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Sample records for potencial cliente real

  1. Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

  2. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients…

  3. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients provide similar opportunities for skill demonstration. This study examined the correspondence of treatment adherence and competence ratings obtained in real client and role-played sessions for 91 clinicians trained in Motivational Interviewing (MI), using data from a multi-site trial examining three methods of clinician training (Martino et al., 2011). Results indicated overall poor integrity rating correspondence across the two session types, as indicated by weak correlations (r = .05–.27). Clinicians were rated significantly more MI adherent overall and specifically used more advanced MI strategies in role-played than real client sessions at several assessment time points (d = 0.36, 0.42). Real clients, in comparison to the role-play actor, demonstrated greater motivation at the beginning of the session (d = 1.09), discussion of unrelated topics (d = 0.70), and alliance with the clinician (d = 0.72). These findings suggest that MI integrity rating data obtained from real client and role-played sessions may not be interchangeable. More research is needed to improve the procedures and psychometric strength of treatment integrity assessment based on role-played sessions. PMID:23205626

  4. Clients' and therapists' real relationship and session quality in brief therapy: an actor partner interdependence analysis.

    PubMed

    Markin, Rayna D; Kivlighan, Dennis M; Gelso, Charles J; Hummel, Ann M; Spiegel, Eric B

    2014-09-01

    This study used the Actor Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kenny & Cook, 1999) to examine the associations of client- and therapist-rated real relationship (RR) and session quality over time. Eighty-seven clients and their therapists (n = 25) completed RR and session quality measures after every session of brief therapy. Therapists' current session quality ratings were significantly related to all of the following: session number (b = .04), their session quality rating of the previous session (b = .24), their RR in the previous session (b = 1.091), their client's RR in the previous session (b = .17), and interactions between their own and their clients' RR and session number (b = -.16 and β = -.04, respectively). Clients' ratings of current session quality were significantly related to only their own RR in the previous session (b = .47). Implications for future research and practice are discussed. PMID:24773091

  5. Real Clients, Real Management, Real Failure: The Risks and Rewards of Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyphert, Dale

    2006-01-01

    There are multiple advantages to service-learning projects across the business curriculum, but in communication classes the author has found their biggest value to be authenticity. A "real-world" assignment requires the flexible, creative integration of communication skills in an environment where, "unlike exams and other typical university…

  6. FRIEND Engine Framework: a real time neurofeedback client-server system for neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Basilio, Rodrigo; Garrido, Griselda J.; Sato, João R.; Hoefle, Sebastian; Melo, Bruno R. P.; Pamplona, Fabricio A.; Zahn, Roland; Moll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In this methods article, we present a new implementation of a recently reported FSL-integrated neurofeedback tool, the standalone version of “Functional Real-time Interactive Endogenous Neuromodulation and Decoding” (FRIEND). We will refer to this new implementation as the FRIEND Engine Framework. The framework comprises a client-server cross-platform solution for real time fMRI and fMRI/EEG neurofeedback studies, enabling flexible customization or integration of graphical interfaces, devices, and data processing. This implementation allows a fast setup of novel plug-ins and frontends, which can be shared with the user community at large. The FRIEND Engine Framework is freely distributed for non-commercial, research purposes. PMID:25688193

  7. Real Cases with African American Clients: Reports of Racially Diverse Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbley, Aretha F.; Shen, Yih-Jiun; Bonner, Fred A., II; Rice, Cynthia Wimberly; McGonagill, Rachelle; Williams, Vicki A.; Stevens, Harold

    2007-01-01

    By calling attention to human factors such as cultural biases, mistakes made, and lessons learned from real clinical scenarios, these racially diverse practitioners use their counseling experiences to offer a people-responsive, diversity-sensitive framework and recommendations for clinicians working with African Americans in university, school,…

  8. A Flexible Client-Driven 3DTV System for Real-Time Acquisition, Transmission, and Display of Dynamic Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xun; Liu, Yebin; Dai, Qionghai

    2008-12-01

    3D experience and free-viewpoint navigation are expected to be two essential features of next generation television. In this paper, we present a flexible 3DTV system in which multiview video streams are captured, compressed, transmitted, and finally converted to high-quality 3D video in real time. Our system consists of an [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] camera array, 16 producer PCs, a streaming server, multiple clients, and several autostereoscopic displays. The whole system is implemented over IP network to provide multiple users with interactive 2D/3D switching, viewpoint control, and synthesis for dynamic scenes. In our approach, multiple video streams are first captured by a synchronized camera array. Then, we adopt a lengthened-B-field and region of interest- (ROI-) based coding scheme to guarantee a seamless view switching for each user as well as saving per-user transmission bandwidth. Finally, a convenient rendering algorithm is used to synthesize a visually pleasing result by introducing a new metric called Clarity Degree (CD). Experiments on both synthetic and real-world data have verified the feasibility, flexibility, and good performance of our system.

  9. Interpersonal Influence Process in Real Life Counseling: Investigating Client Perceptions, Counselor Experience Level, and Counselor Power over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, P. Paul; Heesacker, Martin

    1982-01-01

    Examined interpersonal influence processes within an actual counseling context over an average of eight sessions. Results indicated that counselor experience level did not affect client perceptions of the counselor and perceived counselor expertise, attractiveness, and trustworthiness did change over time, but not in the same direction. (Author)

  10. Clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse J; Tao, Karen; Leach, Mark M; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-09-01

    The current retrospective study examined whether clients' (N = 176) perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation (MCO) were associated with their psychological functioning, working alliance, and real relationship scores. Moreover, we tested whether clients' perceptions of the working alliance and the real relationship mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. The results showed that clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO were positively related to working alliance, real relationship, and psychological functioning. Only clients' ratings of the working alliance mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. Thus, because clients perceive their psychotherapists as being more oriented toward cultural issues, they may view the therapist as being more credible and may gain a sense of comfort in the therapeutic process. In turn, clients' strong alliance facilitates improvement in psychological well-being. PMID:21639652

  11. Open Clients for Distributed Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayes, D. N.; Arko, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    We are actively developing a collection of open source example clients that demonstrate use of our "back end" data management infrastructure. The data management system is reported elsewhere at this meeting (Arko and Chayes: A Scaleable Database Infrastructure). In addition to their primary goal of being examples for others to build upon, some of these clients may have limited utility in them selves. More information about the clients and the data infrastructure is available on line at http://data.ldeo.columbia.edu. The available examples to be demonstrated include several web-based clients including those developed for the Community Review System of the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a real-time watch standers log book, an offline interface to use log book entries, a simple client to search on multibeam metadata and others are Internet enabled and generally web-based front ends that support searches against one or more relational databases using industry standard SQL queries. In addition to the web based clients, simple SQL searches from within Excel and similar applications will be demonstrated. By defining, documenting and publishing a clear interface to the fully searchable databases, it becomes relatively easy to construct client interfaces that are optimized for specific applications in comparison to building a monolithic data and user interface system.

  12. Client Suicide: What Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Patel, Amee B.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of a client to suicide is a painful personal and professional experience for mental health providers. Whether trainee or experienced professional, the affected clinician often reports feeling overwhelmed and unprepared for the experience of client suicide, together with significant emotional distress and diminished work performance. In…

  13. Perceived Counselor Characteristics, Client Expectations, and Client Satisfaction with Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, P. Paul; Heesacker, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Examined interpersonal influence process within counseling including relationship between perceived counselor expertness, attractiveness, and trustworthiness and client satisfaction; between client expectations on perceived counselor expertness, attractiveness, trustworthiness, and client satisfaction; and effects of actual counselor experience…

  14. Sophia Client Version 12

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Client Version 12 offers command line access to the Sophia Daemon and the Sophia database files. It provides print, fingerprint, acknowledge, color coding and status access to these other resources.

  15. Treating the bisexual client.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, S H

    2001-05-01

    Therapists, having recently come to terms with treating gay and lesbian clients, now must consider the issues that bisexual clients face. This article reviews the literature on what it means to identify as bisexual in a world where sexual identity is viewed as dichotomous, heterosexual at one end and gay or lesbian at the other end. The article explores sexual identity and its biological versus social origins, internalized biphobia, coming out, relationship patterns, and therapist issues. Two cases illustrate issues that might arise when a therapist is treating a bisexual client. The first case is a 17-year-old young woman who is accepting of her bisexual identity, and the second case is a 56-year-old woman, heterosexually identified and married, who suddenly fell in love with a woman. Concluding remarks focus on some future directions for research and work with bisexual clients. PMID:11304706

  16. Telematics-based online client-server/client collaborative environment for radiotherapy planning simulations.

    PubMed

    Kum, Oyeon

    2007-11-01

    Customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient is very useful for both a patient and a doctor because it provides the ability to deliver higher doses to a more accurately defined tumor and at the same time lower doses to organs at risk and normal tissues. This can be realized by building an accurate planning simulation system to provide better treatment strategies based on each patient's tomographic data such as CT, MRI, PET, or SPECT. In this study, we develop a real-time online client-server/client collaborative environment between the client (health care professionals or hospitals) and the server/client under a secure network using telematics (the integrated use of telecommunications and medical informatics). The implementation is based on a point-to-point communication scheme between client and server/client following the WYSIWIS (what you see is what I see) paradigm. After uploading the patient tomographic data, the client is able to collaborate with the server/client for treatment planning. Consequently, the level of health care services can be improved, specifically for small radiotherapy clinics in rural/remote-country areas that do not possess much experience or equipment such as a treatment planning simulator. The telematics service of the system can also be used to provide continued medical education in radiotherapy. Moreover, the system is easy to use. A client can use the system if s/he is familiar with the Windows(TM) operating system because it is designed and built based on a user-friendly concept. This system does not require the client to continue hardware and software maintenance and updates. These are performed automatically by the server. PMID:17943336

  17. Superpowers and client states

    SciTech Connect

    Efrat, M.; Bercovitch, J.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the world the two superpowers often conduct their global conflict by proxy, taking different sides in regional disputes. An important question of international relations is where the balance of power lies in the superpower client state relationship-how far are the interests of the superpower subordinated to those of the client state or vice versa. Taking the two case studies of the US-Israel relationship and the Soviet-Syrian relationship, this book explores the perceptions by each side of the relationship and the reality. It goes on to make general conclusions about superpower-client state relationships. Contents: Introduction; In Search of a Theoretical Framework; Client-States in Superpower Perception; Superpowers in Client States' Perception; The Case of US-Israel Relations; Israel in US Perspective; The USA in Israeli Perspective; Flows of US Civilian and Military Resources to Israel; The Case of Soviet-Syrian Relations; Syria in Soviet Perspective; The USSR in Syrian Perspective; Flows of Soviet Civilian and Military Resources to Syria; Comparative Analysis and Conclusions; Overview of the two cases studies and conclusions.

  18. On the Use of Client-Driven Projects in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, Dan; Winston, Wayne; Shafii-Mousavi, Morteza; Kochanowski, Paul; Lang, Chris; Ernstberger, Kathy; Hodgson, Ted

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of client-driven projects--projects that are posed by business, government, and non-profit organizations and based upon real problems facing the organization. Although client-driven projects have long been used in business and engineering education, their use in the mathematics classroom is rare. Client-driven…

  19. Meeting clients' spiritual needs.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2007-06-01

    True holistic care requires attention to spiritual as well as physical needs, but many health care providers do not feel comfortable discussing spiritual matters with clients. Although recognized by national nursing groups as a standard of care, nurses are not well prepared or rewarded for spiritual care efforts. There are several spiritual assessment tools available and many suggestions for interventions, but little research-based evidence on the effectiveness of spiritual care assessments or interventions. Nurses are well positioned by their continued intimate contact with clients and the importance of caring to nursing to lead the health care profession in developing spiritual care theory and practices. PMID:17544683

  20. Counseling Bisexual Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiley, Elizabeth B.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a brief conceptual statement about bisexuality. Offers a review of existing research studies, and suggests issues to consider when counseling bisexual clients. Defines bisexuality and discusses prevalence studies, identity development, and implications for counseling. Claims that bisexuality challenges traditional rules about sexual…

  1. The Afghan Refugee Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firling, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Contends both Afghan refugee children and adults perceive school as the primary resource for their successful transition into American society. Claims the school counselor is in a position to guide clients by providing them with necessary educational and career information. Describes aspects of Afghan culture relevant to counselors. (Author/ABL)

  2. Training Evaluation: Clients' Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted of 262 training providers in Malaysia, where providers must be government approved. Government regulation, client demands for high quality, and an economic downturn that focused attention on training costs have all influenced evaluation in a positive direction. (SK)

  3. Working with Potentially Assaultive Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdach, Allison D.

    1993-01-01

    Examines potentially assaultive or preassaultive client and suggests some ways to minimize the risk of assault by such clients. Data for the article are from author's 10-year experience in providing social work services on acute psychiatric ward in large public medical center. Reviews potentially assaultive client conditions of panic, rage,…

  4. The Competitive Advantage: Client Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffel, Linda G.; DeBord, Karen B.

    The adult education literature contains a considerable amount of research on and discussion of client service in the marketing process, management and staff roles in service- and product-oriented businesses, and the importance of client service and service quality to survival in the marketplace. By applying the principles of client-oriented…

  5. Client Perceptions of Pretreatment Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindsvatter, Aaron; Osborn, Cynthia J.; Bubenzer, Donald; Duba, Jill D.

    2010-01-01

    The authors suggest that when counselors have a rich understanding of pretreatment changes, they are better able to assist clients in capitalizing on such changes. The current study examined client perceptions of pretreatment changes. Thirty-six clients completed Q-sorts pertaining to pretreatment changes they experienced. Four factors pertaining…

  6. Chapter 43: Registry Clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G.; Plante, R.

    The registry is a central component for the development of astronomical tools and applications requiring search and discovery. It contains standard descriptions for a variety of astronomical resources and services, including methods for remote invocation. Using web service technology, programmatic interfaces to the registry offer a powerful and robust mechanism for extracting specific sets of services and also a framework for combining a variety of astronomical resources into complex applications, for example, Datascope, Open SkyQuery, and WESIX. While the legacy of the NVO does not extend far back into history, we present here the current state of interfaces that client applications and tools have been built on, yet also extend the concepts to the new standard Registry Interface which will provide a uniform client interface protocol throughout the IVOA registry network. We explore this technology and discuss several implementations that exist in the current VO framework using JAVA, C#, Python, and IDL.

  7. Client/server study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar; Marcus, Robert; Brewster, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find cost-effective and efficient strategies/solutions to integrate existing databases, manage network, and improve productivity of users in a move towards client/server and Integrated Desktop Environment (IDE) at NASA LeRC. The project consisted of two tasks as follows: (1) Data collection, and (2) Database Development/Integration. Under task 1, survey questionnaires and a database were developed. Also, an investigation on commercially available tools for automated data-collection and net-management was performed. As requirements evolved, the main focus has been task 2 which involved the following subtasks: (1) Data gathering/analysis of database user requirements, (2) Database analysis and design, making recommendations for modification of existing data structures into relational database or proposing a common interface to access heterogeneous databases(INFOMAN system, CCNS equipment list, CCNS software list, USERMAN, and other databases), (3) Establishment of a client/server test bed at Central State University (CSU), (4) Investigation of multi-database integration technologies/ products for IDE at NASA LeRC, and (5) Development of prototypes using CASE tools (Object/View) for representative scenarios accessing multi-databases and tables in a client/server environment. Both CSU and NASA LeRC have benefited from this project. CSU team investigated and prototyped cost-effective/practical solutions to facilitate NASA LeRC move to a more productive environment. CSU students utilized new products and gained skills that could be a great resource for future needs of NASA.

  8. Client Common Factors Represented by Client Motivation and Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheel, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ryan and colleagues are applauded for elevating client factors in the form of motivation and autonomy to equal status with the alliance as common factors in psychotherapy. Next, client motivation and autonomy are explained to be inextricably linked with one promoting the other. Motivational methods are summarized for the major approaches, making…

  9. The Therapeutic Alliance: Clients' Categorization of Client-Identified Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Arlene J.; Bedi, Robinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Clients' perspectives on the therapeutic alliance were examined using written descriptions of factors that clients believed to be helpful in developing a strong alliance. Fifty participants sorted previously collected statements into thematically similar piles and then gave each set of statements a title. Multivariate concept mapping statistical…

  10. Therapist Homophobia, Client Sexual Orientation, and Source of Client HIV Infection as Predictors of Therapist Reactions to Clients with HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Erkis, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses revealed that therapists responded with less empathy, attributed less responsibility to client for problem solving, assessed client's functioning to be worse, and were less willing to work with client when the client's source of HIV infection was from something other than drugs, when the client was gay, and when the therapist was more…

  11. Beyond clients and servers.

    PubMed Central

    van Mulligen, E.; Timmers, T.

    1994-01-01

    Computer scientists working in medical informatics have to face the problem that software offered by industry is more and more adopted for clinical use by medical professionals. A new challenge arises of how to combine commercial solutions with typical medical software that already exists for some years and proved to be reliable with these off-the-shelf solutions [1]. With the HERMES project, this new challenge was accepted and possible solutions to integrate existing legacy systems with state-of-the-art commercial solutions have been investigated. After a period of prototyping to assess possible alternative solutions, a system based on an indirect client-server model was implemented with help of the industry. In this paper, its architecture is described together with the most important features currently covered. Based on the HERMES architecture, both systems for clinical data analysis and patient care (cardiology) are currently developed. PMID:7949988

  12. Client-server technology meets operational-planning challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, L.A.; Stansberry, C.J. Jr.; Le, K.D.; Ma, H.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities are starting to find that it is rather difficult to upgrade their proprietary energy management system, which was designed for real-time operations, fast enough to keep pace with rapidly changing business needs. To solve this problem, many utilities are building a data warehouse to store real-time data and using the data warehouse to launch client-server applications to meet their pressing business requirements. This article describes a client-server implementation launched at Tennessee Valley Authority in 1994 to meet the utility`s operational-planning needs. The article summarizes some of the lessons learned and outlines future development plans.

  13. Using Clients to Monitor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Jack; Stup, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing survey that illustrates how evaluators, working with program managers, have effectively used client-based data to monitor performance in the Social Security Administration. The value of client-based data outweighs the limitations and problems collecting it. Customer perceptions are a critical barometer of quality.…

  14. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  15. Dogmatism within the Counselor-Client Dyad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosi, Donald J.

    1970-01-01

    Different levels of counselor and client dogmatism combined additively in terms of their effect on client ratings of the relationship. Client ratings of the relationship were progressively higher as more openness occurred in the dyad. (Author)

  16. Students as Clients in a Professional/Client Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes the metaphor of professional/client rather than student-as-customer to characterize the relationship between professors and students. Uses examples of fitness trainer, management consultant, accounting service, and mountain guide to illustrate faculty and student roles. (SK)

  17. Risk taking among diabetic clients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D H; Schwartz-Barcott, D; Patterson, B

    1992-01-01

    Diabetic clients must make daily decisions about their health care needs. Observational and anecdotal evidence suggests that vast differences exist between the kinds of choices diabetic clients make and the kinds of chances they are willing to take. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a diabetic risk-assessment tool. This instrument, which is based on subjective expected utility theory, measures risk-prone and risk-averse behavior. Initial findings from a pilot study of 18 women clients who are on insulin indicate that patterns of risk behavior exist in the areas of exercise, skin care, and diet. PMID:1729123

  18. Influence of Client Socioeconomic Status on Selected Behaviors, Attitudes, and Decisions of Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jarvis A.; Hutton, Ben O.

    1977-01-01

    Male and female graduate students interviewed an actor and an actress whom they believed to be real clients. To half of the counselors, the players posed as well-to-do individuals, and to half as working class individuals. Counselors may unconsciously emply a different decision-making process for high- and low-status clients. (Author)

  19. Effectively communicating with your clients.

    PubMed

    Abood, Sarah K

    2008-08-01

    The successful ability to efficiently collect diet histories, convey appropriate health messages, and discuss client concerns about the safe feeding of pets requires excellent communication skills. In addition to understanding what the client wants for their pet, thorough nutritional interviewers gather information pertaining to animal factors, dietary factors, and feeding management factors. With the expansion of the Internet, increasing advances in medical care, and the health concerns associated with pet food recalls, small animal clients are looking to veterinarians for guidance and information on dietary recommendations in ever increasing numbers. Evaluating current information on changes in the pet food industry should be a periodic learning objective for all members of the veterinary health care team. Consistent, effective communication between veterinarians, their staff, and their clients can improve compliance, increase satisfaction levels, and improve patient outcomes. PMID:18656842

  20. Resistance, Reactance, and the Difficult Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, E. Thomas; Sanders, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Describes effect of client resistance and reactance in counseling and methods for assessing these phenomena. Conceptualizes client symptoms as ego-syntonic, where symptom is consonant with client's self-image, or ego-dystonic, where it is not. Uses concepts in deriving counseling strategies for working with difficult clients according to model…

  1. A Client Centered Approach to Job Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    1971-01-01

    A client centered placement approach for handicapped people is proposed as an alternative to the traditional selective placement method. The client centered placement is based on client responsibility and counselor direction and requires the counselor to have an unrealistic but optimistic attitude that the client will get a suitable job.…

  2. Client training vital for NFP.

    PubMed

    Keller, S; Finger, W R

    1996-01-01

    Clients need both skill and motivation to effectively use natural family planning (NFP). Thus, NFP services must provide adequate counseling and training to clients. A good teacher of NFP does not need formal health care training but she/must have good communication skills. A teacher usually needs to meet with a client four times over a period of several months to teach NFP. Fertility awareness comprises the first step in NFP training. This involves helping couples to understand the reproductive system, menstrual cycles, and fertile periods. The NFP Training and Medical Services Center in Nairobi, Kenya, provides clients, many of whom live in slums and are illiterate, with an exercise book with small squares that they color so they can track their fertility signs. They tend to use the cervical mucus method rather than the basal temperature method which requires a thermometer. In Los Angeles, California, clients of one NFP program attend group sessions and individual counseling sessions to learn about the menstrual cycle, fertile period, and rules of NFP and how to apply them. The Twin Cities NFP Center in Minnesota found that individual counseling was 50% more expensive than group sessions and it affected changes in neither the pregnancy nor NFP continuation rates. Group training here involved more men. Catholic groups in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Korea, and the US conducted a study of NFP programs and found that client's willingness or ability to discuss NFP were not associated with socioeconomic status, previous family planning experiences, and education. Another study of the same users did find an association between higher education and lower unplanned pregnancy rate. The same was true for previous family planning use. Since limited resources prevent some family planning programs from training staff in NFP, the programs can refer clients to existing NFP services, sending one staff member to be trained in NFP, or having one staff member providing NFP

  3. Interpersonal psychotherapy with transgender clients.

    PubMed

    Budge, Stephanie L

    2013-09-01

    Interpersonal therapy (IPT) is a particularly useful approach to use when working with clients who identify as transgender or gender nonconforming. All transgender individuals will experience changes and adjustment throughout their identity process, often referred to as transitioning. IPT offers specific interventions for psychotherapists to use with clients whose presenting concerns are specifically related to transitions. The current article outlines a case example of a transgender man who is experiencing difficulty with "role transitions" and offers four transgender-specific clinical intervention strategies derived within the traditional IPT framework. PMID:24000851

  4. When a client considers surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Storch, Janet

    2002-05-01

    Although the registered nurse is not expected to have expert knowledge in all areas of practice, clients do ask questions in one health service area that might normally be handled in the context of another service area. When these sorts of 'surprising questions' arise, it is important for registered nurses to determine the nature of the question and to provide as much beginning assistance and guidance as possible to help the client to clarify the issues/concerns. Clearly, the nurse should do all she can to assist Sarah to access nurses and other health professionals who could provide more complete information and counselling for Sarah. PMID:12046496

  5. The cost of treating addiction from the client's perspective: results from a multi-modality application of the Client DATCAP.

    PubMed

    McCollister, Kathryn E; French, Michael T; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Booth, Brenda; Rapp, Richard; Carr, Carey

    2009-10-01

    There is a considerable disparity between the number of individuals who need substance abuse treatment and the number who actually receive it. This is partly due to the fact that many individuals with substance use disorders do not perceive a need for formal treatment. Another contributing factor, however, is a discrepancy between the real and perceived cost of services. Although many cost evaluations of substance abuse treatment have been conducted from the treatment provider perspective, less is known about the client-specific costs of attending treatment (e.g., lost work and leisure time, transportation, out-of-pocket and in-kind payments). Concerns about financial and other barriers to participating in treatment have encouraged addiction researchers to more carefully consider these previously unmeasured costs. To address this information gap, we administered the Client Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program (Client DATCAP) to 302 clients (representing a total of 302 outpatient and 142 inpatient treatment episodes) as part of a larger study examining the cost-effectiveness of interventions designed to improve treatment linkage and engagement in Dayton, Ohio. The value of a client's time accounted for the largest component of total cost (more than 59%). The cost per visit for outpatient clients ranged from $19 for outpatient methadone to $38 for intensive outpatient/aftercare treatment. The average cost per day of treatment for inpatient clients was $235. Policy makers and treatment providers now have a broader view of the opportunity cost of addiction treatment and can use this information to support initiatives for improved treatment access and delivery. PMID:19574000

  6. Understanding and Counseling Narcissistic Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Provides counselors with an overview of narcissism and its treatment. In the first section, dysfunctional narcissism is described, drawing on the diagnostic indicators presented in the DSM-III and the contemporary object relations theories of Heinz Kohut and Otto Kerberg. The second section focuses on counseling narcissistic clients. (Author/JAC)

  7. Nutrition Education Needs Pantry Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Dolores K.; Shultz, Jill Armstrong; Edlefsen, Miriam; Butkus, Sue N.

    2007-01-01

    Two food pantries were surveyed for nutrition education (NE) interests and experiences. One site provided nutrition education classes; the comparison site was utilized to assess client interest in class topics. "Fixing low cost meals," "fixing quick and easy recipes," and "stretching food and food dollars" were topics rated highly by nutrition…

  8. Students: Customers, Clients or Pawns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tight, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The metaphor of the student as a consumer or customer is widely used within contemporary higher education, and impacts on the ways in which students, academics and institutions behave. These, and a number of alternative metaphors for the student, are critically reviewed. The alternatives considered include both contemporary (student as client or…

  9. Snoezelen: benefits for nursing older clients.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, M; Biela, C

    1997-10-01

    In this article, the authors examine the possible benefits of Snoezelen for older clients. The authors suggest that nurses can be instrumental in developing and creating innovative therapeutic environments for this vulnerable client group. PMID:9370672

  10. Client Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, William B.

    Psychotherapists of different theoretical persuasions use systematically different profiles of verbal response modes. However, clients tend to use very similar profiles, regardless of what their therapist does. Disclosure comprises the largest part of this common client profile, and it distinguishes the client role from other roles. Higher levels…

  11. Client Introversion and Counseling Session Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nocita, Andrew; Stiles, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Examined impact of counseling sessions as a function of clients' personality characteristics. Results indicated introverted clients rated their sessions as uncomfortable, unpleasant, tense, rough, and difficult and rated their postsession mood as relatively unfriendly, uncertain, sad, angry, and afraid. Conversely, extroverted clients rated their…

  12. Client-Side Monitoring for Web Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenstermacher, Kurt D.; Ginsburg, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Discusses mining Web data to draw conclusions about Web users and proposes a client-side monitoring system that supports flexible data collection and encompasses client-side applications beyond the Web browser to incorporate standard office productivity tools. Highlights include goals for client-side monitoring; framework for user monitoring,…

  13. Rehabilitation Counseling Student Perceptions of Obese Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Steven P.; Thomas, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated whether stigmatization of obese persons has affected rehabilitation counseling students' perceptions of such clients. Results suggest that rehabilitation students perceive obese clients more negatively. If a counselor's first impression of an obese client is that he is less competent and less attractive, rehabilitation outcome could…

  14. Bulimia: Book for Therapist and Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Barbara G.; And Others

    This book was written for practitioners working with bulimic clients and for clients themselves. Bulimia is presented as a multidimensional problem requiring a multidisciplinary team approach to treatment. An introductory chapter presents six treatment sessions with a bulimic client which provide an overview of the experiences and attitudes of the…

  15. Client Motivation and Rehabilitation Counseling Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    1972-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between client motivation or lack of motivation for rehabilitation services and rehabilitation counseling outcome. Using the case-closure system of the Minnesota Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the results were that motivated clients were more frequently closed employed'' than unmotivated clients.…

  16. Client and Therapist Variability in Clients' Perceptions of Their Therapists' Multicultural Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jesse; Leach, Mark M.; Wampold, Bruce; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-01-01

    This study examined therapist differences in their clients' ratings of their therapists' multicultural competencies (MCCs) as well as tested whether therapists' who were rated as exhibiting more MCCs also had clients who had better therapy outcomes (N = 143 clients and 31 therapists). All clients completed at least 3 sessions. Results demonstrated…

  17. Do client fees help or hurt?

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of client fees for family planning (FP) services on cost recovery and level of user services in developing countries. The UN Population Fund reports that developing country governments currently pay 75% of the costs of FP programs. Donors contribute 15%, and clients pay 10%. Current pressures are on FP services to broaden and improve their scope, while user demand is increasing. Program managers should consider the program's need for funds and the clients' willingness to pay. Clients are willing to pay about 1% of their income for contraception. A study of sterilization acceptance in Mexico finds that the average monthly case load declined by 10% after the 1st price increase from $43 to $55 and declined by 58% after the 2nd price increase to $60. Fewer low-income clients requested sterilization. A CEMOPLAF study in Ecuador finds that in three price increase situations the number of clients seeking services declined, but the economic mix of clients remained about the same. The decline was 20% in the group with a 20% price increase and 26% in the 40% increase group. In setting fees, the first need is to determine unit costs. The Futures Group International recommends considering political, regulatory, and institutional constraints for charging fees; priorities for revenue use; protection for poor clients; and monitoring of money collection and expenditure. Management Sciences for Health emphasizes consideration of the reasons for collection of fees, client affordability, and client perception of quality issues. Sliding scales can be used to protect poor clients. Charging fees for laboratory services can subsidize poor clients. A Bangladesh program operated a restaurant and catering service in order to subsidize FP services. Colombia's PROFAMILIA sells medical and surgical services and a social marketing program in order to expand clinics. PMID:12293239

  18. Working with clients by incorporating their preferences.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Kelley A; Swift, Joshua K; Callahan, Jennifer L

    2013-09-01

    Working with clients by integrating their therapy preferences into the treatment decision-making process has been identified as an important part of evidence-based practice in psychology. Accommodating client preferences has also been demonstrated to lead to fewer treatment dropouts and improved therapy outcomes. In this article, we present a number of clinical interventions or techniques for addressing client preferences in psychotherapy. Clinical examples demonstrating the techniques are also provided. PMID:24000835

  19. Increasing hope by addressing clients' outcome expectations.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Derthick, Annie O

    2013-09-01

    Addressing clients' outcome expectations is an important clinical process that can lead to a strong therapeutic alliance, more positive treatment outcomes, and decreased rates of premature termination from psychotherapy. Five interventions designed to foster appropriate outcome expectations are discussed, including presenting a convincing treatment rationale, increasing clients' faith in their therapists, expressing faith in clients, providing outcome education, and comparing progress with expectations. Clinical examples and research support are provided for each. PMID:24000836

  20. Collecting Multidimensional Client Data Using Repeated Measures: Experiences of Clients and Counselors Using the CCAPS-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jessica L.; Hess, Timothy R.; Ain, Stacie C.; Nelson, Dana L.; Locke, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Many college counseling centers do not collect client data at each session because of perceived burdens. This study explored 55 clients' and 16 doctoral counselor trainees' experiences collecting and using data on client distress at each session over the course of counseling at a large public university's counseling center. Results indicated that…

  1. Attractive versus Unattractive Clients: Mediating Influences on Counselors' Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kathleen N; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effects of clients' age, physical attractiveness, and behavior on subjects' attraction to the clients. Results indicated that "counselor" subjects were significantly more attracted to child than to adult clients and to clients demonstrating good in-session behaviors. Physically attractive clients were not rated significantly more…

  2. Training Clients for Counseling: A Social Psychological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Fred J.

    Research on social influence in counseling has examined how clients perceive counselors and how counselors influence clients. There has been little attention to counselors' perception of clients or the ways clients influence counselors. Research in this area could identify client characteristics which contribute to the counseling process and could…

  3. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidences of a client. 1103.23 Section 1103.23... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his client's confidence outlasts the practitioner's employment by the client, and this duty extends to...

