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Sample records for potent ichthyotoxic neurotoxins

  1. Brevetoxins, like ciguatoxins, are potent ichthyotoxic neurotoxins that accumulate in fish✩

    PubMed Central

    Naar, Jerome P.; Flewelling, Leanne J.; Lenzi, Allison; Abbott, Jay P.; Granholm, April; Jacocks, Henry M.; Gannon, Damon; Henry, Michael; Pierce, Richard; Baden, Daniel G.; Wolny, Jennifer; Landsberg, Jan H.

    2009-01-01

    Brevetoxins and ciguatoxins are closely related potent marine neurotoxins. Although ciguatoxins accumulate in fish to levels that are dangerous for human consumption, live fish have not been considered as potential sources of brevetoxin exposure in humans. Here we show that, analogous to ciguatoxins, brevetoxins can accumulate in live fish by dietary transfer. We experimentally identify two pathways leading to brevetoxin-contaminated omnivorous and planktivorous fish. Fish fed with toxic shellfish and Karenia brevis cultures remained healthy and accumulated high brevetoxin levels in their tissues (up to 2675 ng g−1 in viscera and 1540 ng g−1 in muscle). Repeated collections of fish from St. Joseph Bay in the Florida panhandle reveal that accumulation of brevetoxins in healthy fish occurs in the wild. We observed that levels of brevetoxins in the muscle of fish at all trophic levels rise significantly, but not to dangerous levels, during a K. brevis bloom. Concentrations were highest in fish liver and stomach contents, and increased during and immediately following the bloom. The persistence of brevetoxins in the fish food web was followed for 1 year after the K. brevis bloom. PMID:17675204

  2. Tetrodotoxin, an Extremely Potent Marine Neurotoxin: Distribution, Toxicity, Origin and Therapeutical Uses.

    PubMed

    Lago, Jorge; Rodríguez, Laura P; Blanco, Lucía; Vieites, Juan Manuel; Cabado, Ana G

    2015-10-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin responsible for many human intoxications and fatalities each year. The origin of TTX is unknown, but in the pufferfish, it seems to be produced by endosymbiotic bacteria that often seem to be passed down the food chain. The ingestion of contaminated pufferfish, considered the most delicious fish in Japan, is the usual route of toxicity. This neurotoxin, reported as a threat to human health in Asian countries, has spread to the Pacific and Mediterranean, due to the increase of temperature waters worldwide. TTX, for which there is no known antidote, inhibits sodium channel producing heart failure in many cases and consequently death. In Japan, a regulatory limit of 2 mg eq TTX/kg was established, although the restaurant preparation of "fugu" is strictly controlled by law and only chefs qualified are allowed to prepare the fish. Due to its paralysis effect, this neurotoxin could be used in the medical field as an analgesic to treat some cancer pains. PMID:26492253

  3. Tetrodotoxin, an Extremely Potent Marine Neurotoxin: Distribution, Toxicity, Origin and Therapeutical Uses

    PubMed Central

    Lago, Jorge; Rodríguez, Laura P.; Blanco, Lucía; Vieites, Juan Manuel; Cabado, Ana G.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin responsible for many human intoxications and fatalities each year. The origin of TTX is unknown, but in the pufferfish, it seems to be produced by endosymbiotic bacteria that often seem to be passed down the food chain. The ingestion of contaminated pufferfish, considered the most delicious fish in Japan, is the usual route of toxicity. This neurotoxin, reported as a threat to human health in Asian countries, has spread to the Pacific and Mediterranean, due to the increase of temperature waters worldwide. TTX, for which there is no known antidote, inhibits sodium channel producing heart failure in many cases and consequently death. In Japan, a regulatory limit of 2 mg eq TTX/kg was established, although the restaurant preparation of “fugu” is strictly controlled by law and only chefs qualified are allowed to prepare the fish. Due to its paralysis effect, this neurotoxin could be used in the medical field as an analgesic to treat some cancer pains. PMID:26492253

  4. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  5. A Potent Peptidomimetic Inhibitor of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype a Has a Very Different Conformation Than SNAP-25 Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga, J.E.; Schmidt, J.J.; Fenn, T.; Burnett, J.C.; Arac, D.; Gussio, R.; Stafford, R.G.; Badie, S.S.; Bavari, S.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-05-28

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A is the most lethal of all known toxins. Here, we report the crystal structure, along with SAR data, of the zinc metalloprotease domain of BoNT/A bound to a potent peptidomimetic inhibitor (Ki = 41 nM) that resembles the local sequence of the SNAP-25 substrate. Surprisingly, the inhibitor adopts a helical conformation around the cleavage site, in contrast to the extended conformation of the native substrate. The backbone of the inhibitor's P1 residue displaces the putative catalytic water molecule and concomitantly interacts with the 'proton shuttle' E224. This mechanism of inhibition is aided by residue contacts in the conserved S1' pocket of the substrate binding cleft, and the induction of new hydrophobic pockets, which are not present in the apo form, especially for the P2' residue of the inhibitor. Our inhibitor is specific for BoNT/A as it does not inhibit other BoNT serotypes or thermolysin.

  6. Molecular Evolution of α-Latrotoxin, the Exceptionally Potent Vertebrate Neurotoxin in Black Widow Spider Venom

    PubMed Central

    Garb, Jessica E.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2013-01-01

    Black widow spiders (members of the genus Latrodectus) are widely feared because of their potent neurotoxic venom. α-Latrotoxin is the vertebrate-specific toxin responsible for the dramatic effects of black widow envenomation. The evolution of this toxin is enigmatic because only two α-latrotoxin sequences are known. In this study, ∼4 kb α-latrotoxin sequences and their homologs were characterized from a diversity of Latrodectus species, and representatives of Steatoda and Parasteatoda, establishing the wide distribution of latrotoxins across the mega-diverse spider family Theridiidae. Across black widow species, α-latrotoxin shows ≥94% nucleotide identity and variability consistent with purifying selection. Multiple codon and branch-specific estimates of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratio also suggest a long history of purifying selection has acted on α-latrotoxin across Latrodectus and Steatoda. However, α-latrotoxin is highly divergent in amino acid sequence between these genera, with 68.7% of protein differences involving non-conservative substitutions, evidence for positive selection on its physiochemical properties and particular codons, and an elevated rate of nonsynonymous substitutions along α-latrotoxin’s Latrodectus branch. Such variation likely explains the efficacy of red-back spider, L. hasselti, antivenom in treating bites from other Latrodectus species, and the weaker neurotoxic symptoms associated with Steatoda and Parasteatoda bites. Long-term purifying selection on α-latrotoxin indicates its functional importance in black widow venom, even though vertebrates are a small fraction of their diet. The greater differences between Latrodectus and Steatoda α-latrotoxin, and their relationships to invertebrate-specific latrotoxins, suggest a shift in α-latrotoxin toward increased vertebrate toxicity coincident with the evolution of widow spiders. PMID:23339183

  7. Interactions of a potent cyclic peptide inhibitor with the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin A: Insights from X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, Desigan; Adler, Michael; Levit, Matthew; Krebs, Michael; Sweeney, Richard; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-11-15

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes (A-G) of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) are responsible for the deadly disease botulism. BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) exerts its lethal action by cleaving the SNARE protein SNAP-25, leading to inhibition of neurotransmitter release, flaccid paralysis and autonomic dysfunction. BoNTs are dichain proteins consisting of a ∼ 100 kDa heavy chain and a ∼ 50 kDa light chain; the former is responsible for neurospecific binding, internalization and translocation, and the latter for cleavage of neuronal SNARE proteins. Because of their extreme toxicity and history of weaponization, the BoNTs are regarded as potential biowarfare/bioterrorism agents. No post-symptomatic therapeutic interventions are available for BoNT intoxication other than intensive care; therefore it is imperative to develop specific antidotes against this neurotoxin. To this end, a cyclic peptide inhibitor (CPI-1) was evaluated in a FRET assay for its ability to inhibit BoNT/A light chain (Balc). CPI was found to be highly potent, exhibiting a Ki of 12.3 nM with full-length Balc448 and 39.2 nM using a truncated crystallizable form of the light chain (Balc424). Cocrystallization studies revealed that in the Balc424-CPI-1 complex, the inhibitor adopts a helical conformation, occupies a high percentage of the active site cavity and interacts in an amphipathic manner with critical active site residues. The data suggest that CPI-1 prevents SNAP-25 from accessing the Balc active site by blocking both the substrate binding path at the surface and the Zn(2+) binding region involved in catalysis. This differs from linear peptide inhibitors described to date which block only the latter. PMID:26522088

  8. Potent Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin/B by Synergistic Action of Antibodies Recognizing Protein and Ganglioside Receptor Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Tiancheng; Ji, Guanghui; Shi, Xin; Xia, Tian; Lu, Weijia; Zhang, Dapeng; Dai, Jianxin; Guo, Yajun

    2012-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the causative agents for life-threatening human disease botulism, have been recognized as biological warfare agents. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the potencies of mAbs against BoNTs are usually less than that of polyclonal antibodies (or oligoclonal antibodies). The confirmation of key epitopes with development of effective mAb is urgently needed. Methods and Findings We selected 3 neutralizing mAbs which recognize different non-overlapping epitopes of BoNT/B from a panel of neutralizing antibodies against BoNT/B. By comparing the neutralizing effects among different combination groups, we found that 8E10, response to ganglioside receptor binding site, could synergy with 5G10 and 2F4, recognizing non-overlapping epitopes within Syt II binding sites. However, the combination of 5G10 with 2F4 blocking protein receptor binding sites did not achieve synergistical effects. Moreover, we found that the binding epitope of 8E10 was conserved among BoNT A, B, E, and F, which might cross-protect the challenge of different serotypes of BoNTs in vivo. Conclusions The combination of two mAbs recognizing different receptors' binding domain in BoNTs has a synergistic effect. 8E10 is a potential universal partner for the synergistical combination with other mAb against protein receptor binding domain in BoNTs of other serotypes. PMID:22952786

  9. Second generation steroidal 4-aminoquinolines are potent, dual-target inhibitors of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A metalloprotease and P. falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Videnović, Milica; Opsenica, Dejan M; Burnett, James C; Gomba, Laura; Nuss, Jonathan E; Selaković, Zivota; Konstantinović, Jelena; Krstić, Maja; Segan, Sandra; Zlatović, Mario; Sciotti, Richard J; Bavari, Sina; Solaja, Bogdan A

    2014-05-22

    Significantly more potent second generation 4-amino-7-chloroquinoline (4,7-ACQ) based inhibitors of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) light chain were synthesized. Introducing an amino group at the C(3) position of the cholate component markedly increased potency (IC50 values for such derivatives ranged from 0.81 to 2.27 μM). Two additional subclasses were prepared: bis(steroidal)-4,7-ACQ derivatives and bis(4,7-ACQ)cholate derivatives; both classes provided inhibitors with nanomolar-range potencies (e.g., the Ki of compound 67 is 0.10 μM). During BoNT/A challenge using primary neurons, select derivatives protected SNAP-25 by up to 89%. Docking simulations were performed to rationalize the compounds' in vitro potencies. In addition to specific residue contacts, coordination of the enzyme's catalytic zinc and expulsion of the enzyme's catalytic water were a consistent theme. With respect to antimalarial activity, the compounds provided better IC90 activities against chloroquine resistant (CQR) malaria than CQ, and seven compounds were more active than mefloquine against CQR strain W2. PMID:24742203

  10. The insecticidal neurotoxin Aps III is an atypical knottin peptide that potently blocks insect voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Niraj S.; Kang, Eunji; Herzig, Volker; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M.; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most potent insecticidal venom peptides described to date is Aps III from the venom of the trapdoor spider Apomastus schlingeri. Aps III is highly neurotoxic to lepidopteran crop pests, making it a promising candidate for bioinsecticide development. However, its disulfide-connectivity, three-dimensional structure, and mode of action have not been determined. Here we show that recombinant Aps III (rAps III) is an atypical knottin peptide; three of the disulfide bridges form a classical inhibitor cystine knot motif while the fourth disulfide acts as a molecular staple that restricts the flexibility of an unusually large β hairpin loop that often houses the pharmacophore in this class of toxins. We demonstrate that the irreversible paralysis induced in insects by rAps III results from a potent block of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. Channel block by rAps III is voltage-independent insofar as it occurs without significant alteration in the voltage-dependence of channel activation or steady-state inactivation. Thus, rAps III appears to be a pore blocker that plugs the outer vestibule of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. This mechanism of action contrasts strikingly with virtually all other sodium channel modulators isolated from spider venoms that act as gating modifiers by interacting with one or more of the four voltage-sensing domains of the channel. PMID:23473802

  11. The insecticidal neurotoxin Aps III is an atypical knottin peptide that potently blocks insect voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Bende, Niraj S; Kang, Eunji; Herzig, Volker; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2013-05-15

    One of the most potent insecticidal venom peptides described to date is Aps III from the venom of the trapdoor spider Apomastus schlingeri. Aps III is highly neurotoxic to lepidopteran crop pests, making it a promising candidate for bioinsecticide development. However, its disulfide-connectivity, three-dimensional structure, and mode of action have not been determined. Here we show that recombinant Aps III (rAps III) is an atypical knottin peptide; three of the disulfide bridges form a classical inhibitor cystine knot motif while the fourth disulfide acts as a molecular staple that restricts the flexibility of an unusually large β hairpin loop that often houses the pharmacophore in this class of toxins. We demonstrate that the irreversible paralysis induced in insects by rAps III results from a potent block of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. Channel block by rAps III is voltage-independent insofar as it occurs without significant alteration in the voltage-dependence of channel activation or steady-state inactivation. Thus, rAps III appears to be a pore blocker that plugs the outer vestibule of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. This mechanism of action contrasts strikingly with virtually all other sodium channel modulators isolated from spider venoms that act as gating modifiers by interacting with one or more of the four voltage-sensing domains of the channel. PMID:23473802

  12. A Single-Domain Llama Antibody Potently Inhibits the Enzymatic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Binding to the Non-Catalytic [alpha]-Exosite Binding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A.; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-13

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub d}) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K{sub d} for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10{sup -10} M and an IC{sub 50} (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10{sup -10} M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the {alpha}-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc {alpha}-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  13. Interactions of a potent cyclic peptide inhibitor with the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin A: insights from x-ray crystallography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumaran, D.; Adler, M.; Levit, M.; Krebs, M.; Sweeney, R.; Swaminathan, S.

    2015-10-17

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes (A to G) of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) are responsible for the deadly disease botulism. BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) exerts its lethal action by cleaving the SNARE protein SNAP-25, leading to inhibition of neurotransmitter release, flaccid paralysis and autonomic dysfunction. BoNTs are dichain proteins: the heavy chain is responsible for neurospecific binding, internalization and translocation, and the light chain is responsible for substrate cleavage. Because of their extreme toxicity and prior history of weaponization, the BoNTs are considered to be potential bioterrorism agents. No post-symptomatic therapeutic interventions are available for BoNT intoxication other than critical care;more » therefore it is imperative to develop specific antidotes against this neurotoxin. To this end, a cyclic peptide inhibitor (CPI-1) was synthesized and found to inhibit BoNT/A light chain (Balc) with high affinity. When tested in a cell-free Förster resonance excitation transfer (FRET) assay, CPI-1 was found to have a Ki of 13.9 nM using full-length Balc448 and 42.1 nM using a truncated crystallizable form of light chain (Balc424). Co-crystallization of CPI-1 with Balc424 revealed that in the Balc-CPI-1 complex, the inhibitor adopts a helical conformation, occupies a high percentage of the active site cavity and interacts in an amphipathic manner with critical active site residues. The data suggest that CPI-1 prevents SNAP-25 from accessing the Balc active site by blocking both the substrate binding path at the surface and the Zn2+ binding region involved in catalysis. This is in contrast to linear peptide inhibitors described to date which block only the latter« less

  14. Interactions of a potent cyclic peptide inhibitor with the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin A: insights from x-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, D.; Adler, M.; Levit, M.; Krebs, M.; Sweeney, R.; Swaminathan, S.

    2015-10-17

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes (A to G) of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) are responsible for the deadly disease botulism. BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) exerts its lethal action by cleaving the SNARE protein SNAP-25, leading to inhibition of neurotransmitter release, flaccid paralysis and autonomic dysfunction. BoNTs are dichain proteins: the heavy chain is responsible for neurospecific binding, internalization and translocation, and the light chain is responsible for substrate cleavage. Because of their extreme toxicity and prior history of weaponization, the BoNTs are considered to be potential bioterrorism agents. No post-symptomatic therapeutic interventions are available for BoNT intoxication other than critical care; therefore it is imperative to develop specific antidotes against this neurotoxin. To this end, a cyclic peptide inhibitor (CPI-1) was synthesized and found to inhibit BoNT/A light chain (Balc) with high affinity. When tested in a cell-free Förster resonance excitation transfer (FRET) assay, CPI-1 was found to have a Ki of 13.9 nM using full-length Balc448 and 42.1 nM using a truncated crystallizable form of light chain (Balc424). Co-crystallization of CPI-1 with Balc424 revealed that in the Balc-CPI-1 complex, the inhibitor adopts a helical conformation, occupies a high percentage of the active site cavity and interacts in an amphipathic manner with critical active site residues. The data suggest that CPI-1 prevents SNAP-25 from accessing the Balc active site by blocking both the substrate binding path at the surface and the Zn2+ binding region involved in catalysis. This is in contrast to linear peptide inhibitors described to date which block only the latter

  15. Epitope targeting of tertiary protein structure enables target-guided synthesis of a potent in-cell inhibitor of botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Blake; Wong, Michelle; Malette, Jacquie; Lai, Bert; Deyle, Kaycie M; Das, Samir; Nag, Arundhati; Agnew, Heather D; Heath, James R

    2015-06-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotype A is the most lethal known toxin and has an occluded structure, which prevents direct inhibition of its active site before it enters the cytosol. Target-guided synthesis by in situ click chemistry is combined with synthetic epitope targeting to exploit the tertiary structure of the BoNT protein as a landscape for assembling a competitive inhibitor. A substrate-mimicking peptide macrocycle is used as a direct inhibitor of BoNT. An epitope-targeting in situ click screen is utilized to identify a second peptide macrocycle ligand that binds to an epitope that, in the folded BoNT structure, is active-site-adjacent. A second in situ click screen identifies a molecular bridge between the two macrocycles. The resulting divalent inhibitor exhibits an in vitro inhibition constant of 165 pM against the BoNT/A catalytic chain. The inhibitor is carried into cells by the intact holotoxin, and demonstrates protection and rescue of BoNT intoxication in a human neuron model. PMID:25925721

  16. Comparison of oral toxicological properties of botulinum neurotoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent biological toxins for humans. Of the seven known serotypes (A-G) of BoNT, serotypes A, B and E cause most of the foodborne intoxications in humans. BoNTs in nature are associated with non-toxic accessory proteins known as neurotoxin-associated ...

  17. Spatial and temporal patterns of surface water quality and ichthyotoxicity in urban and rural river basins in Texas.

    PubMed

    Vanlandeghem, Matthew M; Meyer, Matthew D; Cox, Stephen B; Sharma, Bibek; Patiño, Reynaldo

    2012-12-15

    The Double Mountain Fork Brazos River (Texas, USA) consists of North (NF) and South Forks (SF). The NF receives urban runoff and twice-reclaimed wastewater effluent, whereas the SF flows through primarily rural areas. The objective of this study was to determine and compare associations between standard water quality variables and ichthyotoxicity at a landscape scale that included urban (NF) and rural (SF) sites. Five NF and three SF sites were sampled quarterly from March 2008 to March 2009 for specific conductance, salinity, hardness, pH, temperature, and turbidity; and a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo bioassay was used to determine ichthyotoxicity. Metal and nutrient concentrations at all sites were also measured in addition to standard water quality variables in spring 2009. Principal component analyses identified hardness, specific conductance, and salinity as the water variables that best differentiate the urban NF (higher levels) from rural SF habitat. Nutrient levels were also higher in the NF, but no landscape scale patterns in metal concentrations were observed. Ichthyotoxicity was generally higher in NF water especially in winter, and multiple regression analyses suggested a positive association between water hardness and ichthyotoxicity. To test for the potential influence of the toxic golden alga (Prymnesium parvum) on overall ichthyotoxicity, a cofactor known to enhance golden alga toxin activity was used in the bioassays. Golden alga ichthyotoxicity was detected in the NF but not the SF, suggesting golden alga may have contributed to overall ichthyotoxicity in the urban but not in the rural system. In conclusion, the physicochemistry of the urban-influenced NF water was conducive to the expression of ichthyotoxicity and also point to water hardness as a novel factor influencing golden alga ichthyotoxicity in surface waters. PMID:22682267

  18. Potent New Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Endopeptidase Developed by Synthesis-Based Computer-Aided Molecular Design

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Vummenthala, Anuradha; Mishra, Rajesh K.; Park, Jewn Giew; Wang, Shaohua; Davis, Jon; Millard, Charles B.; Schmidt, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNTA) causes a life-threatening neuroparalytic disease known as botulism. Current treatment for post exposure of BoNTA uses antibodies that are effective in neutralizing the extracellular toxin to prevent further intoxication but generally cannot rescue already intoxicated neurons. Effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNTA endopeptidase (BoNTAe) are desirable because such inhibitors potentially can neutralize the intracellular BoNTA and offer complementary treatment for botulism. Previously we reported a serotype-selective, small-molecule BoNTAe inhibitor with a Kiapp value of 3.8±0.8 µM. This inhibitor was developed by lead identification using virtual screening followed by computer-aided optimization of a lead with an IC50 value of 100 µM. However, it was difficult to further improve the lead from micromolar to even high nanomolar potency due to the unusually large enzyme-substrate interface of BoNTAe. The enzyme-substrate interface area of 4,840 Å2 for BoNTAe is about four times larger than the typical protein-protein interface area of 750–1,500 Å2. Inhibitors must carry several functional groups to block the unusually large interface of BoNTAe, and syntheses of such inhibitors are therefore time-consuming and expensive. Herein we report the development of a serotype-selective, small-molecule, and competitive inhibitor of BoNTAe with a Ki value of 760±170 nM using synthesis-based computer-aided molecular design (SBCAMD). This new approach accounts the practicality and efficiency of inhibitor synthesis in addition to binding affinity and selectivity. We also report a three-dimensional model of BoNTAe in complex with the new inhibitor and the dynamics of the complex predicted by multiple molecular dynamics simulations, and discuss further structural optimization to achieve better in vivo efficacy in neutralizing BoNTA than those of our early micromolar leads. This work provides new insight into structural modification

  19. Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Microscale Model for Ichthyotoxicity Evaluation of Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hong; Kong, Wen-Wen; Shao, Chang-Lun; Li, Yun; Liu, Yun-Zhang; Liu, Min; Guan, Fei-Fei; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Marine organisms often protect themselves against their predators by chemical defensive strategy. The second metabolites isolated from marine organisms and their symbiotic microbes have been proven to play a vital role in marine chemical ecology, such as ichthyotoxicity, allelopathy, and antifouling. It is well known that the microscale models for marine chemoecology assessment are urgently needed for trace quantity of marine natural products. Zebrafish model has been widely used as a microscale model in the fields of environment ecological evaluation and drug safety evaluation, but seldom reported for marine chemoecology assessment. In this work, zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model was established for ichthyotoxicity evaluation of marine natural products by using 24-well microplate based on zebrafish embryo. Ichthyotoxicity was evaluated by observation of multiple toxicological endpoints, including coagulation egg, death, abnormal heartbeat, no spontaneous movement, delayed hatch, and malformation of the different organs during zebrafish embryogenesis periods at 24, 48, and 72 h post-fertilization (hpf). 3,4-Dichloroaniline was used as the positive control for method validation. Subsequently, the established model was applied to test the ichthyotoxic activity of the compounds isolated from corals and their symbiotic microbes and to isolate the bioactive secondary metabolites from the gorgonian Subergorgia mollis under bioassay guidance. It was suggested that zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model is suitable for bioassay-guided isolation and preliminary bioactivity screening of marine natural products. PMID:26838966

  20. Prymnesium parvum revisited: relationship between allelopathy, ichthyotoxicity, and chemical profiles in 5 strains.

    PubMed

    Blossom, Hannah E; Rasmussen, Silas A; Andersen, Nikolaj G; Larsen, Thomas O; Nielsen, Kristian F; Hansen, Per J

    2014-12-01

    Bioassay-guided discovery of ichthyotoxic algal compounds using in vivo fish assays is labor intensive, costly, and highly regulated. Since the mode of action of most known algal-mediated fish-killing toxins is damage to the cell membranes in the gills, various types of cell-based bioassays are often used for bioassay guided purification of new ichthyotoxins. Here we tested the hypothesis that allelopathy is related to ichthyotoxicity and thus that a microalgal bioassay can be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity by comparing the toxicity of five strains of Prymnesium parvum toward rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 10 g) and the microalga Teleaulax acuta. No relationship between median effective concentrations (EC50s) on fish and median lethal concentrations (LC50s) on algae was observed in the 5 strains showing that a microalgal bioassay cannot be used as a proxy for ichthyotoxicity. Fish were more sensitive to P. parvum with EC50s ranging from 6×10(3) to 40×10(3) cells ml(-1), compared to the test alga where LC50s ranged from 30×10(3) to nearly non-toxic at 500×10(3) cells ml(-1). In addition, the cellular concentrations of two recently suggested ichthyotoxins produced by P. parvum, the "golden algae toxins", GAT 512 and a novel GAT 510, did not show any relationship to either ichthyotoxicity or allelopathy, and are not the biologically relevant toxins, but are simply lipids found in algal chloroplasts. Finally, we demonstrate that the recently suggested ichthyotoxin, oleamide, could not be detected in any of the five P. parvum strains above the limit of detection, nor was it found in a (13)C-labeled strain. Instead we document that oleamide can easily be extracted from plastic materials, which may have been the source of oleamide reported previously. PMID:25456230

  1. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  2. Zebrafish Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia S.; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent known toxins. The mouse LD50 assay is the gold standard for testing BoNT potency, but is not sensitive enough to detect the extremely low levels of neurotoxin that may be present in the serum of sensitive animal species that are showing the effects of BoNT toxicity, such as channel catfish affected by visceral toxicosis of catfish. Since zebrafish are an important animal model for diverse biomedical and basic research, they are readily available and have defined genetic lines that facilitate reproducibility. This makes them attractive for use as an alternative bioassay organism. The utility of zebrafish as a bioassay model organism for BoNT was investigated. The 96 h median immobilizing doses of BoNT/A, BoNT/C, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F for adult male Tübingen strain zebrafish (0.32 g mean weight) at 25 °C were 16.31, 124.6, 4.7, and 0.61 picograms (pg)/fish, respectively. These findings support the use of the zebrafish-based bioassays for evaluating the presence of BoNT/A, BoNT/E, and BoNT/F. Evaluating the basis of the relatively high resistance of zebrafish to BoNT/C and the extreme sensitivity to BoNT/F may reveal unique functional patterns to the action of these neurotoxins. PMID:27153088

  3. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins. PMID:26158319

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... years without side effects from long-term use. Immunity Because botulinum neurotoxin is a biological product, it ... for the body to create antibodies and develop immunity to the effects of the toxin. Measures are ...

  5. Sublethal concentrations of ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect rainbow trout susceptibility to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Lorenzen, Ellen; Snogdal Boutrup, Torsten; Hansen, Per Juel; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-13

    Ichthyotoxic algal blooms are normally considered a threat to maricultured fish only when blooms reach lethal cell concentrations. The degree to which sublethal algal concentrations challenge the health of the fish during blooms is practically unknown. In this study, we analysed whether sublethal concentrations of the ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect the susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). During exposure to sublethal algal concentrations, the fish increased production of mucus on their gills. When fish were exposed to the algae for 12 h prior to the addition of virus, a marginal decrease in the susceptibility to VHSV was observed compared to fish exposed to VHSV without algae. If virus and algae were added simultaneously, inclusion of the algae increased mortality by 50% compared to fish exposed to virus only, depending on the experimental setup. We concluded that depending on the local exposure conditions, sublethal concentrations of P. parvum could affect susceptibility of fish to infectious agents such as VHSV. PMID:26758652

  6. Botulinum Neurotoxin Research at the Western Regional Research Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent toxins to humans. The most common route of intoxication is through ingestion of contaminated food or drink. In addition, these toxins are likely targets for use in intentional adulteration of food or animal feeds and are thus classified as Se...

  7. Botulinum neurotoxin: a deadly protease with applications to human medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent biological toxins to humans. They are synthesized by the gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum. BoNT is secreted from the bacterium as a ~150 kDa polypeptide which is cleaved by bacterial or host proteases into a ~50 kD...

