopic views of whiskers. There is also a chart with information on the documented failures associated with metal whiskers. There are also examples of on-orbit failures believed to be caused by whiskers.

  2. The probabilistic distribution of metal whisker lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, D.; Karpov, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    Significant reliability concerns in multiple industries are related to metal whiskers, which are random high aspect ratio filaments growing on metal surfaces and causing shorts in electronic packages. We derive a closed form expression for the probabilistic distribution of metal whisker lengths. Our consideration is based on the electrostatic theory of metal whiskers, according to which whisker growth is interrupted when its tip enters a random local "dead region" of a weak electric field. Here, we use the approximation neglecting the possibility of thermally activated escapes from the "dead regions," which is later justified. We predict a one-parameter distribution with a peak at a length that depends on the metal surface charge density and surface tension. In the intermediate range, it fits well the log-normal distribution used in the experimental studies, although it decays more rapidly in the range of very long whiskers. In addition, our theory quantitatively explains how the typical whisker concentration is much lower than that of surface grains. Finally, it predicts the stop-and-go phenomenon for some of the whiskers growth.

  3. The probabilistic distribution of metal whisker lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Niraula, D. Karpov, V. G.

    2015-11-28

    Significant reliability concerns in multiple industries are related to metal whiskers, which are random high aspect ratio filaments growing on metal surfaces and causing shorts in electronic packages. We derive a closed form expression for the probabilistic distribution of metal whisker lengths. Our consideration is based on the electrostatic theory of metal whiskers, according to which whisker growth is interrupted when its tip enters a random local “dead region” of a weak electric field. Here, we use the approximation neglecting the possibility of thermally activated escapes from the “dead regions,” which is later justified. We predict a one-parameter distribution with a peak at a length that depends on the metal surface charge density and surface tension. In the intermediate range, it fits well the log-normal distribution used in the experimental studies, although it decays more rapidly in the range of very long whiskers. In addition, our theory quantitatively explains how the typical whisker concentration is much lower than that of surface grains. Finally, it predicts the stop-and-go phenomenon for some of the whiskers growth.

  4. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan S W; Graff, Matthew M; Bresee, Chris S; Man, Yan B; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2016-08-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents. PMID:27574705

  5. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan S. W.; Graff, Matthew M.; Bresee, Chris S.; Man, Yan B.; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents. PMID:27574705

  6. Potassium test

    MedlinePlus

    ... activity of nerves and muscles, especially the heart. Low levels of potassium can lead to an irregular heartbeat or other ... cell destruction Too much potassium in your diet Low levels of potassium ( hypokalemia ) may be due to: Chronic diarrhea Cushing ...

  7. Potassium Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, John

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity to determine whether the radioactivity of a pure potassium salt is directly proportional to the amount of potassium in it and whether this could be used as a method of analysis for potassium in a solid. (MKR)

  8. Improved dispersion of silicon nitride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.H.; Buchta, M.

    1995-10-01

    To improve the dispersion of silicon nitride whiskers in aqueous suspensions, a standard dispersant used in glass fiber industry, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) is added. It was found that the viscosity of the whisker suspensions is lowered and the centrifuged density of the suspensions is increased with the addition of the APS. The pH values of suspensions before and after the addition of APS indicate that ASP extracts H{sup +} ions from the solutions and the adsorption of APS on silicon nitride is saturated in the experiment. The results indicate a colloidal route to the processing of ceramic composites with silicon nitride whiskers as reinforcements.

  9. A model for nucleation of tin whisker through dislocation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Takamizawa, M.; Murakami, K.; Hino, M.

    2009-05-01

    A model for the nucleation and growth processes of Sn whisker is offered. High density of localized screw dislocations by deformation form the dense spiral steps of atomic scale on Sn surface. The spiral steps would induce the nucleation of Sn whisker. Edge dislocations localized at the same region where dense screw dislocations exist supply Sn atoms to the Sn whisker through pipe diffusion. Both screw and edge dislocations would bend along almost one direction, namely, to relax the external shear stress. The image force also helps to bend the dislocations perpendicular to the whisker side-surface. The bending of dislocations at root of whisker leads the bend of whisker. The pipe diffusion of Sn atoms through edge dislocations from bulk Sn toward whisker is suppressed at the bent part of edge dislocation, resulting in release of Sn atoms inside whisker and leading to the growth of whisker near its root.

  10. Contact Whiskers for Millimeter Wave Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.; Grange, J. A.; Lichtenberger, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Several techniques are investigated for making short conical tips on wires (whiskers) used for contacting millimeter-wave Schottky diodes. One procedure, using a phosphoric and chromic acid etching solution (PCE), is found to give good results on 12 microns phosphor-bronze wires. Full cone angles of 60 degrees-80 degrees are consistently obtained, compared with the 15 degrees-20 degrees angles obtained with the widely used sodium hydroxide etch. Methods are also described for cleaning, increasing the tip diameter (i.e. blunting), gold plating, and testing the contact resistance of the whiskers. The effects of the whisker tip shape on the electrical resistance, inductance, and capacitance of the whiskers are studied, and examples given for typical sets of parameters.

  11. Creep and its effect on Sn whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osenbach, John W.

    2009-11-01

    A comprehensive quantitative whisker growth theory has been developed. In this theory whisker growth is controlled by the ratio of the long range grain boundary diffusion creep relaxation rate to the short range creep relaxation rate. The theory relies solely on solid state diffusion effects and does not require additional constraints or assumptions to explain whisker growth. It explains a number of heretofore relatively poorly explained and puzzling observations reported over the past 6 decades, including: (i) Sn films that are 1-10 μm thick are more susceptible to whisker growth than thinner or thicker films; (ii) Sn film contamination in the form of hydrocarbons, Cu, hydrogen, etc., tend to increase the whisker propensity; (iii) as-deposited Sn films tend to be more susceptible to whisker growth than fused films; (iv) postplate annealing tends to improve the whisker resistance; (v) whisker growth rate tends toward zero as the temperature exceeds 100 °C; (vi) whisker growth propensity depends upon the crystallographic orientation of the Sn film; and (vii) the large statistical variations reported in whisker density and incubation time. The theory predicts: (i) the magnitude of the as deposited film stress state is not fundamental to whisker growth; (ii) at high stresses where power law creep relaxation dominates, whiskers do not form.; (iii) whiskers occur in those regions of the film that are exposed to stresses lower than that required for power law creep; (iv) whiskers form when a quasiequilibrium stress state is achieved as the stress in the film tends toward zero; (v) anything that affects (limits or restrains) power law creep and its associated stress dissipation, such as grain boundary pinning, increases the propensity for whisker growth; (vi) pinning tends to increase the whisker propensity and increase the whisker growth rate; and (vii) films with certain crystallographic orientations and grain sizes are less prone to whisker growth, independent of the

  12. Growth process of Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17} whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chengcai; Nai Xueying; Zhu Donghai; Guo Fengqin; Zhang Yongxing; Li Wu

    2013-01-15

    The reactions occurred and growth process in the preparation of copper aluminum borate (Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17}) whiskers based on flux method (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}/CuSO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as raw materials, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as flux) were investigated. The thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analysis (TG-DSC), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrum analysis (ICP-AES) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results of reactants mixture quenched at various temperatures and phase diagrams of K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} system and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system showed that the reaction process proceeds through three steps: the formation and decomposition of two different kinds of potassium aluminum sulfate (K{sub 3}Al(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}); the formation of aluminum borate (Al{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 9}) and decomposition of copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) and boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}); growth and formation of copper aluminum borate (Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17}) whiskers. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis results indicated that morphology in growth of Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17} whiskers develops through three stages: nanoparticles, fan-shaped whiskers and agminate-needlelike whiskers. - Graphical abstract: The morphology in growth of Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17} whiskers develops through three stages: nanoparticles, fan-shaped whiskers and agminate-needlelike whiskers. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction process in the preparation of Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17} whiskers was researched systematically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal growth mechanism of Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17} whiskers was proposed by theory and experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Properties of Cu{sub 2}Al{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 17} were analyzed by instruments, such as TG-DSC, ICP-AES, XRD and SEM.

  13. Space Shuttle Program Tin Whisker Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimi, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of tin whiskers (TW) on space shuttle hardware led to a program to investigate and removal and mitigation of the source of the tin whiskers. A Flight Control System (FCS) avionics box failed during vehicle testing, and was routed to the NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot for testing and disassembly. The internal inspection of the box revealed TW growth visible without magnification. The results of the Tiger Team that was assembled to investigate and develop recommendations are reviewed in this viewgraph presentation.

  14. Tin Whisker Growth on NdSn3 Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hong-Chang; Xian, Ai-Ping

    2011-09-01

    Tin whiskers grew rapidly and spontaneously on NdSn3 powder under atmospheric conditions. By in situ optical microscopy observation, the incubation period of whisker growth was found to be very short, only about 10 min to 30 min, and the whisker growth rate was very high (up to 73 Å/s). It is proposed that the strong tendency for whisker growth on NdSn3 powder indicates that such growth is closely related to decomposition of NdSn3 under atmospheric conditions. An electron beam irradiation effect on whisker growth was also observed, in which the whiskers cease to grow after observation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Methane Clouds on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.

    Following the Voyager encounter with Titan in 1981 Saturn's largest moon was hypothesized sport a liquid cycle similar that on Earth with clouds rain and seas. On Titan methane is the condensible playing the role that water plays on Earth. Although the presence of seas is difficult to establish from ground methane clouds have been detected on Titan. Ground-based observations reveal that Titan's clouds differ remarkedly from their terrestrial counterparts. Titan's clouds are sparse reside primarily at particular altitude and concentrate presently in the south pole. That Titan's clouds are exotic is not surprising. Titan receives ~100 times less sunlight than Earth to drive weather. In addition Titan's radiative time constant is 180 years large compared to the 3 month terrestrial value. With little power and sluggish conditions it is not clear how clouds form on Titan. This talk will compare Titan to Earth to explore the nature of clouds under Titan's foreign conditions.

  16. Morphology and Growth Kinetics of Straight and Kinked Tin Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, Donald; Michael, Joseph; Grant, Richard P.; McKenzie, Bonnie; Yelton, W. Graham

    2013-03-01

    Time-lapse SEM studies of Sn whiskers were conducted to estimate growth kinetics and document whisker morphologies. For straight whiskers, growth rates of 3 to 4 microns per day were measured at room temperature. Two types of kinked whiskers were observed. For Type A kinks, the original growth segment spatial orientation remains unchanged, there are no other changes in morphology or diameter, and growth continues. For Type B kinks, the spatial orientation of the original segment changes and it appears that the whisker bends over. Whiskers with Type B kinks show changes in morphology and diameter at the base, indicating grain boundary motion in the film, which eliminates the conditions suitable for long-term whisker growth. To estimate the errors in the whisker growth measurements, a technique is presented to correct for SEM projection effects. With this technique, the actual growth angles and lengths of a large number of whiskers were collected. It was found that most whiskers grow at moderate or shallow angles with respect to the surface; few straight whiskers grow nearly normal to the surface. In addition, there is no simple correlation between growth angles and lengths for whiskers observed over an approximate 2-year period.

  17. Tensile Behavior of Single-Crystal Tin Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. S.; Sarkar, R.; Xie, H.-X.; Mayer, C.; Rajagopalan, J.; Chawla, N.

    2014-04-01

    The growth of metallic (predominantly Sn) whiskers from pure metallic platings has been studied for over 50 years. While the phenomenon of Sn whiskering has been studied for decades, very little is known about the mechanical properties of these materials. This can be attributed to the difficulty in handling, gripping, and testing such fine-diameter and high-aspect-ratio whiskers. We report on the stress-strain behavior of Sn whiskers inside a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Lift-out of the whiskers was conducted in situ in the FIB, and the whiskers were tested using a microelectromechanical system tensile testing stage. Using this technique, the whiskers had minimum exposure to ambient air and were not handled by hand. SEM images after fracture enabled reliable calculation of the whisker cross-sectional area. Tests on two different whiskers revealed relatively high tensile strengths of 720 MPa and 880 MPa, respectively, and a limited strain to failure of ˜2% to 3%. For both whiskers, the Young's modulus was between 42 GPa and 45 GPa. It is interesting to note that the whiskers were quite strong and had limited ductility. These findings are intriguing and provide a basis for further work to understand the effect of Sn whisker mechanical properties on short circuits in electronics.

  18. Understanding the movements of metal whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. G.

    2015-06-01

    Metal whiskers often grow across leads of electric equipment causing short circuits and raising significant reliability issues. Their nature remains a mystery after several decades of research. It was observed that metal whiskers exhibit large amplitude movements under gentle air flow or, according to some testimonies, without obvious stimuli. Understanding the physics behind that movements would give additional insights into the nature of metal whiskers. Here, we quantitatively analyze possible mechanisms of the observed movements: (1) minute air currents; (2) Brownian motion due to random bombardments with the air molecules; (3) mechanically caused movements, such as (a) transmitted external vibrations, and (b) torque exerted due to material propagation along curved whiskers (the garden hose instability); (4) time dependent electric fields due to diffusion of ions; and (5) non-equilibrium electric fields making it possible for some whiskers to move. For all these mechanisms, we provide numerical estimates. Our conclusion is that the observed movements are likely due to the air currents or electric recharging caused by external light or similar factors.

  19. Whisker Formation on SAC305 Soldered Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschter, S.; Snugovsky, P.; Bagheri, Z.; Kosiba, E.; Romansky, M.; Kennedy, J.; Snugovsky, L.; Perovic, D.

    2014-11-01

    This article describes the results of a whisker formation study on SAC305 assemblies, evaluating the effects of lead-frame materials and cleanliness in different environments: low-stress simulated power cycling (50-85°C thermal cycling), thermal shock (-55°C to 85°C), and high temperature/high humidity (85°C/85% RH). Cleaned and contaminated small outline transistors, large leaded quad flat packs (QFP), plastic leaded chip carrier packages, and solder balls with and without rare earth elements (REE) were soldered to custom designed test boards with Sn3Ag0.5Cu (SAC305) solder. After assembly, all the boards were cleaned, and half of them were recontaminated (1.56 µg/cm2 Cl-). Whisker length, diameter, and density were measured. Detailed metallurgical analysis on components before assembly and on solder joints before and after testing was performed. It was found that whiskers grow from solder joint fillets, where the thickness is less than 25 µm, unless REE was present. The influence of lead-frame and solder ball material, microstructure, cleanliness, and environment on whisker characteristics is discussed. This article provides detailed metallurgical observations and select whisker length data obtained during this multiyear testing program.

  20. Potassium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Potassium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: K Formal name: Potassium, blood or urine Related tests: Chloride , Sodium , Bicarbonate , ...

  1. Titan Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s methane clouds have received much attention since they were first discovered spectroscopically (Griffith et al. 1998). Titan's seasons evolve slowly, and there is growing evidence of a seasonal response in the regions of methane cloud formation (e.g. Rodriguez et al. 2009). A complete, three-dimensional view of Titan’s clouds is possible through the determination of cloud-top heights from Cassini images (e.g., Ádámkovics et al. 2010). Even though Titan’s surface is warmed by very little sunlight, we now know Titan’s methane clouds are convective, evolving through tens of kilometers of altitude on timescales of hours to days with dynamics similar to clouds that appear on Earth (Porco et al. 2005). Cassini ISS has also shown evidence of rain storms on Titan that produce surface accumulation of methane (Turtle et al. 2009). Most recently, Cassini has revealed a 1000-km-scale, arrow-shaped cloud at the equator followed by changes that appear to be evidence of surface precipitation (Turtle et al. 2011b). Individual convective towers simulated with high fidelity indicate that surface convergence of methane humidity and dynamic lifting are required to trigger deep, precipitating convection (e.g. Barth & Rafkin 2010). The global expanses of these cloud outbursts, the evidence for surface precipitation, and the requirement of dynamic convergence and lifting at the surface to trigger deep convection motivate an analysis of storm formation in the context of Titan’s global circulation. I will review our current understanding of Titan’s methane meteorology using Cassini and ground-based observations and, in particular, global circulation model simulations of Titan’s methane cycle. When compared with cloud observations, our simulations indicate an essential role for planetary-scale atmospheric waves in organizing convective storms on large scales (Mitchell et al. 2011). I will end with predictions of Titan’s weather during the upcoming northern

  2. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  3. NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage http://nepp.nasa.gov/whisker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry

    2000-01-01

    The NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage provides general information and GSFC Code 562 experimentation results regarding the well known phenomenon of tin whisker formation from pure tin plated substrates. The objective of this www site is to provide a central repository for information pertaining to this phenomenon and to provide status of the GSFC experiments to understand the behavior of tin whiskers in space environments. The Tin Whisker www site is produced by Code 562. This www site does not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in this www site is at the level of that produced by industry and university researchers and is published at international conferences.

  4. Titanic: A Statistical Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takis, Sandra L.

    1999-01-01

    Uses the available data about the Titanic's passengers to interest students in exploring categorical data and the chi-square distribution. Describes activities incorporated into a statistics class and gives additional resources for collecting information about the Titanic. (ASK)

  5. Titan Haze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie M.; West, Robert; Lavvas, Panayotis

    2011-01-01

    The Titan haze exerts a dominating influence on surface visibility and atmospheric radiative heating at optical and near-infrared wavelengths and our desire to understand surface composition and atmospheric dynamics provides a strong motivation to study the properties of the haze. Prior to the Cassini/Huygens missions the haze was known to be global in extent, with a hemispheric contrast asymmetry, with a complicated structure in the polar vortex region poleward of about 55 deg latitude, and with a distinct layer near 370 km altitude outside of the polar vortex at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby. The haze particles measured by the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft were both highly polarizing and strongly forward scattering, a combination that seems to require an aggregation of small (several tens of nm radius) primary particles. These same properties were seen in the Cassini orbiter and Huygens Probe data. The most extensive set of optical measurements were made inside the atmosphere by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument on the Huygens Probe. At the probe location as determined by the DISR measurements the average haze particle contained about 3000 primary particles whose radius is about 40 nm. Three distinct vertical regions were seen in the DISR data with differing particle properties. Refractive indices of the particles in the main haze layer resemble those reported by Khare et al. between O.3S and about 0.7 micron but are more absorbing than the Khare et al. results between 0.7 micron and the long-wavelength limit of the DISR spectra at 1.6 micron. These and other results are described by Tomasko et al., and a broader summary of results was given by Tomasko and West,. New data continue to stream in from the Cassini spacecraft. New data analyses and new laboratory and model results continue to move the field forward. Titan's 'detached' haze layer suffered a dramatic drop in altitude near equinox in 2009 with implications for the circulation

  6. Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F.; Fedorov, P. P.

    2009-07-15

    Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  7. The Climate of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Lora, Juan M.