  4. CLIENT/PATIENT SAMPLE SURVEY (CPSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Client/Patient Sample Surveys (conducted in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, and 1997) has been the collection of general purpose statistics on the sociodemographic, clinical, and service use characteristics of clients served in the inpatient, residential, outpatient, a...

  5. Client Outcome Evaluation in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Outcome evaluation assesses the results or benefits of mental health services received by clients or communities by comparing descriptive data on the mental health status of clients at different points in time. It aids clinicians and managers in planning programs and managing clinical services. A mental health center should establish goal-oriented…

  6. Predicting Improvement among University Counseling Center Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Hummel, Thomas J.

    The fundamental question to which most clients want and deserve an answer is, "Am I going to get better (as a result of counseling)?" Although meta-analyses provide strong evidence supporting the efficacy of counseling in general, if one wants to make probabilistic statements about individual client outcomes--rather than about the more generalized…

  7. Client Relations: More than Just "Business"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Courtney L.; Yee, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors review the literature on partnership evolution to offer strategies for developing collaborative evaluator-client relationships. They begin with a brief introduction to partnerships and their approach to client relationships. A synthesis of the literature on partnership evolution is provided and applied to the…

  8. Meeting Client Resistance and Reactance with Reverence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Eric W.; Presbury, Jack H.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the meaning and function of client resistance in counseling from various theoretical orientations. A relational model of resistance is offered that redefines traditional formulations and has implications for clinical treatment. A vignette illustrates that the counselor's contribution to the emergence of client resistance is a relevant…

  9. The Client: Characteristics Which Influence Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, Susan A.

    Research on client characteristics is reviewed. The degree of disturbance, client expectations, social and economic attributes, race, sex, intellectual variables, and the nature of the presenting problem are all shown to interact with treatment method in determining the outcome of counseling. Several specific recommendations are made: (1) Behavior…

  10. When Are Clients Ready to Terminate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobsons, Lara J.; Brown, Jessica S.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Termination of psychotherapy has received less attention in the research literature than other aspects of the treatment process. This paper presents a structured framework emphasizing observable markers to indicate when termination with a client is appropriate during cognitive behavioral treatment. The 7 criteria that indicate when a client is…

  11. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M.; Morrow, Paula C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines affective commitment to employing and client organizations among long-term contracted employees, a new and growing employment classification. Drawing on organizational commitment and social exchange literatures, we propose two categories of antecedents of employee commitment to client organizations. We tested our hypotheses…

  12. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  13. Cut Costs with Thin Client Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how school districts can considerably increase the number of administrative computers in their districts without a corresponding increase in costs by using the "Thin Client" component of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCC) model. TCC and Thin Client are described, including its software and hardware components. An example of a Thin Client…

  14. Employment Patterns of Methadone Maintenance Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Harriet I.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of employment patterns of methadone maintenance clients had indicated that the majority were not employed at time of program admission. At time of evaluation, 70 percent of the sample were employed; 88 percent of these clients had previous work histories and brought marketable skills with them. (Author)

  15. Counselors' Accounts of Their Clients' Spiritual Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Janice Miner

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a special section within this issue of Counseling and Values that focuses on counselors' accounts of their clients' transpersonal experiences. The eight articles in this special section discuss ten types of transpersonal experiences. Clients range in age from early 20s to early 80s. Experiences occurred in various settings and were…

  16. Writing about Clients: Ethical Considerations and Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len; Pies, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Today, the decision to prepare clinical case material for publication is a decision that cannot be taken lightly. The decision involves reviewing ethical considerations and choosing among various options to safeguard client privacy. Such options include seeking the client's permission, disguising case material, and developing composite case…

  17. Client and Counselor Expectations of Rehabilitation Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Stephen T.; Salomone, Paul R.

    1983-01-01

    Collected data concerning perceptions and expectations of services by rehabilitation counselors (N=7) and 12 of their severely disabled clients. Results showed differences between counselors and clients regarding (a) counselor's role in vocational aspects; (b) control over decision making for rehabilitation services; and (c) counselor perceptions…

  18. Client Motivation and Rehabilitation Counseling Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    This study investigates the relationship between client motivation or lack of motivation for vocational rehabilitation services, and rehabilitation outcome. Clients who had received services at a rehabilitation center during a two year period were rated on their level of motivation for rehabilitation services using the contents of diagnostic…

  19. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement…

  20. Analysis of the Competency-Based High School Diploma Program for CETA Clients. Report III: Student/Client Completion Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Samuel H., Jr.

    A study examined the student/client completion of a competency-based high school diploma for CETA clients. Using follow-up forms, attendance records, correspondence, telephone calls, and client information sheets, researchers collected data from clients and staff pertaining to 102 of the 238 program clients from five sites in Texas (Abilene,…

  1. Profile of Clients Attending a Methadone Clinic

    PubMed Central

    JACOB, Sabrina Anne; MOHAMMED, Fauziah; HASSALI, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client characteristics provide useful information for designing programs that target individuals with risk factors for substance use and for determining client retention. Therefore, this study examined the profiles of clients attending a methadone clinic. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of clients of a methadone clinic was conducted through a survey to obtain a profile of methadone clients. Results: Of the 51 patients who responded (response rate: 66.2%), the mean (SD) age at which they started substance use was 19.8 (5.1) years. Friends were cited as the most regular source of drugs (82.4%), and heroin was the most commonly used drug (98%). Daily substance use was reported by 72.5% of the respondents; 23.5% admitted to having stolen money to purchase drugs; 92.2% tried quitting substance use on their own and 98% stated that the main reason for registering at the clinic was that they wanted to stop their drug dependence. Approximately 60% of clients were receiving methadone doses of less than 60 mg/day. Conclusion: Heroin is still the most popular drug of abuse and most clients still receive methadone doses below the recommended level, despite evidence of poor patient retention rates associated with these low doses. PMID:25892951

  2. [Care counselling - the client's expectations].

    PubMed

    Nickel, W; Hanns, S; Brähler, E; Born, A

    2012-12-01

    The amendment of legal care consultations in the context of the long-term care insurance law (2008) has broadened recent consulting practice within the action range of the nursing care insurance in Germany. The informational needs and consulting requests of the clients were not investigated so far. Our aim was to examine information needs and consulting requests of those in need of care and their informal carers.The consulting requests of visitors of 2 open citizen events were documented by the use of a semi-structured questionnaire. Content analysis following Mayring (2008) was used for data analysis.158 consulting discussions were documented, from which 177 consulting requests were formed. The consulting requests can be divided in 4 main categories: (1) inquiry about the care system [56/32%], (2) inquiry about individual access to care offers [43/24%], (3) inquiry about regional care suppliers [43/24%], (4) situation- and disease-specific inquiries [35/20%].Inquiries about local suppliers of care and situation- and disease-specific inquiries outweigh the number of inquiries about the care system in general. Furthermore, our results show that the informational needs of those in need of care do not only refer to the scope of care insurance law, but to additional social security codes. PMID:22354362

  3. The Unfolding of the Real Relationship and the Outcome of Brief Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelso, Charles J.; Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Busa-Knepp, Johnna; Spiegel, Eric B.; Ain, Stacie; Hummel, Ann M.; Ma, Yueher Emilie; Markin, Rayna D.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess the association of client- and therapist-rated real relationship with each other and with the outcome of brief psychotherapy. It also aimed to determine whether changes over time in perceptions of the real relationship and increasing convergence between clients' and therapists' ratings of the real relationship were…

  4. Innovations in Social Work Training: A Pilot Study of Interprofessional Collaboration Using Standardized Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark D.; Lewis, Melinda; Rappe, Paula; Hartley, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study depicting a collaborative learning experience involving students in the helping professions (i.e., social work and paramedic) is presented, whereby students put discipline-specific practice behaviors into action in a training exercise using standardized clients (SCs). Real world scenarios commonly encountered in emergency response…

  5. Clients Who Frequent Madam Barnett's Emporium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Scott

    1999-01-01

    Develops a comparison between writing tutors and prostitutes. Suggests that the intimate arrangement of people that places one in the position of professional and the other in the position of client works against collaboration. (NH)

  6. Counselor Values and the Pregnant Adolescent Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Bebe C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews options counselors can suggest to pregnant adolescents, including abortion, adoption, marriage, and single parenthood. Discusses the need for counselors to be aware of their own values and help the client explore her values. (JAC)

  7. Marketing Communication Consulting: Tips from Our Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, Martha

    1989-01-01

    Presents advice on how business communication consultants can best work with clients to meet communication and training challenges. Summarizes the views of four training professionals and managers on successful marketing strategies for business communication consultants. (MM)

  8. Clients' and therapists' stories about psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jonathan M

    2013-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the emerging field of research on clients' stories about their experiences in psychotherapy. The theory of narrative identity suggests that individuals construct stories about their lives in order to provide the self with a sense of purpose and unity. Psychotherapy stories serve both psychological functions. Focusing on the theme of agency as a vehicle for operationalizing purpose and coherence as a way of operationalizing unity, this article will describe the existing scholarship connecting psychotherapy stories to clients' psychological well-being. Results from cross-sectional qualitative and quantitative studies as well as longitudinal research indicate a connection between the stories clients tell about therapy and their psychological well-being, both over the course of treatment and after it is over. In addition, a preliminary analysis of therapists' stories about their clients' treatment is presented. These analyses reveal that the way therapists recount a particular client's therapy does not impact the relationships between clients' narratives and their improvement. The article concludes with a discussion of how this body of scholarship might be fruitfully applied in the realm of clinical practice. PMID:22812587

  9. Moving beyond Consultation and into Action with a Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Sara; Dover, Howard F.

    2012-01-01

    Attempting to implement client-based projects within a single semester often overwhelms students and underwhelms the client and grading professor. In this paper, we share results from a two-year pilot project in which the components of a client project were split between several classes. We discuss the client project model as a valuable teaching…

  10. 49 CFR 1103.22 - Restraining clients from improprieties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restraining clients from improprieties. 1103.22... Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.22 Restraining clients from improprieties. A practitioner should see that his clients act with the same restraint that the practitioner himself...

  11. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most cases) is the client served by each covered USG attorney unless detailed to represent another client...

  12. 32 CFR 776.28 - Conflict of interest: Former client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conflict of interest: Former client. 776.28... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.28 Conflict of interest: Former client. (a) Conflict of interest: Former client. A covered attorney who has represented a client in a matter shall...

  13. Client Engagement Characteristics Associated with Problem Gambling Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Nicki A.; Cosic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research examining the factors associated with problem gambling treatment outcomes has examined client factors and to date, treatment characteristics, therapist factors, and client-therapist interactions have essentially remained unexplored. This study aimed to investigate how client engagement variables (client-rated therapeutic…

  14. Using client outcome monitoring as a tool for supervision.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Callahan, Jennifer L; Rousmaniere, Tony G; Whipple, Jason L; Dexter, Kyle; Wrape, Elizabeth R

    2015-06-01

    A large body of research has supported the use of client outcome monitoring and client feedback in psychotherapy. However, discussions between supervisors and trainee clinicians in supervision are still largely based on subjective appraisals made by the trainees. In this article, we discuss 3 strategies for integrating client outcome data and feedback into the supervisory process: training students to obtain and use objective client feedback, using specific client data to inform discussions of clients, and identifying patterns of outcomes across clients to facilitate supervisee growth and development. PMID:25286066

  15. Clinical Writing about Clients: Seeking Consent and Negotiating the Impact on Clients and Their Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses her experiences seeking consent from 16 clients to use clinical material for publication. Sharing case examples from her practice, she elucidates her process with clients and focuses on the beneficial and detrimental effects on the therapeutic relationship. Seeking consent raises issues of confidentiality and stimulates…

  16. A Comparison of Intake Counselors' and Clients' Perceptions of Clients' Presenting Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Roger L.; And Others

    Clients seeking psychological counseling, who initiate service of their own volition, do so to obtain help with a problem that they feel afflicts them. Counselors' perceptions of clients' presenting problems assist counselors in making predictions about behavior from which they construct treatment plans. Research has demonstrated that incongruity…

  17. The Relationship between Client Attachment and Therapist Interventions in Client-Nominated Relationship-Building Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Jennifer I.; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn R.; Drapeau, Martin; Blake, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-four clients were asked to nominate an incident that was critical to the development of their therapeutic relationship with a trainee therapist. Therapist interventions within each client relationship building incident (RBI) were identified. The results of multiple regression indicated that attachment anxiety moderated the relationship…

  18. Neurobiological response to EMDR therapy in clients with different psychological traumas

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Monaco, Leonardo; Daverio, Andrea; Giannoudas, Ioannis; La Porta, Patrizia; Verardo, Anna R.; Niolu, Cinzia; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed cortical activation differences in real-time upon exposure to traumatic memory between two distinct groups of psychologically traumatized clients also in comparison with healthy controls. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to compare neuronal activation throughout the bilateral stimulation phase of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) sessions. We compared activation between the first (T0) and the last (T1) session, the latter performed after processing the index trauma. The group including all clients showed significantly higher cortical activity in orbito-frontal cortex at T0 shifting at T1 toward posterior associative regions. However, the subgroup of clients with chronic exposure to the traumatic event showed a cortical firing at both stages which was closer to that of controls. For the first time EEG monitoring enabled to disclose neurobiological differences between groups of clients with different trauma histories during the reliving of the traumatic event. Cortical activations in clients chronically exposed to traumatic memories were moderate, suggesting an association between social and environmental contexts with the neurobiological response to trauma exposure and psychotherapy. PMID:26579006

  19. Neurobiological response to EMDR therapy in clients with different psychological traumas.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Monaco, Leonardo; Daverio, Andrea; Giannoudas, Ioannis; La Porta, Patrizia; Verardo, Anna R; Niolu, Cinzia; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed cortical activation differences in real-time upon exposure to traumatic memory between two distinct groups of psychologically traumatized clients also in comparison with healthy controls. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to compare neuronal activation throughout the bilateral stimulation phase of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) sessions. We compared activation between the first (T0) and the last (T1) session, the latter performed after processing the index trauma. The group including all clients showed significantly higher cortical activity in orbito-frontal cortex at T0 shifting at T1 toward posterior associative regions. However, the subgroup of clients with chronic exposure to the traumatic event showed a cortical firing at both stages which was closer to that of controls. For the first time EEG monitoring enabled to disclose neurobiological differences between groups of clients with different trauma histories during the reliving of the traumatic event. Cortical activations in clients chronically exposed to traumatic memories were moderate, suggesting an association between social and environmental contexts with the neurobiological response to trauma exposure and psychotherapy. PMID:26579006

  20. Client engagement in psychotherapeutic treatment and associations with client characteristics, therapist characteristics, and treatment factors.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Emma; Bowen, Erica; Brown, Sarah; Howat, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    Client engagement has been associated with positive psychotherapeutic outcomes, yet it is relatively under-theorized. The aims of this review were to establish how client engagement with psychotherapeutic interventions targeting psychological or behavioral change has been operationally defined and assessed, and the associated client characteristics, therapist characteristic, and treatment factors. Seventy-nine studies were selected for review, revealing inconsistent definitions and assessments of engagement and a broad array of client characteristics and treatment factors investigated. Attendance was frequently used as a proxy for engagement, but may not be reliable. Participation or involvement in conjunction with homework compliance which reflects clients' efforts within and between sessions may more reliably reflect engagement. The findings of associations between client characteristics and engagement variables were equivocal, although clients' capacities to address their problems tended to be positively associated with engagement. Nearly all therapist characteristics, particularly therapists' interpersonal skills, and most treatment factors, particularly strengths-based approaches and the therapeutic relationship, were positively associated with engagement. A theory of engagement that characterizes the function and inter-relations of variables across different psychotherapeutic settings is needed. PMID:25000204

  1. Helping Clients Uncover Metaphoric Understandings of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1998-01-01

    Written responses of three women with bulimia were analyzed for instances of metaphoric understanding of their difficulties with food during 20 to 24 therapy sessions. Results show a gradual deepening of the metaphoric understanding of what the troubled eating represented for each client. Metaphoric understanding included ways of dealing with self…

  2. Considering Thin Client Computing for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Mark

    1998-01-01

    In response to concerns about the cost of keeping up with individual desktop computing technology, several new solutions have emerged. Referred to as "thin clients," or network-centric computers, they include two types of desktop device: the network computer and the Windows terminal. Purchase cost, life span, support costs, and overall total cost…

  3. Finding Happiness for Ourselves and Our Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Reviews D. G. Myers' (2000) examination of the contributing factors of happiness: money, relationships, and religion. Discusses the implications of these factors for counseling with specific recommendations made for counselors regarding their own self-care and their work with their clients. (GCP)

  4. Counselor Loss: Terminating the Helped Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses counselor feelings of loss due to client departure from therapy. Describes components of loss within a five-stage model including denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Outlines strategies for coping with counselor loss. Suggests feelings of loss are natural. (RC)

  5. The Existential Mode and Client Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, James D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and clarifies counseling from an existential perspective, with emphasis on the distinction between neurotic and ontological anxiety. The existentially oriented counselor insists that clients face themselves as referents in a phenomenological context by experiencing existential "anxiety" when confronted with the pain of finitude,…

  6. Client-Centered Employee Assistance Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Darryl Lee

    This paper addresses delivery aspects and benefits of client-centered Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services through a review of the literature and research. EAP services are described as educational and mental health services utilized to assist employees and their families to respond constructively to job, personal, interpersonal or…

  7. Pretherapy Information: An Investigation of Client Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kathleen N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated effects of pretherapy information about a feminist therapist's values and therapy orientation. Studied self-identified feminist clients' judgments of similarity to the therapist's values, confidence in the therapist's helpfulness, and willingness to see the therapist. Subjects were not as willing to see the explicitly feminist…

  8. Client Confidentiality in Police Social Work Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Patrick Almond; Lutkus, Anita M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey that questioned police social workers regarding the protection of client confidentiality in police settings revealed several problems related to the unique character of the setting and to the identification of social workers with the goals and practices of police. Results raise questions about the protection of client…

  9. Accommodating blind and partially sighted clients

    PubMed Central

    England, Gary; Gebbels, Tim; Whelan, Chantelle; Freeman, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary surgeons provide an important service to blind and partially sighted guide dog owners. By adopting basic disability awareness and visual impairment training, practices can ensure that the assistance needs of those clients are met, facilitating access to veterinary care. PMID:25642013

  10. Attracting Clients to Service-Oriented Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disney, Diane M.

    One of a series of manuals developed by the Home and Community-Based Career Education Project, the outreach component publication describes how the project went about attracting clients for its adult vocational counseling services. Sections include: creating a publicity campaign, using an advertising agency, creating products for the mass media,…

  11. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  12. Client Perceptions of Prison Counselor Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, J. A. Gordon

    Research evidence indicates that counselors rated as more effective are lower in dogmatism. Additional research suggests that the counseling relationship with deliquent populations is different from that with nondelinquent populations. It is the intent of this study to investigate perceptions of counselor effectiveness held by clients in a major…

  13. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  14. Defining the Worker-Client Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that effective use of the relationship between worker and client requires defining the concept of relationship more specifically. This may be accomplished through a consideration of the context and purpose of the particular treatment situations, the outcomes desired and the responses that are necessary to achieve these goals. (Author)

  15. Restating a Client-Centered Approach to Career Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.

    1988-01-01

    Asserts career counseling too often is associated with objective test scores and rational decision making. Reiterates the importance of considering the client's developing self-concept in career counseling. Provides sample client centered career counseling session. (Author/ABL)

  16. 19 CFR 111.39 - Advice to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of that noncompliance, error, or omission. (c) Illegal plans. A broker must not knowingly suggest to a client or prospective client any illegal plan for evading payment of any duty, tax, or other...

  17. 19 CFR 111.39 - Advice to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of that noncompliance, error, or omission. (c) Illegal plans. A broker must not knowingly suggest to a client or prospective client any illegal plan for evading payment of any duty, tax, or other...

  18. Gender Dysphoria: The Therapist's Dilemma--The Client's Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherebrin, Hannah

    1996-01-01

    Therapist's role and dilemmas faced in treating a gender dysphoric client are discussed. Examines ethical and moral issues relating to transsexualism and discusses the appropriateness of art therapy as a treatment for transsexual clients. (SNR)

  19. Counselor Stress in Relation to Disabled and Minority Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Kolk, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Physiological and self-reported reactions of counselors in training to five disabled clients and a minority client were examined. Implications for counselor practice, education, and in-service education are discussed. (Author)

  20. A Responsive Client for Distributed Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, E. F.; Jensen, P. A.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D. A.; Momsen, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    As grids, web services and distributed computing continue to gain popularity in the scientific community, demand for virtual laboratories likewise increases. Today organizations such as the Virtual Laboratory for Earth and Planetary Sciences (VLab) are dedicated to developing web-based portals to perform various simulations remotely while abstracting away details of the underlying computation. Two of the biggest challenges in portal- based computing are fast visualization and smooth interrogation without over taxing clients resources. In response to this challenge, we have expanded on our previous data storage strategy and thick client visualization scheme [1] to develop a client-centric distributed application that utilizes remote visualization of large datasets and makes use of the local graphics processor for improved interactivity. Rather than waste precious client resources for visualization, a combination of 3D graphics and 2D server bitmaps are used to simulate the look and feel of local rendering. Java Web Start and Java Bindings for OpenGL enable install-on- demand functionality as well as low level access to client graphics for all platforms. Powerful visualization services based on VTK and auto-generated by the WATT compiler [2] are accessible through a standard web API. Data is permanently stored on compute nodes while separate visualization nodes fetch data requested by clients, caching it locally to prevent unnecessary transfers. We will demonstrate application capabilities in the context of simulated charge density visualization within the VLab portal. In addition, we will address generalizations of our application to interact with a wider number of WATT services and performance bottlenecks. [1] Ananthuni, R., Karki, B.B., Bollig, E.F., da Silva, C.R.S., Erlebacher, G., "A Web-Based Visualization and Reposition Scheme for Scientific Data," In Press, Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on Modeling Simulation and Visualization Methods (MSV

  1. Counselor Beliefs and Perceived Knowledge Regarding Clients with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Tamekia R.

    2012-01-01

    Clients with learning disabilities constitute a cultural group that has not been extensively studied. The professional literature has found that counselors have reported the need for additional training in working with clients with disabilities. This study explored counselors' beliefs and perceived knowledge regarding counseling clients with…

  2. Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Clients with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taheri-Araghi, M.; Hendren, G.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 10 personal (client) variables and four program variables related to 76 people who became blind from retinitis pigmentosa revealed that 6 variables predicted clients' rehabilitation outcomes: age, gender, race, work status, amount of case-service money spent on the client's behalf, and number of changes in career objectives…

  3. Brief Therapy with Difficult Clients. Hatherleigh Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loar, Lynn

    1995-01-01

    Brief therapy is an effective, time-limited approach that invokes clients values, appreciates their strengths, and is based on mutual respect. Counseling nonvoluntary clients can be extremely difficult because of the intense degree of denial, minimization, or rationalization of problems such clients typically bring to therapy. Therapists must…

  4. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  5. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  6. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  7. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  8. Can Knowledge of Client Birth Order Bias Clinical Judgment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Allan E.

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians (N = 308) responded to identical counseling vignettes of a male client that differed only in the client's stated birth order. Clinicians developed different impressions about the client and his family experiences that corresponded with the prototypical descriptions of persons from 1 of 4 birth orders (i.e., first, middle, youngest, and…

  9. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned,...

  10. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for the Mentally Retarded § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of clients' rights. The...

  11. Client Good Moments: An Intensive Analysis of a Single Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalikas, Anastassios; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    An intensive analysis of a single counseling session conducted by Fritz Perls was carried out to examine relationships among client experiencing level, client strength of feeling, counselor interventions, and client good moments. The possibility that positive therapeutic outcome is related to the accretion of good moments is discussed. (JBJ)

  12. What Business Students Should Know about Attorney-Client Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draba, Robert; Marshall, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The case law on attorney-client privilege is extensive and can be somewhat complex. Over seven hundred articles in Westlaw, for example, have the phrase "attorney-client privilege" in the title; in the last three years alone, there have been over 3700 federal cases in which the phrase "attorney-client privilege" appears at least once. However,…

  13. 37 CFR 10.84 - Representing a client zealously.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Representing a client... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.84 Representing a client zealously. (a) A practitioner shall not intentionally: (1) Fail to seek the lawful objectives of a client through reasonably...

  14. Developing Individualized Behavior Change Goals with Clients: A Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Richard G.; Uhlemann, Max R.

    This document reviews 10 specific and sequential steps which have emerged as being particularly effective in assisting clients in developing individualized behavior change goals in psychotherapy. The therapist and client typically work through these steps together near the beginning of treatment, but only after the client has had the opportunity…

  15. Impact of Client Suicide on Practitioner Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Joseph Simon

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine posttraumatic growth in clinicians after the suicide death of a client. An experience such as a client suicide could be an opportunity for growth or a danger for the practitioner to become traumatized. Thus, the clinician who works with clients who complete suicide may either suffer or experience a positive change from…

  16. Health Promotion through the Use of Nurse-Client Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dover, Leslie J.

    Much of the practice of community health nurses is focused on health promotion. Nurse-client contracting has been used with clients experiencing hypertension, diabetes, or arthritis. A study was conducted to determine whether nurse-client contracting would be useful as a method for providing nursing care to assist sexually active young women to…

  17. A Network Client Using the Gopher Information Discovery Protocol

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-10-05

    WSGOPHER uses the protocol known as Gopher, which is described in Internet RFC 1436. Specifically Gopher is a client/server protocol. Gopher servers provide information across the network to Gopher clients. WSGOPHER is an implementation of a Gopher client for Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Windows Sockets version 1.1.

  18. Counselor Interventions Preceding Client Laughter in Brief Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Dana R.; Hill, Clara E.

    1992-01-01

    Examined whether 6 categories of counselor humor and 4 categories of risk interventions preceded client laughter in 236 events from 8 cases of brief psychotherapy. Found most client laughter was mild and moderate, with only eight instances of strong laughter. Humorous interventions led to more client laughter than did interventions that encouraged…

  19. A Program Evaluation Using Client Records and Census Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachrach, Kenneth M.; Zautra, Alex

    Use of client records and census data as a research methodology can provide mental health planners with information on community needs as well as the adequacy of existing programs. Three ways of analyzing client records in conjunction with census data are: (1) tract by tract, comparing client geographic distribution with census characteristics;…

  20. Attitudes of Social Work Students toward Clients with Basic Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumer-Nevo, Michal; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of 91 undergraduate social work students toward clients with basic needs in Israel. The results indicate that only about 1/3 of the students consider the treatment of clients with basic needs to be a part of the profession. In addition, a positive correlation was found between willingness to help clients with…

  1. WSGOPHER. A Network Client Using the Gopher Information Discovery Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.L.

    1993-10-05

    WSGOPHER uses the protocol known as Gopher, which is described in Internet RFC 1436. Specifically Gopher is a client/server protocol. Gopher servers provide information across the network to Gopher clients. WSGOPHER is an implementation of a Gopher client for Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Windows Sockets version 1.1.

  2. 37 CFR 11.113 - Organization as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organization as client. 11... Rules of Professional Conduct Client-Practitioner Relationship § 11.113 Organization as client. (a) A... substantial injury to the organization, then the practitioner shall proceed as is reasonably necessary in...

  3. 37 CFR 11.113 - Organization as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organization as client. 11... Rules of Professional Conduct Client-Practitioner Relationship § 11.113 Organization as client. (a) A... substantial injury to the organization, then the practitioner shall proceed as is reasonably necessary in...