  8. Coupling the Torpedo Microplate-Receptor Binding Assay with Mass Spectrometry to Detect Cyclic Imine Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M.; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility. PMID:23131021

  9. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-01

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility. PMID:23131021

  10. Strain variability in fatty acid composition of Chattonella marina (Raphidophyceae) and its relation to differing ichthyotoxicity toward rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Aranda, Juan José; Nichols, Peter D; David Waite, Trevor; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf M

    2013-04-01

    Lipid profiles of three strains (Mexico, Australia, Japan) of Chattonella marina (Subrahmanyan) Hara et Chihara were studied under defined growth (phosphate, light, and growth phase) and harvest (intact and ruptured cells) conditions. Triacylglycerol levels were always <2%, sterols <7%, free fatty acids varied between 2 and 33%, and polar lipids were the most abundant lipid class (>51% of total lipids). The major fatty acids in C. marina were palmitic (16:0), eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5ω3), octadecatetraenoic (18:4ω3), myristic (14:0), and palmitoleic (16:1ω7c) acids. Higher levels of EPA were found in ruptured cells (21.4-29.4%) compared to intact cells (8.5-25.3%). In general, Japanese N-118 C. marina was the highest producer of EPA (14.3-29.4%), and Mexican CMCV-1 the lowest producer (7.9-27.1%). Algal cultures, free fatty acids from C. marina, and the two aldehydes 2E,4E-decadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal (suspected fatty acid-derived products) were tested against the rainbow trout fish gill cell line RTgill-W1. The configuration of fatty acids plays an important role in ichthyotoxicity. Free fatty acid fractions, obtained by base saponification of total lipids from C. marina showed a potent toxicity toward gill cells (median lethal concentration, LC50 (at 1 h) of 0.44 μg · mL(-1) in light conditions, with a complete loss of viability at >3.2 μg · mL(-1) ). Live cultures of Mexican C. marina were less toxic than Japanese and Australian strains. This difference could be related to differing EPA content, superoxide anion production, and cell fragility. The aldehydes 2E,4E-decadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal also showed high impact on gill cell viability, with LC50 (at 1 h) of 0.34 and 0.36 μg · mL(-1) , respectively. Superoxide anion production was highest in Australian strain CMPL01, followed by Japanese N-118 and Mexican CMCV-1 strains. Ruptured cells showed higher production of superoxide anion compared to intact cells (e.g., 19 vs. 9.5

  11. Ligand-binding assays for cyanobacterial neurotoxins targeting cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-07-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a threat to public health because of the capacity of some cyanobacterial species to produce potent hepatotoxins and neurotoxins. Cyanobacterial neurotoxins are involved in the rapid death of wild and domestic animals by targeting voltage gated sodium channels and cholinergic synapses, including the neuromuscular junction. Anatoxin-a and its methylene homologue homoanatoxin-a are potent agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Since the structural determination of anatoxin-a, several mass spectrometry-based methods have been developed for detection of anatoxin-a and, later, homoanatoxin-a. Mass spectrometry-based techniques provide accuracy, precision, selectivity, sensitivity, reproducibility, adequate limit of detection, and structural and quantitative information for analyses of cyanobacterial anatoxins from cultured and environmental cyanobacterial samples. However, these physicochemical techniques will only detect known toxins for which toxin standards are commercially available, and they require highly specialized laboratory personnel and expensive equipment. Receptor-based assays are functional methods that are based on the mechanism of action of a class of toxins and are thus, suitable tools for survey of freshwater reservoirs for cyanobacterial anatoxins. The competition between cyanobacterial anatoxins and a labelled ligand for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is measured radioactively or non-radioactively providing high-throughput screening formats for routine detection of this class of neurotoxins. The mouse bioassay is the method of choice for marine toxin monitoring, but has to be replaced by fully validated functional methods. In this paper we review the ligand-binding assays developed for detection of cyanobacterial and algal neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and for high-throughput screening of novel nicotinic agents. PMID:20238109

  12. Structure of a bimodular botulinum neurotoxin complex provides insights into its oral toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent oral poisons produced by Clostridium botulinum. BoNTs are secreted along with several auxiliary proteins forming progenitor toxin complexes (PTC). Here, we report the structure of a ~760 kDa 14-subunit PTC using a combination of X-ray crystallography a...

  13. Rapid microfluidic assay for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin in animal sera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potent botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit f...

  14. Maculotoxin: a neurotoxin from the venom glands of the octopus Hapalochlaena maculosa identified as tetrodotoxin.

    PubMed

    Sheumack, D D; Howden, M E; Spence, I; Quinn, R J

    1978-01-13

    Maculotoxin, a potent neurotoxin isolated from the posterior salivary glands of the blue-ringed octopus. Hapalochlaena maculosa, has now been identified as tetrodotoxin. This is the first reported case in which tetrodotoxin has been found to occur in a venom. PMID:619451

  15. Use of monoclonal antibodies in the sensitive detection and neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of nature’s most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) i...

  16. Effects of purification on the bioavailability of botulinum neurotoxin type A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent biological toxins for humans. They are primarily produced by the gram-positive, anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. In bacterial cultures, secreted BoNTs are associated with non-toxic accessory proteins such as hemagglut...

  17. DOMOIC ACID AS A DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXIN

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; Giordano, Gennaro; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2010-01-01

    Domoic acid (DomA) is an excitatory aminoacid which can accumulate in shellfish and finfish under certain environmental conditions. DomA is a potent neurotoxin. In humans and in non-human primates, oral exposure to a few mg/kg DomA elicits gastrointestinal effects, while slightly higher doses cause neurological symptoms, seizures, memory impairment, and limbic system degeneration. In rodents, which appear to be less sensitive than humans or non-human primates, oral doses cause behavioral abnormalities (e.g. hindlimb scratching), followed by seizures and hippocampal degeneration. Similar effects are also seen in other species (from sea-lions to zebrafish), indicating that DomA exerts similar neurotoxic effects across species. The neurotoxicity of DomA is ascribed to its ability to interact and activate the AMPA/KA receptors, a subfamily of receptors for the neuroexcitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. Studies exploring the neurotoxic effects of DomA on the developing nervous system indicate that DomA elicits similar behavioral, biochemical and morphological effects as in adult animals. However, most importantly, developmental neurotoxicity is seen at doses of DomA that are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those exerting neurotoxicity in adults. This difference may be due to toxicokinetic and/or toxicodynamic differences. Estimated safe doses may be exceeded in adults by high consumption of shellfish contaminated with DomA at the current limit of 20 ug/g. Given the potential higher susceptibility of the young to DomA neurotoxicity, additional studies investigating exposure to, and effects of this neurotoxin during brain development are warranted. PMID:20471419

  18. Botulinum neurotoxin: the ugly duckling.

    PubMed

    Koussoulakos, Stauros

    2009-01-01

    This review presents a brief account of the most significant biological effects and clinical applications of botulinum neurotoxins, in a way comprehensive even for casual readers who are not familiar with the subject. The most toxic known substances in botulinum neurotoxins are polypeptides naturally synthesized by bacteria of the genus Clostridium. These polypeptides inhibit acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions, thus causing muscle paralysis involving both somatic and autonomic innervation. There is substantial evidence that this muscle-paralyzing feature of botulinum neurotoxins is useful for their beneficial influence on more than 50 pathological conditions such as spastic paralysis, cerebral palsy, focal dystonia, essential tremor, headache, incontinence and a variety of cosmetic interventions. Injection of adequate quantities of botulinum toxins in spastic muscles is considered as a highly hopeful procedure for the treatment of people who suffer from dystonia, cerebral palsy or have experienced a stroke. So far, numerous and reliable studies have established the safety and efficacy of botulinum neurotoxins and advocate wider clinical therapeutic and cosmetic applications. PMID:19365125

  19. A Novel Inhibitor Prevents the Peripheral Neuroparalysis of Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Zanetti, Giulia; Leka, Oneda; Lista, Florigio; Fillo, Silvia; Binz, Thomas; Shone, Clifford C; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare; Paradisi, Cristina; Mattarei, Andrea; Pirazzini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) form a large class of potent and deadly neurotoxins. Given their growing number, it is of paramount importance to discover novel inhibitors targeting common steps of their intoxication process. Recently, EGA was shown to inhibit the action of bacterial toxins and viruses exhibiting a pH-dependent translocation step in mammalian cells, by interfering with their entry route. As BoNTs act in the cytosol of nerve terminals, the entry into an appropriate compartment wherefrom they translocate the catalytic moiety is essential for toxicity. Herein we propose an optimized procedure to synthesize EGA and we show that, in vitro, it prevents the neurotoxicity of different BoNT serotypes by interfering with their trafficking. Furthermore, in mice, EGA mitigates botulism symptoms induced by BoNT/A and significantly decreases the lethality of BoNT/B and BoNT/D. This opens the possibility of using EGA as a lead compound to develop novel inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxins. PMID:26670952

  20. A Novel Inhibitor Prevents the Peripheral Neuroparalysis of Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Zanetti, Giulia; Leka, Oneda; Lista, Florigio; Fillo, Silvia; Binz, Thomas; Shone, Clifford C.; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare; Paradisi, Cristina; Mattarei, Andrea; Pirazzini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) form a large class of potent and deadly neurotoxins. Given their growing number, it is of paramount importance to discover novel inhibitors targeting common steps of their intoxication process. Recently, EGA was shown to inhibit the action of bacterial toxins and viruses exhibiting a pH-dependent translocation step in mammalian cells, by interfering with their entry route. As BoNTs act in the cytosol of nerve terminals, the entry into an appropriate compartment wherefrom they translocate the catalytic moiety is essential for toxicity. Herein we propose an optimized procedure to synthesize EGA and we show that, in vitro, it prevents the neurotoxicity of different BoNT serotypes by interfering with their trafficking. Furthermore, in mice, EGA mitigates botulism symptoms induced by BoNT/A and significantly decreases the lethality of BoNT/B and BoNT/D. This opens the possibility of using EGA as a lead compound to develop novel inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxins. PMID:26670952

  1. Neurotoxins: Free Radical Mechanisms and Melatonin Protection

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Russel J.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2010-01-01

    Toxins that pass through the blood-brain barrier put neurons and glia in peril. The damage inflicted is usually a consequence of the ability of these toxic agents to induce free radical generation within cells but especially at the level of the mitochondria. The elevated production of oxygen and nitrogen-based radicals and related non-radical products leads to the oxidation of essential macromolecules including lipids, proteins and DNA. The resultant damage is referred to as oxidative and nitrosative stress and, when the molecular destruction is sufficiently severe, it causes apoptosis or necrosis of neurons and glia. Loss of brain cells compromises the functions of the central nervous system expressed as motor, sensory and cognitive deficits and psychological alterations. In this survey we summarize the publications related to the following neurotoxins and the protective actions of melatonin: aminolevulinic acid, cyanide, domoic acid, kainic acid, metals, methamphetamine, polychlorinated biphenyls, rotenone, toluene and 6-hydroxydopamine. Given the potent direct free radical scavenging activities of melatonin and its metabolites, their ability to indirectly stimulate antioxidative enzymes and their efficacy in reducing electron leakage from mitochondria, it would be expected that these molecules would protect the brain from oxidative and nitrosative molecular mutilation. The studies summarized in this review indicate that this is indeed the case, an action that is obviously assisted by the fact that melatonin readily crosses the blood brain barrier. PMID:21358970

  2. High-Throughput Screening Uncovers Novel Botulinum Neurotoxin Inhibitor Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Bompiani, Kristin M; Caglič, Dejan; Krutein, Michelle C; Benoni, Galit; Hrones, Morgan; Lairson, Luke L; Bian, Haiyan; Smith, Garry R; Dickerson, Tobin J

    2016-08-01

    Botulism is caused by potent and specific bacterial neurotoxins that infect host neurons and block neurotransmitter release. Treatment for botulism is limited to administration of an antitoxin within a short time window, before the toxin enters neurons. Alternatively, current botulism drug development targets the toxin light chain, which is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that is delivered into neurons and mediates long-term pathology. Several groups have identified inhibitory small molecules, peptides, or aptamers, although no molecule has advanced to the clinic due to a lack of efficacy in advanced models. Here we used a homogeneous high-throughput enzyme assay to screen three libraries of drug-like small molecules for new chemotypes that modulate recombinant botulinum neurotoxin light chain activity. High-throughput screening of 97088 compounds identified numerous small molecules that activate or inhibit metalloprotease activity. We describe four major classes of inhibitory compounds identified, detail their structure-activity relationships, and assess their relative inhibitory potency. A previously unreported chemotype in any context of enzyme inhibition is described with potent submicromolar inhibition (Ki = 200-300 nM). Additional detailed kinetic analyses and cellular cytotoxicity assays indicate the best compound from this series is a competitive inhibitor with cytotoxicity values around 4-5 μM. Given the potency and drug-like character of these lead compounds, further studies, including cellular activity assays and DMPK analysis, are justified. PMID:27314875

  3. Three enzymatically active neurotoxins of Clostridium botulinum strain Af84: BoNT/A2, /F4, and /F5.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Baudys, Jakub; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Barr, John R

    2014-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by various species of clostridia and are potent neurotoxins which cause the disease botulism, by cleaving proteins needed for successful nerve transmission. There are currently seven confirmed serotypes of BoNTs, labeled A-G, and toxin-producing clostridia typically only produce one serotype of BoNT. There are a few strains (bivalent strains) which are known to produce more than one serotype of BoNT, producing either both BoNT/A and /B, BoNT/A and /F, or BoNT/B and /F, designated as Ab, Ba, Af, or Bf. Recently, it was reported that Clostridium botulinum strain Af84 has three neurotoxin gene clusters: bont/A2, bont/F4, and bont/F5. This was the first report of a clostridial organism containing more than two neurotoxin gene clusters. Using a mass spectrometry based proteomics approach, we report here that all three neurotoxins, BoNT/A2, /F4, and /F5, are produced by C. botulinum Af84. Label free MS(E) quantification of the three toxins indicated that toxin composition is 88% BoNT/A2, 1% BoNT/F4, and 11% BoNT/F5. The enzymatic activity of all three neurotoxins was assessed by examining the enzymatic activity of the neurotoxins upon peptide substrates, which mimic the toxins' natural targets, and monitoring cleavage of the substrates by mass spectrometry. We determined that all three neurotoxins are enzymatically active. This is the first report of three enzymatically active neurotoxins produced in a single strain of Clostridium botulinum. PMID:24605815

  4. Detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B using a chemiluminescent versus electrochemiluminescent immunoassay in food and serum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent biological toxins. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been developed for the detection of BoNT serotypes A and B using a chemiluminescent capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In an effort to improve toxin detection ...

  5. Detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B using chemiluminescence and electrochemiluninescene immunoassays in food and serum matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of the most potent biological toxins with serotypes A and B being most prevalent in foodborne contaminations. BoNTs are also likely targets for use in intentional adulteration of food or animal feeds and are thus classified as Select Agents. In our laboratories,...

  6. Rapid and selective detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes-A and –B with a single immunochromatographic test strip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven, antigenically distinct botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and classified into serotypes designated A-G. In animals these potent toxin acts to inhibit acetylcholine release, resulting in paralysis and death. BoNT/A and /B, together represent >80% o...

  7. Synthesis/biological evaluation of hydroxamic acids and their prodrugs as inhibitors for Botulinum neurotoxin A light chain

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Hajime; Pellett, Sabine; Šilhár, Peter; Stowe, G. Neil; Blanco, Beatriz; Lardy, Matthew; Johnson, Eric A.; Janda, Kim D.

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is the most potent toxin known. Unfortunately, it is also a potential bioweapon in terrorism, which is without an approved therapeutic treatment once cellular intoxication takes place. Previously, we reported how hydroxamic acid prodrug carbamates increased cellular uptake, which translated to successful inhibition of this neurotoxin. Building upon this research, we detail BoNT/A protease molecular modeling studies accompanied by the construction of small library of hydroxamic acids based on 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamic acid scaffold and their carbamate prodrug derivatization along with the evaluation of these molecules in both enzymatic and cellular models. PMID:24360826

  8. Neurotoxin localization to ectodermal gland cells uncovers an alternative mechanism of venom delivery in sea anemones.

    PubMed

    Moran, Yehu; Genikhovich, Grigory; Gordon, Dalia; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Zenkert, Claudia; Ozbek, Suat; Technau, Ulrich; Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Jellyfish, hydras, corals and sea anemones (phylum Cnidaria) are known for their venomous stinging cells, nematocytes, used for prey and defence. Here we show, however, that the potent Type I neurotoxin of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, Nv1, is confined to ectodermal gland cells rather than nematocytes. We demonstrate massive Nv1 secretion upon encounter with a crustacean prey. Concomitant discharge of nematocysts probably pierces the prey, expediting toxin penetration. Toxin efficiency in sea water is further demonstrated by the rapid paralysis of fish or crustacean larvae upon application of recombinant Nv1 into their medium. Analysis of other anemone species reveals that in Anthopleura elegantissima, Type I neurotoxins also appear in gland cells, whereas in the common species Anemonia viridis, Type I toxins are localized to both nematocytes and ectodermal gland cells. The nematocyte-based and gland cell-based envenomation mechanisms may reflect substantial differences in the ecology and feeding habits of sea anemone species. Overall, the immunolocalization of neurotoxins to gland cells changes the common view in the literature that sea anemone neurotoxins are produced and delivered only by stinging nematocytes, and raises the possibility that this toxin-secretion mechanism is an ancestral evolutionary state of the venom delivery machinery in sea anemones. PMID:22048953

  9. Structure- and Substrate- Based Inhibitor Design for Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A*

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran,D.; Rawat, R.; Ludivico, M.; Ahmed, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins cleave specific soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex proteins and block the release of neurotransmitters that cause flaccid paralysis and are considered potential bioweapons. Botulinum neurotoxin type A is the most potent among the clostridial neurotoxins, and to date there is no post-exposure therapeutic intervention available. To develop inhibitors leading to drug design, it is imperative that critical interactions between the enzyme and the substrate near the active site are known. Although enzyme-substrate interactions at exosites away from the active site are mapped in detail for botulinum neurotoxin type A, information about the active site interactions is lacking. Here, we present the crystal structures of botulinum neurotoxin type A catalytic domain in complex with four inhibitory substrate analog tetrapeptides, viz. RRGC, RRGL, RRGI, and RRGM at resolutions of 1.6-1.8 Angstroms . These structures show for the first time the interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site and delineate residues important for substrate stabilization and catalytic activity. We show that OH of Tyr366 and NH2 of Arg363 are hydrogen-bonded to carbonyl oxygens of P1 and P1' of the substrate analog and position it for catalytic activity. Most importantly, the nucleophilic water is replaced by the amino group of the N-terminal residue of the tetrapeptide. Furthermore, the S1' site is formed by Phe194, Thr215, Thr220, Asp370, and Arg363. The Ki of the best inhibitory tetrapeptide is 157 nm.

  10. Current gaps in basic science knowledge of botulinum neurotoxin biological actions.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Ornella; Pirazzini, Marco; Montecucco, Cesare

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria of the genus Clostridium in several dozens of variants that inactivate neurotransmitter release owing to their metalloprotease activity. This results in a persistent paralysis of peripheral nerve terminals known as botulism. They are the most potent toxins known and are classified as one of the six highest-risk threat agents of bioterrorism. Despite their high toxicity, two of them are used as valuable pharmaceutical for the therapy of many neurological and non-neurological disorders. Notwithstanding the many advances in our understanding of the genetics and structure of botulinum neurotoxins, there are still many gaps in knowledge of toxin mechanism of action that will be discussed here. PMID:26163315

  11. Substrate Binding Mode and its Implication on Drug Design for Botulinum Neurotoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, D.; Rawat, R; Ahmed, A; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, the causative agents of botulism, block the neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declared them as Category A biowarfare agents. The most potent among them, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), cleaves its substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). An efficient drug for botulism can be developed only with the knowledge of interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site. Here, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A with its uncleavable SNAP-25 peptide 197QRATKM202 and its variant 197RRATKM202 to 1.5 A and 1.6 A, respectively. This is the first time the structure of an uncleavable substrate bound to an active botulinum neurotoxin is reported and it has helped in unequivocally defining S1 to S5? sites. These substrate peptides make interactions with the enzyme predominantly by the residues from 160, 200, 250 and 370 loops. Most notably, the amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of P1 residue (Gln197) chelate the zinc ion and replace the nucleophilic water. The P1?-Arg198, occupies the S1? site formed by Arg363, Thr220, Asp370, Thr215, Ile161, Phe163 and Phe194. The S2? subsite is formed by Arg363, Asn368 and Asp370, while S3? subsite is formed by Tyr251, Leu256, Val258, Tyr366, Phe369 and Asn388. P4?-Lys201 makes hydrogen bond with Gln162. P5?-Met202 binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the residues from the 250 and 200 loop. Knowledge of interactions between the enzyme and substrate peptide from these complex structures should form the basis for design of potent inhibitors for this neurotoxin.

  12. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Pai, Ramdas; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    NSC 240898 was previously identified as a botulinum neurotoxin A light chain (BoNT/A LC) endopeptidase inhibitor by screening the National Cancer Institute Open Repository diversity set. Two types of analogs have been synthesized and shown to inhibit BoNT/A LC in a FRET-based enzyme assay, with confirmation in an HPLC-based assay. These two series of compounds have also been evaluated for inhibition of anthrax lethal factor (LF), an unrelated metalloprotease, to examine enzyme specificity of the BoNT/A LC inhibition. The most potent inhibitor against BoNT/A LC in these two series is compound 12 (IC50 = 2.5 µM, FRET assay), which is 4.4-fold more potent than the lead structure, and 11.2-fold more selective for BoNT/A LC versus the anthrax LF metalloproteinase. Structure-activity relationship studies have revealed structural features important to potency and enzyme specificity. PMID:20155918

  13. The long journey of botulinum neurotoxins into the synapse.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) cause the disease botulism, a flaccid paralysis of the muscle. They are also very effective, widely used medicines applied locally in sub-nanogram quantities. BoNTs are released together with several non-toxic, associated proteins as progenitor toxin complexes (PCT) by Clostridium botulinum to become highly potent oral poisons ingested via contaminated food. They block the neurotransmission in susceptible animals and humans already in nanogram quantities due to their specific ability to enter motoneurons and to cleave only selected neuronal proteins involved in neuroexocytosis. BoNTs have developed a sophisticated strategy to passage the gastrointestinal tract and to be absorbed in the intestine of the host to finally attack neurons. A non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNHA) forms a binary complex with BoNT to protect it from gastrointestinal degradation. This binary M-PTC is one component of the bi-modular 14-subunit ∼760 kDa large progenitor toxin complex. The other component is the structurally and functionally independent dodecameric hemagglutinin (HA) complex which facilitates the absorption on the intestinal epithelium by glycan binding. Subsequent to its transcytosis the HA complex disrupts the tight junction of the intestinal barrier from the basolateral side by binding to E-cadherin. Now, the L-PTC can also enter the circulation by paracellular routes in much larger quantities. From here, the dissociated BoNTs reach the neuromuscular junction and accumulate via interaction with polysialo gangliosides, complex glycolipids, on motoneurons at the neuromuscular junction. Subsequently, additional specific binding to luminal segments of synaptic vesicles proteins like SV2 and synaptotagmin leads to their uptake. Finally, the neurotoxins shut down the synaptic vesicle cycle, which they had exploited before to enter their target cells, via specific cleavage of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE

  14. Substrate-based inhibitors exhibiting excellent protective and therapeutic effects against Botulinum Neurotoxin A intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiubiao; Wang, Jinglin; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Waichi Chan, Edward; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Potent inhibitors to reverse Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) activity in neuronal cells are currently not available. A better understanding of the substrate recognition mechanism of BoNTs enabled us to design a novel class of peptide inhibitors which were derivatives of the BoNT/A substrate, SNAP25. Through a combination of in vitro, cellular based, and in vivo mouse assays, several potent inhibitors of approximately one nanomolar inhibitory strength both in vitro and in vivo have been identified. These compounds represent the first set of inhibitors that exhibited full protection against BoNT/A intoxication in mice model with undetectable toxicity. Our findings validated the hypothesis that a peptide inhibitor targeting the two BoNT structural regions which were responsible for substrate recognition and cleavage respectively could exhibit excellent inhibitory effect, thereby providing insight on future development of more potent inhibitors against BoNTs. PMID:26584873

  15. Bacterial Toxins and the Nervous System: Neurotoxins and Multipotential Toxins Interacting with Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R.; Poulain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Toxins are potent molecules used by various bacteria to interact with a host organism. Some of them specifically act on neuronal cells (clostridial neurotoxins) leading to characteristics neurological affections. But many other toxins are multifunctional and recognize a wider range of cell types including neuronal cells. Various enterotoxins interact with the enteric nervous system, for example by stimulating afferent neurons or inducing neurotransmitter release from enterochromaffin cells which result either in vomiting, in amplification of the diarrhea, or in intestinal inflammation process. Other toxins can pass the blood brain barrier and directly act on specific neurons. PMID:22069606

  16. Identification of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 receptor binding site in botulinum neurotoxin A.

    PubMed

    Strotmeier, Jasmin; Mahrhold, Stefan; Krez, Nadja; Janzen, Constantin; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Binz, Thomas; Rummel, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) inhibit neurotransmitter release by hydrolysing SNARE proteins. The most important serotype BoNT/A employs the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) isoforms A-C as neuronal receptors. Here, we identified their binding site by blocking SV2 interaction using monoclonal antibodies with characterised epitopes within the cell binding domain (HC). The site is located on the backside of the conserved ganglioside binding pocket at the interface of the HCC and HCN subdomains. The dimension of the binding pocket was characterised in detail by site directed mutagenesis allowing the development of potent inhibitors as well as modifying receptor binding properties. PMID:24583011

  17. Exchanging the minimal cell binding fragments of tetanus neurotoxin in botulinum neurotoxin A and B impacts their toxicity at the neuromuscular junction and central neurons.

    PubMed

    Höltje, Markus; Schulze, Sebastian; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Mahrhold, Stefan; Richter, Karin; Binz, Thomas; Bigalke, Hans; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Rummel, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The modular four domain structure of clostridial neurotoxins supports the idea to reassemble individual domains from tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins to generate novel molecules with altered pharmacological properties. To treat disorders of the central nervous system drug transporter molecules based on catalytically inactive clostridial neurotoxins circumventing the passage of the blood-brain-barrier are desired. Such molecules can be produced based on the highly effective botulinum neurotoxin serotype A incorporating the retrograde axonal sorting property of tetanus neurotoxin which is supposed to be encoded within its C-terminal cell binding domain HC. The corresponding exchange of the tetanus neurotoxin HC-fragment in botulinum neurotoxin A yielded the novel hybrid molecule AATT which displayed decreased potency at the neuromuscular junction like tetanus neurotoxin but exerted equal activity in cortical neurons compared to botulinum neurotoxin A wild-type. Minimizing the tetanus neurotoxin cell binding domain to its N- or C-terminal half drastically reduced the potencies of AATA and AAAT in cortical neurons indicating that the structural motif mediating sorting of tetanus neurotoxin is predominantly encoded within the entire HC-fragment. However, the reciprocal exchange resulted in TTAA which showed a similar potency as tetanus neurotoxin at the neuromuscular junction indicating that the tetanus neurotoxin portion prevents a high potency as observed for botulinum neurotoxins. In conclusion, clostridial neurotoxin based inactivated drug transporter for targeting central neurons should contain the cell binding domain of tetanus neurotoxin to exert its tropism for the central nervous system. PMID:23817019

  18. Unique Ganglioside Recognition Strategies for Clostridial Neurotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Marc A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R.

    2012-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin are the causative agents of the paralytic diseases botulism and tetanus, respectively. The potency of the clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) relies primarily on their highly specific binding to nerve terminals and cleavage of SNARE proteins. Although individual CNTs utilize distinct proteins for entry, they share common ganglioside co-receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of the BoNT/F receptor-binding domain in complex with the sugar moiety of ganglioside GD1a. GD1a binds in a shallow groove formed by the conserved peptide motif E ... H ... SXWY ... G, with additional stabilizing interactions provided by two arginine residues. Comparative analysis of BoNT/F with other CNTs revealed several differences in the interactions of each toxin with ganglioside. Notably, exchange of BoNT/F His-1241 with the corresponding lysine residue of BoNT/E resulted in increased affinity for GD1a and conferred the ability to bind ganglioside GM1a. Conversely, BoNT/E was not able to bind GM1a, demonstrating a discrete mechanism of ganglioside recognition. These findings provide a structural basis for ganglioside binding among the CNTs and show that individual toxins utilize unique ganglioside recognition strategies.

  19. The Zinc-Dependent Protease Activity of the Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J.; Cer, Regina Z.; Mudunuri, Uma; Stephens, Robert; Singh, Bal Ram; Adler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, serotypes A-G) are some of the most toxic proteins known and are the causative agents of botulism. Following exposure, the neurotoxin binds and enters peripheral cholinergic nerve endings and specifically and selectively cleaves one or more SNARE proteins to produce flaccid paralysis. This review centers on the kinetics of the Zn-dependent proteolytic activities of these neurotoxins, and briefly describes inhibitors, activators and factors underlying persistence of toxin action. Some of the structural, enzymatic and inhibitor data that are discussed here are available at the botulinum neurotoxin resource, BotDB (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov). PMID:22069621

  20. A conjugate composed of nerve growth factor coupled to a non-toxic derivative of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A can inhibit neurotransmitter release in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chaddock, J A; Purkiss, J R; Duggan, M J; Quinn, C P; Shone, C C; Foster, K A

    2000-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor binding, internalisation and transportation of NGF has been identified as a potential route of delivery for other molecules. A derivative of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (LHN) that retains catalytic activity but has significantly reduced cell-binding capability has been prepared and chemically coupled to NGF. Intact clostridial neurotoxins potently inhibit neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction by proteolysis of specific components of the vesicle docking/fusion complex. Here we report that the NGF-LHN/A conjugate, when applied to PC12 cells, significantly inhibited neurotransmitter release and cleaved the type A toxin substrate. This work represents the successful use of NGF as a targeting moiety for the delivery of a neurotoxin fragment. PMID:11019785

  1. Botulinum neurotoxin type A: Actions beyond SNAP-25?

    PubMed

    Matak, Ivica; Lacković, Zdravko

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), the most potent toxin known in nature which causes botulism, is a commonly used therapeutic protein. It prevents synaptic vesicle neuroexocytosis by proteolytic cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). It is widely believed that BoNT/A therapeutic or toxic actions are exclusively mediated by SNAP-25 cleavage. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that several BoNT/A actions related to neuroexocytosis, cell cycle and apoptosis, neuritogenesis and gene expression are not necessarily mediated by this widely accepted mechanism of action. In present review we summarize the literature evidence which point to the existence of unknown BoNT/A molecular target(s) and modulation of unknown signaling pathways. The effects of BoNT/A apparently independent of SNAP-25 occur at similar doses/concentrations known to induce SNAP-25 cleavage and prevention of neurotransmitter release. Accordingly, these effects might be pharmacologically significant. Potentially the most interesting are observations of antimitotic and antitumor activity of BoNT/A. However, the exact mechanisms require further studies. PMID:26169827

  2. Clostridial neurotoxins: mode of substrate recognition and novel therapy development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are among the most potent protein toxins known to humans. CNTs include seven serotypes (A~G) of botulinum toxins (BoNTs), which cause botulism, a flaccid paralysis, and tetanus toxin (TeNT), which causes spastic paralysis. BoNTs are classified as category A agent and may be used as potential bioterrorism weapons. On the other hand, the ability of an extremely low dosage of BoNTs (less than 1 ng) to cause reversible partial paralysis upon injection into muscle has turned BoNTs, in particular serotypes A and B, from deadly agents to novel therapeutic agents for treatment of a wide range of clinical conditions associated with involuntary muscle spasm and contractions. In addition to clinical use, they may also be used in cosmetics. Further indications for BoNTs will continue to be developed, although current BoNT therapies have encountered some limitations due to the pharmacological properties of BoNTs, such as their ability to elicit immunoresistance in patients upon periodical injections. This review summarizes the present knowledge of the mechanisms of action of CNTs, with particular focus on the mode of substrate recognition by CNT catalytic domains and knowledge regarding substrate recognition can be utilized to develop novel BoNT products to extend its usefulness in therapeutic interventions and overcome the immunoresistance problems. PMID:24106961

  3. Computer-aided identification, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel inhibitors for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Y. G.; Berger, W. T.; Nesbitt, N. M.; Kumar, K.; Balius, T. E.; Rizzo, R. C.; Tonge, P. J.; Ojima, I.; Swaminathan, S.

