Science.gov

Sample records for potencial cliente real

  1. Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

  2. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients…

  3. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients provide similar opportunities for skill demonstration. This study examined the correspondence of treatment adherence and competence ratings obtained in real client and role-played sessions for 91 clinicians trained in Motivational Interviewing (MI), using data from a multi-site trial examining three methods of clinician training (Martino et al., 2011). Results indicated overall poor integrity rating correspondence across the two session types, as indicated by weak correlations (r = .05–.27). Clinicians were rated significantly more MI adherent overall and specifically used more advanced MI strategies in role-played than real client sessions at several assessment time points (d = 0.36, 0.42). Real clients, in comparison to the role-play actor, demonstrated greater motivation at the beginning of the session (d = 1.09), discussion of unrelated topics (d = 0.70), and alliance with the clinician (d = 0.72). These findings suggest that MI integrity rating data obtained from real client and role-played sessions may not be interchangeable. More research is needed to improve the procedures and psychometric strength of treatment integrity assessment based on role-played sessions. PMID:23205626

  4. Clients' and therapists' real relationship and session quality in brief therapy: an actor partner interdependence analysis.

    PubMed

    Markin, Rayna D; Kivlighan, Dennis M; Gelso, Charles J; Hummel, Ann M; Spiegel, Eric B

    2014-09-01

    This study used the Actor Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kenny & Cook, 1999) to examine the associations of client- and therapist-rated real relationship (RR) and session quality over time. Eighty-seven clients and their therapists (n = 25) completed RR and session quality measures after every session of brief therapy. Therapists' current session quality ratings were significantly related to all of the following: session number (b = .04), their session quality rating of the previous session (b = .24), their RR in the previous session (b = 1.091), their client's RR in the previous session (b = .17), and interactions between their own and their clients' RR and session number (b = -.16 and β = -.04, respectively). Clients' ratings of current session quality were significantly related to only their own RR in the previous session (b = .47). Implications for future research and practice are discussed. PMID:24773091

  5. Real Clients, Real Management, Real Failure: The Risks and Rewards of Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyphert, Dale

    2006-01-01

    There are multiple advantages to service-learning projects across the business curriculum, but in communication classes the author has found their biggest value to be authenticity. A "real-world" assignment requires the flexible, creative integration of communication skills in an environment where, "unlike exams and other typical university…

  6. FRIEND Engine Framework: a real time neurofeedback client-server system for neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Basilio, Rodrigo; Garrido, Griselda J.; Sato, João R.; Hoefle, Sebastian; Melo, Bruno R. P.; Pamplona, Fabricio A.; Zahn, Roland; Moll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In this methods article, we present a new implementation of a recently reported FSL-integrated neurofeedback tool, the standalone version of “Functional Real-time Interactive Endogenous Neuromodulation and Decoding” (FRIEND). We will refer to this new implementation as the FRIEND Engine Framework. The framework comprises a client-server cross-platform solution for real time fMRI and fMRI/EEG neurofeedback studies, enabling flexible customization or integration of graphical interfaces, devices, and data processing. This implementation allows a fast setup of novel plug-ins and frontends, which can be shared with the user community at large. The FRIEND Engine Framework is freely distributed for non-commercial, research purposes. PMID:25688193

  7. Real Cases with African American Clients: Reports of Racially Diverse Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbley, Aretha F.; Shen, Yih-Jiun; Bonner, Fred A., II; Rice, Cynthia Wimberly; McGonagill, Rachelle; Williams, Vicki A.; Stevens, Harold

    2007-01-01

    By calling attention to human factors such as cultural biases, mistakes made, and lessons learned from real clinical scenarios, these racially diverse practitioners use their counseling experiences to offer a people-responsive, diversity-sensitive framework and recommendations for clinicians working with African Americans in university, school,…

  8. A Flexible Client-Driven 3DTV System for Real-Time Acquisition, Transmission, and Display of Dynamic Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xun; Liu, Yebin; Dai, Qionghai

    2008-12-01

    3D experience and free-viewpoint navigation are expected to be two essential features of next generation television. In this paper, we present a flexible 3DTV system in which multiview video streams are captured, compressed, transmitted, and finally converted to high-quality 3D video in real time. Our system consists of an [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] camera array, 16 producer PCs, a streaming server, multiple clients, and several autostereoscopic displays. The whole system is implemented over IP network to provide multiple users with interactive 2D/3D switching, viewpoint control, and synthesis for dynamic scenes. In our approach, multiple video streams are first captured by a synchronized camera array. Then, we adopt a lengthened-B-field and region of interest- (ROI-) based coding scheme to guarantee a seamless view switching for each user as well as saving per-user transmission bandwidth. Finally, a convenient rendering algorithm is used to synthesize a visually pleasing result by introducing a new metric called Clarity Degree (CD). Experiments on both synthetic and real-world data have verified the feasibility, flexibility, and good performance of our system.

  9. Interpersonal Influence Process in Real Life Counseling: Investigating Client Perceptions, Counselor Experience Level, and Counselor Power over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, P. Paul; Heesacker, Martin

    1982-01-01

    Examined interpersonal influence processes within an actual counseling context over an average of eight sessions. Results indicated that counselor experience level did not affect client perceptions of the counselor and perceived counselor expertise, attractiveness, and trustworthiness did change over time, but not in the same direction. (Author)

  10. Clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse J; Tao, Karen; Leach, Mark M; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-09-01

    The current retrospective study examined whether clients' (N = 176) perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation (MCO) were associated with their psychological functioning, working alliance, and real relationship scores. Moreover, we tested whether clients' perceptions of the working alliance and the real relationship mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. The results showed that clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO were positively related to working alliance, real relationship, and psychological functioning. Only clients' ratings of the working alliance mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. Thus, because clients perceive their psychotherapists as being more oriented toward cultural issues, they may view the therapist as being more credible and may gain a sense of comfort in the therapeutic process. In turn, clients' strong alliance facilitates improvement in psychological well-being. PMID:21639652

  11. Open Clients for Distributed Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayes, D. N.; Arko, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    We are actively developing a collection of open source example clients that demonstrate use of our "back end" data management infrastructure. The data management system is reported elsewhere at this meeting (Arko and Chayes: A Scaleable Database Infrastructure). In addition to their primary goal of being examples for others to build upon, some of these clients may have limited utility in them selves. More information about the clients and the data infrastructure is available on line at http://data.ldeo.columbia.edu. The available examples to be demonstrated include several web-based clients including those developed for the Community Review System of the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a real-time watch standers log book, an offline interface to use log book entries, a simple client to search on multibeam metadata and others are Internet enabled and generally web-based front ends that support searches against one or more relational databases using industry standard SQL queries. In addition to the web based clients, simple SQL searches from within Excel and similar applications will be demonstrated. By defining, documenting and publishing a clear interface to the fully searchable databases, it becomes relatively easy to construct client interfaces that are optimized for specific applications in comparison to building a monolithic data and user interface system.

  12. Client Suicide: What Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Patel, Amee B.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of a client to suicide is a painful personal and professional experience for mental health providers. Whether trainee or experienced professional, the affected clinician often reports feeling overwhelmed and unprepared for the experience of client suicide, together with significant emotional distress and diminished work performance. In…

  13. Perceived Counselor Characteristics, Client Expectations, and Client Satisfaction with Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppner, P. Paul; Heesacker, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Examined interpersonal influence process within counseling including relationship between perceived counselor expertness, attractiveness, and trustworthiness and client satisfaction; between client expectations on perceived counselor expertness, attractiveness, trustworthiness, and client satisfaction; and effects of actual counselor experience…

  14. Sophia Client Version 12

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Client Version 12 offers command line access to the Sophia Daemon and the Sophia database files. It provides print, fingerprint, acknowledge, color coding and status access to these other resources.

  15. Treating the bisexual client.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, S H

    2001-05-01

    Therapists, having recently come to terms with treating gay and lesbian clients, now must consider the issues that bisexual clients face. This article reviews the literature on what it means to identify as bisexual in a world where sexual identity is viewed as dichotomous, heterosexual at one end and gay or lesbian at the other end. The article explores sexual identity and its biological versus social origins, internalized biphobia, coming out, relationship patterns, and therapist issues. Two cases illustrate issues that might arise when a therapist is treating a bisexual client. The first case is a 17-year-old young woman who is accepting of her bisexual identity, and the second case is a 56-year-old woman, heterosexually identified and married, who suddenly fell in love with a woman. Concluding remarks focus on some future directions for research and work with bisexual clients. PMID:11304706

  16. Telematics-based online client-server/client collaborative environment for radiotherapy planning simulations.

    PubMed

    Kum, Oyeon

    2007-11-01

    Customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient is very useful for both a patient and a doctor because it provides the ability to deliver higher doses to a more accurately defined tumor and at the same time lower doses to organs at risk and normal tissues. This can be realized by building an accurate planning simulation system to provide better treatment strategies based on each patient's tomographic data such as CT, MRI, PET, or SPECT. In this study, we develop a real-time online client-server/client collaborative environment between the client (health care professionals or hospitals) and the server/client under a secure network using telematics (the integrated use of telecommunications and medical informatics). The implementation is based on a point-to-point communication scheme between client and server/client following the WYSIWIS (what you see is what I see) paradigm. After uploading the patient tomographic data, the client is able to collaborate with the server/client for treatment planning. Consequently, the level of health care services can be improved, specifically for small radiotherapy clinics in rural/remote-country areas that do not possess much experience or equipment such as a treatment planning simulator. The telematics service of the system can also be used to provide continued medical education in radiotherapy. Moreover, the system is easy to use. A client can use the system if s/he is familiar with the Windows(TM) operating system because it is designed and built based on a user-friendly concept. This system does not require the client to continue hardware and software maintenance and updates. These are performed automatically by the server. PMID:17943336

  17. Superpowers and client states

    SciTech Connect

    Efrat, M.; Bercovitch, J.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the world the two superpowers often conduct their global conflict by proxy, taking different sides in regional disputes. An important question of international relations is where the balance of power lies in the superpower client state relationship-how far are the interests of the superpower subordinated to those of the client state or vice versa. Taking the two case studies of the US-Israel relationship and the Soviet-Syrian relationship, this book explores the perceptions by each side of the relationship and the reality. It goes on to make general conclusions about superpower-client state relationships. Contents: Introduction; In Search of a Theoretical Framework; Client-States in Superpower Perception; Superpowers in Client States' Perception; The Case of US-Israel Relations; Israel in US Perspective; The USA in Israeli Perspective; Flows of US Civilian and Military Resources to Israel; The Case of Soviet-Syrian Relations; Syria in Soviet Perspective; The USSR in Syrian Perspective; Flows of Soviet Civilian and Military Resources to Syria; Comparative Analysis and Conclusions; Overview of the two cases studies and conclusions.

  18. On the Use of Client-Driven Projects in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, Dan; Winston, Wayne; Shafii-Mousavi, Morteza; Kochanowski, Paul; Lang, Chris; Ernstberger, Kathy; Hodgson, Ted

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of client-driven projects--projects that are posed by business, government, and non-profit organizations and based upon real problems facing the organization. Although client-driven projects have long been used in business and engineering education, their use in the mathematics classroom is rare. Client-driven…

  19. Meeting clients' spiritual needs.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2007-06-01

    True holistic care requires attention to spiritual as well as physical needs, but many health care providers do not feel comfortable discussing spiritual matters with clients. Although recognized by national nursing groups as a standard of care, nurses are not well prepared or rewarded for spiritual care efforts. There are several spiritual assessment tools available and many suggestions for interventions, but little research-based evidence on the effectiveness of spiritual care assessments or interventions. Nurses are well positioned by their continued intimate contact with clients and the importance of caring to nursing to lead the health care profession in developing spiritual care theory and practices. PMID:17544683

  20. Counseling Bisexual Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiley, Elizabeth B.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a brief conceptual statement about bisexuality. Offers a review of existing research studies, and suggests issues to consider when counseling bisexual clients. Defines bisexuality and discusses prevalence studies, identity development, and implications for counseling. Claims that bisexuality challenges traditional rules about sexual…

  1. Training Evaluation: Clients' Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted of 262 training providers in Malaysia, where providers must be government approved. Government regulation, client demands for high quality, and an economic downturn that focused attention on training costs have all influenced evaluation in a positive direction. (SK)

  2. The Afghan Refugee Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firling, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Contends both Afghan refugee children and adults perceive school as the primary resource for their successful transition into American society. Claims the school counselor is in a position to guide clients by providing them with necessary educational and career information. Describes aspects of Afghan culture relevant to counselors. (Author/ABL)

  3. Working with Potentially Assaultive Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdach, Allison D.

    1993-01-01

    Examines potentially assaultive or preassaultive client and suggests some ways to minimize the risk of assault by such clients. Data for the article are from author's 10-year experience in providing social work services on acute psychiatric ward in large public medical center. Reviews potentially assaultive client conditions of panic, rage,…

  4. The Competitive Advantage: Client Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffel, Linda G.; DeBord, Karen B.

    The adult education literature contains a considerable amount of research on and discussion of client service in the marketing process, management and staff roles in service- and product-oriented businesses, and the importance of client service and service quality to survival in the marketplace. By applying the principles of client-oriented…

  5. Client Perceptions of Pretreatment Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindsvatter, Aaron; Osborn, Cynthia J.; Bubenzer, Donald; Duba, Jill D.

    2010-01-01

    The authors suggest that when counselors have a rich understanding of pretreatment changes, they are better able to assist clients in capitalizing on such changes. The current study examined client perceptions of pretreatment changes. Thirty-six clients completed Q-sorts pertaining to pretreatment changes they experienced. Four factors pertaining…

  6. Chapter 43: Registry Clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G.; Plante, R.

    The registry is a central component for the development of astronomical tools and applications requiring search and discovery. It contains standard descriptions for a variety of astronomical resources and services, including methods for remote invocation. Using web service technology, programmatic interfaces to the registry offer a powerful and robust mechanism for extracting specific sets of services and also a framework for combining a variety of astronomical resources into complex applications, for example, Datascope, Open SkyQuery, and WESIX. While the legacy of the NVO does not extend far back into history, we present here the current state of interfaces that client applications and tools have been built on, yet also extend the concepts to the new standard Registry Interface which will provide a uniform client interface protocol throughout the IVOA registry network. We explore this technology and discuss several implementations that exist in the current VO framework using JAVA, C#, Python, and IDL.