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, the Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturn system has revolutionized our understanding of Titan and its climate. Veiled in a thick organic haze, Titan's visible appearance belies an active, seasonal weather cycle operating in the lower atmosphere. Here we review the climate of Titan, as gleaned from observations and models. Titan's cold surface temperatures (˜90 K) allow methane to form clouds and precipitation analogously to Earth's hydrologic cycle. Because of Titan's slow rotation and small size, its atmospheric circulation falls into a regime resembling Earth's tropics, with weak horizontal temperature gradients. A general overview of how Titan's atmosphere responds to seasonal forcing is provided by estimating a number of climate-related timescales. Titan lacks a global ocean, but methane is cold-trapped at the poles in large seas, and models indicate that weak baroclinic storms form at the boundary of Titan's wet and dry regions. Titan's saturated troposphere is a substantial reservoir of methane, supplied by deep convection from the summer poles. A significant seasonal cycle, first revealed by observations of clouds, causes Titan's convergence zone to migrate deep into the summer hemispheres, but its connection to polar convection remains undetermined. Models suggest that downwelling of air at the winter pole communicates upper-level radiative cooling, reducing the stability of the middle troposphere and priming the atmosphere for spring and summer storms when sunlight returns to Titan's lakes. Despite great gains in our understanding of Titan, many challenges remain. The greatest mystery is how Titan is able to retain an abundance of atmospheric methane with only limited surface liquids, while methane is being irreversibly destroyed by photochemistry. A related mystery is how Titan is able to hide all the ethane that is produced in this process. Future studies will need to consider the interactions between Titan's atmosphere, surface

  8. Tin Whisker Formation - A Stress Relieve Phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Dittes, M.; Oberndorff, P.; Crema, P.; Su, P.

    2006-02-07

    With the move towards lead-free electronics also the solderable finish of electronic components' terminations are converted. While the typical finish was containing 5 % to 20 % lead (Pb) and thus was almost whisker free, lead (Pb)-free finishes such as pure tin or high tin alloys are rather prone to grow whisker. These whiskers are spontaneous protrusions that grow to a significant length of up to millimeters with a typical diameter in the range of few microns and are suspect to cause shorts in electronic assemblies. The latest details of the mechanisms are not yet understood. However it appears to be well established that the driving force for tin whisker growth is a compressive stress in the tin layer and that this stress is released by whisker formation. Besides the mechanism for whisker growth therefore the mechanism of the stress induction is of interest. The origin of that stress may have multiple sources. Among others the most important one is the volume increase within the tin layer due the formation of intermetallics at the interface to the base material. This applies to all copper based material. For base materials with a coefficient of thermal expansion (cte) significantly different from the tin finish another mechanism plays the dominant role. This is the induction of stress during thermal cycling due to the different expansion of the materials with every temperature change. Another mechanism for stress induction may be the oxidation of the finish, which also leads to a local volume increase. Based on the knowledge of stress induction various mitigation strategies can be deducted. Most common is the introduction of a diffusion barrier (e.g. Ni) in order to prevent the growth of the Cu-Sn intermetallics, the controlled growth of Cu-Sn intermetallics in order to prevent their irregularity or the introduction of a mechanical buffer material targeting at the minimisation of the cte mismatch between base and finish material. With respect to the stress

  9. Does Titan have oceans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1994-04-01

    Titan is one of the few worlds in the solar system whose essential nature remains hidden. Satellite data from Voyager are examined. Remote sensing investigations from Earth are explored. Possible models of Titan's surface are reviewed. A closer look at Titan would provide useful information. The data to be gathered by the planetary mission Cassini is discussed.

  10. Tides in Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Nicole J.

    1997-01-01

    Tides raised in Titan by Saturn give rise to a static and a periodic deformation; both will be measured with Doppler tracking during the CASSINI Tour of the Saturnian System. The latter deformation is due to the significant eccentricity of Titan's orbit and has a frequency equal to the orbital angular velocity of Titan.

  11. Intensive Titan exploration begins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Orbiter spacecraft first skimmed through the tenuous upper atmosphere of Titan on 26 October 2004. This moon of Saturn is unique in our solar system, with a dense nitrogen atmosphere that is cold enough in places to rain methane, the feedstock for the atmospheric chemistry that produces hydrocarbons, nitrile compounds, and Titan's orange haze. The data returned from this flyby supply new information on the magnetic field and plasma environment around Titan, expose new facets of the dynamics and chemistry of Titan's atmosphere, and provide the first glimpses of what appears to be a complex, fluid-processed, geologically young Titan surface.

  12. A MRI-COMPATIBLE SYSTEM FOR WHISKER STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Li, Limin; Weiss, Craig; Talk, Andrew C.; Disterhoft, John F.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a system for whisker stimulation designed for functional studies in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environments. This system, which incorporates real-time optical monitoring of the vibration stimulus, can generate well-controlled and reproducible whisker deflections with amplitudes up to 2 mm and frequencies up to 75 Hz, suitable for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of animals. Whiskers on either or both sides of the head can be stimulated selectively during fMRI experiments without removing the subject from the magnet. With a user-friendly graphical interface of a computer, a user can conveniently control both the whisker vibration and gating of the MR imager, and synchronize the stimulation with the fMRI acquisition to ensure precise timing of the stimulus presentation. This whisker stimulation system should facilitate a wide variety of fMRI investigations of the neural systems mediating sensory information from the whiskers. PMID:22322316

  13. Significance of Nucleation Kinetics in Sn Whisker Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chason, E.; Pei, F.; Briant, C. L.; Kesari, H.; Bower, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Sn whiskers are believed to form in response to stress in layers used as protective coatings. However, what makes them form at specific sites on the surface is not known. We have used thermal expansion mismatch to induce stress and observe the resulting whisker formation. Cross-sectional measurements of the region around whiskers show that there are oblique grain boundaries under the whiskers that are not seen in the as-deposited columnar structure. The kinetics also suggest that the whiskering sites may be formed by a nucleation process. Based on these results, we propose a nucleation mechanism in which the boundaries of the surrounding grains migrate due to strain energy differences and create oblique boundaries at which whiskers can form. A simple model is developed to predict the stress-dependence of the nucleation rate.

  14. Significance of Nucleation Kinetics in Sn Whisker Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chason, E.; Pei, F.; Briant, C. L.; Kesari, H.; Bower, A. F.

    2014-09-01

    Sn whiskers are believed to form in response to stress in layers used as protective coatings. However, what makes them form at specific sites on the surface is not known. We have used thermal expansion mismatch to induce stress and observe the resulting whisker formation. Cross-sectional measurements of the region around whiskers show that there are oblique grain boundaries under the whiskers that are not seen in the as-deposited columnar structure. The kinetics also suggest that the whiskering sites may be formed by a nucleation process. Based on these results, we propose a nucleation mechanism in which the boundaries of the surrounding grains migrate due to strain energy differences and create oblique boundaries at which whiskers can form. A simple model is developed to predict the stress-dependence of the nucleation rate.

  15. Further development and application of polycrystalline metal whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schladitz, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    High strength metal whiskers have a larger versatile field of application than monocrystalline whiskers. Although polycrystalline metal whiskers can be used for composites, preferably by extrusion in thermoplastics or by infiltration of resins or metals into whisker networks, the chief application at present may be the production and various use of whisker networks. Such networks can be produced up to high degrees of porosity and besides high mechanical strength, they have high inside surfaces and high electric conductivity. There are for instance, applications concerning construction of electrodes for batteries and fuel cells, catalysts and also new heat-exchanger material, capable of preparing fuel oil and gasoline in order to assist a high-efficiency combustion. The technical application of polycrystalline metal whiskers require their modification as well as the construction of a pilot production unit.

  16. Preparation of titanate nanosheets and nanoribbons by exfoliation of amine intercalated titanates.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, A Anto; Pradeep, A; Rajamathi, Michael

    2016-05-14

    Amine intercalated titanates were synthesized by direct exchange of potassium ions of K2Ti4O9 by alkyl ammonium ions of various alkyl chain lengths. These intercalated solids exfoliate well in alcohols of different alkyl chain lengths and non-polar solvents such as toluene and hexane to yield colloidal dispersions of titanate nanosheets. The longer the alkyl chain of the intercalated amine the better the exfoliation of the intercalated titanate in long chain alcohols and non-polar solvents. While non-uniform rectangular nanosheets were obtained when aggressive sonication was employed for exfoliating the solids, nanoribbons were obtained when the exfoliation was carried out by gently stirring the solids in the solvent. PMID:27089839

  17. Pressureless sintering of whisker-toughened ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    A pressureless sintering method is disclosed for use in the production of whisker-toughened ceramic composites wherein the sintered density of composites containing up to about 20 vol. % SiC whiskers is improved by reducing the average aspect ratio of the whiskers to from about 10 to about 20. Sintering aids further improve the density, permitting the production of composites containing 20 vol. % SiC with sintered densities of 94% or better of theoretical density by a pressureless sintering method.

  18. Pressureless sintering of whisker-toughened ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1993-01-01

    A pressureless sintering method is disclosed for use in the production of whisker-toughened ceramic composites wherein the sintered density of composites containing up to about 20 vol. % SiC whiskers is improved by reducing the average aspect ratio of the whiskers to from about 10 to about 20. Sintering aids further improve the density, permitting the production of composites containing 20 vol. % SiC with sintered densities of 94% or better of theoretical density by a pressureless sintering method.

  19. Pressureless sintering of whiskered-toughened ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1994-01-01

    A pressureless sintering method is disclosed for use in the production of whisker-toughened ceramic composites wherein the sintered density of composites containing up to about 20 vol. % SiC whiskers is improved by reducing the average aspect ratio of the whiskers to from about 10 to about 20. Sintering aids further improve the density, permitting the production of composites containing 20 vol. % SiC with sintered densities of 94% or better of theoretical density by a pressureless sintering method.

  20. EVALUATION OF LOCAL STRAIN EVOLUTION FROM METALLIC WHISKER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Lam, P.

    2011-05-11

    Evolution of local strain on electrodeposited tin films upon aging has been monitored by digital image correlation (DIC) for the first time. Maps of principal strains adjacent to whisker locations were constructed via comparing pre- and post-growth scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Results showed that the magnitude of the strain gradient plays an important role in whisker growth. DIC visualized the dynamic growth process in which the alteration of strain field has been identified to cause growth of subsequent whiskers.

  1. Ferroelastic domains in lead-free barium zirconate titanate - barium calcium titanate piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Matthias Claudius

    Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions. Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of

  2. Effects of cellulose whiskers on properties of soy protein thermoplastics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixiang; Cao, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lina

    2006-07-14

    Environmentally-friendly SPI/cellulose whisker composites were successfully prepared using a colloidal suspension of cellulose whiskers, to reinforce soy protein isolate (SPI) plastics. The cellulose whiskers, having an average length of 1.2 microm and diameter of 90 nm, respectively, were prepared from cotton linter pulp by hydrolyzing with sulfuric acid aqueous solution. The effects of the whisker content on the morphology and properties of the glycerol-plasticized SPI composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, water-resistivity testing and tensile testing. The results indicated that, with the addition of 0 to 30 wt.-% of cellulose whiskers, strong interactions occurred both between the whiskers and between the filler and the SPI matrix, reinforcing the composites and preserving their biodegradability. Both the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the SPI/cellulose whisker composites increased from 5.8 to 8.1 MPa and from 44.7 to 133.2 MPa, respectively, at a relative humidity of 43%, following an increase of the whisker content from 0 to 30 wt.-%. Furthermore, the incorporation of the cellulose whiskers into the SPI matrix led to an improvement in the water resistance for the SPI-based composites. PMID:16921539

  3. Controlled positions and kinetic analysis of spontaneous tin whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chien-Hao; Chen, Hao; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Albert T.

    2011-09-01

    This study achieved controlling the positions of spontaneous growth of tin whiskers. We surmounted the unpredictable growing nature of such whiskers and performed accurately quantitative analyses of the growth kinetics and yielded precise measurement of the growth rate. Furthermore, using synchrotron radiation x-ray, this study determined the stress variations in conjunction with whisker growth that fitted appropriately to the model. Accordingly, the results could address the debate held for decades and prove that forming a surface oxide layer is one of the required and necessary conditions for controlling the positions of spontaneous growth of tin whiskers.

  4. Silicon carbide whisker-zirconia reinforced mullite and alumina ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Becher, Paul F.; Tiegs, Terry N.

    1987-01-01

    The flexural strength and/or fracture toughness of SiC whisker-reinforced composites utilizing mullite or alumina as the matrix material for the composite are increased by the addition of zirconia in a monoclinic or tetragonal phase to the matrix. The zirconia addition also provides for a lower hot-pressing temperature and increases the flexural strength and/or fracture toughness of the SiC whisker-reinforced composites over SiC whisker-reinforced composites of the similar matrix materials reinforced with similar concentrations of SiC whiskers.

  5. Plastic deformation of alumina reinforced with SiC whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    DeArellano-Lopez, A.R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    Addition of small amounts of stiff reinforcement (SiC whiskers) to a polycrystalline AL{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix partially inhibits grain boundary sliding because of an increase in threshold stress. When the concentration of whiskers is high enough, a pure diffusional mechanism takes over the control of plastic deformation of the composites. For higher whisker loadings, the materials creep properties depend on a microstructural feature different from the nominal grain size. A tentative correlation of this effective microstructural parameter with the spacing between the whiskers was established through a model.

  6. Hybrid Effect on Whisker Orientation Dependence of Composite Strength of Aluminum Cast Alloy Reinforced by Al2O3 Whiskers and SiC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md, Rafiquzzaman; Arai, Yoshio

    The hybrid effect on the orientation dependence of the composite strength of an aluminum cast alloy reinforced by Al2O3 whiskers and SiC particles is studied experimentally and numerically. Two types of specimens are prepared for monotonic bending tests. The longitudinal specimen orientation (maximum stress direction) is parallel to or normal to randomly oriented whiskers in plane. The monotonic strength is 18% higher when the hybrid metal matrix composite (MMC) is subjected to an external load parallel to the random whisker orientation in plane than when the load is perpendicular to the whisker orientation. The whisker orientation dependence of composite strength in hybrid composite is weaker than that in whisker-reinforced composite. On the fracture surface of the specimen loaded along the direction parallel to the random whisker orientation in plane, most whiskers are broken while many de-bonded interfaces between the whiskers and matrix are observed on the fracture surface of the specimen loaded along the direction perpendicular to the whisker orientation. To characterize the hybrid effect on the whisker orientation dependence of composite strength, a three-dimensional hybrid composite unit cell model including one whisker and a few particles under a periodic boundary condition is developed using the finite element method. The hybrid composites have higher whisker stress than whisker-reinforced composite when subjected to an external load parallel to the whisker orientation if these composites have the same total volume fraction of reinforcement and the particles are distributed randomly. Under an external load perpendicular to the whisker orientation, the interface stress of hybrid composites is lower than that of whisker-reinforced composite. As a result, the strength difference for parallel and perpendicular loading conditions of the hybrid composites is smaller than that of whisker-reinforced composite. Thus, the weak whisker orientation effect in the

  7. Algorithms of whisker-mediated touch perception.

    PubMed

    Maravall, Miguel; Diamond, Mathew E

    2014-04-01

    Comparison of the functional organization of sensory modalities can reveal the specialized mechanisms unique to each modality as well as processing algorithms that are common across modalities. Here we examine the rodent whisker system. The whisker's mechanical properties shape the forces transmitted to specialized receptors. The sensory and motor systems are intimately interconnected, giving rise to two forms of sensation: generative and receptive. The sensory pathway is a test bed for fundamental concepts in computation and coding: hierarchical feature detection, sparseness, adaptive representations, and population coding. The central processing of signals can be considered a sequence of filters. At the level of cortex, neurons represent object features by a coordinated population code which encompasses cells with heterogeneous properties. PMID:24549178

  8. Nucleation and growth of tin whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Zhang, Bei; Li, James C. M.

    2011-06-01

    Pure tin film of one micron thick was evaporated onto a silicon substrate with chromium and nickel underlayers. The tinned silicon disk was bent by applying a dead load at the center and supported below around the edge to apply biaxial compressive stresses to the tin layer. After 180 C vacuum annealing for 1,2,4,6, and 8 weeks, tin whiskers/hillocks grew. A quantitative method revealed that the overall growth rate decreased with time with a tendency for saturation. A review of the literature showed in general, tin whisker growth has a nucleation period, a growth period and a period of saturation, very similar to recrystallization or phase transformation. In fact we found our data fit Avrami equation very well. This equation shows that the nucleation period was the first week.

  9. Network array of zinc oxide whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. X.; Sun, X. W.; Chen, B. J.; Dong, Z. L.; Yu, M. B.; Zhang, X. H.; Chua, S. J.

    2005-01-01

    A zinc oxide (ZnO) whisker network array with sixfold symmetry was fabricated on ZnO-buffered (0001) sapphire substrate by the vapour-phase transport method using a mixture of zinc oxide and graphite powders as source materials and patterned gold as catalyst. From the ZnO buffer layer, hexagonal ZnO nanorods with identical in-plane structure grew epitaxially along the [0001] orientation to form vertical stems. The branches grew horizontally from six side-surfaces of the vertical stem along [01\\bar {1}0] and other equivalent directions. Most whiskers were confined along the six preferential orientations and interconnected with each other to form a regular network structure. The growth mechanism is discussed.

  10. Future Exploration of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Titan Decadal Panel Collaboration

    2001-11-01

    Titan promises to be the Mars of the Outer Solar System - the focus of not only the broadest range of investigations in planetary science but also the focus of public attention. The reasons for exploring Titan are threefold: 1. Titan and Astrobiology : Titan ranks with Mars and Europa as a prime body for astrobiological study due to its abundant organics. Like Europa, it may well have a liquid water interior. 2. Titan - A world in its own right. Titan deserves study even only to put other satellites (its remarkably smaller Saturnian siblings, and its same-sized but volatile-poor Jovian counterparts) in context. The added dimension of an atmosphere makes Titan's origin and evolution particularly interesting. 3. Titan - an environmental laboratory for Earth. Titan will be an unrivalled place to investigate meteorological, oceanographical and other processes. Many of these (e.g. wave generation by wind) are only empirically parameterized - the very different physical parameters of the Titan environment will bring new insights to these phenomena. While Cassini-Huygens will dramatically boost our knowledge of Titan, it will likely only whet our appetite for more. The potential for prebiotic materials at various locations (in particular where liquid water has interacted with photochemical deposits) and the need to monitor Titan's meteorology favor future missions that may exploit Titan's unique thick-atmosphere, low-gravity environment - a mobile platform like an airship or helicopter, able to explore on global scales, but access the surface for in-situ chemical analysis and probe the interior by electromagnetic and seismic means. Such missions have dramatic potential to capture the public's imagination, on both sides of the Atlantic.

  11. Whisker-related afferents in superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A; Favero, Morgana

    2016-05-01

    Rodents use their whiskers to explore the environment, and the superior colliculus is part of the neural circuits that process this sensorimotor information. Cells in the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus integrate trigeminotectal afferents from trigeminal complex and corticotectal afferents from barrel cortex. Using histological methods in mice, we found that trigeminotectal and corticotectal synapses overlap somewhat as they innervate the lower and upper portions of the intermediate granular layer, respectively. Using electrophysiological recordings and optogenetics in anesthetized mice in vivo, we showed that, similar to rats, whisker deflections produce two successive responses that are driven by trigeminotectal and corticotectal afferents. We then employed in vivo and slice experiments to characterize the response properties of these afferents. In vivo, corticotectal responses triggered by electrical stimulation of the barrel cortex evoke activity in the superior colliculus that increases with stimulus intensity and depresses with increasing frequency. In slices from adult mice, optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing trigeminotectal and corticotectal fibers revealed that cells in the intermediate layers receive more efficacious trigeminotectal, than corticotectal, synaptic inputs. Moreover, the efficacy of trigeminotectal inputs depresses more strongly with increasing frequency than that of corticotectal inputs. The intermediate layers of superior colliculus appear to be tuned to process strong but infrequent trigeminal inputs and weak but more persistent cortical inputs, which explains features of sensory responsiveness, such as the robust rapid sensory adaptation of whisker responses in the superior colliculus. PMID:26864754

  12. Titan Saturn System Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reh, Kim R.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is a high priority for exploration, as recommended by NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Roadmap. NASA's 2003 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey and ESA's Cosmic Vision Program Themes. Recent revolutionary Cassini-Huygens discoveries have dramatically escalated interest in Titan as the next scientific target in the outer solar system. This study demonstrates that an exciting Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) that explores two worlds of intense astrobiological interest can be initiated now as a single NASA/ESA collaboration.