    2015-07-27

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent biological toxin known to humans, and are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and prevention (CDC). There are seven known BoNT serotypes (A-G) which have been thus far identified in literature. BoNTs have been shown to block neurotransmitter release by cleaving proteins of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. Disruption of the SNARE complex precludes motor neuron failure which ultimately results in flaccid paralysis in humans and animals. Currently, there are no effective therapeutic treatments against the neurotoxin light chain (LC) after translocation into the cytosols of motor neurons. In this work, high-throughput virtual screening was employed to screen a library of commercially available compounds from ZINC database against BoNT/A-LC. Among the hit compounds from the in-silico screening, two lead compounds were identified and found to have potent inhibitory activity against BoNT/A-LC in vitro, as well as in Neuro-2a cells. A few analogues of the lead compounds were synthesized and their potency examined. One of these analogues showed an enhanced activity than the lead compounds

  4. Computer-aided identification, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel inhibitors for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Teng, Y. G.; Berger, W. T.; Nesbitt, N. M.; Kumar, K.; Balius, T. E.; Rizzo, R. C.; Tonge, P. J.; Ojima, I.; Swaminathan, S.

    2015-07-27

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent biological toxin known to humans, and are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and prevention (CDC). There are seven known BoNT serotypes (A-G) which have been thus far identified in literature. BoNTs have been shown to block neurotransmitter release by cleaving proteins of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. Disruption of the SNARE complex precludes motor neuron failure which ultimately results in flaccid paralysis in humans and animals. Currently, there are no effective therapeutic treatments against the neurotoxin light chain (LC) after translocation intomore » the cytosols of motor neurons. In this work, high-throughput virtual screening was employed to screen a library of commercially available compounds from ZINC database against BoNT/A-LC. Among the hit compounds from the in-silico screening, two lead compounds were identified and found to have potent inhibitory activity against BoNT/A-LC in vitro, as well as in Neuro-2a cells. A few analogues of the lead compounds were synthesized and their potency examined. One of these analogues showed an enhanced activity than the lead compounds« less

  5. Computer-aided identification, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel inhibitors for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yu-Han Gary; Berger, William T; Nesbitt, Natasha M; Kumar, Kunal; Balius, Trent E; Rizzo, Robert C; Tonge, Peter J; Ojima, Iwao; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent biological toxin known to humans, and are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and prevention (CDC). There are seven known BoNT serotypes (A-G) which have been thus far identified in literature. BoNTs have been shown to block neurotransmitter release by cleaving proteins of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. Disruption of the SNARE complex precludes motor neuron failure which ultimately results in flaccid paralysis in humans and animals. Currently, there are no effective therapeutic treatments against the neurotoxin light chain (LC) after translocation into the cytosols of motor neurons. In this work, high-throughput in silico screening was employed to screen a library of commercially available compounds from ZINC database against BoNT/A-LC. Among the hit compounds from the in silico screening, two lead compounds were identified and found to have potent inhibitory activity against BoNT/A-LC in vitro, as well as in Neuro-2a cells. A few analogs of the lead compounds were synthesized and their potency examined. One of these analogs showed an enhanced activity than the lead compounds. PMID:26275678

  6. The ichthyotoxic alga Chattonella marina induces Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase, and CFTR proteins expression in fish gill chloride cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Janet Y.M.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Au, Doris W.T. . E-mail: bhdwtau@cityu.edu.hk

    2007-02-02

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the ichthyotoxic Chattonella marina stimulated proliferation of branchial chloride cell (CC) and induced osmotic distress akin to hyperactive elimination of ions in fish (Rhabdosargus sarba). To ascertain the in vivo effects of C. marina on key CC ion transporters, the localization and expression of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase (NKA) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) proteins in response to C. marina exposure were investigated, using a quantitative immunocytochemical approach. The polarized distributions of NKA ({alpha} subunit) and CFTR proteins in branchial CCs of R. sarba remained unchanged under C. marina exposure. However, significant inductions of these two ion-transporters were detected in CCs of fish after 6 h exposure. By real-time PCR, no significant changes in gill NKA and CFTR mRNA expressions were detected, suggesting a post-transcriptional pathway is likely involved in regulating the ion transporters abundance. This study is the first to demonstrate the in vivo effects of harmful algal toxin on NKA and CFTR protein expressions in gill transepithelial cells. Taken together, an augmentation of branchial CCs together with hyper-stimulation of NKA and CFTR in CCs attribute to the rapid development of osmotic distress in C. marina susceptible fish.

  7. Therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck disorders

    PubMed Central

    Alshadwi, Ahmad; Nadershah, Mohammed; Osborn, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to review the mechanism of action, physiological effects, and therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in the head and neck area. Study design An extensive literature search was performed using keywords. The resulting articles were analyzed for relevance in four areas: overview on botulinum neurotoxins, the role of botulinum neurotoxins in the management of salivary secretory disorders, the role of botulinum neurotoxins in the management of facial pain, and the role of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck movement disorders. Institutional review board approval was not needed due the nature of the study. Results Botulinum neurotoxin therapy was demonstrated to be a valuable alternative to conventional medical therapy for many conditions affecting the head and neck area in terms of morbidly, mortality, and patient satisfaction with treatment outcomes. Conclusion Botulinum neurotoxin therapy provides viable alternatives to traditional treatment modalities for some conditions affecting the head and neck region that have neurological components. This therapy can overcome some of the morbidities associated with conventional therapy. More research is needed to determine the ideal doses of botulinum neurotoxin to treat different diseases affecting the head and neck regions. PMID:25544809

  8. Substrate recognition of VAMP-2 by botulinum neurotoxin B and tetanus neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Hall, Cherisse; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT; serotypes A-G) and tetanus neurotoxin elicit flaccid and spastic paralysis, respectively. These neurotoxins are zinc proteases that cleave SNARE proteins to inhibit synaptic vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane. Although BoNT/B and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) cleave VAMP-2 at the same scissile bond, their mechanism(s) of VAMP-2 recognition is not clear. Mapping experiments showed that residues 60-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient cleavage by BoNT/B and that residues 40-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient TeNT cleavage. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis and kinetic analysis identified three regions within VAMP-2 that were recognized by BoNT/B and TeNT: residues adjacent to the site of scissile bond cleavage (cleavage region) and residues located within N-terminal and C-terminal regions relative to the cleavage region. Analysis of residues within the cleavage region showed that mutations at the P7, P4, P2, and P1' residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/B cleavage (> or =32-fold), whereas mutations at P7, P4, P1', and P2' residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/TeNT cleavage (> or =64-fold). Residues within the cleavage region influenced catalysis, whereas residues N-terminal and C-terminal to the cleavage region influenced binding affinity. Thus, BoNT/B and TeNT possess similar organization but have unique residues to recognize and cleave VAMP-2. These studies provide new insights into how the clostridial neurotoxins recognize their substrates. PMID:18511417

  9. Neurotoxins from Marine Dinoflagellates: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are not only important marine primary producers and grazers, but also the major causative agents of harmful algal blooms. It has been reported that many dinoflagellate species can produce various natural toxins. These toxins can be extremely toxic and many of them are effective at far lower dosages than conventional chemical agents. Consumption of seafood contaminated by algal toxins results in various seafood poisoning syndromes: paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP), amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP), ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and azaspiracid shellfish poisoning (ASP). Most of these poisonings are caused by neurotoxins which present themselves with highly specific effects on the nervous system of animals, including humans, by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Neurotoxins are a varied group of compounds, both chemically and pharmacologically. They vary in both chemical structure and mechanism of action, and produce very distinct biological effects, which provides a potential application of these toxins in pharmacology and toxicology. This review summarizes the origin, structure and clinical symptoms of PSP, NSP, CFP, AZP, yessotoxin and palytoxin produced by marine dinoflagellates, as well as their molecular mechanisms of action on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:18728731

  10. Development of recombinant vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A

    1998-11-01

    Synthetic genes encoding non-toxic, carboxyl-terminal regions (approximately 50 kDa) of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B (referred to as fragment C or HC) were constructed and cloned into the methylotropic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Genes specifying BoNTA(HC) and BoNTB(HC) were expressed as both intracellular and secreted products. Recombinants, expressed intracellularly, yielded products with the expected molecular weight as judged by SDS PAGE and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, while secreted products were larger due to glycosylation. Gene products were used to vaccinate mice and evaluated for their ability to elicit protective antibody titers in vivo. Mice given three intramuscular vaccinations with yeast supernatant containing glycosylated BoNTA(HC) were protected against an intraperitoneal challenge of 10(6) 50% mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of serotype A neurotoxin, a result not duplicated by its BoNTB(HC) counterpart. Vaccinating mice with cytoplasmically produced BoNTA(HC) and BoNTB(HC) protected animals from a challenge of 10(6) MLD50 of serotype A and B toxins, respectively. Because of the glycosylation encountered with secreted BoNT(HC), our efforts focused on the production and purification of products from intracellular expression. PMID:9792170

  11. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Neurotoxins as Sufficient Etiologic Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Christopher A.; Höglinger, Günter U.

    2008-01-01

    A dominant paradigm in neurological disease research is that the primary etiological factors for diseases such as Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are genetic. Opposed to this perspective are the clear observations from epidemiology that purely genetic casual factors account for a relatively small fraction of all cases. Many who support a genetic etiology for neurological disease take the view that while the percentages may be relatively small, these numbers will rise in the future with the inevitable discoveries of additional genetic mutations. The follow up argument is that even if the last is not true, the events triggered by the aberrant genes identified so far will be shown to impact the same neuronal cell death pathways as those activated by environmental factors that trigger most sporadic disease cases. In this article we present a countervailing view that environmental neurotoxins may be the sole sufficient factor in at least three neurological disease clusters. For each, neurotoxins have been isolated and characterized that, at least in animal models, faithfully reproduce each disorder without the need for genetic co-factors. Based on these data, we will propose a set of principles that would enable any potential toxin to be evaluated as an etiological factor in a given neurodegenerative disease. Finally, we will attempt to put environmental toxins into the context of possible genetically-determined susceptibility. PMID:17985252

  12. Temporal characteristics of botulinum neurotoxin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J; Cer, Regina Z; Stephens, Robert M; Mudunuri, Uma

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is a pharmaceutical treatment used for an increasing number of neurological and non-neurological indications, symptoms and diseases. Despite the wealth of clinical reports that involve the timing of the therapeutic effects of this toxin, few studies have attempted to integrate these data into unified models. Secondary reactions have also been examined including the development of adverse events, resistance to repeated applications, and nerve terminal sprouting. Our primary intent for conducting this review was to gather relevant pharmacodynamic data from suitable biomedical literature regarding botulinum neurotoxins via the use of automated data-mining techniques. We envision that mathematical models will ultimately be of value to those who are healthcare decision makers and providers, as well as clinical and basic researchers. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the combination of this computer-intensive approach with mathematical modeling will predict the percentage of patients who will favorably or adversely respond to this treatment and thus will eventually assist in developing the increasingly important area of personalized medicine. PMID:20021324

  13. A 1-D simulation analysis of the development and maintenance of the 2001 red tide of the ichthyotoxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis on the West Florida shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenes, J. M.; Darrow, B. P.; Walsh, J. J.; Jolliff, J. K.; Chen, F. R.; Weisberg, R. H.; Zheng, L.

    2012-06-01

    A one-dimensional (1-D) ecological model, HABSIM, examined the initiation and maintenance of the 2001 red tide on the West Florida shelf (WFS). Phytoplankton competition among toxic dinoflagellates (Karenia brevis), nitrogen fixing cyanophytes (Trichodesmium erythraeum), large siliceous phytoplankton (diatoms), and small non-siliceous phytoplankton (microflagellates) explored the sequence of events required to support the observed red tide from August to December 2001. The ecological model contained 24 state variables within five submodels: circulation, atmospheric (iron deposition), bio-optics, pelagic (phytoplankton, nutrients, bacteria, zooplankton, and fish), and benthic (nutrient regeneration). The 2001 model results reaffirmed that diazotrophs are the basis for initiation of red tides of K. brevis on the WFS. A combination of selective grazing pressure, iron fertilization, low molar nitrogen to phosphorus ratios, and eventual silica limitation of fast-growing diatoms set the stage for dominance of nitrogen fixers. "New" nitrogen was made available for subsequent blooms of K. brevis through the release of ammonium and urea during nitrogen fixation, as well as during cell lysis, by the Trichodesmium population. Once K. brevis biomass reached ichthyotoxic levels, rapid decay of subsequent fish kills supplied additional organic nutrients for utilization by these opportunistic toxic algae. Both nutrient vectors represented organic non-siliceous sources of nitrogen and phosphorus, further exacerbating silica limitation of the diatom population. The model reproduced this spring transition from a simple estuarine-driven, diatom-based food chain to a complex summer-fall system of Trichodesmium and toxic dinoflagellates. While the model was able to replicate the initiation and maintenance of the 2001 red tide, bloom termination was not captured by this 1-D form on the WFS. Here, horizontal advection and perhaps cell lysis loss terms might play a significant role, to be

  14. Genetic diversity within the botulinum neurotoxin-producing bacteria and their neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Hill, K K; Xie, G; Foley, B T; Smith, T J

    2015-12-01

    The recent availability of multiple Clostridium botulinum genomic sequences has initiated a new genomics era that strengthens our understanding of the bacterial species that produce botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). Analysis of the genomes has reinforced the historical Group I-VI designations and provided evidence that the bont genes can be located within the chromosome, phage or plasmids. The sequences provide the opportunity to examine closely the variation among the toxin genes, the composition and organization of the toxin complex, the regions flanking the toxin complex and the location of the toxin within different bacterial strains. These comparisons provide evidence of horizontal gene transfer and site-specific insertion and recombination events that have contributed to the variation observed among the neurotoxins. Here, examples that have contributed to the variation observed in serotypes A-H strains are presented to illustrate the mechanisms that have contributed to their variation. PMID:26368006

  15. Re-engineering clostridial neurotoxins for the treatment of chronic pain: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Andy

    2010-06-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins from the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) family are protein complexes, derived from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, which potently inhibit acetylcholine release and result in a reversible blockade of the neuromuscular junction. This feature led to the clinical development of BoNT-A for a number of neuromuscular disorders. BoNT-A toxins are commercially available as three different preparations: Dysport/Azzalure, Botox/Vistabel, and Xeomin/Bocouture. Although BoNT-A preparations have not yet been approved for the treatment of pain, a substantial body of preclinical and clinical evidence shows that BoNT-A is effective in treating a number of different types of pain. It is thought to exert an analgesic effect both via muscle-relaxant properties and also directly, via inhibition of nociceptive neuropeptides. This review explores the mechanistic basis of this analgesic effect, summarizing current knowledge of the structure-function relationship of BoNT and discussing effects on both motor and pain neurons. For a complete picture of the analgesic properties of BoNT-A, clinical evidence of efficacy in myofascial pain and neuropathic pain is considered in tandem with a mechanistic rationale for activity. Patients experiencing chronic pain are clear candidates for treatment with a modified clostridial endopeptidase that would provide enduring inhibition of neurotransmitter release. A strong preclinical evidence base underpins the concept that re-engineering of BoNT could be used to enhance the analgesic potential of this neurotoxin, and it is hoped that the first clinical studies examining re-engineered BoNT-A will confirm this potential. PMID:20462283

  16. Progress in Cell Based Assays for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent human toxins known and the causative agent of botulism, and are widely used as valuable pharmaceuticals. The BoNTs are modular proteins consisting of a heavy chain and a light chain linked by a disulfide bond. Intoxication of neuronal cells by BoNTs is a multi-step process including specific cell binding, endocytosis, conformational change in the endosome, translocation of the enzymatic light chain into the cells cytosol, and SNARE target cleavage. The quantitative and reliable potency determination of fully functional BoNTs produced as active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) requires an assay that considers all steps in the intoxication pathway. The in vivo mouse bioassay has for years been the ‘gold standard’ assay used for this purpose, but it requires the use of large numbers of mice and thus causes associated costs and ethical concerns. Cell-based assays are currently the only in vitro alternative that detect fully functional BoNTs in a single assay and have been utilized for years for research purposes. Within the last 5 years, several cell-based BoNT detection assays have been developed that are able to quantitatively determine BoNT potency with similar or greater sensitivity than the mouse bioassay. These assays now offer an alternative method for BoNT potency determination. Such quantitative and reliable BoNT potency determination is a crucial step in basic research, in the development of pharmaceutical BoNTs, and in the quantitative detection of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:23239357

  17. Benzoquinones as Inhibitors of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Paul T.; Hixon, Mark S.; Janda, Kim D.

    2014-01-01

    Although botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is known for its use in cosmetics, it causes a potentially fatal illness, botulism, and can be used as a bioterror weapon. Many compounds have been developed that inhibit the BoNTA zinc-metalloprotease light chain (LC), however, none of these inhibitors have advanced to clinical trials. In this study, a fragment-based approach was implemented to develop novel covalent inhibitors of BoNT/A LC. First, electrophilic fragments were screened against BoNT/A LC, and benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives were found to be active. In kinetic studies, BQ compounds acted as irreversible inhibitors that presumably covalently modify cysteine 165 of BoNT/A LC. Although most BQ derivatives were highly reactive toward glutathione in vitro, a few compounds such as natural product naphthazarin displayed low thiol reactivity and good BoNT/A inhibition. In order to increase the potency of the BQ fragment, computational docking studies were employed to elucidate a scaffold that could bind to sites adjacent to Cys165 while positioning a BQ fragment at Cys165 for covalent modification; 2-amino-N-arylacetamides met these criteria and when linked to BQ displayed at least a 20-fold increase in activity to low μM IC50 values. Unlike BQ alone, the linked-BQ compounds demonstrated only weak irreversible inhibition and therefore acted mainly as non-covalent inhibitors. Further kinetic studies revealed a mutual exclusivity of BQ covalent inactivation and competitive inhibitor binding to sites adjacent to Cys165, refuting the viability of the current strategy for developing more potent irreversible BoNT/A inhibitors. The highlights of this study include the discovery of BQ compounds as irreversible BoNT/A inhibitors and the rational design of low μM IC50 competitive inhibitors that depend on the BQ moiety for activity. PMID:24984937

  18. Benzoquinones as inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Paul T; Hixon, Mark S; Janda, Kim D

    2014-08-01

    Although botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is known for its use in cosmetics, it causes a potentially fatal illness, botulism, and can be used as a bioterror weapon. Many compounds have been developed that inhibit the BoNTA zinc-metalloprotease light chain (LC), however, none of these inhibitors have advanced to clinical trials. In this study, a fragment-based approach was implemented to develop novel covalent inhibitors of BoNT/A LC. First, electrophilic fragments were screened against BoNT/A LC, and benzoquinone (BQ) derivatives were found to be active. In kinetic studies, BQ compounds acted as irreversible inhibitors that presumably covalently modify cysteine 165 of BoNT/A LC. Although most BQ derivatives were highly reactive toward glutathione in vitro, a few compounds such as natural product naphthazarin displayed low thiol reactivity and good BoNT/A inhibition. In order to increase the potency of the BQ fragment, computational docking studies were employed to elucidate a scaffold that could bind to sites adjacent to Cys165 while positioning a BQ fragment at Cys165 for covalent modification; 2-amino-N-arylacetamides met these criteria and when linked to BQ displayed at least a 20-fold increase in activity to low μM IC₅₀ values. Unlike BQ alone, the linked-BQ compounds demonstrated only weak irreversible inhibition and therefore acted mainly as non-covalent inhibitors. Further kinetic studies revealed a mutual exclusivity of BQ covalent inactivation and competitive inhibitor binding to sites adjacent to Cys165, refuting the viability of the current strategy for developing more potent irreversible BoNT/A inhibitors. The highlights of this study include the discovery of BQ compounds as irreversible BoNT/A inhibitors and the rational design of low μM IC50 competitive inhibitors that depend on the BQ moiety for activity. PMID:24984937

  19. Molecular assembly of botulinum neurotoxin progenitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Benefield, Desirée A; Dessain, Scott K; Shine, Nancy; Ohi, Melanie D; Lacy, D Borden

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is produced by Clostridium botulinum and associates with nontoxic neurotoxin-associated proteins to form high-molecular weight progenitor complexes (PCs). The PCs are required for the oral toxicity of BoNT in the context of food-borne botulism and are thought to protect BoNT from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract and aid in absorption from the gut lumen. The PC can differ in size and protein content depending on the C. botulinum strain. The oral toxicity of the BoNT PC increases as the size of the PC increases, but the molecular architecture of these large complexes and how they contribute to BoNT toxicity have not been elucidated. We have generated 2D images of PCs from strains producing BoNT serotypes A1, B, and E using negative stain electron microscopy and single-particle averaging. The BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PCs were observed as ovoid-shaped bodies with three appendages, whereas the BoNT/E PC was observed as an ovoid body. Both the BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PCs showed significant flexibility, and the BoNT/B PC was documented as a heterogeneous population of assembly/disassembly intermediates. We have also determined 3D structures for each serotype using the random conical tilt approach. Crystal structures of the individual proteins were placed into the BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PC electron density maps to generate unique detailed models of the BoNT PCs. The structures highlight an effective platform that can be engineered for the development of mucosal vaccines and the intestinal absorption of oral biologics. PMID:23509303

  20. Algal chloroplast produced camelid VHH antitoxins are capable of neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Julian N.; Chiu, Joanna G.; Chang, Yung-Nien; Debatis, Michelle; Ngoi, Soo-Mun; Chang, John T.; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Oyler, George A.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    We have produced three antitoxins consisting of the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VHH) by expressing the genes in the chloroplast of green algae. These antitoxins accumulate as soluble proteins capable of binding and neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin. Furthermore, they accumulate at up to 5% total soluble protein, sufficient expression to easily produce these antitoxins at scale from algae. The genes for the three different antitoxins were transformed into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts and their products purified from algae lysates and assayed for in vitro biological activity using toxin protection assays. The produced antibody domains bind to botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) with similar affinities as camelid antibodies produced in Escherichia coli, and they are similarly able to protect primary rat neurons from intoxication by BoNT/A. Furthermore, the camelid antibodies were produced in algae without the use of solubilization tags commonly employed in E. coli. These camelid antibody domains are potent antigen binding proteins and the heterodimer fusion protein containing two VHH domains was capable of neutralizing BoNT/A at near equimolar concentrations with the toxin. Intact antibody domains were detected in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice treated orally with antitoxin producing microalgae. These findings support the use of orally delivered antitoxins produced in green algae as a novel treatment for botulism. PMID:25229405

  1. Exploration of endogenous substrate cleavage by various forms of botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiubiao; Wang, Jinglin; Chan, Edward Waichi; Chen, Sheng

    2015-06-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most potent protein neurotoxin known to human. The dual roles of BoNTs as both the causative agent of human botulism and a widely used protein-based therapeutic agent for treatment of numerous neuromuscular disorders/cosmetic uses make it an extremely hot topic of research. Biochemical characterization of these toxins was mainly confined to the recombinant light chains and substrate and little is known about their efficiency on the cleavage of endogenous substrates. In the present study, we showed that BoNTs exhibited variable activities on their endogenous substrates and that their efficiency to cleave recombinant and endogenous substrate was not consistent, presumably due to the differential recognition of their respective substrates in the natural SNARE complex format. Through testing the combinatorial effects of different BoNTs on cleavage of endogenous substrates, we showed that the combinations of LC/A and LC/B, as well as LC/A and LC/F, could enhance the activity of each individual BoNT. This finding may shed light on the future development of new BoNT serotypes for clinical application, and formulation of combinatorial uses of different BoNTs to minimize the development of immuno-resistance by using a lower amount of individual type. PMID:25912942

  2. New Elements To Consider When Modeling the Hazards Associated with Botulinum Neurotoxin in Food

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Ivan; Malakar, Pradeep K.; Walshaw, John; Peck, Michael W.; Barker, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the most potent biological substances known to mankind. BoNTs are the agents responsible for botulism, a rare condition affecting the neuromuscular junction and causing a spectrum of diseases ranging from mild cranial nerve palsies to acute respiratory failure and death. BoNTs are a potential biowarfare threat and a public health hazard, since outbreaks of foodborne botulism are caused by the ingestion of preformed BoNTs in food. Currently, mathematical models relating to the hazards associated with C. botulinum, which are largely empirical, make major contributions to botulinum risk assessment. Evaluated using statistical techniques, these models simulate the response of the bacterium to environmental conditions. Though empirical models have been successfully incorporated into risk assessments to support food safety decision making, this process includes significant uncertainties so that relevant decision making is frequently conservative and inflexible. Progression involves encoding into the models cellular processes at a molecular level, especially the details of the genetic and molecular machinery. This addition drives the connection between biological mechanisms and botulism risk assessment and hazard management strategies. This review brings together elements currently described in the literature that will be useful in building quantitative models of C. botulinum neurotoxin production. Subsequently, it outlines how the established form of modeling could be extended to include these new elements. Ultimately, this can offer further contributions to risk assessments to support food safety decision making. PMID:26350137

  3. New Elements To Consider When Modeling the Hazards Associated with Botulinum Neurotoxin in Food.

    PubMed

    Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Mura, Ivan; Malakar, Pradeep K; Walshaw, John; Peck, Michael W; Barker, G C

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the most potent biological substances known to mankind. BoNTs are the agents responsible for botulism, a rare condition affecting the neuromuscular junction and causing a spectrum of diseases ranging from mild cranial nerve palsies to acute respiratory failure and death. BoNTs are a potential biowarfare threat and a public health hazard, since outbreaks of foodborne botulism are caused by the ingestion of preformed BoNTs in food. Currently, mathematical models relating to the hazards associated with C. botulinum, which are largely empirical, make major contributions to botulinum risk assessment. Evaluated using statistical techniques, these models simulate the response of the bacterium to environmental conditions. Though empirical models have been successfully incorporated into risk assessments to support food safety decision making, this process includes significant uncertainties so that relevant decision making is frequently conservative and inflexible. Progression involves encoding into the models cellular processes at a molecular level, especially the details of the genetic and molecular machinery. This addition drives the connection between biological mechanisms and botulism risk assessment and hazard management strategies. This review brings together elements currently described in the literature that will be useful in building quantitative models of C. botulinum neurotoxin production. Subsequently, it outlines how the established form of modeling could be extended to include these new elements. Ultimately, this can offer further contributions to risk assessments to support food safety decision making. PMID:26350137

  4. Mechanism of substrate recognition by the novel Botulinum Neurotoxin subtype F5.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the causative agents of botulism, which act by potently inhibiting the neurotransmitter release in motor neurons. Seven serotypes of BoNTs designated as BoNT/A-G have been identified. Recently, two novel types of Botulinum neurotoxins, which cleave a novel scissile bond, L(54)-E(55), of VAMP-2 have been reported including BoNT/F subtype F5 and serotype H. However, little has been known on how these BoNTs recognize their substrates. The present study addressed for the first time the unique substrate recognition mechanism of LC/F5. Our data indicated that the optimal peptide required for efficient LC/F5 substrate cleavage is VAMP-2 (20-65). Interestingly, the overall mode of substrate recognition adopted by LC/F5 was similar to LC/F1, except that its recognition sites were shifted one helix toward the N-terminus of VAMP-2 when compared to that of LC/F1. The composition of LC/F5 pockets were found to have changed accordingly to facilitate specific recognition of these new sites of VAMP-2, including the P2', P1', P2, P3, B3, B2 and B1 sites. The study provides direct evidence of the evolutionary adaption of BoNT to recognize its substrate which is useful for effective antitoxin and inhibitor development. PMID:26794648

  5. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A enters a non-recycling pool of synaptic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Callista B.; Papadopulos, Andreas; Martin, Sally; Matthews, Daniel R.; Morgan, Garry P.; Nguyen, Tam H.; Wang, Tong; Nair, Deepak; Choquet, Daniel; Meunier, Frederic A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal communication relies on synaptic vesicles undergoing regulated exocytosis and recycling for multiple rounds of fusion. Whether all synaptic vesicles have identical protein content has been challenged, suggesting that their recycling ability may differ greatly. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that is internalized in synaptic vesicles at motor nerve terminals and induces flaccid paralysis. Recently, BoNT/A was also shown to undergo retrograde transport, suggesting it might enter a specific pool of synaptic vesicles with a retrograde trafficking fate. Using high-resolution microscopy techniques including electron microscopy and single molecule imaging, we found that the BoNT/A binding domain is internalized within a subset of vesicles that only partially co-localize with cholera toxin B-subunit and have markedly reduced VAMP2 immunoreactivity. Synaptic vesicles loaded with pHrodo-BoNT/A-Hc exhibited a significantly reduced ability to fuse with the plasma membrane in mouse hippocampal nerve terminals when compared with pHrodo-dextran-containing synaptic vesicles and pHrodo-labeled anti-GFP nanobodies bound to VAMP2-pHluorin or vGlut-pHluorin. Similar results were also obtained at the amphibian neuromuscular junction. These results reveal that BoNT/A is internalized in a subpopulation of synaptic vesicles that are not destined to recycle, highlighting the existence of significant molecular and functional heterogeneity between synaptic vesicles. PMID:26805017

  6. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype a Specific Cell-Based Potency Assay to Replace the Mouse Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Wang, Joanne; Molina, Yanira; Nelson, Jeremy B.; Jacky, Birgitte P. S.; Aoki, K. Roger

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), a potent therapeutic used to treat various disorders, inhibits vesicular neurotransmitter exocytosis by cleaving SNAP25. Development of cell-based potency assays (CBPAs) to assess the biological function of BoNT/A have been challenging because of its potency. CBPAs can evaluate the key steps of BoNT action: receptor binding, internalization-translocation, and catalytic activity; and therefore could replace the current mouse bioassay. Primary neurons possess appropriate sensitivity to develop potential replacement assays but those potency assays are difficult to perform and validate. This report describes a CBPA utilizing differentiated human neuroblastoma SiMa cells and a sandwich ELISA that measures BoNT/A-dependent intracellular increase of cleaved SNAP25. Assay sensitivity is similar to the mouse bioassay and measures neurotoxin biological activity in bulk drug substance and BOTOX® product (onabotulinumtoxinA). Validation of a version of this CBPA in a Quality Control laboratory has led to FDA, Health Canada, and European Union approval for potency testing of BOTOX®, BOTOX® Cosmetic, and Vistabel®. Moreover, we also developed and optimized a BoNT/A CBPA screening assay that can be used for the discovery of novel BoNT/A inhibitors to treat human disease. PMID:23185348

  7. Identification of a Unique Ganglioside Binding Loop within Botulinum Neurotoxins C and D-SA

    SciTech Connect

    Karalewitz, Andrew P.-A.; Kroken, Abby R.; Fu, Zhuji; Baldwin, Michael R.; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2010-09-22

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent protein toxins for humans. There are seven serotypes of BoNTs (A-G) based on a lack of cross antiserum neutralization. BoNTs utilize gangliosides as components of the host receptors for binding and entry into neurons. Members of BoNT/C and BoNT/D serotypes include mosaic toxins that are organized in D/C and C/D toxins. One D/C mosaic toxin, BoNT/D-South Africa (BoNT/D-SA), was not fully neutralized by immunization with BoNT serotype C or D, which stimulated this study. Here the crystal structures of the receptor binding domains of BoNT/C, BoNT/D, and BoNT/D-SA are presented. Biochemical and cell binding studies show that BoNT/C and BoNT/D-SA possess unique mechanisms for ganglioside binding. These studies provide new information about how the BoNTs can enter host cells as well as a basis for understanding the immunological diversity of these neurotoxins.