  7. Client/server study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar; Marcus, Robert; Brewster, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find cost-effective and efficient strategies/solutions to integrate existing databases, manage network, and improve productivity of users in a move towards client/server and Integrated Desktop Environment (IDE) at NASA LeRC. The project consisted of two tasks as follows: (1) Data collection, and (2) Database Development/Integration. Under task 1, survey questionnaires and a database were developed. Also, an investigation on commercially available tools for automated data-collection and net-management was performed. As requirements evolved, the main focus has been task 2 which involved the following subtasks: (1) Data gathering/analysis of database user requirements, (2) Database analysis and design, making recommendations for modification of existing data structures into relational database or proposing a common interface to access heterogeneous databases(INFOMAN system, CCNS equipment list, CCNS software list, USERMAN, and other databases), (3) Establishment of a client/server test bed at Central State University (CSU), (4) Investigation of multi-database integration technologies/ products for IDE at NASA LeRC, and (5) Development of prototypes using CASE tools (Object/View) for representative scenarios accessing multi-databases and tables in a client/server environment. Both CSU and NASA LeRC have benefited from this project. CSU team investigated and prototyped cost-effective/practical solutions to facilitate NASA LeRC move to a more productive environment. CSU students utilized new products and gained skills that could be a great resource for future needs of NASA.

  8. Client Common Factors Represented by Client Motivation and Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheel, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ryan and colleagues are applauded for elevating client factors in the form of motivation and autonomy to equal status with the alliance as common factors in psychotherapy. Next, client motivation and autonomy are explained to be inextricably linked with one promoting the other. Motivational methods are summarized for the major approaches, making…

  9. The Therapeutic Alliance: Clients' Categorization of Client-Identified Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Arlene J.; Bedi, Robinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Clients' perspectives on the therapeutic alliance were examined using written descriptions of factors that clients believed to be helpful in developing a strong alliance. Fifty participants sorted previously collected statements into thematically similar piles and then gave each set of statements a title. Multivariate concept mapping statistical…

  10. Therapist Homophobia, Client Sexual Orientation, and Source of Client HIV Infection as Predictors of Therapist Reactions to Clients with HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Erkis, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses revealed that therapists responded with less empathy, attributed less responsibility to client for problem solving, assessed client's functioning to be worse, and were less willing to work with client when the client's source of HIV infection was from something other than drugs, when the client was gay, and when the therapist was more…

  11. Beyond clients and servers.

    PubMed Central

    van Mulligen, E.; Timmers, T.

    1994-01-01

    Computer scientists working in medical informatics have to face the problem that software offered by industry is more and more adopted for clinical use by medical professionals. A new challenge arises of how to combine commercial solutions with typical medical software that already exists for some years and proved to be reliable with these off-the-shelf solutions [1]. With the HERMES project, this new challenge was accepted and possible solutions to integrate existing legacy systems with state-of-the-art commercial solutions have been investigated. After a period of prototyping to assess possible alternative solutions, a system based on an indirect client-server model was implemented with help of the industry. In this paper, its architecture is described together with the most important features currently covered. Based on the HERMES architecture, both systems for clinical data analysis and patient care (cardiology) are currently developed. PMID:7949988

  12. Client-server technology meets operational-planning challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, L.A.; Stansberry, C.J. Jr.; Le, K.D.; Ma, H.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities are starting to find that it is rather difficult to upgrade their proprietary energy management system, which was designed for real-time operations, fast enough to keep pace with rapidly changing business needs. To solve this problem, many utilities are building a data warehouse to store real-time data and using the data warehouse to launch client-server applications to meet their pressing business requirements. This article describes a client-server implementation launched at Tennessee Valley Authority in 1994 to meet the utility`s operational-planning needs. The article summarizes some of the lessons learned and outlines future development plans.

  13. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  14. Using Clients to Monitor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Jack; Stup, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing survey that illustrates how evaluators, working with program managers, have effectively used client-based data to monitor performance in the Social Security Administration. The value of client-based data outweighs the limitations and problems collecting it. Customer perceptions are a critical barometer of quality.…

  15. Dogmatism within the Counselor-Client Dyad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosi, Donald J.

    1970-01-01

    Different levels of counselor and client dogmatism combined additively in terms of their effect on client ratings of the relationship. Client ratings of the relationship were progressively higher as more openness occurred in the dyad. (Author)

  16. Students as Clients in a Professional/Client Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes the metaphor of professional/client rather than student-as-customer to characterize the relationship between professors and students. Uses examples of fitness trainer, management consultant, accounting service, and mountain guide to illustrate faculty and student roles. (SK)

  17. Risk taking among diabetic clients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D H; Schwartz-Barcott, D; Patterson, B

    1992-01-01

    Diabetic clients must make daily decisions about their health care needs. Observational and anecdotal evidence suggests that vast differences exist between the kinds of choices diabetic clients make and the kinds of chances they are willing to take. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a diabetic risk-assessment tool. This instrument, which is based on subjective expected utility theory, measures risk-prone and risk-averse behavior. Initial findings from a pilot study of 18 women clients who are on insulin indicate that patterns of risk behavior exist in the areas of exercise, skin care, and diet. PMID:1729123

  18. Influence of Client Socioeconomic Status on Selected Behaviors, Attitudes, and Decisions of Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jarvis A.; Hutton, Ben O.

    1977-01-01

    Male and female graduate students interviewed an actor and an actress whom they believed to be real clients. To half of the counselors, the players posed as well-to-do individuals, and to half as working class individuals. Counselors may unconsciously emply a different decision-making process for high- and low-status clients. (Author)

  19. Effectively communicating with your clients.

    PubMed

    Abood, Sarah K

    2008-08-01

    The successful ability to efficiently collect diet histories, convey appropriate health messages, and discuss client concerns about the safe feeding of pets requires excellent communication skills. In addition to understanding what the client wants for their pet, thorough nutritional interviewers gather information pertaining to animal factors, dietary factors, and feeding management factors. With the expansion of the Internet, increasing advances in medical care, and the health concerns associated with pet food recalls, small animal clients are looking to veterinarians for guidance and information on dietary recommendations in ever increasing numbers. Evaluating current information on changes in the pet food industry should be a periodic learning objective for all members of the veterinary health care team. Consistent, effective communication between veterinarians, their staff, and their clients can improve compliance, increase satisfaction levels, and improve patient outcomes. PMID:18656842

  20. Resistance, Reactance, and the Difficult Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, E. Thomas; Sanders, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Describes effect of client resistance and reactance in counseling and methods for assessing these phenomena. Conceptualizes client symptoms as ego-syntonic, where symptom is consonant with client's self-image, or ego-dystonic, where it is not. Uses concepts in deriving counseling strategies for working with difficult clients according to model…

  1. A Client Centered Approach to Job Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    1971-01-01

    A client centered placement approach for handicapped people is proposed as an alternative to the traditional selective placement method. The client centered placement is based on client responsibility and counselor direction and requires the counselor to have an unrealistic but optimistic attitude that the client will get a suitable job.…

  2. Client training vital for NFP.

    PubMed

    Keller, S; Finger, W R

    1996-01-01

    Clients need both skill and motivation to effectively use natural family planning (NFP). Thus, NFP services must provide adequate counseling and training to clients. A good teacher of NFP does not need formal health care training but she/must have good communication skills. A teacher usually needs to meet with a client four times over a period of several months to teach NFP. Fertility awareness comprises the first step in NFP training. This involves helping couples to understand the reproductive system, menstrual cycles, and fertile periods. The NFP Training and Medical Services Center in Nairobi, Kenya, provides clients, many of whom live in slums and are illiterate, with an exercise book with small squares that they color so they can track their fertility signs. They tend to use the cervical mucus method rather than the basal temperature method which requires a thermometer. In Los Angeles, California, clients of one NFP program attend group sessions and individual counseling sessions to learn about the menstrual cycle, fertile period, and rules of NFP and how to apply them. The Twin Cities NFP Center in Minnesota found that individual counseling was 50% more expensive than group sessions and it affected changes in neither the pregnancy nor NFP continuation rates. Group training here involved more men. Catholic groups in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Korea, and the US conducted a study of NFP programs and found that client's willingness or ability to discuss NFP were not associated with socioeconomic status, previous family planning experiences, and education. Another study of the same users did find an association between higher education and lower unplanned pregnancy rate. The same was true for previous family planning use. Since limited resources prevent some family planning programs from training staff in NFP, the programs can refer clients to existing NFP services, sending one staff member to be trained in NFP, or having one staff member providing NFP

  3. When a client considers surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Storch, Janet

    2002-05-01

    Although the registered nurse is not expected to have expert knowledge in all areas of practice, clients do ask questions in one health service area that might normally be handled in the context of another service area. When these sorts of 'surprising questions' arise, it is important for registered nurses to determine the nature of the question and to provide as much beginning assistance and guidance as possible to help the client to clarify the issues/concerns. Clearly, the nurse should do all she can to assist Sarah to access nurses and other health professionals who could provide more complete information and counselling for Sarah. PMID:12046496

  4. Interpersonal psychotherapy with transgender clients.

    PubMed

    Budge, Stephanie L

    2013-09-01

    Interpersonal therapy (IPT) is a particularly useful approach to use when working with clients who identify as transgender or gender nonconforming. All transgender individuals will experience changes and adjustment throughout their identity process, often referred to as transitioning. IPT offers specific interventions for psychotherapists to use with clients whose presenting concerns are specifically related to transitions. The current article outlines a case example of a transgender man who is experiencing difficulty with "role transitions" and offers four transgender-specific clinical intervention strategies derived within the traditional IPT framework. PMID:24000851

  5. The cost of treating addiction from the client's perspective: results from a multi-modality application of the Client DATCAP.

    PubMed

    McCollister, Kathryn E; French, Michael T; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Booth, Brenda; Rapp, Richard; Carr, Carey

    2009-10-01

    There is a considerable disparity between the number of individuals who need substance abuse treatment and the number who actually receive it. This is partly due to the fact that many individuals with substance use disorders do not perceive a need for formal treatment. Another contributing factor, however, is a discrepancy between the real and perceived cost of services. Although many cost evaluations of substance abuse treatment have been conducted from the treatment provider perspective, less is known about the client-specific costs of attending treatment (e.g., lost work and leisure time, transportation, out-of-pocket and in-kind payments). Concerns about financial and other barriers to participating in treatment have encouraged addiction researchers to more carefully consider these previously unmeasured costs. To address this information gap, we administered the Client Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program (Client DATCAP) to 302 clients (representing a total of 302 outpatient and 142 inpatient treatment episodes) as part of a larger study examining the cost-effectiveness of interventions designed to improve treatment linkage and engagement in Dayton, Ohio. The value of a client's time accounted for the largest component of total cost (more than 59%). The cost per visit for outpatient clients ranged from $19 for outpatient methadone to $38 for intensive outpatient/aftercare treatment. The average cost per day of treatment for inpatient clients was $235. Policy makers and treatment providers now have a broader view of the opportunity cost of addiction treatment and can use this information to support initiatives for improved treatment access and delivery. PMID:19574000

  6. Students: Customers, Clients or Pawns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tight, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The metaphor of the student as a consumer or customer is widely used within contemporary higher education, and impacts on the ways in which students, academics and institutions behave. These, and a number of alternative metaphors for the student, are critically reviewed. The alternatives considered include both contemporary (student as client or…

  7. Nutrition Education Needs Pantry Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Dolores K.; Shultz, Jill Armstrong; Edlefsen, Miriam; Butkus, Sue N.

    2007-01-01

    Two food pantries were surveyed for nutrition education (NE) interests and experiences. One site provided nutrition education classes; the comparison site was utilized to assess client interest in class topics. "Fixing low cost meals," "fixing quick and easy recipes," and "stretching food and food dollars" were topics rated highly by nutrition…

  8. Understanding and Counseling Narcissistic Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Provides counselors with an overview of narcissism and its treatment. In the first section, dysfunctional narcissism is described, drawing on the diagnostic indicators presented in the DSM-III and the contemporary object relations theories of Heinz Kohut and Otto Kerberg. The second section focuses on counseling narcissistic clients. (Author/JAC)

  9. Snoezelen: benefits for nursing older clients.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, M; Biela, C

    1997-10-01

    In this article, the authors examine the possible benefits of Snoezelen for older clients. The authors suggest that nurses can be instrumental in developing and creating innovative therapeutic environments for this vulnerable client group. PMID:9370672

  10. Bulimia: Book for Therapist and Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Barbara G.; And Others

    This book was written for practitioners working with bulimic clients and for clients themselves. Bulimia is presented as a multidimensional problem requiring a multidisciplinary team approach to treatment. An introductory chapter presents six treatment sessions with a bulimic client which provide an overview of the experiences and attitudes of the…

  11. Rehabilitation Counseling Student Perceptions of Obese Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Steven P.; Thomas, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated whether stigmatization of obese persons has affected rehabilitation counseling students' perceptions of such clients. Results suggest that rehabilitation students perceive obese clients more negatively. If a counselor's first impression of an obese client is that he is less competent and less attractive, rehabilitation outcome could…

  12. Client Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, William B.

    Psychotherapists of different theoretical persuasions use systematically different profiles of verbal response modes. However, clients tend to use very similar profiles, regardless of what their therapist does. Disclosure comprises the largest part of this common client profile, and it distinguishes the client role from other roles. Higher levels…

  13. Client Introversion and Counseling Session Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nocita, Andrew; Stiles, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Examined impact of counseling sessions as a function of clients' personality characteristics. Results indicated introverted clients rated their sessions as uncomfortable, unpleasant, tense, rough, and difficult and rated their postsession mood as relatively unfriendly, uncertain, sad, angry, and afraid. Conversely, extroverted clients rated their…