  4. Educating Therapists in Training about Clients' Expectations of Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Kathleen; Ogiba, Shawn; Chambliss, Catherine

    Training therapists effectively requires familiarizing them with the modal expectations that clients bring to the therapeutic encounter. Ways in which therapists can be apprised of clients' expectations of therapy are discussed. Accurate understanding of clients' attitudes permits development of appropriately focused therapy goals and is generally…

  5. Incorporating Perceived Importance of Service Elements into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the need for incorporating perceived importance of service elements into client satisfaction measures. Method: A secondary analysis of client satisfaction data from 112 clients of an elderly case management setting was conducted. Results: This study found that the relationship between global…

  6. 14 CFR 1261.317 - Attorney-client privilege.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attorney-client privilege. 1261.317 Section... Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.317 Attorney-client privilege. (a) Attorneys... traditional attorney-client relationship with the employee with respect to application of the...

  7. 37 CFR 10.67 - Settling similar claims of clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... clients. 10.67 Section 10.67 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.67 Settling similar claims of clients. A practitioner who represents two or more clients shall not make or participate in the making of an aggregate settlement of...

  8. 37 CFR 10.78 - Limiting liability to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limiting liability to client... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.78 Limiting liability to client. A practitioner shall not attempt to exonerate himself or herself from, or limit his or her liability to, a client for his or...

  9. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients... CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent an individual eligible client who is seeking specific relief from a welfare agency....

  10. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client under a disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Client under a disability. 776.33 Section 776.33... of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client under a disability. (a) Client under a disability: (1) When a... impaired, whether because of minority, mental disability, or for some other reason, the covered...

  11. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for the Mentally Retarded § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of clients' rights. The...

  12. The Arab Muslim client: implications for anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sheets, D L; el-Azhary, R A

    1998-06-01

    The Arab Muslim client has unique cultural characteristics that should be incorporated into anesthetic care. In obtaining a preoperative assessment and consent, issues such as privacy, family roles, body language, group decision making, communication distances, and use of translators should be addressed. Intraoperatively, the need for modesty and the client's possible adherence to folk beliefs should also be recognized. Postoperatively, pain and overall needs assessments are a continuing challenge. The anesthetist must also understand the underlying family roles, the high correlation between fear and pain, and the possible coexisting folk beliefs when working within the labor and delivery setting. By addressing these unique issues, the anesthetist can provide appropriate and safe anesthetic care. PMID:9830857

  13. Implementing a secure client/server application

    SciTech Connect

    Kissinger, B.A.

    1994-08-01

    There is an increasing rise in attacks and security breaches on computer systems. Particularly vulnerable are systems that exchange user names and passwords directly across a network without encryption. These kinds of systems include many commercial-off-the-shelf client/server applications. A secure technique for authenticating computer users and transmitting passwords through the use of a trusted {open_quotes}broker{close_quotes} and public/private keys is described in this paper.

  14. Client-side Skype forensics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Tina; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. In the present study, a client-side Skype forensics is performed. It is designed to explain which kind of user data are stored on a computer and which tools allow the extraction of those data for a forensic investigation. There are described both methods - a manual analysis and an analysis with (mainly) open source tools, respectively.

  15. Dietary intake in clients with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Agnieszka; Atkins, Marlis; Mager, Diana R

    2011-01-01

    To assess relationships among food intake, anthropometrics, and wound severity, we studied 31 home care clients with pressure ulcers (PUs) or venous stasis ulcers (VSUs). Anthropometric variables (weight, height, waist circumference [WC]) were measured according to standard methodologies. Risk for PU development was assessed using the Braden Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment score and wound severity according to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. Three-day food records were analyzed to assess dietary adequacy. Adults with VSUs (65.8 ± 18.4 years) had a higher body mass index (48.1 vs. 25.9), WC (146.6 vs. 98.4 cm), and Braden score (20.2 vs. 17.5) than did those with PUs (67.8 ± 17.9 years) (p <0.05). Energy, protein, and zinc intake by diet alone did not meet estimated requirements in 41%, 32%, and 54.5% of clients, respectively. Intake by diet alone met the Estimated Average Requirement/Adequate Intake for all nutrients except fibre, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K, folate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Nutrient supplementation resolved this for all nutrients except fibre, vitamin K, and potassium. In multivariate analysis, increasing wound severity was associated with decreased intakes of vitamin A, vitamin K, magnesium, and protein (r2=0.90, p<0.001). Optimizing nutrient intake may be an important strategy to promote wound healing and decrease wound severity in home care clients with chronic wounds. PMID:21645427

  16. Hsp90: Friends, clients and natural foes.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-08-01

    Hsp90, a homodimeric ATPase, is responsible for the correct folding of a number of newly synthesized polypeptides in addition to the correct folding of denatured/misfolded client proteins. It requires several co-chaperones and other partner proteins for chaperone activity. Due to the involvement of Hsp90-dependent client proteins in a variety of oncogenic signaling pathways, Hsp90 inhibition has emerged as one of the leading strategies for anticancer chemotherapeutics. Most of Hsp90 inhibitors blocks the N terminal ATP binding pocket and prevents the conformational changes which are essential for the loading of co-chaperones and client proteins. Several other inhibitors have also been reported which disrupt chaperone cycle in ways other than binding to N terminal ATP binding pocket. The Hsp90 inhibition is associated with heat shock response, mediated by HSF-1, to overcome the loss of Hsp90 and sustain cell survival. This review is an attempt to give an over view of all the important players of chaperone cycle. PMID:27295069

  17. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system. PMID:27441559

  18. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Souza Pardo, Mário Henrique; Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system. PMID:27441559

  19. Social networks and psychiatric clients: the personal and environmental context.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R E

    1982-08-01

    The study examines the extent to which characteristics of psychiatric clients (interpersonal problem-solving) and their families (family climate and family social resources) are associated with dimensions of clients' social networks (size and support). Respondents were 35 clients recruited from outpatient psychiatric clinics and the family members with whom they resided. The results revealed that individual and environmental variables were significant correlates of social network dimensions. For example, client problem-solving was positively related to the number of intimates cited by the client, while level of independence was positively related to the degree of support clients reported receiving from their peers. Level of client psychopathology partially moderated the effects of some of the predictor variables. The results highlight the need to examine the individual and environmental processes that shape and are shaped by social network patterns. PMID:7137127

  20. Neurofeedback outcomes in clients with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lynda; Thompson, Michael; Reid, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    This paper summarizes data from a review of neurofeedback (NFB) training with 150 clients with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) and 9 clients with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seen over a 15 year period (1993-2008) in a clinical setting. The main objective was to investigate whether electroncephalographic (EEG) biofeedback, also called neurofeedback (NFB), made a significant difference in clients diagnosed with AS. An earlier paper (Thompson et al. 2009) reviews the symptoms of AS, highlights research findings and theories concerning this disorder, discusses QEEG patterns in AS (both single and 19-channel), and details a hypothesis, based on functional neuroanatomy, concerning how NFB, often paired with biofeedback (BFB), might produce a change in symptoms. A further aim of the current report is to provide practitioners with a detailed description of the method used to address some of the key symptoms of AS in order to encourage further research and clinical work to refine the use of NFB plus BFB in the treatment of AS. All charts were included for review where there was a diagnosis of AS or ASD and pre- and post-training testing results were available for one or more of the standardized tests used. Clients received 40-60 sessions of NFB, which was combined with training in metacognitive strategies and, for most older adolescent and adult clients, with BFB of respiration, electrodermal response, and, more recently, heart rate variability. For the majority of clients, feedback was contingent on decreasing slow wave activity (usually 3-7 Hz), decreasing beta spindling if it was present (usually between 23 and 35 Hz), and increasing fast wave activity termed sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) (12-15 or 13-15 Hz depending on assessment findings). The most common initial montage was referential placement at the vertex (CZ) for children and at FCz (midway between FZ and CZ) for adults, referenced to the right ear. Metacognitive strategies relevant to social understanding, spatial

  1. Exploring the potential of constructionist therapy: deaf clients, hearing therapists and a reflecting team.

    PubMed

    Munro, L; Knox, M; Lowe, R

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of constructionist therapy with a reflecting team of hearing therapists seeing deaf clients. Using findings from two in-depth interviews, postsession reflections and a review of the literature, we propose that this model has the potential to cater to the diversity of the lived experiences of deaf people and also to address issues of power and tensions between medical, social, and cultural models of deafness. The interviews found there was real value in sharing multiple perspectives between the reflecting team of hearing therapists and these deaf clients. In addition, the clients reported feeling safe and comfortable with this model of counseling. Other information that emerged from the interviews supports previous findings regarding consistency in interpreting and the importance of hearing therapists having an understanding of the distinctions between Deaf and hearing worlds. As the first investigation of its kind in Australia, this article provides a map for therapists to incorporate reflecting teams with interpreters, deaf clients, and hearing therapists. The value of this article also lies in providing a much needed platform for future research into counseling outcomes and the efficacy of this constructionist model of therapy. PMID:18303009

  2. A client/server approach to telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, B J; Torok, K E; Kelly, L M; Ewing, D J; Andrews, L T

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Medical College of Ohio's efforts in developing a client/server telemedicine system. Telemedicine vastly improves the ability of a medical center physician or specialist to interactively consult with a physician at a remote health care facility. The patient receives attention more quickly, he and his family do not need to travel long distances to obtain specialists' services, and the primary care physician can be involved in diagnosis and developing a treatment program [1, 2]. Telemedicine consultations are designed to improve access to health services in underserved urban and rural communities and reduce isolation of rural practitioners [3]. PMID:8563396

  3. Measuring client perceptions of motivational interviewing: factor analysis of the Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing scale.

    PubMed

    Madson, Michael B; Mohn, Richard S; Zuckoff, Allan; Schumacher, Julie A; Kogan, Jane; Hutchison, Shari; Magee, Emily; Stein, Bradley

    2013-03-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an intervention approach that has solid evidence of efficacy with substance use disorders. Research and training have benefitted from the development of observational measures to assess MI fidelity and competence. However, one untapped area of assessment is the client perception of the clinician use of MI. Client perceptions of MI have been found through qualitative interviews to relate to motivation to change, view of the therapist and safety of therapy. The Client Evaluation of MI (CEMI) scale was developed to assess client perception of clinician MI use. This study further evaluated the CEMI through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis with a sample of 500 individuals with dual diagnosis pre-discharge from an inpatient unit. Participants completed an MI based session prior to completing CEMIs. A two factor (relational and technical) model explained 51.1% of the cumulative variance and was supported through confirmatory factor analysis. Suggestions for revisions are provided as well as potential uses of the CEMI and future directions for research. PMID:22999814

  4. Client-centered home care: balancing between competing responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Schoot, Tineke; Proot, Ireen; Legius, Marja; ter Meulen, Ruud; de Witte, Luc

    2006-11-01

    This study explores and describes the perceptions of nurses with respect to everyday client-centered care. A grounded theory study was conducted with 10 Dutch nurses and auxiliary nurses giving home care to chronically ill clients. Participatory observations and semistructured interviews were held. Nurses perceived roles and responsibilities competing with the role as a responsive professional to the client demand: a critical professional, developer of client competencies, individual, and employee. Strategies in balancing between competing responsibilities were distinguished: pleasing, dialoguing, directing, and detaching. Directing (related to impaired client competencies) and detaching (related to organizational barriers) were also used as second choice strategies. Effectively balancing between competing responsibilities was seen in dialoguing and directing as second choice. Conditions identified related to these strategies are awareness of, and responsibility taking for competing responsibilities. Recommendations for practice concern a care relationship and a dialogue with the client, critical ethical reflection, professional autonomy, self-assertiveness and organizational support. PMID:17056768

  5. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy. PMID:24702034

  6. Barriers to client-centredness and their resolution.

    PubMed

    Sumsion, T; Smyth, G

    2000-02-01

    This research sought to determine which therapist barriers prevent client-centred practice the most, and which methods are perceived as being most effective in resolving therapist barriers. A list of barriers that therapists bring to client-centred practice and methods to resolve these was identified from the literature and formed the basis of a questionnaire sent to 60 occupational therapists in the United Kingdom. The results showed that the therapist and client having different goals was the barrier which most prevented client-centred practice. The high ratings of other statements suggested that the values, beliefs and attitudes of therapists and of the employment culture make client-centred practice uncomfortable to use and hence prevent its implementation. Case examples showing how to practice in a client-centred fashion were rated as the most effective method of barrier removal. PMID:10695165

  7. Spiritual interventions in psychotherapy: evaluations by highly religious clients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jennifer S; Smith, Timothy B; Barlow, Sally H

    2007-10-01

    Spiritual and religious interventions in psychotherapy have increasingly received research attention, particularly with highly religious clients. This study examined client opinions about and experiences with religious interventions in psychotherapy. A sample of 152 clients at a counseling center of a university sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) completed a survey with ratings of specific religious interventions concerning appropriateness, helpfulness, and prevalence. Out-of-session religious interventions were considered more appropriate by clients than in-session religious interventions, but in-session interventions were rated as more helpful. Specific interventions considered both appropriate and helpful by the LDS participants included referencing scriptural passages, teaching spiritual concepts, encouraging forgiveness, involving religious community resources, and conducting assessments of client spirituality. Some religious interventions were perceived as inappropriate or not helpful, and clients provided explanations for why religious interventions can be either effective or ineffective in psychotherapy. PMID:17828760

  8. A concept analysis of partnership with clients.

    PubMed

    Bidmead, Christine; Cowley, Sarah

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this first paper of two about partnership working with clients is to define and clarify partnership as it is practised within health visiting, by identifying the central notions of partnership working in practice. The aim of the second paper will be to describe an evaluation of a training course in partnership working for health visitors. Partnership is a word in common usage within the health professions but its meaning is ill-defined. A literature search was undertaken to identify ways in which previous authors have used the concept within nursing, counselling and health visiting. Rodgers' approach to concept analysis was undertaken to seek clarity for the concept. This revealed the ways in which various authors have used the word, an analysis of its defining attributes, surrogate terms, antecedents, consequences and a concluding definition. The results showed that partnership with clients in health visiting can be defined as a respectful, negotiated way of working together that enables choice, participation and equity, within an honest, trusting relationship that is based in empathy, support and reciprocity. It is best established within a model of health visiting that recognises partnership as a central tenet. It requires a high level of interpersonal qualities and communication skills in staff who are, themselves, supported through a system of clinical supervision that operates within the same partnership framework. PMID:15984559

  9. Hardened Client Platforms for Secure Internet Banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, C.; Zakhidov, S.

    We review the security of e-banking platforms with particular attention to the exploitable attack vectors of three main attack categories: Man-in-the-Middle, Man-in-the-PC and Man-in-the-Browser. It will be shown that the most serious threats come from combination attacks capable of hacking any transaction without the need to control the authentication process. Using this approach, the security of any authentication system can be bypassed, including those using SecureID Tokens, OTP Tokens, Biometric Sensors and Smart Cards. We will describe and compare two recently proposed e-banking platforms, the ZTIC and the USPD, both of which are based on the use of dedicated client devices, but with diverging approaches with respect to the need of hardening the Web client application. It will be shown that the use of a Hardened Browser (or H-Browser) component is critical to force attackers to employ complex and expensive techniques and to reduce the strength and variety of social engineering attacks down to physiological fraud levels.

  10. Spiritual Pain in Meals on Wheels’ Clients

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Lisa; Branson, Sandy; Cron, Stanley; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meals on Wheels’ clients are at risk for spiritual pain due to advanced age, social isolation, and failing health. They are also prone to stress, depression, and loneliness, placing them at risk for adverse biological disruptions and health outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine associations of spiritual pain with psychosocial factors (stress, depression, loneliness, religious coping) and salivary biomarkers of stress and inflammation (cortisol, IL-1β) in Meals on Wheels’ clients. Methods: Data were collected cross-sectionally from 88 elderly (mean age 75.4). Spiritual pain, stress, depression, loneliness, and religious coping were measured with standardized instruments, and salivary biomarkers were assessed with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Spiritual pain was significantly and positively correlated with stress (r = 0.35, p ≤ 0.001), depression (r = 0.27, p = 0.01), and negative religious coping (r = 0.27, p = 0.01). Correlations with loneliness, positive religious coping, and salivary biomarkers were non-significant. Conclusion: Spiritual pain is an important concept in this population. Research should be expanded to understand the significance of spiritual pain in conjunction with psychosocial and biological variables and its potential impact on physical, mental, and cognitive health outcomes in the elderly.

  11. Fresh Wounds: Metadata and Usability Lessons from building the Earthdata Search Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Quinn, P.; Murphy, K. J.; Baynes, K.

    2014-12-01

    Data discovery and accessibility are frequent topics in science conferences but are usually discussed in an abstract XML schema kind-of way. In the course of designing and building the NASA Earthdata Search Client, a "concept-car" discovery client for the new Common Metadata Repository (CMR) and NASA Earthdata, we learned important lessons about usability from user studies and our actual use of science metadata. In this talk we challenge the community with the issues we ran into: the critical usability stumbling blocks for even seasoned researchers, "bug reports" from users that were ultimately usability problems in metadata, the challenges and questions that arise from incorporating "visual metadata", and the state of data access services. We intend to show that high quality metadata and real human usability factors are essential to making critical data accessible.

  12. Dual diagnosis clients' treatment satisfaction - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review is to synthesize existing evidence about treatment satisfaction among clients with substance misuse and mental health co-morbidity (dual diagnoses, DD). Methods We examined satisfaction with treatment received, variations in satisfaction levels by type of treatment intervention and by diagnosis (i.e. DD clients vs. single diagnosis clients), and the influence of factors other than treatment type on satisfaction. Peer-reviewed studies published in English since 1970 were identified by searching electronic databases using pre-defined search strings. Results Across the 27 studies that met inclusion criteria, high average satisfaction scores were found. In most studies, integrated DD treatment yielded greater client satisfaction than standard treatment without explicit DD focus. In standard treatment without DD focus, DD clients tended to be less satisfied than single diagnosis clients. Whilst the evidence base on client and treatment variables related to satisfaction is small, it suggested client demographics and symptom severity to be unrelated to treatment satisfaction. However, satisfaction tended to be linked to other treatment process and outcome variables. Findings are limited in that many studies had very small sample sizes, did not use validated satisfaction instruments and may not have controlled for potential confounders. A framework for further research in this important area is discussed. Conclusions High satisfaction levels with current treatment provision, especially among those in integrated treatment, should enhance therapeutic optimism among practitioners dealing with DD clients. PMID:21501510

  13. JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgast, Paul; Pechkam, Paul

    2007-01-01

    JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK (JMS signifies "Java messaging service" and "SDK" signifies "software development kit") is a software package for developing interfaces that enable legacy programs (here denoted "clients") written in the C and C++ languages to communicate with each other via a JMS broker. This package consists of two main components: the JMS proxy server component and the client C library SDK component. The JMS proxy server component implements a native Java process that receives and responds to requests from clients. This component can run on any computer that supports Java and a JMS client. The client C library SDK component is used to develop a JMS client program running in each affected C or C++ environment, without need for running a Java virtual machine in the affected computer. A C client program developed by use of this SDK has most of the quality-of-service characteristics of standard Java-based client programs, including the following: Durable subscriptions; Asynchronous message receipt; Such standard JMS message qualities as "TimeToLive," "Message Properties," and "DeliveryMode" (as the quoted terms are defined in previously published JMS documentation); and Automatic reconnection of a JMS proxy to a restarted JMS broker.

  14. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Aldana, J.; Piechulek, H.; al-Sabir, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess user expectations and degree of client satisfaction and quality of health care provided in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 1913 persons chosen by systematic random sampling were successfully interviewed immediately after having received care in government health facilities. FINDINGS: The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction with the government services was provider behaviour, especially respect and politeness. For patients this aspect was much more important than the technical competence of the provider. Furthermore, a reduction in waiting time (on average to 30 min) was more important to clients than a prolongation of the quite short (from a medical standpoint) consultation time (on average 2 min, 22 sec), with 75% of clients being satisfied. Waiting time, which was about double at outreach services than that at fixed services, was the only element with which users of outreach services were dissatisfied. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores that client satisfaction is determined by the cultural background of the people. It shows the dilemma that, though optimally care should be capable of meeting both medical and psychosocial needs, in reality care that meets all medical needs may fail to meet the client's emotional or social needs. Conversely, care that meets psychosocial needs may leave the clients medically at risk. It seems important that developing countries promoting client-oriented health services should carry out more in-depth research on the determinants of client satisfaction in the respective culture. PMID:11436472

  15. Improvement of AMGA Python Client Library for Belle II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jae-Hyuck; Park, Geunchul; Huh, Taesang; Hwang, Soonwook

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the recent improvement of the AMGA (ARDA Metadata Grid Application) python client library for the Belle II Experiment. We were drawn to the action items related to library improvement after in-depth discussions with the developer of the Belle II distributed computing system. The improvement includes client-side metadata federation support in python, DIRAC SSL library support as well as API refinement for synchronous operation. Some of the improvements have already been applied to the AMGA python client library as bundled with the Belle II distributed computing software. The recent mass Monte- Carlo (MC) production campaign shows that the AMGA python client library is reliably stable.

  16. Multi-client quantum key distribution using wavelength division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, Warren P; Bennink, Ryan S; Earl, Dennis Duncan; Evans, Philip G; Humble, Travis S; Pooser, Raphael C; Schaake, Jason; Williams, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) exploits the rules of quantum mechanics to generate and securely distribute a random sequence of bits to two spatially separated clients. Typically a QKD system can support only a single pair of clients at a time, and so a separate quantum link is required for every pair of users. We overcome this limitation with the design and characterization of a multi-client entangled-photon QKD system with the capacity for up to 100 clients simultaneously. The time-bin entangled QKD system includes a broadband down-conversion source with two unique features that enable the multi-user capability. First, the photons are emitted across a very large portion of the telecom spectrum. Second, and more importantly, the photons are strongly correlated in their energy degree of freedom. Using standard wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) hardware, the photons can be routed to different parties on a quantum communication network, while the strong spectral correlations ensure that each client is linked only to the client receiving the conjugate wavelength. In this way, a single down-conversion source can support dozens of channels simultaneously--and to the extent that the WDM hardware can send different spectral channels to different clients, the system can support multiple client pairings. We will describe the design and characterization of the down-conversion source, as well as the client stations, which must be tunable across the emission spectrum.

  17. Deaf client with bipolar illness: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background This case report highlights the diagnostic and assessment difficulties faced by mental health professionals when dealing with a Deaf client. Case presentation We used mobile phone text facility to monitor and liaise with the client while in the community. We focused on the affect and signing amplitude/intensity of the client to make a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, prescribed valproate semisodium, and noticed an improvement in two months. Conclusion This is an example of some areas of good practice when assessing a Deaf client with mental health problems. PMID:17903259

  18. Real Earthquakes, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred…

  19. Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  20. Investigating bias in psychotherapy with BDSM clients.

    PubMed

    Kolmes, Keely; Stock, Wendy; Moser, Charles

    2006-01-01

    There is a concern among consensual BDSM participants that they will receive biased care from mental health professionals. Results are presented of an anonymous Internet-based survey administered to both BDSM-identified individuals who have received psychological care and to mental health professionals. The survey included socio-demographic data and invited participants to write narrative accounts of biased or culturally sensitive care, from which common themes were identified. Mental health providers (N=17) responded in fewer numbers than those who identified as BDSM-identified participants (N=175). Descriptive characteristics of the sample will be discussed. Themes from the qualitative data may be useful in informing the future development of guidelines for practitioners to work more responsibly with clients who identify as members of this sexual minority group. PMID:16803769

  1. Clients' Representations of Childhood Emotional Bonds with Parents, Social Support, and Formation of the Working Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, Brent

    1991-01-01

    Collected survey data from 102 client-counselor dyads with regard to client and counselor third-session working alliance ratings, quality of clients' current social relationships, and clients' representations of care and overprotection in memories of childhood emotional bonds with parents. Social support was significant predictor of client-rated…

  2. Communicating Social Support to Grieving Clients: The Veterinarians' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgram, Mary D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines veterinarians' perceptions of how they offer social support to grieving clients. Because many clients cannot find the social support they would like from other sources when grieving the death of a pet, the role of the vet in offering support becomes increasingly important. The results indicate that vets perceive…

  3. Client Perspectives of Multicultural Counseling Competence: A Qualitative Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope-Davis, Donald B.; Toporek, Rebecca L.; Ortega-Villalobos, Lideth; Ligiero, Daniela P.; Brittan-Powell, Christopher S.; Liu, William M.; Bashshur, Michael R.; Codrington, Jamila N.; Liang, Christopher T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Multicultural competence is a burgeoning area of research in counseling psychology. However, there has been little focus on understanding multicultural competence from the perspective of clients. This study used qualitative interviews and grounded theory to develop a model of clients' perspectives of multicultural counseling. The resulting model…

  4. A Call for Feminist Research: A Limited Client Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    Feminist approaches embrace a counselor stance that is both collaborative and supportive, seeking client empowerment. On review of feminist family and couple counseling literature of the past 20 years using several academic databases, no research was found that explored a clients experience of feminist-informed family and couple counseling. The…

  5. Performance Consulting: Job Aids for Interacting with Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the human performance technology process focuses on interacting with clients. Describes a seven-step process that includes assessment; a performance consulting guide that explains the leadership process used in interacting with clients; and how to ask the right questions in the right order. (LRW)

  6. A Classification Scheme for Client Problems in Community Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visiting Nurse Association of Omaha, NE.

    This manual describes a classification system for classifying and recording client problems requiring nursing intervention and offers a plan for its implementation. Part 1 discusses the development of the method, described as an orderly arrangement of a nonexhaustive list of client problems diagnosed by nurses. Problems are divided into four…

  7. Making a Case for Client Insistence in Social Work Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarese, Maureen T.; van Nijnatten, Carolus

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the goals of the institution can shape the talk therein. What happens when a client consistently invokes topics and role identities that are outside the parameters of the institution, insisting on his or her own goals and gaining and maintaining a control of the floor usually expected of practitioners? Client power is often…

  8. 37 CFR 11.107 - Conflict of interest; Current clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients. 11.107 Section 11.107 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK...; Current clients. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a practitioner shall...

  9. 37 CFR 11.107 - Conflict of interest; Current clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients. 11.107 Section 11.107 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK...; Current clients. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a practitioner shall...

  10. Unnoticed, Untapped, and Underappreciated: Clients' Perceptions of their Public Defenders.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher; Moore, Janet; Maier, Wesley; Gaffney, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of providing high-quality public defense services continues to be a concern at federal, state, and local levels. Some scholars have alluded to a potential solution in client-centered representation, but research in this area is sparse at best. Such a lack of understanding leaves in its place speculation, particularly as to the potential importance of client perceptions in shaping broader system legitimacy. To fill this gap and create an empirical platform for future research, an exploratory pilot study was launched with the Hamilton County, Ohio Public Defender's Office, which used mixed methodologies to assess client attitudes toward public defenders as a potential resource for aiding the improvement of indigent representation. Findings from this pilot study suggest that there are five factors a public defense attorney should address that may prove to be very important in obtaining client satisfaction and cooperation: engaging the client for input, listening to the client, examining the prosecutor's evidence, focusing on the client's case during meetings, and informing the client of potential consequences. Implications for practice and future research are discussed. PMID:25953463

  11. Reading the Client: Nonverbal Communication as an Interviewing Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Tom H.

    The importance of effective communication skills between lawyers and clients is equalled only by the imperative need for sustained instruction in the development of communicative skills for the lawyer. Especially important are the nonverbal communication skills in "reading the client." The subtleties of intonation, posture, gesture, and eye…

  12. Lawyer-Client Confidentiality in the Campus Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinan, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that the attorney-client privilege of confidentiality may be more important in the case of the university attorney than in the situation of the attorney representing the client as a law firm member. The principle is illustrated in a hypothetical case concerning research fraud. (MSE)

  13. The Challenge of Prejudice: Counsellors' Talk about Challenging Clients' Prejudices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Sheila J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the implications for training and practice of counsellors' responses to the notion of challenging clients' prejudices. It explores tensions in counselling discourse between social responsibility, responsibility to the client and responsibility for one's self as counsellor. Three focus groups of counsellors were asked whether a…

  14. Working In-Vivo with Client Sense of Unlovability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Mavis; Reed, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Clients sometimes react negatively when their in-session problem behavior is simply blocked. This article illustrates how a FAP (Functional Analytic Psychotherapy) therapist can work effectively in session with a client's problem feeling of unlovability by: 1) understanding its antecedents and functions, 2) using therapeutic love to reinforce…

  15. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended to prohibit an attorney or staff attorney...

  16. Client Retrospective Recall of Resolved and Unresolved Misunderstanding Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Renee H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studied client retrospective recall of major misunderstanding events in 19 cases of therapy. Found that good relationship, clients' willingness to assert negative feelings about being misunderstood, and therapists' facilitation of mutual repair effort through maintaining flexible and accepting stance typically led to resolution. (Author/NB)

  17. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended...

  18. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of...

  19. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of...

  20. Client-Controlled Case Information: A General System Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-01-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of…

  1. Working with Clients Who Self-Injure: Providing Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wester, Kelly L.; Trepal, Heather C.

    2005-01-01

    The topic of self-injurious behavior (SIB) has been gaining widespread attention. Although college counselors engage in various types of treatments in order to uncover the underlying reasons for a client's SIB, there is another step in treatment that might be helpful to clients who self-injure. This step involves alternatives to self-injury. The…

  2. Client Suicide: Its Frequency and Impact on Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Charles R. III; Foster, Victoria A.