  8. Algal chloroplast produced camelid VH H antitoxins are capable of neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Daniel J; Rosenberg, Julian N; Chiu, Joanna G; Chang, Yung-Nien; Debatis, Michelle; Ngoi, Soo-Mun; Chang, John T; Shoemaker, Charles B; Oyler, George A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    We have produced three antitoxins consisting of the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VH H) by expressing the genes in the chloroplast of green algae. These antitoxins accumulate as soluble proteins capable of binding and neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin. Furthermore, they accumulate at up to 5% total soluble protein, sufficient expression to easily produce these antitoxins at scale from algae. The genes for the three different antitoxins were transformed into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts and their products purified from algae lysates and assayed for in vitro biological activity using toxin protection assays. The produced antibody domains bind to botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) with similar affinities as camelid antibodies produced in Escherichia coli, and they are similarly able to protect primary rat neurons from intoxication by BoNT/A. Furthermore, the camelid antibodies were produced in algae without the use of solubilization tags commonly employed in E. coli. These camelid antibody domains are potent antigen-binding proteins and the heterodimer fusion protein containing two VH H domains was capable of neutralizing BoNT/A at near equimolar concentrations with the toxin. Intact antibody domains were detected in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mice treated orally with antitoxin-producing microalgae. These findings support the use of orally delivered antitoxins produced in green algae as a novel treatment for botulism. PMID:25229405

  9. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A enters a non-recycling pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Harper, Callista B; Papadopulos, Andreas; Martin, Sally; Matthews, Daniel R; Morgan, Garry P; Nguyen, Tam H; Wang, Tong; Nair, Deepak; Choquet, Daniel; Meunier, Frederic A

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal communication relies on synaptic vesicles undergoing regulated exocytosis and recycling for multiple rounds of fusion. Whether all synaptic vesicles have identical protein content has been challenged, suggesting that their recycling ability may differ greatly. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that is internalized in synaptic vesicles at motor nerve terminals and induces flaccid paralysis. Recently, BoNT/A was also shown to undergo retrograde transport, suggesting it might enter a specific pool of synaptic vesicles with a retrograde trafficking fate. Using high-resolution microscopy techniques including electron microscopy and single molecule imaging, we found that the BoNT/A binding domain is internalized within a subset of vesicles that only partially co-localize with cholera toxin B-subunit and have markedly reduced VAMP2 immunoreactivity. Synaptic vesicles loaded with pHrodo-BoNT/A-Hc exhibited a significantly reduced ability to fuse with the plasma membrane in mouse hippocampal nerve terminals when compared with pHrodo-dextran-containing synaptic vesicles and pHrodo-labeled anti-GFP nanobodies bound to VAMP2-pHluorin or vGlut-pHluorin. Similar results were also obtained at the amphibian neuromuscular junction. These results reveal that BoNT/A is internalized in a subpopulation of synaptic vesicles that are not destined to recycle, highlighting the existence of significant molecular and functional heterogeneity between synaptic vesicles. PMID:26805017

  10. Mechanism of substrate recognition by the novel Botulinum Neurotoxin subtype F5

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the causative agents of botulism, which act by potently inhibiting the neurotransmitter release in motor neurons. Seven serotypes of BoNTs designated as BoNT/A-G have been identified. Recently, two novel types of Botulinum neurotoxins, which cleave a novel scissile bond, L54-E55, of VAMP-2 have been reported including BoNT/F subtype F5 and serotype H. However, little has been known on how these BoNTs recognize their substrates. The present study addressed for the first time the unique substrate recognition mechanism of LC/F5. Our data indicated that the optimal peptide required for efficient LC/F5 substrate cleavage is VAMP-2 (20–65). Interestingly, the overall mode of substrate recognition adopted by LC/F5 was similar to LC/F1, except that its recognition sites were shifted one helix toward the N-terminus of VAMP-2 when compared to that of LC/F1. The composition of LC/F5 pockets were found to have changed accordingly to facilitate specific recognition of these new sites of VAMP-2, including the P2′, P1′, P2, P3, B3, B2 and B1 sites. The study provides direct evidence of the evolutionary adaption of BoNT to recognize its substrate which is useful for effective antitoxin and inhibitor development. PMID:26794648

  11. A simple, rapid and sensitive FRET assay for botulinum neurotoxin serotype B detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiubiao; Xu, Ci; Li, Xuechen; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most potent naturally-occurring neurotoxins known to humans, comprise seven distinct serotypes (BoNT/A-G), each of which exhibits unique substrate specificity. Many methods have been developed for BoNT detection, in particular for BoNT/A, with various complexity and sensitivity, while substrate based FRET assay is considered as the most widely used approach due to its simplicity and sensitivity. In this study, we designed a vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) based FRET assay based on the understanding of the VAMP2 and light chain/B (LC/B) interactions in our previous studies. The current design constituted the shortest peptide, VAMP2 (63-85), with FRET dyes (EDAN and Dabcyl) labelled at position 76 and 85, respectively, which showed minimal effect on VAMP2 substrate catalysis by LC/B and therefore enhanced the sensitivity of the assay. The FRET peptide, designated as FVP-B, was specific to LC/B, with a detection sensitivity as low as ∼20 pM in 2 h. Importantly, FVP-B showed the potential to be scaled up and used in high throughput screening of LC/B inhibitor. The currently developed FRET assay is one of the most economic and rapid FRET assays for LC/B detection. PMID:25437190

  12. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

    SciTech Connect

    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  13. Cyanobacterial blooms and biomagnification of the neurotoxin BMAA in South Florida coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, L.; Mash, D.

    2008-12-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria have developed in Florida Bay, Biscayne Bay and other coastal waters of South Florida. It has recently been shown that virtually all cyanobacteria produce the potent neurotoxin, beta-N- methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Studies in Guam indicate that BMAA can biomagnify up the food chain from cyanobacteria to human food and humans. Recent studies in Guam and on human brains in North America suggest an association between BMAA and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). A variety of organisms from South Florida coastal waters are being analyzed for BMAA content to determine if BMAA is biomagnifying in these food chains and if it is a potential human health hazard. Some have extremely high concentrations of BMAA.

  14. Brevetoxin derivatives act as partial agonists at neurotoxin site 5 on the voltage-gated Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    LePage, K T; Baden, D G; Murray, T F

    2003-01-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTx-1 to PbTx-10) are potent lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins produced by the marine dinoflagellate Karina brevis, an organism associated with 'red tide' blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. Ingestion of shellfish contaminated with K. brevis produces neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) in humans. NSP symptoms emanate from brevetoxin activation of neurotoxin site 5 on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) [Toxicon 20 (1982) 457]. In primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGN), brevetoxins produce acute neuronal injury and death. The ability of a series of naturally occurring and synthetic brevetoxins to trigger Ca(2+) influx in CGN was explored in the present study. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was monitored in fluo-3-loaded CGN using a fluorescent laser imaging plate reader. The naturally occurring derivatives PbTx-1, PbTx-2 and PbTx-3 all produced a rapid and concentration-dependent increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. The maximum response to PbTx-1 was approximately two-fold greater than that of either PbTx-2 or PbTx-3. Two synthetic derivatives of PbTx-3, alpha-naphthoyl-PbTx-3 and beta-naphthoyl-PbTx-3, were also tested. Both alpha- and beta-naphthoyl-PbTx-3 stimulated a rapid and concentration-dependent Ca(2+) influx that was, however, less efficacious than that of PbTx-3. These data indicate that, analogous to neurotoxin site 2 ligands, activators of neurotoxin site 5 display a range of efficacies, with PbTx-1 being a full agonist and other derivatives acting as partial agonists. PMID:12480165

  15. SjAPI-2 is the first member of a new neurotoxin family with Ascaris-type fold and KCNQ1 inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Chuangeng; Yang, Weishan; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Chen, Zongyun; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-08-01

    Peptides with Ascaris-type fold are a new kind of toxins founded from venomous animals recently. Functionally, these unique toxin peptides had been identified as potent protease inhibitors, which was similar to other known Ascaris-type peptides from non-venomous animals. Whether Ascaris-type peptides from venom animals have neurotoxin activities remains unclear. Here, a scorpion toxin SjAPI-2 with Ascaris-type fold was characterized to have a neurotoxin activity, which can selectively inhibit KCNQ1 potassium channel. SjAPI-2 had 62 amino acid residues, including 10 cysteine residues. Charged residue analyses showed that two acidic residues of SjAPI-2 were regionally distributed, and 10 basic residues were distributed widely throughout the whole peptide, which was similar to classical potassium channel toxins. Pharmacological studies confirmed that SjAPI-2 was a selective KCNQ1 potassium channel inhibitor with weak effects on other potassium channels, such as Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.3, SKCa2, SKCa3, and IKCa channels. Concentration-dependent studies showed that SjAPI-2 inhibited the KCNQ1 potassium channel with an IC50 of 771.5±169.9 nM. To the best of our knowledge, SjAPI-2 is the first neurotoxin with a unique Ascaris-type fold, providing novel insights into the divergent evolution of neurotoxins from venomous animals. PMID:26014142

  16. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin by a Human Monoclonal Antibody Specific for the Catalytic Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Adekar, Sharad P.; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Jones, R. Mark; Al-Saleem, Fetweh H.; Ancharski, Denise M.; Root, Michael J.; Kapadnis, B. P.; Simpson, Lance L.; Dessain, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are a family of category A select bioterror agents and the most potent biological toxins known. Cloned antibody therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the therapeutic utility of antibodies that bind the BoNT light chain domain (LC), a metalloprotease that functions in the cytosol of cholinergic neurons, has not been thoroughly explored. Methods and Findings We used an optimized hybridoma method to clone a fully human antibody specific for the LC of serotype A BoNT (BoNT/A). The 4LCA antibody demonstrated potent in vivo neutralization when administered alone and collaborated with an antibody specific for the HC. In Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, the 4LCA antibody prevented the cleavage of the BoNT/A proteolytic target, SNAP-25. Unlike an antibody specific for the HC, the 4LCA antibody did not block entry of BoNT/A into cultured cells. Instead, it was taken up into synaptic vesicles along with BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody also directly inhibited BoNT/A catalytic activity in vitro. Conclusions An antibody specific for the BoNT/A LC can potently inhibit BoNT/A in vivo and in vitro, using mechanisms not previously associated with BoNT-neutralizing antibodies. Antibodies specific for BoNT LC may be valuable components of an antibody antidote for BoNT exposure. PMID:18714390

  17. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in Neurology: Update

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Chung, Tae Mo; Bocca, Wladimir; de Souza, Jano Alves; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Moreira, Rayele Priscila; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Teixeira, Silmar; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Moraes, Bruno da Silva; Matta, André Palma; Jacinto, Luis Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current and most neurological (central nervous system, CNS) uses of the botulinum neurotoxin type A. The effect of these toxins at neuromuscular junction lends themselves to neurological diseases of muscle overactivity, particularly abnormalities of muscle control. There are seven serotypes of the toxin, each with a specific activity at the molecular level. Currently, serotypes A (in two preparations) and B are available for clinical purpose, and they have proved to be safe and effective for the treatment of dystonia, spasticity, headache, and other CNS disorders in which muscle hyperactivity gives rise to symptoms. Although initially thought to inhibit acetylcholine release only at the neuromuscular junction, botulinum toxins are now recognized to inhibit acetylcholine release at autonomic cholinergic nerve terminals, as well as peripheral release of neuro-transmitters involved in pain regulation. Its effects are transient and nondestructive, and largely limited to the area in which it is administered. These effects are also graded according to the dose, allowing individualized treatment of patients and disorders. It may also prove to be useful in the control of autonomic dysfunction and sialorrhea. In over 20 years of use in humans, botulinum toxin has accumulated a considerable safety record, and in many cases represents relief for thousands of patients unaided by other therapy. PMID:26487928

  18. Comparison and Overview of Currently Available Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Thomas J.; Dayan, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Botulinum toxin has been in use since the 1970s. Over the last few years, the indications for botulinum toxin use have extended for cosmetic and noncosmetic applications. Three preparations of botulinum toxin type A and one preparation of botulinum toxin type B are commercially available and approved for use in the United States by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Objective: To review the most recent literature on all commercially available botulinum toxins in the United States, their indications, Food and Drug Administration approvals, and handling (reconstitution, storage, and dilution). Methods: A literature review (not Cochrane type analysis) using several databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, textbooks, Food and Drug Administration homepage, and manufacturer information) was performed. Conclusion: Several different preparations of botulinum toxins exist worldwide, none of which are identical or interchangeable. Manufacturer recommendations on all available botulinum neurotoxins advise the use of unpreserved saline for reconstitution. Side effects are mostly mild and always self-limited. More serious complications are associated with higher doses, improper injection techniques, and occur in patients with underlying comorbidities. PMID:24587850

  19. The Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Drug-Like Compounds that Inhibit Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Endopeptidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shuowei; Lindo, Paul; Park, Jong-Beak; Vasa, Kruti; Singh, Bal Ram

    2009-01-01

    A robust, high throughput, two-tiered assay for screening small molecule inhibitors against botulinum neurotoxin serotype A was developed and employed to screen 16,544 compounds. Thirty-four compounds were identified as potent hits employing the first-tier assay. Subsequently, nine were confirmed as actives by our second-tier confirmatory assay. Of these, one displayed potent inhibitory efficacy, possessing an IC50 = 16 μM (± 1.6 μM) in our in vitro assay. This inhibitor (0831–1035) is highly water-soluble, and possesses an IC50 = 47 μM (± 7.0 μM) in our primary cell culture assay (with virtually no cytotoxicity up to 500 μM) suggesting that this inhibitor is a good candidate for further development as a therapeutic countermeasure to treat botulism resulting from botulinum neurotoxin serotype A intoxication. An enzyme kinetics study indicated that this inhibitor exhibits mixed non-competitive inhibition, with a KI = 9 μM. PMID:20003913

  20. Positive Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Gene Expression by CodY in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Dahlsten, Elias; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin, produced mainly by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum, is the most poisonous biological substance known. Here, we show that CodY, a global regulator conserved in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, positively regulates the botulinum neurotoxin gene expression. Inactivation of codY resulted in decreased expression of botA, encoding the neurotoxin, as well as in reduced neurotoxin synthesis. Complementation of the codY mutation in trans rescued neurotoxin synthesis, and overexpression of codY in trans caused elevated neurotoxin production. Recombinant CodY was found to bind to a 30-bp region containing the botA transcription start site, suggesting regulation of the neurotoxin gene transcription through direct interaction. GTP enhanced the binding affinity of CodY to the botA promoter, suggesting that CodY-dependent neurotoxin regulation is associated with nutritional status. PMID:25281376

  1. A Novel Neurotoxin from Venom of the Spider, Brachypelma albopilosum

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Mingwei; Li, Hongli; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Minglong; Lu, Qiumin

    2014-01-01

    Spiders have evolved highly selective toxins for insects. There are many insecticidal neurotoxins in spider venoms. Although a large amount of work has been done to focus on neurotoxicity of spider components, little information, which is related with effects of spider toxins on tumor cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, is available for Brachypelma albopilosum venom. In this work, a novel spider neurotoxin (brachyin) was identified and characterized from venoms of the spider, Brachypelma albopilosum. Brachyin is composed of 41 amino acid residues with the sequence of CLGENVPCDKDRPNCCSRYECLEPTGYGWWYASYYCYKKRS. There are six cysteines in this sequence, which form three disulfided bridges. The serine residue at the C-terminus is amidated. Brachyin showed strong lethal effects on American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) and Tenebrio molitor (common mealbeetle). This neurotoxin also showed significant analgesic effects in mice models including abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid and formalin-induced paw licking tests. It was interesting that brachyin exerted marked inhibition on tumor cell proliferation. PMID:25329070

  2. Mechanism of action of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, C; Schiavo, G

    1994-07-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins responsible for tetanus and botulism are metallo-proteases that enter nerve cells and block neurotransmitter release via zinc-dependent cleavage of protein components of the neuroexocytosis apparatus. Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) binds to the presynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction and is internalized and transported retroaxonally to the spinal cord. Whilst TeNT causes spastic paralysis by acting on the spinal inhibitory interneurons, the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) induce a flaccid paralysis because they intoxicate the neuromuscular junction. TeNT and BoNT serotypes B, D, F and G specifically cleave VAMP/synaptobrevin, a membrane protein of small synaptic vesicles, at different single peptide bonds. Proteins of the presynaptic membrane are specifically attacked by the other BoNTs: serotypes A and E cleave SNAP-25 at two different sites located within the carboxyl terminus, whereas the specific target of serotype C is syntaxin. PMID:7527117

  3. SV2 mediates entry of tetanus neurotoxin into central neurons.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Felix L; Dong, Min; Yao, Jun; Tepp, William H; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A; Chapman, Edwin R

    2010-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin causes the disease tetanus, which is characterized by rigid paralysis. The toxin acts by inhibiting the release of neurotransmitters from inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord that innervate motor neurons and is unique among the clostridial neurotoxins due to its ability to shuttle from the periphery to the central nervous system. Tetanus neurotoxin is thought to interact with a high affinity receptor complex that is composed of lipid and protein components; however, the identity of the protein receptor remains elusive. In the current study, we demonstrate that toxin binding, to dissociated hippocampal and spinal cord neurons, is greatly enhanced by driving synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Moreover, tetanus neurotoxin entry and subsequent cleavage of synaptobrevin II, the substrate for this toxin, was also dependent on synaptic vesicle recycling. Next, we identified the potential synaptic vesicle binding protein for the toxin and found that it corresponded to SV2; tetanus neurotoxin was unable to cleave synaptobrevin II in SV2 knockout neurons. Toxin entry into knockout neurons was rescued by infecting with viruses that express SV2A or SV2B. Tetanus toxin elicited the hyper excitability in dissociated spinal cord neurons - due to preferential loss of inhibitory transmission - that is characteristic of the disease. Surprisingly, in dissociated cortical cultures, low concentrations of the toxin preferentially acted on excitatory neurons. Further examination of the distribution of SV2A and SV2B in both spinal cord and cortical neurons revealed that SV2B is to a large extent localized to excitatory terminals, while SV2A is localized to inhibitory terminals. Therefore, the distinct effects of tetanus toxin on cortical and spinal cord neurons are not due to differential expression of SV2 isoforms. In summary, the findings reported here indicate that SV2A and SV2B mediate binding and entry of tetanus neurotoxin into central neurons. PMID:21124874

  4. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. PMID:25445012

  5. Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  6. Control of autophagosome axonal retrograde flux by presynaptic activity unveiled using botulinum neurotoxin type a.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B; Mavlyutov, Timur A; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R; Cooper-White, Justin J; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2015-04-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  7. Antibody Protection Against Botulinum Neurotoxin Intoxication In Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adulteration of food or feed with any of the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a potential bioterrorism concern. Currently, there is strong interest in the development of detection reagents, vaccines, therapeutics and other countermeasures. A sensitive immunoassay for detecting BoNT/...

  8. Botulinum neurotoxin: Where are we with detection technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poisonous nature of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) poses a great risk to humans and also can be exploited as a possible bioterrorism and biological warfare agent. BoNT serotypes A and B have emerged as effective treatments for a variety of neurological disorders, in addition to their applicability ...

  9. The neurotoxins of the sea snake Laticauda schistorhynchus.

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, M L; Tamiya, N; Cogger, H G

    1983-01-01

    Erabutoxins a and b, the major neurotoxins in the venom of the sea snake Laticauda semifasciata, were detected in the venom of Laticauda schistorhynchus. The identity of the toxins was confirmed on the basis of elution position on CM-cellulose column chromatography, disc electrophoretic mobility, amino acid analysis and toxicity measurement. PMID:6615432

  10. Botulinum neurotoxin serotypes detected by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Savage, Alison C; Buckley, Nicholas; Halliwell, Jennifer; Gwenin, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is one of the deadliest biological toxins known to mankind and is able to cause the debilitating disease botulism. The rapid detection of the different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin is essential for both diagnosis of botulism and identifying the presence of toxin in potential cases of terrorism and food contamination. The modes of action of botulinum neurotoxins are well-established in literature and differ for each serotype. The toxins are known to specifically cleave portions of the SNARE proteins SNAP-25 or VAMP; an interaction that can be monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study presents a SNAP-25 and a VAMP biosensors for detecting the activity of five botulinum neurotoxin serotypes (A-E) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors are able to detect concentrations of toxins as low as 25 fg/mL, in a short time-frame compared with the current standard methods of detection. Both biosensors show greater specificity for their compatible serotypes compared with incompatible serotypes and denatured toxins. PMID:25954998

  11. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes Detected by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Alison C.; Buckley, Nicholas; Halliwell, Jennifer; Gwenin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is one of the deadliest biological toxins known to mankind and is able to cause the debilitating disease botulism. The rapid detection of the different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin is essential for both diagnosis of botulism and identifying the presence of toxin in potential cases of terrorism and food contamination. The modes of action of botulinum neurotoxins are well-established in literature and differ for each serotype. The toxins are known to specifically cleave portions of the SNARE proteins SNAP-25 or VAMP; an interaction that can be monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study presents a SNAP-25 and a VAMP biosensors for detecting the activity of five botulinum neurotoxin serotypes (A–E) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors are able to detect concentrations of toxins as low as 25 fg/mL, in a short time-frame compared with the current standard methods of detection. Both biosensors show greater specificity for their compatible serotypes compared with incompatible serotypes and denatured toxins. PMID:25954998

  12. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Naja naja oxiana neurotoxin I.

    PubMed

    Stiles, B G; Sexton, F W; Guest, S B; Olson, M A; Hack, D C

    1994-10-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed against neurotoxin I (NT-1), a protein from central Asian cobra (Naja naja oxiana) venom which binds specifically to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR). All of the mAbs cross-reacted with another long-chain post-synaptic neurotoxin, Bungarus multicinctus alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT), but not Naja naja kaouthia alpha-cobratoxin, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (e.l.i.s.a.). Short-chain post-synaptic neurotoxins like Naja naja atra cobrotoxin, Laticauda semifasciata erabutoxin b, or N. n. oxiana neurotoxin II did not cross-react with the NT-1 mAbs, but an antigen(s) found in Dendroaspis polylepis, Acanthophis antarcticus and Pseudechis australis venoms was immunoreactive. The e.l.i.s.a. readings for dithiothreitol-reduced NT-1 and NT-1 mAbs ranged from 13 to 27% of those for native toxin but reduced alpha-BT was not immunoreactive. Synthetic NT-1 peptides were used in epitope-mapping studies and two, non-contiguous regions (Cys15-Tyr23 and Lys25-Gly33 or Pro17-Lys25 and Asp29-Lys37) were recognized by the NT-1 mAbs. The NT-1 mAbs individually inhibited 31-71% of alpha-BT binding to AchR in vitro and afforded a slight protective effect in vivo with a toxin: antibody mole ratio of 1:1.5. This report is the first to describe mAbs which recognize and protect against a heterologous, long-chain, post-synaptic neurotoxin from snake venom. PMID:7945236

  13. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Naja naja oxiana neurotoxin I.

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, B G; Sexton, F W; Guest, S B; Olson, M A; Hack, D C

    1994-01-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed against neurotoxin I (NT-1), a protein from central Asian cobra (Naja naja oxiana) venom which binds specifically to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR). All of the mAbs cross-reacted with another long-chain post-synaptic neurotoxin, Bungarus multicinctus alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT), but not Naja naja kaouthia alpha-cobratoxin, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (e.l.i.s.a.). Short-chain post-synaptic neurotoxins like Naja naja atra cobrotoxin, Laticauda semifasciata erabutoxin b, or N. n. oxiana neurotoxin II did not cross-react with the NT-1 mAbs, but an antigen(s) found in Dendroaspis polylepis, Acanthophis antarcticus and Pseudechis australis venoms was immunoreactive. The e.l.i.s.a. readings for dithiothreitol-reduced NT-1 and NT-1 mAbs ranged from 13 to 27% of those for native toxin but reduced alpha-BT was not immunoreactive. Synthetic NT-1 peptides were used in epitope-mapping studies and two, non-contiguous regions (Cys15-Tyr23 and Lys25-Gly33 or Pro17-Lys25 and Asp29-Lys37) were recognized by the NT-1 mAbs. The NT-1 mAbs individually inhibited 31-71% of alpha-BT binding to AchR in vitro and afforded a slight protective effect in vivo with a toxin: antibody mole ratio of 1:1.5. This report is the first to describe mAbs which recognize and protect against a heterologous, long-chain, post-synaptic neurotoxin from snake venom. PMID:7945236

  14. Light chain of botulinum A neurotoxin expressed as an inclusion body from a synthetic gene is catalytically and functionally active.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S A; Smith, L A

    2000-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, the most potent of all toxins, induce lethal neuromuscular paralysis by inhibiting exocytosis at the neuromuscular junction. The light chains (LC) of these dichain neurotoxins are a new class of zinc-endopeptidases that specifically cleave the synaptosomal proteins, SNAP-25, VAMP, or syntaxin at discrete sites. To facilitate the structural and functional characterization of these unique endopeptidases, we constructed a synthetic gene for the LC of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), overexpressed it in Escherichia coli, and purified the gene product from inclusion bodies. Our procedure can provide 1.1 g of the LC from 1 L of culture. The LC product was stable in solution at 4 degrees C for at least 6 months. This rBoNT/A LC was proteolytically active, specifically cleaving the Glu-Arg bond in a 17-residue synthetic peptide of SNAP-25, the reported cleavage site of BoNT/A. Its calculated catalytic efficiency kcat/Km was higher than that reported for the native BoNT/A dichain. Treating the rBoNT/A LC with mercuric compounds completely abolished its activity, most probably by modifying the cysteine-164 residue located in the vicinity of the active site. About 70% activity of the LC was restored by adding Zn2+ to a Zn2+-free, apo-LC preparation. The LC was nontoxic to mice and failed to elicit neutralizing epitope(s) when the animals were vaccinated with this protein. In addition, injecting rBoNT/A LC into sea urchin eggs inhibited exocytosis-dependent plasma membrane resealing. For the first time, results of our study make available a large amount of the biologically active toxin fragment in a soluble and stable form. PMID:11195972

  15. Structural analysis of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type D as a platform for the development of targeted secretion inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Masuyer, Geoffrey; Davies, Jonathan R.; Moore, Kevin; Chaddock, John A.; Ravi Acharya, K.