  14. Client-Side Monitoring for Web Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenstermacher, Kurt D.; Ginsburg, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Discusses mining Web data to draw conclusions about Web users and proposes a client-side monitoring system that supports flexible data collection and encompasses client-side applications beyond the Web browser to incorporate standard office productivity tools. Highlights include goals for client-side monitoring; framework for user monitoring,…

  15. Client Motivation and Rehabilitation Counseling Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    1972-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between client motivation or lack of motivation for rehabilitation services and rehabilitation counseling outcome. Using the case-closure system of the Minnesota Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the results were that motivated clients were more frequently closed employed'' than unmotivated clients.…

  16. Client and Therapist Variability in Clients' Perceptions of Their Therapists' Multicultural Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jesse; Leach, Mark M.; Wampold, Bruce; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-01-01

    This study examined therapist differences in their clients' ratings of their therapists' multicultural competencies (MCCs) as well as tested whether therapists' who were rated as exhibiting more MCCs also had clients who had better therapy outcomes (N = 143 clients and 31 therapists). All clients completed at least 3 sessions. Results demonstrated…

  17. Do client fees help or hurt?

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of client fees for family planning (FP) services on cost recovery and level of user services in developing countries. The UN Population Fund reports that developing country governments currently pay 75% of the costs of FP programs. Donors contribute 15%, and clients pay 10%. Current pressures are on FP services to broaden and improve their scope, while user demand is increasing. Program managers should consider the program's need for funds and the clients' willingness to pay. Clients are willing to pay about 1% of their income for contraception. A study of sterilization acceptance in Mexico finds that the average monthly case load declined by 10% after the 1st price increase from $43 to $55 and declined by 58% after the 2nd price increase to $60. Fewer low-income clients requested sterilization. A CEMOPLAF study in Ecuador finds that in three price increase situations the number of clients seeking services declined, but the economic mix of clients remained about the same. The decline was 20% in the group with a 20% price increase and 26% in the 40% increase group. In setting fees, the first need is to determine unit costs. The Futures Group International recommends considering political, regulatory, and institutional constraints for charging fees; priorities for revenue use; protection for poor clients; and monitoring of money collection and expenditure. Management Sciences for Health emphasizes consideration of the reasons for collection of fees, client affordability, and client perception of quality issues. Sliding scales can be used to protect poor clients. Charging fees for laboratory services can subsidize poor clients. A Bangladesh program operated a restaurant and catering service in order to subsidize FP services. Colombia's PROFAMILIA sells medical and surgical services and a social marketing program in order to expand clinics. PMID:12293239

  18. Working with clients by incorporating their preferences.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Kelley A; Swift, Joshua K; Callahan, Jennifer L

    2013-09-01

    Working with clients by integrating their therapy preferences into the treatment decision-making process has been identified as an important part of evidence-based practice in psychology. Accommodating client preferences has also been demonstrated to lead to fewer treatment dropouts and improved therapy outcomes. In this article, we present a number of clinical interventions or techniques for addressing client preferences in psychotherapy. Clinical examples demonstrating the techniques are also provided. PMID:24000835

  19. Increasing hope by addressing clients' outcome expectations.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Derthick, Annie O

    2013-09-01

    Addressing clients' outcome expectations is an important clinical process that can lead to a strong therapeutic alliance, more positive treatment outcomes, and decreased rates of premature termination from psychotherapy. Five interventions designed to foster appropriate outcome expectations are discussed, including presenting a convincing treatment rationale, increasing clients' faith in their therapists, expressing faith in clients, providing outcome education, and comparing progress with expectations. Clinical examples and research support are provided for each. PMID:24000836

  20. Collecting Multidimensional Client Data Using Repeated Measures: Experiences of Clients and Counselors Using the CCAPS-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jessica L.; Hess, Timothy R.; Ain, Stacie C.; Nelson, Dana L.; Locke, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Many college counseling centers do not collect client data at each session because of perceived burdens. This study explored 55 clients' and 16 doctoral counselor trainees' experiences collecting and using data on client distress at each session over the course of counseling at a large public university's counseling center. Results indicated that…

  1. Attractive versus Unattractive Clients: Mediating Influences on Counselors' Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kathleen N; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effects of clients' age, physical attractiveness, and behavior on subjects' attraction to the clients. Results indicated that "counselor" subjects were significantly more attracted to child than to adult clients and to clients demonstrating good in-session behaviors. Physically attractive clients were not rated significantly more…

  2. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidences of a client. 1103.23 Section 1103.23... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his client's confidence outlasts the practitioner's employment by the client, and this duty extends to...

  3. Training Clients for Counseling: A Social Psychological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Fred J.

    Research on social influence in counseling has examined how clients perceive counselors and how counselors influence clients. There has been little attention to counselors' perception of clients or the ways clients influence counselors. Research in this area could identify client characteristics which contribute to the counseling process and could…

  4. Writing about Clients: Ethical Considerations and Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len; Pies, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Today, the decision to prepare clinical case material for publication is a decision that cannot be taken lightly. The decision involves reviewing ethical considerations and choosing among various options to safeguard client privacy. Such options include seeking the client's permission, disguising case material, and developing composite case…

  5. Predicting Improvement among University Counseling Center Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Hummel, Thomas J.

    The fundamental question to which most clients want and deserve an answer is, "Am I going to get better (as a result of counseling)?" Although meta-analyses provide strong evidence supporting the efficacy of counseling in general, if one wants to make probabilistic statements about individual client outcomes--rather than about the more generalized…

  6. Client Relations: More than Just "Business"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Courtney L.; Yee, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors review the literature on partnership evolution to offer strategies for developing collaborative evaluator-client relationships. They begin with a brief introduction to partnerships and their approach to client relationships. A synthesis of the literature on partnership evolution is provided and applied to the…

  7. Meeting Client Resistance and Reactance with Reverence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Eric W.; Presbury, Jack H.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the meaning and function of client resistance in counseling from various theoretical orientations. A relational model of resistance is offered that redefines traditional formulations and has implications for clinical treatment. A vignette illustrates that the counselor's contribution to the emergence of client resistance is a relevant…

  8. CLIENT/PATIENT SAMPLE SURVEY (CPSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Client/Patient Sample Surveys (conducted in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, and 1997) has been the collection of general purpose statistics on the sociodemographic, clinical, and service use characteristics of clients served in the inpatient, residential, outpatient, a...

  9. Client Outcome Evaluation in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Outcome evaluation assesses the results or benefits of mental health services received by clients or communities by comparing descriptive data on the mental health status of clients at different points in time. It aids clinicians and managers in planning programs and managing clinical services. A mental health center should establish goal-oriented…

  10. Cut Costs with Thin Client Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how school districts can considerably increase the number of administrative computers in their districts without a corresponding increase in costs by using the "Thin Client" component of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCC) model. TCC and Thin Client are described, including its software and hardware components. An example of a Thin Client…

  11. Employment Patterns of Methadone Maintenance Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Harriet I.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of employment patterns of methadone maintenance clients had indicated that the majority were not employed at time of program admission. At time of evaluation, 70 percent of the sample were employed; 88 percent of these clients had previous work histories and brought marketable skills with them. (Author)

  12. Counselors' Accounts of Their Clients' Spiritual Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Janice Miner

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a special section within this issue of Counseling and Values that focuses on counselors' accounts of their clients' transpersonal experiences. The eight articles in this special section discuss ten types of transpersonal experiences. Clients range in age from early 20s to early 80s. Experiences occurred in various settings and were…

  13. Client and Counselor Expectations of Rehabilitation Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Stephen T.; Salomone, Paul R.

    1983-01-01

    Collected data concerning perceptions and expectations of services by rehabilitation counselors (N=7) and 12 of their severely disabled clients. Results showed differences between counselors and clients regarding (a) counselor's role in vocational aspects; (b) control over decision making for rehabilitation services; and (c) counselor perceptions…

  14. Client Motivation and Rehabilitation Counseling Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    This study investigates the relationship between client motivation or lack of motivation for vocational rehabilitation services, and rehabilitation outcome. Clients who had received services at a rehabilitation center during a two year period were rated on their level of motivation for rehabilitation services using the contents of diagnostic…

  15. The Client: Characteristics Which Influence Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, Susan A.

    Research on client characteristics is reviewed. The degree of disturbance, client expectations, social and economic attributes, race, sex, intellectual variables, and the nature of the presenting problem are all shown to interact with treatment method in determining the outcome of counseling. Several specific recommendations are made: (1) Behavior…

  16. When Are Clients Ready to Terminate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobsons, Lara J.; Brown, Jessica S.; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Termination of psychotherapy has received less attention in the research literature than other aspects of the treatment process. This paper presents a structured framework emphasizing observable markers to indicate when termination with a client is appropriate during cognitive behavioral treatment. The 7 criteria that indicate when a client is…

  17. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M.; Morrow, Paula C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines affective commitment to employing and client organizations among long-term contracted employees, a new and growing employment classification. Drawing on organizational commitment and social exchange literatures, we propose two categories of antecedents of employee commitment to client organizations. We tested our hypotheses…

  18. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  19. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement…

  20. Analysis of the Competency-Based High School Diploma Program for CETA Clients. Report III: Student/Client Completion Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Samuel H., Jr.

    A study examined the student/client completion of a competency-based high school diploma for CETA clients. Using follow-up forms, attendance records, correspondence, telephone calls, and client information sheets, researchers collected data from clients and staff pertaining to 102 of the 238 program clients from five sites in Texas (Abilene,…

  1. Profile of Clients Attending a Methadone Clinic

    PubMed Central

    JACOB, Sabrina Anne; MOHAMMED, Fauziah; HASSALI, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client characteristics provide useful information for designing programs that target individuals with risk factors for substance use and for determining client retention. Therefore, this study examined the profiles of clients attending a methadone clinic. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of clients of a methadone clinic was conducted through a survey to obtain a profile of methadone clients. Results: Of the 51 patients who responded (response rate: 66.2%), the mean (SD) age at which they started substance use was 19.8 (5.1) years. Friends were cited as the most regular source of drugs (82.4%), and heroin was the most commonly used drug (98%). Daily substance use was reported by 72.5% of the respondents; 23.5% admitted to having stolen money to purchase drugs; 92.2% tried quitting substance use on their own and 98% stated that the main reason for registering at the clinic was that they wanted to stop their drug dependence. Approximately 60% of clients were receiving methadone doses of less than 60 mg/day. Conclusion: Heroin is still the most popular drug of abuse and most clients still receive methadone doses below the recommended level, despite evidence of poor patient retention rates associated with these low doses. PMID:25892951

  2. [Care counselling - the client's expectations].

    PubMed

    Nickel, W; Hanns, S; Brähler, E; Born, A

    2012-12-01

    The amendment of legal care consultations in the context of the long-term care insurance law (2008) has broadened recent consulting practice within the action range of the nursing care insurance in Germany. The informational needs and consulting requests of the clients were not investigated so far. Our aim was to examine information needs and consulting requests of those in need of care and their informal carers.The consulting requests of visitors of 2 open citizen events were documented by the use of a semi-structured questionnaire. Content analysis following Mayring (2008) was used for data analysis.158 consulting discussions were documented, from which 177 consulting requests were formed. The consulting requests can be divided in 4 main categories: (1) inquiry about the care system [56/32%], (2) inquiry about individual access to care offers [43/24%], (3) inquiry about regional care suppliers [43/24%], (4) situation- and disease-specific inquiries [35/20%].Inquiries about local suppliers of care and situation- and disease-specific inquiries outweigh the number of inquiries about the care system in general. Furthermore, our results show that the informational needs of those in need of care do not only refer to the scope of care insurance law, but to additional social security codes. PMID:22354362

  3. The Unfolding of the Real Relationship and the Outcome of Brief Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelso, Charles J.; Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Busa-Knepp, Johnna; Spiegel, Eric B.; Ain, Stacie; Hummel, Ann M.; Ma, Yueher Emilie; Markin, Rayna D.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess the association of client- and therapist-rated real relationship with each other and with the outcome of brief psychotherapy. It also aimed to determine whether changes over time in perceptions of the real relationship and increasing convergence between clients' and therapists' ratings of the real relationship were…

  4. Innovations in Social Work Training: A Pilot Study of Interprofessional Collaboration Using Standardized Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark D.; Lewis, Melinda; Rappe, Paula; Hartley, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study depicting a collaborative learning experience involving students in the helping professions (i.e., social work and paramedic) is presented, whereby students put discipline-specific practice behaviors into action in a training exercise using standardized clients (SCs). Real world scenarios commonly encountered in emergency response…

  5. Clients Who Frequent Madam Barnett's Emporium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Scott

    1999-01-01

    Develops a comparison between writing tutors and prostitutes. Suggests that the intimate arrangement of people that places one in the position of professional and the other in the position of client works against collaboration. (NH)

  6. Counselor Values and the Pregnant Adolescent Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Bebe C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews options counselors can suggest to pregnant adolescents, including abortion, adoption, marriage, and single parenthood. Discusses the need for counselors to be aware of their own values and help the client explore her values. (JAC)

  7. Marketing Communication Consulting: Tips from Our Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, Martha

    1989-01-01

    Presents advice on how business communication consultants can best work with clients to meet communication and training challenges. Summarizes the views of four training professionals and managers on successful marketing strategies for business communication consultants. (MM)

  8. Clients' and therapists' stories about psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jonathan M

    2013-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the emerging field of research on clients' stories about their experiences in psychotherapy. The theory of narrative identity suggests that individuals construct stories about their lives in order to provide the self with a sense of purpose and unity. Psychotherapy stories serve both psychological functions. Focusing on the theme of agency as a vehicle for operationalizing purpose and coherence as a way of operationalizing unity, this article will describe the existing scholarship connecting psychotherapy stories to clients' psychological well-being. Results from cross-sectional qualitative and quantitative studies as well as longitudinal research indicate a connection between the stories clients tell about therapy and their psychological well-being, both over the course of treatment and after it is over. In addition, a preliminary analysis of therapists' stories about their clients' treatment is presented. These analyses reveal that the way therapists recount a particular client's therapy does not impact the relationships between clients' narratives and their improvement. The article concludes with a discussion of how this body of scholarship might be fruitfully applied in the realm of clinical practice. PMID:22812587

  9. Moving beyond Consultation and into Action with a Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Sara; Dover, Howard F.