    2000-01-01

    Study reports the results of a national survey of 1000 professional counselors regarding the frequency and impact of client suicide. Counselors reported having intrusive and avoidant thoughts regarding the crisis that were higher than those of either psychologists or psychiatrists. Results indicate that the effects of client suicide have…

  3. Psychologists' Use of Homework Assignments with Clients Who Have Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Frank P.; Glaser, Natalie M.; Oades, Lindsay G.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos

    2005-01-01

    This study explored psychologists' use of homework with clients in general and specifically for clients with schizophrenia. A survey of 48 Australian psychologists confirmed patterns of homework use found in a New Zealand study of practitioners. Ninety-six percent of the Australian psychologists reported using homework and whilst homework was used…

  4. Client Perceptions of the Microcomputer Evaluation and Screening Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordieri, James E.; Musgrave, Jack

    1989-01-01

    Explored rehabilitation clients' (N=75) perceptions of Microcomputer Evaluation and Screening Assessment (MESA). Results showed clients experienced greater enjoyment, but more difficulty, learning how to complete computer exercises than hardware exercises but viewed computer exercises instructions as easier to understand. Observed differences in…

  5. Rehabilitation Counseling Students' Perceptions of Obese Male and Female Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Steven P.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed attitudes of 72 rehabilitation counseling students toward normal to massively obese clients. Participants viewed pictures of clients and read additional information. Results showed students held negative attitudes toward massively obese people, particularly massively obese women, who were more likely to be perceived as needing…

  6. 31 CFR 10.28 - Return of client's records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Return of client's records. 10.28 Section 10.28 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice Before the Internal Revenue Service § 10.28 Return of client's records. (a)...

  7. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice Before the Internal Revenue Service § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission....

  8. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  9. Factors Assisting Female Clients' Disclosure of Incest during Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Gilda S.; Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1987-01-01

    Explored specific behaviors and characteristics of counselors that relate to adult, female clients' disclosure of incest during counseling. Suggests that factors related to initial disclosure and exploration of incest are client readiness, direct questioning by the counselor, specific counselor characteristics, and positive counselor reactions to…

  10. Implications of Client Demands for R&E Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGranahan, Pamela

    Potential clients for centralized school district organizations with formal responsibilities for research and evaluation include societies, federal and state governments, boards of education, superintendents, other administrators, principals, and teachers. Not all clients are equal. An historical review of the evaluation literature supports the…

  11. Integrating Social and Traditional Media in the Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, James; Hicks, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Based on a client project assigned to students in two undergraduate business classes, this article argues that social media learning is best done in a context that mixes social media with more traditional kinds of media. Ideally, this approach will involve teams of students who are working on different aspects of a larger client project. This…

  12. Counselor Cognitive Complexity Effects on Counselor-Client Interaction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Edward J.; Lichtenberg, James W.

    Assuming that counseling is an interlocking system of mutual influence and that the effect of various counselor/client responses on the behavior of the other is probabilistic, then it becomes important to understand what categories of factors contribute to the probabilistic tendencies of counselor and client to respond in different ways. One…

  13. Do Organizational Culture and Climate Matter for Successful Client Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver Wolf, David A. Patterson; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene; Cristalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The existing literature on the impact of workplace conditions on client care suggests that good cultures and climates provide the best outcomes for clients. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and climate and the proportion of children and youth successfully discharged…

  14. Alienation: A Concept for Understanding Low-Income, Urban Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    The author examines the concept of alienation and how it can be used to understand low-income, urban clients. A description is presented of 4 dimensions of alienation: powerlessness, meaninglessness, normlessness, and social isolation. Case illustrations are provided, and recommendations are made for counseling alienated clients. This article…

  15. Thin Clients: Anwendungsvirtualisierung (SBC) oder Desktop-Virtualisierung?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lamp, Frank

    Mit Thin Clients lassen sich verschiedene auf Virtualisierung basierende Infrastrukturen unterstützen, die jeweils unterschiedliche Vor- und Nachteile besitzen. Dieser Beitrag stellt die wichtigsten Vor- und Nachteile von Server Based Computing und Desktop-Virtualisierung mit Thin Clients gegenüber.

  16. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  17. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  18. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  19. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  20. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  1. Counseling with Methadone Clients: A Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.; Powers, Henrietta B.

    1978-01-01

    A review of studies on counseling with methadone clients affirmed the importance of counseling services. Support was found for analytic therapy, T-group therapy, behavioral training, reality therapy, and family therapy. There was evidence of client resistance to group therapy. (Author)

  2. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  3. Professional Value Conflicts in Forcing Services on Resistant Older Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Christopher L.

    Clinicians who work with at-risk older adults are often faced with the difficult decision to override their client's civil rights and force institutionalization. Many times the professional is pressured by police or a housing manager to "just do something" with the judgmentally impaired older client. Clinicians faced with these decisions may…

  4. Client and Therapist Views about Intensive and Standard Motivational Interviewing

    PubMed Central

    Polcin, Douglas L.; Sterling, Jennifer; Brown, Thomas; Brown, Michelle; Buscemi, Raymond; Korcha, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Although motivational interviewing (MI) is a widely used intervention for alcohol and drug problems, little is known about client and therapist experiences. Client and therapist views could help better understand how MI works and what factors are important. This paper investigates experiences of clients and therapists who participated in a study that examined a standard single session of MI (MI 1) and a more intensive 9-session model (MI 9) for methamphetamine dependence. Qualitative methods included open ended questions presented to 184 clients at 2-month follow-up and 189 clients at 6-month follow-up. In addition, a focus group consisting of two therapists who delivered the interventions and two adherence monitors who listened to audiotape recordings of sessions was conducted. Clients in both conditions felt supportive, nonjudgmental therapist attitudes were helpful. Most clients in the MI 9 condition but few receiving MI 1 volunteered that feedback and advice were helpful. A strong majority in both conditions desired more sessions. Expert panel members emphasized: 1) multiple benefits of a nonjudgmental stance, 2) finding the right balance among different MI interventions, and 3) understanding the interaction of supportive and directive interventions. Panel members also emphasized that one advantages of MI 9 over MI 1 was that it enabled client change plans to be implemented over time. PMID:26185335

  5. Learning Creativity in the Client-Agency Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Taewon; Jung, Jae C.; Smith, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate creativity-related determinants of learning in the context of business-to-business services and client-agency relationships. Design/methodology/approach: The research model includes client encouragement, agency creativity, campaign creativity, and perceived performance. The study involved conducting a…

  6. General and Specific Psychotherapy Role Induction with Substance Abusing Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Michael J.; Kane, Barbara J.

    Successful outcome in psychotherapy depends, in part, on clients' preconceptions and expectations. Research has shown that inaccurate expectations are more prevalent among lower socioeconomic status clients, who also represent the majority of substance abusers in community treatment programs. To investigate the effect of general and specific…

  7. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  8. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  9. Facet Analysis of the Client Needs Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancer, L. Suzanne; Stanley, Lawrence R.

    The structure of the revised Client Needs Assessment Instrument (CNAI) is examined. In 1978-79, the Texas Department of Human Resources (DHR) developed the CNAI to provide an index of applicants' and clients' capacity for self-care by measuring the respondents' levels of functioning in: (1) physical health; (2) daily living activities; (3) mental…

  10. Facilitating the Job Search for Special Needs Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Carolyn C.

    It is the work of the job search counselor/facilitator to educate, mentor, and guide the special needs client in identifying and tackling anything that would encumber the job hunter. The purpose of this paper is to provide information to the job search counselor that will enable him/her to fully and skillfully assist the special needs client in…

  11. Client and service characteristics associated with addiction treatment completion of clients with co-occurring disorders.

    PubMed

    Mangrum, Laurel F

    2009-10-01

    The study examines client and service characteristics of addiction treatment completers and non-completers with co-occurring disorders (COD). On demographic variables, completers were more likely to be male and homeless. In the psychiatric domain, a greater proportion of completers received diagnoses of depression and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas non-completers were more often diagnosed with bipolar disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. No group differences were found in client-reported psychiatric symptom severity; however, non-completers were rated by clinicians as having more severe symptoms in the areas of interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and hostility. In the area of substance use patterns, no differences were found in primary substance of abuse but completers reported more days of use during the month prior to treatment. Completers also had a greater history of both prior detox and non-detox treatment. At discharge, completers achieved higher rates of past month abstinence and AA attendance, but no differences were found in length of stay in treatment. Examination of recovery support services utilization revealed that completers more often received peer mentoring services. Greater proportions of the non-completer group received educational support, clothing, medical care, and employment assistance. These results suggest that future studies are needed in examining possible differential treatment response by diagnostic category and the potential role of peer mentoring in enhancing addiction treatment completion of COD clients. PMID:19303219

  12. A Comparison Between Publish-and-Subscribe and Client-Server Models in Distributed Control System Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard P., Jr.; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Stagnaro, Mike; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The BIO-Plex control system requires real-time, flexible, and reliable data delivery. There is no simple "off-the-shelf 'solution. However, several commercial packages will be evaluated using a testbed at ARC for publish- and-subscribe and client-server communication architectures. Point-to-point communication architecture is not suitable for real-time BIO-Plex control system. Client-server architecture provides more flexible data delivery. However, it does not provide direct communication among nodes on the network. Publish-and-subscribe implementation allows direct information exchange among nodes on the net, providing the best time-critical communication. In this work Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) from Real-Time Innovations, Inc. ARTIE will be used to implement publish-and subscribe architecture. It offers update guarantees and deadlines for real-time data delivery. Bridgestone, a data acquisition and control software package from National Instruments, will be tested for client-server arrangement. A microwave incinerator located at ARC will be instrumented with a fieldbus network of control devices. BridgeVIEW will be used to implement an enterprise server. An enterprise network consisting of several nodes at ARC and a WAN connecting ARC and RISC will then be setup to evaluate proposed control system architectures. Several network configurations will be evaluated for fault tolerance, quality of service, reliability and efficiency. Data acquired from these network evaluation tests will then be used to determine preliminary design criteria for the BIO-Plex distributed control system.

  13. Relating Counselor Attributes to Client Engagement in England

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, D. Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Joe, George W.; Best, David; Day, Ed; Campbell, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Client functioning and treatment engagement were examined in relation to staff attributes and organizational climate across a diverse sample of drug treatment and outreach programs in England. Self-rating assessments were obtained from 1,539 clients and 439 counselors representing 44 programs, and results were interpreted using comparable data from studies of treatment programs in the United States. Client scores on treatment participation and counseling rapport in England were directly related to their higher levels of motivation and psychosocial functioning, as well as to staff ratings of professional attributes and program atmosphere. By linking records from English clients with their counselors in each program, findings also indicate these relationships are rooted in the personal interactions between clients and their counselor. Standardized assessments of treatment structure, process, and performance used across therapeutic settings and national boundaries show there is generalizability in the pattern of clinical dynamics, including the relationships between organizational functioning and quality of services. PMID:18835675

  14. The Impact of Organizational Stress and Burnout on Client Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Landrum, Brittany; Knight, Danica K.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of organizational attributes on client engagement within substance abuse treatment. Previous research has identified organizational features, including small size, accreditation, and workplace practices that impact client engagement (Broome, Flynn, Knight, & Simpson, 2007). The current study sought to explore how aspects of the work environment impact client engagement. The sample included 89 programs located in 9 states across the U.S. Work environment measures included counselor perceptions of stress, burnout, and work satisfaction at each program, while engagement measures included client ratings of participation, counseling rapport, and treatment satisfaction. Using multiple regression, tests of moderation and mediation revealed that staff stress negatively predicted client participation in treatment. Burnout was related to stress, but was not related to participation. Two additional organizational measures – workload and influence – moderated the positive relationship between staff stress and burnout. Implications for drug treatment programs are discussed. PMID:22154029

  15. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    PubMed

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs. PMID:24605071

  16. Client Adherence to Asian Cultural Values, Common Factors in Counseling, and Session Outcome with Asian American Clients at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.; Ng, Gladys F.; Ahn, Annie J.

    2009-01-01

    Based on data from 61 Asian American clients at a university counseling center, the study found that client-perceived match on client-counselor belief about problem etiology was related to counselor credibility, empathy, and cross-cultural competence; the client-counselor working alliance; session depth; and the likelihood of the client…

  17. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 3: Serving Clients with Client/Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on client/server issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "The Realities of Client/Server Development and Implementation" (Mary Ann Carr and Alan Hartwig), which examines Carnegie Mellon University's transition to…

  18. 77 FR 67804 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Application for Client Assistance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Application for Client Assistance Program... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Application for Client Assistance Program... request funds to establish and carry out Client Assistance Programs (CAP). CAP is mandated by...

  19. Negotiating: experiences of community nurses when contracting with clients.

    PubMed

    Duiveman, Trudie; Bonner, Ann

    2012-04-01

    A community nurse is required to have excellent interpersonal, teaching, collaborative and clinical skills in order to develop effective individualised client care contracts. Using a descriptive qualitative design data was collected from two focus groups of fourteen community nurses to explore the issues surrounding negotiating and contracting client care contracts from the perspective of community nurses. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: 'assessment of needs', 'education towards enablement', and 'negotiation'. 'Assessment of needs' identified that community nurses assess both the client's requirements for health care as well as the ability of the nurse to provide that care. 'Education towards enablement' described that education of the client is a common strategy used by community nurses to establish realistic goals of health care as part of developing an ongoing care plan. The final theme, 'negotiation', involved an informed agreement between the client and the community nurse which forms the origin of the care contract that will direct the partnership between the client and the nurse. Of importance for community nurses is that development of successful person-centred care contracts requires skillful negotiation of care that strikes the balance between the needs of the client and the ability of the nurse to meet those needs. PMID:22724913

  20. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

    2013-12-01

    'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited. PMID:23217061

  1. Remembering and diagnosing clients: does experience matter?

    PubMed

    Witteman, Cilia L M; Tollenaar, Marieke S

    2012-01-01

    Experienced mental health clinicians often do not outperform novices in diagnostic decision making. In this paper we look for an explanation of this phenomenon by testing differences in memory processes. In two studies we aimed to look at differences in accuracy of diagnoses in relation to free recall of client information between mental health clinicians with different levels of experience. Clinicians were presented with two cases, and were asked afterwards, either directly (Study 1) or after 1 week (Study 2), to give the appropriate diagnoses and to write down what they remembered of the cases. We found in Study 1 that the accuracy of the diagnoses was the same for all levels of experience, as was the amount of details recalled. Very experienced clinicians did remember more higher-order concepts, that is, abstractions from the presented information. In Study 2 we found that the very experienced clinicians were less accurate in their diagnoses and remembered fewer details than the novices. In response to these findings we further discuss their implications for psychodiagnostic practice. PMID:22360789

  2. The Impact of Comprehensive Case Management on HIV Client Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brennan-Ing, Mark; Seidel, Liz; Rodgers, Leslie; Ernst, Jerome; Wirth, Doug; Tietz, Daniel; Morretti, Antonio; Karpiak, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    In 1990, New York State instituted Comprehensive Medicaid Case Management, also known as Target Case Management (TCM), for people dealing with multiple comorbid conditions, including HIV. The goal of TCM is to assist clients in navigating the health care system to increase care engagement and treatment adherence for individuals with complex needs. HIV-positive individuals engaged in care are more likely to be virally suppressed, improving clinical outcomes and decreasing chances of HIV transmission. The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of TCM management on outcomes for people with HIV. Data were obtained from Amida Care, which operates not-for-profit managed care Medicaid and Medicare Special Needs Plans (SNPs) for HIV clients. Changes in clinical, cost, as well as medical and pharmacy utilization data among TCM clients were examined between January 2011 through September 2012 from the start of case management enrollment through the end of the study period (i.e., up to 6 months after disenrollment). Additionally, CD4 counts were compared between Amida Care TCM clients and non-TCM clients. Notable findings include increased CD4 counts for TCM clients over the one-year study period, achieving parity with non-TCM clients (i.e., Mean CD4 count > 500). When looking exclusively at TCM clients, there were increases in medication costs over time, which were concomitant with increased care engagement. Current findings demonstrate that TCM is able to achieve its goals of improving care engagement and treatment adherence. Subsequent policy changes resulting from the Affordable Care Act and the New York State Medicaid Redesign have made the Health Home the administrator of TCM services. Government entities charged with securing and managing TCM and care coordination for people with HIV should provide thoughtful and reasonable guidance and oversight in order to maintain optimal clinical outcomes for TCM clients and reduce the transmission of HIV. PMID:26849561

  3. The Impact of Comprehensive Case Management on HIV Client Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Leslie; Ernst, Jerome; Wirth, Doug; Morretti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In 1990, New York State instituted Comprehensive Medicaid Case Management, also known as Target Case Management (TCM), for people dealing with multiple comorbid conditions, including HIV. The goal of TCM is to assist clients in navigating the health care system to increase care engagement and treatment adherence for individuals with complex needs. HIV-positive individuals engaged in care are more likely to be virally suppressed, improving clinical outcomes and decreasing chances of HIV transmission. The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of TCM management on outcomes for people with HIV. Data were obtained from Amida Care, which operates not-for-profit managed care Medicaid and Medicare Special Needs Plans (SNPs) for HIV clients. Changes in clinical, cost, as well as medical and pharmacy utilization data among TCM clients were examined between January 2011 through September 2012 from the start of case management enrollment through the end of the study period (i.e., up to 6 months after disenrollment). Additionally, CD4 counts were compared between Amida Care TCM clients and non-TCM clients. Notable findings include increased CD4 counts for TCM clients over the one-year study period, achieving parity with non-TCM clients (i.e., Mean CD4 count > 500). When looking exclusively at TCM clients, there were increases in medication costs over time, which were concomitant with increased care engagement. Current findings demonstrate that TCM is able to achieve its goals of improving care engagement and treatment adherence. Subsequent policy changes resulting from the Affordable Care Act and the New York State Medicaid Redesign have made the Health Home the administrator of TCM services. Government entities charged with securing and managing TCM and care coordination for people with HIV should provide thoughtful and reasonable guidance and oversight in order to maintain optimal clinical outcomes for TCM clients and reduce the transmission of HIV. PMID:26849561

  4. The AROW Health Link experience with client-based system design.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    This article outlines the experience of the Arnprior Region & Ottawa West (AROW) Health Link using a multi-dimensional engagement framework in the co-development of systems change with client representatives. The article outlines patient, organizational, and societal factors influencing client engagement. The key learning that has allowed the joint Client Engagement Committee to evolve has been the core of client leadership. Client-led tables and workgroups have fueled client-to-client engagement, which has shifted clients from being a part of the change to driving the change. PMID:27576856

  5. Social work with dying and bereaved clients: helping the workers.

    PubMed

    Davidson, K W; Foster, Z

    1995-01-01

    This paper considers the stresses and satisfactions experienced by health care social workers as they help clients with grief and loss at a time of great fiscal restraint. Their clients face life-threatening illnesses such as AIDS and many forms of cancer. There are untimely losses in families and communities whose resources are dwindling. As social workers confront struggles with death and bereavement, they may receive limited support to deal with these stresses in their work. The authors suggest administrative strategies both to help workers reduce stress and increase satisfactions and to demonstrate the value of social work services to dying and bereaved clients along a continuum of health care. PMID:8560366

  6. Teaching accountability: using client feedback to train effective family therapists.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Jacqueline A; Kisler, Tiffani S; Adams, Jerome F; Blumen, Dale G

    2011-10-01

    The AAMFT Task Force on Core Competencies (Nelson et al., 2007) proposed that marriage and family therapy (MFT) educators teach and provide evidence of trainee competence beyond coursework and accrued clinical hours. This article describes the integration of a systematic client feedback protocol into an MFT-accredited program's curricula to address the call for outcome-based learning. Outcome management (OM) provides a framework for teaching and assessing trainee effectiveness. Continuous incorporation of client feedback embodies collaborative, strengths-based, integrative, and diversity-centered program values. Students learn a system for being accountable to clients, the profession, and service communities. PMID:22007779

  7. Secure thin client architecture for DICOM image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogatala, Harsha V. R.; Gallet, Jacqueline

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a concept of Secure Thin Client (STC) Architecture for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image analysis over Internet. STC Architecture provides in-depth analysis and design of customized reports for DICOM images using drag-and-drop and data warehouse technology. Using a personal computer and a common set of browsing software, STC can be used for analyzing and reporting detailed patient information, type of examinations, date, Computer Tomography (CT) dose index, and other relevant information stored within the images header files as well as in the hospital databases. STC Architecture is three-tier architecture. The First-Tier consists of drag-and-drop web based interface and web server, which provides customized analysis and reporting ability to the users. The Second-Tier consists of an online analytical processing (OLAP) server and database system, which serves fast, real-time, aggregated multi-dimensional data using OLAP technology. The Third-Tier consists of a smart algorithm based software program which extracts DICOM tags from CT images in this particular application, irrespective of CT vendor's, and transfers these tags into a secure database system. This architecture provides Winnipeg Regional Health Authorities (WRHA) with quality indicators for CT examinations in the hospitals. It also provides health care professionals with analytical tool to optimize radiation dose and image quality parameters. The information is provided to the user by way of a secure socket layer (SSL) and role based security criteria over Internet. Although this particular application has been developed for WRHA, this paper also discusses the effort to extend the Architecture to other hospitals in the region. Any DICOM tag from any imaging modality could be tracked with this software.

  8. Verbal Response Mode Use by Clients in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, William B.; Sultan, Faye E.

    1979-01-01

    Verbal behavior in transcripts of psychotherapy was coded according to Stile's taxonomy of verbal response modes. Therapists of different theoretical persuasions used different mixtures of verbal techniques. Common elements that make verbal interaction psychologically therapeutic lie in client behavior. (Author)

  9. Development and evaluation of the Active Treatment Client Rights Checklist.

    PubMed

    Gross, E J; Maguire, K B; Shepard, S M; Piersel, W C

    1994-01-01

    The role of active treatment has been recognized as vital to the habilitation of persons with mental retardation; however, evaluating the provision of active treatment has been difficult. This study describes the development of the Active Treatment Client Rights checklist (ATCR), which was designed to facilitate the assessment, monitoring, and implementation of readily observable client active treatment services. This investigation provides an explanation of item content, initial reliability data (Phase I), and the results of implementation of the ATCR over a 2-year period in an ICF/MR facility with 29 living units serving nearly 500 clients (Phase II). The ATCR is highly reliable, valid, and useful in enhancing staff provision of active treatment. The most sensitive indicator of active treatment was shown to be related to frequency of functional interactions between clients and staff. PMID:8190969

  10. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  11. Reflections on the Development of Patron-Client Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melick-Barthelmess, Karin

    1985-01-01

    The development of the institution of clientage is traced from ancient Rome to modern times. The patron-client relationships in the hierarchical nature of society and institutions in Spain and Latin America are specifically examined. (RM)

  12. Dislikable Clients or Countertransference: A Clinician’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    LINN-WALTON, REBECCA; PARDASANI, MANOJ

    2015-01-01

    Dislike of one’s clients is a problem many clinicians encounter and it can have a drastic negative impact on client-clinician rapport, as well as the intervention outcome. Reasons for dislike can be varied and are not clearly known, as little research has been done on the topic. The purpose of this pilot study was to begin to understand how clinicians experience and navigate dislike for clients in practice. The study yielded critical information regarding the factors that influence dislike and the coping skills utilized by practitioners to counter or ameliorate such feelings. Recommendations for practitioners are provided, including a better understanding of feelings of dislike for one’s client outside of the countertransference framework of understanding. PMID:25798024

  13. Ulysses directives in The Netherlands: opinions of psychiatrists and clients.

    PubMed

    Varekamp, I

    2004-12-01

    In this article we present a study on the opinions of Dutch psychiatrists and clients on Ulysses directives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 clients and 17 psychiatrists. Most respondents were proponents of Ulysses directives. The most frequently mentioned objective of these directives was to secure timely admission to hospital, although a large minority was mainly interested in giving patients influence on treatment decisions. Psychiatrists differed on how much autonomy they preferred with regard to decisions about the moment of admission and kind of treatment. Clients also differed in this respect. Pressure from others to execute a Ulysses directive, and premature admission to the hospital were mentioned as risks of Ulysses directives. Crisis cards were seen as an alternative by many psychiatrists and some clients. Recommendations are made for a good functioning of Ulysses directives, and the appropriateness of crisis cards as an alternative for a number of patients is discussed. PMID:15488996

  14. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitonyak, Jennifer S.; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy’s rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy’s perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy’s research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  15. Influence of organizational functioning on client engagement in treatment.

    PubMed

    Greener, Jack M; Joe, George W; Simpson, D Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A; Lehman, Wayne E K

    2007-09-01

    This study focused on the relationship between organizational functioning factors measured in a staff survey using the Texas Christian University (TCU) Organizational Readiness for Change assessment and client-level engagement measured by the TCU Client Evaluation of Self and Treatment in drug treatment programs. The sample consisted of 531 clinical and counseling staff and 3,475 clients from 163 substance abuse treatment programs located in nine states from three regional Addiction Technology Transfer Centers. Measures of client engagement in treatment (rapport, satisfaction, and participation) were shown to be higher in programs with more positive staff ratings of organizational functioning. In particular, these programs had fewer agency needs and more favorable ratings for their resources, staff attributes, and climate. These findings help establish the importance of addressing organizational factors as part of an overall strategy for improving treatment effectiveness. PMID:17433863

  16. Voice and Communication Therapy for Transgender/Transsexual Clients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Voice and Communication Therapy for Clients Who Are Transgender and/or ... transgender/transsexual may elect to have voice and communication therapy to help them use their voice in ...

  17. Difficult Cases in Career Counseling. Part II: The Indecisive Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    Argues that undecided students and indecisive clients should be clearly distinguished and that, generally, younger persons should not be categorized as indecisive. Following an exposition of the common characteristics of indecisive adults, offers several recommendations for counseling such persons. (Author)

  18. Family therapist comfort with and willingness to discuss client sexuality.

    PubMed

    Harris, Steven M; Hays, Kelli Wenner

    2008-04-01

    Limited empirical information exists on whether or not marriage and family therapists are having sexuality-related discussions with their clients. When helping professionals ignore client sexuality, the potential for unintended negative outcomes increases. The researchers surveyed 175 clinical members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy to assess how their clinical training and education, their perceived sexual knowledge, and their comfort with sexual material influenced their willingness to engage in sexuality-related discussions with their clients. The results indicate that sexuality education and supervision experiences are the cornerstone for a therapist's base level of comfort. It is through sexuality education and supervision that sex knowledge is acquired and comfort levels are increased. Once comfort with sexual discussions increases, then therapists are more likely to engage in sexuality discussions with their clients. PMID:18412829

  19. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is client-server.'' There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  20. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is ``client-server.`` There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  1. Substance abuse treatment client experience in an employed population: results of a client survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding client perspectives on treatment is increasingly recognized as key to improving care. Yet information on the perceptions and experiences of workers with private insurance coverage who receive help for substance use conditions is relatively sparse, particularly in managed behavioral health care organization (MBHO) populations. Furthermore, the role of several factors including prior service use has not been fully explored. Methods Employees covered by a large MBHO who had received substance abuse services in the past year were surveyed (146 respondents completed the telephone survey and self-reported service use). Results The most common reasons for entering treatment were problems with health; home, family or friends; or work. Prior treatment users reported more reasons for entering treatment and more substance use-related work impairment. The majority of all respondents felt treatment helped a lot or some. One quarter reported getting less treatment than they felt they needed. Discussion and conclusions Study findings point to the need to tailor treatment for prior service users and to recognize the role of work in treatment entry and outcomes. Perceived access issues may be present even among insured clients already in treatment. PMID:22251622

  2. Violence or discipline? Working with multicultural court-ordered clients.

    PubMed

    Waldman, F

    1999-10-01

    Therapists working with court-ordered clients from cultures differing from the mainstream face challenging issues of compulsory therapy in the context of cultural diversity. This article reviews the literature on court-ordered and multicultural counseling, highlighting central elements of both. It then suggests guidelines that blend these elements. The author illustrates how using these guidelines can enable therapists to engage these clients in the therapeutic process and focus on culture as the context for change. PMID:10553563

  3. The Client Server Design of the Gemini Data Handling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Norman; Gaudet, Séverin; Dunn, Jennifer; Jaeger, Shannon; Cockayne, Steve

    The Gemini Telescopes Data Handling System (DHS) developed by the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) has diverse requirements to support the operation of the Gemini telescopes. The DHS is implemented as a group of servers, where each performs separate functions. The servers use a client server model to communicate between themselves and with other Gemini software systems. This paper describes the client server model of the Gemini Data Handling System.

  4. Engaging Client's Family and Friends in Online Counseling.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Haack, Mary R; Dill, Robert; Harge, Angela

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes how online counseling can be used to engage family members in the recovery of clients. The counselor guides the client and the family member separately through the stages of change, helping them commit to joint action. Each participant thinks through his/her concerns and the advantages of getting involved, each makes a specific commitment to working together under the guidance of the counselor. Finally each celebrates, with specific rituals, their decision to work together. Once the client and the family members commit to working together, the counselor guides them through the stages of change as a group. In the pre-contemplation stage, the family members are taught the goals of working together and the procedures to avoid dysfunctional conflict. In the contemplation phase, the client and the family members examine the shared environment and its links to target behavior. In the commitment to action stage, the client and the family members decide on specific changes in their shared environment. In the maintenance phase, the client and the family members analyze if the change has led to improvements. They analyze relapses and make additional cycles of improvement. PMID:19997537

  5. Client-centred ADL intervention after stroke: Occupational therapists' experiences.

    PubMed

    Ranner, Maria; von Koch, Lena; Guidetti, Susanne; Tham, Kerstin

    2016-03-01

    Background This study was conducted in the context of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of a client-centred activities in daily living intervention (CADL). The aim of the CADL was to enable agency in daily activities and participation in everyday life among persons with stroke. Objective This qualitative, longitudinal study aimed to describe how occupational therapists (OTs) applied the CADL in their clinical practice by studying their experiences and reflections concerning their interaction with the clients with stroke. Methods Six OTs who conducted the CADL were followed through interviews and observations on four separate occasions over one year. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results Sharing was the core category showing how the OTs helped their clients to achieve agency in daily activities. Through sharing the situation the OTs strove to obtain an empathetic understanding of the clients' lived experience throughout the whole intervention process in order to enable the clients' ownership of their daily activities. Conclusion The continuity of sharing seems to be the key for a gradual increase in agency. The approach of sharing should preferably be applied by all members of the interprofessional team, including the client and significant others. PMID:26654956

  6. NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

    2011-03-28

    developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

  7. Maximising health literacy and client recall of clinical information: an exploratory study of clients and speech-language pathologists.