    2015-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin type D is one of seven highly potent toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum which inhibit neurotransmission at cholinergic nerve terminals. A functional fragment derived from the toxin, LHn, consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains, has been heralded as a platform for the development of targeted secretion inhibitors. These secretion inhibitors are aimed at retargeting the toxin towards a specific cell type to inhibit vesicular secretion. Here we report crystal structures of LHn from serotype D at 2.3 Å, and that of SXN101959 at 3.1 Å resolution. SXN101959, a derivative that combines LHn from serotype D with a fragment of the growth hormone releasing hormone, has previously revealed promising results in inhibiting growth hormone release in pituitary somatotrophs. These structures offer for the first time insights into the translocation domain interaction with the catalytic domain in serotype D. Furthermore, structural information from small-angle X-ray scattering of LHn/D is compared among serotypes A, B, and D. Taken together, these results demonstrate the robustness of the ‘LHn fold’ across serotypes and its use in engineering additional polypeptide components with added functionality. Our study demonstrates the suitability of botulinum neurotoxin, and serotype D in particular, as a basis for engineering novel secretion inhibitors. PMID:26324071

  16. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.

  17. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  18. Structural analysis of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type D as a platform for the development of targeted secretion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masuyer, Geoffrey; Davies, Jonathan R; Moore, Kevin; Chaddock, John A; Ravi Acharya, K

    2015-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin type D is one of seven highly potent toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum which inhibit neurotransmission at cholinergic nerve terminals. A functional fragment derived from the toxin, LHn, consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains, has been heralded as a platform for the development of targeted secretion inhibitors. These secretion inhibitors are aimed at retargeting the toxin towards a specific cell type to inhibit vesicular secretion. Here we report crystal structures of LHn from serotype D at 2.3 Å, and that of SXN101959 at 3.1 Å resolution. SXN101959, a derivative that combines LHn from serotype D with a fragment of the growth hormone releasing hormone, has previously revealed promising results in inhibiting growth hormone release in pituitary somatotrophs. These structures offer for the first time insights into the translocation domain interaction with the catalytic domain in serotype D. Furthermore, structural information from small-angle X-ray scattering of LHn/D is compared among serotypes A, B, and D. Taken together, these results demonstrate the robustness of the 'LHn fold' across serotypes and its use in engineering additional polypeptide components with added functionality. Our study demonstrates the suitability of botulinum neurotoxin, and serotype D in particular, as a basis for engineering novel secretion inhibitors. PMID:26324071

  19. Evolution of an ancient venom: recognition of a novel family of cnidarian toxins and the common evolutionary origin of sodium and potassium neurotoxins in sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Jouiaei, Mahdokht; Sunagar, Kartik; Federman Gross, Aya; Scheib, Holger; Alewood, Paul F; Moran, Yehu; Fry, Bryan G

    2015-06-01

    Despite Cnidaria (sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids) being the oldest venomous animal lineage, structure-function relationships, phyletic distributions, and the molecular evolutionary regimes of toxins encoded by these intriguing animals are poorly understood. Hence, we have comprehensively elucidated the phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary histories of pharmacologically characterized cnidarian toxin families, including peptide neurotoxins (voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channel-targeting toxins: NaTxs and KTxs, respectively), pore-forming toxins (actinoporins, aerolysin-related toxins, and jellyfish toxins), and the newly discovered small cysteine-rich peptides (SCRiPs). We show that despite long evolutionary histories, most cnidarian toxins remain conserved under the strong influence of negative selection-a finding that is in striking contrast to the rapid evolution of toxin families in evolutionarily younger lineages, such as cone snails and advanced snakes. In contrast to the previous suggestions that implicated SCRiPs in the biomineralization process in corals, we demonstrate that they are potent neurotoxins that are likely involved in the envenoming function, and thus represent the first family of neurotoxins from corals. We also demonstrate the common evolutionary origin of type III KTxs and NaTxs in sea anemones. We show that type III KTxs have evolved from NaTxs under the regime of positive selection, and likely represent a unique evolutionary innovation of the Actinioidea lineage. We report a correlation between the accumulation of episodically adaptive sites and the emergence of novel pharmacological activities in this rapidly evolving neurotoxic clade. PMID:25757852

  20. Small molecule non-peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype E: Structure-activity relationship and a pharmacophore model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gyanendra; Agarwal, Rakhi; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-09-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous biological substance known to humans. They cause flaccid paralysis by blocking the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we report a number of small molecule non-peptide inhibitors of BoNT serotype E. The structure-activity relationship and a pharmacophore model are presented. Although non-peptidic in nature, these inhibitors mimic key features of the uncleavable substrate peptide Arg-Ile-Met-Glu (RIME) of the SNAP-25 protein. Among the compounds tested, most of the potent inhibitors bear a zinc-chelating moiety connected to a hydrophobic and aromatic moiety through a carboxyl or amide linker. All of them show low micromolar IC50 values. PMID:27353886

  1. Isolation and Pharmacological Characterization of α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a, a Short-Chain Postsynaptic Neurotoxin from the Venom of the Western Desert Taipan, Oxyuranus temporalis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Carmel M.; Ahmad Rusmili, Muhamad Rusdi; Hodgson, Wayne C.

    2016-01-01

    Taipans (Oxyuranus spp.) are elapids with highly potent venoms containing presynaptic (β) and postsynaptic (α) neurotoxins. O. temporalis (Western Desert taipan), a newly discovered member of this genus, has been shown to possess venom which displays marked in vitro neurotoxicity. No components have been isolated from this venom. We describe the characterization of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (α-EPTX-Ot1a; 6712 Da), a short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxin, which accounts for approximately 30% of O. temporalis venom. α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a (0.1–1 µM) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of indirect-twitches, and abolished contractile responses to exogenous acetylcholine and carbachol, in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation. The inhibition of indirect twitches by α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (1 µM) was not reversed by washing the tissue. Prior addition of taipan antivenom (10 U/mL) delayed the neurotoxic effects of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (1 µM) and markedly attenuated the neurotoxic effects of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (0.1 µM). α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a displayed pseudo-irreversible antagonism of concentration-response curves to carbachol with a pA2 value of 8.02 ± 0.05. De novo sequencing revealed the main sequence of the short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxin (i.e., α-elapitoxin-Ot1a) as well as three other isoforms found in O. temporalis venom. α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a shows high sequence similarity (i.e., >87%) with other taipan short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxins. PMID:26938558

  2. Botulinum neurotoxins: new questions arising from structural biology.

    PubMed

    Kammerer, Richard A; Benoit, Roger M

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic substances known and cause botulism in vertebrates. They have also emerged as effective and powerful reagents for cosmetic and medical applications. One important prerequisite for understanding BoNT function in disease, and the further development of the toxins for cosmetic and medical applications, is a detailed knowledge of BoNT interactions with non-toxic neurotoxin-associated proteins and cell surface receptors. Based on the substantial recent progress in obtaining high-resolution crystal structures of key BoNT complexes, we summarize the major advances in understanding BoNT interactions and discuss the resulting potential implications, in particular those relating to BoNT serotype A. PMID:25282537

  3. Mass spectrometry-based methods for detection and differentiation of botulinum neurotoxins

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Jurgen G.; Boyer, Anne E.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Moura, Hercules; Barr, John R.; Woolfitt, Adrian R.

    2009-11-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for detecting the presence of clostridial neurotoxins in a sample by mixing a sample with a peptide that can serve as a substrate for proteolytic activity of a clostridial neurotoxin; and measuring for proteolytic activity of a clostridial neurotoxin by a mass spectroscopy technique. In one embodiment, the peptide can have an affinity tag attached at two or more sites.

  4. Aphicidal efficacy of scorpion- and spider-derived neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pal, Narinder; Yamamoto, Takashi; King, Glenn F; Waine, Clement; Bonning, Bryony

    2013-08-01

    Insect-specific neurotoxins that act within the insect hemocoel (body cavity) represent an untapped resource for insect pest management. On the basis of recent advances made in development of appropriate delivery systems for transport of these toxins from the insect gut, across the gut epithelium to their target site, we screened neurotoxins derived from scorpion or spider venom for efficacy against the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. Toxins were selected to represent different modes of electrophysiological action, including activity on voltage-gated calcium channels (ω-TRTX-Gr1a, ω-agatoxin Aa4a, ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a), calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (charybdotoxin, maurotoxin), chloride channels (chlorotoxin) and voltage-gated sodium channels (LqhαIT). The Bacillus thuringiensis-derived toxin Cyt1Aa was also tested as a positive control for toxicity. In per os bioassays with both aphid species, toxicity was only seen for ω-TRTX-Gr1a and Cyt1Aa. On injection into the hemocoel of A. pisum, LD₅₀ values ranged from 1 to 8 ng/mg body weight, with ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a being the most toxic (1.02 ng/mg body weight). All neurotoxins caused rapid paralysis, with charybdotoxin, maurotoxin and chlorotoxin also causing melanization of injected aphids. These data represent the first comprehensive screen of neurotoxins against aphids, and highlight the potential for practical use of the insect-specific toxin ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a in aphid management. PMID:23651761

  5. Substrate recognition mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin-cleaving clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4') do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond. PMID:18511418

  6. Tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins: mechanism of action and therapeutic uses.

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzari, R; Rossetto, O; Schiavo, G; Montecucco, C

    1999-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins responsible for tetanus and botulism are proteins consisting of three domains endowed with different functions: neurospecific binding, membrane translocation and proteolysis for specific components of the neuroexocytosis apparatus. Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) binds to the presynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, is internalized and transported retroaxonally to the spinal cord. The spastic paralysis induced by the toxin is due to the blockade of neurotransmitter release from spinal inhibitory interneurons. In contrast, the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) act at the periphery by inducing a flaccid paralysis due to the inhibition of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction. TeNT and BoNT serotypes B, D, F and G cleave specifically at single but different peptide bonds, of the vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP) synaptobrevin, a membrane protein of small synaptic vesicles (SSVs). BoNT types A, C and E cleave SNAP-25 at different sites located within the carboxyl-terminus, while BoNT type C additionally cleaves syntaxin. The remarkable specificity of BoNTs is exploited in the treatment of human diseases characterized by a hyperfunction of cholinergic terminals. PMID:10212474

  7. Recovery of a strain of Clostridium botulinum producing both neurotoxin A and neurotoxin B from canned macrobiotic food.

    PubMed

    Franciosa, G; Fenicia, L; Pourshaban, M; Aureli, P

    1997-03-01

    A rare strain of Clostridium botulinum subtype Ab was isolated from a canned macrobiotic food suspected of being linked to a fatal case of food-borne botulism. The strain was recovered and identified by conventional methods modified by the inclusion of a PCR assay (G. Franciosa, J.L. Ferreira, and C.L. Hatheway, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:1911-1917, 1994). The titers of neurotoxins produced by the strain were evaluated by a mouse bioassay. PMID:9055430

  8. Recovery of a strain of Clostridium botulinum producing both neurotoxin A and neurotoxin B from canned macrobiotic food.

    PubMed Central

    Franciosa, G; Fenicia, L; Pourshaban, M; Aureli, P

    1997-01-01

    A rare strain of Clostridium botulinum subtype Ab was isolated from a canned macrobiotic food suspected of being linked to a fatal case of food-borne botulism. The strain was recovered and identified by conventional methods modified by the inclusion of a PCR assay (G. Franciosa, J.L. Ferreira, and C.L. Hatheway, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:1911-1917, 1994). The titers of neurotoxins produced by the strain were evaluated by a mouse bioassay. PMID:9055430

  9. Translocation and dissemination to target neurons of botulinum neurotoxin type B in the mouse intestinal wall.

    PubMed

    Connan, Chloé; Varela-Chavez, Carolina; Mazuet, Christelle; Molgó, Jordi; Haustant, Georges Michel; Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc; Vandewalle, Alain; Popoff, Michel R

    2016-02-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are responsible for severe flaccid paralysis (botulism), which in most cases enter the organism via the digestive tract and then disseminate into the blood or lymph circulation to target autonomic and motor nerve endings. The passage way of BoNTs alone or in complex forms with associated nontoxic proteins through the epithelial barrier of the digestive tract still remains unclear. Here, we show using an in vivo model of mouse ligated intestinal loop that BoNT/B alone or the BoNT/B C-terminal domain of the heavy chain (HCcB), which interacts with cell surface receptors, translocates across the intestinal barrier. The BoNT/B or HCcB translocation through the intestinal barrier occurred via an endocytosis-dependent mechanism within 10-20 min, because Dynasore, a potent endocytosis inhibitor, significantly prevented BoNT/B as well as HCcB translocation. We also show that HCcB or BoNT/B specifically targets neuronal cells and neuronal extensions in the intestinal submucosa and musculosa expressing synaptotagmin, preferentially cholinergic neurons and to a lower extent other neuronal cell types, notably serotonergic neurons. Interestingly, rare intestinal epithelial cells accumulated HCcB suggesting that distinct cell types of the intestinal epithelium, still undefined, might mediate efficient translocation of BoNT/B. PMID:26294282

  10. Rapid Microfluidic Assay for the Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Animal Sera

    PubMed Central

    Babrak, Lmar; Lin, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hnasko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Potent Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit foodborne contamination and morbidity. In this report, we describe a rapid 96-well microfluidic double sandwich immunoassay for the sensitive detection of BoNT-A from animal sera. This BoNT microfluidic assay requires only 5 μL of serum, provides results in 75 min using a standard fluorescence microplate reader and generates minimal hazardous waste. The assay has a <30 pg·mL−1 limit of detection (LOD) of BoNT-A from spiked human serum. This sensitive microfluidic BoNT-A assay offers a fast and simplified workflow suitable for the detection of BoNT-A from serum samples of limited volume in most laboratory settings. PMID:26742073

  11. Rapid Microfluidic Assay for the Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Animal Sera.

    PubMed

    Babrak, Lmar; Lin, Alice; Stanker, Larry H; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hnasko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Potent Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit foodborne contamination and morbidity. In this report, we describe a rapid 96-well microfluidic double sandwich immunoassay for the sensitive detection of BoNT-A from animal sera. This BoNT microfluidic assay requires only 5 μL of serum, provides results in 75 min using a standard fluorescence microplate reader and generates minimal hazardous waste. The assay has a <30 pg·mL(-1) limit of detection (LOD) of BoNT-A from spiked human serum. This sensitive microfluidic BoNT-A assay offers a fast and simplified workflow suitable for the detection of BoNT-A from serum samples of limited volume in most laboratory settings. PMID:26742073

  12. Searching for Therapeutics Against Botulinum Neurotoxins: A True Challenge for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Duplantier, Allen J; Kane, Christopher D; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most potent known toxins, cause severe muscle paralysis and death at nanogram exposures and are considered biothreat agents. BoNTs target the neuromuscular junction where they release smaller zinc metalloprotease light chains (LCs) into the neuron cytosol that selectively cleave SNARE proteins and thus block the exocytosis of acetylcholine neurotransmitters necessary for skeletal muscle contraction. The majority of efforts to develop post-symptomatic therapeutics for botulism poisoning have focused on inhibiting the LC and tremendous strides have been made in understanding how the LC binds to the SNARE proteins via X-ray crystallography. Subsequent homology modeling and structure based drug design have led to the discovery of multiple small molecule BoNT/A inhibitors in the 0.05 ~10 μΜ range, but to date none have shown significant post-symptomatic efficacy in an animal model of botulinum intoxication. With the lack of reported pharmacokinetic data, we have analyzed the BoNT/A inhibitor lead chemical matter from a physicochemical property point of view and have attempted to understand if bioavailability of drug at the neuromuscular junction is the root cause of this apparent in vitro/in vivo disconnect in the field. PMID:27072693

  13. Dynamin Inhibition Blocks Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Endocytosis in Neurons and Delays Botulism*

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Callista B.; Martin, Sally; Nguyen, Tam H.; Daniels, Shari J.; Lavidis, Nickolas A.; Popoff, Michel R.; Hadzic, Gordana; Mariana, Anna; Chau, Ngoc; McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J.; Meunier, Frederic A.

    2011-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are di-chain bacterial proteins responsible for the paralytic disease botulism. Following binding to the plasma membrane of cholinergic motor nerve terminals, BoNTs are internalized into an endocytic compartment. Although several endocytic pathways have been characterized in neurons, the molecular mechanism underpinning the uptake of BoNTs at the presynaptic nerve terminal is still unclear. Here, a recombinant BoNT/A heavy chain binding domain (Hc) was used to unravel the internalization pathway by fluorescence and electron microscopy. BoNT/A-Hc initially enters cultured hippocampal neurons in an activity-dependent manner into synaptic vesicles and clathrin-coated vesicles before also entering endosomal structures and multivesicular bodies. We found that inhibiting dynamin with the novel potent Dynasore analog, Dyngo-4aTM, was sufficient to abolish BoNT/A-Hc internalization and BoNT/A-induced SNAP25 cleavage in hippocampal neurons. Dyngo-4a also interfered with BoNT/A-Hc internalization into motor nerve terminals. Furthermore, Dyngo-4a afforded protection against BoNT/A-induced paralysis at the rat hemidiaphragm. A significant delay of >30% in the onset of botulism was observed in mice injected with Dyngo-4a. Dynamin inhibition therefore provides a therapeutic avenue for the treatment of botulism and other diseases caused by pathogens sharing dynamin-dependent uptake mechanisms. PMID:21832053

  14. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Sensitive Detection and Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Luisa W.; Henderson, Thomas D.; Lam, Tina I.; Stanker, Larry H.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of nature’s most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination, and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay for BoNT/B, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) MCS6-27 and anti-BoNT/B rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture and detector. The ECL assay detected as little as 1 pg/mL BoNT/B in the buffer matrix, surpassing the detection sensitivities of the gold standard mouse bioassays. The ECL assay also allowed detection of BoNT/B in sera matrices of up to 100% sera with negligible matrix effects. This highly-sensitive assay allowed the determination of the biological half-lives of BoNT/B holotoxin in vivo. We further tested the toxin neutralization potential of our monoclonal antibodies using the mouse systemic and oral intoxication models. A combination of mAbs protected mice in both pre- and post-exposure models to lethal doses of BoNT/B. MAbs were capable of increasing survival of animals when administered even 10 h post-intoxication in an oral model, suggesting a likely time for BoNT/B complexes to reach the blood stream. More sensitive detection assays and treatments against BoNT intoxication will greatly enhance efforts to combat botulism. PMID:26633496

  15. Plasma membrane localization signals in the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Steward, Lance E.; Ho, Helen; Garay, Patton E.; Sun, Sarah W.; Gilmore, Marcella A.; Ordas, Joseph V.; Wang, Joanne; Francis, Joseph; Aoki, K. Roger

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a potent biological substance used to treat neuromuscular and pain disorders. Both BoNT type A and BoNT type E display high-affinity uptake into motor neurons and inhibit exocytosis through cleavage of the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25). The therapeutic effects of BoNT/A last from 3 to 12 months, whereas the effects of BoNT/E last less than 4 weeks. Using confocal microscopy and site-specific mutagenesis, we have determined that the protease domain of BoNT/A light chain (BoNT/A-LC) localizes in a punctate manner to the plasma membrane, colocalizing with the cleaved product, SNAP25197. In contrast, the short-duration BoNT/E serotype is cytoplasmic. Mutations in the BoNT/A-LC have revealed sequences at the N terminus necessary for plasma membrane localization, and an active dileucine motif in the C terminus that is likely involved in trafficking and interaction with adaptor proteins. These data support sequence-specific signals as determinants of intracellular localization and as a basis for the different durations of action in these two BoNT serotypes. PMID:14982988

  16. Structure of a Bimodular Botulinum Neurotoxin Complex Provides Insights into Its Oral Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lei; Le, Thi Tuc Nghi; Cheng, Luisa W.; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Yao, Guorui; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by Clostridium botulinum and cause the fatal disease botulism, a flaccid paralysis of the muscle. BoNTs are released together with several auxiliary proteins as progenitor toxin complexes (PTCs) to become highly potent oral poisons. Here, we report the structure of a ∼760 kDa 14-subunit large PTC of serotype A (L-PTC/A) and reveal insight into its absorption mechanism. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and functional studies, we found that L-PTC/A consists of two structurally and functionally independent sub-complexes. A hetero-dimeric 290 kDa complex protects BoNT, while a hetero-dodecameric 470 kDa complex facilitates its absorption in the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. BoNT absorption is mediated by nine glycan-binding sites on the dodecameric sub-complex that forms multivalent interactions with carbohydrate receptors on intestinal epithelial cells. We identified monosaccharides that blocked oral BoNT intoxication in mice, which suggests a new strategy for the development of preventive countermeasures for BoNTs based on carbohydrate receptor mimicry. PMID:24130488

  17. Epitope Characterization of Sero-Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Ballegeer, Erin; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Elias, M.D.; Al-Saleem, Fetweh H.; Ancharski, Denise M.; Simpson, Lance L.; Berry, Jody D.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that can contaminate foods and are a public health concern. Anti-BoNT antibodies have been described that are capable of detecting BoNTs; however there still exists a need for accurate and sensitive detection capabilities for BoNTs. Herein, we describe the characterization of a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated to the non-toxic receptor-binding domain of BoNT/A (HC50/A) developed using a high-throughput screening approach. In two independent hybridoma fusions, two groups of four IgG MAbs were developed against recombinant HC50/A. Of these eight, only a single MAb, F90G5-3, bound to the whole BoNT/A protein and was characterized further. The F90G5-3 MAb slightly prolonged time to death in an in vivo mouse bioassay and was mapped by pepscan to a peptide epitope in the N-terminal subdomain of HC50/A (HCN25/A) comprising amino acid residues 985WTLQDTQEIKQRVVF999, an epitope that is highly immunoreactive in humans. Furthermore, we demonstrate that F90G5-3 binds BoNT/A with nanomolar efficiency. Together, our results indicate that F90G5-3 is of potential value as a diagnostic immunoreagent for BoNT/A capture assay development and bio-forensic analysis. PMID:22149274

  18. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Sensitive Detection and Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Luisa W; Henderson, Thomas D; Lam, Tina I; Stanker, Larry H

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of nature's most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination, and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay for BoNT/B, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) MCS6-27 and anti-BoNT/B rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture and detector. The ECL assay detected as little as 1 pg/mL BoNT/B in the buffer matrix, surpassing the detection sensitivities of the gold standard mouse bioassays. The ECL assay also allowed detection of BoNT/B in sera matrices of up to 100% sera with negligible matrix effects. This highly-sensitive assay allowed the determination of the biological half-lives of BoNT/B holotoxin in vivo. We further tested the toxin neutralization potential of our monoclonal antibodies using the mouse systemic and oral intoxication models. A combination of mAbs protected mice in both pre- and post-exposure models to lethal doses of BoNT/B. MAbs were capable of increasing survival of animals when administered even 10 h post-intoxication in an oral model, suggesting a likely time for BoNT/B complexes to reach the blood stream. More sensitive detection assays and treatments against BoNT intoxication will greatly enhance efforts to combat botulism. PMID:26633496

  19. Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne botulism is caused by the ingestion of foods containing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). Currently, the only accepted assay to detect active C. botulinum neurotoxin is an in vivo mouse bioassay, which raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. Therefore, there is...

  20. Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the causative agents of botulism, are among the most lethal human bacterial toxins and the causative agent of botulism. BoNTs are also classified as Select Agents ...

  1. Cloning and purification of alpha-neurotoxins from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah).

    PubMed

    He, Ying-Ying; Lee, Wei-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2004-09-01

    Thirteen complete and three partial cDNA sequences were cloned from the constructed king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom gland cDNA library. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of king cobra with those from other snake venoms revealed that obtained cDNAs are highly homologous to snake venom alpha-neurotoxins. Alignment of deduced mature peptide sequences of the obtained clones with those of other reported alpha-neurotoxins from the king cobra venom indicates that our obtained 16 clones belong to long-chain neurotoxins (seven), short-chain neurotoxins (seven), weak toxin (one) and variant (one), respectively. Up to now, two out of 16 newly cloned king cobra alpha-neurotoxins have identical amino acid sequences with CM-11 and Oh-6A/6B, which have been characterized from the same venom. Furthermore, five long-chain alpha-neurotoxins and two short-chain alpha-neurotoxins were purified from crude venom and their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. The cDNAs encoding the putative precursors of the purified native peptide were also determined based on the N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The purified alpha-neurotoxins showed different lethal activities on mice. PMID:15302536

  2. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype a and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins and considered to be a major venue of bioterrorist threat. BoNTs associate with neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs), forming large complexes. NAPs have been shown to shield the BoNT holotoxin from the harsh environment of ...

  3. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs). The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presenc...

  4. Sequence homology and structural analysis of the clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lacy, D B; Stevens, R C

    1999-09-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs), comprised of tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT A-G), specifically bind to neuronal cells and disrupt neurotransmitter release by cleaving proteins involved in synaptic vesicle membrane fusion. In this study, multiple CNT sequences were analyzed within the context of the 1277 residue BoNT/A crystal structure to gain insight into the events of binding, pore formation, translocation, and catalysis that are required for toxicity. A comparison of the TeNT-binding domain structure to that of BoNT/A reveals striking differences in their surface properties. Further, the solvent accessibility of a key tryptophan in the C terminus of the BoNT/A-binding domain refines the location of the ganglioside-binding site. Data collected from a single frozen crystal of BoNT/A are included in this study, revealing slight differences in the binding domain orientation as well as density for a previously unobserved translocation domain loop. This loop and the conservation of charged residues with structural proximity to putative pore-forming sequences lend insight into the CNT mechanism of pore formation and translocation. The sequence analysis of the catalytic domain revealed an area near the active-site likely to account for specificity differences between the CNTs. It revealed also a tertiary structure, highly conserved in primary sequence, which seems critical to catalysis but is 30 A from the active-site zinc ion. This observation, along with an analysis of the 54 residue "belt" from the translocation domain are discussed with respect to the mechanism of catalysis. PMID:10518945

  5. Molecular Structures and Functional Relationships in Clostridial Neurotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan S.

    2011-12-01

    The seven serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (A-G) are the deadliest poison known to humans. They share significant sequence homology and hence possess similar structure-function relationships. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) act via a four-step mechanism, viz., binding and internalization to neuronal cells, translocation of the catalytic domain into the cytosol and finally cleavage of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) causing blockage of neurotransmitter release leading to flaccid paralysis. Crystal structures of three holotoxins, BoNT/A, B and E, are available to date. Although the individual domains are remarkably similar, their domain organization is different. These structures have helped in correlating the structural and functional domains. This has led to the determination of structures of individual domains and combinations of them. Crystal structures of catalytic domains of all serotypes and several binding domains are now available. The catalytic domains are zinc endopeptidases and share significant sequence and structural homology. The active site architecture and the catalytic mechanism are similar although the binding mode of individual substrates may be different, dictating substrate specificity and peptide cleavage selectivity. Crystal structures of catalytic domains with substrate peptides provide clues to specificity and selectivity unique to BoNTs. Crystal structures of the receptor domain in complex with ganglioside or the protein receptor have provided information about the binding of botulinum neurotoxin to the neuronal cell. An overview of the structure-function relationship correlating the 3D structures with biochemical and biophysical data and how they can be used for structure-based drug discovery is presented here.

  6. Serological identification of botulinum neurotoxins: A critical overview.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Domingo F

    2016-08-01

    The reasons that gave rise to the controversy over the serological method (SerM) and genetics regarding the identification of an alleged novel botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), type H, have been concisely examined. This discussion will remain opened inasmuch as the SerM is not performed according to the recommended procedures outlined in this overview and thoroughly discussed on previous publications. If correctly performed and interpreted, the SerM will keep its preeminence in the identification, typing and taxonomy of BoNTs. PMID:27130373

  7. Sensing the Deadliest Toxin: Technologies for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    PubMed Central

    Čapek, Petr; Dickerson, Tobin J.

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and rapid detection of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous substances known to date, is essential for studies of medical applications of BoNTs and detection of poisoned food, as well as for response to potential bioterrorist threats. Currently, the most common method of BoNT detection is the mouse bioassay. While this assay is sensitive, it is slow, quite expensive, has limited throughput and requires sacrificing animals. Herein, we discuss and compare recently developed alternative in vitro detection methods and assess their ability to supplement or replace the mouse bioassay in the analysis of complex matrix samples. PMID:22069545

  8. Marine Toxins Potently Affecting Neurotransmitter Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Frédéric A.; Mattei, César; Molgó, Jordi

    Synapses are specialised structures where interneuronal communication takes place. Not only brain function is absolutely dependent on synaptic activity, but also most of our organs are intimately controlled by synaptic activity. Synapses re therefore an ideal target to act upon and poisonous species have evolved fascinating neurotoxins capable of shutting down neuronal communication by blocking or activating essential components of the synapse. By hijacking key proteins of the communication machinery, neurotoxins are therefore extremely valuable tools that have, in turn, greatly helped our understanding of synaptic biology. Moreover, analysis and understanding of the molecular strategy used by certain neurotoxins has allowed the design of entirely new classes of drugs acting on specific targets with high selectivity and efficacy. This chapter will discuss the different classes of marine neurotoxins, their effects on neurotransmitter release and how they act to incapacitate key steps in the process leading to synaptic vesicle fusion.

  9. 4-Amino-7-chloroquinolines: probing ligand efficiency provides botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain inhibitors with significant antiprotozoal activity

    PubMed Central

    Opsenica, Igor M.; Tot, Mikloš; Gomba, Laura; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Bavari, Sina; Burnett, James C.; Šolaja, Bogdan A.