    2012-01-01

    Attempting to implement client-based projects within a single semester often overwhelms students and underwhelms the client and grading professor. In this paper, we share results from a two-year pilot project in which the components of a client project were split between several classes. We discuss the client project model as a valuable teaching…

  10. 49 CFR 1103.22 - Restraining clients from improprieties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restraining clients from improprieties. 1103.22... Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.22 Restraining clients from improprieties. A practitioner should see that his clients act with the same restraint that the practitioner himself...

  11. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most cases) is the client served by each covered USG attorney unless detailed to represent another client...

  12. 32 CFR 776.28 - Conflict of interest: Former client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conflict of interest: Former client. 776.28... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.28 Conflict of interest: Former client. (a) Conflict of interest: Former client. A covered attorney who has represented a client in a matter shall...

  13. Client Engagement Characteristics Associated with Problem Gambling Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Nicki A.; Cosic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research examining the factors associated with problem gambling treatment outcomes has examined client factors and to date, treatment characteristics, therapist factors, and client-therapist interactions have essentially remained unexplored. This study aimed to investigate how client engagement variables (client-rated therapeutic…

  14. Using client outcome monitoring as a tool for supervision.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Callahan, Jennifer L; Rousmaniere, Tony G; Whipple, Jason L; Dexter, Kyle; Wrape, Elizabeth R

    2015-06-01

    A large body of research has supported the use of client outcome monitoring and client feedback in psychotherapy. However, discussions between supervisors and trainee clinicians in supervision are still largely based on subjective appraisals made by the trainees. In this article, we discuss 3 strategies for integrating client outcome data and feedback into the supervisory process: training students to obtain and use objective client feedback, using specific client data to inform discussions of clients, and identifying patterns of outcomes across clients to facilitate supervisee growth and development. PMID:25286066

  15. Clinical Writing about Clients: Seeking Consent and Negotiating the Impact on Clients and Their Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses her experiences seeking consent from 16 clients to use clinical material for publication. Sharing case examples from her practice, she elucidates her process with clients and focuses on the beneficial and detrimental effects on the therapeutic relationship. Seeking consent raises issues of confidentiality and stimulates…

  16. The Relationship between Client Attachment and Therapist Interventions in Client-Nominated Relationship-Building Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Jennifer I.; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn R.; Drapeau, Martin; Blake, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-four clients were asked to nominate an incident that was critical to the development of their therapeutic relationship with a trainee therapist. Therapist interventions within each client relationship building incident (RBI) were identified. The results of multiple regression indicated that attachment anxiety moderated the relationship…

  17. A Comparison of Intake Counselors' and Clients' Perceptions of Clients' Presenting Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Roger L.; And Others

    Clients seeking psychological counseling, who initiate service of their own volition, do so to obtain help with a problem that they feel afflicts them. Counselors' perceptions of clients' presenting problems assist counselors in making predictions about behavior from which they construct treatment plans. Research has demonstrated that incongruity…

  18. Neurobiological response to EMDR therapy in clients with different psychological traumas

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Monaco, Leonardo; Daverio, Andrea; Giannoudas, Ioannis; La Porta, Patrizia; Verardo, Anna R.; Niolu, Cinzia; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed cortical activation differences in real-time upon exposure to traumatic memory between two distinct groups of psychologically traumatized clients also in comparison with healthy controls. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to compare neuronal activation throughout the bilateral stimulation phase of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) sessions. We compared activation between the first (T0) and the last (T1) session, the latter performed after processing the index trauma. The group including all clients showed significantly higher cortical activity in orbito-frontal cortex at T0 shifting at T1 toward posterior associative regions. However, the subgroup of clients with chronic exposure to the traumatic event showed a cortical firing at both stages which was closer to that of controls. For the first time EEG monitoring enabled to disclose neurobiological differences between groups of clients with different trauma histories during the reliving of the traumatic event. Cortical activations in clients chronically exposed to traumatic memories were moderate, suggesting an association between social and environmental contexts with the neurobiological response to trauma exposure and psychotherapy. PMID:26579006

  19. Neurobiological response to EMDR therapy in clients with different psychological traumas.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Monaco, Leonardo; Daverio, Andrea; Giannoudas, Ioannis; La Porta, Patrizia; Verardo, Anna R; Niolu, Cinzia; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed cortical activation differences in real-time upon exposure to traumatic memory between two distinct groups of psychologically traumatized clients also in comparison with healthy controls. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to compare neuronal activation throughout the bilateral stimulation phase of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) sessions. We compared activation between the first (T0) and the last (T1) session, the latter performed after processing the index trauma. The group including all clients showed significantly higher cortical activity in orbito-frontal cortex at T0 shifting at T1 toward posterior associative regions. However, the subgroup of clients with chronic exposure to the traumatic event showed a cortical firing at both stages which was closer to that of controls. For the first time EEG monitoring enabled to disclose neurobiological differences between groups of clients with different trauma histories during the reliving of the traumatic event. Cortical activations in clients chronically exposed to traumatic memories were moderate, suggesting an association between social and environmental contexts with the neurobiological response to trauma exposure and psychotherapy. PMID:26579006

  20. Client engagement in psychotherapeutic treatment and associations with client characteristics, therapist characteristics, and treatment factors.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Emma; Bowen, Erica; Brown, Sarah; Howat, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    Client engagement has been associated with positive psychotherapeutic outcomes, yet it is relatively under-theorized. The aims of this review were to establish how client engagement with psychotherapeutic interventions targeting psychological or behavioral change has been operationally defined and assessed, and the associated client characteristics, therapist characteristic, and treatment factors. Seventy-nine studies were selected for review, revealing inconsistent definitions and assessments of engagement and a broad array of client characteristics and treatment factors investigated. Attendance was frequently used as a proxy for engagement, but may not be reliable. Participation or involvement in conjunction with homework compliance which reflects clients' efforts within and between sessions may more reliably reflect engagement. The findings of associations between client characteristics and engagement variables were equivocal, although clients' capacities to address their problems tended to be positively associated with engagement. Nearly all therapist characteristics, particularly therapists' interpersonal skills, and most treatment factors, particularly strengths-based approaches and the therapeutic relationship, were positively associated with engagement. A theory of engagement that characterizes the function and inter-relations of variables across different psychotherapeutic settings is needed. PMID:25000204

  1. Client Perceptions of Prison Counselor Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, J. A. Gordon

    Research evidence indicates that counselors rated as more effective are lower in dogmatism. Additional research suggests that the counseling relationship with deliquent populations is different from that with nondelinquent populations. It is the intent of this study to investigate perceptions of counselor effectiveness held by clients in a major…

  2. The Existential Mode and Client Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, James D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and clarifies counseling from an existential perspective, with emphasis on the distinction between neurotic and ontological anxiety. The existentially oriented counselor insists that clients face themselves as referents in a phenomenological context by experiencing existential "anxiety" when confronted with the pain of finitude,…

  3. Client-Centered Employee Assistance Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Darryl Lee

    This paper addresses delivery aspects and benefits of client-centered Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services through a review of the literature and research. EAP services are described as educational and mental health services utilized to assist employees and their families to respond constructively to job, personal, interpersonal or…

  4. Pretherapy Information: An Investigation of Client Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kathleen N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated effects of pretherapy information about a feminist therapist's values and therapy orientation. Studied self-identified feminist clients' judgments of similarity to the therapist's values, confidence in the therapist's helpfulness, and willingness to see the therapist. Subjects were not as willing to see the explicitly feminist…

  5. Client Confidentiality in Police Social Work Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Patrick Almond; Lutkus, Anita M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey that questioned police social workers regarding the protection of client confidentiality in police settings revealed several problems related to the unique character of the setting and to the identification of social workers with the goals and practices of police. Results raise questions about the protection of client…

  6. Accommodating blind and partially sighted clients

    PubMed Central

    England, Gary; Gebbels, Tim; Whelan, Chantelle; Freeman, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary surgeons provide an important service to blind and partially sighted guide dog owners. By adopting basic disability awareness and visual impairment training, practices can ensure that the assistance needs of those clients are met, facilitating access to veterinary care. PMID:25642013

  7. Helping Clients Uncover Metaphoric Understandings of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1998-01-01

    Written responses of three women with bulimia were analyzed for instances of metaphoric understanding of their difficulties with food during 20 to 24 therapy sessions. Results show a gradual deepening of the metaphoric understanding of what the troubled eating represented for each client. Metaphoric understanding included ways of dealing with self…

  8. Considering Thin Client Computing for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Mark

    1998-01-01

    In response to concerns about the cost of keeping up with individual desktop computing technology, several new solutions have emerged. Referred to as "thin clients," or network-centric computers, they include two types of desktop device: the network computer and the Windows terminal. Purchase cost, life span, support costs, and overall total cost…

  9. Finding Happiness for Ourselves and Our Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Reviews D. G. Myers' (2000) examination of the contributing factors of happiness: money, relationships, and religion. Discusses the implications of these factors for counseling with specific recommendations made for counselors regarding their own self-care and their work with their clients. (GCP)

  10. Counselor Loss: Terminating the Helped Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses counselor feelings of loss due to client departure from therapy. Describes components of loss within a five-stage model including denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Outlines strategies for coping with counselor loss. Suggests feelings of loss are natural. (RC)

  11. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  12. Defining the Worker-Client Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that effective use of the relationship between worker and client requires defining the concept of relationship more specifically. This may be accomplished through a consideration of the context and purpose of the particular treatment situations, the outcomes desired and the responses that are necessary to achieve these goals. (Author)

  13. Attracting Clients to Service-Oriented Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disney, Diane M.

    One of a series of manuals developed by the Home and Community-Based Career Education Project, the outreach component publication describes how the project went about attracting clients for its adult vocational counseling services. Sections include: creating a publicity campaign, using an advertising agency, creating products for the mass media,…

  14. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  15. Restating a Client-Centered Approach to Career Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.

    1988-01-01

    Asserts career counseling too often is associated with objective test scores and rational decision making. Reiterates the importance of considering the client's developing self-concept in career counseling. Provides sample client centered career counseling session. (Author/ABL)

  16. 19 CFR 111.39 - Advice to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of that noncompliance, error, or omission. (c) Illegal plans. A broker must not knowingly suggest to a client or prospective client any illegal plan for evading payment of any duty, tax, or other...

  17. 19 CFR 111.39 - Advice to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of that noncompliance, error, or omission. (c) Illegal plans. A broker must not knowingly suggest to a client or prospective client any illegal plan for evading payment of any duty, tax, or other...

  18. Gender Dysphoria: The Therapist's Dilemma--The Client's Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherebrin, Hannah

    1996-01-01

    Therapist's role and dilemmas faced in treating a gender dysphoric client are discussed. Examines ethical and moral issues relating to transsexualism and discusses the appropriateness of art therapy as a treatment for transsexual clients. (SNR)

  19. Counselor Stress in Relation to Disabled and Minority Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Kolk, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Physiological and self-reported reactions of counselors in training to five disabled clients and a minority client were examined. Implications for counselor practice, education, and in-service education are discussed. (Author)

  20. A Responsive Client for Distributed Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, E. F.; Jensen, P. A.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D. A.; Momsen, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    As grids, web services and distributed computing continue to gain popularity in the scientific community, demand for virtual laboratories likewise increases. Today organizations such as the Virtual Laboratory for Earth and Planetary Sciences (VLab) are dedicated to developing web-based portals to perform various simulations remotely while abstracting away details of the underlying computation. Two of the biggest challenges in portal- based computing are fast visualization and smooth interrogation without over taxing clients resources. In response to this challenge, we have expanded on our previous data storage strategy and thick client visualization scheme [1] to develop a client-centric distributed application that utilizes remote visualization of large datasets and makes use of the local graphics processor for improved interactivity. Rather than waste precious client resources for visualization, a combination of 3D graphics and 2D server bitmaps are used to simulate the look and feel of local rendering. Java Web Start and Java Bindings for OpenGL enable install-on- demand functionality as well as low level access to client graphics for all platforms. Powerful visualization services based on VTK and auto-generated by the WATT compiler [2] are accessible through a standard web API. Data is permanently stored on compute nodes while separate visualization nodes fetch data requested by clients, caching it locally to prevent unnecessary transfers. We will demonstrate application capabilities in the context of simulated charge density visualization within the VLab portal. In addition, we will address generalizations of our application to interact with a wider number of WATT services and performance bottlenecks. [1] Ananthuni, R., Karki, B.B., Bollig, E.F., da Silva, C.R.S., Erlebacher, G., "A Web-Based Visualization and Reposition Scheme for Scientific Data," In Press, Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on Modeling Simulation and Visualization Methods (MSV

  1. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  2. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  3. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  4. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  5. Can Knowledge of Client Birth Order Bias Clinical Judgment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Allan E.

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians (N = 308) responded to identical counseling vignettes of a male client that differed only in the client's stated birth order. Clinicians developed different impressions about the client and his family experiences that corresponded with the prototypical descriptions of persons from 1 of 4 birth orders (i.e., first, middle, youngest, and…

  6. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned,...

  7. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for the Mentally Retarded § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of clients' rights. The...

  8. Client Good Moments: An Intensive Analysis of a Single Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalikas, Anastassios; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    An intensive analysis of a single counseling session conducted by Fritz Perls was carried out to examine relationships among client experiencing level, client strength of feeling, counselor interventions, and client good moments. The possibility that positive therapeutic outcome is related to the accretion of good moments is discussed. (JBJ)

  9. What Business Students Should Know about Attorney-Client Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draba, Robert; Marshall, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The case law on attorney-client privilege is extensive and can be somewhat complex. Over seven hundred articles in Westlaw, for example, have the phrase "attorney-client privilege" in the title; in the last three years alone, there have been over 3700 federal cases in which the phrase "attorney-client privilege" appears at least once. However,…

  10. 37 CFR 10.84 - Representing a client zealously.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Representing a client... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.84 Representing a client zealously. (a) A practitioner shall not intentionally: (1) Fail to seek the lawful objectives of a client through reasonably...