  13. Potassium Iodide

    MedlinePlus

    ... radioactive iodine that may be released during a nuclear radiation emergency. Radioactive iodine can damage the thyroid gland. ... only take potassium iodide if there is a nuclear radiation emergency and public officials tell you that you ...

  14. Potassium Iodide

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium iodide is used to protect the thyroid gland from taking in radioactive iodine that may be released during a nuclear radiation emergency. Radioactive iodine can damage the thyroid gland. You ...

  15. Potassium test

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be done if your provider suspects metabolic acidosis (for example, caused by uncontrolled diabetes) or alkalosis ( ... Hypoaldosteronism (very rare) Kidney failure Metabolic or respiratory acidosis Red blood cell destruction Too much potassium in ...

  16. Future Titan Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. H.; Coustenis, A.; Lorenz, R.; Lunine, J.; Stofan, E.

    2012-04-01

    New discoveries about Titan from the Cassini-Huygens mission have led to a broad range of mission class studies for future missions, ranging from NASA Discovery class to International Flagship class. Three consistent science themes emerge and serve as a framework for discussing the various mission concepts: Goal A: Explore Titan, an Earth-Like System - How does Titan function as a system? How are the similarities and differences with Earth, and other solar system bodies, a result of the interplay of the geology, hydrology, meteorology, and aeronomy present in the Titan system?; Goal B: Examine Titan’s Organic Inventory—A Path to Prebiological Molecules - What is the complexity of Titan’s organic chemistry in the atmosphere, within its lakes, on its surface, and in its putative subsurface water ocean and how does this inventory differ from known abiotic organic material in meteorites and therefore contribute to our understanding of the origin of life in the Solar System?; and Goal C: Explore Enceladus and Saturn’s magnetosphere—clues to Titan’s origin and evolution - What is the exchange of energy and material with the Saturn magnetosphere and solar wind? What is the source of geysers on Enceladus? Does complex chemistry occur in the geyser source? Within this scientific framework the presentation will overview the Titan Explorer, Titan AND Enceladus Mission, Titan Saturn System Mission, Titan Mare Explorer, and Titan Submersible. Future timelines and plans will be discussed.

  17. Optical Microscopy Techniques to Inspect for Metallic Whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay A.

    2006-01-01

    Metal surface finishes of tin, zinc and cadmium are often applied to electronic components, mechanical hardware and other structures. These finishes sometimes unpredictably may form metal whiskers over periods that can take from hours to months or even many years. The metal whiskers are crystalline structures commonly having uniform cross sectional area along their entire length. Typical whisker dimensions are nominally on the order of only a few microns (um) across while their lengths can extend from a few microns to several millimeters. Metal whiskers pose a reliability hazard to electronic systems primarily as an electrical shorting hazard. The extremely narrow dimensions of metal whiskers can make observation with optical techniques very challenging. The videos herein were compiled to demonstrate the complexities associated with optical microscope inspection of electronic and mechanical components and assemblies for the presence or absence of metal whiskers. The importance of magnification, light source and angle of illumination play critical roles in being able to detect metal whiskers when present. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how improper techniques can easily obscure detection. It is hoped that these videos will improve the probability of detecting metal whiskers with optical inspection techniques.

  18. A whisker sensor: role of geometry and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, Hendrik; Valdivia Y Alvarado, Pablo; Thekoodan, Dilip; Jianmin, Miao; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Harbor seal whiskers are currently being studied for their role in sensing and tracking of the fluid structures left in wakes. Seal whiskers are exposed to incoming flows and are subject to self-induced vibrations. The whisker's unusual geometry is thought to reduce these self-induced disturbances and facilitate a stable reference for wake sensing. An experimental platform was designed to measure flow-induced displacements and vibrations at the base of whisker-like models. Four different whisker-like models (scale: 3x) were towed at different speeds down a towing tank and base displacements in the direction of motion and in the perpendicular axis were measured. Each model incorporated a particular geometrical feature found in harbor seal whiskers. Three different visco-elastic supports were used to mimic various boundary conditions at the base of the whisker models. The effects of geometrical features and boundary conditions on measured base vibrations at three relevant Reynolds numbers are discussed. The material properties of a model's base influence its sensitivity. When compared to a circular cylinder model, whisker models show almost no sign of VIV.

  19. Hydroxyapatite whisker-reinforced polyetherketoneketone bone ingrowth scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Converse, Gabriel L; Conrad, Timothy L; Merrill, Christina H; Roeder, Ryan K

    2010-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) whisker-reinforced polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) bone ingrowth scaffolds were prepared and characterized. High levels of porosity (75-90%) and HA whisker reinforcement (0-40 vol.%) were attained using a powder processing approach to mix the HA whiskers, PEKK powder and a NaCl porogen, followed by compression molding at 350-375 degrees Celsius and particle leaching to remove the porogen. The scaffold architecture and microstructure exhibited characteristics known to be favorable for osteointegration. Scaffold porosity was interconnected with a mean pore size in the range 200-300 microm as measured by micro-computed tomography. HA whiskers were embedded within and exposed on the surface of scaffold struts, producing a microscale surface topography, shown by von Kossa staining and scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, HA whisker-reinforced PEKK bone ingrowth scaffolds may be advantageous for orthopedic implant fixation, including interbody spinal fusion. PMID:19665061

  20. Biological effects of inhaled magnesium sulphate whiskers in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hori, H; Kasai, T; Haratake, J; Ishimatsu, S; Oyabu, T; Yamato, H; Higashi, T; Tanaka, I

    1994-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to two types of magnesium sulphate whiskers by inhalation for six hours a day, five days a week, for four weeks (sub-chronic study), or for one year (chronic study) to clarify the biological effects of the whiskers. There were few whiskers detected in the rat lungs even at one day after the exposure, suggesting that they are dissolved and eliminated rapidly from the lungs. To measure the clearance rate of the whiskers from the lungs, an intratracheal instillation was performed in golden hamsters. The half life of the whiskers in the lung was determined as 17.6 minutes by temporally measuring the magnesium concentration up to 80 minutes after the instillation. A histopathological examination indicated a frequent occurrence of adenoma and carcinoma in the year after chronic exposure, but it was not significantly different between exposed and control rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8044250

  1. Growth of R-123 Phase Single Crystal Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Masanori; Sato, Mitsunori; Tachiki, Yukitake; Miyagawa, Kinya; Tanaka, Masaki; Maeda, Hiroshi; Yun, Kyung Sung; Takano, Yoshihiko; Hatano, Takeshi

    2004-03-01

    Single-crystal whiskers of R1Ba2Cu3Ox (R-123, R = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) phase have been successfully grown by the Te- and Ca-doping method. The whiskers were grown from precursor pellets at just below their partial melting (peritectic) temperatures. The nominal composition of the R-123 whiskers is R1+uBa2+vCawCu3Ox (u+v+w=0, w>0) with R and/or Ba sites being substituted by Ca. However, the amount of Te was less than the analytical limit. The critical temperatures of the R-123 whiskers were around 80 K, and among these whiskers those with larger R ionic radii such as Dy, Gd, Eu and Sm require post-annealing in an oxygen atmosphere.

  2. Strengthening of phosphate ceramic foam by silicon carbide whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetanov, B. V.; Prilepskiy, V. N.; Lapidovskaya, L. A.; Chernyak, A. I.; Romanovich, I. V.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of additions of SiC whiskers on the elastic modulus and flexural strength of phosphate ceramic foam is assessed. It is shown that the incorporation into the material composition of even small amounts (2.4 vol%) of SiC whiskers enhances the impact toughness and heat resistance of the ceramic foam. A 12.3 vol% of SiC whiskers leads to a more than threefold increase of the flexural strength. Strengthening of the phosphate ceramic foam is due to the fact that the whiskers hinder the propagation of matrix crack by increasing the work of matrix fracture. The whiskers reinforce only that volume of material which is occupied by solid matter, whereas they do not reinforce the pores.

  3. Responses of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons to longitudinal whisker stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, Maik C; Kullmann, Stephanie; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2008-10-01

    Responses of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons to longitudinal whisker stimulation. Rats use their mobile set of whiskers to actively explore their environment. Parameters that play a role to generate movement dynamics of the whisker shaft within the follicle, thus activating primary afferents, are manifold: among them are mechanical properties of the whiskers (curvature, elasticity and taper), active movements (head, body, and whiskers), and finally, object characteristics (surface, geometry, position, and orientation). Hence the whisker system is confronted with forces along all three axes in space. Movements along the two latitudinal axes of the whisker (horizontal and vertical) have been well studied. Here we focus on movement along the whisker's longitudinal axis that has been neglected so far. We employed ramp-and-hold movements that pushed the whisker shaft toward the skin and quantified the resulting activity in trigeminal first-order afferents in anesthetized rats. Virtually all recorded neurons were highly sensitive to longitudinal movement. Neurons could be perfectly segregated into two groups according to their modulation by stimulus amplitude and velocity, respectively. This classification regimen correlated perfectly with the presence or absence of slowly adapting responses in longitudinal stimulation but agreed with classification derived from latitudinal stimulation only if the whisker was engaged in its optimal direction and set point. We conclude that longitudinal stimulation is an extremely effective means to activate the tactile pathway and thus is highly likely to play an important role in tactile coding on the ascending somatosensory pathway. In addition, compared with latitudinal stimulation, it provides a reliable and easy to use method to classify trigeminal first-order afferents. PMID:18684907

  4. Morphological instability of whiskers, pores, and tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirill, Dimitri Jay

    1999-11-01

    A thin, stressed solid cylinder, a whisker, is subject to mass transport by curvature and elastic-stress-driven surface diffusion. The stability of the cylindrical surface is examined using linear stability theory. It is found that the applied stress leads to a greater range of unstable wavenumbers, and hence is destabilizing. The presence of elastic strains can excite non-axisymmetric modes, which, under certain conditions, are preferred and can give rise to helical surfaces. In addition, asymptotic formulas for growth rate in the limit of long and short wavelengths are found. A possible experiment is proposed which, if undertaken, should reveal the helical instability. The linear stability analysis is then extended to the case of cylindrical pore channels and hollow cylindrical tubules. In both cases, results similar to the whisker are found---increased applied stress leads to a greater range of unstable wavenumbers. For both the pore and tubule geometries, the dominant modes are axisymmetric for any value of applied stress; this contrasts with the solid whisker results. Since the tubule geometry consists of an inner and outer surface, there is a phase relationship between the two surface perturbations. The most dangerous eigenmode can exhibit either in-phase (sinuous) or 180° out-of-phase (varicose) perturbations, depending on the value of applied stress. Furthermore, there is a critical value of applied stress below which the most dangerous mode is varicose, and above which it is sinuous. Lastly, asymptotic formulas for growth rate are obtained in the limit of a thin-walled tubule. These results compare favorably to work done on stressed lamellar composites.

  5. Texture Coding in the Rat Whisker System: Slip-Stick Versus Differential Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Jason; Hill, Dan N; Pahlavan, Sohrab; Drew, Patrick J; Kleinfeld, David; Feldman, Daniel E

    2008-01-01

    Rats discriminate surface textures using their whiskers (vibrissae), but how whiskers extract texture information, and how this information is encoded by the brain, are not known. In the resonance model, whisker motion across different textures excites mechanical resonance in distinct subsets of whiskers, due to variation across whiskers in resonance frequency, which varies with whisker length. Texture information is therefore encoded by the spatial pattern of activated whiskers. In the competing kinetic signature model, different textures excite resonance equally across whiskers, and instead, texture is encoded by characteristic, nonuniform temporal patterns of whisker motion. We tested these models by measuring whisker motion in awake, behaving rats whisking in air and onto sandpaper surfaces. Resonant motion was prominent during whisking in air, with fundamental frequencies ranging from approximately 35 Hz for the long Delta whisker to approximately 110 Hz for the shorter D3 whisker. Resonant vibrations also occurred while whisking against textures, but the amplitude of resonance within single whiskers was independent of texture, contradicting the resonance model. Rather, whiskers resonated transiently during discrete, high-velocity, and high-acceleration slip-stick events, which occurred prominently during whisking on surfaces. The rate and magnitude of slip-stick events varied systematically with texture. These results suggest that texture is encoded not by differential resonant motion across whiskers, but by the magnitude and temporal pattern of slip-stick motion. These findings predict a temporal code for texture in neural spike trains. PMID:18752354

  6. Harbor seal whiskers synchronize with frequency of upstream wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, Heather; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Harbor seals are able to use their whiskers to track minute water movements, such as those left in the wake of a fish. The current study is a simple representation of what the whiskers experience as the seal chases a fish. A scaled whisker model (average cross-flow diameter: dw) is first tested in a towing tank by itself and then towed behind a larger cylinder (dc = 2 . 5dw), which serves as a wake generator. A flexing plate attached to the model base allows the whisker to freely vibrate in response to the flow. Measurements from strain gages on the plate are calibrated to tip deflections. While in the cylinder wake, the whisker vibrates with an amplitude up to ten times higher than it does on its own (A /dw = 0 . 15). Also, the whisker synchronizes with the vortex shedding frequency (fs =0/. 2 U dc) of the upstream cylinder over the range of reduced velocities tested, whereas on its own, the whisker oscillates around its own natural frequency in water. Seals may use the difference in vibration amplitude and frequency between these two cases to help detect the presence of a vortex wake.

  7. Internal Microstructure Investigation of Tin Whisker Growth Using FIB Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, Aleksandra; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2012-08-01

    The problem of tin (Sn) whiskers has been a significant reliability issue in electronics for the past several decades. Despite the large amount of research conducted on this issue, a solution for mitigating the growth of whiskers remains a challenge for the research community. Whiskers have unpredictable growth and morphology, and a study of a whisker's internal structure may provide further insights into the reason behind their complex growth. This study reports on the internal microstructure and morphology of complex-shaped Sn whiskers grown from an electroplated bright Sn layer on brass substrates exposed to ambient and 95% humid environment. The variables analyzed include surface and microstructure conditions of the film, and morphology and internal microstructure of the Sn whiskers using scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam technology. Experimental results demonstrated that the whiskers with more complex morphology grow primarily from surfaces exposed to a controlled environment, and some of them have traits of polycrystalline growth rather than only single crystalline, as usually known.

  8. Anatomical Pathways Involved in Generating and Sensing Rhythmic Whisker Movements

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Laurens W. J.; Houweling, Arthur R.; Owens, Cullen B.; Tanke, Nouk; Shevchouk, Olesya T.; Rahmati, Negah; Teunissen, Wouter H. T.; Ju, Chiheng; Gong, Wei; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K. E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2011-01-01

    The rodent whisker system is widely used as a model system for investigating sensorimotor integration, neural mechanisms of complex cognitive tasks, neural development, and robotics. The whisker pathways to the barrel cortex have received considerable attention. However, many subcortical structures are paramount to the whisker system. They contribute to important processes, like filtering out salient features, integration with other senses, and adaptation of the whisker system to the general behavioral state of the animal. We present here an overview of the brain regions and their connections involved in the whisker system. We do not only describe the anatomy and functional roles of the cerebral cortex, but also those of subcortical structures like the striatum, superior colliculus, cerebellum, pontomedullary reticular formation, zona incerta, and anterior pretectal nucleus as well as those of level setting systems like the cholinergic, histaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic pathways. We conclude by discussing how these brain regions may affect each other and how they together may control the precise timing of whisker movements and coordinate whisker perception. PMID:22065951

  9. Graphite whiskers in CV3 meteorites.

    PubMed

    Fries, Marc; Steele, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Graphite whiskers (GWs), an allotrope of carbon that has been proposed to occur in space, have been discovered in three CV-type carbonaceous chondrites via Raman imaging and electron microscopy. The GWs are associated with high-temperature calcium-aluminum inclusion (CAI) rims and interiors, with the rim of a dark inclusion, and within an inclusion inside an unusual chondrule that bears mineralogy and texture indicative of high-temperature processing. Current understanding of CAI formation places their condensation, and that of associated GWs, relatively close to the Sun and early in the condensation sequence of protoplanetary disk materials. If this is the case, then it is a possibility that GWs are expelled from any young solar system early in its history, thus populating interstellar space with diffuse GWs. Graphite whiskers have been postulated to play a role in the near-infrared (near-IR) dimming of type Ia supernovae, as well as in the thermalization of both the cosmic IR and microwave background and in galactic center dimming between 3 and 9 micrometers. Our observations, along with the further possibility that GWs could be manufactured during supernovae, suggest that GWs may have substantial effects in observational astronomy. PMID:18309047

  10. Potassium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for potassium cyanide is included in

  11. The astrobiology of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, F.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Hebrard, E.; Israel, G.; Nguyen, M.-J.; Szopa, C.; Gpcos Team

    Largest satellite of Saturn and the only satellite in the solar system having a dense atmosphere, Titan is one of the key planetary bodies for astrobiological studies, due to several aspects: Its analogies with planet Earth, in spite of much lower temperatures, The Cassini-Huygens data have largely confirmed the many analogies between Titan and our own planet. Both have similar vertical temperature profiles, (although much colder, of course, on Titan). Both have condensable and non condensable greenhouse gases in their atmosphere. Both are geologically very active. Furthermore, the data also suggest strongly the presence of a methane cycle on Titan analogous to the water cycle on Earth. The presence of an active organic chemistry, involving several of the key compounds of prebiotic chemistry. The recent data obtained from the Huygens instruments show that the organic matter in Titan low atmosphere (stratosphere and troposphere) is mainly concentrated in the aerosol particles. Because of the vertical temperature profile in this part of the atmosphere, most of the volatile organics are probably mainly condensed on the aerosol particles. The nucleus of these particles seems to be made of complex macromolecular organic matter, well mimicked in the laboratory by the "Titan's tholins". Now, laboratory tholins are known to release many organic compounds of biological interest, such as amino acids and purine and pyrimidine bases, when they are in contact with liquid water. Such hydrolysis may have occurred on the surface of Titan, in the bodies of liquid water which episodically may form on Titan's surface from meteoritic and cometary impacts. The formation of biologically interesting compounds may also occur in the deep water ocean, from the hydrolysis of complex organic material included in the chrondritic matter accreted during the formation of Titan. The possible emergence and persistence of Life on Titan 1 All ingredients which seems necessary for Life are present on

  12. Titan's Variable Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine the effects of the incident plasma distribution function and the flow velocity. We closely examine the results on Titan's induced magnetosphere and the resulting pickup ion properties.

  13. Pressureless sintering of whiskered-toughened ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-12-27

    A pressureless sintering method is disclosed for use in the production of whisker-toughened ceramic composites wherein the sintered density of composites containing up to about 20 vol. % SiC whiskers is improved by reducing the average aspect ratio of the whiskers to from about 10 to about 20. Sintering aids further improve the density, permitting the production of composites containing 20 vol. % SiC with sintered densities of 94% or better of theoretical density by a pressureless sintering method. 6 figures.