    2013-01-01

    Structurally simplified analogs of dual antimalarial and botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A LC) inhibitor bis-aminoquinoline (1) were prepared. New compounds were designed to improve ligand efficiency while maintaining or exceeding the inhibitory potency of 1. Three of the new compounds are more active than 1 against both indications. Metabolically, the new inhibitors are relatively stable and non-toxic. Twelve, 14, and 15 are more potent BoNT/A LC inhibitors than 1. Additionally, 15 has excellent in vitro antimalarial efficacy, with IC90 values ranging from 4.45-12.11 nM against five Plasmodium falciparum (P.f.) strains: W2, D6, C235, C2A, C2B. The results indicate that the same level of inhibitory efficacy provided by 1 can be retained/exceeded with less structural complexity. Twelve, 14, and 15 provide new platforms for the development of more potent dual BoNT/A LC and P.f. inhibitors adhering to generally accepted chemical properties associated with the druggability of synthetic molecules. PMID:23815186

  10. Botulinum neurotoxin A and an engineered derivate targeted secretion inhibitor (TSI) A enter cells via different vesicular compartments.

    PubMed

    Fonfria, Elena; Donald, Sarah; Cadd, Verity A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent multi-domain proteins, responsible for botulism in animals and humans. The modular structural organization of BoNTs has led to the development of novel engineered bio-therapeutic proteins called targeted secretion inhibitors (TSIs). We report here that botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) and a TSI/A in which the neuronal binding domain of BoNT/A has been substituted by an epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand, named EGFR-targeted TSI/A, exploit different routes to gain entry in the same in vitro neuroblastoma cell system, SiMa cells. We found that the EGF ligand conferred the affinity to the EGFR-targeted TSI/A at the EGF receptor when compared to an untargeted TSI/A and also the ability to internalize into the cells and cleave its cytosolic target protein SNAP-25. Using high content analysis we found that both BoNT/A and the EGFR-targeted TSI/A enter the cell in a concentration-dependent manner and in compartments which are able to translocate the proteins into the cytosol within 4 h. The EGFR-targeted TSI/A internalized into a compartment which gave a punctate staining pattern by immunofluorescence and partially overlapped with structures positive for the early endosomal marker EAA1; whereas BoNT/A did not internalize into a punctate compartment but did so in an acidifying compartment consistent with local synaptic vesicle recycling. These findings show that the BoNT/A translocation domain, common to both BoNT/A and the EGFR-targeted TSI/A, is a versatile tool for cytosolic delivery from distinct intracellular vesicular compartments. PMID:26329879

  11. Neurotoxin quantum dot conjugates detect endogenous targets expressed in live cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Orndorff, Rebecca L; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2009-07-01

    High affinity peptide neurotoxins are effective agents for integrating technological advances with biological inquiries. Both chlorotoxin (CTX) and dendrotoxin-1 (DTX-1) are peptide neurotoxins demonstrated to bind targets expressed by glioma cancer cells and are suitable ligands for quantum dot (QD) live cell investigations. Here, we present dual labeling of endogenously expressed cellular proteins within living cells utilizing high affinity peptide neurotoxins conjugated to QDs. Multiplexing experiments reveal quantifiable evidence that CTX and DTX-1 conjugated QDs may potentially be used as a live assessment of markers toward identification of cancer cell presence. PMID:19507837

  12. Complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 isolated from an infant patient in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Koji; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Kohda, Tomoko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Umeda, Kaoru; Iida, Tetsuya; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent toxins that are produced by Clostridium botulinum. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to obtain an insight into the toxigenicity and evolution of the bont gene in C. botulinum. Group I C. botulinum type B strain 111 was isolated from the first case of infant botulism in Japan in 1995. In previous studies, botulinum neurotoxin subtype B2 (BoNT/B2) produced by strain 111 exhibited different antigenic properties from those of authentic BoNT/B1 produced by strain Okra. We have recently shown that the isolates of strain 111 that lost toxigenicity were cured of the plasmid containing the bont/B2 gene. In the present study, the plasmid (named pCB111) was circular 265,575 bp double-stranded DNA and contained 332 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). 85 gene products of these ORFs could be functionally assigned on the basis of sequence homology to known proteins. The bont/B2 complex genes were located on pCB111 and some gene products may be involved in the conjugative plasmid transfer and horizontal transfer of bont genes. pCB111 was similar to previously identified plasmids containing bont/B1, /B5, or/A3 complex genes in other group I C. botulinum strains. It was suggested that these plasmids had been derived from a common ancestor and had played important roles for the bont gene transfer between C. botulinum. PMID:25149145

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit the Proteolytic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongfeng; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Geren, Isin N; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A; Marks, James D

    2015-09-01

    Existing antibodies (Abs) used to treat botulism cannot enter the cytosol of neurons and bind to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) at its site of action, and thus cannot reverse paralysis. However, Abs targeting the proteolytic domain of the toxin could inhibit the proteolytic activity of the toxin intracellularly and potentially reverse intoxication, if they could be delivered intracellularly. As such, antibodies that neutralize toxin activity could serve as potent inhibitory cargos for therapeutic antitoxins against botulism. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B) contains a zinc endopeptidase light chain (LC) domain that cleaves synaoptobrevin-2, a SNARE protein responsible for vesicle fusion and acetylcholine vesicle release. To generate monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis, we targeted the protease domain for Ab generation. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized mice or humans were displayed on yeast, and 19 unique BoNT/B LC-specific mAbs isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of these mAbs for BoNT/B LC ranged from 0.24 nM to 14.3 nM (mean KD 3.27 nM). Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/B LC proteolytic activity. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that inhibitory mAbs bound near the active site, substrate-binding site or the extended substrate-binding site. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis and identify epitopes that could be targeted by small molecules inhibitors. PMID:26343720

  14. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Induces TLR2-Mediated Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Lee, Kwang-Jun; Choi, Myung-Min; Kim, Yeon Hee; Rhie, Gi-eun; Yoo, Cheon-Kwon; Cha, Kiweon; Shin, Na-Ri

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is the most potent protein toxin and causes fatal flaccid muscle paralysis by blocking neurotransmission. Application of BoNT/A has been extended to the fields of therapeutics and biodefense. Nevertheless, the global response of host immune cells to authentic BoNT/A has not been reported. Employing microarray analysis, we performed global transcriptional profiling of RAW264.7 cells, a murine alveolar macrophage cell line. We identified 70 genes that were modulated following 1 nM BoNT/A treatment. The altered genes were mainly involved in signal transduction, immunity and defense, protein metabolism and modification, neuronal activities, intracellular protein trafficking, and muscle contraction. Microarray data were validated with real-time RT-PCR for seven selected genes including tlr2, tnf, inos, ccl4, slpi, stx11, and irg1. Proinflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) were induced in a dose-dependent manner in BoNT/A-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Increased expression of these factors was inhibited by monoclonal anti-Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and inhibitors specific to intracellular proteins such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen–activated protein kinase (MAPK). BoNT/A also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced NO and TNFα production from RAW264.7 macrophages at the transcription level by blocking activation of JNK, ERK, and p38 MAPK. As confirmed by TLR2-/- knock out experiments, these results suggest that BoNT/A induces global gene expression changes in host immune cells and that host responses to BoNT/A proceed through a TLR2-dependent pathway, which is modulated by JNK, ERK, and p38 MAPK. PMID:25853816

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit the Proteolytic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Geren, Isin N.; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Marks, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Existing antibodies (Abs) used to treat botulism cannot enter the cytosol of neurons and bind to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) at its site of action, and thus cannot reverse paralysis. However, Abs targeting the proteolytic domain of the toxin could inhibit the proteolytic activity of the toxin intracellularly and potentially reverse intoxication, if they could be delivered intracellularly. As such, antibodies that neutralize toxin activity could serve as potent inhibitory cargos for therapeutic antitoxins against botulism. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B) contains a zinc endopeptidase light chain (LC) domain that cleaves synaoptobrevin-2, a SNARE protein responsible for vesicle fusion and acetylcholine vesicle release. To generate monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis, we targeted the protease domain for Ab generation. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized mice or humans were displayed on yeast, and 19 unique BoNT/B LC-specific mAbs isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of these mAbs for BoNT/B LC ranged from 0.24 nM to 14.3 nM (mean KD 3.27 nM). Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/B LC proteolytic activity. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that inhibitory mAbs bound near the active site, substrate-binding site or the extended substrate-binding site. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis and identify epitopes that could be targeted by small molecules inhibitors. PMID:26343720

  16. Endogenous dynorphin protects against neurotoxin-elicited nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron damage and motor deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The striato-nigral projecting pathway contains the highest concentrations of dynorphin in the brain. The functional role of this opioid peptide in the regulation of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is not clear. We reported previously that exogenous dynorphin exerts potent neuroprotective effects against inflammation-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vitro. The present study was performed to investigate whether endogenous dynorphin has neuroprotective roles in vivo. Methods 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and methamphetamine (MA), two commonly used neurotoxins in rodent models of Parkinson’s disease, were administered to wild-type (Dyn+/+) and prodynorphin-deficient mice (Dyn−/−). We examined dopaminergic neurotoxicity by using an automated video tracking system, HPLC, immunocytochemistry, and reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Treatment with MPTP resulted in behavioral impairments in both strains. However, these impairments were more pronounced in Dyn-l- than in Dyn+/+. Dyn−/− showed more severe MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and striatum than Dyn+/+. Similarly, the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum were depleted to a greater extent in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Additional mechanistic studies revealed that MPTP treatment caused a higher degree of microglial activation and M1 phenotype differentiation in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Consistent with these observations, prodynorphin deficiency also exacerbated neurotoxic effects induced by MA, although this effect was less pronounced than that of MPTP. Conclusions The in vivo results presented here extend our previous in vitro findings and further indicate that endogenous dynorphin plays a critical role in protecting dopaminergic neurons through its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22695044

  17. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Ken; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Miyata, Keita; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Suzuki, Tomonori; Shikamori, Yasuyuki; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  18. Discovery of Nuclear-Encoded Genes for the Neurotoxin Saxitoxin in Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J. S.; Kellmann, Ralf; Murray, Shauna A.; Neilan, Brett A.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes required for saxitoxin synthesis are encoded in the nuclear genomes of dinoflagellates. We sequenced >1.2×106 mRNA transcripts from the two saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellate strains Alexandrium fundyense CCMP1719 and A. minutum CCMP113 using high-throughput sequencing technology. In addition, we used in silico transcriptome analyses, RACE, qPCR and conventional PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing. These approaches successfully identified genes required for saxitoxin-synthesis in the two transcriptomes. We focused on sxtA, the unique starting gene of saxitoxin synthesis, and show that the dinoflagellate transcripts of sxtA have the same domain structure as the cyanobacterial sxtA genes. But, in contrast to the bacterial homologs, the dinoflagellate transcripts are monocistronic, have a higher GC content, occur in multiple copies, contain typical dinoflagellate spliced-leader sequences and eukaryotic polyA-tails. Further, we investigated 28 saxitoxin-producing and non-producing dinoflagellate strains from six different genera for the presence of genomic sxtA homologs. Our results show very good agreement between the presence of sxtA and saxitoxin-synthesis, except in three strains of A. tamarense, for which we amplified sxtA, but did not detect the toxin. Our work opens for possibilities to develop molecular tools to detect saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellates in the environment. PMID:21625593

  19. Solubility of the catalytic domains of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent protein toxins known to humans. There are seven serotypes of the BoNTs (A-G), among which serotypes A, B, E and F are known to cause natural human intoxication. To date, eleven subtypes of LC/E, termed E1∼E11, have been identified. The LCs of BoNT/E were insoluble, prohibiting studies towards understanding the mechanisms of toxin action and substrate recognition. In this work, the molecular basis of insolubility of the recombinant LCs of two representative subtypes of BoNT/E, E1(Beluga) and E3 (Alaska), was determined. Hydrophobicity profile and structural modeling predicted a C-terminal candidate region responsible for the insolubility of LC/Es. Deletion of C-terminal 19 residues of LC/E(1-400) resulted in enhanced solubility, from 2 to ∼50% for LC/EAlaska and from 16 to ∼95% for LC/EBeluga. In addition, resides 230-236 were found to contribute to a different solubility level of LC/EAlaska when compared to LC/EBeluga. Substituting residues (230)TCI(232) in LC/EAlaska to the corresponding residues of (230)KYT(232) in LC/EBeluga enhanced the solubility of LC/EAlaska to a level approaching that of LC/EBeluga. Among these LC/Es and their derivatives, LC/EBeluga 1-400 was the most soluble and stable protein. Each LC/E derivative possessed similar catalytic activity, suggesting that the C-terminal region of LC/Es contributed to protein solubility, but not catalytic activity. In conclusion, this study generated a soluble and stable recombinant LC/E and provided insight into the structural components that govern the solubility and stability of the LCs of other BoNT serotypes and Tetanus toxin. PMID:26477500

  20. Expression and biochemical characterization of light chains of Botulinum neurotoxin subtypes F5 and F7.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chen, Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most potent protein toxins known to human. To date, seven subtypes of the BoNT/F serotype (BoNT/F1 to BoNT/F7) have been identified, among which BoNT/F5 and BoNT/F7 are the most divergent. However, little structural and functional information is available for these two subtypes due to a lack of suitable recombinant proteins for biochemical characterization, except that they appear to possess unique substrate recognition mechanisms, thereby impeding development of vaccine or inhibitors against these proteins. In the present study, we utilized a combinatorial approach which involved examining the effects of different affinity tags, mapping C-terminal truncation mutants and optimization of expression and purification conditions, that allowed us to successfully express and purify soluble and highly active recombinant LC/F5 and LC/F7 proteins. GST-LC/F5(1-450) and 6× His-LC/F5(1-405) were the formats which exhibit the highest level of solubility and activity, whereas GST-LC/F7(1-405) was the most active form of LC/F7. In comparison, GST-LC/F5(1-450) was more active than GST-LC/F7(1-405), which was in turn more active than the LC/F1 control. Our data suggest that solubility of these proteins strongly correlated with their catalytic activity. Successful expression and purification of LC/F5 and LC/F7 in this work will, for the first time, provide materials for further characterization of these two subtypes of BoNT/F, which is essential for future development of protective vaccine or other therapeutic strategies, as well as BoNT/F protein engineering. PMID:25858313

  1. Widespread Sequence Variations in VAMP1 across Vertebrates Suggest a Potential Selective Pressure from Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H.; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A.; Sawyer, Sara L.; Dong, Min

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, suggesting a potential selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates. PMID:25010769

  2. Widespread sequence variations in VAMP1 across vertebrates suggest a potential selective pressure from botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lisheng; Adler, Michael; Demogines, Ann; Borrell, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Tao, Liang; Tepp, William H; Zhang, Su-Chun; Johnson, Eric A; Sawyer, Sara L; Dong, Min

    2014-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A-G), the most potent toxins known, act by cleaving three SNARE proteins required for synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Previous studies on BoNTs have generally utilized the major SNARE homologues expressed in brain (VAMP2, syntaxin 1, and SNAP-25). However, BoNTs target peripheral motor neurons and cause death by paralyzing respiratory muscles such as the diaphragm. Here we report that VAMP1, but not VAMP2, is the SNARE homologue predominantly expressed in adult rodent diaphragm motor nerve terminals and in differentiated human motor neurons. In contrast to the highly conserved VAMP2, BoNT-resistant variations in VAMP1 are widespread across vertebrates. In particular, we identified a polymorphism at position 48 of VAMP1 in rats, which renders VAMP1 either resistant (I48) or sensitive (M48) to BoNT/D. Taking advantage of this finding, we showed that rat diaphragms with I48 in VAMP1 are insensitive to BoNT/D compared to rat diaphragms with M48 in VAMP1. This unique intra-species comparison establishes VAMP1 as a physiological toxin target in diaphragm motor nerve terminals, and demonstrates that the resistance of VAMP1 to BoNTs can underlie the insensitivity of a species to members of BoNTs. Consistently, human VAMP1 contains I48, which may explain why humans are insensitive to BoNT/D. Finally, we report that residue 48 of VAMP1 varies frequently between M and I across seventeen closely related primate species, suggesting a potential selective pressure from members of BoNTs for resistance in vertebrates. PMID:25010769

  3. Botulinum Neurotoxin Is Shielded by NTNHA in an Interlocked Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Shenyan; Rumpel, Sophie; Zhou, Jie; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Bigalke, Hans; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2012-03-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly poisonous substances that are also effective medicines. Accidental BoNT poisoning often occurs through ingestion of Clostridium botulinum-contaminated food. Here, we present the crystal structure of a BoNT in complex with a clostridial nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA) protein at 2.7 angstroms. Biochemical and functional studies show that NTNHA provides large and multivalent binding interfaces to protect BoNT from gastrointestinal degradation. Moreover, the structure highlights key residues in BoNT that regulate complex assembly in a pH-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings define the molecular mechanisms by which NTNHA shields BoNT in the hostile gastrointestinal environment and releases it upon entry into the circulation. These results will assist in the design of small molecules for inhibiting oral BoNT intoxication and of delivery vehicles for oral administration of biologics.

  4. Botulinum neurotoxin: where are we with detection technologies?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Stanker, Larry H; Sharma, Shashi K

    2013-02-01

    Because of its high toxicity, botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) poses a significant risk to humans and it represents a possible biological warfare agent. Nevertheless, BoNT serotypes A and B are considered an effective treatment for a variety of neurological disorders. The growing applicability of BoNT as a drug, and its potential use as a biological threat agent, highlight the urgent need to develop sensitive detection assays and therapeutic counter measures. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in BoNT detection technologies but none have fully replaced the mouse lethality assay, the current "gold standard". Recently, new advances in robotics and the availability of new reagents have allowed development of methods for rapid toxin analysis. These technologies while promising need further refinement. PMID:22676403

  5. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  6. Immunological Characterization and Neutralizing Ability of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against Botulinum Neurotoxin Type H

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Barash, Jason R.; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Marks, James D.; Arnon, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Only Clostridium botulinum strain IBCA10-7060 produces the recently described novel botulinum neurotoxin type H (BoNT/H). BoNT/H (N-terminal two-thirds most homologous to BoNT/F and C-terminal one-third most homologous to BoNT/A) requires antitoxin to toxin ratios ≥1190:1 for neutralization by existing antitoxins. Hence, more potent and safer antitoxins against BoNT/H are needed. Methods. We therefore evaluated our existing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to BoNT/A and BoNT/F for BoNT/H binding, created yeast-displayed mutants to select for higher-affinity-binding mAbs by using flow cytometry, and evaluated the mAbs' ability to neutralize BoNT/H in the standard mouse bioassay. Results. Anti-BoNT/A HCC-binding mAbs RAZ1 and CR2 bound BoNT/H with high affinity. However, only 1 of 6 BoNT/F mAbs (4E17.2A) bound BoNT/H but with an affinity >800-fold lower (equilibrium dissociation binding constant [KD] = 7.56 × 10−8 M) than its BoNT/F affinity (KD = 9.1 × 10−11 M), indicating that the N-terminal two-thirds of BoNT/H is immunologically unique. The affinity of 4E17.2A for BoNT/H was increased >500-fold to KD = 1.48 × 10−10 M (mAb 4E17.2D). A combination of mAbs RAZ1, CR2, and 4E17.2D completely protected mice challenged with 280 mouse median lethal doses of BoNT/H at a mAb dose as low as 5 µg of total antibody. Conclusions. This 3-mAb combination potently neutralized BoNT/H and represents a potential human antitoxin that could be developed for the prevention and treatment of type H botulism. PMID:26936913

  7. Genetic Diversity Among Botulinum Neurotoxin Producing Clostridial Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K K; Smith, T J; Helma, C H; Ticknor, L O; Foley, B T; Svennson, R T; Brown, J L; Johnson, E A; Smith, L A; Okinaka, R T; Jackson, P J; Marks, J D

    2006-07-06

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation for many diverse anaerobic spore forming rod-shaped bacteria which have the common property of producing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The BoNTs are exoneurotoxins that can cause severe paralysis and even death in humans and various other animal species. A collection of 174 C. botulinum strains were examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and BoNT genes to examine genetic diversity within this species. This collection contained representatives of each of the seven different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT A-G). Analysis of the16S rRNA sequences confirmed earlier reports of at least four distinct genomic backgrounds (Groups I-IV) each of which has independently acquired one or more BoNT serotypes through horizontal gene transfer. AFLP analysis provided higher resolution, and can be used to further subdivide the four groups into sub-groups. Sequencing of the BoNT genes from serotypes A, B and E in multiple strains confirmed significant sequence variation within each serotype. Four distinct lineages within each of the BoNT A and B serotypes, and five distinct lineages of serotype E strains were identified. The nucleotide sequences of the seven serotypes of BoNT were compared and show varying degrees of interrelatedness and recombination as has been previously noted for the NTNH gene which is linked to BoNT. These analyses contribute to the understanding of the evolution and phylogeny within this species and assist in the development of improved diagnostics and therapeutics for treatment of botulism.

  8. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody.

    PubMed

    Derman, Yağmur; Selby, Katja; Miethe, Sebastian; Frenzel, André; Liu, Yvonne; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Thullier, Philippe; Sesardic, Dorothea; Lindström, Miia; Hust, Michael; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis)-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18) by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E). In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD) in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans. PMID:27626446

  9. Structure-based sequence alignment for the beta-trefoil subdomain of the clostridial neurotoxin family provides residue level information about the putative ganglioside binding site.

    PubMed

    Ginalski, K; Venclovas, C; Lesyng, B; Fidelis, K

    2000-09-29

    Clostridial neurotoxins embrace a family of extremely potent toxins comprised of tetanus toxin (TeNT) and seven different serotypes of botulinum toxin (BoNT/A-G). The beta-trefoil subdomain of the C-terminal part of the heavy chain (H(C)), responsible for ganglioside binding, is the most divergent region in clostridial neurotoxins with sequence identity as low as 15%. We re-examined the alignment between family sequences within this subdomain, since in this region all alignments published to date show obvious inconsistencies with the beta-trefoil fold. The final alignment was obtained by considering the general constraints imposed by this fold, and homology modeling studies based on the TeNT structure. Recently solved structures of BoNT/A confirm the validity of this structure-based approach. Taking into account biochemical data and crystal structures of TeNT and BoNT/A, we also re-examined the location of the putative ganglioside binding site and, using the new alignment, characterized this site in other BoNT serotypes. PMID:11018534

  10. [Neurotoxins with anticholinesterase activity and their possible use as warfare agents].

    PubMed

    Pita, René; Anadón, Arturo; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa

    2003-10-18

    Anatoxin-a(s), onchidal and fasciculins are neurotoxins with anticholinesterase activity. An intoxication by these neurotoxins is characterized by cholinergic syndromes similar to organophosphate insecticide and nerve agent intoxications. Anticholinesterase neurotoxins, as well as other toxins, have some disadvantages if used as weapons of mass destruction. Drawbacks include difficulties to produce them in big quantities and their dissemination in form of aerosols. However, other properties such as high toxicity, improbable identification with common commercial portable detectors for chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals, as well as the lack of effectiveness of antidotal treatments with oximes may make them attractive in order to be used in military operations or terrorist attacks. For these reasons, it should be necessary to control these neurotoxins through international treaties which have real verification measures such as the Chemical Weapons Convention. PMID:14588195

  11. Purification and characterization of a neurotoxin from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra).

    PubMed

    Chang, Long-Sen; Liou, Jau-Cheng; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Huang, Hsien-Bin

    2002-06-14

    A neurotoxin, Oh9-1, from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah was isolated by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that Oh9-1 consists of 57 amino acids and eight cysteine residues. This protein was mainly constituted with beta-sheet as evidenced by CD spectrum. Oh9-1 inhibited carbachol-induced muscle contraction in an irreversible manner and the dose for achieving 50% inhibition was approximately fourfold that of alpha-bungarotoxin. Since the residues in alpha-neurotoxins closely involve in the binding with acetylcholine receptors are not highly conserved in this toxin molecule, Oh9-1 represents a novel type of neurotoxin structurally distinct from alpha-neurotoxins. PMID:12056805

  12. Detection of the genes encoding botulinum neurotoxin types A to E by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, E A; Pemberton, J M; Desmarchelier, P M

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used as the basis for the development of highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for organisms harboring botulinum neurotoxin type A through E genes. Synthetic DNA primers were selected from nucleic acid sequence data for Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. Individual components of the PCR for each serotype (serotypes A through E) were adjusted for optimal amplification of the target fragment. Each PCR assay was tested with organisms expressing each of the botulinum neurotoxin types (types A through G), Clostridium tetani, genetically related nontoxigenic organisms, and unrelated strains. Each assay was specific for the intended target. The PCR reliably identified multiple strains having the same neurotoxin type. The sensitivity of the test was determined with different concentrations of genomic DNA from strains producing each toxin type. As little as 10 fg of DNA (approximately three clostridial cells) was detected. C. botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E, which are most commonly associated with human botulism, could be amplified from crude DNA extracts, from vegetative cells, and from spore preparations. This suggests that there is great potential for the PCR in the identification and detection of botulinum neurotoxin-producing strains. Images PMID:8215372

  13. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H.; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Dykes, Janet K.; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M.; Pier, Christina L.; Barr, John R.; Maslanka, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated “type H,” has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 107 mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes

  14. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R; Dykes, Janet K; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M; Pier, Christina L; Barr, John R; Maslanka, Susan E; Johnson, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated "type H," has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 10(7) mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes, serotypes A

  15. Novel co-operation between eotaxin and substance-P in inducing eosinophil-derived neurotoxin release.

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, A; Ishikawa, T

    1999-01-01

    Eosinophils, chemokines, and neuropeptides are thought to play effector roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases such as rhinitis. Eotaxin is a novel C-C chemokine with a potent and relatively specific eosinophil chemoattractant activity that binds selectively to CCR3 receptor, however, its activity in inducing eosinophil granules proteins release is poorly characterized. This study was performed to determine whether eotaxin primes eosinophil exocytosis and whether this co-operates with the sensory neuroimmune-axis. In the present communication, we show that 10 ng/ml eotaxin primed normal human eosinophil for exaggerated eosonophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) release stimulated by 10(-8) M Substance-P (SP). This novel priming was blocked by; 7B11 and Herbimycin A (HA), the CCR3 antagonist and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, respectively. SDS-Page studies showed significant tyrosine phosphorylation of several protein residues induced by 10(-8) M SP only after priming with 10 ng/ml eotaxin. These results demonstrate a novel co-operation between eotaxin and SP in inducing eosinophil cytotoxicity, which at least in part involves tyrosine kinases pathway(s). PMID:10704057

  16. Two-Component Systems Are Involved in the Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Synthesis in Clostridium botulinum Type A Strain Hall

    PubMed Central

    Connan, Chloé; Brueggemann, Holger; Mazuet, Christelle; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Cayet, Nadège; Popoff, Michel R.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT) which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs) and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes) have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs. PMID:22848632

  17. N-linked glycosylation of SV2 is required for binding and uptake of botulinum neurotoxin A.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guorui; Zhang, Sicai; Mahrhold, Stefan; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Stern, Daniel; Bagramyan, Karine; Perry, Kay; Kalkum, Markus; Rummel, Andreas; Dong, Min; Jin, Rongsheng

    2016-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A1 (BoNT/A1), a licensed drug widely used for medical and cosmetic applications, exerts its action by invading motoneurons. Here we report a 2.0-Å-resolution crystal structure of the BoNT/A1 receptor-binding domain in complex with its neuronal receptor, glycosylated human SV2C. We found that the neuronal tropism of BoNT/A1 requires recognition of both the peptide moiety and an N-linked glycan on SV2. This N-glycan-which is conserved in all SV2 isoforms across vertebrates-is essential for BoNT/A1 binding to neurons and for its potent neurotoxicity. The glycan-binding interface on SV2 is targeted by a human BoNT/A1-neutralizing antibody currently licensed as an antibotulism drug. Our studies reveal a new paradigm of host-pathogen interactions, in which pathogens exploit conserved host post-translational modifications, thereby achieving highly specific receptor binding while also tolerating genetic changes across multiple isoforms of receptors. PMID:27294781

  18. Effects of COX inhibitors on neurodegeneration and survival in mice exposed to the marine neurotoxin domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James C; Cross, Cheryl A; Van Dolah, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    The marine neurotoxin domoic acid (DA) is a rigid analogue of the neurotransmitter glutamate and a potent agonist of kainate subtype glutamate receptors. Persistent activation of these receptor subtypes results in rapid excitotoxicity, calcium-dependent cell death, and neuronal degeneration in regions of the brain where glutamatergic pathways are concentrated. Previous work has shown that DA promotes the expression of inflammatory genes in the brain, such as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). To investigate the impact of inflammation on the development of neurodegeneration, and ultimately survival following DA administration, we used selective (L745337, Merck) and non-selective (acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)) COX inhibitors in DA exposed mice. Adult male ICR mice were given a regime of either ASA or L23547 both before and after a single LD50 dose of DA. Mice were observed immediately after toxin introduction and then sacrificed at 2 days post exposure. Our lower dose of L23547 increased survival and was most effective at decreasing neuronal degeneration in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, areas especially sensitive to DA excitotoxicity. This study shows that COX2 plays a role in DA induced neurodegeneration and death, and that inhibitors may be of value for treatment in human and wildlife DA exposure. PMID:20934488

  19. A High-throughput-compatible FRET-based Platform for Identification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Light Chain Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Caglič, Dejan; Bompiani, Kristin M.; Krutein, Michelle C.; Čapek, Petr; Dickerson, Tobin J.