    PubMed

    von Wühlisch, Friderike Schmidt; Pascoe, Michelle

    2010-12-01

    Limited research has been carried out in the field of speech-language pathology with regard to ways of maximising health literacy and client recall. However, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) frequently provide vast amounts of information that clients need to understand, apply and review in order to manage their (or their child's) health. This exploratory study aimed to contribute information about ways in which SLPs can overcome low health literacy and poor client recall so that treatment effectiveness is improved. A case-study design was used with specific focus on four clients receiving treatment for dysphagia, voice disorders (including laryngectomies) and cleft lip and/or palate management in Cape Town. Strategies which may be able to maximise health literacy and client recall of clinical information were trialled and evaluated by clients and their SLPs, using semi-structured interviews. The researchers proposed a combination of high-tech strategies which assisted in all the cases. No single solution or universal tool was found that would be appropriate for all. There is a need to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of the combined strategies across a wider population, at different stages of rehabilitation and in diverse contexts. Implications and suggestions for future related research are presented. PMID:21329263

  8. H3+: superficies de energía potencial, estados y transiciones rovibracionales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, M. Paniagua Y. A.

    Hemos calculado varias superficies globales de energía potencial para el estado fundamental y excitados del sistema H3+ en más de ocho mil geometrías diferentes usando una base (9s 3p 1d)/[4s 3p 1d] en cada átomo de Hidrógeno y mediante un método de cálculo de interacción de configuraciones completa (FCI). Hemos ajustado las superficies a formas analíticas del tipo Aguado y Paniagua con un error promedio menor de 50 cm-1 y menor en el pozo de potencial del estado fundamental. Finalmente hemos calculado y analizado los niveles vibracionales para los dos estados electrónicos más bajos, siendo la desviación respecto de los mejores valores publicados, tanto experimentales como teóricos, de unos pocos números de onda.

  9. Counselor-Client Diagnostic Agreement and Perceived Outcomes of Counseling: A Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of congruity of counselor and client diagnoses upon client-perceived success in counseling. The Missouri Diagnostic Classification Plan (MDCP) was used as the basic diagnostic method. Agreement in the 15 categories was related to client-perceived success of counseling. Subjects, all clients at the…

  10. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  11. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  12. 42 CFR 483.450 - Condition of participation: Client behavior and facility practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... (3) Clients must not discipline other clients, except as part of an organized system of self...) Address the extent to which client choice will be accommodated in daily decision-making, emphasizing self-determination and self-management, to the extent possible; (iii) Specify client conduct to be allowed or...

  13. Meeting the Needs of Clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder: Considerations for Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringrose, Jo L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychotherapy for clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is different to therapy with most clients because these clients are multiple, comprising one or more host, and one or more alter personalities. The necessary components to be addressed in order that clients can live successfully either as a multiple or as an integrated person are…

  14. Male Therapists' Clinical Bias: Influence of Client Gender Roles and Therapist Gender Role Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisch, Andrew F.; Mahalik, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Examines male therapists' gender-role conflict, client sexual orientation, and client emotional expression as they interrelate with clinical judgments about male clients. Results indicate that therapist gender-role-conflict factors, in combination with client sexual orientation and emotional expression, were associated with therapists' ratings of…

  15. 75 FR 1455 - Custody of Funds or Securities of Clients by Investment Advisers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... accountant to verify client assets; to have the qualified custodian maintaining client funds and securities send account statements directly to the advisory clients; and unless client assets are maintained by an... receive from a related person, a report of the internal controls relating to the custody of those...

  16. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  17. 37 CFR 10.68 - Avoiding influence by others than the client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... than the client. 10.68 Section 10.68 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... the client. (a) Except with the consent of the practitioner's client after full disclosure, a practitioner shall not: (1) Accept compensation from one other than the practitioner's client for...

  18. 34 CFR 377.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client... PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM General § 377.1 What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program? The Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program is designed...

  19. The Contribution of the Counselor-Client Working Alliance to Career Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elad-Strenger, Julia; Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of Israeli counselors' and clients' ratings of their working alliance on clients' career exploration (CE), using a sample of 94 three-session career counseling processes. Results reveal that both clients' and counselors' working alliance ratings increased over time; yet, clients' ratings remained…

  20. Social Cognitive Variables in the Prediction of Client Motivation and Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniele A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined client motivation and attrition from counseling among 139 clients. Found that self-efficacy and outcome expectations each explained unique variation in motivation, beyond client and counselor background variables; self-efficacy and motivation each contributed to prediction of client return status after intake interview; and self-efficacy…

  1. 49 CFR 1103.19 - Advising upon the merits of a client's cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advising upon the merits of a client's cause. 1103... Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.19 Advising upon the merits of a client's cause. A practitioner shall try to obtain full knowledge of his client's cause before advising...

  2. 37 CFR 10.65 - Limiting business relations with a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with a client. 10.65 Section 10.65 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... a client. A practitioner shall not enter into a business transaction with a client if they have differing interests therein and if the client expects the practitioner to exercise professional...

  3. Real Language Meets Real Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Muirhead; Schechter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Real Business Language Challenge was a collaborative pilot project between Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) and Routes into Languages East for Year 9 and 10 pupils. It was based on CCE's award-winning Real Business Challenge, part of its highly acclaimed education programme. The Real Business Language Challenge transformed the project into a…

  4. Request queues for interactive clients in a shared file system of a parallel computing system

    DOEpatents

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin

    2015-08-18

    Interactive requests are processed from users of log-in nodes. A metadata server node is provided for use in a file system shared by one or more interactive nodes and one or more batch nodes. The interactive nodes comprise interactive clients to execute interactive tasks and the batch nodes execute batch jobs for one or more batch clients. The metadata server node comprises a virtual machine monitor; an interactive client proxy to store metadata requests from the interactive clients in an interactive client queue; a batch client proxy to store metadata requests from the batch clients in a batch client queue; and a metadata server to store the metadata requests from the interactive client queue and the batch client queue in a metadata queue based on an allocation of resources by the virtual machine monitor. The metadata requests can be prioritized, for example, based on one or more of a predefined policy and predefined rules.

  5. Real Time Monitor of Grid job executions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colling, D. J.; Martyniak, J.; McGough, A. S.; Křenek, A.; Sitera, J.; Mulač, M.; Dvořák, F.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we describe the architecture and operation of the Real Time Monitor (RTM), developed by the Grid team in the HEP group at Imperial College London. This is arguably the most popular dissemination tool within the EGEE [1] Grid. Having been used, on many occasions including GridFest and LHC inauguration events held at CERN in October 2008. The RTM gathers information from EGEE sites hosting Logging and Bookkeeping (LB) services. Information is cached locally at a dedicated server at Imperial College London and made available for clients to use in near real time. The system consists of three main components: the RTM server, enquirer and an apache Web Server which is queried by clients. The RTM server queries the LB servers at fixed time intervals, collecting job related information and storing this in a local database. Job related data includes not only job state (i.e. Scheduled, Waiting, Running or Done) along with timing information but also other attributes such as Virtual Organization and Computing Element (CE) queue - if known. The job data stored in the RTM database is read by the enquirer every minute and converted to an XML format which is stored on a Web Server. This decouples the RTM server database from the client removing the bottleneck problem caused by many clients simultaneously accessing the database. This information can be visualized through either a 2D or 3D Java based client with live job data either being overlaid on to a 2 dimensional map of the world or rendered in 3 dimensions over a globe map using OpenGL.

  6. Crying as communication in psychotherapy: The influence of client and therapist attachment dimensions and client attachment to therapist on amount and type of crying.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Noah; Hill, Clara E; Kivlighan, Dennis M

    2015-07-01

    Nelson (2005) associated 3 types of crying (inhibited, protest, despair) with 3 dimensions of attachment (avoidant, anxious, and secure). To test this theory, trained judges rated the intensity of inhibition, protest, and despair in 347 crying episodes for 40 clients and 14 therapists in 1,074 psychotherapy sessions. Crying occurred once out of every 7 sessions, and usually was characterized by protest or inhibition. Pre-therapy attachment dimensions of both therapist and client influenced crying. Therapists with high attachment avoidance had clients who cried frequently but less over time, whereas therapists with high attachment anxiety had clients who cried with more protest over time. Clients with high attachment anxiety initially cried with more protest and inhibition, but decreased over time, whereas clients with low attachment anxiety increased protest over time. Throughout the course of psychotherapy, therapists who were seen by their clients as establishing a secure attachment elicited more overall crying and a higher intensity of protest, whereas therapists who were seen by their clients as establishing insecure attachments had clients who cried less. Clients who established a secure or avoidant relationship with their therapists, relative to other clients of that therapist, cried infrequently and with inhibition, whereas clients who established a preoccupied relationship cried relatively often. Changes are suggested for Nelson's (2005) typology. PMID:26010287

  7. Does Motivational Interviewing (MI) Work with Nonaddicted Clients? A Controlled Study Measuring the Effects of a Brief Training in MI on Client Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tabitha L.; Gutierrez, Daniel; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between motivational interviewing (MI) and client symptoms, attendance, and satisfaction. Seventy-nine clients attending a university-based counseling center were purposefully assigned to treatment or control conditions. Statistical analyses revealed client symptoms in both groups improved. However,…

  8. Web-client based distributed generalization and geoprocessing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, E.B.; Howe, K.

    2009-01-01

    Generalization and geoprocessing operations on geospatial information were once the domain of complex software running on high-performance workstations. Currently, these computationally intensive processes are the domain of desktop applications. Recent efforts have been made to move geoprocessing operations server-side in a distributed, web accessible environment. This paper initiates research into portable client-side generalization and geoprocessing operations as part of a larger effort in user-centered design for the US Geological Survey's The National Map. An implementation of the Ramer-Douglas-Peucker (RDP) line simplification algorithm was created in the open source OpenLayers geoweb client. This algorithm implementation was benchmarked using differing data structures and browser platforms. The implementation and results of the benchmarks are discussed in the general context of client-side geoprocessing. (Abstract).

  9. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  10. Client retention and health among sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2012-12-01

    It is still a small body of research that directly addresses female sex workers' relationships with their regular commercial male partners. I used ethnographic data from Nairobi, Kenya to interrogate motivations and strategies for recruiting and retaining regular male clients among female sex workers (FSWs). Regular commercial male partners, popularly called customer care, wera or wesh by Nairobi's FSWs, played diverse roles in their lives. Client retention enabled sex workers to manage the risk of reduced marriage prospects, guaranteed them steady work, livelihoods, and incomes, and prevented their victimization and harassment. To retain clients, sex workers obliged them a great deal, pretended they had quit prostitution, and sometimes resorted to magical practices. However, these strategies were also accompanied by risks that reinforced the vulnerability of sex workers. Lack of critical attention to sex workers' practices for managing perceived risks in their particular type of work may hamper current programmatic efforts to make their job safer. PMID:22434396

  11. Helpful and unhelpful therapy experiences of LGBT clients.

    PubMed

    Israel, Tania; Gorcheva, Raya; Burnes, Theodore R; Walther, William A

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify a broad range of variables that characterize the helpful and unhelpful therapy experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Interviews were completed with a diverse sample of 42 LGBT individuals who have been in therapy, and a content analysis was conducted. Results indicated that basic counseling skills and relationships were key determinants of the quality of LGBT clients' therapy experiences. Also important to the helpfulness of the therapy experience were therapist variables such as professional background and attitudes toward client sexual orientation/gender identity; client variables such as stage of identity development, health status, and social support; and environmental factors such as confidentiality of the therapy setting. PMID:18815981

  12. Privacy preserving, real-time and location secured biometrics for mCommerce authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuseler, Torben; Al-Assam, Hisham; Jassim, Sabah; Lami, Ihsan A.

    2011-06-01

    Secure wireless connectivity between mobile devices and financial/commercial establishments is mature, and so is the security of remote authentication for mCommerce. However, the current techniques are open for hacking, false misrepresentation, replay and other attacks. This is because of the lack of real-time and current-precise-location in the authentication process. This paper proposes a new technique that includes freshly-generated real-time personal biometric data of the client and present-position of the mobile device used by the client to perform the mCommerce so to form a real-time biometric representation to authenticate any remote transaction. A fresh GPS fix generates the "time and location" to stamp the biometric data freshly captured to produce a single, real-time biometric representation on the mobile device. A trusted Certification Authority (CA) acts as an independent authenticator of such client's claimed realtime location and his/her provided fresh biometric data. Thus eliminates the necessity of user enrolment with many mCommerce services and application providers. This CA can also "independently from the client" and "at that instant of time" collect the client's mobile device "time and location" from the cellular network operator so to compare with the received information, together with the client's stored biometric information. Finally, to preserve the client's location privacy and to eliminate the possibility of cross-application client tracking, this paper proposes shielding the real location of the mobile device used prior to submission to the CA or authenticators.

  13. Understanding the working alliance with clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Oyer, Laura; O'Halloran, Mary Sean; Christoe-Frazier, Liesel

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic working alliance is a vital ingredient of psychotherapy, specifically for clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, as progress is often slow and treatment difficult. This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the experiences of eight clients with anorexia nervosa and seven therapists who work with this population, regarding which therapist factors aided in and challenged the working alliance formation in individual psychotherapy. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews. Some helpful therapist factors included collaboration, appropriate self-disclosure, providing a warm and safe environment, and willingness to be contacted outside of a session. Unhelpful factors included lack of attunement and objectivity and failure to individualize treatment. PMID:25879137

  14. Gerontological social workers' perceived efficacy for influencing client outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bonifas, Robin; Gammonley, Denise; Simons, Kelsey

    2012-01-01

    Using a sample of practitioners (n = 269) from the 2004 National Study of Licensed Social Workers, this article employs a quality assurance structure-process-outcome model to examine factors at the practitioner, workplace, and service delivery levels that influence the perceived efficacy of licensed gerontological social workers to affect client outcomes in the context of a highly challenging health care environment. A regression model accounted for 33.9% of the variance (adjusted R (2) = .291) in perceived efficacy with 3 aspects of service delivery satisfaction having significant effects: ability to address complex/chronic care, to influence the design of services, and to help clients navigate the system. PMID:22852994

  15. Clients or citizens? Some considerations for primary care organisations.

    PubMed Central

    Cawston, Peter G; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2003-01-01

    Health services policy in the United Kingdom has given prominence to patient and public participation within a 'modernization' agenda. The superficial consensus in support of lay participation masks a conflicting array of ideologies and theoretical perspectives that colour how this is interpreted. Both client-oriented perspectives and citizenship-oriented approaches are limited by the dynamics of power relationships and decision-making processes within National Health Service structures. Primary care organisations offer the possibility of developing structures for providing closer collaboration between citizens and services. In order to achieve this, however, vague processes of client representation need to be replaced by robust community-based participatory action research models. PMID:15103881

  16. Real-time flight test data distribution and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesel, Michael C.; Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    Enhancements to the real-time processing and display systems of the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range are described. Display processing has been moved out of the telemetry and radar acquisition processing systems super-minicomputers into user/client interactive graphic workstations. Real-time data is provided to the workstations by way of Ethernet. Future enhancement plans include use of fiber optic cable to replace the Ethernet.

  17. Real Forestry for Real Estate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Jennifer; Fisher, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Virginia is poised to see an unprecedented change in forest land ownership. To provide new landowners with information on sustainable forest management, we developed a two-part program, Real Forestry for Real Estate. First, we assembled New Landowner Packets, which contain a variety of sustainable forest management resources. Second, two…

  18. Effective Strategies for Nurses Empowering Clients With Schizophrenia: Medication Use as a Tool in Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mahone, Irma H; Maphis, Chris Fasching; Snow, Diane E

    2016-05-01

    Clients with schizophrenia require maintenance treatment with antipsychotic medication and psychosocial therapy to maintain symptom control. Rates of medication adherence or follow-through are low in clients with schizophrenia. This increases the risk of relapse and contributes to poor quality of life. As educators and advisers, psychiatric nurses can collaborate with clients to improve adherence and other outcomes using shared decision-making techniques and tools that engage and empower clients to actively participate in decisions about their treatment. This article outlines effective strategies used by psychiatric nurses to improve outcomes in clients with schizophrenia and uses a case example for demonstrating this strategy in a client with schizophrenia. PMID:27111300

  19. Effective Strategies for Nurses Empowering Clients With Schizophrenia: Medication Use as a Tool in Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mahone, Irma H.; Maphis, Chris Fasching; Snow, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Clients with schizophrenia require maintenance treatment with antipsychotic medication and psychosocial therapy to maintain symptom control. Rates of medication adherence or follow-through are low in clients with schizophrenia. This increases the risk of relapse and contributes to poor quality of life. As educators and advisers, psychiatric nurses can collaborate with clients to improve adherence and other outcomes using shared decision-making techniques and tools that engage and empower clients to actively participate in decisions about their treatment. This article outlines effective strategies used by psychiatric nurses to improve outcomes in clients with schizophrenia and uses a case example for demonstrating this strategy in a client with schizophrenia. PMID:27111300

  20. The client-centred approach as experienced by male neurological rehabilitation clients in occupational therapy. A qualitative study based on a grounded theory tradition.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Dominique; Devisch, Ignaas; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To explore the perspectives of male clients in a neurological rehabilitation setting with regard to the occupational therapy they have received and the client-centred approach. Method This study involved a qualitative research design based on the grounded theory tradition. Individual in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method. Seven male participants from an inpatient neurological setting were included using a theoretical sampling technique. Results Three themes emerged to describe the approach of the therapists to client-centred practice: (a) a shared biomedical focus as the start of the rehabilitation process, (b) the un-simultaneous shift from a biomedical towards a psycho-social focus and (c) formal versus informal nature of gathering client information. Conclusion A client-centred approach entails a shift from the therapist focussing on recovery from the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term consequences of the disease. According to the client, this shift in reasoning must occur at a specific and highly subjective moment during the rehabilitation process. Identifying this moment could strengthen the client-centred approach. Implications for Rehabilitation Client-centred practice entails a shift from recovering the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term psycho-social consequences of the disease. To be effective in client-centred practice, the clients expect from the professional to be an authority with regard to biomedical issues and to be partner with regard to psycho-social issues. Client-centred practice is most likely to be successful when client is susceptible to discuss his psycho-social issues and finding this moment is a challenge for the professional. Using formal methods for goal setting do not necessarily cover all the information needed for a client-centred therapy programme. Rather, using informal methods could lead to a more valid image of the client

  1. 31 CFR 8.34 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 8.34 Section 8.34 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice § 8.34 Knowledge...

  2. Client-Centered Problem-Solving Networks in Complex Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Charles; Hanna, Michael

    Employees in different kinds of organizations were surveyed for their perceptions of their companies' client and operational problem-solving networks. The individuals came from a manufacturing firm, a community college, a telephone company, a farmers' cooperative, and a hospital. Interviews were conducted with those people reporting numerous…

  3. The Concerns about Counseling Racial Minority Clients Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Meifen; Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien; Tsai, Pei-Chun; Botello-Zamarron, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Concerns about Counseling Racial Minority Clients (CCRMC) scale among counselor trainees. Sample 1 was used for an exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Four factors were identified, Managing Cultural Differences ([alpha] = 0.82), Offending or Hurting Clients…

  4. Writing about Clients: Developing Composite Case Material and Its Rationale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Ethical guidelines of the 4 major professional associations representing counselors and psychotherapists are reviewed. To help clarify thinking about writing up clinical cases, 3 kinds of cases are described. The author concludes that the current guidelines for clinician authors in writing about clients for publication or presentation are…

  5. Observation and Recording Effects on Group Therapy Client Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L.; Decker, Robert E.

    This study assesses the effect of visual versus audio observation/recording on both client and therapist verbal and non-verbal behavior in ongoing therapy. Three co-led, therapy groups were studied over six weekly sessions under counterbalanced observation conditions. Measures of verbal behavior, verbal productivity, and non-verbal behavior were…

  6. 42 CFR 485.910 - Condition of participation: Client rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... permitted only in accordance with 45 CFR parts 160 and 164. (4) Be free from mistreatment, neglect, or... of restraint or seclusion used must be the least restrictive intervention that will be effective to... clinical record of the following: (A) A description of the client's behavior and the intervention used....

  7. Concept Mapping the Client's Perspective on Counseling Alliance Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Robinder P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify, categorize, and model clients' understanding of early counseling alliance formation factors. Forty participants who had received counseling services were interviewed and asked about what observable behaviors and verbalizations they thought had helped establish the alliance with their counselor.…

  8. Use of Drama Students as "Clients" in Teaching Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Kirby

    1982-01-01

    Describes the use of drama students to role play subjects of case studies in simulations of standard interviews in a college-level abnormal psychology class. Graduate drama students role-played clients in interviews with instructors or student panels. After the interviews, class discussion covered alternative possible diagnoses and possible…

  9. Undergraduate Role Players as "Clients" for Graduate Counseling Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dana D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes two exercises in which undergraduates from abnormal psychology courses act as role-play clients for graduate counselor-trainees. Finds that the exercises seem to be educationally beneficial and may also help decrease undergraduates' negative stereotyping of persons with psychological problems. (KO)

  10. A Multimodal Approach in Dealing with Older Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikel, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Notes that older persons underuse community-based and outpatient mental health services, yet are overrepresented in inpatient facilities. Argues for increased programing targeted for elderly client. Advocates use of multimodal model as efficient method of service delivery and provides sample case study using BASIC ID (Behavior, Affect, Sensation,…

  11. The network of corporate clients: customer attrition at commercial banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lublóy, Á.; Szenes, M.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial banks might profit from the adoption of methods widely used in network theory. A decision making process might become biased if one disregards network effects within the corporate client portfolio. This paper models the phenomenon of customer attrition by generating a weighted and directed network of corporate clients linked by financial transactions. During the numerical study of the agent-based toy model we demonstrate that multiple steady states may exist. The statistical properties of the distinct steady states show similarities. We show that most companies of the same community choose the same bank in the steady state. In contrast to the case for the steady state of the Barabási-Albert network, market shares in this model equalize by network size. When modeling customer attrition in the network of 3 × 105 corporate clients, none of the companies followed the behavior of the initial switcher in three quarters of the simulations. The number of switchers exceeded 20 in 1% of the cases. In the worst-case scenario a total of 688 companies chose a competitor bank. Significant network effects have been discovered; high correlation prevailed between the degree of the initial switcher and the severity of the avalanche effect. This suggests that the position of the corporate client in the network might be much more important than the underlying properties (industry, size, profitability, etc) of the company.

  12. Simulating the Client's Internal Dialogue as a Counselor Training Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Examines the Triad Training Model for training counselors to better articulate a client's internal dialog during simulated counseling interviews. The theoretical basis for the model is discussed, positive and negative feedback is considered, and supporting research is presented. (Contains 20 references.) (LRW)

  13. Relating Ethnic Identity, Acculturation, and Attitudes toward Treating Minority Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurung, Regan A. R.; Mehta, Vivek

    2001-01-01

    The attitudes of medical students of Indian decent (N=150) toward treating minority clients and using alternative therapies were assessed in relationship to the students' ethnic identity, acculturation, and self-concept. Students with strong ethnic identity and acculturation were more likely to treat minority patients and use alternative…

  14. Art Therapy with Hispanic Clients: Results of a Survey Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermudez, Diana; ter Maat, Mercedes

    2006-01-01

    Despite the growing number of Hispanics in the US and in caseloads of art therapists, previous literature on this topic is scarce and predominantly based on case studies. This survey assessed the perceptions of 27 art therapists from large metropolitan areas regarding the use of art therapy with Hispanic clients. These perceptions included client…

  15. The Realities of Respite for Families, Clients, and Sponsors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dulcy B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Evaluates two respite programs which offer families temporary relief from caring for elderly relatives: an institutional program for those needing constant nursing attention, and a residential plan for those requiring housekeeping and companion services. Benefits for clients, family, and community appear to be indisputable. (Author/ABB)

  16. Clinical Assessment of Dissociative Identity Disorder among College Counseling Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Benjamin; Swanson, Janine E.

    2008-01-01

    College counseling professionals address a wide range of complex student mental health concerns. Among these, accurately identifying client presentations of dissociative identity disorder (DID) can be especially challenging because students with DID sometimes present as if they are experiencing another problem, such as a mood, anxiety, or…

  17. Searching for Mercy Street: Protecting Records after the Client's Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoener, Gary R.

    The duties of a therapist to a deceased client are not directly dealt with in codes of ethics. The issues came into focus following the publication of a biography of Anne Sexton, as it contained information from more than 80 hours of therapy that Ms. Sexton's psychologist released to the biographer. This paper considers the question of whether the…

  18. Personality Processes Reflected in Client Vocal Style and Rorschach Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Laura North; Gaylin, Ned L.

    1973-01-01

    Vocal style was proposed as a useful variable with which to classify groups of clients in order to study the differential effects of various therapeutic maneuvers. Relationships between voice quality ratings in early psychotherapy interviews and pretherapy Rorschach and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory scores were investigated in order…

  19. Client-Server Connection Status Monitoring Using Ajax Push Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamongie, Julien R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how simple client-server connection status monitoring can be implemented using Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), JSF (Java Server Faces) and ICEfaces technologies. This functionality is required for NASA LCS (Launch Control System) displays used in the firing room for the Constellation project. Two separate implementations based on two distinct approaches are detailed and analyzed.

  20. Learning from Clients: Counseling the Frail and Dying Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, James T.

    1984-01-01

    Contends that experience with a frail or dying client is a learning opportunity for the counselor. Presents several examples illustrating the reactions of the elderly to approaching death and suggests that successful counselors accept their own mortality and acknowledge the decision of the failing elderly that death is near. (JAC)

  1. Client Preferences for STD/HIV Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Michael; Mercier, Michele M.; Williams, Samantha P.; Arno, Janet N.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a formative research study designed to elicit preferences for sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV prevention programs from clients at a midwestern STD clinic. Responses of 126 participants show preferences for mixed group or individual meetings with counselors, with extensive intervention less favored than single sessions. Discusses…

  2. Risk Factors for Suicidality among Clients with Schizophrenia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Robert C.; Cohen, Benjamin N.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates risk factors for current suicidality in clients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N=223). Results indicate that severity of depressive symptoms most strongly correlated with degree of suicidality. Younger age and recent traumatic stress each significantly predicted suicidality independent of depressive symptoms. Suggests that the…

  3. Experiences of Forgiveness among Nonclergy Clients Receiving Residential Psychiatric Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivett, Melissa; Powers, Robin

    2009-01-01

    In response to the growing importance focused on forgiveness in clinical work (R. D. Enright, 2000), the relevance of forgiveness to 54 clients receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment was examined. The authors used a reflective questionnaire developed by M. J. Brenneis (2002) to gain a qualitative understanding of forgiveness in the sample.…

  4. A Successful Cooperative Effort to Update Client Files.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Lee; And Others

    1994-01-01

    An office of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind completed a project which updated over 5,000 client files through personal conversations with them or their relatives, using 7 sighted volunteers and 7 visually impaired volunteers. Hundreds of individuals whose service needs had changed were identified, and an ongoing process for…

  5. Attending to Self Activity in the Afro-American Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Adelbert H.

    Recent literature which proposes a more active therapeutic stance with Afro-American clients is consistent with general trends in clinical theory. Therapists are beginning to appreciate the usefulness of the concept of the "self." Rychlak (1979) notes that a humanistic approach in psychology emphasizes the importance of an introspective point of…

  6. Thin Client Architecture: The Promise and the Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1997-01-01

    Describes thin clients, a networking technology that allows organizations to provide software applications over networked workstations connected to a central server. Topics include corporate settings; major advantages, including cost effectiveness and increased computer security; problems; and possible applications for large public and academic…

  7. A Client-Side Web Agent for Document Categorization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boley, Daniel; Gini, Maria; Hastings, Kyle; Mobasher, Bamshad; Moore, Jerry

    1998-01-01

    Describes WebACE, the architecture of a client-side agent that explores and classifies Web documents in clusters automatically and discusses the details of the algorithms within its key components. Highlights principal direction divisive partitioning (PDDP), a scalable hierarchical clustering algorithm; compares it to other clustering methods; and…

  8. Evaluation of a Continuing Education Training on Client Financial Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Svoboda, Deborah; Sander, Rebecca L.; Osteen, Philip J.; Callahan, Christine; Elkinson, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The researchers conducted an evaluation study assessing outcomes among 37 social workers who completed a continuing education course on financial capability and working with clients. Key constructs assessed included participants' attitudes about financial capability, self-efficacy to provide services, organizational barriers, and basic financial…

  9. 37 CFR 10.33 - Direct contact with prospective clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... evidencing undue influence, intimidation, or overreaching. The term “solicit” includes contact in person, by... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Direct contact with prospective clients. 10.33 Section 10.33 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT...

  10. Social Work Students' Attitudes about Working with Involuntary Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Natalie D.; Kang, Byungdeok

    2011-01-01

    Social workers employed in areas such as public child welfare, substance abuse, and corrections often provide services to involuntary clients. These individuals do not seek social work services on their own volition and may be actively opposed to the services they are receiving. This study explores social work students' attitudes about working…

  11. Teaching Accountability: Using Client Feedback to Train Effective Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Jacqueline A.; Kisler, Tiffani S.; Adams, Jerome F.; Blumen, Dale G.

    2011-01-01

    The AAMFT Task Force on Core Competencies (Nelson et al., 2007) proposed that marriage and family therapy (MFT) educators teach and provide evidence of trainee competence beyond coursework and accrued clinical hours. This article describes the integration of a systematic client feedback protocol into an MFT-accredited program's curricula to…

  12. Beyond Multiplication: Incorporating Importance into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This article brings the discussions on incorporating perceived importance across study areas into the study of client satisfaction and cautions the use of multiplicative scores (multiplying satisfaction and importance scores) as a weighting method. An alternative weighting method is provided. Method: Analyze data from a client…

  13. Ethical Considerations in Maintaining Confidentiality with Dangerous Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, J. Kelley

    This paper discusses ethical considerations involved in breach of confidentiality in counseling dangerous clients, i.e., those who have the potential to inflict bodily harm on others. The ethical basis for confidentiality is presented in a model for decision making in ethical dilemmas which encompasses three evaluative levels or tiers: ethical…

  14. Collaborating with Your Clients Using Social Media & Mobile Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Typhina, Eli; Bardon, Robert E.; Gharis, Laurie W.