  11. Developing Individualized Behavior Change Goals with Clients: A Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Richard G.; Uhlemann, Max R.

    This document reviews 10 specific and sequential steps which have emerged as being particularly effective in assisting clients in developing individualized behavior change goals in psychotherapy. The therapist and client typically work through these steps together near the beginning of treatment, but only after the client has had the opportunity…

  12. Impact of Client Suicide on Practitioner Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Joseph Simon

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine posttraumatic growth in clinicians after the suicide death of a client. An experience such as a client suicide could be an opportunity for growth or a danger for the practitioner to become traumatized. Thus, the clinician who works with clients who complete suicide may either suffer or experience a positive change from…

  13. Counselor Beliefs and Perceived Knowledge Regarding Clients with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Tamekia R.

    2012-01-01

    Clients with learning disabilities constitute a cultural group that has not been extensively studied. The professional literature has found that counselors have reported the need for additional training in working with clients with disabilities. This study explored counselors' beliefs and perceived knowledge regarding counseling clients with…

  14. Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Clients with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taheri-Araghi, M.; Hendren, G.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 10 personal (client) variables and four program variables related to 76 people who became blind from retinitis pigmentosa revealed that 6 variables predicted clients' rehabilitation outcomes: age, gender, race, work status, amount of case-service money spent on the client's behalf, and number of changes in career objectives…

  15. Brief Therapy with Difficult Clients. Hatherleigh Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loar, Lynn

    1995-01-01

    Brief therapy is an effective, time-limited approach that invokes clients values, appreciates their strengths, and is based on mutual respect. Counseling nonvoluntary clients can be extremely difficult because of the intense degree of denial, minimization, or rationalization of problems such clients typically bring to therapy. Therapists must…

  16. 37 CFR 11.113 - Organization as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organization as client. 11... Rules of Professional Conduct Client-Practitioner Relationship § 11.113 Organization as client. (a) A... substantial injury to the organization, then the practitioner shall proceed as is reasonably necessary in...

  17. 37 CFR 11.113 - Organization as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organization as client. 11... Rules of Professional Conduct Client-Practitioner Relationship § 11.113 Organization as client. (a) A... substantial injury to the organization, then the practitioner shall proceed as is reasonably necessary in...

  18. Incorporating Perceived Importance of Service Elements into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the need for incorporating perceived importance of service elements into client satisfaction measures. Method: A secondary analysis of client satisfaction data from 112 clients of an elderly case management setting was conducted. Results: This study found that the relationship between global…

  19. 14 CFR 1261.317 - Attorney-client privilege.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attorney-client privilege. 1261.317 Section... Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.317 Attorney-client privilege. (a) Attorneys... traditional attorney-client relationship with the employee with respect to application of the...

  20. 37 CFR 10.67 - Settling similar claims of clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... clients. 10.67 Section 10.67 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.67 Settling similar claims of clients. A practitioner who represents two or more clients shall not make or participate in the making of an aggregate settlement of...

  1. 37 CFR 10.78 - Limiting liability to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limiting liability to client... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.78 Limiting liability to client. A practitioner shall not attempt to exonerate himself or herself from, or limit his or her liability to, a client for his or...

  2. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients... CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent an individual eligible client who is seeking specific relief from a welfare agency....

  3. A Program Evaluation Using Client Records and Census Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachrach, Kenneth M.; Zautra, Alex

    Use of client records and census data as a research methodology can provide mental health planners with information on community needs as well as the adequacy of existing programs. Three ways of analyzing client records in conjunction with census data are: (1) tract by tract, comparing client geographic distribution with census characteristics;…

  4. Educating Therapists in Training about Clients' Expectations of Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Kathleen; Ogiba, Shawn; Chambliss, Catherine

    Training therapists effectively requires familiarizing them with the modal expectations that clients bring to the therapeutic encounter. Ways in which therapists can be apprised of clients' expectations of therapy are discussed. Accurate understanding of clients' attitudes permits development of appropriately focused therapy goals and is generally…

  5. Attitudes of Social Work Students toward Clients with Basic Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumer-Nevo, Michal; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of 91 undergraduate social work students toward clients with basic needs in Israel. The results indicate that only about 1/3 of the students consider the treatment of clients with basic needs to be a part of the profession. In addition, a positive correlation was found between willingness to help clients with…

  6. WSGOPHER. A Network Client Using the Gopher Information Discovery Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.L.

    1993-10-05

    WSGOPHER uses the protocol known as Gopher, which is described in Internet RFC 1436. Specifically Gopher is a client/server protocol. Gopher servers provide information across the network to Gopher clients. WSGOPHER is an implementation of a Gopher client for Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Windows Sockets version 1.1.

  7. Health Promotion through the Use of Nurse-Client Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dover, Leslie J.

    Much of the practice of community health nurses is focused on health promotion. Nurse-client contracting has been used with clients experiencing hypertension, diabetes, or arthritis. A study was conducted to determine whether nurse-client contracting would be useful as a method for providing nursing care to assist sexually active young women to…

  8. A Network Client Using the Gopher Information Discovery Protocol

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-10-05

    WSGOPHER uses the protocol known as Gopher, which is described in Internet RFC 1436. Specifically Gopher is a client/server protocol. Gopher servers provide information across the network to Gopher clients. WSGOPHER is an implementation of a Gopher client for Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Windows Sockets version 1.1.

  9. Counselor Interventions Preceding Client Laughter in Brief Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Dana R.; Hill, Clara E.

    1992-01-01

    Examined whether 6 categories of counselor humor and 4 categories of risk interventions preceded client laughter in 236 events from 8 cases of brief psychotherapy. Found most client laughter was mild and moderate, with only eight instances of strong laughter. Humorous interventions led to more client laughter than did interventions that encouraged…

  10. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client under a disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Client under a disability. 776.33 Section 776.33... of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client under a disability. (a) Client under a disability: (1) When a... impaired, whether because of minority, mental disability, or for some other reason, the covered...

  11. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for the Mentally Retarded § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of clients' rights. The...

  12. The Arab Muslim client: implications for anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sheets, D L; el-Azhary, R A

    1998-06-01

    The Arab Muslim client has unique cultural characteristics that should be incorporated into anesthetic care. In obtaining a preoperative assessment and consent, issues such as privacy, family roles, body language, group decision making, communication distances, and use of translators should be addressed. Intraoperatively, the need for modesty and the client's possible adherence to folk beliefs should also be recognized. Postoperatively, pain and overall needs assessments are a continuing challenge. The anesthetist must also understand the underlying family roles, the high correlation between fear and pain, and the possible coexisting folk beliefs when working within the labor and delivery setting. By addressing these unique issues, the anesthetist can provide appropriate and safe anesthetic care. PMID:9830857

  13. Client-side Skype forensics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Tina; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. In the present study, a client-side Skype forensics is performed. It is designed to explain which kind of user data are stored on a computer and which tools allow the extraction of those data for a forensic investigation. There are described both methods - a manual analysis and an analysis with (mainly) open source tools, respectively.

  14. Implementing a secure client/server application

    SciTech Connect

    Kissinger, B.A.

    1994-08-01

    There is an increasing rise in attacks and security breaches on computer systems. Particularly vulnerable are systems that exchange user names and passwords directly across a network without encryption. These kinds of systems include many commercial-off-the-shelf client/server applications. A secure technique for authenticating computer users and transmitting passwords through the use of a trusted {open_quotes}broker{close_quotes} and public/private keys is described in this paper.

  15. Dietary intake in clients with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Agnieszka; Atkins, Marlis; Mager, Diana R

    2011-01-01

    To assess relationships among food intake, anthropometrics, and wound severity, we studied 31 home care clients with pressure ulcers (PUs) or venous stasis ulcers (VSUs). Anthropometric variables (weight, height, waist circumference [WC]) were measured according to standard methodologies. Risk for PU development was assessed using the Braden Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment score and wound severity according to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. Three-day food records were analyzed to assess dietary adequacy. Adults with VSUs (65.8 ± 18.4 years) had a higher body mass index (48.1 vs. 25.9), WC (146.6 vs. 98.4 cm), and Braden score (20.2 vs. 17.5) than did those with PUs (67.8 ± 17.9 years) (p <0.05). Energy, protein, and zinc intake by diet alone did not meet estimated requirements in 41%, 32%, and 54.5% of clients, respectively. Intake by diet alone met the Estimated Average Requirement/Adequate Intake for all nutrients except fibre, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K, folate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Nutrient supplementation resolved this for all nutrients except fibre, vitamin K, and potassium. In multivariate analysis, increasing wound severity was associated with decreased intakes of vitamin A, vitamin K, magnesium, and protein (r2=0.90, p<0.001). Optimizing nutrient intake may be an important strategy to promote wound healing and decrease wound severity in home care clients with chronic wounds. PMID:21645427

  16. Hsp90: Friends, clients and natural foes.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-08-01

    Hsp90, a homodimeric ATPase, is responsible for the correct folding of a number of newly synthesized polypeptides in addition to the correct folding of denatured/misfolded client proteins. It requires several co-chaperones and other partner proteins for chaperone activity. Due to the involvement of Hsp90-dependent client proteins in a variety of oncogenic signaling pathways, Hsp90 inhibition has emerged as one of the leading strategies for anticancer chemotherapeutics. Most of Hsp90 inhibitors blocks the N terminal ATP binding pocket and prevents the conformational changes which are essential for the loading of co-chaperones and client proteins. Several other inhibitors have also been reported which disrupt chaperone cycle in ways other than binding to N terminal ATP binding pocket. The Hsp90 inhibition is associated with heat shock response, mediated by HSF-1, to overcome the loss of Hsp90 and sustain cell survival. This review is an attempt to give an over view of all the important players of chaperone cycle. PMID:27295069

  17. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system. PMID:27441559

  18. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Souza Pardo, Mário Henrique; Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system. PMID:27441559

  19. Social networks and psychiatric clients: the personal and environmental context.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R E

    1982-08-01

    The study examines the extent to which characteristics of psychiatric clients (interpersonal problem-solving) and their families (family climate and family social resources) are associated with dimensions of clients' social networks (size and support). Respondents were 35 clients recruited from outpatient psychiatric clinics and the family members with whom they resided. The results revealed that individual and environmental variables were significant correlates of social network dimensions. For example, client problem-solving was positively related to the number of intimates cited by the client, while level of independence was positively related to the degree of support clients reported receiving from their peers. Level of client psychopathology partially moderated the effects of some of the predictor variables. The results highlight the need to examine the individual and environmental processes that shape and are shaped by social network patterns. PMID:7137127

  20. Neurofeedback outcomes in clients with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lynda; Thompson, Michael; Reid, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    This paper summarizes data from a review of neurofeedback (NFB) training with 150 clients with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) and 9 clients with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seen over a 15 year period (1993-2008) in a clinical setting. The main objective was to investigate whether electroncephalographic (EEG) biofeedback, also called neurofeedback (NFB), made a significant difference in clients diagnosed with AS. An earlier paper (Thompson et al. 2009) reviews the symptoms of AS, highlights research findings and theories concerning this disorder, discusses QEEG patterns in AS (both single and 19-channel), and details a hypothesis, based on functional neuroanatomy, concerning how NFB, often paired with biofeedback (BFB), might produce a change in symptoms. A further aim of the current report is to provide practitioners with a detailed description of the method used to address some of the key symptoms of AS in order to encourage further research and clinical work to refine the use of NFB plus BFB in the treatment of AS. All charts were included for review where there was a diagnosis of AS or ASD and pre- and post-training testing results were available for one or more of the standardized tests used. Clients received 40-60 sessions of NFB, which was combined with training in metacognitive strategies and, for most older adolescent and adult clients, with BFB of respiration, electrodermal response, and, more recently, heart rate variability. For the majority of clients, feedback was contingent on decreasing slow wave activity (usually 3-7 Hz), decreasing beta spindling if it was present (usually between 23 and 35 Hz), and increasing fast wave activity termed sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) (12-15 or 13-15 Hz depending on assessment findings). The most common initial montage was referential placement at the vertex (CZ) for children and at FCz (midway between FZ and CZ) for adults, referenced to the right ear. Metacognitive strategies relevant to social understanding, spatial

  1. Exploring the potential of constructionist therapy: deaf clients, hearing therapists and a reflecting team.

    PubMed

    Munro, L; Knox, M; Lowe, R

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of constructionist therapy with a reflecting team of hearing therapists seeing deaf clients. Using findings from two in-depth interviews, postsession reflections and a review of the literature, we propose that this model has the potential to cater to the diversity of the lived experiences of deaf people and also to address issues of power and tensions between medical, social, and cultural models of deafness. The interviews found there was real value in sharing multiple perspectives between the reflecting team of hearing therapists and these deaf clients. In addition, the clients reported feeling safe and comfortable with this model of counseling. Other information that emerged from the interviews supports previous findings regarding consistency in interpreting and the importance of hearing therapists having an understanding of the distinctions between Deaf and hearing worlds. As the first investigation of its kind in Australia, this article provides a map for therapists to incorporate reflecting teams with interpreters, deaf clients, and hearing therapists. The value of this article also lies in providing a much needed platform for future research into counseling outcomes and the efficacy of this constructionist model of therapy. PMID:18303009

  2. A client/server approach to telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, B J; Torok, K E; Kelly, L M; Ewing, D J; Andrews, L T

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Medical College of Ohio's efforts in developing a client/server telemedicine system. Telemedicine vastly improves the ability of a medical center physician or specialist to interactively consult with a physician at a remote health care facility. The patient receives attention more quickly, he and his family do not need to travel long distances to obtain specialists' services, and the primary care physician can be involved in diagnosis and developing a treatment program [1, 2]. Telemedicine consultations are designed to improve access to health services in underserved urban and rural communities and reduce isolation of rural practitioners [3]. PMID:8563396

  3. Measuring client perceptions of motivational interviewing: factor analysis of the Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing scale.