  14. A Nonlinear Viscous Model for Sn-Whisker Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuqian

    2016-04-01

    Based on the mechanism of the grain boundary fluid flow, a nonlinear viscous model for the growth of Sn-whiskers is proposed. This model consists of two units, one with a stress exponent of one and one with a stress exponent of n -1. By letting one of the constants be zero in the model, the constitutive relationship reduces to a linear flow relation or a power-law relation, representing the flow behavior of various metals. Closed-form solutions for the growth behavior of a whisker are derived, which can be used to predict the whisker growth and the stress evolution.

  15. Atomizing apparatus for making polymer and metal powders and whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Otaigbe, Joshua U.; McAvoy, Jon M.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ting, Jason; Mi, Jia; Terpstra, Robert

    2003-03-18

    Method for making polymer particulates, such as spherical powder and whiskers, by melting a polymer material under conditions to avoid thermal degradation of the polymer material, atomizing the melt using gas jet means in a manner to form atomized droplets, and cooling the droplets to form polymer particulates, which are collected for further processing. Atomization parameters can be controlled to produce polymer particulates with controlled particle shape, particle size, and particle size distribution. For example, atomization parameters can be controlled to produce spherical polymer powders, polymer whiskers, and combinations of spherical powders and whiskers. Atomizing apparatus also is provided for atoomizing polymer and metallic materials.

  16. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  17. Aluminum nitride-silicon carbide whisker composites: Processing, properties, and microstructural stability

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum nitride -- silicon carbide whisker composites with up to 20 vol % whiskers were fabricated by pressureless sintering (1750{degree}--1800{degree}C) and by hot-pressing (1700{degree}--1800{degree}C). Silicon carbide whiskers were found to degrade depending on the type of protective powder bed used during sintering. Whiskers were found to degraded in high oxygen containing samples by reaction with sintering additives. Whisker degradation was also due to the formation of silicon carbide -- aluminum nitride solid solution. No whisker degradation was observed in hot-pressed samples. For these samples Young's modulus and fracture toughness were measured. A 33% increase in the fracture toughness was measured by the indentation technique for a 20 vol % whisker composite. Operative toughening mechanisms were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Crack deflection and whisker bridging were the dominant mechanisms. It was also shown that load transfer from matrix to whiskers can be a contributing factor to toughening. 88 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. The greenhouse of Titan.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of non-gray radiative equilibrium and gray convective equilibrium on Titan suggests that a massive molecular-hydrogen greenhouse effect may be responsible for the disagreement between the observed IR temperatures and the equilibrium temperature of an atmosphereless Titan. Calculations of convection indicate a probable minimum optical depth of 14 which corresponds to a molecular hydrogen shell of substantial thickness with total pressures of about 0.1 bar. It is suggested that there is an equilibrium between outgassing and blow-off on the one hand and accretion from the protons trapped in a hypothetical Saturnian magnetic field on the other, in the present atmosphere of Titan. It is believed that an outgassing equivalent to the volatilization of a few kilometers of subsurface ice is required to maintain the present blow-off rate without compensation for all geological time. The presence of an extensive hydrogen corona around Titan is postulated, with surface temperatures up to 200 K.

  19. Raising the Titanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Romona

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which groups of students investigate engineering principles by writing a feasibility study to raise the luxury liner, Titanic. The problem statement and directions, and suggestions for problem solutions are included. (CW)

  20. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  1. Whisker Formation Induced by Component and Assembly Ionic Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snugovsky, Polina; Meschter, Stephan; Bagheri, Zohreh; Kosiba, Eva; Romansky, Marianne; Kennedy, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the results of an intensive whisker formation study on Pb-free assemblies with different levels of cleanliness. Thirteen types of as-received surface-mount and pin-through-hole components were cleaned and intentionally contaminated with solutions containing chloride, sulfate, bromide, and nitrate. Then the parts were assembled on double-sided boards that were also cleaned or intentionally contaminated with three fluxes having different halide contents. The assemblies were subjected to high-temperature/high-humidity testing (85°C/85% RH). Periodic examination found that contamination triggered whisker formation on both exposed tin and solder fillets. Whisker occurrence and parameters depending on the type and level of contamination are discussed. Cross-sections were used to assess the metallurgical aspects of whisker formation and the microstructural changes occurring during corrosion.

  2. Clash of the Titans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2010-01-01

    WebQuests and the 5E learning cycle are titans of the science classroom. These popular inquiry-based strategies are most often used as separate entities, but the author has discovered that using a combined WebQuest and 5E learning cycle format taps into the inherent power and potential of both strategies. In the lesson, "Clash of the Titans,"…

  3. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  4. Silicate interactions with ammonia-water fluids on early Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, S.; Lunine, J. I.

    1994-02-01

    Plausible models of the early history of Titan suggest that ammonia and water were present in liquid form at the surface. We show here by thermodynamic modeling that such an ocean could have reacted with silicates to put substantial quantities of sodium and potassium into solution. Following the formation of an ice crust by cooling, mantle ammonia-water fluids enriched in potassium would have been brought to the surface through the cryogenic equivalent of volcanism. Later impacts would have released the Ar-40 produced by decay of the K-40 into the atmosphere. The abundance of atmospheric Ar-40, measurable by the Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, may be dominated by this source and hence gives a proxy indication of the volume of ammonia-water resurfacing on Titan over geologic time.

  5. Silicate interactions with ammonia-water fluids on early Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Steffi; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1994-01-01

    Plausible models of the early history of Titan suggest that ammonia and water were present in liquid form at the surface. We show here by thermodynamic modeling that such an ocean could have reacted with silicates to put substantial quantities of sodium and potassium into solution. Following the formation of an ice crust by cooling, mantle ammonia-water fluids enriched in potassium would have been brought to the surface through the cryogenic equivalent of volcanism. Later impacts would have released the Ar-40 produced by decay of the K-40 into the atmosphere. The abundance of atmospheric Ar-40, measurable by the Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, may be dominated by this source and hence gives a proxy indication of the volume of ammonia-water resurfacing on Titan over geologic time.

  6. Titan Probe navigation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, A.; Wood, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed Cassini mission, a combined Saturn Orbiter/Titan Probe spacecraft will be launched from the Space Shuttle to arrive at Saturn around 2002, by means of a delta-VEGA trajectory. After Saturn-orbit insertion and a pericrone raise maneuver, the probe will be released to enter the Titan atmosphere and impact onto its surface. During its descent phase and impact onto Titan, the probe will maintain radio contact with the orbiter. Since the Titan-probe experimental phase lasts for only about four hours, probe-orbiter geometry and probe-delivery accuracy are critical to successful completion of this part of the mission. From a preliminary navigation analysis for probe delivery accuracy, it seems feasible to deliver the probe within 50 km (1-sigma value) of the desired aim-point in the Titan B-plane. The covariance study, however, clearly indicates the need for optical data, in addition to radio metric data. A Monte Carlo study indicates that a Delta-V capability of 98 m/sec for trajectory correction maneuvers will be sufficient to cover 99 percent of all contingencies during the segment from Saturn-orbit insertion to Titan-probe release.

  7. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  8. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

  9. Effect of Substrate Composition on Sn Whisker Growth in Pure Sn Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sarah M.; Sahaym, Uttara; Norton, M. Grant

    2010-12-01

    Pure Sn films deposited on Cu and Cu alloys are prone to spontaneous whisker formation. One way of preventing whisker formation is to alloy Pb into Sn coatings. However, restriction on the use of Pb demands the development of alternative methods for preventing whisker growth. The present work reports the effect of substrate composition on whisker formation and morphology. Despite employing identical plating conditions, long filament-like whiskers grew only on Sn-plated Cu samples and not on brass. The presence or lack of Sn whiskers has been explained via the thermodynamic stability of various intermetallic compounds at the Sn/substrate interface.

  10. Witnessing Springtime on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Have you ever wondered what springtime is like on Saturns largest moon, Titan? A team of researchers has analyzed a decade of data from the Cassini spacecraft to determine how Titans gradual progression through seasons has affected its temperatures.Observing the Saturn SystemThough Titan orbits Saturn once every ~16 days, it is Saturns ~30-year march around the Sun that sets Titans seasons: each traditional season on Titan spans roughly 7.5 years. Thus, when the Cassini spacecraft first arrived at Saturn in 2004 to study the giant planet and its ring system and moons, Titans northern hemisphere was in early winter. A decade later, the season in the northern hemisphere had advanced to late spring.A team scientists led by Donald Jennings (Goddard Space Flight Center) has now used data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on board Cassini to analyze the evolution of Titans surface temperature between 2004 and 2014.Changing of SeasonsSurface brightness temperatures (with errors) on Titan are shown in blue for five time periods between 2004 and 2014. The location of maximum temperature migrates from 19S to 16N over the decade. Two climate models are also shown in green (high thermal inertia) and red (low thermal inertia). [Jennings et al. 2016]CIRS uses the decreased opacity of Titans atmosphere at 19 m to detect infrared emission from Titans surface at this wavelength. From this data, Jennings and collaborators determine Titans surface temperature for five time intervals between 2004 and 2014. They bin the data into 10 latitude bins that span from the south pole (90S) to the north pole (90N).The authors find that the maximum temperature on the moon stays stable over the ten-year period at 94 K, or a chilly -240F). But as time passes, the latitude with the warmest temperature shifts from 19S to 16N, marking the transition from early winter to late spring. Over the decade of monitoring, the surface temperature near the south pole decreased by ~2 K, and that

  11. Evaluation of Effectiveness of Conformal Coatings as Tin Whisker Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sungwon; Osterman, Michael; Meschter, Stephan; Pecht, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The application of a conformal coat has been considered as a mitigation strategy to prevent unintended shorting events induced by tin whisker formation in electronic products. While various conformal coatings have been shown to be effective at containing tin whiskers on treated coupons, the effectiveness of conformal coating on actual assembled hardware has not been adequately examined. In this study, the ability of six types of conformal coatings to contain tin whiskers was examined through their application to assembled gull-wing lead quad flat package test specimens. Nonuniform coverage of conformal coating on the gull-wing leads was found to be a primary concern. Quantitative image analysis using scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode was developed to aid in quantifying coating coverage. The ability of applied coatings to contain tin whiskers was examined after specimens were subjected to sequential temperature cycling and elevated temperature/humidity conditions as well as exposure to corrosive gases. For all but one coating, tin whiskers were observed to escape areas of relatively thin coating. Parylene C coating was found to be the most effective coating in providing uniform coverage and thickness, and containing whiskers.

  12. Tin Whisker Growth and Mitigation with a Nanocrysytalline Nickel Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiuk, Szymon

    Tin whiskers are a problem in the electronics industry since the EU banned the use of lead in Pb-Sn solders as part of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS). The biggest concern with Sn whiskers is their ability to short-circuit electronics. High reliability applications such as the aerospace, defense, healthcare, and automotive industries are at most risk. This project explores Sn whisker mitigation and prevention with the use of nanocrystalline nickel coating over Sn surfaces. Sn was plated onto a pure Cu substrate using electroplating. A high temperature and high humidity condition, at 85°C and 85% RH, was effective at growing whiskers. A nNi coating was plated over Sn/Cu coupons. After subjecting the nNi/ Sn/Cu samples through 85°C/85% RH testing conditions, no whiskers were observed penetrating the surface. These results make nNi a viable material to use as a coating to prevent the growth of Sn whiskers in electronic assemblies.

  13. Facial whisker pattern is not sufficient to instruct a whisker-related topographic map in the mouse somatosensory brainstem.

    PubMed

    Laumonnerie, Christophe; Bechara, Ahmad; Vilain, Nathalie; Kurihara, Yukiko; Kurihara, Hiroki; Rijli, Filippo M

    2015-11-01

    Facial somatosensory input is relayed by trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and serially wired to brainstem, thalamus and cortex. Spatially ordered sets of target neurons generate central topographic maps reproducing the spatial arrangement of peripheral facial receptors. Facial pattern provides a necessary template for map formation, but may be insufficient to impose a brain somatotopic pattern. In mice, lower jaw sensory information is relayed by the trigeminal nerve mandibular branch, whose axons target the brainstem dorsal principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (dPrV). Input from mystacial whiskers is relayed by the maxillary branch and forms a topographic representation of rows and whiskers in the ventral PrV (vPrV). To investigate peripheral organisation in imposing a brain topographic pattern, we analysed Edn1(-/-) mice, which present ectopic whisker rows on the lower jaw. We found that these whiskers were innervated by mandibular TG neurons which initially targeted dPrV. Unlike maxillary TG neurons, the ectopic whisker-innervating mandibular neuron cell bodies and pre-target central axons did not segregate into a row-specific pattern nor target the dPrV with a topographic pattern. Following periphery-driven molecular repatterning to a maxillary-like identity, mandibular neurons partially redirected their central projections from dPrV to vPrV. Thus, while able to induce maxillary-like molecular features resulting in vPrV final targeting, a spatially ordered lower jaw ectopic whisker pattern is insufficient to impose row-specific pre-target organisation of the central mandibular tract or a whisker-related matching pattern of afferents in dPrV. These results provide novel insights into periphery-dependent versus periphery-independent mechanisms of trigeminal ganglion and brainstem patterning in matching whisker topography. PMID:26417040

  14. The environment of Titan, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Information regarding the physical characteristics of Titan and atmospheric models necessary to support design and mission planning of spacecraft that are to orbit Titan, enter its atmosphere or land on its surface is given.

  15. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Weather on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, C. A.; Hall, J. L.; Geballe, T. R.

    2000-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere potentially sports a cycle similar to the hydrologic one on Earth with clouds, rain and seas, but with methane playing the terrestrial role of water. Over the past ten years many independent efforts indicated no strong evidence for cloudiness until some unique spectra were analyzed in 1998 (Griffith et al.). These surprising observations displayed enhanced fluxes of 14-200% on two nights at precisely the wavelengths (windows) that sense Titan's lower altitude where clouds might reside. The morphology of these enhancements in all 4 windows observed indicate that clouds covered ~6-9% of Titan's surface and existed at ~15 km altitude. Here I discuss new observations recorded in 1999 aimed to further characterize Titan's clouds. While we find no evidence for a massive cloud system similar to the one observed previously, 1%-4% fluctuations in flux occur daily. These modulations, similar in wavelength and morphology to the more pronounced ones observed earlier, suggest the presence of clouds covering <=1% of Titan's disk. The variations are too small to have been detected by most prior measurements. Repeated observations, spaced 30 minutes apart, indicate a temporal variability observable in the time scale of a couple of hours. The cloud heights hint that convection governs their evolutions. Their short lives point to the presence of rain. C. A. Griffith and J. L. Hall are supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program NAG5-6790.

  17. Hypsometry of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Stiles, Bryan; Le Gall, Alice; Hayes, Alexander; Aharonson, Oded; Wood, Charles A.; Stofan, Ellen; Kirk, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Cassini RADAR topography data are used to evaluate Titan's hypsometric profile, and to make comparisons with other planetary bodies. Titan's hypsogram is unimodal and strikingly narrow compared with the terrestrial planets. To investigate topographic extremes, a novel variant on the classic hypsogram is introduced, with a logarithmic abscissa to highlight mountainous terrain. In such a plot, the top of the terrestrial hypsogram is quite distinct from those of Mars and Venus due to the 'glacial buzz-saw' that clips terrestrial topography above the snowline. In contrast to the positive skew seen in other hypsograms, with a long tail of positive relief due to mountains, there is an indication (weak, given the limited data for Titan so far) that the Titan hypsogram appears slightly negatively skewed, suggesting a significant population of unfilled depressions. Limited data permit only a simplistic comparison of Titan topography with other icy satellites but we find that the standard deviation of terrain height (albeit at different scales) is similar to those of Ganymede and Europa.

  18. Flight through Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Ádámkovics, Máté; Gibbard, Seran; Roe, Henry G.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    We assembled spectral image data cubes of Titan in H-band (1.413-1.808 μm), using adaptive optics on the 10-m W.M. Keck telescope, by stepping a spectrometer slit across Titan's disk. We constructed images of Titan at each wavelength by 'glueing' the spectra together, producing 1400 ultra-narrowband (~0.1nm) views of the satellite. With this method one can characterise Titan's atmosphere over the entire disk, in more specific vertical detail than possible with either narrowband imaging or slit spectroscopy at one position. Data were obtained of Titan's leading hemisphere on UT 20 February 2001. At the shorter wavelengths we probe all the way down to the surface, revealing the familiar bright and dark terrain, while at longer wavelengths we probe various altitudes in the atmosphere. The data have been assembled into a movie, showing the surface and different haze layers while stepping up in altitude. The transitions from the surface to the tropospheric haze, and through the tropopause into the upper atmospheric haze, are clearly recognised.

  19. Strengthening and toughening of poly(L-lactide) composites by surface modified MgO whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei; Luo, Binghong; Qin, Xiaopeng; Li, Cairong; Liu, Mingxian; Ding, Shan; Zhou, Changren

    2015-03-01

    To improve both the strength and toughness of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA), fibrous-like MgO whiskers with diameters of 0.15-1 μm and lengths of 15-110 μm were prepared, and subsequently surface modified with L-lactide to obtain grafted MgO whiskers (g-MgO whiskers). The structures and properties of MgO whiskers and g-MgO whiskers were studied. Then, a series of MgO whiskers/PLLA and g-MgO whiskers/PLLA composites were prepared by solution casting method, for comparison, MgO particles/PLLA composite was prepared too. The resulting composites were evaluated in terms of hydrophilicity, crystallinity, dispersion of whiskers, interfacial adhesion and mechanical performance by means of polarized optical microscopy (POM), contact angle measurement, field emission scanning electron microscope (FSEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tensile testing. The results revealed that the crystallization rate and hydrophilicity of PLLA were improved by the introduction of MgO whiskers and g-MgO whiskers. The g-MgO whiskers can disperse more uniformly in and show stronger interfacial adhesion with the matrix than MgO whiskers as a result of the surface modification. Due to the bridge effect of the whiskers and the excellent interfacial adhesion between g-MgO whiskers and PLLA, g-MgO whiskers/PLLA composites exhibited remarkably higher strength, modulus and toughness compared to the pristine PLLA, MgO particles/PLLA and MgO whiskers/PLLA composites.

  20. Potassium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... good sources of potassium. Soy products and veggie burgers are also good sources of potassium. Vegetables including ... these dietary intakes for potassium, based on age: Infants 0 - 6 months: 0.4 grams a day ( ...

  1. High potassium level

    MedlinePlus

    High potassium level is a problem in which the amount of potassium in the blood is higher than normal. The medical ... There are often no symptoms with a high level of potassium. When symptoms do occur, they may ...

  2. Low potassium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low potassium level is a condition in which the amount of potassium in the blood is lower than normal. The medical ... in the body. Common causes of low potassium level include: Antibiotics Diarrhea or vomiting Using too much ...