    2015-01-01

    Many Extension educators are still learning how to effectively integrate social media into their programs. By using the right social media platforms and mobile applications to create engaged, online communities, Extension educators can collaborate with clients to produce and to share information expanding and enhancing their social media and…

  15. The Effects of Incest on Therapist Assessment of Female Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiselman, Karin C.; Sheehy, Nancy

    The occurrence of incest in which a female child is molested by an older male family member may be increasing as the number of stepfamilies increases, because previous evidence suggests that girls living with stepfathers are at greater risk for molestation. If psychotherapists will be seeing more incest-history clients as a result of this trend,…

  16. The Use of Music in Counseling Addictive Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Wilfred; Siegel, Sammi; Holosko, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Explores a broad range of music interventions appropriate for addictive clients so as to fill a void in the music therapy and addictions counseling literature. Presents a rationale for the use of music intervention and presents case examples. Describes a social work intervention approach tested over a 10-year period. (RJM)

  17. Why "Who Is the Client?" Is the Wrong Ethical Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Mary Alice

    2014-01-01

    The familiar question "Who is the client?" elicits a singular answer. This may be appropriate as a clinical question, and it is sometimes necessary as a legal question or reimbursement question, but on ethical questions, the National Association of School Psychologists Ethics Code requires school psychologists to "think plural"…

  18. Working With Suicidal Clients: "Not" Business as Usual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Goldston, David B.

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction to a special series of articles on working with suicidal clients, we note that much of the recent growth in theory and research pertaining to suicidal individuals has been contributed by cognitive-behavioral theorists and researchers. This work has established that suicidal people manifest important cognitive vulnerabilities…

  19. Client Judgement of Therapist Characteristics: A Factor in Treatment Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Alycia A.; And Others

    This study, based on Strong's (1968) model of therapy as social influence, focused on the relationship between clients' judgments of therapists' characteristics and the outcomes of their treatment for generalized anxiety. Thirty subjects and 15 therapists met in 12 individual therapy sessions using Progressive Relaxation Training combined with…

  20. Competent Counseling for Middle Eastern American Clients: Implications for Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soheilian, Sepideh S.; Inman, Arpana G.

    2015-01-01

    The authors used a factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to determine whether counselor trainees' group differences on measures of multicultural competence, empathy, and multicultural counseling self-efficacy (CSE) when working with Middle Eastern American (MEA) clients were moderated by trainee race. Two hundred and fifty-six…

  1. 29 CFR 404.5 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 404.5 Section 404.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION OFFICER AND EMPLOYEE REPORTS § 404.5...

  2. 29 CFR 403.9 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 403.9 Section 403.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORTS § 403.9...

  3. 29 CFR 402.11 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 402.11 Section 402.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION INFORMATION REPORTS § 402.11...

  4. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483.420 Section 483.420 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Conditions of Participation...

  5. Students, Client, and Teacher: Observations from a Practicum in Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preskill, Hallie

    1992-01-01

    The present author's experiences teaching a graduate course on evaluation for those who train adults in various settings illustrate how principles of adult learning made the course practical. Outcomes from class experiences with an actual program evaluation are described for the students, evaluation client, and teacher. (SLD)

  6. Importance of the Sex of Worker and Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Mary C.

    1974-01-01

    The author surveys the writings of the last eight years of "Social Work" in order to study the profession's attitude toward the sex factor (sex of case worker and of client groups), and to determine whether and how this factor has been interpreted in professional thinking. (Author/EAK)

  7. Legal and Ethical Implications of Refusing to Counsel Homosexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Mary A.; Herlihy, Barbara Richter

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, a federal appeals court upheld the job termination of a counselor who requested being excused from counseling a lesbian client on relationship issues because homosexuality conflicted with the counselor's religious beliefs ("Bruff v. North Mississippi Health Services, Inc.," 2001). This article provides the facts of the case and the legal…

  8. Designing Lives and Empowering Clients: The Case of Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik, J.

    2003-01-01

    This case response centers on the client Sue, a professional mediator who seeks counseling to resolve a conflict with her employer (M. C. Rehfuss, 2003). The Selective Optimization with Compensation model of human development and Life-Span Theory of Control are used to frame Sue's career development and assist her in making the transition from…

  9. Counselling the (Self?) Diagnosed Client: Generative and Reflective Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Tom; Ross, Karen H.; Sesma-Vazquez, Monica

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the phenomenon of clients who present their concerns in the medicalised discourse of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition" ("DSM-5"). We contextualise this phenomenon, highlighting how a "diagnose-and-treat" logic increasingly pervades everyday…

  10. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  11. Counselors' Values Profile: Implications for Counseling Ethnic Minority Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consoli, Andres J.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Meyer, Dinorah M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors review the empirical literature on counselors' values, describe values salient to the 4 largest ethnic minority groups in the United States, identify similarities and differences between counselors' values and those of the minority groups, and discuss implications for counseling ethnically different clients. Understanding counselors'…

  12. Measuring Client Experiences of Motivational Interviewing during a Lifestyle Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madson, Michael B.; Mohn, Richard S.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Landry, Alicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing was used to assess motivational interviewing experiences in a predominantly female, African American sample from the Southeastern United States who received motivational interviewing-based feedback during a multicomponent lifestyle intervention. Motivational interviewing was experienced…

  13. Suggested Perspectives in Counseling the American Indian Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paisano-Suazo, Aleta

    The standard western theoretical approach to mental health counseling is not applicable to the views held by Native American clients. Consideration must be given to their unique differences, if the therapist is to provide maximum effectiveness. Several perspectives offer alternative counseling procedures. For instance, Indians place great…

  14. Difficult Cases in Career Counseling: III--The Multipotentialed Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pask-McCartney, Claudia; Salomone, Paul R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses counseling methods for individuals who, by virtue of their multiple interests, talents, skills, and drives, present unique career-making difficulties for themselves and for their counselors. Considers advantages and disadvantages of multipotentiality for career counseling, offers methods for identifying clients whose multipotentiality…

  15. Client-Centered Placement Revisited: A Dialogue on Placement Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.; Usdane, William M.

    1977-01-01

    The authors take substantially different philosophical stances concerning placement in the rehabilitation process. Usdane believes that job placement is not given enough attention by rehabilitation counselors early in the rehabilitation process. Salomone advocates a greater emphasis on client growth and independence. (Author)

  16. Clients as Change Agents: What Color Could My Parachute Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remer, Pam; O'Neill, Charles

    1980-01-01

    Advocates an approach to career counseling that helps clients understand career choice as a developmental process, learn decision-making skills, and become active change agents in their own lives. Discusses the potential impact of this self-directed, decision-making model on career counseling. (Author)

  17. Perceptions of Clients and Counseling Professionals regarding Spirituality in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Clutter, Stacy M.; Pritchett, Elaine M.; Demmitt, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Although current research indicates that psychotherapeutic change both affects and is affected by spiritual concerns, relatively little is known about the degree to which spirituality is used as an intervention in counseling and how it is perceived by clients and mental health professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions…

  18. A Profile of Clients Entering Treatment for Alcohol Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkbiner, Richard

    Large numbers of clients entering publicly-funded substance abuse treatment facilities cite problems with alcohol as one reason for seeking treatment. This report presents the results of a secondary analysis of the National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES) data set. It profiles the treatment experiences of three study groups that…

  19. Trying differently: A relationship-centered approach to representing clients with cognitive challenges.

    PubMed

    Boulding, David M; Brooks, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    This article demonstrates the usefulness of an innovative framework called "Relationship-Centered Lawyering" to enhancing real world legal practice. It uses the example of lawyers, particularly criminal defense lawyers, who often deal with clients with cognitive challenges. The article developed out of a series of workshops conducted jointly by the co-authors, an American law professor with a social work background, and a Canadian criminal defense lawyer and family mediator who is an international expert on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and other Neuro-Behavioral Disorders (FA/NB). The paper describes the relational theory Brooks developed (along with Robert Madden), along with the science of cognitive impairments, with a specific focus on FA/NB. The paper provides two illustrations of the relational framework by explaining Boulding's strategy of creating what is called the "external brain" and his techniques of relational interviewing. PMID:20888044

  20. Use of Deception to Improve Client Honeypot Detection of Drive-by-Download Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Popovsky, Barbara; Narvaez Suarez, Julia F.; Seifert, Christian; Frincke, Deborah A.; O'Neil, Lori R.; Aval, Chiraag U.

    2009-07-24

    This paper presents the application of deception theory to improve the success of client honeypots at detecting malicious web page attacks from infected servers programmed by online criminals to launch drive-by-download attacks. The design of honeypots faces three main challenges: deception, how to design honeypots that seem real systems; counter-deception, techniques used to identify honeypots and hence defeating their deceiving nature; and counter counter-deception, how to design honeypots that deceive attackers. The authors propose the application of a deception model known as the deception planning loop to identify the current status on honeypot research, development and deployment. The analysis leads to a proposal to formulate a landscape of the honeypot research and planning of steps ahead.

  1. Assessment of client satisfaction in labor and delivery services at a maternity referral hospital in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Melese, Tadele; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Bisetegne, Daniel; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients perception about service quality shapes their confidence with regard to use of the available health care facility. This study is aimed to assess the client`s satisfaction in a maternal health care setting. Methods This is an institution based cross sectional descriptive study. A total of 423 postpartum women were interviewed. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical package. Results The proportion of mothers who are completely satisfied with health care ranges between 2.4 to 21%. Pain control was the poorest source of satisfaction with 82% reporting dissatisfaction. Provider's communication with clients yielded complete satisfaction rates ranging between 0.7 to 26%. Inadequate information about the drug prescribed and explanation of procedures to be done to the client were found to be major causes of dissatisfaction. The complete satisfaction rate with environmental factor of the hospital was between 3.3 to 40.2%. Age of the client, educational status, income of the client and client's address away from Addis Ababa were found to be the predictors of client satisfaction. Provider's attitude and communication, as well as longer duration of stay in the ward were independent predictors of client satisfaction. Conclusion Pain management, client privacy and client provider communication need to be addressed to ensure the satisfaction of maternity clients. The clients need to be involved in the management of their own health problems. PMID:25018826

  2. Client Evaluation of Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder in COMBINE.

    PubMed

    Kirouac, Megan; Witkiewitz, Katie; Donovan, Dennis M

    2016-08-01

    Practitioners and researchers across disciplines have been interested in identifying variables that act as indicators of treatment success or failure and one straightforward approach to measuring treatment success is to assess client satisfaction with treatment. Existing measures of treatment satisfaction do not address the specific aspects relevant to alcohol use disorder (AUD) treatment. Researchers in the COMBINE Study developed a new measure of treatment satisfaction to assess satisfaction in AUD treatment: The Evaluation of Treatment (EOT) measure. The aims of the present study were to examine the factor structure of items from the EOT measure and to examine the association between the EOT measure and other measures of client engagement, as well as AUD treatment outcomes. We also extended the model to test for possible mediation effects of treatment evaluation on the relationship between client treatment engagement components and AUD treatment outcomes. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated a 6-factor model with a higher order treatment satisfaction factor provided an excellent fit to the data (χ2 (246)=499.44, p<0.001, CFI=0.99, TLI=0.98, RMSEA =0.040 (90% CI: 0.035, 0.045). Overall, the latent factor of treatment satisfaction was significantly associated with client engagement predictors and treatment evaluation significantly mediated the associations between both working alliance and treatment expectations in the prediction of alcohol-related problems and global severity. Findings suggest that client evaluations of treatment play a substantial role in predicting AUD treatment outcomes and should be considered in future treatment and research. PMID:27296660

  3. Client safety in assisted living: perspectives from clients, personal support workers and administrative staff in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Speller, Brittany; Stolee, Paul

    2015-03-01

    As the population ages, the demand for long-term care settings is expected to increase. Assisted living is a suitable and favourable residence for older individuals to receive care services specific to their needs while maintaining their independence and privacy. With the growing transition of older individuals into assisted living, facilities need to ensure that safe care is continually maintained. The purpose of this study was to determine the gaps and strengths in care related to safety in assisted living facilities (ALFs). A qualitative descriptive research design was used to provide a comprehensive understanding of client safety from the perspectives of clients, administrative staff and personal support workers. Interviews were conducted with 22 key informants from three ALFs in Toronto, Ontario throughout July 2012. All interviews were semi-structured, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Initial deductive analysis used directed coding based on a prior literature review, followed by inductive analysis to determine themes. Three themes emerged relating to the safety of clients in ALFs: meaning of safety, a multi-faceted approach to providing safe care and perceived areas of improvement. Sub-themes also emerged including physical safety, multiple factors, working as a team, respecting clients' independence, communication and increased education and available resources. The study findings can contribute to the improvement and development of new processes to maintain and continually ensure safe care in ALFs. PMID:25175102

  4. Client and Worker Opinions About Fee-Charging in a Child Welfare Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shireman, Joan

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the reactions of clients and social workers to a proposal to charge a fee for counseling service indicates that most clients are willing to pay while staff expressed concern about effects of a fee. (Author/CS)

  5. 34 CFR 377.31 - What information must a grantee provide to eligible clients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM What Post-Award Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 377.31... authorized representatives, of the availability and purposes of the Client Assistance Program under...

  6. Teaching Client Relations and Communication Skills: Part II--A Systematic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvatich, P. K.; Meyer, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    A veterinarian-client relations course at Purdue University is described. It is designed to assist students in developing, applying, and adopting comfortable interpersonal communication and interviewing skills for interaction with clients in the practice of veterinary medicine. (BH)

  7. Clients' Demographic Characteristics and Therapeutic Treatment: Differences That Make a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sue, Stanley

    1976-01-01

    Relationships of client demographics and services at mental health centers was studied. Services studied were: diagnosis, programs, personnel, and therapy. Client attributes accounted for small proportions of variance, with ethnicity and age being the most consistent single predictors. (NG)

  8. Predicting Change for Individual Psychotherapy Clients on the Basis of their Nearest Neighbors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Leach, Chris; Barkham, Michael; Lucock, Mike; Stiles, William B.; Evans, Chris; Noble, Rachael; Iveson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This study extended client-focused research by using the nearest neighbor (NN) approach, a client-specific sampling and prediction strategy derived from research on alpine avalanches. Psychotherapy clients (N = 203) seen in routine practice settings in the United Kingdom completed a battery of intake measures and then completed symptom intensity…

  9. Client Assistance Program: A Rehabilitation Resource. Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (15th, Tampa, Florida, December 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankowski, Joe; Rice, B. Douglas

    This report provides guidelines for Client Assistance Programs (CAPs), established to assist applicants and clients of programs and facilities funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This report developed out of a study to provide information to increase cooperative approaches of benefit to both programs and clients and to create training…

  10. Counselor Verbal Behavior as a Function of Client Demeanor. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Elaine

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the verbal behavior of counselors emitted in response to different emotional dispositions of clients. Aggressive amd submissive client "stimuli" were the focus of study. Two members of a college drama group, trained in the role of a submissive and an aggressive client, respectively, were interviewed…

  11. Better versus Worse Family Therapy Sessions as Reflected in Clients' Alliance-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Bernardi, Shaina; Lee, Hsin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    To be responsive to clients' evaluations of the unfolding therapy process, therapists must first accurately "read" client behavior, a particularly challenging task in conjoint family therapy. In this study, the authors compared client behavior in 28 sessions that one family member and the therapist concurred, on the Session Evaluation…

  12. Client and Counselor Verbal Category Systems for the Analysis of Trainees' Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaka, William H.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Defined verbal behavior categories for clients (the Client Verbal Behavior System, CL-VBS), and for counselors (the Counselor Verbal Behavior System, CO-VBS), to match the categories in the Carkhuff and Ivey training models, in order to study the acquisition of the skills and their impact on client responses and outcomes. (Author/JAC)

  13. Clients' Emotional Processing in Psychotherapy: A Comparison between Cognitive-Behavioral and Process-Experiential Therapies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jeanne C.; Bedard, Danielle L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors compared clients' emotional processing in good and bad outcome cases in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and process-experiential therapy (PET) and investigated whether clients' emotional processing increases over the course of therapy. Twenty minutes from each of 3 sessions from 40 clients were rated on the Experiencing Scale. A 2 *…

  14. The Value of Client Perceptions in University Strategic Planning: An Empirical Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Barrio-Garcia, Salvador; Luque-Martinez, Teodoro

    2009-01-01

    Given the normative changes in higher education at European, national and regional levels, together with social, economic, demographic and technological developments, universities need to adopt a client-oriented approach and to make this client orientation an integral component of their strategic planning process. The university's "clients" should…

  15. Can Religion Make You Crazy? Impact of Client and Therapist Religious Values on Clinical Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Arthur C.; Graham, Kenton

    1986-01-01

    Investigated influence of Christian values of clinicians and clients on judgments of prognosis, psychopathology, and locus of client problems. Both religious and nonreligious clinicians assigned moderately religious clients more pessimistic prognoses and greater psychopathology. Religious therapists made more internal attributions for the…

  16. Range of Verbal Behavior as a Function of Counselor Philosophy and Coached-Client Role Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzicka, Mary F.; Naun, Robert

    1976-01-01

    To assess the influence of counselor philosophy and client type on the range of counselor trainee verbal behavior, the Philosophies of Human Nature Scale was administered to 34 counseling students who subsequently interviewed role-played clients. Results indicate client type only, not counselor's philosophy, influenced the range of trainee verbal…

  17. The Counselor-Client Contact Variable and Occupational Aspiration-Expectation Discrepancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogie, Donald W.; Bogie, Cheryl E.

    1976-01-01

    This research assesses the importance of counselor-client contact in occupational aspiration-expectation discrepancies. Subjects are 1835 high school seniors. The study finds the more counselor-client contact there is, the less discrepant is the client's career aspiration and expectation. This relationship remains after controlling for variables…

  18. 34 CFR 379.42 - What are the special requirements pertaining to the Client Assistance Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Client Assistance Program? 379.42 Section 379.42 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... requirements pertaining to the Client Assistance Program? Each grantee under a program covered by this part... availability and purposes of the State's Client Assistance Program, including information on seeking...

  19. 34 CFR 370.1 - What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? 370.1... SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CLIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM General § 370.1 What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? The purpose of this program is to establish...

  20. Are Client-Counselor Ethnic/Racial Matches Associated with Successful Rehabilitation Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Harold Wayne; Venable, Riley; Broussard, Shanna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if client-counselor ethnic/racial matches were associated with successful vocational rehabilitation (VR) outcomes. There was no significant difference in acceptance rates for VR services. Client-counselor ethnic/racial matches had a significantly higher rehabilitation rate than client-counselor…

  1. Experiences of Rural Vocational Rehabilitation Clients Who Leave the System Prematurely: A Qualitative Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigles, Bethany; Ipsen, Catherine; Arnold, Nancy; Seekins, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Vocational rehabilitation (VR) clients who leave the system prematurely experience worse employment outcomes than clients who stay in services. The authors conducted this study to learn about factors leading to premature exit by rural VR clients. Results will inform survey development for a large longitudinal study on this topic. The authors…

  2. Voluntary Testing for HIV Antibodies among Clients in Long-Term Substance Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galea, Robert P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes voluntary testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a residential substance abuse treatment program; highlights discussion group involving 5 clients who tested positive for HIV. Notes that clients in HIV groups dropped out of treatment at significantly lower percentages than clients in general, indicating HIV identification…

  3. 17 CFR 4.31 - Required delivery of Disclosure Document to prospective clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Disclosure Document to prospective clients. 4.31 Section 4.31 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY... Advisors § 4.31 Required delivery of Disclosure Document to prospective clients. (a) Each commodity trading... prospective client a Disclosure Document containing the information set forth in §§ 4.34 and 4.35 for...

  4. Reconceptualizing Perceived Client Resistance: Inroads for Counseling and Human Service Interns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissette, Patrick J.

    1998-01-01

    The theory of psychological reactance provides a useful framework for understanding perceived client resistance. This article elaborates on how this theory can be helpful to human services interns, particularly in the areas of client socialization, client motivation, and therapeutic pacing. A case example from adolescent treatment is included.…

  5. Challenging the Courtesy Bias Interpretation of Favorable Clients' Perceptions of Family Planning Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Len, Federico R.; Lundgren, Rebecka; Huapaya, Ana; Sinai, Irit; Jennings, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Favorable client perceptions of provider's interpersonal behavior in contraceptive delivery, documented in clinic exit questionnaires, appear to contradict results from qualitative evaluations and are attributed to clients' courtesy bias. In this study, trained simulated clients requested services from Ministry of Health providers in three…

  6. Client Self-Disclosure as a Predictor of Short-Term Outcome in Brief Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Apryl E.; Kahn, Jeffrey H.

    2005-01-01

    College students differ in their tendencies to self-disclose personal information. The goal of this study was to determine how differing disclosure tendencies among university counseling center clients affect psychotherapy outcomes. Among 22 clients in brief psychotherapy, client tendencies to self-disclose personal information predicted how…

  7. Promoting Participation in Organizational Decision Making by Clients with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Eckert, Anne; Hamilton, Gary

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study assessed clients' participation in organizational decision making in a public long-term psychiatric hospital. Numerous examples were found in which clients meaningfully participated in the decision-making process and achieved favorable policy changes. Three means of involving clients were found to be especially useful: (1)…

  8. Client-Centred Practice: What Does It Mean and Does It Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Mary; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Key concepts of client-centered occupational therapy are as follows: individual autonomy and choice, client-therapist partnership and responsibility, enablement, contextual congruence, accessibility, and respect for diversity. Research findings show that client-centered practice enhances satisfaction and outcomes. (SK)

  9. An Analysis of the Opinions of Thirteen Client Groups Concerning the Harrison County Teacher Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, John

    This study is an analysis of the opinions of 13 client groups concerning the Harrison County Teacher Education Center (HCTEC) and is a sequel to a previous study. This study concentrated on two major questions: (1) what are the opinions of 13 client groups about the perceived needs for the HCTEC; and (2) how do these client groups differ in their…

  10. Physical Attractiveness: Interactive Effects of Counselor and Client on Counseling Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Alice M.; Borkowski, John G.

    1983-01-01

    Assessed how the physical attractiveness of counselors and clients interacted to build rapport in two experiments involving college students (N=128 and N=64). Results showed the counselor's physical attractiveness had a major impact on her perceived effectiveness and the client's expectation of success irrespective of the client's attractiveness…

  11. Breaking through with Thin-Client Technologies: A Cost Effective Approach for Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbaz, Sohair W.; Stewart, Christofer

    This paper provides an overview of thin-client/server computing in higher education. Thin-clients are like PCs in appearance, but they do not house hard drives or localized operating systems and cannot function without being connected to a server. Two types of thin-clients are described: the Network Computer (NC) and the Windows Terminal (WT).…

  12. Understanding the Experience of Black Clients in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awosan, Christiana I.; Sandberg, Jonathan G.; Hall, Cadmona A.

    2011-01-01

    Past research on Black clients' utilization of therapy focused on the barriers that prevent Black clients from attending therapy and the reasons for these barriers. However, few studies have been conducted that focus on how Black clients attending therapy actually experience these barriers. This study utilized both Likert and open-ended questions…

  13. Factors Associated with Recent Suicide Attempts in Clients Presenting for Addiction Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penney, Alexander; Mazmanian, Dwight; Jamieson, John; Black, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Factors associated with recent suicide attempts were examined in clients who sought treatment at an addictions facility between 2001 and 2008. Clients who reported being hospitalized for attempting suicide in the past year (n = 76) were compared to all other clients (n = 5914) on demographic, mental health, substance use, and problem gambling…

  14. Real-time GPS monitoring throughout Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbourne, T. I.; Santillan, V. M.; Scrivner, C. W.; Szeliga, W. M.; Webb, F.; Abundiz, S.

    2012-12-01

    Over 400 GPS receivers of the combined PANGA and PBO networks currently operate along the Cascadia subduction zone, all of which are high-rate and telemetered in real-time. These receivers span the M9 megathrust, M7 crustal faults beneath population centers, several active Cascades volcanoes, and a host of other hazard sources, and together enable a host of new approaches towards hazards mitigation. Data from the majority of the stations is received in real time at CWU and processed into one-second position estimates using 1) relative positioning within several reference frames constrained by 2) absolute point positioning using streamed satellite orbit and clock corrections. While the former produces lower-noise time series, for earthquakes greater than ~M7 and ground displacements exceeding ~20 cm, point positioning alone is shown to provide very rapid and robust estimates of the location and amplitude of both dynamic strong ground motion and permanent deformation. Raw phase and range observables from stations throughout Cascadia are being processed in real time at JPL and CWU into station positions, which in turn are analyzed also in real-time for earthquake processes at CWU. Our efforts can be broken down into three distinct areas: 1) Real-time point-positioning methodologies, 2) a data aggregator that captures real-time position streams from a variety of processing centers and methodologies (JPL RTGipsy, CWU rtPP, Trimble VRS) and re-streams the data as configurable streams to application clients out anywhere on the web, and 3) a suite of analysis tools that operate on the real-time position streams, including plotting, vectors, peak ground deformation contouring, and finite-fault inversions. This suite is currently bundled within a single client written in JAVA, called 'GPS Cockpit.'

  15. Goal Attainment Scaling. A responsive measure of client outcomes.

    PubMed

    Forbes, D A

    1998-12-01

    Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) was developed by Kiresuk and Sherman in 1968. Although highly criticized in the early years of its conception, GAS is beginning to be recognized as a reliable, valid, and responsive outcome measurement approach. This article describes the application of GAS, using elderly home health care clients as an example. Reliability and validity issues are examined. Criticism of GAS is often based on traditional psychometric assumptions associated with normative assessment and does not reflect the evaluative nature of the GAS methodology. The advantages and limitations of GAS are discussed. Goal Attainment Scaling has the potential to demonstrate the important contribution home health care programs make to clients by measuring the change that has occurred during their admission to the program. This kind of information is required by policy makers, case managers, and home health care providers to develop policy, allocate limited resources, and offer appropriate and effective services. PMID:10025309

  16. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Serowik, Kristin L.; Bellamy, Chyrell D.; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I.

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients’ day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients’ day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients’ control over their own affairs. PMID:24605071

  17. Short term neuropsychological recovery in substance use disordered clients

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Marsha E.; Voelbel, Gerald T.; Buckman, Jennifer F.; Labouvie, Erich W.; Barry, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairments are frequently observed in clients who enter treatment programs for substance abuse. The potential for early recovery of cognitive abilities is suggested by previous research; however, the extent of improvement and risk factors that may help predict individual differences in rates of recovery remain unclear. This study is a 6-week follow-up and retest of an original sample of 197 men and women who had received a broad neuropsychological assessment at addiction treatment entry. The aim was to examine the potential clinical significance of changes in cognitive functioning and the extent to which differential recovery was predictable from client background information. Methods Fifteen neuropsychological tests were readministered to 169 of 197 clients 6 weeks after treatment entry. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate separately the practice effects and recovery in four cognitive domains: executive function, memory, information processing speed, and verbal ability. Client background information included age, sex, education, substance use and consequences, psychopathology, medical problems, familial alcoholism history, and childhood behavior problems. Results A four-factor model of latent neuropsychological ability that was previously identified at treatment entry was replicated at follow-up. Statistically significant increases in the means of the four latent abilities were found. Memory showed a medium effect size improvement. Executive function, verbal ability, and information processing speed, however, showed only small effect size improvements, suggesting limited clinical significance. Substance use between treatment entry and follow-up, antisocial personality disorder, negative use consequences, less education, and medical problems were modestly predictive of less recovery. Conclusion Cognitive recovery in the first 6 weeks of treatment is possible, but, with the possible exception of memory, improvement may be minor in

  18. One Client, One Team: Health system integration for leaders.

    PubMed

    Daub, Stacey; Goldhar, Jodeme; Purbhoo, Dipti

    2016-07-01

    This article examines the implementation of the strategy and Integrated Client Care Program, a multi-level health system strategy to break down the barriers in a solid health system and a program to integrate care for populations with the most complex needs. Specific reference is made to two specialized programs, older adults with complex care needs and a palliative care program whose goal is to meet the needs of patients and their families in a community setting. PMID:27365383

  19. Could Family Planning Clients Benefit From More Nutrition Counselling?

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Charlotte A.; Powell, Marion G.; Yurkiw, Mary Anne

    1978-01-01

    The nutritional concerns of females prior to conception and while practicing birth control have often been given less emphasis than the importance of nutrition to pregnant women. This article indicates ways of ensuring that family planning clients are not frustrated in practicing their chosen method of birth control because physicians are unaware that they may have a special need for nutrition counselling and services. PMID:20469290

  20. Romancing the boundary: client masculinities in the Chinese sex industry.

    PubMed

    Kong, Travis S K

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on 24 in-depth interviews and 2 focus-group discussions conducted since 2012 with Hong Kong heterosexual men who buy sex in order to examine men's level of physical and emotional engagement with sex workers under two dominant sexual scripts in contemporary Hong Kong. Torn between companionate sexuality, with its companionate model of relationships, and recreational sexuality, with its promiscuous model of sexual pleasure, Hong Kong male clients seek to satisfy their sexual and affective needs through commercial sexual relationships. The term (meaning 'chicken worm', connoting a 'McSex' form of masculinity) refers to those men who seek impersonal sexual release with as many women as they wish, while the term (meaning 'sunken boat' and connoting a 'Titanic' form of masculinity) refers to those men who seek an intense level of emotional intimacy with sex workers. Between these two contrasting types, the majority of respondents fall into a form of 'bounded' masculinity characteristic of men who emphasise control and balance by seeking emotionally responsive women in a time-bound romance. By comparing clients' variations in the level of physical and emotional engagement with sex workers, this paper seeks to understand individual differences in client types and offers a new understanding of Chinese male sexuality and relationship formation, and the corresponding health risks (e.g., sexual, emotional) associated with each type. PMID:25686625

  1. Working With the Suicidal Client Who Also Abuses Substances

    PubMed Central

    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Walsh, Adam; Spirito, Anthony; Rizzo, Christie; Goldston, David B.; Kaminer, Yifrah

    2012-01-01

    Substance use disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors commonly co-occur in adolescent and adult psychiatric populations and are often functionally interrelated. Although the evidence base for treatment of this population is sparse, integrated cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) protocols, or those that rely heavily on CBT techniques, hold promise. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence-based literature for interventions that target suicidal behavior and substance use disorders with adults and adolescents. We then discuss the manner in which these behaviors may be functionally interrelated and offer a conceptual framework (S-O-R-C) to guide case conceptualization and treatment planning for clients with co-occurring suicidality and substance use disorders. Next, we provide a case example of a client with suicidal behavior and an alcohol use disorder and demonstrate how to apply an integrated CBT treatment protocol to this case. This case example is followed by a more general discussion about the potential advantages of integrated CBT protocols for suicidality and substance use disorders, guidelines for prioritizing treatment targets and skill selection for each individual client, and other important treatment considerations. We conclude with recommendations for future research in this area. PMID:23209362

  2. Post-partum Family Planning Service Provision in Durban, South Africa: Client and Provider Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Heather M.; Maman, Suzanne; Moodley, Dhayendre; Curtis, Siân

    2014-01-01

    Researchers in sub-Saharan Africa have found health facility factors influence client contraceptive use. We sought to understand how client provider interactions, discussion of side effects and HIV status influence women’s contraceptive use post-partum. We conducted in-depth interviews with 8 HIV negative clients and 6 HIV positive clients in Zulu and with 5 nurses in English. Interviews were translated and transcribed into English. We created a codebook and coded all transcripts. Nurses and clients reported limited time to discuss contraception, side effects and HIV. Nurses did not comply with national contraceptive policies and created unnecessary barriers to contraceptive use. PMID:23998760

  3. The new version 2.12 of BKG Ntrip Client (BNC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürze, Andrea; Mervart, Leos; Weber, Georg; Rülke, Axel; Wiesensarter, Erwin; Neumaier, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A new version of the BKG Ntrip Client (BNC) has been released. Originally developed in cooperation of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG) and the Czech Technical University (CTU) with a focus on multi-stream real-time access to GPS observations, the software has once again been substantially extended. Promoting Open Standards as recommended by the Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services (RTCM) remains the prime subject. Beside its Graphical User Interface (GUI), the real-time software for Windows, Linux, Mac, and Linux platforms now comes with complete Command Line Interface (CLI) and considerable post processing functionality. RINEX Version 3 file editing & Quality Check (QC) with full support of Galileo, BeiDou, and SBAS - besides GPS and GLONASS - is part of the new features. Comparison of satellite orbit/clock files in SP3 format is another fresh ability of BNC. Simultaneous multi-station Precise Point Positioning (PPP) for real-time displacement-monitoring of entire reference station networks is one more recent addition to BNC. Implemented RTCM messages for PPP (under development) comprise satellite orbit and clock corrections, code and phase observation biases, and the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) of the ionosphere. The well established, mature codebase is mostly written in C++ language. Its publication under GNU GPL is thought to be well-suited for test, validation and demonstration of new approaches in precise real-time satellite navigation when IP streaming is involved. The poster highlights BNC features which are new in version 2.12 and beneficial to IAG institutions and services such as IGS/RT-IGS and to the interested public in general.