    PubMed

    Madson, Michael B; Mohn, Richard S; Zuckoff, Allan; Schumacher, Julie A; Kogan, Jane; Hutchison, Shari; Magee, Emily; Stein, Bradley

    2013-03-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an intervention approach that has solid evidence of efficacy with substance use disorders. Research and training have benefitted from the development of observational measures to assess MI fidelity and competence. However, one untapped area of assessment is the client perception of the clinician use of MI. Client perceptions of MI have been found through qualitative interviews to relate to motivation to change, view of the therapist and safety of therapy. The Client Evaluation of MI (CEMI) scale was developed to assess client perception of clinician MI use. This study further evaluated the CEMI through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis with a sample of 500 individuals with dual diagnosis pre-discharge from an inpatient unit. Participants completed an MI based session prior to completing CEMIs. A two factor (relational and technical) model explained 51.1% of the cumulative variance and was supported through confirmatory factor analysis. Suggestions for revisions are provided as well as potential uses of the CEMI and future directions for research. PMID:22999814

  4. Client-centered home care: balancing between competing responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Schoot, Tineke; Proot, Ireen; Legius, Marja; ter Meulen, Ruud; de Witte, Luc

    2006-11-01

    This study explores and describes the perceptions of nurses with respect to everyday client-centered care. A grounded theory study was conducted with 10 Dutch nurses and auxiliary nurses giving home care to chronically ill clients. Participatory observations and semistructured interviews were held. Nurses perceived roles and responsibilities competing with the role as a responsive professional to the client demand: a critical professional, developer of client competencies, individual, and employee. Strategies in balancing between competing responsibilities were distinguished: pleasing, dialoguing, directing, and detaching. Directing (related to impaired client competencies) and detaching (related to organizational barriers) were also used as second choice strategies. Effectively balancing between competing responsibilities was seen in dialoguing and directing as second choice. Conditions identified related to these strategies are awareness of, and responsibility taking for competing responsibilities. Recommendations for practice concern a care relationship and a dialogue with the client, critical ethical reflection, professional autonomy, self-assertiveness and organizational support. PMID:17056768

  5. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy. PMID:24702034

  6. Spiritual interventions in psychotherapy: evaluations by highly religious clients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jennifer S; Smith, Timothy B; Barlow, Sally H

    2007-10-01

    Spiritual and religious interventions in psychotherapy have increasingly received research attention, particularly with highly religious clients. This study examined client opinions about and experiences with religious interventions in psychotherapy. A sample of 152 clients at a counseling center of a university sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) completed a survey with ratings of specific religious interventions concerning appropriateness, helpfulness, and prevalence. Out-of-session religious interventions were considered more appropriate by clients than in-session religious interventions, but in-session interventions were rated as more helpful. Specific interventions considered both appropriate and helpful by the LDS participants included referencing scriptural passages, teaching spiritual concepts, encouraging forgiveness, involving religious community resources, and conducting assessments of client spirituality. Some religious interventions were perceived as inappropriate or not helpful, and clients provided explanations for why religious interventions can be either effective or ineffective in psychotherapy. PMID:17828760

  7. Barriers to client-centredness and their resolution.

    PubMed

    Sumsion, T; Smyth, G

    2000-02-01

    This research sought to determine which therapist barriers prevent client-centred practice the most, and which methods are perceived as being most effective in resolving therapist barriers. A list of barriers that therapists bring to client-centred practice and methods to resolve these was identified from the literature and formed the basis of a questionnaire sent to 60 occupational therapists in the United Kingdom. The results showed that the therapist and client having different goals was the barrier which most prevented client-centred practice. The high ratings of other statements suggested that the values, beliefs and attitudes of therapists and of the employment culture make client-centred practice uncomfortable to use and hence prevent its implementation. Case examples showing how to practice in a client-centred fashion were rated as the most effective method of barrier removal. PMID:10695165

  8. Hardened Client Platforms for Secure Internet Banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, C.; Zakhidov, S.

    We review the security of e-banking platforms with particular attention to the exploitable attack vectors of three main attack categories: Man-in-the-Middle, Man-in-the-PC and Man-in-the-Browser. It will be shown that the most serious threats come from combination attacks capable of hacking any transaction without the need to control the authentication process. Using this approach, the security of any authentication system can be bypassed, including those using SecureID Tokens, OTP Tokens, Biometric Sensors and Smart Cards. We will describe and compare two recently proposed e-banking platforms, the ZTIC and the USPD, both of which are based on the use of dedicated client devices, but with diverging approaches with respect to the need of hardening the Web client application. It will be shown that the use of a Hardened Browser (or H-Browser) component is critical to force attackers to employ complex and expensive techniques and to reduce the strength and variety of social engineering attacks down to physiological fraud levels.

  9. A concept analysis of partnership with clients.

    PubMed

    Bidmead, Christine; Cowley, Sarah

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this first paper of two about partnership working with clients is to define and clarify partnership as it is practised within health visiting, by identifying the central notions of partnership working in practice. The aim of the second paper will be to describe an evaluation of a training course in partnership working for health visitors. Partnership is a word in common usage within the health professions but its meaning is ill-defined. A literature search was undertaken to identify ways in which previous authors have used the concept within nursing, counselling and health visiting. Rodgers' approach to concept analysis was undertaken to seek clarity for the concept. This revealed the ways in which various authors have used the word, an analysis of its defining attributes, surrogate terms, antecedents, consequences and a concluding definition. The results showed that partnership with clients in health visiting can be defined as a respectful, negotiated way of working together that enables choice, participation and equity, within an honest, trusting relationship that is based in empathy, support and reciprocity. It is best established within a model of health visiting that recognises partnership as a central tenet. It requires a high level of interpersonal qualities and communication skills in staff who are, themselves, supported through a system of clinical supervision that operates within the same partnership framework. PMID:15984559

  10. Spiritual Pain in Meals on Wheels’ Clients

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Lisa; Branson, Sandy; Cron, Stanley; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meals on Wheels’ clients are at risk for spiritual pain due to advanced age, social isolation, and failing health. They are also prone to stress, depression, and loneliness, placing them at risk for adverse biological disruptions and health outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine associations of spiritual pain with psychosocial factors (stress, depression, loneliness, religious coping) and salivary biomarkers of stress and inflammation (cortisol, IL-1β) in Meals on Wheels’ clients. Methods: Data were collected cross-sectionally from 88 elderly (mean age 75.4). Spiritual pain, stress, depression, loneliness, and religious coping were measured with standardized instruments, and salivary biomarkers were assessed with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Spiritual pain was significantly and positively correlated with stress (r = 0.35, p ≤ 0.001), depression (r = 0.27, p = 0.01), and negative religious coping (r = 0.27, p = 0.01). Correlations with loneliness, positive religious coping, and salivary biomarkers were non-significant. Conclusion: Spiritual pain is an important concept in this population. Research should be expanded to understand the significance of spiritual pain in conjunction with psychosocial and biological variables and its potential impact on physical, mental, and cognitive health outcomes in the elderly.

  11. Fresh Wounds: Metadata and Usability Lessons from building the Earthdata Search Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Quinn, P.; Murphy, K. J.; Baynes, K.

    2014-12-01

    Data discovery and accessibility are frequent topics in science conferences but are usually discussed in an abstract XML schema kind-of way. In the course of designing and building the NASA Earthdata Search Client, a "concept-car" discovery client for the new Common Metadata Repository (CMR) and NASA Earthdata, we learned important lessons about usability from user studies and our actual use of science metadata. In this talk we challenge the community with the issues we ran into: the critical usability stumbling blocks for even seasoned researchers, "bug reports" from users that were ultimately usability problems in metadata, the challenges and questions that arise from incorporating "visual metadata", and the state of data access services. We intend to show that high quality metadata and real human usability factors are essential to making critical data accessible.

  12. Deaf client with bipolar illness: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background This case report highlights the diagnostic and assessment difficulties faced by mental health professionals when dealing with a Deaf client. Case presentation We used mobile phone text facility to monitor and liaise with the client while in the community. We focused on the affect and signing amplitude/intensity of the client to make a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, prescribed valproate semisodium, and noticed an improvement in two months. Conclusion This is an example of some areas of good practice when assessing a Deaf client with mental health problems. PMID:17903259

  13. Dual diagnosis clients' treatment satisfaction - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review is to synthesize existing evidence about treatment satisfaction among clients with substance misuse and mental health co-morbidity (dual diagnoses, DD). Methods We examined satisfaction with treatment received, variations in satisfaction levels by type of treatment intervention and by diagnosis (i.e. DD clients vs. single diagnosis clients), and the influence of factors other than treatment type on satisfaction. Peer-reviewed studies published in English since 1970 were identified by searching electronic databases using pre-defined search strings. Results Across the 27 studies that met inclusion criteria, high average satisfaction scores were found. In most studies, integrated DD treatment yielded greater client satisfaction than standard treatment without explicit DD focus. In standard treatment without DD focus, DD clients tended to be less satisfied than single diagnosis clients. Whilst the evidence base on client and treatment variables related to satisfaction is small, it suggested client demographics and symptom severity to be unrelated to treatment satisfaction. However, satisfaction tended to be linked to other treatment process and outcome variables. Findings are limited in that many studies had very small sample sizes, did not use validated satisfaction instruments and may not have controlled for potential confounders. A framework for further research in this important area is discussed. Conclusions High satisfaction levels with current treatment provision, especially among those in integrated treatment, should enhance therapeutic optimism among practitioners dealing with DD clients. PMID:21501510

  14. JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgast, Paul; Pechkam, Paul

    2007-01-01

    JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK (JMS signifies "Java messaging service" and "SDK" signifies "software development kit") is a software package for developing interfaces that enable legacy programs (here denoted "clients") written in the C and C++ languages to communicate with each other via a JMS broker. This package consists of two main components: the JMS proxy server component and the client C library SDK component. The JMS proxy server component implements a native Java process that receives and responds to requests from clients. This component can run on any computer that supports Java and a JMS client. The client C library SDK component is used to develop a JMS client program running in each affected C or C++ environment, without need for running a Java virtual machine in the affected computer. A C client program developed by use of this SDK has most of the quality-of-service characteristics of standard Java-based client programs, including the following: Durable subscriptions; Asynchronous message receipt; Such standard JMS message qualities as "TimeToLive," "Message Properties," and "DeliveryMode" (as the quoted terms are defined in previously published JMS documentation); and Automatic reconnection of a JMS proxy to a restarted JMS broker.

  15. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Aldana, J.; Piechulek, H.; al-Sabir, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess user expectations and degree of client satisfaction and quality of health care provided in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 1913 persons chosen by systematic random sampling were successfully interviewed immediately after having received care in government health facilities. FINDINGS: The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction with the government services was provider behaviour, especially respect and politeness. For patients this aspect was much more important than the technical competence of the provider. Furthermore, a reduction in waiting time (on average to 30 min) was more important to clients than a prolongation of the quite short (from a medical standpoint) consultation time (on average 2 min, 22 sec), with 75% of clients being satisfied. Waiting time, which was about double at outreach services than that at fixed services, was the only element with which users of outreach services were dissatisfied. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores that client satisfaction is determined by the cultural background of the people. It shows the dilemma that, though optimally care should be capable of meeting both medical and psychosocial needs, in reality care that meets all medical needs may fail to meet the client's emotional or social needs. Conversely, care that meets psychosocial needs may leave the clients medically at risk. It seems important that developing countries promoting client-oriented health services should carry out more in-depth research on the determinants of client satisfaction in the respective culture. PMID:11436472

  16. Improvement of AMGA Python Client Library for Belle II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jae-Hyuck; Park, Geunchul; Huh, Taesang; Hwang, Soonwook

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the recent improvement of the AMGA (ARDA Metadata Grid Application) python client library for the Belle II Experiment. We were drawn to the action items related to library improvement after in-depth discussions with the developer of the Belle II distributed computing system. The improvement includes client-side metadata federation support in python, DIRAC SSL library support as well as API refinement for synchronous operation. Some of the improvements have already been applied to the AMGA python client library as bundled with the Belle II distributed computing software. The recent mass Monte- Carlo (MC) production campaign shows that the AMGA python client library is reliably stable.

  17. Multi-client quantum key distribution using wavelength division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, Warren P; Bennink, Ryan S; Earl, Dennis Duncan; Evans, Philip G; Humble, Travis S; Pooser, Raphael C; Schaake, Jason; Williams, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) exploits the rules of quantum mechanics to generate and securely distribute a random sequence of bits to two spatially separated clients. Typically a QKD system can support only a single pair of clients at a time, and so a separate quantum link is required for every pair of users. We overcome this limitation with the design and characterization of a multi-client entangled-photon QKD system with the capacity for up to 100 clients simultaneously. The time-bin entangled QKD system includes a broadband down-conversion source with two unique features that enable the multi-user capability. First, the photons are emitted across a very large portion of the telecom spectrum. Second, and more importantly, the photons are strongly correlated in their energy degree of freedom. Using standard wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) hardware, the photons can be routed to different parties on a quantum communication network, while the strong spectral correlations ensure that each client is linked only to the client receiving the conjugate wavelength. In this way, a single down-conversion source can support dozens of channels simultaneously--and to the extent that the WDM hardware can send different spectral channels to different clients, the system can support multiple client pairings. We will describe the design and characterization of the down-conversion source, as well as the client stations, which must be tunable across the emission spectrum.

  18. Real Earthquakes, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred…

  19. Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  20. Investigating bias in psychotherapy with BDSM clients.

    PubMed

    Kolmes, Keely; Stock, Wendy; Moser, Charles

    2006-01-01

    There is a concern among consensual BDSM participants that they will receive biased care from mental health professionals. Results are presented of an anonymous Internet-based survey administered to both BDSM-identified individuals who have received psychological care and to mental health professionals. The survey included socio-demographic data and invited participants to write narrative accounts of biased or culturally sensitive care, from which common themes were identified. Mental health providers (N=17) responded in fewer numbers than those who identified as BDSM-identified participants (N=175). Descriptive characteristics of the sample will be discussed. Themes from the qualitative data may be useful in informing the future development of guidelines for practitioners to work more responsibly with clients who identify as members of this sexual minority group. PMID:16803769

  1. Clients' Representations of Childhood Emotional Bonds with Parents, Social Support, and Formation of the Working Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, Brent

    1991-01-01

    Collected survey data from 102 client-counselor dyads with regard to client and counselor third-session working alliance ratings, quality of clients' current social relationships, and clients' representations of care and overprotection in memories of childhood emotional bonds with parents. Social support was significant predictor of client-rated…

  2. Professional Value Conflicts in Forcing Services on Resistant Older Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Christopher L.