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a potent and potentially lethal bacterial toxin that binds to host motor neurons, is internalized into the cell, and cleaves intracellular proteins that are essential for neurotransmitter release. BoNT is comprised of a heavy chain (HC), which mediates host cell binding and internalization, and a light chain (LC), which cleaves intracellular host proteins essential for acetylcholine release. While therapies that inhibit toxin binding/internalization have a small time window of administration, compounds that target intracellular LC activity have a much larger time window of administrations, particularly relevant given the extremely long half-life of the toxin. In recent years, small molecules have been heavily analyzed as potential LC inhibitors based on their increased cellular permeability relative to larger therapeutics (peptides, aptamers, etc.). Lead identification often involves high-throughput screening (HTS), where large libraries of small molecules are screened based on their ability to modulate therapeutic target function. Here we describe a FRET-based assay with a commercial BoNT/A LC substrate and recombinant LC that can be automated for HTS of potential BoNT inhibitors. Moreover, we describe a manual technique that can be used for follow-up secondary screening, or for comparing the potency of several candidate compounds. PMID:24430674

  20. In vitro potency determination of botulinum neurotoxin B based on its receptor-binding and proteolytic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wild, Emina; Bonifas, Ursula; Klimek, Jolanta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Krämer, Beate; Kegel, Birgit; Behrensdorf-Nicol, Heike A

    2016-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent toxins known. However, the paralytic effect caused by BoNT serotypes A and B is taken advantage of to treat different forms of dystonia and in cosmetic procedures. Due to the increasing areas of application, the demand for BoNTs A and B is rising steadily. Because of the high toxicity, it is mandatory to precisely determine the potency of every produced BoNT batch, which is usually accomplished by performing toxicity testing (LD50 test) in mice. Here we describe an alternative in vitro assay for the potency determination of the BoNT serotype B. In this assay, the toxin is first bound to its specific receptor molecules. After the proteolytic subunit of the toxin has been released and activated by chemical reduction, it is exposed to synaptobrevin, its substrate protein. Finally the proteolytic cleavage is quantified by an antibody-mediated detection of the neoepitope, reaching a detection limit below 0.1mouseLD50/ml. Thus, the assay, named BoNT/B binding and cleavage assay (BoNT/B BINACLE), takes into account the binding as well as the protease function of the toxin, thereby measuring its biological activity. PMID:27032463

  1. Production and characterization of a recombinant chimeric antigen consisting botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B and E binding subdomains.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Firouz; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Mousavi, Seyed Latif; Babaeipour, Valiollah

    2010-02-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are potent toxicant proteins composed of a heavy chain (100 kDa) and a light chain (50 kDa) of seven (A-G) serotypes that is responsible for botulism syndrome. In this study, polypeptides from C-terminal heavy chain of BoNTs serotypes A, B and E to the length of 54, 45 and 48 amino acid respectively were selected, linked together using a hydrophobic linker and expressed in E. coli. The expression efficiency of the chimeric protein was found to be 51%. The chimeric protein was produced in the form of inclusion body (IB) both at two studied temperatures, 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C. This IB was extracted by ultracentrifugation and followed for chimeric protein solubilization and purification using of ultrafiltration and preparative electrophoresis. The purified chimeric protein was characterized using blotting and ELISA. To evaluate the protection ability of this chimeric antigen against their active toxins, it was injected to mice and the antibody titer as well as the extent of protectivity were determined. Mice given three injections (10 microg/mice) of the antigen were protected against an intra-peritoneal administration of 10 LD(50 )of serotypes A and E, but 100 LD(50) of serotype B. We conclude that a significant correlation exists between the antigenic characteristics and protection capability of the chimeric protein prepared in this study. PMID:20118620

  2. Structural insight into exosite binding and discovery of novel exosite inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A through in silico screening.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Legler, Patricia M; Southall, Noel; Maloney, David J; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit

    2014-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is the most lethal toxin among the Tier 1 Select Agents. Development of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors against BoNT/A zinc metalloprotease remains a challenging problem due to its exceptionally large substrate binding surface and conformational plasticity. The exosites of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A are intriguing alternative sites for small molecule intervention, but their suitability for inhibitor design remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed two recently identified exosite inhibitors, D-chicoric acid and lomofungin, to probe the structural features of the exosites and molecular mechanisms of synergistic inhibition. The results showed that D-chicoric acid favors binding at the α-exosite, whereas lomofungin preferentially binds at the β-exosite by mimicking the substrate β-sheet binding interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations and binding interaction analysis of the exosite inhibitors with BoNT/A revealed key elements and hotspots that likely contribute to the inhibitor binding and synergistic inhibition. Finally, we performed database virtual screening for novel inhibitors of BoNT/A targeting the exosites. Hits C1 and C2 showed non-competitive inhibition and likely target the α- and β-exosites, respectively. The identified exosite inhibitors may provide novel candidates for structure-based development of therapeutics against BoNT/A intoxication. PMID:24958623

  3. Use of pharmacologic antagonists to deduce commonalities of biologic activity among clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Simpson, L L

    1988-06-01

    The pharmacologic activity of several clostridial neurotoxins was assayed on the mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation. The substances that were assayed included botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, C and E and tetanus toxin. Experiments were done in the presence or absence of antagonists that inhibit either the internalization of toxins or intracellular expression of toxicity. Ammonium chloride and methylamine hydrochloride, agents that inhibit toxins that enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, antagonized botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins. The magnitude of antagonism was substantial for all toxins. Calcium, 3,4-diaminopyridine and guanidine, agents that alter the intracellular expression of toxicity, produced a variable result. They were effective antagonists of botulinum neurotoxin type A, but they were less effective or inactive against the other neurotoxins. The ability of 3,4-diaminopyridine and guanidine to antagonize botulinum neurotoxin type A was highly calcium dependent. When ambient levels of the cation were reduced from 1.8 to 1.0 mM, the activity of the drugs was substantially reduced. The ability of these drugs to produce antagonism was also time dependent. When added simultaneously with toxin, they were maximally active; when added at later times, activity was diminished. A host of agents that alter intracellular levels of cyclic AMP, including theophylline, forskolin, isobutylmethylxanthine and cholera toxin, were evaluated as potential neurotoxin antagonists. Theophylline and isobutylmethylxanthine produced a transient increase in nerve-evoked muscle twitch. None of the drugs that alter tissue levels of cyclic AMP had a universal effect in antagonizing clostridial toxins. The data here have been compared with published data on drugs that antagonize binding of botulinum toxin and tetanus toxin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2455038

  4. Botulinum neurotoxins in the treatment of refractory pain.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Bahman

    2008-12-01

    The proper management of pain is a critical issue in the practice of medicine. Despite the availability of a large number of analgesic medications, management of pain that is refractory to conventional treatments remains a challenge for both clinicians and surgeons. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) has recently emerged as a potential novel approach to control pain. Animal studies have revealed a number of mechanisms by which BoNTs can influence and alleviate chronic pain, including inhibition of pain peptide release from nerve terminals and sensory ganglia, anti-inflammatory and antiglutaminergic effects, reduction of sympathetic neural discharge, and inhibition of muscle spindle discharge. In humans, prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies have also provided evidence for effectiveness of BoNT therapy in a number of painful disorders. These include cervical dystonia, pelvic pain, low back pain, plantar fasciitis, postsurgical painful spasms, myofascial pain syndromes, migraine, and chronic daily headaches. Long-term studies on cervical dystonia and low back pain have demonstrated safety and sustained efficacy after repeated injections. This Review focuses on the analgesic effects of BoNT and the mechanisms of its pain control as revealed by animal models, and provides evidence-based data on the efficacy of BoNT therapy in various pain syndromes in humans. PMID:19043424

  5. Sweet Poisons: Honeys Contaminated with Glycosides of the Neurotoxin Tutin.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lesley; Joyce, Nigel I; Sansom, Catherine E; Cooney, Janine M; Jensen, Dwayne J; Perry, Nigel B

    2015-06-26

    Poisonings due to consumption of honeys containing plant toxins have been reported widely. One cause is the neurotoxin tutin, an oxygenated sesquiterpene picrotoxane, traced back to honeybees (Apis mellifera) collecting honeydew produced by passionvine hoppers (Scolypopa australis) feeding on sap of the poisonous shrub tutu (Coriaria spp.). However, a pharmacokinetic study suggested that unidentified conjugates of tutin were also present in such honeys. We now report the discovery, using ion trap LC-MS, of two tutin glycosides and their purification and structure determination as 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)tutin (4) and 2-[6'-(α-d-glucopyranosyl)-β-d-glucopyranosyl]tutin (5). These compounds were used to develop a quantitative triple quadrupole LC-MS method for honey analysis, which showed the presence of tutin (3.6 ± 0.1 μg/g honey), hyenanchin (19.3 ± 0.5), tutin glycoside (4) (4.9 ± 0.4), and tutin diglycoside (5) (4.9 ± 0.1) in one toxic honey. The ratios of 4 and 5 to tutin varied widely in other tutin-containing honeys. The glycosidation of tutin may represent detoxification by one or both of the insects involved in the food chain from plant to honey. PMID:25993882

  6. Dopaminergic neurotoxins require excitotoxic stimulation in organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Kress, Geraldine J; Reynolds, Ian J

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated the properties of the dopaminergic neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and rotenone using an organotypic culture that included slices of substantia nigra, striatum and cortex maintained for about 20 days in vitro. At this age, the organotypic culture contains dopaminergic neurons, visualized using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry, that project into the striatal slice and extend up to 1 mm into the cortical slice. Using TH immunohistochemistry to assess survival of dopaminergic neurons, we found that the three dopaminergic toxins alone were not selectively neurotoxic. However, the addition of a low concentration of N-methyl-d-aspartate together with each individual toxin resulted in profound injury to the dopaminergic neurons, reflected by the loss of cell bodies and the fragmentation of processes. The combined toxicity was completely blocked by MK801. To assess the specificity of the injury, we measured the diameter of cell nuclei in the organotypic culture stained with Hoechst 33342 because the nucleus shrinks when neurons are injured. These measurements showed that the combined toxin treatment selectively injured only the TH immunoreactive cells. Thus, in a model culture system where dopaminergic neurons innervate appropriate targets, excitotoxicity appears to be essential for the manifestation of the toxic actions of 6-hydroxydopamine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and rotenone. PMID:15996475

  7. Tetanus neurotoxin utilizes two sequential membrane interactions for channel formation.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joshua R; Baldwin, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) causes neuroparalytic disease by entering the neuronal soma to block the release of neurotransmitters. However, the mechanism by which TeNT translocates its enzymatic domain (light chain) across endosomal membranes remains unclear. We found that TeNT and a truncated protein devoid of the receptor binding domain (TeNT-LHN) associated with membranes enriched in acidic phospholipids in a pH-dependent manner. Thus, in contrast to diphtheria toxin, the formation of a membrane-competent state of TeNT requires the membrane interface and is modulated by the bilayer composition. Channel formation is further enhanced by tethering of TeNT to the membrane through ganglioside co-receptors prior to acidification. Thus, TeNT channel formation can be resolved into two sequential steps: 1) interaction of the receptor binding domain (heavy chain receptor binding domain) with ganglioside co-receptors orients the translocation domain (heavy chain translocation domain) as the lumen of the endosome is acidified and 2) low pH, in conjunction with acidic lipids within the membrane drives the conformational changes in TeNT necessary for channel formation. PMID:24973217

  8. Time-dependent botulinum neurotoxin serotype A metalloprotease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Pai, Ramdas; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Peet, Norton P.; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most lethal of biological substances, and are categorized as class A biothreat agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There are currently no drugs to treat the deadly flaccid paralysis resulting from BoNT intoxication. Among the seven BoNT serotypes, the development of therapeutics to counter BoNT/A is a priority (due to its long half-life in the neuronal cytosol and its ease of production). In this regard, the BoNT/A enzyme light chain (LC) component, a zinc metalloprotease responsible for the intracellular cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, is a desirable target for developing post-BoNT/A intoxication rescue therapeutics. In an earlier study, we reported the high throughput screening of a library containing 70,000 compounds, and uncovered a novel class of benzimidazole acrylonitrile-based BoNT/A LC inhibitors. Herein, we present both structure-activity relationships and a proposed mechanism of action for this novel inhibitor chemotype. PMID:22082667

  9. Snake and Spider Toxins Induce a Rapid Recovery of Function of Botulinum Neurotoxin Paralysed Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Duregotti, Elisa; Zanetti, Giulia; Scorzeto, Michele; Megighian, Aram; Montecucco, Cesare; Pirazzini, Marco; Rigoni, Michela

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and some animal neurotoxins (β-Bungarotoxin, β-Btx, from elapid snakes and α-Latrotoxin, α-Ltx, from black widow spiders) are pre-synaptic neurotoxins that paralyse motor axon terminals with similar clinical outcomes in patients. However, their mechanism of action is different, leading to a largely-different duration of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) blockade. BoNTs induce a long-lasting paralysis without nerve terminal degeneration acting via proteolytic cleavage of SNARE proteins, whereas animal neurotoxins cause an acute and complete degeneration of motor axon terminals, followed by a rapid recovery. In this study, the injection of animal neurotoxins in mice muscles previously paralyzed by BoNT/A or /B accelerates the recovery of neurotransmission, as assessed by electrophysiology and morphological analysis. This result provides a proof of principle that, by causing the complete degeneration, reabsorption, and regeneration of a paralysed nerve terminal, one could favour the recovery of function of a biochemically- or genetically-altered motor axon terminal. These observations might be relevant to dying-back neuropathies, where pathological changes first occur at the neuromuscular junction and then progress proximally toward the cell body. PMID:26670253

  10. Preparation of a potent anti-scorpion-venom-serum against the venom of red scorpion (Buthus tamalus).

    PubMed

    Kankonkar, R C; Kulkurni, D G; Hulikavi, C B

    1998-01-01

    A number of children and adults, especially pregnant women succumb to the sting by red Scorpion (Buthus tamalus) in Konkan region--particularly on the coastal line. No specific antiserum or any other antidote is available to treat a victim of scorpion bite and hence the need to prepare a potent antiserum. Red Scorpion (B. tamalus) venom is a mixture of a number of protein moieties and neurotoxins of low molecular weight. Therefore, the venom is poor in antigenic composition and it is difficult to get antibodies specific to neutralise lethal factor/factors. Using Bentonite as an adjuvant and extending the period of immunization a potent antiserum has been prepared capable of neutralising the lethal factor/factors. In vivo testing carried out in albino mice, guinea pigs, dogs and langurs confirms this finding and shows that the antiserum is quite effective in neutralising the scorpion venom to save the life of envenomated animals. PMID:10703580

  11. Structural and functional characterization of a novel homodimeric three-finger neurotoxin from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra).

    PubMed

    Roy, Amrita; Zhou, Xingding; Chong, Ming Zhi; D'hoedt, Dieter; Foo, Chun Shin; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Bertrand, Daniel; Sivaraman, J; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2010-03-12

    Snake venoms are a mixture of pharmacologically active proteins and polypeptides that have led to the development of molecular probes and therapeutic agents. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a novel neurotoxin, haditoxin, from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Haditoxin exhibited novel pharmacology with antagonism toward muscle (alphabetagammadelta) and neuronal (alpha(7), alpha(3)beta(2), and alpha(4)beta(2)) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with highest affinity for alpha(7)-nAChRs. The high resolution (1.5 A) crystal structure revealed haditoxin to be a homodimer, like kappa-neurotoxins, which target neuronal alpha(3)beta(2)- and alpha(4)beta(2)-nAChRs. Interestingly however, the monomeric subunits of haditoxin were composed of a three-finger protein fold typical of curaremimetic short-chain alpha-neurotoxins. Biochemical studies confirmed that it existed as a non-covalent dimer species in solution. Its structural similarity to short-chain alpha-neurotoxins and kappa-neurotoxins notwithstanding, haditoxin exhibited unique blockade of alpha(7)-nAChRs (IC(50) 180 nm), which is recognized by neither short-chain alpha-neurotoxins nor kappa-neurotoxins. This is the first report of a dimeric short-chain alpha-neurotoxin interacting with neuronal alpha(7)-nAChRs as well as the first homodimeric three-finger toxin to interact with muscle nAChRs. PMID:20071329

  12. Production and purification of Clostridium botulinum type C and D neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Gessler, F; Böhnel, H

    1999-07-01

    Neurotoxins of Clostridium botulinum are needed in basic neurologic research, but as therapeutic agent for certain neuromuscular disorders like strabism as well. A method for the production and purification of botulinum neurotoxins C and D is reported using a two-step hollow-fiber cross flow filtration and a newly developed chromatographic purification procedure. Hollow-fiber filtration proved to be a rapid and safe concentration and pre-purification step, which can easily be scaled up. The chromatographic purification included hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography runs. Botulinum neurotoxins C and D could be recovered with an overall yield of 12.6% and 10.6%, respectively. A specific toxicity of 1.86 x 10(7) minimal lethal dose mg(-1) (type C) and 5.26 x 10(7) minimal lethal dose mg(-1) (type D) was determined in the mouse bioassay. PMID:10397323

  13. Molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a natural neurotoxin from the star fruit: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a neurotoxin recently isolated from the star fruit Averroha carambola. Among the seven conformers that exist within an energy window of ∼16.0 kcal/mol, two of them are the most favored ones with an energy difference of less than 2.0 kcal/mol. The computed chemical shifts of these two low-energy conformers are in good agreement with the experimental values determined in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide thus confirming the 2D chemical structure assigned to the neurotoxin. A topological analysis of the theoretical electronic charge density of four caramboxin conformers reveals the existence of intramolecular CH⋯O/N interactions which, in addition to the classical OH⋯O/N H-bonding interactions, contribute to decrease the conformational freedom of the neurotoxin.

  14. Neurotoxin-induced neuropeptide perturbations in striatum of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Kultima, Kim; Wadensten, Henrik; Nilsson, Anna; Roman, Erika; Andrén, Per E; Brittebo, Eva B

    2013-04-01

    The cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is suggested to play a role in neurodegenerative disease. We have previously shown that although the selective uptake of BMAA in the rodent neonatal striatum does not cause neuronal cell death, exposure during the neonatal development leads to cognitive impairments in adult rats. The aim of the present study was to characterize the changes in the striatal neuropeptide systems of male and female rat pups treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with BMAA (40-460 mg/kg). The label-free quantification of the relative levels of endogenous neuropeptides using mass spectrometry revealed that 25 peptides from 13 neuropeptide precursors were significantly changed in the rat neonatal striatum. The exposure to noncytotoxic doses of BMAA induced a dose-dependent increase of neurosecretory protein VGF-derived peptides, and changes in the relative levels of cholecystokinin, chromogranin, secretogranin, MCH, somatostatin and cortistatin-derived peptides were observed at the highest dose. In addition, the results revealed a sex-dependent increase in the relative level of peptides derived from the proenkephalin-A and protachykinin-1 precursors, including substance P and neurokinin A, in female pups. Because several of these peptides play a critical role in the development and survival of neurons, the observed neuropeptide changes might be possible mediators of BMAA-induced behavioral changes. Moreover, some neuropeptide changes suggest potential sex-related differences in susceptibility toward this neurotoxin. The present study also suggests that neuropeptide profiling might provide a sensitive characterization of the BMAA-induced noncytotoxic effects on the developing brain. PMID:23410195

  15. Gangliosides as high affinity receptors for tetanus neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Barbieri, Joseph T; Baldwin, Michael R

    2009-09-25

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) is an exotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani that causes paralytic death to hundreds of thousands of humans annually. TeNT cleaves vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, which inhibits neurotransmitter release in the central nervous system to elicit spastic paralysis, but the molecular basis for TeNT entry into neurons remains unclear. TeNT is a approximately 150-kDa protein that has AB structure-function properties; the A domain is a zinc metalloprotease, and the B domain encodes a translocation domain and C-terminal receptor-binding domain (HCR/T). Earlier studies showed that HCR/T bound gangliosides via two carbohydrate-binding sites, termed the lactose-binding site (the "W" pocket) and the sialic acid-binding site (the "R" pocket). Here we report that TeNT high affinity binding to neurons is mediated solely by gangliosides. Glycan array and solid phase binding analyses identified gangliosides that bound exclusively to either the W pocket or the R pocket of TeNT; GM1a bound to the W pocket, and GD3 bound to the R pocket. Using these gangliosides and mutated forms of HCR/T that lacked one or both carbohydrate-binding pocket, gangliosides binding to both of the W and R pockets were shown to be necessary for high affinity binding to neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of HCR/T with sugar components of two gangliosides bound to the W and R supported the binding of gangliosides to both carbohydrate pockets. These data show that gangliosides are functional dual receptors for TeNT. PMID:19602728

  16. Environmental risk factors for temporal lobe epilepsy--is prenatal exposure to the marine algal neurotoxin domoic acid a potentially preventable cause?

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian

    2010-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS) is one of the more common forms of chronic epilepsy. Its aetiology is unknown, though an early developmental insult is thought by some to be an important trigger. There is not a strong genetic predisposition; gene-environment interactions are more significant considerations. Environmental risk factors for TLE-HS are under-researched. Domoic acid (DA) is an environmental neurotoxin of algal origin that can contaminate marine food webs. DA can cross the placenta, is significantly more toxic to the developing brain compared to the adult brain, and has affected humans and marine wildlife through mass poisonings. DA coincidentally has a decades-long history of use as a chemical model of temporal lobe epilepsy, along with its close structural analogue kainic acid (also of algal origin). The principal hypothesis presented here is that dietary exposure to doses of DA that are sub-clinical in pregnant women may be sufficient to damage the foetal hippocampus and initiate epileptogenesis. The hypothesis could be tested both experimentally by in vivo proof-of-concept animal studies that expand on current knowledge of prenatal susceptibility to DA neurotoxicity, and by epidemiological investigations directed towards dietary exposure to marine food products. If only a small proportion of the attributable risk for TLE-HS is found to be due to gestational exposure to DA, the public health implications would still be of great significance, as this would represent a potentially preventable exposure. Other potent neurotoxins are produced by marine microalgae and freshwater cyanobacteria. These structurally and mechanistically diverse toxins can also contaminate water supplies, seafood and shellfish. Several operate by modulating ion channels, so may also be of interest to epilepsy researchers. DA is also the subject of preliminary scrutiny in strandings involving odontocete cetaceans. The implications of such work are

  17. Neurotoxins from snake venoms and α-conotoxin ImI inhibit functionally active ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Shelukhina, Irina V; Son, Lina V; Ojomoko, Lucy O; Kryukova, Elena V; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Zhmak, Maxim N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Ivanov, Igor A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Starkov, Vladislav G; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2015-09-11

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. PMID:26221036

  18. Clinical differences between botulinum neurotoxin type A and B.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Del Grande, Alessandra; Petracca, Martina; Ialongo, Tamara; Ricciardi, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    In humans, the therapeutic use of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is well recognized and continuously expanding. Four BoNTs are widely available for clinical practice: three are serotype A and one is serotype B: onabotulinumtoxinA (A/Ona), abobotulinumtoxinA (A/Abo) and incobotulinumtoxinA (A/Inco), rimabotulinumtoxinB (B/Rima). A/Abo, A/Inco, A/Ona and B/Rima are all licensed worldwide for cervical dystonia. In addition, the three BoNT/A products are approved for blepharospasm and focal dystonias, spasticity, hemifacial spasm, hyperhidrosis and facial lines, with remarkable regional differences. These toxin brands differ for specific activity, packaging, constituents, excipient, and storage. Comparative literature assessing the relative safety and efficacy of different BoNT products is limited, most data come from reports on small samples, and only a few studies meet criteria of evidence-based medicine. One study compared the effects of BoNT/A and BoNT/B on muscle activity of healthy volunteers, showing similar neurophysiological effects with a dose ratio of 1:100. In cervical dystonia, when comparing the effects of BoNT/A and BoNT/B, results are more variable, some studies reporting roughly similar peak effect and overall duration (at a ratio of 1:66, others reporting substantially shorter duration of BoNT/B than BoNT/A (at a ratio 1/24). Although the results of clinical studies are difficult to compare for methodological differences (dose ratio, study design, outcome measures), it is widely accepted that: BoNT/B is clinically effective using appropriate doses as BoNT/A (1:40-50), injections are generally more painful, in most of the studies on muscular conditions, efficacy is shorter, and immunogenicity higher. Since the earliest clinical trials, it has been reported that autonomic side effects are more frequent after BoNT/B injections, and this observation encouraged the use of BoNT/B for sialorrhea, hyperhidrosis and other non-motor symptoms. In these

  19. Cell internalization and traffic pathway of Clostridium botulinum type C neurotoxin in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Uotsu, Nobuo; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Tonozuka, Takashi; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Oguma, Keiji

    2006-01-01

    The bacterium Clostridium botulinum type C produces a progenitor toxin (C16S toxin) that binds to O-linked sugar chains terminating with sialic acid on the surface of HT-29 cells prior to internalization [A. Nishikawa, N. Uotsu, H. Arimitsu, J.C. Lee, Y. Miura, Y. Fujinaga, H. Nakada, T. Watanabe, T. Ohyama, Y. Sakano, K. Oguma, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 319 (2004) 327-333] [21]. Based on this, it was hypothesized that the C16S toxin is internalized via clathrin-coated pits. To examine this possibility, the internalized toxin was observed with a fluorescent antibody using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The confocal images clearly indicated that the C16S toxin was internalized mainly via clathrin-coated pits and localized in early endosomes. The toxin was colocalized with caveolin-1 which is one of the components of caveolae, however, implying the toxin was also internalized via caveolae. The confocal images also showed that the neurotoxin transported to the endosome was transferred to the Golgi apparatus. However, the non-toxic components were not merged with the Golgi marker protein, TGN38, implying the neurotoxin was dissociated from progenitor toxin in endosomes. These results suggested that the C16S toxin was separated to the neurotoxin and other proteins in endosome and the neurotoxin was further transferred to the Golgi apparatus which is the center for protein sorting. PMID:16413070

  20. Development of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium botulinum is a ubiquitous microorganism that under anaerobic conditions produces botulinum neurotoxins. In regards to both food-borne illness and the potential use of botulinum toxin as a biological weapon, the capability to assess the amount of toxin in a food or environmental sample e...

  1. Multiplex PCR for Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin-Producing Clostridia in Clinical, Food, and Environmental Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    De Medici, Dario; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Wyatt, Gary M.; Lindström, Miia; Messelhäußer, Ute; Aldus, Clare F.; Delibato, Elisabetta; Korkeala, Hannu; Peck, Michael W.; Fenicia, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most toxic substance known, is produced by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum and, in rare cases, also by some strains of Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii. The standard procedure for definitive detection of BoNT-producing clostridia is a culture method combined with neurotoxin detection using a standard mouse bioassay (SMB). The SMB is highly sensitive and specific, but it is expensive and time-consuming and there are ethical concerns due to use of laboratory animals. PCR provides a rapid alternative for initial screening for BoNT-producing clostridia. In this study, a previously described multiplex PCR assay was modified to detect all type A, B, E, and F neurotoxin genes in isolated strains and in clinical, food, environmental samples. This assay includes an internal amplification control. The effectiveness of the multiplex PCR method for detecting clostridia possessing type A, B, E, and F neurotoxin genes was evaluated by direct comparison with the SMB. This method showed 100% inclusivity and 100% exclusivity when 182 BoNT-producing clostridia and 21 other bacterial strains were used. The relative accuracy of the multiplex PCR and SMB was evaluated using 532 clinical, food, and environmental samples and was estimated to be 99.2%. The multiplex PCR was also used to investigate 110 freshly collected food and environmental samples, and 4 of the 110 samples (3.6%) were positive for BoNT-encoding genes. PMID:19684163

  2. Multiplex PCR for detection of botulinum neurotoxin-producing clostridia in clinical, food, and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    De Medici, Dario; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Wyatt, Gary M; Lindström, Miia; Messelhäusser, Ute; Aldus, Clare F; Delibato, Elisabetta; Korkeala, Hannu; Peck, Michael W; Fenicia, Lucia

    2009-10-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most toxic substance known, is produced by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum and, in rare cases, also by some strains of Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii. The standard procedure for definitive detection of BoNT-producing clostridia is a culture method combined with neurotoxin detection using a standard mouse bioassay (SMB). The SMB is highly sensitive and specific, but it is expensive and time-consuming and there are ethical concerns due to use of laboratory animals. PCR provides a rapid alternative for initial screening for BoNT-producing clostridia. In this study, a previously described multiplex PCR assay was modified to detect all type A, B, E, and F neurotoxin genes in isolated strains and in clinical, food, environmental samples. This assay includes an internal amplification control. The effectiveness of the multiplex PCR method for detecting clostridia possessing type A, B, E, and F neurotoxin genes was evaluated by direct comparison with the SMB. This method showed 100% inclusivity and 100% exclusivity when 182 BoNT-producing clostridia and 21 other bacterial strains were used. The relative accuracy of the multiplex PCR and SMB was evaluated using 532 clinical, food, and environmental samples and was estimated to be 99.2%. The multiplex PCR was also used to investigate 110 freshly collected food and environmental samples, and 4 of the 110 samples (3.6%) were positive for BoNT-encoding genes. PMID:19684163

  3. Fungal bis-naphthopyrones as inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An in silico screen of the Molecular Library Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) of ˜350,000 compounds and confirmatory bioassays led to identification of the fungal natural product chaetochromin A (1) as an inhibitor of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT A). Subsequent acquisition and testing of a...

  4. Neuronal targeting, internalization, and biological activity of a recombinant atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-toxic derivatives of Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) have potential use as neuron-targeting delivery vehicles, and as reagents to study intracellular trafficking. We have designed and expressed an atoxic derivative of BoNT/A (BoNT/A ad) as a full-length 150kDa molecule consisting of a 50 kDa lig...

  5. Comparison of Toxicological Properties of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes A and B in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most toxic biological toxins for humans. Of the seven known serotypes (A-G) of BoNT, serotypes A, B and E cause most of the human foodborne intoxications. In this study, we compared the toxicological properties of BoNT serotype A and B holotoxins and compl...

  6. Neuronal targeting, internalization, and biological activity of a recombinant atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) have the unique capacity to cross epithelial barriers, target neuromuscular junctions, and translocate active metalloprotease component to the cytosol of motor neurons. We have taken advantage of the molecular carriers responsible for this trafficking to create a family ...

  7. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A by carbohydrate receptor mimics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes of BoNT intoxication, where BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to surviv...

  8. A monoclonal antibody based capture ELISA for botulinum neurotoxin serotype B: toxin detection in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalyic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A-H) have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We repo...