  3. Titanic Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    New Detailed VLT Images of Saturn's Largest Moon Optimizing space missions Titan, the largest moon of Saturn was discovered by Dutch astronomer Christian Huygens in 1655 and certainly deserves its name. With a diameter of no less than 5,150 km, it is larger than Mercury and twice as large as Pluto. It is unique in having a hazy atmosphere of nitrogen, methane and oily hydrocarbons. Although it was explored in some detail by the NASA Voyager missions, many aspects of the atmosphere and surface still remain unknown. Thus, the existence of seasonal or diurnal phenomena, the presence of clouds, the surface composition and topography are still under debate. There have even been speculations that some kind of primitive life (now possibly extinct) may be found on Titan. Titan is the main target of the NASA/ESA Cassini/Huygens mission, launched in 1997 and scheduled to arrive at Saturn on July 1, 2004. The ESA Huygens probe is designed to enter the atmosphere of Titan, and to descend by parachute to the surface. Ground-based observations are essential to optimize the return of this space mission, because they will complement the information gained from space and add confidence to the interpretation of the data. Hence, the advent of the adaptive optics system NAOS-CONICA (NACO) [1] in combination with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile now offers a unique opportunity to study the resolved disc of Titan with high sensitivity and increased spatial resolution. Adaptive Optics (AO) systems work by means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror that counteracts the image distortion induced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed from image data obtained by a special camera at very high speed, many hundreds of times each second (see e.g. ESO Press Release 25/01 , ESO PR Photos 04a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 19a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 21a-c/02, ESO Press Release 17/02, and ESO Press Release 26/03 for earlier NACO

  4. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; Cassini RADAR Team

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  5. Diurnal variations of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1,000 and 1,400 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from 8 close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Though there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ~700 cm-3 below ~1,300 km. Such a plateau is associated with the combination of distinct diurnal variations of light and heavy ions. Light ions (e.g. CH5+, HCNH+, C2H5+) show strong diurnal variation, with clear bite-outs in their nightside distributions. In contrast, heavy ions (e.g. c-C3H3+, C2H3CNH+, C6H7+) present modest diurnal variation, with significant densities observed on the nightside. We propose that the distinctions between light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through "fast" ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through "slow" electron dissociative recombination. The INMS data suggest day-to-night transport as an important source of ions on Titan's nightside, to be distinguished from the conventional scenario of auroral ionization by magnetospheric particles as the only ionizing source on the nightside. This is supported by the strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effects of day-to-night transport on the ionospheric structures of Titan. The predicted diurnal variation has similar general characteristics to those observed, with some apparent discrepancies which could be reconciled by imposing fast horizontal thermal winds in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  6. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.A.; Lorenz, R.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Mitchell, Ken; Stofan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Effects of Conformal Coat on Tin Whisker Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadesch, Jong S.; Leidecker, Henning; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A whisker from a tin plated part was blamed for the loss of a commercial spacecraft in 1998. Although pure tin finishes are prohibited by NASA, tin plated parts, such as hybrids, relays and commercial off the shelf (COTS) parts, are something discovered to have been installed in NASA spacecraft. Invariably, the assumption is that a conformal coat will prevent the growth of, or short circuits caused by, tin whiskers. This study measures the effect a Uralane coating has on the initiation and growth of tin whiskers, on the ability of this coating to prevent a tin whisker from emerging from the coating, and on the ability to prevent shorting. A sample of fourteen brass substrates (1 inch by 4 inches by 1/16 inch) were plated by two separate processes: half of the specimens were 'bright' tin plated directly over the brass substrate and half received a copper flash over the brass substrate prior to 'bright' tin plating. Each specimen was coated on one half of the substrate with three bi-directional sprays of Uralane 5750 to a nominal thickness of 25 to 75 micrometers (1 to 3 mils). Several specimens of both types, Cu and non-Cu flashed, were placed in an oven maintained at 50 C as others' work suggests that this is the optimal temperature for whisker formation. The remaining specimens were maintained at room ambient conditions. The surfaces of each specimen have been regularly inspected using both optical (15 to 400x power) and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). Many types of growths, including needle-like whiskers, first appeared approximately three months after plating on the non-conformally coated sides of all specimens. At four months, 4 to 5 times more growth sites were observed on the coated side; however, the density of growth sites on the non-conformally coated side has since increased rapidly, and now, at one year, is about the same for both sides. The density of growth sites is estimated at 90/sq mm with 30 percent of the sites growing whiskers (needle

  8. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  9. Flying by Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Frederic J.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Criddle, Kevin E.; Ionasescu, Rodica; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jones, Jeremy B.; Parcher, Daniel W.; Roth, Duane C.; Thompson, Paul F.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft encounters the massive Titan about once every month. These encounters are essential to the mission as Titan is the only satellite of Saturn that can provide enough gravity assist to shape the orbit tour and allow outstanding science for many years. From a navigation point of view, these encounters provide many challenges, in particular those that fly close enough to the surface for the atmospheric drag to perturb the orbit. This paper discusses the dynamics models developed to successfully navigate Cassini and determine its trajectory. This includes the moon's gravity pull with its second degree zonal harmonics J2, the attitude thrust control perturbations and the acceleration of drag.

  10. Titan's "Hot Cross Bun": A Titan Laccolith?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Wall, S. D.; Wood, C.; Kirk, R. L.; Lucas, A.; Mitchell, K. L.; Lunine, J. I.; Turtle, E. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Malaska, M.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2012-10-01

    Cassini’s RADAR instrument acquired Synthetic Aperture Radar data during the T83 flyby on May 22, 2012. The data showed a feature centered at 38.5N, 203W that resembles a “hot cross bun”. This type of feature has not been seen on Titan before, even though 52% of Titan’s surface has been imaged using SAR. The feature, approximately 100 km across, is mostly radar bright but the cross pattern, interpreted to be extensional fractures, located roughly at the center of the brighter area, appears darker at radar wavelengths (2.3 cm). Radar illumination of the image indicates that the fractures are lower in elevation than the surrounding bright region. The morphology of the region is markedly similar to that of a 30-km dome-shaped feature on Venus that lies at the summit of the Kunapipi volcano. The Venus feature is interpreted to be the result of intrusion of magma at the summit of the volcano [1]. A similar feature, interpreted as a laccolith, is seen on the Moon near the crater Ramsden [2]. The lunar feature, imaged by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the cross-shaped depression over a 300 m high rise. No topographic data for the feature on Titan are available at this time, but the morphology seen by the SAR data suggests that the feature may have been formed by material pushing up from below. Laccoliths form when an igneous intrusion splits apart two strata, resulting in a domeline structure. This previously unknown type of structure on Titan may be yet another indication of cryovolcanism. [1] Stofan, E.R., et al, Icarus, 152, 75-95, 2001. [2] Wichman, R.W. and Schultz, P. H. (1996). Icarus, 122, Issue 1, July 1996, pages 193-199. doi:10.1006/icar.1996.0118

  11. Topography of whisking II: interaction of whisker and pad.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, R; Friedman, W; Zeigler, H P

    2005-09-01

    The peripheral effector system mediating rodent whisking produces protraction/retraction movements of the whiskers and translation movements of the collagenous mystacial pad. To examine the interaction of these movements during whisking in air we used high-resolution, optoelectronic methods for two-dimensional monitoring of whisker and pad movements in head-fixed rats. Under these testing conditions (1) whisker movements on the same side of the face are synchronous and of similar amplitude; (2) pad movements exhibit the characteristic 'exploratory' rhythm (6-12 Hz) of whisking but their movements often have a low frequency (1-2 Hz) component; (3) Pad movements occur in both antero-posterior and dorso-ventral planes but there are considerable variations in the amplitude and topography of movement parameters in the two planes. We conclude that (a) both whisker and pad receive input from a common central rhythm generator; (b) differences in whisker and pad amplitude and topography probably reflect differences in the biomechanical properties of the structures receiving that input; (c) pad movements make a significant contribution to the kinematics of whisking behavior and (d) the two-dimensional nature of pad translation movements significantly increases the rat's flexible control of its mobile sensor. PMID:16338829

  12. Interlayer tunneling spectroscopy of mixed-phase BSCCO superconducting whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilaslan, O.; Truccato, M.; Simsek, Y.; Aksan, M. A.; Koval, Y.; Müller, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study on the interlayer tunneling spectroscopy (ITS) of mixed-phase BiSrCaCuO (BSCCO) superconducting whiskers. The tunneling experiments were carried out on the artificial cross-whisker (twist angle of 90°) junctions. A multiple superconducting energy gap in the cross-whisker junctions was observed, which is attributed to the presence of different doping levels of two Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ phases (Bi-2212), rather than two different phases, in the BSCCO whiskers, namely Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O8+δ (Bi-2212 and Bi-2223). The temperature dependence of the energy gaps was discussed in the framework of the BCS T-dependence. On the other hand, the carrier concentration of the cross-whisker junction was changed by the carrier injection process. The effects of the carrier injection on the critical current, I c, and the ITS of intrinsic Josephson junctions were investigated in details.

  13. Mitigation of Sn Whisker Growth by Small Bi Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jung-Lae; Nagao, Shijo; Hamasaki, Kyoko; Tsujimoto, Masanobu; Sugahara, Tohru; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the morphological development of electroplated matte Sn and Sn- xBi ( x = 0.5 wt.%, 1.0 wt.%, 2.0 wt.%) film surfaces was investigated under diverse testing conditions: 1-year room-temperature storage, high temperature and humidity (HTH), mechanical loading by indentation, and thermal cycling. These small Bi additions prevented Sn whisker formation; no whisker growth was observed on any Sn- xBi surface during either the room-temperature storage or HTH testing. In the indentation loading and thermal cycling tests, short (<5 μm) surface extrusions were occasionally observed, but only on x = 0.5 wt.% and 1.0 wt.% plated samples. In all test cases, Sn-2Bi plated samples exhibited excellent whisker mitigation, while pure Sn samples always generated many whiskers on the surface. We confirmed that the addition of Bi into Sn refined the grain size of the as-plated films and altered the columnar structure to form equiaxed grains. The storage conditions allowed the formation of intermetallic compounds between the plated layer and the substrate regardless of the Bi addition. However, the growth patterns became more uniform with increasing amounts of Bi. These microstructural improvements with Bi addition effectively released the internal stress from Sn plating, thus mitigating whisker formation on the surface under various environments.

  14. Biomimetic Active Touch with Fingertips and Whiskers.

    PubMed

    Lepora, Nathan F

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a synthetic viewpoint that compares, contrasts, and draws commonalities for biomimetic perception over a range of tactile sensors and tactile stimuli. Biomimetic active perception is formulated from three principles: (i) evidence accumulation based on leading models of perceptual decision making; (ii) action selection with an evidence-based policy, here based on overt focal attention; and (iii) sensory encoding of evidence based on neural coding. Two experiments with each of three biomimetic tactile sensors are considered: the iCub (capacitive) fingertip, the TacTip (optical) tactile sensor, and BIOTACT whiskers. For each sensor, one experiment considers a similar task (perception of shape and location) and the other a different tactile perception task. In all experiments, active perception with a biomimetic action selection policy based on focal attention outperforms passive perception with static or random action selection. The active perception also consistently reaches superresolved accuracy (hyperacuity) finer than the spacing between tactile elements. Biomimetic active touch thus offers a common approach for biomimetic tactile sensors to accurately and robustly characterize and explore non-trivial, uncertain environments analogous to how animals perceive the natural world. PMID:27168603

  15. Plasma deposition of polymer composite films incorporating nanocellulose whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, P.; Airoudj, A.; Laborie, M.-P.; Mathew, A. P.; Roucoules, V.

    2011-11-01

    In a trend for sustainable engineering and functionalization of surfaces, we explore the possibilities of gas phase processes to deposit nanocomposite films. From an analysis of pulsed plasma polymerization of maleic anhydride in the presence of nanocellulose whiskers, it seems that thin nanocomposite films can be deposited with various patterns. By specifically modifying plasma parameters such as total power, duty cycle, and monomer gas pressure, the nanocellulose whiskers are either incorporated into a buckled polymer film or single nanocellulose whiskers are deposited on top of a polymeric film. The density of the latter can be controlled by modifying the exact positioning of the substrate in the reactor. The resulting morphologies are evaluated by optical microscopy, AFM, contact angle measurements and ellipsometry.

  16. Bacteriophage T4 whiskers: a rudimentary environment-sensing device.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M P; Wood, W B

    1975-01-01

    The 400 A filaments or "whiskers," which extend outward from the collar region of the phage, control retraction and extension of the tail fibers in response to certain environmental conditions. The tail fibers of normal phage retract in the absence of a required adsorption cofactor, at low pH, at low ionic strength, at low temperature, and at high concentrations of polyethylene glycol. The tail fibers of mutant whiskerless (wac) phage still retract under the first two conditions, but not the last three. Antibodies to whiskers neutralize T4, probably by fixing tail fibers in the retracted configuration. Phage with retracted tail fibers adsorb poorly to host bacterial cells, and their adsorption rate increases as the fibers become extended. These results suggest that one function of the whiskers is to retract the tail fibers and thereby prevent adsorption to host cells under certain conditions that might be unfavorable for production of phage progeny following infection. PMID:242007

  17. Optimum Thickness of Sn Film for Whisker Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Yang, Fuqian; Vianco, Paul T.; Zhang, Bei; Li, James C. M.

    2011-10-01

    By depositing different thicknesses of Sn films over a silicon wafer precoated with Cr and Ni adhesion layers and then by bending the tinned wafer using a dead load applied at the center to introduce the same compressive stresses in the Sn films, the growth rate of whiskers appeared to have a maximum for a certain thickness. This is explained by assuming the Sn atoms to flow along the vertical grain boundaries (perpendicular to the interface) into the interface between Sn and Ni and then along the interface to the root of the whisker through some more vertical grain boundaries. The resistance along the vertical grain boundaries appeared to control the rate of whisker growth for thick films.

  18. Neural coding in barrel cortex during whisker-guided locomotion.

    PubMed

    Sofroniew, Nicholas James; Vlasov, Yurii A; Andrew Hires, Samuel; Freeman, Jeremy; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Animals seek out relevant information by moving through a dynamic world, but sensory systems are usually studied under highly constrained and passive conditions that may not probe important dimensions of the neural code. Here, we explored neural coding in the barrel cortex of head-fixed mice that tracked walls with their whiskers in tactile virtual reality. Optogenetic manipulations revealed that barrel cortex plays a role in wall-tracking. Closed-loop optogenetic control of layer 4 neurons can substitute for whisker-object contact to guide behavior resembling wall tracking. We measured neural activity using two-photon calcium imaging and extracellular recordings. Neurons were tuned to the distance between the animal snout and the contralateral wall, with monotonic, unimodal, and multimodal tuning curves. This rich representation of object location in the barrel cortex could not be predicted based on simple stimulus-response relationships involving individual whiskers and likely emerges within cortical circuits. PMID:26701910

  19. Tin Whisker Electrical Short Circuit Characteristics Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.; Asfour, Shihab S.; Bayliss, Jon A.; Ludwib, Lawrence L.; Zapata, Maria C.

    2007-01-01

    Existing risk simulations make the assumption that when a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors, the result is an electrical short circuit. This conservative assumption is made because shorting is a random event that has a currently unknown probability associated with it. Due to contact resistance electrical shorts may not occur at lower voltage levels. In this experiment, we study the effect of varying voltage on the breakdown of the contact resistance which leads to a short circuit. From this data we can estimate the probability of an electrical short, as a function of voltage, given that a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors. In addition, three tin whiskers grown from the same Space Shuttle Orbiter card guide used in the aforementioned experiment were cross-sectioned and studied using a focused ion beam (FIB).

  20. Mechanical characterization of C60 whiskers by MEMS bend testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, M. P.; Lucyszyn, S.

    2009-04-01

    Little has been published on the mechanical characteristics of C60 whiskers, due to the inherent difficulties in physically mounting such small test samples. Earlier reported results suggested Young's modulus values of 32 and 54 GPa, with 130 and 160 micron diameter C60 nanowhiskers, respectively, using compressive deformation techniques. In our work, an experimental bespoke silicon-based microelectromechanical system has been developed to extract an other value. 1th as been found, through parameter extraction techniques, that a Young's modulus of only ~ 2 GPa is obtained with a C60 whisker having a diameter of 4 microns. By including the previously published data points, there is now strong evidence to suggest an inverse proportionality relationship between the Young's modulus and the diameter of a C60 whisker.

  1. Sinking with the Titanic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2015-03-01

    In the Titanic movie, when the rear part of the ship is about to sink, Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio) says to Rose DeWitt Bukater (Kate Winslet) to get ready to swim, because the sinking body will suck them into the abysses. Is this sucking phenomenon really happening? And, if so, why?

  2. Titan Nitriles Awaiting Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2003-05-01

    The nitrogen-methane haze of Titan is known to harbor at least four molecules containing a nitrile (-CN) group: H-CN, NC-CN, CH3-CN, and HCC-CN. The low-temperature reaction chemistry of these molecules is of interest as the Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe approach the Saturnian system. As part of our preparation for Cassini-Huygens results we have undertaken an experimental study of the dominant chemical changes of nitrile molecules. Our results point to isomerization products formed by both low-temperature photochemistry and radiation chemistry. Among the new molecules we can predict are isonitriles (e.g. CH3-NC) and enimines (e.g. H2C=C=NH). We also expect, depending on the amount of H2O present, that cyanate ions (OCN-) can form on Titan. This presentation will include our latest results for Titan nitriles, as well a few nitriles not yet detected on Titan but present in either cometary comae or the interstellar medium. Since nitriles can form biological molecules, such as alpha-amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines, our results may also have astrobiological implications. -- The authors acknowledge NASA funding through the SARA and Planetary Atmospheres programs. RLH acknowledges support from NASA grant NAG-5-1843.

  3. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Laurens W J; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Shapiro, Joël; Rijken, Bianca F M; Zandstra, Froukje; van der Ende, Barry; Owens, Cullen B; Potters, Jan-Willem; de Gruijl, Jornt R; Ruigrok, Tom J H; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre–parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of Purkinje cells. We used, for the first time, the mouse whisker system as a model system to study the encoding of somatosensory input by Purkinje cells. We show that most Purkinje cells in ipsilateral crus 1 and crus 2 of awake mice respond to whisker stimulation with complex spike and/or simple spike responses. Single-whisker stimulation in anaesthetised mice revealed that the receptive fields of complex spike and simple spike responses were strikingly different. Complex spike responses, which proved to be sensitive to the amplitude, speed and direction of whisker movement, were evoked by only one or a few whiskers. Simple spike responses, which were not affected by the direction of movement, could be evoked by many individual whiskers. The receptive fields of Purkinje cells were largely intermingled, and we suggest that this facilitates the rapid integration of sensory inputs from different sources. Furthermore, we describe that individual Purkinje cells, at least under anaesthesia, may be bound in two functional ensembles based on the receptive fields and the synchrony of the complex spike and simple spike responses. The ‘complex spike ensembles’ were oriented in the sagittal plane, following the anatomical organization of the climbing fibres, while the ‘simple spike ensembles’ were oriented in the transversal plane, as are the beams of parallel fibres. PMID:20724365

  5. Coordinated Stem and NanoSIMS Analysis of Enstatite Whiskers in Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, Scott; Keller, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    Enstatite whiskers (less than 10 micrometer length, less than 200 nanometer width) occur in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), an Antarctic micrometeorite and a comet 81P/Wild-2 sample. The whiskers are typically elongated along the [100] axis and contain axial screw dislocations, while those in terrestrial rocks and meteorites are elongated along [001]. The unique crystal morphologies and microstructures are consistent with the enstatite whiskers condensing above approximately 1300 K in a low-pressure nebular or circumstellar gas. To constrain the site of enstatite whisker formation, we carried out coordinated mineralogical, chemical and oxygen isotope measurements on enstatite whiskers in a CP IDP.