  4. Increased clinic awareness and attitudes of independence through client advisory board membership.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J K; Yablonovitz, H

    1978-08-01

    In order to determine the effect of client advisory board membership on clients' awareness of a clinic, and on client attitudes of independence, the responses of 13 board members were compared with those of 13 matched controls on two self-report measures (Clinic Recognition Test, Client Independence Questionnaire) before and after 3-month periods. Analysis of the results indicated that, whereas the responses of controls did not significantly change on the Client Independence Questionnaire, the responses of board members indicated a significant increase in attitudes of independence. And, even though both board members and control clients significantly increased their awareness of clinic and staff over 3 months, the awareness of the broad members was significantly greater than that of the control clients. PMID:696698

  5. Perspectives of Treatment Providers and Clients with Serious Mental Illness Regarding Effective Therapeutic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Easter, Alison; Pollock, Michele; Pope, Leah Gogel; Wisdom, Jennifer P; Smith, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the nature of clinical therapeutic relationships between mental health treatment providers and high-need clients with serious mental illness who had recently discontinued treatment. Semi-structured qualitative interviews of 56 clients with serious mental illness who had recently discontinued care and 25 mental health treatment providers were completed. Both clients with serious mental illness and treatment providers emphasized the importance of client-focused goal setting, time and availability of treatment providers, a caring approach, and trust and honesty in the relationship. However, clients with serious mental illness placed greater emphasis on goals involving tangible services, a notable area of discord between the two groups. Individuals with serious mental illness and treatment providers agreed regarding several key elements to a positive clinical relationship. Further attention to client goals related to tangible services may serve to improve relationships between treatment providers and high-need clients with serious mental illness. PMID:26658917

  6. Real Writing for Real Audiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunce-Crim, Marna

    1992-01-01

    An experienced teacher describes how to provide students with a real audience to motivate them to write. Suggestions include writing letters to make a difference in the community, preparing newsletters, compiling class literary magazines, and writing for local newspapers and businesses or for commercial children's magazines. (SM)

  7. Verifying the secure setup of Unix client/servers and detection of network intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, R.; Bruestle, H.R.; Bartoletti, T.; Saroyan, A.; Fisher, J.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes our technical approach to developing and delivering Unix host- and network-based security products to meet the increasing challenges in information security. Today`s global ``Infosphere`` presents us with a networked environment that knows no geographical, national, or temporal boundaries, and no ownership, laws, or identity cards. This seamless aggregation of computers, networks, databases, applications, and the like store, transmit, and process information. This information is now recognized as an asset to governments, corporations, and individuals alike. This information must be protected from misuse. The Security Profile Inspector (SPI) performs static analyses of Unix-based clients and servers to check on their security configuration. SPI`s broad range of security tests and flexible usage options support the needs of novice and expert system administrators alike. SPI`s use within the Department of Energy and Department of Defense has resulted in more secure systems, less vulnerable to hostile intentions. Host-based information protection techniques and tools must also be supported by network-based capabilities. Our experience shows that a weak link in a network of clients and servers presents itself sooner or later, and can be more readily identified by dynamic intrusion detection techniques and tools. The Network Intrusion Detector (NID) is one such tool. NID is designed to monitor and analyze activity on an Ethernet broadcast Local Area Network segment and produce transcripts of suspicious user connections. NID`s retrospective and real-time modes have proven invaluable to security officers faced with ongoing attacks to their systems and networks.

  8. The Evaluation of Participants' Perceptions of Session Impact: Do Counselors-in-Training, Volunteer Clients, and Extra-Credit/Class Required Clients View Session Impact Differently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckenbach, John; Patrick, Shawn; Sells, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Training programmes frequently recruit students from undergraduate classes to serve as clients for counselors-in-training. Some of these clients receive external incentives for this participation, such as extra-credit or expectation of fulfilling a course requirement. It is unknown however whether or not this external incentive influences the…

  9. A Theory Led Narrative Review of One-to-One Health Interventions: The Influence of Attachment Style and Client-Provider Relationship on Client Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanjappa, S.; Chambers, S.; Marcenes, W.; Richards, D.; Freeman, R.

    2014-01-01

    A theory-led narrative approach was used to unpack the complexities of the factors that enable successful client adherence following one-to-one health interventions. Understanding this could prepare the provider to anticipate different adherence behaviours by clients, allowing them to tailor their interventions to increase the likelihood of…

  10. "The Weight of Class": Clients' Experiences of How Perceived Differences in Social Class between Counsellor and Client Affect the Therapeutic Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmforth, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The impact of a difference in social class on the therapeutic relationship has received less attention than other differences between counsellor and client, such as gender, race and sexual orientation. In this qualitative research study six clients who identified as working class were interviewed about their experience of a therapeutic…

  11. The Trouble with the Short-Term Therapist-Client Relationship and What Can Be Done about It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberghe, Luc; Martins da Silveira, Jocelaine

    2012-01-01

    When problems from the client's daily life show up in the therapist-client relationship, crucial learning opportunities may become available. Occurrence of the client's problems during the therapy hour turns the relationship into a psychological space where they can be worked on in-vivo. But sometimes the client's daily life problems are specific…

  12. Epistemic asymmetries in psychotherapy interaction: therapists' practices for displaying access to clients' inner experiences.

    PubMed

    Weiste, Elina; Voutilainen, Liisa; Peräkylä, Anssi

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between a psychotherapist and a client involves a specific kind of epistemic asymmetry: in therapy sessions the talk mainly concerns the client's experience, which is unavailable, as such, to the therapist. This epistemic asymmetry is understood in different ways within different psychotherapeutic traditions. Drawing on a corpus of 70 audio-recorded sessions of cognitive psychotherapy and psychoanalysis and using the method of conversation analysis, the interactional practices of therapists for dealing with this epistemic asymmetry are investigated. Two types of epistemic practices were found to be employed by therapists while formulating and interpreting the client's inner experience. In the formulations, the therapists and clients co-described the client's experience, demonstrating that the client's inner experience was somewhat similarly available to both participants. In the interpretations, the therapists constructed an evidential foundation for the interpretation by summarising the client's talk and using the same descriptive terms as the client. Clients held therapists accountable for this epistemic work: if they failed to engage in such work, their right to know the client's inner experience was called into question. PMID:26574238

  13. Parallel image registration with a thin client interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiprasad, Ganesh; Lo, Yi-Jung; Plishker, William; Lei, Peng; Ahmad, Tabassum; Shekhar, Raj

    2010-03-01

    Despite its high significance, the clinical utilization of image registration remains limited because of its lengthy execution time and a lack of easy access. The focus of this work was twofold. First, we accelerated our course-to-fine, volume subdivision-based image registration algorithm by a novel parallel implementation that maintains the accuracy of our uniprocessor implementation. Second, we developed a thin-client computing model with a user-friendly interface to perform rigid and nonrigid image registration. Our novel parallel computing model uses the message passing interface model on a 32-core cluster. The results show that, compared with the uniprocessor implementation, the parallel implementation of our image registration algorithm is approximately 5 times faster for rigid image registration and approximately 9 times faster for nonrigid registration for the images used. To test the viability of such systems for clinical use, we developed a thin client in the form of a plug-in in OsiriX, a well-known open source PACS workstation and DICOM viewer, and used it for two applications. The first application registered the baseline and follow-up MR brain images, whose subtraction was used to track progression of multiple sclerosis. The second application registered pretreatment PET and intratreatment CT of radiofrequency ablation patients to demonstrate a new capability of multimodality imaging guidance. The registration acceleration coupled with the remote implementation using a thin client should ultimately increase accuracy, speed, and access of image registration-based interpretations in a number of diagnostic and interventional applications.

  14. Paid caregiver motivation, work conditions, and falls among senior clients.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Lee A; Tam, Karen; Friesema, Elisha; Martin, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation of paid non-familial caregivers of seniors, understand more about their work conditions, and identify any links to negative outcomes among their senior clients. Ninety-eight paid caregivers (eighty-five female and thirteen male), recruited from multiple sites (i.e. senior centers, shopping malls, local parks, lobbies of senior apartments, caregiver agency meetings) completed face-to-face questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. We found that 60.7% of participants chose to become a caregiver because they enjoyed being with seniors while 31.7% were unable to obtain other work, and 8.2% stated it was a prerequisite to a different health related occupation. Caregivers stated that the most challenging conditions of their work were physical lifting (24.5%), behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (24.5%), senior depression/mood changes (18.4%), attachment with impending death (8.2%), missing injuries to client (5.1%), lack of sleep (4.1%), and lack of connection with outside world (3.1%). Caregivers who reported that the best part of their job was the salary, flexible hours, and ease of work were significantly more likely to have clients who fell and fractured a bone than those who enjoyed being with seniors (job characteristics, 62.5% vs. senior enjoyment, 25.6%; p<0.004). We concluded that in pursuing their occupation, paid caregivers are motivated commonly by their love of seniors and also by their lack of other job opportunities. Paid caregivers frequently face challenging work conditions. When seeking a caregiver for a senior, motivation of the caregiver should be considered when hiring. PMID:22360830

  15. The Development and Validation of the Client Expectations of Massage Scale

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Karen T.; Campo, Shelly; Glanville, Jennifer L.; Lowe, John B; Yang, Jingzhen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although there is evidence that client expectations influence client outcomes, a valid and reliable scale for measuring the range of client expectations for both massage therapy and the behaviors of their massage therapists does not exist. Understanding how client expectations influence client outcomes would provide insight into how massage achieves its reported effects. Purpose: To develop and validate the Client Expectations of Massage Scale (CEMS), a measure of clients’ clinical, educational, interpersonal, and outcome expectations. Setting: Offices of licensed massage therapists in Iowa. Research Design: A practice-based research methodology was used to collect data from two samples of massage therapy clients. For Sample 1, 21 volunteer massage therapists collected data from their clients before the massage. Factor analysis was conducted to test construct validity and coefficient alpha was used to assess reliability. Correlational analyses with the CEMS, previous measures of client expectations, and the Life Orientation Test–Revised were examined to test the convergent and discriminant validity of the CEMS. For Sample 2, 24 massage therapists distributed study materials for clients to complete before and after a massage therapy session. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the construct, discriminant, and predictive validity of the CEMS. Participants: Sample 1 involved 320 and Sample 2 involved 321 adult massage clients. Intervention: Standard care provided by licensed massage therapists. Main Outcomes: Numeric Rating Scale for pain and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule–Revised (including the Serenity subscale). Results: The CEMS demonstrated good construct, convergent, discriminant and predictive validity, and adequate reliability. Client expectations were generally positive toward massage and their massage therapists. Positive outcome expectations had a positive effect on clients’ changes in pain and serenity. High

  16. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy with a client with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lunn, Susanne; Daniel, Sarah I F; Poulsen, Stig

    2016-06-01

    This case study presents the progress of one patient with bulimia nervosa who was originally very compromised in psychological domains that are the focus of analytic treatment, and includes in-session therapeutic process and a range of outcomes, for example, eating disorder symptoms, attachment status, and reflective functioning. Nested in a study showing more rapid behavioral improvement in subjects receiving cognitive behavior therapy than in subjects receiving psychoanalytic psychotherapy, the case highlights the importance of supplementing RCTs with single case studies and the need of adapting the therapeutic approach as well as the current therapeutic dialogue to the individual client. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27267505

  17. Developing inclusive design expertise within a client/consultancy relationship.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Nina; Desbarats, Gus; Hosking, Ian

    2015-01-01

    TheAlloy have been working together with British Telecom (BT), as their product design consultants, for over ten years. During that time BT have undergone a key transformation which has had a profound impact on their design focus. This transformation has seen BT actively embrace inclusive design as a core driver for their business objectives. As part of that journey, TheAlloy have in turn developed core competencies which have not only supported BT's transition, but impacted the consultancy's ability to offer these services to other clients. This paper reflects on the development of that relationship and those competencies through a series of project case studies. PMID:23726278

  18. Design and optimisation of a (FA)Q-learning-based HTTP adaptive streaming client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Maxim; Latré, Steven; Famaey, Jeroen; Wu, Tingyao; Van Leekwijck, Werner; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) adaptive streaming (HAS) has become the de facto standard for adaptive video streaming services. A HAS video consists of multiple segments, encoded at multiple quality levels. State-of-the-art HAS clients employ deterministic heuristics to dynamically adapt the requested quality level based on the perceived network conditions. Current HAS client heuristics are, however, hardwired to fit specific network configurations, making them less flexible to fit a vast range of settings. In this article, a (frequency adjusted) Q-learning HAS client is proposed. In contrast to existing heuristics, the proposed HAS client dynamically learns the optimal behaviour corresponding to the current network environment in order to optimise the quality of experience. Furthermore, the client has been optimised both in terms of global performance and convergence speed. Thorough evaluations show that the proposed client can outperform deterministic algorithms by 11-18% in terms of mean opinion score in a wide range of network configurations.

  19. Client attachment and therapist feelings in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Lunn, Susanne; Poulsen, Stig

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between client attachment and therapist postsession feelings was investigated in a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PPT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa. Therapists completed feeling word checklists after each session, and client attachment was assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. A factor analysis identified 3 feeling factors, Happy/Enthusiastic, Overwhelmed/Moved, and Indifferent/Bored. Positive feelings were predominant, but PPT therapists reported more negative and fewer positive feelings than CBT therapists did. Client improvement in terms of frequency of bulimic episodes and general psychiatric distress was related to an increase in Happy/Enthusiastic feelings. Multilevel analyses indicated significant interactions between therapy type and client dismissing versus preoccupied attachment in predicting therapist negative emotional reactions. PPT therapist felt more Indifferent/Bored the more dismissing clients were, whereas CBT therapists felt more Overwhelmed/Moved the more preoccupied clients were. PMID:25985045

  20. Identifying Fallers among Home Care Clients with Dementia and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Symron; Hirdes, John P; Maxwell, Colleen J; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Giangregorio, Lora M

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have focused on falls among home care (HC) clients with neurological conditions. This study identified factors that increase risk of falling among HC clients with no recent history of falls, and explored whether risk profiles varied among those with dementia or parkinsonism compared to those without selected neurological conditions. A retrospective cohort design was used and analysis of data from community-based HC clients across Ontario was conducted on a sample of ambulatory clients with dementia, parkinsonism, or none of the selected neurological conditions. Data were obtained from the Resident Assessment Instrument for HC (RAI-HC) assessment. The outcome used in multivariable analyses was whether clients fell during follow-up. Unsteady gait was a strong predictor of falls across all three groups. Co-morbid parkinsonism most strongly predicted falls in the dementia group. Clients with borderline intact to mild cognitive impairment had higher odds of falling within the parkinsonism and comparison groups. PMID:27426223

  1. Medicaid care management: Description of high-cost addictions treatment clients

    PubMed Central

    Neighbors, Charles J.; Sun, Yi; Yerneni, Rajeev; Tesiny, Ed; Burke, Constance; Bardsley, Leland; McDonald, Rebecca; Morgenstern, Jon

    2013-01-01

    High utilizers of alcohol and other drug treatment (AODTx) services are a priority for healthcare cost control. We examine characteristics of Medicaid-funded AODTx clients, comparing three groups: individuals < 90th percentile of AODTx expenditures (n = 41,054); high-cost clients in the top decile of AODTx expenditures (HC; n = 5,718); and 1760 enrollees in a chronic care management (CM) program for HC clients implemented in 22 counties in New York State. Medicaid and state AODTx registry databases were combined to draw demographic, clinical, social needs and treatment history data. HC clients accounted for 49% of AODTx costs funded by Medicaid. As expected, HC clients had significant social welfare needs, comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions, and use of inpatient services. The CM program was successful in enrolling some high-needs, high-cost clients but faced barriers to reaching the most costly and disengaged individuals. PMID:23579079

  2. Effects of a Snoezelen room on the behavior of three autistic clients.

    PubMed

    McKee, Shari A; Harris, Grant T; Rice, Marnie E; Silk, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a Snoezelen room on the disruptive and prosocial behavior of three male, autistic inpatients was examined. In an ABAB reversal design, specific disruptive and prosocial behaviors were recorded for each client throughout the four 28-day periods of the study. Results indicated that the three clients had different responses to the room, but no client showed a decrease in disruptive behaviors while in the Snoezelen condition compared to baseline, and one client showed a clear pattern of increased disruptive behavior during the Snoezelen periods. There was a slight tendency for clients to engage in more prosocial behaviors while in Snoezelen. These findings do not support the contention that Snoezelen rooms are effective interventions for aggressive behavior in this client population. PMID:16806812

  3. Nursing students' perceptions of clients undergoing elective cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leah Beth

    2007-01-01

    Aesthetic obsession is commonplace in current society. Supermarket a isles dedicated to beauty products, makeup, and anti-aging creams seem to expand daily. Television and publications flood the public with messages of what constitutes beauty and how to achieve the ideal. Surgical alteration of the body is swiftly becoming a form of self-care technique along with other heath-promoting behavior. Since 2003, the general acceptance of plastic surgery among all Americans surpassed 50% (American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 2003). Elective cosmetic surgical procedures have increased by an astounding 444% since 1997 (American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 2006). This quest for body satisfaction based on modern cultural norms increases the public's need for accurate information and understanding from those in the healthcare profession. Despite a transformation in the general population's conception of cosmetic surgery and its clients, stigma still lies in many individuals, including those in the healthcare profession. As this progressively growing patient population emerges, many in healthcare question their attitudes toward plastic surgery and the patients receiving aesthetic operations. With clients undergoing plastic surgery becoming increasingly visible within the healthcare system, some unique aspects of patient care must be addressed. PMID:17901826

  4. MPEG-4 interactive image transmission on mobile thin clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joveski, B.; Mitrea, M.; Pr"teux, F.

    2010-05-01

    The main issue in this paper is to deploy a compressing algorithm for heterogeneous content (text, graphics, image and video) with low-complex decoding. Such an algorithm will be involved in the remote display core problem for mobile thin clients: it allows the graphical content, computed on a remote server, to be displayer on the user's thin terminal, even when the network constraints (bandwidth, errors) are very strict. The paper is structured into three parts. First, a client-server architecture is presented. On the server side, the graphical content is parsed, converted and binary encoded into the MPEG 4 (BiFS, LASeR) format. This content is further streamed to the terminal, where it is played into a simple MPEG player. Secondly, this architecture is considered as a test bed for MPEG 4 performance assessment for various types of content (image, graphics, text). The quantitative results were focussed on bandwidth requirements and quality of experience. Finally, the conclusions are structured as a reference benchmarking of the MPEG (BiFS, LASeR) and outside (VNC) mobile remote display potential solutions.

  5. Indian system of medicine and women's health: a clients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Guha Mazumdar, Papiya; Gupta, Kamla

    2007-11-01

    India has a strong base of ancient indigenous systems of medicine and its national health policies and programmes have consistently promoted the integration of Indian Systems of Medicine (ISM) into the country's official health system. Realizing the safety and efficacy of ISM drugs, the Department of Indian Systems of Medicine and Homoeopathy (ISM&H) has suggested their use for certain women's health problems and during pregnancy. Although the Government of India has attempted to integrate ISM through the country's contemporary health programme of Reproductive and Child Health (RCH), utilization dynamics from the clients' perspective is little understood. This study shows that, at least in urban areas, for the majority of women's health problems biomedicine is regarded as the first choice, failure of which leads clients to seek treatment from ISM as a final resort. Nevertheless, women showed a preference for ISM treatment for certain specific health problems, strongly backed by a belief in their efficacy. Of the predictors that positively influenced women's choice of ISM treatment, 'strong evidenced-based results' was found to be the most important. Women's preference for ISM is dependent on the availability of competent providers. PMID:17537277

  6. Addressing the repressed needs of the Arabic client.

    PubMed

    Dwairy, M

    1997-01-01

    In comparison to families in Western society, the traditional Arabic family plays a relatively greater role in providing support for adult progeny. This serves to condition adult offspring to continue to comply with the will and values of the family. Therefore, in exchange for familial support, Arabic individuals learn to repress authentic needs and emotions, and within that process they relinquish the need for self-actualization. Arabic society discourages individualism and opposes self-actualization by means of simultaneous punishment and moralization. Thus, there is a relatively greater development of the social value system (or superego) and comparatively less development of the self (or ego). In comparison to Western society, Arabic individuals continue to experience greater oppression during adulthood. Given these cultural differences, the processes of reliving and activating repressed needs and emotions, which ultimately serves to promote self-actualization, will transform intrapsychic conflicts into interpersonal and social ones. Thus, personal actions typically encouraged during Western psychotherapy are likely to produce significant social oppression. Indeed, promoting awareness of repressed needs and emotions often leads the Arabic client to become more helpless, because such wishes will rarely be socially sanctioned or satisfactorily fulfilled. Therefore, when addressing repressed needs and emotions in psychotherapy, ego strength, cultural identity, and degree of strictness of the client's family of origin must be considered. PMID:9231529

  7. Client-Side Event Processing for Personalized Web Advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stühmer, Roland; Anicic, Darko; Sen, Sinan; Ma, Jun; Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stojanovic, Nenad

    The market for Web advertisement is continuously growing and correspondingly, the number of approaches that can be used for realizing Web advertisement are increasing. However, current approaches fail to generate very personalized ads for a current Web user that is visiting a particular Web content. They mainly try to develop a profile based on the content of that Web page or on a long-term user's profile, by not taking into account current user's preferences. We argue that by discovering a user's interest from his current Web behavior we can support the process of ad generation, especially the relevance of an ad for the user. In this paper we present the conceptual architecture and implementation of such an approach. The approach is based on the extraction of simple events from the user interaction with a Web page and their combination in order to discover the user's interests. We use semantic technologies in order to build such an interpretation out of many simple events. We present results from preliminary evaluation studies. The main contribution of the paper is a very efficient, semantic-based client-side architecture for generating and combining Web events. The architecture ensures the agility of the whole advertisement system, by complexly processing events on the client. In general, this work contributes to the realization of new, event-driven applications for the (Semantic) Web.

  8. Final Report for ''Client Server Software for the National Transport Code Collaboration''

    SciTech Connect

    John R Cary; David Alexander; Johan Carlsson; Kelly Luetkemeyer; Nathaniel Sizemore

    2004-04-30

    OAK-B135 Tech-X Corporation designed and developed all the networking code tying together the NTCC data server with the data client and the physics server with the data server and physics client. We were also solely responsible for the data and physics clients and the vast majority of the work on the data server. We also performed a number of other tasks.

  9. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    PubMed

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training. PMID:12557465

  10. One-year status of homeless mentally ill clients who completed a transitional residential program.

    PubMed

    Murray, R; Baier, M; North, C; Lato, M; Eskew, C

    1997-02-01

    Of 228 homeless, severely persistently mentally ill clients admitted within a 5 1/2 year period to a transitional residential program, 179 (79%) remained in contact with staff for at least one year post-discharge. Housing was maintained by 141 (78%) of the clients for at least one year. Entitlements increased from admission, to discharge, to one year post-discharge. Clients maintaining contact for at least one year post-discharge were likely to have participated in two or more day treatment programs during residence. Success of the Program may be partly attributed to the staff's vigilance in maintaining post-discharge client contact. PMID:9061262

  11. Psychotherapists' outcomes with White and racial/ethnic minority clients: First, the good news.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jeffrey A; McAleavey, Andrew A; Castonguay, Louis G; Locke, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate whether psychotherapists differ in their effectiveness with clients, (b) determine whether disparities exist within therapists' caseloads in their outcomes with White and racial and ethnic minority (REM) clients, (c) explore therapist factors that might contribute to observed therapist effects, and (d) identify whether treatment outcomes varied for REM and White clients. A sample of 3,825 clients seen by 251 therapists at 45 college counseling centers completed the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms at the beginning and end of individual psychotherapy. Therapists differed in their effectiveness at reducing general distress across clients, and evidence was found for disparities within therapists' caseloads in their effectiveness with REM and White clients. Effect sizes were small. Disparities within therapists' caseloads were not a function of any therapist variable that was studied. Therapy outcomes were similar for White and REM clients. Therapist multicultural competence can, and should, be considered in terms of measurable outcomes across client racial/ethnic groups. It is possible to identify multiculturally expert therapists who evidence competence with both REM and White clients and who might serve as models from whom the field could learn. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27078197

  12. Psychotherapists' experience with clients who engage in consensual sadomasochism: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anne A; Love-Crowell, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Consensual sadomasochism (Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, Sadism and Masochism; BDSM) is relatively common, but the experience of psychotherapists who work with clients who engage in BDSM has received little study. We conducted semistructured interviews with 14 therapists experienced in working with BDSM clients. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for thematic content. Therapists emphasized the importance of cultural competence, including a nonjudgmental attitude and knowledge of BDSM practices and cultural values. BDSM was rarely a central issue in therapy, relationship issues were clients' most common presenting concerns. Therapists who practiced BDSM themselves often encountered boundary issues with clients. PMID:18396730

  13. Healing Relationships: A Qualitative Study of Healers and Their Clients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Stöckigt, B M H; Besch, F; Jeserich, F; Holmberg, C; Witt, C M; Teut, M

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the relationships between healers and their clients in Germany. Methods. An interdisciplinary research team performed semistructured interviews with healers and clients and participatory observation of healing sessions. All interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Results. Fifteen healers and sixteen clients were included. The healer-client relationship was described as a profound and unique experience, which brought forth interpersonal and spiritual connections. The healers were seen as role models for healing to occur and support for being connected spiritually. The clients had to be open-minded and responsible. The importance of the healers' empathy was emphasized. Discussion. The relationship between healer and client can be seen as a triangular connection between client, healer, and a transcendent source which is not the case in typical patient-doctor relationships. The spiritual connection is also said to enhance the empathetic understanding of the healer. The personality and a partner-like attitude of the healer supported the client in giving a more positive meaning to his life, in reconnecting to his spirituality, and in taking responsibility. Future studies should address the role of spirituality in health care and the development of enduring healer-client relationships. PMID:26136806

  14. Healing Relationships: A Qualitative Study of Healers and Their Clients in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stöckigt, B. M. H.; Besch, F.; Jeserich, F.; Holmberg, C.; Witt, C. M.; Teut, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the relationships between healers and their clients in Germany. Methods. An interdisciplinary research team performed semistructured interviews with healers and clients and participatory observation of healing sessions. All interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Results. Fifteen healers and sixteen clients were included. The healer-client relationship was described as a profound and unique experience, which brought forth interpersonal and spiritual connections. The healers were seen as role models for healing to occur and support for being connected spiritually. The clients had to be open-minded and responsible. The importance of the healers' empathy was emphasized. Discussion. The relationship between healer and client can be seen as a triangular connection between client, healer, and a transcendent source which is not the case in typical patient-doctor relationships. The spiritual connection is also said to enhance the empathetic understanding of the healer. The personality and a partner-like attitude of the healer supported the client in giving a more positive meaning to his life, in reconnecting to his spirituality, and in taking responsibility. Future studies should address the role of spirituality in health care and the development of enduring healer-client relationships. PMID:26136806

  15. Comparative analysis of a client's verbal responses in counseling sessions: quantitative case study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Jong

    2011-04-01

    This study investigated how the in-session change in a client's verbal behavior might influence the effectiveness of counseling sessions. 10 sessions of counseling with a male undergraduate suffering from depressive mood were conducted by a humanistically oriented counselor. The two most effective and the two least effective sessions were identified according to the client's evaluation of the effectiveness of counseling sessions. Results indicated that over the three segments of the most effective sessions, the client gradually increased responses that indicated exploration of his own emotions, thoughts, and behaviors. By contrast, the client continued talking mainly about past events in a storytelling manner throughout the least effective sessions. PMID:21675577

  16. Client Preferences Affect Treatment Satisfaction, Completion, and Clinical Outcome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; McLear, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of client preferences on treatment satisfaction, completion, and clinical outcome. Our search of the literature resulted in 34 empirical articles describing 32 unique clinical trials that either randomized some clients to an active choice condition (shared decision making condition or choice of treatment) or assessed client preferences. Clients who were involved in shared decision making, chose a treatment condition, or otherwise received their preferred treatment evidenced higher treatment satisfaction (ESd = .34; p < .001), increased completion rates (ESOR = 1.37; ESd = .17; p < .001), and superior clinical outcome (ESd = .15; p < .0001), compared to clients who were not involved in shared decision making, did not choose a treatment condition, or otherwise did not receive their preferred treatment. Although the effect sizes are modest in magnitude, they were generally consistent across several potential moderating variables including study design (preference versus active choice), psychoeducation (informed versus uninformed), setting (inpatient versus outpatient), client diagnosis (mental health versus other), and unit of randomization (client versus provider). Our findings highlight the clinical benefit of assessing client preferences, providing treatment choices when two or more efficacious options are available, and involving clients in treatment-related decisions when treatment options are not available. PMID:25189522

  17. Temporal variation in facilitator and client behavior during group motivational interviewing sessions

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Jon M.; Hunter, Sarah B.; Benson, Jennifer G.; Cochrum, Linda L.; Rowell, Lauren N.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for Motivational interviewing (MI) in changing problematic behaviors. Research on the causal chain for MI suggests influence of facilitator speech on client speech. This association has been examined using macro (session-level) and micro (utterance-level) measures; however, effects across sessions have largely been unexplored, particularly with groups. We evaluated a sample of 129 adolescent group MI sessions, using a behavioral coding system and timing information to generate information on facilitator and client speech (CT: change talk) within 5 successive segments (quintiles) of each group session. We hypothesized that facilitator speech (open-ended questions and reflections of CT) would be related to subsequent CT. Repeated measures analysis indicated significant quadratic and cubic trends for facilitator and client speech across quintiles. Across quintiles, cross-lagged panel analysis using a zero-inflated negative binomial model showed minimal evidence of facilitator speech on client CT, but did indicate several effects of client CT on facilitator speech, and of client CT on subsequent client CT. Results suggest that session-level effects of facilitator speech on client speech do not arise from long-duration effects of facilitator speech; instead, we detected effects of facilitator speech on client speech only at the beginning and end of sessions, when open questions respectively suppressed and enhanced client expressions of CT. Findings suggest that clinicians must remain vigilant to client CT throughout the group session, reinforcing it when it arises spontaneously and selectively employing open-ended questions to elicit it when it does not, particularly towards the end of the session. PMID:26415055

  18. [Academic procrastination in clients of a psychotherapeutic student counselling center].