    Clinicians who work with at-risk older adults are often faced with the difficult decision to override their client's civil rights and force institutionalization. Many times the professional is pressured by police or a housing manager to "just do something" with the judgmentally impaired older client. Clinicians faced with these decisions may…

  3. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended to prohibit an attorney or staff attorney...

  4. Client Retrospective Recall of Resolved and Unresolved Misunderstanding Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Renee H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studied client retrospective recall of major misunderstanding events in 19 cases of therapy. Found that good relationship, clients' willingness to assert negative feelings about being misunderstood, and therapists' facilitation of mutual repair effort through maintaining flexible and accepting stance typically led to resolution. (Author/NB)

  5. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended...

  6. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of...

  7. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Client protections. 483... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of...

  8. Client-Controlled Case Information: A General System Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-01-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of…

  9. Working with Clients Who Self-Injure: Providing Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wester, Kelly L.; Trepal, Heather C.

    2005-01-01

    The topic of self-injurious behavior (SIB) has been gaining widespread attention. Although college counselors engage in various types of treatments in order to uncover the underlying reasons for a client's SIB, there is another step in treatment that might be helpful to clients who self-injure. This step involves alternatives to self-injury. The…

  10. Client Suicide: Its Frequency and Impact on Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Charles R. III; Foster, Victoria A.

    2000-01-01

    Study reports the results of a national survey of 1000 professional counselors regarding the frequency and impact of client suicide. Counselors reported having intrusive and avoidant thoughts regarding the crisis that were higher than those of either psychologists or psychiatrists. Results indicate that the effects of client suicide have…

  11. Psychologists' Use of Homework Assignments with Clients Who Have Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Frank P.; Glaser, Natalie M.; Oades, Lindsay G.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos

    2005-01-01

    This study explored psychologists' use of homework with clients in general and specifically for clients with schizophrenia. A survey of 48 Australian psychologists confirmed patterns of homework use found in a New Zealand study of practitioners. Ninety-six percent of the Australian psychologists reported using homework and whilst homework was used…

  12. Client Perceptions of the Microcomputer Evaluation and Screening Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordieri, James E.; Musgrave, Jack

    1989-01-01

    Explored rehabilitation clients' (N=75) perceptions of Microcomputer Evaluation and Screening Assessment (MESA). Results showed clients experienced greater enjoyment, but more difficulty, learning how to complete computer exercises than hardware exercises but viewed computer exercises instructions as easier to understand. Observed differences in…

  13. Rehabilitation Counseling Students' Perceptions of Obese Male and Female Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Steven P.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed attitudes of 72 rehabilitation counseling students toward normal to massively obese clients. Participants viewed pictures of clients and read additional information. Results showed students held negative attitudes toward massively obese people, particularly massively obese women, who were more likely to be perceived as needing…

  14. 31 CFR 10.28 - Return of client's records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Return of client's records. 10.28 Section 10.28 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice Before the Internal Revenue Service § 10.28 Return of client's records. (a)...

  15. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice Before the Internal Revenue Service § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission....

  16. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  17. Factors Assisting Female Clients' Disclosure of Incest during Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Gilda S.; Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1987-01-01

    Explored specific behaviors and characteristics of counselors that relate to adult, female clients' disclosure of incest during counseling. Suggests that factors related to initial disclosure and exploration of incest are client readiness, direct questioning by the counselor, specific counselor characteristics, and positive counselor reactions to…

  18. Implications of Client Demands for R&E Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGranahan, Pamela

    Potential clients for centralized school district organizations with formal responsibilities for research and evaluation include societies, federal and state governments, boards of education, superintendents, other administrators, principals, and teachers. Not all clients are equal. An historical review of the evaluation literature supports the…

  19. Integrating Social and Traditional Media in the Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, James; Hicks, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Based on a client project assigned to students in two undergraduate business classes, this article argues that social media learning is best done in a context that mixes social media with more traditional kinds of media. Ideally, this approach will involve teams of students who are working on different aspects of a larger client project. This…

  20. Communicating Social Support to Grieving Clients: The Veterinarians' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgram, Mary D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines veterinarians' perceptions of how they offer social support to grieving clients. Because many clients cannot find the social support they would like from other sources when grieving the death of a pet, the role of the vet in offering support becomes increasingly important. The results indicate that vets perceive…

  1. Client Perspectives of Multicultural Counseling Competence: A Qualitative Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope-Davis, Donald B.; Toporek, Rebecca L.; Ortega-Villalobos, Lideth; Ligiero, Daniela P.; Brittan-Powell, Christopher S.; Liu, William M.; Bashshur, Michael R.; Codrington, Jamila N.; Liang, Christopher T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Multicultural competence is a burgeoning area of research in counseling psychology. However, there has been little focus on understanding multicultural competence from the perspective of clients. This study used qualitative interviews and grounded theory to develop a model of clients' perspectives of multicultural counseling. The resulting model…

  2. A Call for Feminist Research: A Limited Client Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    Feminist approaches embrace a counselor stance that is both collaborative and supportive, seeking client empowerment. On review of feminist family and couple counseling literature of the past 20 years using several academic databases, no research was found that explored a clients experience of feminist-informed family and couple counseling. The…

  3. Performance Consulting: Job Aids for Interacting with Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the human performance technology process focuses on interacting with clients. Describes a seven-step process that includes assessment; a performance consulting guide that explains the leadership process used in interacting with clients; and how to ask the right questions in the right order. (LRW)

  4. A Classification Scheme for Client Problems in Community Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visiting Nurse Association of Omaha, NE.

    This manual describes a classification system for classifying and recording client problems requiring nursing intervention and offers a plan for its implementation. Part 1 discusses the development of the method, described as an orderly arrangement of a nonexhaustive list of client problems diagnosed by nurses. Problems are divided into four…

  5. Making a Case for Client Insistence in Social Work Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarese, Maureen T.; van Nijnatten, Carolus

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the goals of the institution can shape the talk therein. What happens when a client consistently invokes topics and role identities that are outside the parameters of the institution, insisting on his or her own goals and gaining and maintaining a control of the floor usually expected of practitioners? Client power is often…

  6. 37 CFR 11.107 - Conflict of interest; Current clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients. 11.107 Section 11.107 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK...; Current clients. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a practitioner shall...

  7. 37 CFR 11.107 - Conflict of interest; Current clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients. 11.107 Section 11.107 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK...; Current clients. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a practitioner shall...

  8. Unnoticed, Untapped, and Underappreciated: Clients' Perceptions of their Public Defenders.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher; Moore, Janet; Maier, Wesley; Gaffney, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of providing high-quality public defense services continues to be a concern at federal, state, and local levels. Some scholars have alluded to a potential solution in client-centered representation, but research in this area is sparse at best. Such a lack of understanding leaves in its place speculation, particularly as to the potential importance of client perceptions in shaping broader system legitimacy. To fill this gap and create an empirical platform for future research, an exploratory pilot study was launched with the Hamilton County, Ohio Public Defender's Office, which used mixed methodologies to assess client attitudes toward public defenders as a potential resource for aiding the improvement of indigent representation. Findings from this pilot study suggest that there are five factors a public defense attorney should address that may prove to be very important in obtaining client satisfaction and cooperation: engaging the client for input, listening to the client, examining the prosecutor's evidence, focusing on the client's case during meetings, and informing the client of potential consequences. Implications for practice and future research are discussed. PMID:25953463

  9. Reading the Client: Nonverbal Communication as an Interviewing Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Tom H.

    The importance of effective communication skills between lawyers and clients is equalled only by the imperative need for sustained instruction in the development of communicative skills for the lawyer. Especially important are the nonverbal communication skills in "reading the client." The subtleties of intonation, posture, gesture, and eye…

  10. Lawyer-Client Confidentiality in the Campus Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinan, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that the attorney-client privilege of confidentiality may be more important in the case of the university attorney than in the situation of the attorney representing the client as a law firm member. The principle is illustrated in a hypothetical case concerning research fraud. (MSE)

  11. The Challenge of Prejudice: Counsellors' Talk about Challenging Clients' Prejudices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Sheila J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the implications for training and practice of counsellors' responses to the notion of challenging clients' prejudices. It explores tensions in counselling discourse between social responsibility, responsibility to the client and responsibility for one's self as counsellor. Three focus groups of counsellors were asked whether a…

  12. Working In-Vivo with Client Sense of Unlovability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Mavis; Reed, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Clients sometimes react negatively when their in-session problem behavior is simply blocked. This article illustrates how a FAP (Functional Analytic Psychotherapy) therapist can work effectively in session with a client's problem feeling of unlovability by: 1) understanding its antecedents and functions, 2) using therapeutic love to reinforce…

  13. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  14. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  15. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  16. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  17. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuer as client. 205.3... ISSUER § 205.3 Issuer as client. (a) Representing an issuer. An attorney appearing and practicing before... the issuer as an organization. That the attorney may work with and advise the issuer's...

  18. Counseling with Methadone Clients: A Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.; Powers, Henrietta B.

    1978-01-01

    A review of studies on counseling with methadone clients affirmed the importance of counseling services. Support was found for analytic therapy, T-group therapy, behavioral training, reality therapy, and family therapy. There was evidence of client resistance to group therapy. (Author)

  19. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  20. Facet Analysis of the Client Needs Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancer, L. Suzanne; Stanley, Lawrence R.

    The structure of the revised Client Needs Assessment Instrument (CNAI) is examined. In 1978-79, the Texas Department of Human Resources (DHR) developed the CNAI to provide an index of applicants' and clients' capacity for self-care by measuring the respondents' levels of functioning in: (1) physical health; (2) daily living activities; (3) mental…

  1. Facilitating the Job Search for Special Needs Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Carolyn C.

    It is the work of the job search counselor/facilitator to educate, mentor, and guide the special needs client in identifying and tackling anything that would encumber the job hunter. The purpose of this paper is to provide information to the job search counselor that will enable him/her to fully and skillfully assist the special needs client in…

  2. Do Organizational Culture and Climate Matter for Successful Client Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver Wolf, David A. Patterson; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene; Cristalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The existing literature on the impact of workplace conditions on client care suggests that good cultures and climates provide the best outcomes for clients. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and climate and the proportion of children and youth successfully discharged…

  3. Client and Therapist Views about Intensive and Standard Motivational Interviewing

    PubMed Central

    Polcin, Douglas L.; Sterling, Jennifer; Brown, Thomas; Brown, Michelle; Buscemi, Raymond; Korcha, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Although motivational interviewing (MI) is a widely used intervention for alcohol and drug problems, little is known about client and therapist experiences. Client and therapist views could help better understand how MI works and what factors are important. This paper investigates experiences of clients and therapists who participated in a study that examined a standard single session of MI (MI 1) and a more intensive 9-session model (MI 9) for methamphetamine dependence. Qualitative methods included open ended questions presented to 184 clients at 2-month follow-up and 189 clients at 6-month follow-up. In addition, a focus group consisting of two therapists who delivered the interventions and two adherence monitors who listened to audiotape recordings of sessions was conducted. Clients in both conditions felt supportive, nonjudgmental therapist attitudes were helpful. Most clients in the MI 9 condition but few receiving MI 1 volunteered that feedback and advice were helpful. A strong majority in both conditions desired more sessions. Expert panel members emphasized: 1) multiple benefits of a nonjudgmental stance, 2) finding the right balance among different MI interventions, and 3) understanding the interaction of supportive and directive interventions. Panel members also emphasized that one advantages of MI 9 over MI 1 was that it enabled client change plans to be implemented over time. PMID:26185335

  4. Learning Creativity in the Client-Agency Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Taewon; Jung, Jae C.; Smith, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate creativity-related determinants of learning in the context of business-to-business services and client-agency relationships. Design/methodology/approach: The research model includes client encouragement, agency creativity, campaign creativity, and perceived performance. The study involved conducting a…

  5. General and Specific Psychotherapy Role Induction with Substance Abusing Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Michael J.; Kane, Barbara J.

    Successful outcome in psychotherapy depends, in part, on clients' preconceptions and expectations. Research has shown that inaccurate expectations are more prevalent among lower socioeconomic status clients, who also represent the majority of substance abusers in community treatment programs. To investigate the effect of general and specific…

  6. Alienation: A Concept for Understanding Low-Income, Urban Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    The author examines the concept of alienation and how it can be used to understand low-income, urban clients. A description is presented of 4 dimensions of alienation: powerlessness, meaninglessness, normlessness, and social isolation. Case illustrations are provided, and recommendations are made for counseling alienated clients. This article…

  7. Thin Clients: Anwendungsvirtualisierung (SBC) oder Desktop-Virtualisierung?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lamp, Frank

    Mit Thin Clients lassen sich verschiedene auf Virtualisierung basierende Infrastrukturen unterstützen, die jeweils unterschiedliche Vor- und Nachteile besitzen. Dieser Beitrag stellt die wichtigsten Vor- und Nachteile von Server Based Computing und Desktop-Virtualisierung mit Thin Clients gegenüber.

  8. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  9. Counselor Cognitive Complexity Effects on Counselor-Client Interaction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Edward J.; Lichtenberg, James W.

    Assuming that counseling is an interlocking system of mutual influence and that the effect of various counselor/client responses on the behavior of the other is probabilistic, then it becomes important to understand what categories of factors contribute to the probabilistic tendencies of counselor and client to respond in different ways. One…

  10. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  11. Client and service characteristics associated with addiction treatment completion of clients with co-occurring disorders.