  6. Strengthening composite resin restorations with ceramic whisker reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C; Antonucci, J M

    2000-01-01

    Due to their tendency to fracture, current composite formulations are unsuitable for use in large stress-bearing direct posterior restorations that involve cusps. This study investigated the use of single-crystalline ceramic whiskers for the reinforcement of composite resins. The whisker-reinforced composite materials exhibited physical characteristics (i.e., flexural strength, work-of-fracture, and elastic modulus) that were significantly greater (P < 0.05; Student's t test) than those of traditional composite formulations. The experimental materials also had a surface smoothness that was essentially comparable to hybrid composite control specimens. PMID:11404884

  7. Whisker-reinforced ceramic composites for heat engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1988-01-01

    Much work was undertaken to develop techniques of incorporating SiC whiskers into either a Si3N4 or SiC matrix. The result was the fabrication of ceramic composites with ever-increasing fracture toughness and strength. To complement this research effort, the fracture behavior of whisker-reinforced ceramics is studied so as to develop methodologies for the analysis of structural components fabricated from this toughened material. The results, outlined herein, focus on the following areas: the use of micromechanics to predict thermoelastic properties, theoretical aspects of fracture behavior, and reliability analysis.

  8. Whisker Growth Behavior of Sn58Bi Solder Coatings Under Isothermal Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zuo, Yong; Liu, Sihan; Guo, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Whisker formation is a frequently occurring problem in the electronica industry, causing damage to fine-pitch electrical components. Several theories and models have been developed to describe the whisker growth, and many attempts have been made to find solutions for this issue. Most of the previous literature addressed the formation of Sn whiskers, while some attention was focused on Bi-rich whiskers. Moreover, investigation of different types of whiskers would be beneficial for understanding of the fundamental processes behind of the whisker growth. In our work, we analyze and discuss the growth of Bi-rich whiskers in eutectic Sn58Bi solder coatings under isothermal aging conditions. A possible growth mechanism for Bi-whiskers in the coating is proposed. Two processes contributed to the whisker growth. One process was the chemical reaction between Cu and Sn atoms to form Cu6Sn5. Cu atoms were inexhaustibly introduced into the coating from the substrate and caused the formation of Cu6Sn5. This process provided the driving force and was a sufficient condition for the growth of Bi-rich whiskers. The second process was the segregation of Bi atoms driven by the gradient of the Bi atoms' concentration. This process was the necessary condition for Bi-whiskers growth.

  9. The effect of whisker movement on radial distance estimation: a case study in comparative robotics

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Mathew H.; Fox, Charles W.; Lepora, Nathan F.; Pearson, Martin J.; Sullivan, J. Charles; Prescott, Tony J.

    2013-01-01

    Whisker movement has been shown to be under active control in certain specialist animals such as rats and mice. Though this whisker movement is well characterized, the role and effect of this movement on subsequent sensing is poorly understood. One method for investigating this phenomena is to generate artificial whisker deflections with robotic hardware under different movement conditions. A limitation of this approach is that assumptions must be made in the design of any artificial whisker actuators, which will impose certain restrictions on the whisker-object interaction. In this paper we present three robotic whisker platforms, each with different mechanical whisker properties and actuation mechanisms. A feature-based classifier is used to simultaneously discriminate radial distance to contact and contact speed for the first time. We show that whisker-object contact speed predictably affects deflection magnitudes, invariant of whisker material or whisker movement trajectory. We propose that rodent whisker control allows the animal to improve sensing accuracy by regulating contact speed induced touch-to-touch variability. PMID:23293601

  10. Mouse barrel cortex functionally compensates for deprivation produced by neonatal lesion of whisker follicles.

    PubMed

    Melzer, P; Crane, A M; Smith, C B

    1993-12-01

    In the murine somatosensory pathway, the metabolic whisker map in barrel cortex derived with the autoradiographic deoxyglucose method is spatially in register with the morphological whisker map represented by the barrels. The barrel cortex of adult mice, in which we had removed three whisker follicles from the middle row of whiskers shortly after birth, contained a disorganized zone surrounded by enlarged barrels with partially disrupted borders. With the fully quantitative autoradiographic deoxyglucose method, we investigated in barrel cortex of such mice the magnitude and the pattern of metabolic responses evoked by the deflection of whiskers. Most remarkably, the simultaneous deflection of six whiskers neighbouring the lesion activated not only the territory of the corresponding barrels, but also the unspecifiable area intercalated between the clearly identified barrels. This metabolic whisker map, unpredictable from the morphological 'barrel' map, may reflect a functional compensation for the deficit in input. PMID:8124517

  11. Fundamental studies of tin whiskering in microelectronics finishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinol, Lesly Agnes

    Common electronics materials, such as tin, copper, steel, and brass, are ambient reactive under common use conditions, and as such are prone to corrosion. During the early 1940s, reports of failures due to electrical shorting of components caused by 'whisker' (i.e., filamentary surface protrusion) growth on many surface types---including the aforementioned metals---began to emerge. Lead alloying of tin (3--10% by weight, typically in the eutectic proportion) eliminated whiskering risk for decades, until the July 2006 adoption of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive was issued by the European Union. This directive, which has since been adopted by California and parts of China, severely restricted the use of lead (<1000 ppm) in all electrical and electronics equipment being placed on the EU market, imposing the need for developing reliable new "lead-free" alternatives to SnPb. In spite of the abundance of modern-day anecdotes chronicling whisker-related failures in satellites, nuclear power stations, missiles, pacemakers, and spacecraft navigation equipment, pure tin finishes are still increasingly being employed today, and the root cause(s) of tin whiskering remains elusive. This work describes a series of structured experiments exploring the fundamental relationships between the incidence of tin whiskering (as dependent variable) and numerous independent variables. These variables included deposition method (electroplating, electroless plating, template-based electrochemical synthesis, and various physical vapor deposition techniques, including resistive evaporation, electron beam evaporation, and sputtering), the inclusion of microparticles and organic contamination, the effects of sample geometry, and nanostructuring. Key findings pertain to correlations between sample geometry and whisker propensity, and also to the stress evolution across a series of 4"-diameter silicon wafers of varying thicknesses with respect to the degree of post

  12. Titanates and Titanate-Metal Compounds in Biological Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Drury, Jeanie L.; Chung, Whasun Oh; Hobbs, David T.; Wataha, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Metal ions are notorious environmental contaminants, some causing toxicity at exquisitely low (ppm-level) concentrations. Yet, the redox properties of metal ions make them attractive candidates for bio-therapeutics. Titanates are insoluble particulate compounds of titanium and oxygen with crystalline surfaces that bind metal ions; these compounds offer a means to scavenge metal ions in environmental contexts or deliver them in therapeutic contexts while limiting systemic exposure and toxicity. In either application, the toxicological properties of titanates are crucial. To date, the accurate measurement of the in vitro toxicity of titanates has been complicated by their particulate nature, which interferes with many assays that are optical density (OD)-dependent, and at present, little to no in vivo titanate toxicity data exist. Compatibility data garnered thus far for native titanates in vitro are inconsistent and lacking in mechanistic understanding. These data suggest that native titanates have little toxicity toward several oral and skin bacteria species, but do suppress mammalian cell metabolism in a cells-pecific manner. Titanate compounds bind several types of metal ions, including some common environmental toxins, and enhance delivery to bacteria or cells. Substantial work remains to address the practical applicability of titanates. Nevertheless, titanates have promise to serve as novel vehicles for metal-based therapeutics or as a new class of metal scavengers for environmental applications. PMID:26430701

  13. Role of whiskers in sensorimotor development of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2015-01-01

    The mystacial vibrissae (whiskers) of nocturnal rodents play a major role in their sensorimotor behaviors. Relatively little information exists on the role of whiskers during early development. We characterized the contribution of whiskers to sensorimotor development in postnatal C57BL/6 mice. A comparison between intact and whisker-clipped mice in a battery of behavioral tests from postnatal day (P) 4-17 revealed that both male and female pups develop reflexive motor behavior even when the whiskers are clipped. Daily whisker trimming from P3 onwards results in diminished weight gain by P17, and impairment in whisker sensorimotor coordination behaviors, such as cliff avoidance and littermate huddling from P4 to P17, while facilitation of righting reflex at P4 and grasp response at P12. Since active whisker palpation does not start until 2 weeks of age, passive whisker touch during early neonatal stage must play a role in regulating these behaviors. Around the onset of exploratory behaviors (P12) neonatal whisker-clipped pups also display persistent searching movements when they encounter cage walls as a compensatory mechanism of sensorimotor development. Spontaneous whisker motion (whisking) is distinct from respiratory fluttering of whiskers. It is a symmetrical vibration of whiskers at a rate of approximately ∼8 Hz and begins around P10. Oriented, bundled movements of whiskers at higher frequencies of ∼12 Hz during scanning object surfaces, i.e., palpation whisking, emerges at P14. The establishment of locomotive body coordination before eyes open accompanies palpation whisking, indicating an important role in the guidance of exploratory motor behaviors. PMID:25823761

  14. Role of whiskers in sensorimotor development of C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2015-01-01

    The mystacial vibrissae (whiskers) of nocturnal rodents play a major role in their sensorimotor behaviors. Relatively little information exists on the role of whiskers during early development. We characterized the contribution of whiskers to sensorimotor development in postnatal C57BL/6 mice. A comparison between intact and whisker-clipped mice in a battery of behavioral tests from postnatal day (P) 4 to 17 revealed that both male and female pups develop reflexive motor behavior even when the whiskers are clipped. Daily whisker trimming from P3 onwards results in diminished weight gain by P17, and impairment in whisker sensorimotor coordination behaviors, such as cliff avoidance and littermate huddling from P4 through P17, while facilitation of righting reflex at P4 and grasp response at P12. Since active whisker palpation does not start until 2 weeks of age, passive whisker touch during early neonatal stage must play a role in regulating these behaviors. Around the onset of exploratory behaviors (P12) neonatal whisker-clipped pups also display persistent searching movements when they encounter cage walls as a compensatory mechanism of sensorimotor development. Spontaneous whisker motion (whisking) is distinct from respiratory fluttering of whiskers. It is a symmetrical vibration of whiskers at a rate of approximately ∼8 Hz, and begins around P10. Oriented, bundled movements of whiskers at higher frequencies of ∼12 Hz during scanning object surfaces, i.e., palpation whisking, emerges at P14. The establishment of locomotive body coordination before eyes open accompanies palpation whisking, indicating an important role in the guidance of exploratory motor behaviors. PMID:25823761

  15. Understanding and predicting metallic whisker growth and its effects on reliability : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Grant, Richard P.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Pillars, Jamin; Susan, Donald Francis; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Yelton, William Graham

    2012-01-01

    Tin (Sn) whiskers are conductive Sn filaments that grow from Sn-plated surfaces, such as surface finishes on electronic packages. The phenomenon of Sn whiskering has become a concern in recent years due to requirements for lead (Pb)-free soldering and surface finishes in commercial electronics. Pure Sn finishes are more prone to whisker growth than their Sn-Pb counterparts and high profile failures due to whisker formation (causing short circuits) in space applications have been documented. At Sandia, Sn whiskers are of interest due to increased use of Pb-free commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and possible future requirements for Pb-free solders and surface finishes in high-reliability microelectronics. Lead-free solders and surface finishes are currently being used or considered for several Sandia applications. Despite the long history of Sn whisker research and the recently renewed interest in this topic, a comprehensive understanding of whisker growth remains elusive. This report describes recent research on characterization of Sn whiskers with the aim of understanding the underlying whisker growth mechanism(s). The report is divided into four sections and an Appendix. In Section 1, the Sn plating process is summarized. Specifically, the Sn plating parameters that were successful in producing samples with whiskers will be reviewed. In Section 2, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Sn whiskers and time-lapse SEM studies of whisker growth will be discussed. This discussion includes the characterization of straight as well as kinked whiskers. In Section 3, a detailed discussion is given of SEM/EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) techniques developed to determine the crystallography of Sn whiskers. In Section 4, these SEM/EBSD methods are employed to determine the crystallography of Sn whiskers, with a statistically significant number of whiskers analyzed. This is the largest study of Sn whisker crystallography ever reported. This section includes a

  16. Titan III-C Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph shows a Titan III-C launch vehicle. Titan vehicles are designed to carry payloads equal to the size and weight of those on the space shuttle. The Titan IV Centaur can put 10,000 pound payloads into geosynchronous orbit, 22,300 miles above Earth. For more information about Titan and Centaur, please see chapters 4 and 8, respectively, in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  17. Method of making in-situ whisker reinforced glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Lee, K. H.

    1993-02-16

    A heat processing procedure is used to create reinforcing whiskers of TiO.sub.2 in glass-ceramic materials in the LAS and MAS family. The heat processing procedure has particular application in creating TiO.sub.2 in-situ in a modified .beta.-eucryptite system.

  18. Improved whisker pointing technique for micron-size diode contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Green, G.

    1982-01-01

    Pointed phosphor-bronze whiskers are commonly used to contact micron-size Schottky barrier diodes. A process is presented which allows pointing such wire and achieving the desired cone angle and tip diameter without the use of highly undesirable chemical reagents.

  19. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.E. Jr.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic composition which, based on total composition weight, consists essentially of a solid solution of lead zirconate and lead titanate in a PbZrO/sub 3/:PbTiO/sub 3/ ratio from about 0.505:0.495 to about 0.54:0.46; a halide salt selected from the group consisting of fluorides and chlorides of alkali metal and alkaline earth elements and mixtures thereof except for francium and radium in an amount from about 0.5 to 2 weight percent; and an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium, barium, scandium, aluminum, lanthanum, praesodynium, neodymium, samarium, and mixtures thereof in an amount from about 0.5 to about 6 weight percent, the relative amount of oxide being from about 1 to about 4 times that of the halide.

  20. RADAR Reveals Titan Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Callahan, P.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.; Elachi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper is a K(sub u)-band (13.78 GHz, lambda = 2.17 cm) linear polarized RADAR instrument capable of operating in synthetic aperture (SAR), scatterometer, altimeter and radiometer modes. During the first targeted flyby of Titan on 26 October, 2004 (referred to as Ta) observations were made in all modes. Evidence for topographic relief based on the Ta altimetry and SAR data are presented here. Additional SAR and altimetry observations are planned for the T3 encounter on 15 February, 2005, but have not been carried out at this writing. Results from the T3 encounter relevant to topography will be included in our presentation. Data obtained in the Ta encounter include a SAR image swath

  1. Titan's Eccentricity Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, L.; Jacobson, R.; Ducci, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.

    2011-12-01

    The large eccentricity (e=0.03) of Titan's orbit causes significant variations in the tidal field from Saturn and induces periodic stresses in the satellite body at the orbital period (about 16 days). Peak-to-peak variations of the tidal field (from pericenter to apocenter) are about 18% (6e). If Titan hosts a liquid layer (such as an internal ocean), the gravity field would exhibit significant periodic variations. The response of the body to fast variations of the external, perturbing field is controlled by the Love numbers, defined for each spherical harmonic as the ratio between the perturbed and perturbing potential. For Titan the largest effect is by far on the quadrupole field, and the corresponding Love number is indicated by k2 (assumed to be identical for all degree 2 harmonics). Models of Titan's interior generally envisage a core made up of silicates, surrounded by a layer of high pressure ice, possibly a liquid water or water-ammonia ocean, and an ice-I outer shell, with variations associated with the dehydration state of the core or the presence of mixed rock-ice layers. Previous analysis of Titan's tidal response [1] shows that k2 depends crucially on the presence or absence of an internal ocean. k2 was found to vary from about 0.03 for a purely rocky interior to 0.48 for a rigid rocky core surrounded by an ocean and a thin (20 km) ice shell. A large k2 entails changes in the satellite's quadrupole coefficients by a few percent, enough to be detected by accurate range rate measurements of the Cassini spacecraft. So far, of the many Cassini's flybys of Titan, six were used for gravity measurements. During gravity flybys the spacecraft is tracked from the antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network using microwave links at X- and Ka-band frequencies. A state-of-the-art instrumentation enables range rate measurements accurate to 10-50 micron/s at integration times of 60 s. The first four flybys provided the static gravity field and the moment of inertia factor

  2. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  3. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  4. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  5. Changes on Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Coustenis, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Drossart, P.; Lawrence, K. J.; Matsoukas, C. K.; Hirtzig, M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.; Bratsolis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Titan Radar Mapper have investigated Titan's surface since 2004, unveiling a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmospheric interactions, and climate evolution. We focus on understanding the origin of the major geomorphological units identified by Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1,2], Malaska et al. (2015) [3] and regions we studied in Solomonidou et al. (2014; 2015) [4,5]. Here, we investigate the nature of: Undifferentiated Plains, Hummocky/Mountainous terrains, candidate cryovolcanic sites, Labyrinth, and Dunes in terms of surface albedo behavior and spectral evolution with time to identify possible changes. Using a radiative transfer code, we find that temporal variations of surface albedo occur for some areas. Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, both candidate cryovolcanic regions, change with time, becoming darker and brighter respectively in surface albedo. In contrast, we find that the Undifferentiated Plains and the suggested evaporitic areas [6] in the equatorial regions do not present any significant changes. We are able to report the differences and similarities among the various regions and provide constraints on their chemical composition and specific processes of origin. Our results support the hypothesis that both endogenic and exogenic processes have played important roles in shaping Titan's geologic evolution. Such a variety of geologic processes and their relationship to the methane cycle make Titan important for astrobiology and habitability studies and particularly significant in solar system studies. [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-588, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: JGR, 118, 416-435, 2013; [3] Malaska, M., et al : Icarus, submitted, 2015;[4] Solomonidou et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: In press, 2015; [6] Barnes

  6. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  7. Landscape Evolution of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Titan may have acquired its massive atmosphere relatively recently in solar system history. The warming sun may have been key to generating Titan's atmosphere over time, starting from a thin atmosphere with condensed surface volatiles like Triton, with increased luminosity releasing methane, and then large amounts of nitrogen (perhaps suddenly), into the atmosphere. This thick atmosphere, initially with much more methane than at present, resulted in global fluvial erosion that has over time retreated towards the poles with the removal of methane from the atmosphere. Basement rock, as manifested by bright, rough, ridges, scarps, crenulated blocks, or aligned massifs, mostly appears within 30 degrees of the equator. This landscape was intensely eroded by fluvial processes as evidenced by numerous valley systems, fan-like depositional features and regularly-spaced ridges (crenulated terrain). Much of this bedrock landscape, however, is mantled by dunes, suggesting that fluvial erosion no longer dominates in equatorial regions. High midlatitude regions on Titan exhibit dissected sedimentary plains at a number of localities, suggesting deposition (perhaps by sediment eroded from equatorial regions) followed by erosion. The polar regions are mainly dominated by deposits of fluvial and lacustrine sediment. Fluvial processes are active in polar areas as evidenced by alkane lakes and occasional cloud cover.

  8. Evolution of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, H.; Povoden, G.; Selsis, F.; Ribas, I.; Tehrany, M. G.; Guinan, E. F.; Hanslmeier, A.; Bauer, S. J.