    PubMed

    Jamrozinski, Katja; Kuda, Manfred; Mangholz, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    The start of university education is the beginning of a new phase of life for young adults, which requires significant psychosocial adjustments. Sociobiographical data, clinical symptoms, characteristics of education, work attitude, and career perspectives were gathered from 152 clients by a psychotherapeutic student counselling center to evaluate characteristics of students with and without academic procrastination. The procrastination group comprised heightened numbers of students who had changed universities, and people with suboptimal career prospects and career targets. These subjects were more often male and showed increased incidences of drug- and alcohol problems, as well as a lack of planning of the future. Furthermore, they had larger amounts of their study self-financed. On the basis of these results, concrete recommendations for preventive measures to improve on-time completion of study, and to prevent student drop-out are presented. PMID:18988140

  19. Reprint of: Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-06-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  20. Client side decompression technique provides faster DNA sequence data delivery.

    PubMed

    Sufi, Fahim; Fang, Qiang; Cosic, Irena; Ferguson, Roy

    2005-01-01

    DNA sequences are generally very long chains of sequentially linked nucleotides. There are four different nucleotides and combinations of these build the nucleotide information of sequence files contained in data sources. When a user searches for any sequence for an organism, a compressed sequence file can be sent from the data source to the user. The compressed file then can be decompressed at the client end resulting in reduced transmission time over the Internet. A compression algorithm that provides a moderately high compression rate with minimal decompression time is proposed in this paper. We also compare a number of different compression techniques for achieving efficient delivery methods from an intelligent genomic search agent over the Internet. PMID:17282828

  1. Extended Resource Management Using Client Classification and Economic Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püschel, Tim; Borissov, Nikolay; Neumann, Dirk; Macías, Mario; Guitart, Jordi; Torres, Jordi

    Commercialization of computing resources will become more and more important as the transition from Grid computing in academic environments to commercial services based on concepts such as utility or Cloud computing progresses. This results in the necessity to not only base components on technical aspects, but also to include economical aspects in their design. This paper presents a framework that links technical and economical aspects to the management of computational resources. Economic enhancements like dynamic pricing and client classification are introduced based on a technical resource management environment and positioned within this resulting in a proposed architecture for an Economically Enhanced Resource Manager (EERM). The introduced approach is evaluated considering various economic design criteria and example scenarios.

  2. Overcoming decommissioning challenges through client/laboratory co-operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, Mike; Gray, Lesley

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Accelerated decommissioning projects of the type underway at the former gaseous diffusion plant at BNG Capenhurst, UK, involve characterisation and radiochemical fingerprinting of a variety of unusual materials derived from legacy wastes. The project management and technical challenges that can occur during such a program can be successfully surmounted if a close working relationship between the client and the analytical laboratory is achieved. The Capenhurst Integrated Decommissioning Program (IDP) is an example of how such co-operation can reduce costs and time scales by providing the analytical laboratory with key sample and technical information prior to the shipping of the samples to the lab. This ensures that challenges associated with unusual sample matrices can be anticipated and dealt with at an early stage in the project. Gamma spectrometry is the most common analytical technique when analysing samples for radioactive content as it is non-destructive, relatively inexpensive and fast. However, accurate measurement generally requires samples of a known density to be counted in calibrated geometries. This becomes a challenge as many legacy wastes comprise materials of uneven geometry and/or varying density, as has been the case during the Capenhurst IDP. Liaising with the client to ensure a representative sub-sample of the material is taken on-site, and a series of additional checks when analysing the sample ensure that accurate results are obtained even for non-routine materials. Often it is only one or two radionuclides that dominate the radioactive inventory for legacy wastes. (authors)

  3. Viewing ISS Data in Real Time via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Gerry; Chamberlain, Jim

    2004-01-01

    EZStream is a computer program that enables authorized users at diverse terrestrial locations to view, in real time, data generated by scientific payloads aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The only computation/communication resource needed for use of EZStream is a computer equipped with standard Web-browser software and a connection to the Internet. EZStream runs in conjunction with the TReK software, described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article, that coordinates multiple streams of data for the ground communication system of the ISS. EZStream includes server components that interact with TReK within the ISS ground communication system and client components that reside in the users' remote computers. Once an authorized client has logged in, a server component of EZStream pulls the requested data from a TReK application-program interface and sends the data to the client. Future EZStream enhancements will include (1) extensions that enable the server to receive and process arbitrary data streams on its own and (2) a Web-based graphical-user-interface-building subprogram that enables a client who lacks programming expertise to create customized display Web pages.

  4. Managing Mental Health Problems in Everyday Life: Drug Treatment Client's Self-Care Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Martin; Treloar, Carla

    2008-01-01

    Little is understood about the self-care activities undertaken by drug treatment clients. Using data from a qualitative study of drug treatment and mental health we identify the self-care practices of drug treatment clients diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Seventy-seven participants were interviewed in four sites across Australia.…

  5. The Role of Reflection on Clients' Change in the Coaching Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristal, Zuno

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the role of reflection in the personal life-coaching process and the ways it affects clients' change, as perceived by both coach and client. Underlying this study is that coaching is currently recognized as a learning process, yet how reflection is understood or used is currently unspecified. Insights gained from the adult…

  6. Suicide Attempts and Severe Psychiatric Morbidity among Former Child Welfare Clients--A National Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinnerljung, Bo; Hjern, Anders; Lindblad, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background: Few large sample studies have examined psychiatric morbidity among former child welfare/protection clients. In this study, risks for suicide attempts and severe psychiatric morbidity in younger years were assessed for former child welfare clients in ten national birth cohorts, comparing them with general population peers and…

  7. Integrating Attachment Theory to Support a Client Coming to Terms with Infidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claire, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Finding it difficult to overcome the emotional distress experienced when considering her husband's infidelity, a client seeks counselling support. The client's goal was to learn about herself and to use the experience as an opportunity for self transformation. The case study utilizes Attachment Theory and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to help the…

  8. The Effects of Counselor Response Upon the Premature Termination of Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupre, Robert W.

    The response made by the counselor and the degree of interpersonal relationship, which he involves himself, is important in determining whether the client returns to counseling or whether he terminates prematurely. An analysis of 44 interviews, 22 of which led to premature termination on the part of the client, revealed an astoundingly different…

  9. Shared Decision Making for Clients with Mental Illness: A Randomized Factorial Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukens, Jonathan M.; Solomon, Phyllis; Sorenson, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to test the degree to which client clinical characteristics and environmental context and social workers' practice values and experience influenced support for client's autonomy and willingness to engage in shared decision making (SDM), and whether willingness to engage in SDM was mediated by support…

  10. Access to, Use of, and Attitudes toward Telecommunication among Rural VR Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipsen, Catherine; Rigles, Bethany; Arnold, Nancy; Seekins, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Telecommunication offers rural vocational rehabilitation (VR) clients a method of communicating with their VR counselor between face-to-face visits. Unfortunately, certain telecommunication methods may not be available to many rural VR clients or may pose barriers in the rehabilitation process. This article describes findings from an exploratory…

  11. Multiple Codes, Multiple Impressions: An Analysis of Doctor-Client Encounters in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odebunmi, Akin

    2013-01-01

    Existing studies on doctor-client interactions have largely focused on monolingual encounters and the interactional effects and functions of the languages used in the communication between doctors and their clients. They have neither, to a large extent, examined the several codes employed in single encounters and their pragmatic roles nor given…

  12. A Public-Key Based Authentication and Key Establishment Protocol Coupled with a Client Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, M. C.; Fung, Chun-Kan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses network denial-of-service attacks which have become a security threat to the Internet community and suggests the need for reliable authentication protocols in client-server applications. Presents a public-key based authentication and key establishment protocol coupled with a client puzzle protocol and validates it through formal logic…

  13. Using Web-Based Peer Benchmarking to Manage the Client-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raska, David; Keller, Eileen Weisenbach; Shaw, Doris

    2013-01-01

    The complexities of integrating client-based projects into marketing courses provide challenges for the instructor but produce richness of context and active learning for the student. This paper explains the integration of Web-based peer benchmarking as a means of improving student performance on client-based projects within a single semester in…

  14. 37 CFR 11.108 - Conflict of interest; Current clients; Specific rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients; Specific rules. 11.108 Section 11.108 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... Conflict of interest; Current clients; Specific rules. (a) A practitioner shall not enter into a...

  15. 37 CFR 11.108 - Conflict of interest; Current clients; Specific rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients; Specific rules. 11.108 Section 11.108 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... Conflict of interest; Current clients; Specific rules. (a) A practitioner shall not enter into a...

  16. Teenage Parenthood among Child Welfare Clients: A Swedish National Cohort Study of Prevalence and Odds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinnerljung, Bo; Franzen, Eva; Danielsson, Maria

    2007-01-01

    To assess prevalence and odds for teenage parenthood among former child welfare clients, we used national register data for all children born in Sweden 1972-1983 (n = 1,178,207), including 49,582 former child welfare clients with varying intervention experiences. Logistic regression models, adjusted for demographic, socio-economic and familial…

  17. Serving Clients with Hearing Loss: Best Practices in Mental Health Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusick, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the risk factors and characteristics of clients with hearing loss, including inequitable access to education and mental health care services, financial barriers, communication problems, and societal discrimination. Culturally specific counseling approaches and techniques for mental health counselors serving clients with…

  18. Usage of Thin-Client/Server Architecture in Computer Aided Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimen, Caghan; Kavurucu, Yusuf; Aydin, Halit

    2014-01-01

    With the advances of technology, thin-client/server architecture has become popular in multi-user/single network environments. Thin-client is a user terminal in which the user can login to a domain and run programs by connecting to a remote server. Recent developments in network and hardware technologies (cloud computing, virtualization, etc.)…

  19. Reconciling Spiritual Values Conflicts for Counselors and Lesbian and Gay Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Kathleen M.; Dobmeier, Robert A.; Reiner, Summer M.; Casquarelli, Elaine J.; Giglia, Lauren A.; Goodwin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Counselors and lesbian and gay clients experience parallel values conflicts between religious beliefs/spirituality and sexual orientation. This article uses critical thinking to assist counselors to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with professional ethical codes. Clients are assisted to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with sexual…

  20. The Client-Centered Approach as a Foundation for Teaching the Introductory Course in Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najor, Michele A.; Motschall, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the authors use a broad-based, client-centered model to teach an introductory course in public relations, integrating writing assignments for "clients" into course topics, which include history, ethics, theory, research, program planning, publicity, crisis management, and evaluation methods. Discusses course objectives, and notes…

  1. Exploratory Use of Crites's CMI-Attitude Scale with Rehabilitation Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    Explored the use of Crites' Career Maturity Inventory (CMI) with rehabilitation clients in evaluation versus training groups. Results indicate the CMI may be useful in tapping variables important in the progress of rehabilita- tion clients. Suggests group placement, content, and reading level must be considered and further research is needed. (JAC)

  2. Program Evaluation without a Client: The Case of the Disappearing Intended Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluators know they are supposed to identify and engage with stakeholders. What happens when the client has a very narrow concept of the meaning of evaluation? What happens when the primary stakeholders, including the client, disappear just as the evaluation gets started? First, it is important to acknowledge the challenge, then develop a…

  3. A Conceptual Approach to the Problem of Therapist-Client Matching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Robert C.

    1970-01-01

    Approach described derives from social exchange theory as developed by Thibaut and Kelley, and states that successful therapist must provide client with a series of experiences of low hedonic outcome first to block disordered behavior and then to induce client into new behaviors with which he needs construct revising experiences. Presented at…

  4. The Experience of Therapists and Rural Clients Using Internet Therapy Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Shannon Christine

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of therapists and clients who were involved with online therapeutic interventions. Specifically, this study looked at the experiences of clients who live in rural areas and who struggle with substance use issues as previous research has indicated a need for creative ways of reaching these…

  5. 32 CFR 776.32 - Department of the Navy as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Department of the Navy as client. 776.32 Section 776.32 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.32 Department of the Navy as client. (a) Department of Navy...

  6. 32 CFR 776.32 - Department of the Navy as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Department of the Navy as client. 776.32 Section 776.32 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.32 Department of the Navy as client. (a) Department of Navy...

  7. 32 CFR 776.32 - Department of the Navy as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Department of the Navy as client. 776.32 Section 776.32 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.32 Department of the Navy as client. (a) Department of Navy...

  8. 32 CFR 776.32 - Department of the Navy as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Department of the Navy as client. 776.32 Section 776.32 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.32 Department of the Navy as client. (a) Department of Navy...

  9. ERDDAP - An Easier Way for Diverse Clients to Access Scientific Data From Diverse Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelssohn, R.; Simons, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    ERDDAP is a new open-source, web-based service that aggregates data from other web services: OPeNDAP grid servers (THREDDS), OPeNDAP sequence servers (Dapper), NOS SOAP service, SOS (IOOS, OOStethys), microWFS, DiGIR (OBIS, BMDE). Regardless of the data source, ERDDAP makes all datasets available to clients via standard (and enhanced) DAP requests and makes some datasets accessible via WMS. A client's request also specifies the desired format for the results, e.g., .asc, .csv, .das, .dds, .dods, htmlTable, XHTML, .mat, netCDF, .kml, .png, or .pdf (formats more directly useful to clients). ERDDAP interprets a client request, requests the data from the data source (in the appropriate way), reformats the data source's response, and sends the result to the client. Thus ERDDAP makes data from diverse sources available to diverse clients via standardized interfaces. Clients don't have to install libraries to get data from ERDDAP because ERDDAP is RESTful and resource-oriented: a URL completely defines a data request and the URL can be used in any application that can send a URL and receive a file. This also makes it easy to use ERDDAP in mashups with other web services. ERDDAP could be extended to support other protocols. ERDDAP's hub and spoke architecture simplifies adding support for new types of data sources and new types of clients. ERDDAP includes metadata management support, catalog services, and services to make graphs and maps.

  10. Coming out through Art: A Review of Art Therapy with LGBT Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton-Sweet, Laura M.; Sherry, Alissa

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines sexual identity development and the integration of art therapy in counseling with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) clients. Especially during the coming out process for LGBT clients, research has shown that levels of emotional and physical well-being decrease considerably. However, there is growing evidence in…

  11. Therapist-Worldview Matching: Not as Important as Matching to Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blow, Adrian J.; Davis, Sean D.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, we respond to Simon's article (2012). We discuss our view that therapy works best when therapists can match therapeutic interventions to the worldview of clients. We see this matching to client worldview as rooted in research evidence, and we suggest that therapists can practice authentically and effectively using more than one…

  12. Guide to Rehabilitation Services and Self-Advocacy Manual. Client Assistance Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Jamie

    This guide, which gives an overview of federally funded vocational rehabilitation programs available in New Mexico, was developed for clients and potential clients of vocational rehabilitation services. Written in a simple and clear manner, the manual outlines the goals of rehabilitation: independence, self-management, self-advocacy, and…

  13. Dogmatism Measured over Time as It Relates to Counselor Performance with Two Client Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kathleen S.; Hingst, Ann G.

    1980-01-01

    Examined relationship between Rokeach Dogmatism Scale scores obtained prior to training and measures of counseling effectiveness one year later. Higher dogmatic counselors were more effective with nonambiguous client problems and less consistently effective with different client types. Initial dogmatism predicted performance one year later with…

  14. The Client's Perspective on Forming a Counselling Alliance and Implications for Research on Counsellor Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Robinder P.; Davis, Michael D.; Arvay, Marla J.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the client's perspective on what helps form and strengthen the counselling alliance and aims to provide a preliminary catalogue of concrete client-identified alliance-building factors. Nine participants (four males, five females) currently or previously in counselling were interviewed using the Critical Incident…

  15. HIV prevalence and risk behaviors among male clients of female sex workers in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xia; Smith, Kumi; Chen, Ray Y.; Ding, Guowei; Yao, Yan; Wang, Haibo; Qian, Han-Zhu; Chang, Dongfang; Wang, Guixiang; Wang, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence and risk factors of HIV among male clients of female sex workers in China. Methods Convenience sampling methods were used to recruit 315 clients using FSW-client and client-client networks. Subjects provided information on socio-demographic characteristics and sexual and drug behavior patterns. Blood samples were collected for HIV testing and urine samples for opiate testing. Results Overall HIV prevalence was 6.0%; among drug users it was 30.8%. 33.7% of respondents reported that they always use condoms in commercial sex and 63.5% that they used a condom in the last commercial sex episode. Drug use (OR: 6.1; 95% CI: 1.7–21.4) and lack of a regular sexual partner (OR: 6.3; 95% CI: 1.8–21.9) were significantly associated with HIV infection. Conclusions Clients of FSWs serve as potential bridges for HIV transmission from the high-risk FSWs to the low-risk general population, making them a key target for intervention. High HIV prevalence rates among clients in Kaiyuan is particularly alarming given their risk behavior patterns including high rates of partner exchange, low condom use rates, and drug using behaviors. Innovative interventions are needed to reduce the risk of HIV among clients and reduce the bridge of transmission to the general population. PMID:19730110

  16. Jewish Israeli Social Work Students' Attitudes to the Prospect of Being Assigned an Israeli Arab Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    This study attempts to examine implications of political conflicts in social work with clients from the rival group. Using an anonymous, open-ended questionnaire, this study examines responses of 78 Jewish Israeli social work students to the hypothetical prospect of treating an Israeli Arab client. The vast majority expected cultural and political…

  17. How Does Motivational Interviewing Work? Therapist Interpersonal Skill Predicts Client Involvement Within Motivational Interviewing Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyers, Theresa B.; Miller, William R.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Although many studies have shown that motivational interviewing (MI) is effective in reducing problem behaviors, few have investigated purported causal mechanisms. Therapist interpersonal skills have been proposed as an influence on client involvement during MI sessions and as a necessary precursor to client commitment language. Using the…

  18. Goals, benefits, and outcomes of genetic counseling: client and genetic counselor assessment.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, B A; Biesecker, B B; Mastromarino, C L

    2000-09-18

    Most studies of outcomes of genetic counseling have focused on client knowledge, reproductive plans and behavior, or satisfaction. Other measures of the "value" of genetic counseling are needed to guide research assessing the impact of genetic counseling on individuals and populations, as well as to improve the process of providing care. To obtain input from providers, we conducted telephone interviews with six experienced genetic counselors, and then we held a focus group with 10 additional genetic counselors from a variety of practice settings. To obtain input from consumers, telephone interviews were also conducted with 19 past clients of these participating counselors. We found that counselor goals focus on meeting clients' needs, usually educating and providing psychosocial support. Clients often had few goals going into a session because they were unaware of what would be discussed or how the session would be structured. They usually did not expect to receive "counseling," and when they did, it was a welcome surprise. Both clients and counselors commented that a positive interpersonal interaction and "connecting" are primary measures of success. All clients appreciated the large amount of time spent with the counselor, and the manner (clear, comprehensive, and unhurried) of providing information. Many clients said that genetic counseling resulted in improved communication with their partners and other family members. Clients view the counselor as an "expert" and value the counselor as an on-going resource for both information and support. These "outcomes"f genetic counseling need to be assessed, and new measures must be developed. PMID:10995504

  19. 13 CFR 113.3-3 - Structural accommodations for handicapped clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sections 3-8 of the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) (appendix A to 41 CFR subpart 101-19.6... handicapped clients. 113.3-3 Section 113.3-3 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... ADMINISTRATOR General Provisions § 113.3-3 Structural accommodations for handicapped clients. (a)...

  20. Exploring Outcomes and Initial Self-Report of Client Motivation in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Michael L.; Sharp, Julia L.; Ilagan, Jill; Oberman, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between college counseling center clients' initial self-report of motivation and counseling outcome. Participants: The sample was composed of 331 student clients who utilized a college counseling center from August 2007 to August 2009. The college is a public, mid-size, urban university in the Southeast.…

  1. Client Accounts of Hope in Early Counseling Sessions: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Denise J.; Stege, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Hope enables individuals to envision a future in which they wish to participate (Jevne, 1994) and is foundational to counseling practice. However, there has been little research examining client accounts of hope in session. Using basic interpretive inquiry, this case study examines clients' accounts of hope during counseling using video-assisted…

  2. 45 CFR 1621.4 - Complaints by clients about manner or quality of legal assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pursuant to the recipient's private attorney involvement program under 45 CFR Part 1614 shall be processed in a manner consistent with its responsibilities under 45 CFR § 1614.3(d)(3) and with applicable...) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION CLIENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES § 1621.4 Complaints by clients about manner...

  3. 34 CFR 364.30 - What notice must be given about the Client Assistance Program (CAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What notice must be given about the Client Assistance... the State Plan Requirements? § 364.30 What notice must be given about the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? The State plan must include satisfactory assurances that all service providers will use...

  4. 45 CFR 1609.5 - Acceptance of reimbursement from a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of reimbursement from a client. 1609.5... CORPORATION FEE-GENERATING CASES § 1609.5 Acceptance of reimbursement from a client. (a) When a case results in recovery of damages or statutory benefits, a recipient may accept reimbursement from the...

  5. Secondary Prevention Services for Clients Who Are Low Risk in Drug Court: A Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMatteo, David S.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The drug court model assumes that most drug offenders are addicts, and that drug use fuels other criminal activity. As a result, drug court clients must satisfy an intensive regimen of treatment and supervisory obligations. However, research suggests that roughly one third of drug court clients do not have a clinically significant substance use…

  6. Young Clients' Narratives of the Purpose and Outcome of Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Kerry; Cartwright, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how adolescent clients construct the purpose and outcome of counselling. A narrative analysis was performed on interviews with 22 clients (aged 16--18) who had used a school-based counselling service. The aim was to identify the purpose and outcomes that participants attributed to their counselling experience. The analysis…

  7. Personal Counselling at an Ontario Community College: Client Groups, Service Usage, and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on personal counselling clients in a community college in Ontario. Using archival records from the 2008-2009 academic year, at-risk client groups were identified and compared with respect to usage rates and retention. Significant differences were identified. Overall, first-year students who engaged in personal counselling had a…

  8. 77 FR 24685 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Client Focus Groups and Qualitative Interviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... customer service trends seen in the Surveys. Qualitative client focus group data will enrich the... International Trade Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Client Focus Groups and... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The International Trade Administration's U.S. Commercial Service (CS)...

  9. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-3 - Cash payments for client solicitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cash payments for client solicitations. 275.206(4)-3 Section 275.206(4)-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.206(4)-3 Cash payments for client solicitations. (a) It...

  10. Client Aggression toward Rehabilitation Counselors Employed by State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trice, April Lynette

    2011-01-01

    Through a series of interviews this transcendental phenomenological study explored how rehabilitation counselors employed by state vocational rehabilitation agencies experienced client aggression. More specifically, it examined the circumstances involved when client aggression manifested in the work lives of rehabilitation counselors. This study…

  11. 75 FR 66796 - Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (“PwC”), Internal Firm Services Client Account Administrators Group...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Services, Atlanta, Georgia. The notice was published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2010 (75 FR 32224... Employment and Training Administration Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client... subject firm should read PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client...

  12. 45 CFR 2551.81 - What type of clients are eligible to be served?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What type of clients are eligible to be served? 2551.81 Section 2551.81 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SENIOR COMPANION PROGRAM Clients Served § 2551.81 What type...

  13. What Clients Find Helpful in Psychotherapy: Developing Principles for Facilitating Moment-to-Moment Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Heidi; Butler, Mike; Hill, Travis

    2006-01-01

    Clients who had completed psychotherapy were interviewed about the significant experiences and moments they recalled within their sessions. These interviews were analyzed using grounded theory, creating a hierarchy of categories that represent what clients find important in therapy. From the hermeneutic analysis of the content of these categories,…

  14. Effects of Client Violence on Social Work Students: A National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Pam

    2010-01-01

    This study uses a work stress theoretical framework to examine the effects of direct and indirect client violence on a randomly selected national sample of MSW and BSW social work students from the National Association of Social Workers (N=595). Client violence variables were analyzed in relationship to fear of future violence and occupational…

  15. What Therapists Learn from Psychotherapy Clients: Effects on Personal and Professional Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Sherry L.; Kipper-Smith, Adriana; Waddell, Manuela; Uhe, Mechtild; West, Joanne S.; Boothe, Jason H.; Frye, Joan M.; Tighe, Katherine; Usselman, Kelly L.; Gingras, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    While considerable research has examined how clients learn from psychotherapists, there is only sparse literature on what therapists learn from their therapy clients. In a qualitative, exploratory study, nine researchers interviewed 61 psychologists from across North America in order to see what psychotherapists may have learned and how they have…

  16. The Analysis of Challenging Relations: Influences on Interactive Behaviour of Staff towards Clients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, A. P. A. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Hendriks, A. H. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Relationships between support staff and clients with intellectual disability (ID) are important for quality of care, especially when dealing with challenging behaviour. Building upon an interpersonal model, this study investigates the influence of client challenging behaviour, staff attitude and staff emotional intelligence on…

  17. How Counselors Are Trained to Work with Bisexual Clients in CACREP-Accredited Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjo, Laurie Anne

    2013-01-01

    In spite of recent progress toward addressing the need for cultural competence with lesbian and gay-identified clients, bisexual-identified clients continue to be marginalized in the principles, theories, and methods of studying sexuality as well as in the training provided by counselor educators. A descriptive content analysis was conducted to…

  18. 49 CFR 1103.21 - How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. 1103.21 Section 1103.21 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. A practitioner shall put forth his best effort to...

  19. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees: A Replication and Extension with Temporary Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Catherine E.; Gallagher, Daniel G.; Gilley, K. Matthew

    2007-01-01

    This study replicates and extends Coyle-Shapiro and Morrow's study (Coyle-Shapiro, J.A.-M., & Morrow, P.C. 2006. Organizational and client commitment among contracted employees. "Journal of Vocational Behavior, 28," 416-431) of organizational and client commitment among contracted employees. Our study focuses on temporary workers rather than…

  20. Emotional Arousal, Client Perceptual Processing, and the Working Alliance in Experiential Psychotherapy for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missirlian, Tanya M.; Toukmanian, Shake G.; Warwar, Serine H.; Greenberg, Leslie S.

    2005-01-01

    Early-, middle-, and late-phase client emotional arousal, perceptual processing strategies, and working alliance were examined in relation to treatment outcome on 4 measures in 32 clients who previously underwent experiential therapy for depression. Hierarchical regression analyses relating these variables to outcome indicated that results varied…