    PubMed

    Mangrum, Laurel F

    2009-10-01

    The study examines client and service characteristics of addiction treatment completers and non-completers with co-occurring disorders (COD). On demographic variables, completers were more likely to be male and homeless. In the psychiatric domain, a greater proportion of completers received diagnoses of depression and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas non-completers were more often diagnosed with bipolar disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. No group differences were found in client-reported psychiatric symptom severity; however, non-completers were rated by clinicians as having more severe symptoms in the areas of interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and hostility. In the area of substance use patterns, no differences were found in primary substance of abuse but completers reported more days of use during the month prior to treatment. Completers also had a greater history of both prior detox and non-detox treatment. At discharge, completers achieved higher rates of past month abstinence and AA attendance, but no differences were found in length of stay in treatment. Examination of recovery support services utilization revealed that completers more often received peer mentoring services. Greater proportions of the non-completer group received educational support, clothing, medical care, and employment assistance. These results suggest that future studies are needed in examining possible differential treatment response by diagnostic category and the potential role of peer mentoring in enhancing addiction treatment completion of COD clients. PMID:19303219

  12. A Comparison Between Publish-and-Subscribe and Client-Server Models in Distributed Control System Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard P., Jr.; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Stagnaro, Mike; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The BIO-Plex control system requires real-time, flexible, and reliable data delivery. There is no simple "off-the-shelf 'solution. However, several commercial packages will be evaluated using a testbed at ARC for publish- and-subscribe and client-server communication architectures. Point-to-point communication architecture is not suitable for real-time BIO-Plex control system. Client-server architecture provides more flexible data delivery. However, it does not provide direct communication among nodes on the network. Publish-and-subscribe implementation allows direct information exchange among nodes on the net, providing the best time-critical communication. In this work Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) from Real-Time Innovations, Inc. ARTIE will be used to implement publish-and subscribe architecture. It offers update guarantees and deadlines for real-time data delivery. Bridgestone, a data acquisition and control software package from National Instruments, will be tested for client-server arrangement. A microwave incinerator located at ARC will be instrumented with a fieldbus network of control devices. BridgeVIEW will be used to implement an enterprise server. An enterprise network consisting of several nodes at ARC and a WAN connecting ARC and RISC will then be setup to evaluate proposed control system architectures. Several network configurations will be evaluated for fault tolerance, quality of service, reliability and efficiency. Data acquired from these network evaluation tests will then be used to determine preliminary design criteria for the BIO-Plex distributed control system.

  13. The Impact of Organizational Stress and Burnout on Client Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Landrum, Brittany; Knight, Danica K.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of organizational attributes on client engagement within substance abuse treatment. Previous research has identified organizational features, including small size, accreditation, and workplace practices that impact client engagement (Broome, Flynn, Knight, & Simpson, 2007). The current study sought to explore how aspects of the work environment impact client engagement. The sample included 89 programs located in 9 states across the U.S. Work environment measures included counselor perceptions of stress, burnout, and work satisfaction at each program, while engagement measures included client ratings of participation, counseling rapport, and treatment satisfaction. Using multiple regression, tests of moderation and mediation revealed that staff stress negatively predicted client participation in treatment. Burnout was related to stress, but was not related to participation. Two additional organizational measures – workload and influence – moderated the positive relationship between staff stress and burnout. Implications for drug treatment programs are discussed. PMID:22154029

  14. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    PubMed

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs. PMID:24605071

  15. Relating Counselor Attributes to Client Engagement in England

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, D. Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Joe, George W.; Best, David; Day, Ed; Campbell, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Client functioning and treatment engagement were examined in relation to staff attributes and organizational climate across a diverse sample of drug treatment and outreach programs in England. Self-rating assessments were obtained from 1,539 clients and 439 counselors representing 44 programs, and results were interpreted using comparable data from studies of treatment programs in the United States. Client scores on treatment participation and counseling rapport in England were directly related to their higher levels of motivation and psychosocial functioning, as well as to staff ratings of professional attributes and program atmosphere. By linking records from English clients with their counselors in each program, findings also indicate these relationships are rooted in the personal interactions between clients and their counselor. Standardized assessments of treatment structure, process, and performance used across therapeutic settings and national boundaries show there is generalizability in the pattern of clinical dynamics, including the relationships between organizational functioning and quality of services. PMID:18835675

  16. Client Adherence to Asian Cultural Values, Common Factors in Counseling, and Session Outcome with Asian American Clients at a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bryan S. K.; Ng, Gladys F.; Ahn, Annie J.

    2009-01-01

    Based on data from 61 Asian American clients at a university counseling center, the study found that client-perceived match on client-counselor belief about problem etiology was related to counselor credibility, empathy, and cross-cultural competence; the client-counselor working alliance; session depth; and the likelihood of the client…

  17. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 3: Serving Clients with Client/Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on client/server issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "The Realities of Client/Server Development and Implementation" (Mary Ann Carr and Alan Hartwig), which examines Carnegie Mellon University's transition to…

  18. 77 FR 67804 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Application for Client Assistance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Application for Client Assistance Program... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Application for Client Assistance Program... request funds to establish and carry out Client Assistance Programs (CAP). CAP is mandated by...

  19. Negotiating: experiences of community nurses when contracting with clients.

    PubMed

    Duiveman, Trudie; Bonner, Ann

    2012-04-01

    A community nurse is required to have excellent interpersonal, teaching, collaborative and clinical skills in order to develop effective individualised client care contracts. Using a descriptive qualitative design data was collected from two focus groups of fourteen community nurses to explore the issues surrounding negotiating and contracting client care contracts from the perspective of community nurses. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: 'assessment of needs', 'education towards enablement', and 'negotiation'. 'Assessment of needs' identified that community nurses assess both the client's requirements for health care as well as the ability of the nurse to provide that care. 'Education towards enablement' described that education of the client is a common strategy used by community nurses to establish realistic goals of health care as part of developing an ongoing care plan. The final theme, 'negotiation', involved an informed agreement between the client and the community nurse which forms the origin of the care contract that will direct the partnership between the client and the nurse. Of importance for community nurses is that development of successful person-centred care contracts requires skillful negotiation of care that strikes the balance between the needs of the client and the ability of the nurse to meet those needs. PMID:22724913

  20. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

    2013-12-01

    'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited. PMID:23217061

  1. Remembering and diagnosing clients: does experience matter?

    PubMed

    Witteman, Cilia L M; Tollenaar, Marieke S

    2012-01-01

    Experienced mental health clinicians often do not outperform novices in diagnostic decision making. In this paper we look for an explanation of this phenomenon by testing differences in memory processes. In two studies we aimed to look at differences in accuracy of diagnoses in relation to free recall of client information between mental health clinicians with different levels of experience. Clinicians were presented with two cases, and were asked afterwards, either directly (Study 1) or after 1 week (Study 2), to give the appropriate diagnoses and to write down what they remembered of the cases. We found in Study 1 that the accuracy of the diagnoses was the same for all levels of experience, as was the amount of details recalled. Very experienced clinicians did remember more higher-order concepts, that is, abstractions from the presented information. In Study 2 we found that the very experienced clinicians were less accurate in their diagnoses and remembered fewer details than the novices. In response to these findings we further discuss their implications for psychodiagnostic practice. PMID:22360789

  2. The Impact of Comprehensive Case Management on HIV Client Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Leslie; Ernst, Jerome; Wirth, Doug; Morretti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In 1990, New York State instituted Comprehensive Medicaid Case Management, also known as Target Case Management (TCM), for people dealing with multiple comorbid conditions, including HIV. The goal of TCM is to assist clients in navigating the health care system to increase care engagement and treatment adherence for individuals with complex needs. HIV-positive individuals engaged in care are more likely to be virally suppressed, improving clinical outcomes and decreasing chances of HIV transmission. The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of TCM management on outcomes for people with HIV. Data were obtained from Amida Care, which operates not-for-profit managed care Medicaid and Medicare Special Needs Plans (SNPs) for HIV clients. Changes in clinical, cost, as well as medical and pharmacy utilization data among TCM clients were examined between January 2011 through September 2012 from the start of case management enrollment through the end of the study period (i.e., up to 6 months after disenrollment). Additionally, CD4 counts were compared between Amida Care TCM clients and non-TCM clients. Notable findings include increased CD4 counts for TCM clients over the one-year study period, achieving parity with non-TCM clients (i.e., Mean CD4 count > 500). When looking exclusively at TCM clients, there were increases in medication costs over time, which were concomitant with increased care engagement. Current findings demonstrate that TCM is able to achieve its goals of improving care engagement and treatment adherence. Subsequent policy changes resulting from the Affordable Care Act and the New York State Medicaid Redesign have made the Health Home the administrator of TCM services. Government entities charged with securing and managing TCM and care coordination for people with HIV should provide thoughtful and reasonable guidance and oversight in order to maintain optimal clinical outcomes for TCM clients and reduce the transmission of HIV. PMID:26849561

  3. The Impact of Comprehensive Case Management on HIV Client Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brennan-Ing, Mark; Seidel, Liz; Rodgers, Leslie; Ernst, Jerome; Wirth, Doug; Tietz, Daniel; Morretti, Antonio; Karpiak, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    In 1990, New York State instituted Comprehensive Medicaid Case Management, also known as Target Case Management (TCM), for people dealing with multiple comorbid conditions, including HIV. The goal of TCM is to assist clients in navigating the health care system to increase care engagement and treatment adherence for individuals with complex needs. HIV-positive individuals engaged in care are more likely to be virally suppressed, improving clinical outcomes and decreasing chances of HIV transmission. The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of TCM management on outcomes for people with HIV. Data were obtained from Amida Care, which operates not-for-profit managed care Medicaid and Medicare Special Needs Plans (SNPs) for HIV clients. Changes in clinical, cost, as well as medical and pharmacy utilization data among TCM clients were examined between January 2011 through September 2012 from the start of case management enrollment through the end of the study period (i.e., up to 6 months after disenrollment). Additionally, CD4 counts were compared between Amida Care TCM clients and non-TCM clients. Notable findings include increased CD4 counts for TCM clients over the one-year study period, achieving parity with non-TCM clients (i.e., Mean CD4 count > 500). When looking exclusively at TCM clients, there were increases in medication costs over time, which were concomitant with increased care engagement. Current findings demonstrate that TCM is able to achieve its goals of improving care engagement and treatment adherence. Subsequent policy changes resulting from the Affordable Care Act and the New York State Medicaid Redesign have made the Health Home the administrator of TCM services. Government entities charged with securing and managing TCM and care coordination for people with HIV should provide thoughtful and reasonable guidance and oversight in order to maintain optimal clinical outcomes for TCM clients and reduce the transmission of HIV. PMID:26849561

  4. The AROW Health Link experience with client-based system design.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    This article outlines the experience of the Arnprior Region & Ottawa West (AROW) Health Link using a multi-dimensional engagement framework in the co-development of systems change with client representatives. The article outlines patient, organizational, and societal factors influencing client engagement. The key learning that has allowed the joint Client Engagement Committee to evolve has been the core of client leadership. Client-led tables and workgroups have fueled client-to-client engagement, which has shifted clients from being a part of the change to driving the change. PMID:27576856

  5. Teaching accountability: using client feedback to train effective family therapists.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Jacqueline A; Kisler, Tiffani S; Adams, Jerome F; Blumen, Dale G

    2011-10-01

    The AAMFT Task Force on Core Competencies (Nelson et al., 2007) proposed that marriage and family therapy (MFT) educators teach and provide evidence of trainee competence beyond coursework and accrued clinical hours. This article describes the integration of a systematic client feedback protocol into an MFT-accredited program's curricula to address the call for outcome-based learning. Outcome management (OM) provides a framework for teaching and assessing trainee effectiveness. Continuous incorporation of client feedback embodies collaborative, strengths-based, integrative, and diversity-centered program values. Students learn a system for being accountable to clients, the profession, and service communities. PMID:22007779

  6. Social work with dying and bereaved clients: helping the workers.

    PubMed

    Davidson, K W; Foster, Z

    1995-01-01

    This paper considers the stresses and satisfactions experienced by health care social workers as they help clients with grief and loss at a time of great fiscal restraint. Their clients face life-threatening illnesses such as AIDS and many forms of cancer. There are untimely losses in families and communities whose resources are dwindling. As social workers confront struggles with death and bereavement, they may receive limited support to deal with these stresses in their work. The authors suggest administrative strategies both to help workers reduce stress and increase satisfactions and to demonstrate the value of social work services to dying and bereaved clients along a continuum of health care. PMID:8560366

  7. Secure thin client architecture for DICOM image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogatala, Harsha V. R.; Gallet, Jacqueline

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a concept of Secure Thin Client (STC) Architecture for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image analysis over Internet. STC Architecture provides in-depth analysis and design of customized reports for DICOM images using drag-and-drop and data warehouse technology. Using a personal computer and a common set of browsing software, STC can be used for analyzing and reporting detailed patient information, type of examinations, date, Computer Tomography (CT) dose index, and other relevant information stored within the images header files as well as in the hospital databases. STC Architecture is three-tier architecture. The First-Tier consists of drag-and-drop web based interface and web server, which provides customized analysis and reporting ability to the users. The Second-Tier consists of an online analytical processing (OLAP) server and database system, which serves fast, real-time, aggregated multi-dimensional data using OLAP technology. The Third-Tier consists of a smart algorithm based software program which extracts DICOM tags from CT images in this particular application, irrespective of CT vendor's, and transfers these tags into a secure database system. This architecture provides Winnipeg Regional Health Authorities (WRHA) with quality indicators for CT examinations in the hospitals. It also provides health care professionals with analytical tool to optimize radiation dose and image quality parameters. The information is provided to the user by way of a secure socket layer (SSL) and role based security criteria over Internet. Although this particular application has been developed for WRHA, this paper also discusses the effort to extend the Architecture to other hospitals in the region. Any DICOM tag from any imaging modality could be tracked with this software.

  8. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitonyak, Jennifer S.; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy’s rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy’s perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy’s research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  9. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  10. Reflections on the Development of Patron-Client Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melick-Barthelmess, Karin

    1985-01-01

    The development of the institution of clientage is traced from ancient Rome to modern times. The patron-client relationships in the hierarchical nature of society and institutions in Spain and Latin America are specifically examined. (RM)