    2003-04-01

    We show that anomalies of heavy isotopes in Titan's atmosphere can be explained by using observational data of the radiation and particle environment of solar proxies. These observations indicate a larger solar wind flux and high solar EUV radiation of the early Sun during the first billion years are responsible for a fractionated atmospheric loss. For studying the evolution of the thermal escape of Titan's atmosphere we use a scaling law based on an approximate solution of the heat balance equation in the exosphere. Further, isotope fractionation by non-thermal atmospheric escape processes like dissociative recombination, impact dissociation, atmospheric sputtering and ion pick-up processes. We show that Titan lost an atmospheric mass We discuss also possible chemical reactions of methane and other out-gassing substances due to the high solar EUV fluxes powered thermospheric temperature 4 Gyr ago. This could have lead to molecules of higher mass like ethane and other organic compounds. The efficient production of such molecules was reduced by the decrease of the solar activity resulting in a kind of frozen state. At present only high energy processes like lightning discharges may give similar reactions.

  9. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of nonequilibrium phenomena on the Saturn satellite Titan indicate the occurrence of organic chemical evolution. Greenhouse and thermal inversion models of Titan's atmosphere provide environmental constraints within which various pathways for organic chemical synthesis are assessed. Experimental results and theoretical modeling studies suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite may be dominated by two atmospheric processes: energetic-particle bombardment and photochemistry. Reactions initiated in various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic ray, Saturn wind, and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4 - N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the C2-hydrocarbons, the UV-visible-absorbing stratospheric haze, and the reddish color of the satellite. Photochemical reactions of CH4 can also account for the presence of C2-hydrocarbons. In the lower Titan atmosphere, photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. Hot H-atom reactions initiated by photo-dissociation of NH3 can couple the chemical reactions of NH3 and CH4 and produce organic matter.

  10. Infrared thermal imaging of rat somatosensory cortex with whisker stimulation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Ooi, Yasuhiro; Seki, Junji

    2012-04-01

    The present study aims to validate the applicability of infrared (IR) thermal imaging for the study of brain function through experiments on the rat barrel cortex. Regional changes in neural activity within the brain produce alterations in local thermal equilibrium via increases in metabolic activity and blood flow. We studied the relationship between temperature change and neural activity in anesthetized rats using IR imaging to visualize stimulus-induced changes in the somatosensory cortex of the brain. Sensory stimulation of the vibrissae (whiskers) was given for 10 s using an oscillating whisker vibrator (5-mm deflection at 10, 5, and 1 Hz). The brain temperature in the observational region continued to increase significantly with whisker stimulation. The mean peak recorded temperature changes were 0.048 ± 0.028, 0.054 ± 0.036, and 0.097 ± 0.015°C at 10, 5, and 1 Hz, respectively. We also observed that the temperature increase occurred in a focal spot, radiating to encompass a larger region within the contralateral barrel cortex region during single-whisker stimulation. Whisker stimulation also produced ipsilateral cortex temperature increases, which were localized in the same region as the pial arterioles. Temperature increase in the barrel cortex was also observed in rats treated with a calcium channel blocker (nimodipine), which acts to suppress the hemodynamic response to neural activity. Thus the location and area of temperature increase were found to change in accordance with the region of neural activation. These results indicate that IR thermal imaging is viable as a functional quantitative neuroimaging technique. PMID:22282486

  11. Mitigation and Verification Methods for Sn Whisker Growth in Pb-Free Automotive Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Won Sik; Oh, Chul Min; Kim, Do Seop

    2013-02-01

    This work describes mitigation methods against Sn whisker growth in Pb-free automotive electronics using a conformal coating technique, with an additional focus on determining an effective whisker assessment method. We suggest effective whisker growth conditions that involve temperature cycling and two types of storage conditions (high-temperature/humidity storage and ambient storage), and analyze whisker growth mechanisms. In determining an efficient mitigation method against whisker growth, surface finish and conformal coating have been validated as effective means. In our experiments, the surface finish of components comprised Ni/Sn, Ni/SnBi, and Ni/Pd. The effects of acrylic silicone, and rubber coating of components were compared with uncoated performance under high-temperature/humidity storage conditions. An effective whisker assessment method during temperature cycling and under various storage conditions (high temperature/humidity and ambient) is indicated for evaluating whisker growth. Although components were finished with Ni/Pd, we found that whiskers were generated at solder joints and that conformal coating is a useful mitigation method in this regard. Although whiskers penetrated most conformal coating materials (acrylic, silicone, and rubber) after 3500 h of high-temperature/humidity storage, the whisker length was markedly reduced due to the conformal coatings, with silicone providing superior mitigation over acrylic and rubber.

  12. Alkali Silicate Glass Coatings for Mitigating the Risks of Tin Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Dave; Wilcoxon, Ross; Lower, Nate; Grossman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Alkali silicate glass (ASG) coatings were investigated as a possible method for inhibiting tin whisker initiation and growth. The aqueous-based ASG formulations used in this study were deposited with equipment and conditions that are typical of those used to apply conventional conformal coatings. Processes for controlling ASG coating properties were developed, and a number of ASG-based coating combinations were applied to test components with pure tin surfaces. Coatings were applied both in a laboratory environment at Rockwell Collins and in a manufacturing environment at Plasma Ruggedized Solutions. Testing in elevated humidity/temperature environments and subsequent inspection of the test articles identified coating combinations that inhibited tin whisker growth as well as other material combinations that actually accelerated tin whisker growth. None of the coatings evaluated in this study, including conventional acrylic and Parylene conformal coatings, completely prevented the formation of tin whiskers. Two of the coatings were particularly effective at reducing the risks of whisker growth, albeit through different mechanisms. Parylene conformal coating almost, but not completely, eliminated whisker formation, and only a few tin whiskers were found on these surfaces during the study. A composite of ASG and alumina nanoparticles inhibited whisker formation to a lesser degree than Parylene, but did disrupt whisker growth mechanisms so as to inhibit the formation of long, and more dangerous, tin whiskers. Additional testing also demonstrated that the conformal coatings had relatively little effect on the dielectric loss of a stripline test structure operating at frequencies over 30 GHz.

  13. Titan ballute aerocapture using the stochastic TitanGRAM model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wyatt R.

    2004-01-01

    Aerocapture using a towed, inflatable ballute system has been shown to provide a sifnificatn performance advantages compared to traditional technologies, including lower heating rates and accomodation of larger navigational uncertainties. This paper extends previous results by designing a ballute aerocapture separation algorithm that can operate in a more realistic Titan atmospheric model based on TitanGRAM.

  14. A mechanistic study on the synthesis of β-Sialon whiskers from coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.; Wang, P.Y.; Yu, J.L.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The appearance of bead-like whiskers indicated that the growth mechanism of the β-Sialon whiskers was different from the conventional one, in which a chain of droplets were formed and then consumed to participate in the formation of the whiskers. - Highlights: • β-Sialon whiskers were synthesized using waste fly ash by carbothemal reduction reaction under nitrogen atmosphere. • Rod-like β-Sialon whiskers with a diameter of 100–500 nm were formed. • Bead-like whiskers as intermediate morphology of the growing β-Sialon whiskers were found with increasing sintering time. • The growth mechanism of β-Sialon whiskers was different from the conventional VLS mechanism. • A chain of droplets were formed and participated in the formation of the whiskers. - Abstract: β-Sialon whiskers were produced at 1420 °C through carbothemal reduction reaction under nitrogen atmosphere using fly ash from coal-fired power plants. The effects of sintering time on the phase formation and morphology of the products were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) techniques. Rod-like β-Sialon whiskers with the diameter of 100–500 nm were successfully formed. With increasing sintering time, bead-like morphology during the growth process of the whiskers was found, and growth mechanism of β-Sialon whiskers was also discussed in detail. The growth mechanism proposed in this study was different from the conventional vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) mechanism.

  15. Titan's methane clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  16. Titan after Cassini Huygens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J.; Lebreton, J.; Coustenis, A.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Erd, C.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005, the Huygens Probe gave us a snapshot of a world tantalizingly like our own, yet frozen in its evolution on the threshold of life. The descent under parachute, like that of Huygens in 2005, is happening again, but this time in the Saturn-cast twilight of winter in Titan's northern reaches. With a pop, the parachute is released, and then a muffled splash signals the beginning of the first floating exploration of an extraterrestrial sea-this one not of water but of liquid hydrocarbons. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away, a hot air balloon, a "montgolfiere," cruises 6 miles above sunnier terrain, imaging vistas of dunes, river channels, mountains and valleys carved in water ice, and probing the subsurface for vast quantities of "missing" methane and ethane that might be hidden within a porous icy crust. Balloon and floater return their data to a Titan Orbiter equipped to strip away Titan's mysteries with imaging, radar profiling, and atmospheric sampling, much more powerful and more complete than Cassini was capable of. This spacecraft, preparing to enter a circular orbit around Saturn's cloud-shrouded giant moon, has just completed a series of flybys of Enceladus, a tiny but active world with plumes that blow water and organics from the interior into space. Specialized instruments on the orbiter were able to analyze these plumes directly during the flybys. Titan and Enceladus could hardly seem more different, and yet they are linked by their origin in the Saturn system, by a magnetosphere that sweeps up mass and delivers energy, and by the possibility that one or both worlds harbor life. It is the goal of the NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) to explore and investigate these exotic and inviting worlds, to understand their natures and assess the possibilities of habitability in this system so distant from our home world. Orbiting, landing, and ballooning at Titan represent a new and exciting approach to planetary exploration. The TSSM mission

  17. Synthesis of nanosized sodium titanates

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.; Elvington, Mark C.

    2015-09-29

    Methods directed to the synthesis and peroxide-modification of nanosized monosodium titanate are described. Methods include combination of reactants at a low concentration to a solution including a nonionic surfactant. The nanosized monosodium titanate can exhibit high selectivity for sorbing various metallic ions.

  18. Potassium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of electrolyte . Function Potassium is a very important mineral for the human body. Your body needs potassium to: Build proteins Break down and use carbohydrates Build muscle Maintain normal body growth Control ...

  19. Potassium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium carbonate is a white powder used to make soap, glass, and other items. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or breathing in potassium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  20. Penicillin V Potassium Oral

    MedlinePlus

    Penicillin V potassium is an antibiotic used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia, ... Penicillin V potassium comes as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It is usually taken ...

  1. A Model for Rapid Tin Whisker Growth on the Surface of ErSn3 Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Hu; Xu, Guangchen; Song, Yonglun; Shi, Yaowu; Guo, Fu

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous growth of tin whiskers on the finish of leadframes is an extremely slow process under moderate temperature conditions. It therefore becomes difficult to track the continuous growth of tin whiskers and to vary the experimental conditions to determine their root causes. Accordingly, the fundamental growth behaviors of tin whiskers are still not fully understood. In this study, rapid tin whisker growth was achieved by adding 1 wt.% Er to Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu solder alloy. The results showed unique tin whisker morphology with nonconstant cross-section. An explanation is proposed by adding kinetic energy to the conventional energy balance equation. In addition, a double compressive stress zone is proposed to demonstrate the driving force for tin whisker growth in rare-earth-bearing phases.

  2. The mathematical whisker: A review of numerical models of the rat׳s vibrissa biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lucianna, Facundo Adrián; Albarracín, Ana Lía; Vrech, Sonia Mariel; Farfán, Fernando Daniel; Felice, Carmelo José

    2016-07-01

    The vibrissal system of the rat refers to specialized hairs the animal uses for tactile sensory perception. Rats actively move their whiskers in a characteristic way called "whisking". Interaction with the environment produces elastic deformation of the whiskers, generating mechanical signals in the whisker-follicle complex. Advances in our understanding of the vibrissal complex biomechanics is of interest not only for the biological research field, but also for biomimetic approaches. The recent development of whisker numerical models has contributed to comprehending its sophisticated movements and its interactions with the follicle. The great diversity of behavioral patterns and complexities of the whisker-follicle ensemble encouraged the creation of many different biomechanical models. This review analyzes most of the whisker biomechanical models that have been developed so far. This review was written so as to render it accessible to readers coming from different research areas. PMID:27260019

  3. Growth of Sn whiskers after low temperature implantation of 20 keV He or H

    SciTech Connect

    Poker, D.B.; Schubert, J.; Alexandrou, A.; Froehlingsdorf, J.; Stritzker, B.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystalline whiskers have been observed to form on thin films (approx.100 nm) of Sn following implantation of 20-keV H or He at temperatures below 15/sup 0/K. Rapid warming prevented the formation of whiskers, indicating that the growth occurs predominatly during the warming, and not during implantation. Samples that had been warmed rapidly did show whisker growth only after several days in air at room temperature. The adhesion of the films to the substrate is remarkably enhanced by the irradiation, as measured by scratch tests. Thicker films produced progressively fewer whiskers, and none were observed on implanted foils, or films of In, Bi, Zn, or Pb. Possible origins of the driving force for whisker growth are discussed. Whiskers grew on Sn films on all of the substrates that were tested: quartz, sapphire, glass, Si, Cu, stainless steel, and NaCl.

  4. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Gangwal, Santosh K.; Jain, Suresh C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 .mu., and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 .mu.. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  5. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  6. An Investigation of the Electrical Short Circuit Characteristics of Tin Whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, an empirical model to quantify the probability of occurrence of an electrical short circuit from tin whiskers as a function of voltage was developed. This model can be used to improve existing risk simulation models FIB and TEM images of a tin whisker confirm the rare polycrystalline structure on one of the three whiskers studied. FIB cross-section of the card guides verified that the tin finish was bright tin.

  7. Processing and properties of hydroxyapaptite whisker reinforced polyaryletherketones for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Converse, Gabriel Leverne

    The overall objective of this study was to produce hydroxyapatite (HA) whisker reinforced polyaryletherketone (PAEK) biocomposites and scaffolds with tailored mechanical properties similar to those of bone tissue. The effects of the reaction temperature and carboxylic acid on the morphology and composition of HA whiskers synthesized by chelate decomposition were first studied using a controlled heating rate under static conditions. Reaction temperature affected both whisker composition and morphology, while the carboxylic acid used as the chelating agent affected whisker morphology. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was reinforced with up to 50 vol% HA whisker reinforcement using a novel powder processing and compression molding technique. Composites with 40-50 vol% HA whisker reinforcement exhibited elastic moduli similar to that of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. Composites with 10 and 20 vol% HA whisker reinforcement exhibited tensile strengths similar to that of human cortical bone in the longitudinal direction. HA whisker reinforced polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) scaffolds were successfully processed with 75-90% porosity and 20-40 vol% HA whisker reinforcement. The compression molding/particle leaching technique used in this study facilitated the incorporation of high levels of bioactive HA whisker reinforcements into the polymer matrix. Micro-CT indicated interconnected porosity in the size range required for bone ingrowth. The mechanical properties of HA whisker reinforced PEKK scaffolds were investigated in uniaxial compression. Scaffolds processed at 375°C with 75% porosity and 20 vol% HA whisker reinforcement exhibited an apparent modulus of 141 MPa and an apparent yield strength of 2.3 MPa. These values fall within the ranges reported for the modulus and strength of trabecular bone.

  8. Microstructure, strength and toughness of Si3N4-SiC whisker composites

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, E.; Goursat, P.; Besson, J.L.; Madigou, V.; Monthioux, M.; Lespade, P.

    1992-10-01

    Si3N4-SiC whisker composites were fabricated using several routes (i.e., pressure filtration or CIP) followed by HP or HIP. The fracture strength ranges from 650 MPa to 750 MPa on account of the whiskers orientation. Compared to the Si3N4 matrix, the toughness is increased. A strong R-curve effect can be obtained, suggesting that, to be efficient, the whisker diameter must exceed a critical size. 13 refs.

  9. An Empirical Model for Estimating the Probability of Electrical Short Circuits from Tin Whiskers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim; Wright, Clara; Asfour, Shihab; Onar, Arzu; Bayliss, Jon; Ludwig, Larry

    2009-01-01

    In this experiment, an empirical model to quantify the probability of occurrence of an electrical short circuit from tin whiskers as a function of voltage was developed. This empirical model can be used to improve existing risk simulation models. FIB and TEM images of a tin whisker confirm the rare polycrystalline structure on one of the three whiskers studied. FIB cross-section of the card guides verified that the tin finish was bright tin.

  10. Titan's Carbon Conundrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Teanby, N. A.; Vinatier, S.; BÉ Zard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Irwin, P. G.; Flasar, F. M.; Cassini Cirs Team

    2010-12-01

    As recently as a year ago, a consensus was emerging that carbon-13 in Titan's methane was enriched by some ~10% over the terrestrial value (12C/13C = ~77-82 on Titan versus 89 on Earth, Niemann et al 2005, Nixon et al 2008). At the same time, several measurements of 12C/13C in ethane, the main product of methane photolysis, appeared to show no enrichment (Nixon et al 2008, Jennings et al 2009). This led to the suggestion that a steady state equilibrium was being reached, with a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE) in a key reaction (C2H + CH4 → C2H2 + CH3) responsible for the slight enrichment in the atmospheric reservoir relative to both the incoming flux of methane and outgoing flux of ethane (Jennings et al 2009). This paradigm was overturned earlier this year when the Huygens GCMS team revised their measurement of 12CH4/13CH4 upwards to agree with the terrestrial value (Niemann et al, in preparation), eliminating any need for the KIE fractionation. However, this presents a new problem in the sense that the KIE effect is probably real - it is confirmed for the CH3D and 12CH4 reactions with ethynyl (Opansky and Leone 1996), so almost certainly for 13CH4-12CH4 pair as well - and so some fractionation of methane should be occurring. This is true regardless as to whether the atmospheric methane is being replenished or not - differing only in degree - provided the ethynyl abstraction reaction is the dominant path for methane loss as predicted by current models (Lavvas et al. 2008). In this forum we will present updated measurements by the CIRS team of the 12CH4/13CH4 derived from recent high signal-to-noise Titan observations, and discuss the degree of agreement with both the earlier published ratios, and the newer revised GCMS results. We will also discuss the implications for Titan's methane evolution over geologic time including clues from the D/H ratio. We conclude by highlighting the currently open questions and avenues for future work. Jennings, D.E. et al., J. Chem

  11. Titan Science Return Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbin, Charles R.; Lincoln, William

    2014-01-01

    Each proposal for a NASA mission concept includes a Science Traceability Matrix (STM), intended to show that what is being proposed would contribute to satisfying one or more of the agency's top-level science goals. But the information traditionally provided cannot be used directly to quantitatively compare anticipated science return. We added numerical elements to NASA's STM and developed a software tool to process the data. We then applied this methodology to evaluate a group of competing concepts for a proposed mission to Saturn's moon, Titan.

  12. Titan Airship Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerzhanovich, V.; Yavrouian, A.; Cutts, J.; Colozza, A.; Fairbrother, D.

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan is considered to be one of the prime candidates for studying prebiotic materials - the substances that precede the formation of life but have disappeared from the Earth as a result of the evolution of life. A unique combination of a dense, predominantly nitrogen, atmosphere (more than four times that of the Earth), low gravity (six times less than on the Earth) and small temperature variations makes Titan the almost ideal planet for studies with lighter-than-air aerial platforms (aerobots). Moreover, since methane clouds and photochemical haze obscure the surface, low-altitude aerial platforms are the only practical means that can provide global mapping of the Titan surface at visible and infrared wavelengths. One major challenge in Titan exploration is the extremely cold atmosphere (approx. 90 K). However, current material technology the capability to operate aerobots at these very low temperatures. A second challenge is the remoteness from the Sun (10 AU) that makes the nuclear (radioisotopic) energy the only practical source of power. A third challenge is remoteness from the Earth (approx. 10 AU, two-way light-time approx. 160 min) which imposes restrictions on data rates and makes impractical any meaningful real-time control. A small-size airship (approx. 25 cu m) can carry a payload approximately 100 kg. A Stirling engine coupled to a radioisotope heat source would be the prime choice for producing both mechanical and electrical power for sensing, control, and communications. The cold atmospheric temperature makes Stirling machines especially effective. With the radioisotope power source the airship may fly with speed approximately 5 m/s for a year or more providing an excellent platform for in situ atmosphere measurements and a high-resolution remote sensing with unlimited access on a global scale. In a station-keeping mode the airship can be used for in situ studies on the surface by winching down an instrument package. Floating above the

  13. Comparing the functional representations of central and border whiskers in rat primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Brett-Green, B A; Chen-Bee, C H; Frostig, R D

    2001-12-15

    The anatomical representations of the large facial whiskers, termed barrels, are topographically organized and highly segregated in the posteromedial barrel subfield (PMBSF) of rat layer IV primary somatosensory cortex. Although the functional representations of single whiskers are aligned with their appropriate barrels, their areal extents are rather large, spreading outward from the appropriate barrel along the tangential plane and thereby spanning multiple neighboring and non-neighboring barrels and septal regions. To date, single-whisker functional representations have been characterized primarily for whiskers whose corresponding barrels are located centrally within the PMBSF (central whiskers). Using intrinsic signal imaging verified with post-imaging single-unit recording, we demonstrate that border whiskers, whose barrels are located at the borders of the PMBSF, also evoke large activity areas that are similar in size to those of central whiskers but spread beyond the PMBSF and sometimes beyond primary somatosensory cortex into the neighboring dysgranular zones. This study indicates that the large functional representation of a single whisker is a basic functional feature of the rat whisker-to-barrel system and, combined with results from other studies, suggest that a large functional representation of a small, point-like area on the sensory epithelium may be a functional feature of primary sensory cortex in general. PMID:11739601

  14. Peripheral optogenetic stimulation induces whisker movement and sensory perception in head-fixed mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmee; Bandi, Akhil; Lee, Christian R; Margolis, David J

    2016-01-01

    We discovered that optical stimulation of the mystacial pad in Emx1-Cre;Ai27D transgenic mice induces whisker movements due to activation of ChR2 expressed in muscles controlling retraction and protraction. Using high-speed videography in anesthetized mice, we characterize the amplitude of whisker protractions evoked by varying the intensity, duration, and frequency of optogenetic stimulation. Recordings from primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in anesthetized mice indicated that optogenetic whisker pad stimulation evokes robust yet longer latency responses than mechanical whisker stimulation. In head-fixed mice trained to report optogenetic whisker pad stimulation, psychometric curves showed similar dependence on stimulus duration as evoked whisker movements and S1 activity. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of S1 in expert mice was sufficient to substitute for peripheral stimulation. We conclude that whisker protractions evoked by optogenetic activation of whisker pad muscles results in cortical activity and sensory perception, consistent with the coding of evoked whisker movements by reafferent sensory input. PMID:27269285

  15. Peripheral optogenetic stimulation induces whisker movement and sensory perception in head-fixed mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunmee; Bandi, Akhil; Lee, Christian R; Margolis, David J

    2016-01-01

    We discovered that optical stimulation of the mystacial pad in Emx1-Cre;Ai27D transgenic mice induces whisker movements due to activation of ChR2 expressed in muscles controlling retraction and protraction. Using high-speed videography in anesthetized mice, we characterize the amplitude of whisker protractions evoked by varying the intensity, duration, and frequency of optogenetic stimulation. Recordings from primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in anesthetized mice indicated that optogenetic whisker pad stimulation evokes robust yet longer latency responses than mechanical whisker stimulation. In head-fixed mice trained to report optogenetic whisker pad stimulation, psychometric curves showed similar dependence on stimulus duration as evoked whisker movements and S1 activity. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of S1 in expert mice was sufficient to substitute for peripheral stimulation. We conclude that whisker protractions evoked by optogenetic activation of whisker pad muscles results in cortical activity and sensory perception, consistent with the coding of evoked whisker movements by reafferent sensory input. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14140.001 PMID:27269285

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of sodium bismuth titanate and titanate nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Animesh

    A hydrothermal processing method was developed for the synthesis of sodium bismuth titanate powders and thin films from suitable precursors at 150°C. Oxide precursors were best suited for preparing pure phase materials. The sodium bismuth titanate powders consisted of cube shaped crystals. A modified solution-reprecitation model involving partial dissolution of the precursors was proposed to explain the growth of these particles. The thin films were prepared on strontium titanate (100) substrate. A sample holder was specially designed and fabricated to secure the substrates in the reaction vessel. The result was a relatively smooth film of thickness ≤550 nm. The films were essentially single crystalline and had strong epitaxial relationship with the substrate. Titanate nanofibers (NaxH yTinO2n+1° zH2O) were known to form under similar hydrothermal conditions as sodium bismuth titanate powders. Detail research revealed that the pure hydroxide and oxide precursors tend to form sodium bismuth titanate powders or thin films. Titanate nanofibers were the predominant product when any other ions or organics were present in the precursor. Much faster reaction kinetics for the formation of nanofibers was observed when certain organic compounds were added deliberately with the precursors. Accordingly, a hydrothermal process was developed for converting the precursors to titanate nanofibers in a significantly shorter time than reported in the literature. A thin film consisting of vertically aligned nanofibers was prepared on titanium substrate at 150°C in as little as 30 minutes. Complete conversion of starting precursors to free standing nanofibers was achieved in ˜8 hours at 150°C. The as-prepared nanofibers were some form of sodium titanate. They were converted to hydrogen titanate by ion exchange. Differential Scanning calorimetric experiments were performed to understand the thermal evolution of the fibers. The hydrogen titanate fibers underwent structural

  17. 'Where' and 'what' in the whisker sensorimotor system.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Mathew E; von Heimendahl, Moritz; Knutsen, Per Magne; Kleinfeld, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2008-08-01

    In the visual system of primates, different neuronal pathways are specialized for processing information about the spatial coordinates of objects and their identity - that is, 'where' and 'what'. By contrast, rats and other nocturnal animals build up a neuronal representation of 'where' and 'what' by seeking out and palpating objects with their whiskers. We present recent evidence about how the brain constructs a representation of the surrounding world through whisker-mediated sense of touch. While considerable knowledge exists about the representation of the physical properties of stimuli - like texture, shape and position - we know little about how the brain represents their meaning. Future research may elucidate this and show how the transformation of one representation to another is achieved. PMID:18641667

  18. Silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-02-09

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of ceramic composites which possess improved mechanical properties, especially increased fracture toughness. In the formation of these ceramic composites, the single-crystal SiC whiskers are mixed with fine ceramic powders of a ceramic material such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, mullite, or B/sub 4/C. The mixtures which contain a homogeneous dispersion of the SiC whiskers are hot pressed at pressures in a range of about 28 to 70 MPa and temperatures in the range of about 1600 to 1950/sup 0/C with pressing times varying from about 0.75 to 2.5 hours. The resulting ceramic composites show an increase in fracture toughness of up to about 9 MPa.m/sup 1/2/ which represents as much as a two-fold increase over that of the matrix material.

  19. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  20. Crystalline instability of Bi-2212 superconducting whiskers near room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagliero, Stefano; Agostino, Angelo; Khan, Mohammad Mizanur Rahman; Truccato, Marco; Orsini, Francesco; Marinone, Massimo; Poletti, Giulio; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    We report new evidences for the thermodynamic instability of whisker crystals in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) system. Annealing treatments at 90°C have been performed on two sets of samples, which were monitored by means of X-Rays Diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements, respectively. Two main crystalline domains of Bi2Sr2CuCa2O8+ x (Bi-2212) were identified in the samples by the XRD data, which underwent an evident crystalline segregation after about 60 hours. Very fast dynamics of the surface modifications was also described by the AFM monitoring. Two typologies of surface structures formed after about 3 annealing hours: continuous arrays of dome shaped bodies were observed along the edges of the whiskers, while in the central regions a dense texture of flat bodies was found. These modifications are described in terms of the formation of simple oxide clusters involving a degradation of the internal layers.

  1. Titan's astrobiology: some new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, Francois; Coll, Patrice; Buch, Arnaud; Cloix, Megane; Guan, Yuan Yong; Jerome, Murielle; Poch, Olivier; Ramirez, Sandra I.; Szopa, Cyril; Cottin, Hervé

    The Cassini-Huygens observations of Titan have strongly strengthened its astrobiological impor-tance, clearly showing that Titan is one of the key planetary bodies for astrobiological studies. Indeed the Cassini-Huygens data show that there are many similarities which can be found when comparing Titan and the early Earth, in spite of much lower temperatures for Titan. One of these similarities is the presence of an active and complex organic chemistry in Titan's environment, which occurs from the high atmosphere to the surface and very likely in the sub-surface. This organic chemistry involves several of the key compounds of terrestrial prebiotic chemistry, and it represents, by itself, a major astrobiological aspect of Titan. Moreover, the potential presence of an internal water-ocean makes Titan a potential habitable environment, of obvious astrobiological importance. In fact, after five years of close observation by remote sensing and in situ instrumentations from the Cassini-Huygens mission, Titan does not look any more like a frozen primitive Earth, but it looks like an evolving planet, geologically active, with cryo-volcanism, eolian erosion, clouds and precipitations, and a methane cycle analogous to the water cycle on Earth. But the new data also show that a complex organic chemistry is taking place in the very high atmospheric layers of the satellite, with the formation in the ionosphere of high molecular weight (up about 10 000 Daltons) ions. Are these ions abundant enough in the lower atmosphere zones to act as organic monomers which then grow by aggregation, sedimentation and condensation down to the surface? This is one of the key questions that chemical models have now to answer. Cassini-Huygens observations have shown that there is no large surface ocean on Titan, but large regional lakes which behave like evolving liquid media. Those lakes are probably accumulating complex organics of astrobiological interest, including organic aerosols, and could

  2. Regulation of Potassium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potassium is the most abundant cation in the intracellular fluid, and maintaining the proper distribution of potassium across the cell membrane is critical for normal cell function. Long-term maintenance of potassium homeostasis is achieved by alterations in renal excretion of potassium in response to variations in intake. Understanding the mechanism and regulatory influences governing the internal distribution and renal clearance of potassium under normal circumstances can provide a framework for approaching disorders of potassium commonly encountered in clinical practice. This paper reviews key aspects of the normal regulation of potassium metabolism and is designed to serve as a readily accessible review for the well informed clinician as well as a resource for teaching trainees and medical students. PMID:24721891

  3. Titan: A Place with Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Titan is the largest moon of the planet Saturn and is the only moon in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere. Its atmosphere is mostly made of nitrogen and has a pressure one and a half times larger than sea level pressure on Earth. In these respects Titan's atmosphere is the closest twin to Earth's. Methane is found in Titan's atmosphere and results in the formation of a organic smog layer in the atmosphere via chemistry that is similar to the current theories for the origin of life on Earth. Unfortunately, Titan is much too cold for water to be liquid and life is therefore unlikely, earth-like life that is. Titan's atmosphere has a greenhouse effect which is much stronger than the Earth's. However the organic smog layer produces an anti-greenhouse effect that cuts the greenhouse warming in half. The surface of Titan remains unknown, hidden by the thick smog layer, but it may be an ocean of liquid methane and ethane or maybe just lakes. When the NASA/ESA mission to the Saturn System, Cassini/Huygens reaches Saturn in a few years it will launch a probe that to the surface of Titan and show us this world that is strange and yet in many ways similar to our own.

  4. The Geology of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    Titan, the largest and most complex satellite in the solar system exhibits an organic dominated surface chemistry and shares surface features with other large icy satellites as well as the terrestrial planets. It is subject to tidal stresses, and its surface appears to have been modified tectonically. Cassini's global observations at infrared and radar wavelengths as well as local investigations by the instruments on the Huygens probe has revealed that Titan has the largest known abundance of organic material in the solar system apart from Earth, and that its active hydrological cycle is analogous to that of Earth, but with methane replacing water. The surface of Titan exhibits morphological features of different sizes and origins created by geological processes that span the entire dynamic range of aeolian, fluvial and tectonic activities, with likely evidence that cryovolcanism might exists where liquid water, perhaps in concert with ammonia, methane and carbon dioxide, makes its way to the surface from the interior [e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]. Extended dune fields, lakes, mountainous terrain, dendritic erosion patterns and erosional remnants indicate dynamic surface processes. Valleys, small-scale gullies and rounded cobbles require erosion by extended energetic flow of liquids. There is strong evidence that liquid hydrocarbons are ponded on the surface in lakes, predominantly, but not exclusively, at high northern latitudes. A variety of features including extensive flows and caldera-like constructs are interpreted to be cryovolcanic in origin. Chains and isolated blocks of rugged terrain rising from smoother areas are best described as mountains and might be related to tectonic processes. Impact craters form on all solid bodies in the solar system, and have been detected on Titan. But very few have been observed so they must be rapidly destroyed or buried by other geologic processes The morphologies of the impact

  5. Titan's Emergence from Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Achterberg, Richard; Jennings, Donald; Schinder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the changes in Titans thermal structure derived from Cassini CIRS and radio-occultation data during the transition from winter to early spring. Titan's surface, and middle atmosphere show noticeable seasonal change, whereas that in most of the troposphere is mated. This can be understood in terms of the relatively small radiative relaxation time in the middle atmosphere and much larger time scale in the troposphere. The surface exhibits seasonal change because the heat capacity in an annual skin depth is much smaller than that in the lowest scale height of the troposphere. Surface temperatures rise 1 K at raid and high latitudes in the winter northern hemisphere and cool in the southern hemisphere. Changes in in the middle atmosphere are more complicated. Temperatures in the middle stratosphere (approximately 1 mbar) increase by a few kelvin at mid northern latitudes, but those at high latitudes first increase as that region moves out of winter shadow, and then decrease. This probably results from the combined effect of increased solar heating as the suit moves higher in the sky and the decreased adiabatic warming as the sinking motions associated with the cross-equatorial meridional cell weaken. Consistent with this interpretation, the warm temperatures observed higher up at the winter polar stratopause cool significantly.

  6. Touchdown on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Europe's Huygens probe is on target for a Dec. 25 separation from the Cassini Saturn orbiter that has carried it like a baby for more than seven years. The probe will spend three weeks coasting to a plunge into Titan's thick atmosphere on the morning of Jan. 14. If all goes as planned, the 349-kg. Huygens will spend more than 2 hr. descending by parachute to the mysterious surface of the planet-sized moon, and hopefully devote yet more time to broadcasting data after it lands. Before the day is over, Huygens is programmed to beam about 30 megabytes of data - including some 1,100 images-back to Earth through Cassini, a trip that will take some 75 min. to complete over the 1- billion-km. distance that separates the two planets. Within that data should be answers to questions that date back to 1655, when Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens found the moon with a homemade telescope and named it for the family of giants the ancient Greeks believed once ruled the earth. In the Solar System, there is no other world like Titan, with a nitrogen and methane atmospheric and a cold, hidden surface darker than Earth under the full Moon.

  7. THE FORMATION OF GRAPHITE WHISKERS IN THE PRIMITIVE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Kimura, Yuki; Lucas, Christopher; Ferguson, Frank; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2010-02-10

    It has been suggested that carbonaceous grains are efficiently destroyed in the interstellar medium and must either reform in situ at very low pressures and temperatures or in an alternative environment more conducive to grain growth. Graphite whiskers have been discovered associated with high-temperature phases in meteorites such as calcium aluminum inclusions and chondrules, and it has been suggested that the expulsion of such material from protostellar nebulae could significantly affect the optical properties of the average interstellar grain population. We have experimentally studied the potential for Fischer-Tropsch and Haber-Bosch type reactions to produce organic materials in protostellar systems from the abundant H{sub 2}, CO, and N{sub 2} reacting on the surfaces of available silicate grains. When graphite grains are repeatedly exposed to H{sub 2}, CO, and N{sub 2} at 875 K abundant graphite whiskers are observed to form on or from the surfaces of the graphite grains. In a dense, turbulent nebula, such extended whiskers are very likely to be broken off, and fragments could be ejected either in polar jets or by photon pressure after transport to the outer reaches of the nebula.

  8. The Formation of Graphite Whiskers in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Kimura, Yuki; Lucas, Christopher; Ferguson, Frank; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that carbonaceous grains are efficiently destroyed in the interstellar medium and must either reform in situ at very low pressures and temperatures or in an alternative environment more conducive to grain growth. Graphite whiskers have been discovered associated with high-temperature phases in meteorites such as calcium aluminum inclusions and chondrules, and it has been suggested that the expulsion of such material from proto stellar nebulae could significantly affect the optical properties of the average interstellar grain population. We have experimentally studied the potential for Fischer-Tropsch and Haber-Bosch type reactions to produce organic materials in protostellar systems from the abundant H2, CO, and N2 reacting on the surfaces of available silicate grains. When graphite grains are repeatedly exposed to H2, CO, and N2 at 875 K abundant graphite whiskers are observed to form on or from the surfaces of the graphite grains. In a dense, turbulent nebula, such extended whiskers are very likely to be broken off, and fragments could be ejected either in polar jets or by photon pressure after transport to the outer reaches of the nebula.

  9. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for robotic vibrissal tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2014-12-01

    A whisker transducer (WT) inspired by rat’s vibrissal tactile perception is proposed based on a transduction matrix model characterizing the electro-mechanical transduction process in both forward and backward directions. It is capable of acting as an actuator to sweep the whisker and simultaneously as a sensor to sense the force, motion, and mechanical impedance at whisker tip. Its validity is confirmed by numerical simulation using a finite element model. A prototype is then fabricated and its transduction matrix is determined by parameter identification. The calibrated WT can accurately sense mechanical impedance which is directly related to stiffness, mass and damping. Subsequent vibrissal tactile sensing of sandpaper texture reveals that the real part of mechanical impedance sensed by WT is correlated with sandpaper roughness. Texture discrimination is successfully achieved by inputting the real part to a k-means clustering algorithm. The mechanical impedance sensing ability as well as other features of the WT such as simultaneous-actuation-and-sensing makes it a good solution to robotic tactile sensing.

  10. Neural coding in barrel cortex during whisker-guided locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Sofroniew, Nicholas James; Vlasov, Yurii A; Andrew Hires, Samuel; Freeman, Jeremy; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Animals seek out relevant information by moving through a dynamic world, but sensory systems are usually studied under highly constrained and passive conditions that may not probe important dimensions of the neural code. Here, we explored neural coding in the barrel cortex of head-fixed mice that tracked walls with their whiskers in tactile virtual reality. Optogenetic manipulations revealed that barrel cortex plays a role in wall-tracking. Closed-loop optogenetic control of layer 4 neurons can substitute for whisker-object contact to guide behavior resembling wall tracking. We measured neural activity using two-photon calcium imaging and extracellular recordings. Neurons were tuned to the distance between the animal snout and the contralateral wall, with monotonic, unimodal, and multimodal tuning curves. This rich representation of object location in the barrel cortex could not be predicted based on simple stimulus-response relationships involving individual whiskers and likely emerges within cortical circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12559.001 PMID:26701910