  9. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassay for visceral toxicosis of catfish and botulinum neurotoxin serotype E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visceral toxicosis of catfish (VTC), a sporadic disease of cultured channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) often with high mortality, is caused by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E). Presumptive diagnosis of VTC is based on characteristic clinical signs and lesions, and the production of these ...

  10. Atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A as a prototype vehicle for targeted delivery to neuronal cytoplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously described genetic constructs and expression systems that enable facile production of recombinant derivatives of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) that retain the structural and trafficking properties of wt BoNTs. In this report we describe the properties of one such derivative, BoNT/A...

  11. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxins and associated proteins across intestinal epithelial cells(Abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins(BoNTs)secreted by Clostridium botulinum are some of the most poisonous toxins in nature and considered to be major bioterrorism threats. To date, seven BoNT subtypes (A to G) have been identified. When secreted from bacteria, some BoNTs associate with a non-toxic, non hemagglu...

  12. In vitro peptide cleavage assay for detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin-A activity in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gold standard assay for measuring the activity and typing of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins is the mouse bioassay. The mouse bioassay is sensitive, robust and does not require specialized equipment. However, the mouse bioassay is slow, not practical for many settings and results in the death ...

  13. Substrates and controls for the quantitative detection of active botulinum neurotoxin in protease-containing samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) enjoy a wide variety of medical applications. However, limited pharmacokinetic data on active BoNT is available. Monitoring BoNT activity in the circulation is a challenging task, due to BoNT’s enormous toxicity, rapid neuronal uptake, and removal from the bloodstream. ...

  14. Rapid multiplex immunoassay to distinguish botulinum neurotoxin serotypes on a single lateral flow device(Abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven antigenically distinct serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A–G). The potency of these toxins result in a high mortality rate with BoNT/A and /B accounting for most of the naturally occurring outbreaks. The ease of BoNT production and their potential use as bi...

  15. Structure and activity of a functional derivative of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin B.

    PubMed

    Masuyer, Geoffrey; Beard, Matthew; Cadd, Verity A; Chaddock, John A; Acharya, K Ravi

    2011-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause flaccid paralysis by inhibiting neurotransmission at cholinergic nerve terminals. BoNTs consist of three essential domains for toxicity: the cell binding domain (Hc), the translocation domain (Hn) and the catalytic domain (LC). A functional derivative (LHn) of the parent neurotoxin B composed of Hn and LC domains was recombinantly produced and characterised. LHn/B crystallographic structure at 2.8Å resolution is reported. The catalytic activity of LHn/B towards recombinant human VAMP was analysed by substrate cleavage assay and showed a higher specificity for VAMP-1, -2 compared to VAMP-3. LHn/B also showed measurable activity in living spinal cord neurons. Despite lacking the Hc (cell-targeting) domain, LHn/B retained the capacity to internalize and cleave intracellular VAMP-1 and -2 when added to the cells at high concentration. These activities of the LHn/B fragment demonstrate the utility of engineered botulinum neurotoxin fragments as analytical tools to study the mechanisms of action of BoNT neurotoxins and of SNARE proteins. PMID:21078393

  16. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Recognizes Its Protein Receptor SV2 by a Different Mechanism than Botulinum Neurotoxin B Synaptotagmin.

    PubMed

    Weisemann, Jasmin; Stern, Daniel; Mahrhold, Stefan; Dorner, Brigitte G; Rummel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exhibit extraordinary potency due to their exquisite neurospecificity, which is achieved by dual binding to complex polysialo-gangliosides and synaptic vesicle proteins. The luminal domain 4 (LD4) of the three synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 isoforms, SV2A-C, identified as protein receptors for the most relevant serotype BoNT/A, binds within the 50 kDa cell binding domain HC of BoNT/A. Here, we deciphered the BoNT/A-SV2 interactions in more detail. In pull down assays, the binding of HCA to SV2-LD4 isoforms decreases from SV2C > SV2A > SV2B. A binding constant of 200 nM was determined for BoNT/A to rat SV2C-LD4 in GST pull down assay. A similar binding constant was determined by surface plasmon resonance for HCA to rat SV2C and to human SV2C, the latter being slightly lower due to the substitution L563F in LD4. At pH 5, as measured in acidic synaptic vesicles, the binding constant of HCA to hSV2C is increased more than 10-fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that the quadrilateral helix of SV2C-LD4 already exists in solution prior to BoNT/A binding. Hence, the BoNT/A-SV2C interaction is of different nature compared to BoNT/B-Syt-II. In particular, the preexistence of the quadrilateral β-sheet helix of SV2 and its pH-dependent binding to BoNT/A via backbone-backbone interactions constitute major differences. Knowledge of the molecular details of BoNT/A-SV2 interactions drives the development of high affinity peptides to counteract BoNT/A intoxications or to capture functional BoNT/A variants in innovative detection systems for botulism diagnostic. PMID:27196927

  17. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Recognizes Its Protein Receptor SV2 by a Different Mechanism than Botulinum Neurotoxin B Synaptotagmin

    PubMed Central

    Weisemann, Jasmin; Stern, Daniel; Mahrhold, Stefan; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Rummel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exhibit extraordinary potency due to their exquisite neurospecificity, which is achieved by dual binding to complex polysialo-gangliosides and synaptic vesicle proteins. The luminal domain 4 (LD4) of the three synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 isoforms, SV2A‐C, identified as protein receptors for the most relevant serotype BoNT/A, binds within the 50 kDa cell binding domain HC of BoNT/A. Here, we deciphered the BoNT/A‐SV2 interactions in more detail. In pull down assays, the binding of HCA to SV2-LD4 isoforms decreases from SV2C >> SV2A > SV2B. A binding constant of 200 nM was determined for BoNT/A to rat SV2C-LD4 in GST pull down assay. A similar binding constant was determined by surface plasmon resonance for HCA to rat SV2C and to human SV2C, the latter being slightly lower due to the substitution L563F in LD4. At pH 5, as measured in acidic synaptic vesicles, the binding constant of HCA to hSV2C is increased more than 10-fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that the quadrilateral helix of SV2C-LD4 already exists in solution prior to BoNT/A binding. Hence, the BoNT/A‐SV2C interaction is of different nature compared to BoNT/B‐Syt-II. In particular, the preexistence of the quadrilateral β-sheet helix of SV2 and its pH-dependent binding to BoNT/A via backbone–backbone interactions constitute major differences. Knowledge of the molecular details of BoNT/A‐SV2 interactions drives the development of high affinity peptides to counteract BoNT/A intoxications or to capture functional BoNT/A variants in innovative detection systems for botulism diagnostic. PMID:27196927

  18. Peptide Neurotoxins that Affect Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: A Close-Up on ω-Agatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Pringos, Emilie; Vignes, Michel; Martinez, Jean; Rolland, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins found in animal venoms have gained great interest in the field of neurotransmission. As they are high affinity ligands for calcium, potassium and sodium channels, they have become useful tools for studying channel structure and activity. Peptide neurotoxins represent the clinical potential of ion-channel modulators across several therapeutic fields, especially in developing new strategies for treatment of ion channel-related diseases. The aim of this review is to overview the latest updates in the domain of peptide neurotoxins that affect voltage-gated calcium channels, with a special focus on ω-agatoxins. PMID:22069688

  19. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T; Paul, Catherine J; Mason, David R; Twine, Susan M; Alston, Mark J; Logan, Susan M; Austin, John W; Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs) present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes), and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI). These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5) has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:19298644

  20. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tina I; Stanker, Larry H; Lee, Kwangkook; Jin, Rongsheng; Cheng, Luisa W

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins. Botulinum neurotoxins associate with neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs) forming large complexes that are protected from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. However, it is still unclear how BoNT complexes as large as 900 kDa traverse the epithelial barrier and what role NAPs play in toxin translocation. In this study, we examined the transit of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) holotoxin, complex and recombinantly purified NAP complex through cultured and polarized Caco-2 cells and, for the first time, in the small mouse intestine. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and NAPs in the toxin complex were detectable inside intestinal cells beginning at 2 h post intoxication. Appearance of the BoNT/A holotoxin signal was slower, with detection starting at 4–6 h. This indicated that the holotoxin alone was sufficient for entry but the presence of NAPs enhanced the rate of entry. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A detection peaked at approximately 6 and 8 h for complex and holotoxin, respectively, and thereafter began to disperse with some toxin remaining in the epithelia after 24 h. Purified HA complexes alone were also internalized and followed a similar time course to that of BoNT/A complex internalization. However, recombinant HA complexes did not enhance BoNT/A holotoxin entry in the absence of a physical link with BoNT/A. We propose a model for BoNT/A toxin complex translocation whereby toxin complex entry is facilitated by NAPs in a receptor-mediated mechanism. Understanding the intestinal uptake of BoNT complexes will aid the development of new measures to prevent or treat oral intoxications. PMID:25640773

  1. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tina I; Stanker, Larry H; Lee, Kwangkook; Jin, Rongsheng; Cheng, Luisa W

    2015-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins. Botulinum neurotoxins associate with neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs) forming large complexes that are protected from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. However, it is still unclear how BoNT complexes as large as 900 kDa traverse the epithelial barrier and what role NAPs play in toxin translocation. In this study, we examined the transit of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) holotoxin, complex and recombinantly purified NAP complex through cultured and polarized Caco-2 cells and, for the first time, in the small mouse intestine. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and NAPs in the toxin complex were detectable inside intestinal cells beginning at 2 h post intoxication. Appearance of the BoNT/A holotoxin signal was slower, with detection starting at 4-6 h. This indicated that the holotoxin alone was sufficient for entry but the presence of NAPs enhanced the rate of entry. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A detection peaked at approximately 6 and 8 h for complex and holotoxin, respectively, and thereafter began to disperse with some toxin remaining in the epithelia after 24 h. Purified HA complexes alone were also internalized and followed a similar time course to that of BoNT/A complex internalization. However, recombinant HA complexes did not enhance BoNT/A holotoxin entry in the absence of a physical link with BoNT/A. We propose a model for BoNT/A toxin complex translocation whereby toxin complex entry is facilitated by NAPs in a receptor-mediated mechanism. Understanding the intestinal uptake of BoNT complexes will aid the development of new measures to prevent or treat oral intoxications. PMID:25640773

  2. Accelerated intoxication of GABAergic synapses by botulinum neurotoxin A disinhibits stem cell-derived neuron networks prior to network silencing

    PubMed Central

    Beske, Phillip H.; Scheeler, Stephen M.; Adler, Michael; McNutt, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that specifically cleave SNARE proteins in peripheral synapses, preventing neurotransmitter release. Neuronal responses to BoNT intoxication are traditionally studied by quantifying SNARE protein cleavage in vitro or monitoring physiological paralysis in vivo. Consequently, the dynamic effects of intoxication on synaptic behaviors are not well-understood. We have reported that mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) are highly sensitive to BoNT based on molecular readouts of intoxication. Here we study the time-dependent changes in synapse- and network-level behaviors following addition of BoNT/A to spontaneously active networks of glutamatergic and GABAergic ESNs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings indicated that BoNT/A rapidly blocked synaptic neurotransmission, confirming that ESNs replicate the functional pathophysiology responsible for clinical botulism. Quantitation of spontaneous neurotransmission in pharmacologically isolated synapses revealed accelerated silencing of GABAergic synapses compared to glutamatergic synapses, which was consistent with the selective accumulation of cleaved SNAP-25 at GAD1+ pre-synaptic terminals at early timepoints. Different latencies of intoxication resulted in complex network responses to BoNT/A addition, involving rapid disinhibition of stochastic firing followed by network silencing. Synaptic activity was found to be highly sensitive to SNAP-25 cleavage, reflecting the functional consequences of the localized cleavage of the small subpopulation of SNAP-25 that is engaged in neurotransmitter release in the nerve terminal. Collectively these findings illustrate that use of synaptic function assays in networked neurons cultures offers a novel and highly sensitive approach for mechanistic studies of toxin:neuron interactions and synaptic responses to BoNT. PMID:25954159

  3. Rapid and selective detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotype-A and -B with a single immunochromatographic test strip.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kathryn H; Lin, Alice; McGarvey, Jeffery A; Stanker, Larry H; Hnasko, Robert

    2012-06-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent toxins known. Produced by Clostridium botulinum, BoNTs are classified into seven, antigenically distinct serotypes, designated A-G. The toxin acts to inhibit acetylcholine release, resulting in paralysis and death. Naturally occurring foodborne disease is most often the result of improper canning of foods, while wound botulism, associated with injection drug users, is on the rise. Because of its potency, BoNTs have also been identified as targets for use by bioterrorists. The 'gold standard' of detection of BoNTs is the mouse bioassay, an expensive and time consuming test that requires specialized equipment and trained personnel. There is a need for a rapid, sensitive diagnostic for BoNTs that could be used by minimally trained personnel in the event of a foodborne outbreak or a bioterrorist threat. Here, we describe the use of a single lateral flow device (LFD) that can detect and distinguish between BoNT/A and B, two of the four serotypes that are known to intoxicate humans and together represent >80% of naturally occurring illness. The device could detect as little as 5 ng/mL of purified BoNT/A and 10 ng/mL of BoNT/B in 2% and 1% milk, respectively. In undiluted apple juice, 25 ng/mL of BoNT/A and 10 ng/mL of BoNT/B could be detected. No cross reactivity between BoNT/A and B antibodies was observed. The LFD described here is easy to use, requires no specialized training or equipment, and can identify and distinguish between BoNT/A and /B serotypes. These attributes make this rapid diagnostic device a potentially valuable tool in the fields of food safety and homeland security. PMID:22504369

  4. Identification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Substrate Binding Pockets and Their Re-Engineering for Human SNAP-23.

    PubMed

    Sikorra, Stefan; Litschko, Christa; Müller, Carina; Thiel, Nadine; Galli, Thierry; Eichner, Timo; Binz, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent bacterial proteins that block neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAREs (soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors). However, their serotype A (BoNT/A) that cleaves SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa) has also been an established pharmaceutical for treatment of medical conditions that rely on hyperactivity of cholinergic nerve terminals for 25 years. The expansion of its use to a variety of further medical conditions associated with hypersecretion components is prevented partly because the involved SNARE isoforms are not cleaved. Therefore, we examined by mutational analyses the reason for the resistance of human SNAP-23, an isoform of SNAP-25. We show that replacement of 10 SNAP-23 residues with their SNAP-25 counterparts effects SNAP-25-like cleavability. Conversely, transfer of each of the replaced SNAP-23 residues to SNAP-25 drastically decreased the cleavability of SNAP-25. By means of the existing SNAP-25-toxin co-crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulations, and corroborative mutagenesis studies, the appropriate binding pockets for these residues in BoNT/A were characterized. Systematic mutagenesis of two major BoNT/A binding pockets was conducted in order to adapt these pockets to corresponding amino acids of human SNAP-23. Human SNAP-23 cleaving mutants were isolated using a newly established yeast-based screening system. This method may be useful for engineering novel BoNT/A pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diseases that rely on SNAP-23-mediated hypersecretion. PMID:26523682

  5. A microscale neuron and Schwann cell coculture model for increasing detection sensitivity of botulinum neurotoxin type A.

    PubMed

    Hong, Won S; Young, Edmond W K; Tepp, William H; Johnson, Eric A; Beebe, David J

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a potent and specific biomolecule that is both implicated as a potential threat in bioterrorism and used in therapeutics. Highly sensitive and robust assays that measure BoNT activity are needed to manage outbreak or controlled distribution of BoNT. Current in vivo and in vitro assays have limitations, including high costs and variability for mouse bioassays, extensive preparations for primary and stem cell-derived neurons, and inherent low sensitivity for cell lines. Sensitivity of cell lines can be increased by direct differentiation and with their physiological relevance (compared with cell-free strategies) and robustness (compared with primary cell strategies); adopting cell lines is an attractive alternative to in vivo assays. Here, we present two distinct strategies that improved sensitivity of a cell line to BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) without direct differentiation. We developed a cell-based BoNT assay using microscale culture and coculture of neuronal and Schwann cell lines, NG108-15 and S16, respectively, to improve both sensitivity and physiological relevance. Results showed that NG108-15 and S16 coculture decreased EC50 from 12.5 to 0.8ng/µl (p < 0.001) in macroscale and from 2.6 to 1.1ng/µl (p = 0.006) in microscale. In addition, NG108-15 monoculture at microscale decreased EC50 from 12.5 to 2.6ng/µl (p < 0.001) compared with macroscale. Finally, controlling the spatial arrangement of microscale coculture revealed that S16-derived soluble factors can increase sensitivity. Thus, our study demonstrates two distinct strategies for increasing the sensitivity of a cell line to BoNT using coculture and microscale culture, thereby advancing assay technology for BoNT detection. PMID:23564642

  6. Two neurotoxins (BmK I and BmK II) from the venom of the scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch: purification, amino acid sequences and assessment of specific activity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Y H; Mansuelle, P; Terakawa, S; Kopeyan, C; Yanaihara, N; Hsu, K; Rochat, H

    1996-09-01

    Two neurotoxins, BmK I and BmK II, were purified from the venom of the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch. The complete amino acid sequences of both toxins, each containing 64 amino acid residues, were determined by the automatic sequencing of reduced and S-carboxymethylated toxins and their peptides, obtained after cleavage with TPCK-treated trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, respectively. Toxicity as minimum lethal dose tested by i.c.v. injection in mice showed that BmK I was six times more potent than BmK II. Only two amino acid replacements were found: at position 59 Val in BmK I was replaced by Ile in BmK II, and at position 62 a basic Lys residue in BmK I was substituted by a neutral Asn residue in BmK II. These features suggest that the positively charged residue (Lys or Arg) in the C-terminal position 62 (or 61 or 63) may also play an important role in facilitating the interaction between scorpion neurotoxins and the receptor on sodium channels. The effects of BmK I on nerve excitability were examined with the crayfish axon using intracellular recording and voltage-clamp conditions. The results indicate that BmK I preferentially blocks the sodium channel inactivation process. Thus, functional and structural similarities suggest that BmK I and BmK II belong to group 3 of scorpion alpha-type toxins. PMID:8896191

  7. Celebrity Patients, VIPs, and Potentates

    PubMed Central

    Groves, James E.; Dunderdale, Barbara A.; Stern, Theodore A.

    2002-01-01

    Background: During the second half of the 20th century, the literature on the doctor-patient relationship mainly dealt with the management of “difficult” (personality-disordered) patients. Similar problems, however, surround other types of “special” patients. Method: An overview and analysis of the literature were conducted. As a result, such patients can be subcategorized by their main presentations; each requires a specific management strategy. Results: Three types of “special” patients stir up irrational feelings in their caregivers. Sick celebrities threaten to focus public scrutiny on the private world of medical caregivers. VIPs generate awe in caregivers, with loss of the objectivity essential to the practice of scientific medicine. Potentates unearth narcissism in the caregiver-patient relationship, which triggers a struggle between power and shame. Pride, privacy, and the staff's need to be in control are all threatened by introduction of the special patient into medicine's closed culture. Conclusion: The privacy that is owed to sick celebrities should be extended to protect overexposed staff. The awe and loss of medical objectivity that VIPs generate are counteracted by team leadership dedicated to avoiding any deviation from standard clinical procedure. Moreover, the collective ill will surrounding potentates can be neutralized by reassuring them that they are “special”—and by caregivers mending their own vulnerable self-esteem. PMID:15014712

  8. Architecture of the botulinum neurotoxin complex: a molecular machine for protection and delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kwok-Ho; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely poisonous protein toxins that cause the fatal paralytic disease botulism. They are naturally produced in bacteria with several nontoxic neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs) and together they form a progenitor toxin complex (PTC), the largest bacterial toxin complex known. In foodborne botulism, the PTC functions as a molecular machine that helps BoNT breach the host defense in the gut. Here, we discuss the substantial recent advance in elucidating the atomic structures and assembly of the 14-subunit PTC, including structures of BoNT and four NAPs. These structural studies shed light on the molecular mechanisms by which BoNT is protected against the acidic environment and proteolytic destruction in the gastrointestinal tract, and how it is delivered across the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:25889616

  9. Comparative cytotoxicity of gambierol versus other marine neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Cagide, E; Louzao, M C; Espiña, B; Ares, I R; Vieytes, M R; Sasaki, M; Fuwa, H; Tsukano, C; Konno, Y; Yotsu-Yamashita, M; Paquette, L A; Yasumoto, T; Botana, L M

    2011-06-20

    Many microalgae produce compounds that exhibit potent biological activities. Ingestion of marine organisms contaminated with those toxins results in seafood poisonings. In many cases, the lack of toxic material turns out to be an obstacle to make the toxicological investigations needed. In this study, we evaluate the cytotoxicity of several marine toxins on neuroblastoma cells, focusing on gambierol and its effect on cytosolic calcium levels. In addition, we compared the effects of this toxin with ciguatoxin, brevetoxin, and gymnocin-A, with which gambierol shares a similar ladder-like backbone, as well as with polycavernoside A analogue 5, a glycosidic macrolide toxin. For this purpose, different fluorescent dyes were used: Fura-2 to monitor variations in cytosolic calcium levels, Alamar Blue to detect cytotoxicity, and Oregon Green 514 Phalloidin to quantify and visualize modifications in the actin cytoskeleton. Data showed that, while gambierol and ciguatoxin were successful in producing a calcium influx in neuroblastoma cells, gymnocin-A was unable to modify this parameter. Nevertheless, none of the toxins induced morphological changes or alterations in the actin assembly. Although polycavernoside A analogue 5 evoked a sharp reduction of the cellular metabolism of neuroblastoma cells, gambierol scarcely reduced it, and ciguatoxin, brevetoxin, and gymnocin-A failed to produce any signs of cytotoxicity. According to this, sharing a similar polycyclic ether backbone is not enough to produce the same effects on neuroblastoma cells; therefore, more studies should be carried out with these toxins, whose effects may be being underestimated. PMID:21517028

  10. Double receptor anchorage of botulinum neurotoxins accounts for their exquisite neurospecificity.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The high potency of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) is mainly due to their neurospecific binding which is mediated by the interaction with two receptor components. TeNT and all BoNT bind first to complex polysialo-gangliosides abundantly present on the outer leaflet of neuronal membranes. The ganglioside binding occurs in BoNT/A, B, E, F and G via a conserved ganglioside binding pocket within the most carboxyl-terminal 25 kDa domain H(CC) whereas TeNT, BoNT/C and D display two different ganglioside binding sites within their H(CC)-domain. Subsequently, upon exocytosis the intraluminal domains of synaptic vesicle proteins are exposed and can be accessed by the surface accumulated neurotoxins. BoNT/B and G bind with their H(CC)-domain to a 20-mer membrane juxtaposed segment of the intraluminal domain of synaptotagmin-I and -II, respectively. BoNT/A and E employ the intraluminal domain 4 of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) as protein receptor. Whereas the 50 kDa cell binding domain H(C) of BoNT/A interacts with all three SV2 isoforms, BoNT/E H(C) only binds SV2A and SV2B. Also, BoNT/D, F, and TeNT employ SV2 for binding and uptake. Thereafter, the synaptic vesicle is recycled and the anchored neurotoxin is endocytosed. Acidification of the vesicle lumen triggers membrane insertion of the translocation domain followed by pore formation and finally translocation of the enzymatically active light chain to its site of action leading to block of neurotransmitter release. PMID:23239349

  11. Scorpion Potassium Channel-blocking Defensin Highlights a Functional Link with Neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lanxia; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yang; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongyun; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-03-25

    The structural similarity between defensins and scorpion neurotoxins suggests that they might have evolved from a common ancestor. However, there is no direct experimental evidence demonstrating a functional link between scorpion neurotoxins and defensins. The scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 from Mesobuthus martensiiKarsch contains 37 amino acid residues and a conserved cystine-stabilized α/β structural fold. The recombinant BmKDfsin4, a classical defensin, has been found to have inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus luteusas well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Interestingly, electrophysiological experiments showed that BmKDfsin4,like scorpion potassium channel neurotoxins, could effectively inhibit Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channel currents, and its IC50value for the Kv1.3 channel was 510.2 nm Similar to the structure-function relationships of classical scorpion potassium channel-blocking toxins, basic residues (Lys-13 and Arg-19) of BmKDfsin4 play critical roles in peptide-Kv1.3 channel interactions. Furthermore, mutagenesis and electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the channel extracellular pore region is the binding site of BmKDfsin4, indicating that BmKDfsin4 adopts the same mechanism for blocking potassium channel currents as classical scorpion toxins. Taken together, our work identifies scorpion BmKDfsin4 as the first invertebrate defensin to block potassium channels. These findings not only demonstrate that defensins from invertebrate animals are a novel type of potassium channel blockers but also provide evidence of a functional link between defensins and neurotoxins. PMID:26817841

  12. Neurotoxins and their binding areas on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Marijke; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Therefore, genetic defects in sodium channel genes can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called "channelopathies." The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. These concepts still form the basis for understanding the function of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and consequently generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start to inactivate and currents decrease. In the inactivated state, channels stay refractory for new stimuli and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to a new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) also contributed largely to our today's understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and of VGSCs specifically. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable lead compounds in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt(®), Elan). The original peptide, ω-MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in pain fibers. This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the structure and function of

  13. Neurotoxins and Their Binding Areas on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Marijke; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Therefore, genetic defects in sodium channel genes can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called “channelopathies.” The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. These concepts still form the basis for understanding the function of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and consequently generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start to inactivate and currents decrease. In the inactivated state, channels stay refractory for new stimuli and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to a new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and of VGSCs specifically. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable lead compounds in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan). The original peptide, ω-MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in pain fibers. This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the structure and

  14. RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Janardhanan, Pavithra; Mello, Charlene M; Singh, Bal Ram; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Cai, Shuowei

    2013-12-15

    A surface plasmon resonance based RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin is reported. Using detoxified recombinant type A botulinum neurotoxin as the surrogate, the aptasensor detects active toxin within 90 min. The detection limit of the aptasensor in phosphate buffered saline, carrot juice, and fat free milk is 5.8 ng/ml, 20.3 ng/ml and 23.4 ng/ml, respectively, while that in 5-fold diluted human serum is 22.5 ng/ml. Recovery of toxin from disparate sample matrices are within 91-116%. Most significant is the ability of this aptasensor to effectively differentiate the natively folded toxin from denatured, inactive toxin, which is important for homeland security surveillance and threat assessment. The aptasensor is stable for more than 30 days and over 400 injections/regeneration cycles. Such an aptasensor holds great promise for rapid detection of active botulinum neurotoxin for field surveillance due to its robustness, stability and reusability. PMID:24209341

  15. Biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles for colorimetric sensing of botulinum neurotoxin A light chain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohu; Wang, Yi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Yusong; Zhang, Jinling; Aili, Daniel; Liedberg, Bo

    2014-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is considered as one of the most toxic food-borne substances and is a potential bioweapon accessible to terrorists. The development of an accurate, convenient, and rapid assay for botulinum neurotoxins is therefore highly desirable for addressing biosafety concerns. Herein, novel biotinylated peptide substrates designed to mimic synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) are utilized in gold nanoparticle-based assays for colorimetric detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoLcA). In these proteolytic assays, biotinylated peptides serve as triggers for the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, while the cleavage of these peptides by BoLcA prevents nanoparticle aggregation. Two different assay strategies are described, demonstrating limits of detection ranging from 5 to 0.1 nM of BoLcA with an overall assay time of 4 h. These hybrid enzyme-responsive nanomaterials provide rapid and sensitive detection for one of the most toxic substances known to man. PMID:24484451

  16. Molecular mechanisms of substrate recognition and specificity of botulinum neurotoxin serotype F.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Wan, Hoi Ying

    2011-01-15

    BoNTs (botulinum neurotoxins) are both deadly neurotoxins and natural toxins that are widely used in protein therapies to treat numerous neurological disorders of dystonia and spinal spasticity. Understanding the mechanism of action and substrate specificity of BoNTs is a prerequisite to develop antitoxin and novel BoNT-derived protein therapy. To date, there is a lack of detailed information with regard to how BoNTs recognize and hydrolyse the substrate VAMP-2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 2), even though it is known to be cleaved by four of the seven BoNT serotypes, B, D, F, G and TeNT (tetanus neurotoxin). In the present study we dissected the molecular mechanisms of VAMP-2 recognition by BoNT serotype F for the first time. The initial substrate recognition was mediated through sequential binding of VAMP-2 to the B1, B2 and B3 pockets in LC/F (light chain of BoNT serotype F), which directed VAMP-2 to the active site of LC/F and stabilized the active site substrate recognition, where the P2, P1' and P2' sites of VAMP-2 were specifically recognized by the S2, S1' and S2' pockets of LC/F to promote substrate hydrolysis. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of LC/F substrate recognition provides insights into the development of antitoxins and engineering novel BoNTs to optimize current therapy and extend therapeutic interventions. PMID:21029044

  17. An Overview on the Marine Neurotoxin, Saxitoxin: Genetics, Molecular Targets, Methods of Detection and Ecological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cusick, Kathleen D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine neurotoxins are natural products produced by phytoplankton and select species of invertebrates and fish. These compounds interact with voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of these ions into various cell types. This review provides a summary of marine neurotoxins, including their structures, molecular targets and pharmacologies. Saxitoxin and its derivatives, collectively referred to as paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are unique among neurotoxins in that they are found in both marine and freshwater environments by organisms inhabiting two kingdoms of life. Prokaryotic cyanobacteria are responsible for PST production in freshwater systems, while eukaryotic dinoflagellates are the main producers in marine waters. Bioaccumulation by filter-feeding bivalves and fish and subsequent transfer through the food web results in the potentially fatal human illnesses, paralytic shellfish poisoning and saxitoxin pufferfish poisoning. These illnesses are a result of saxitoxin’s ability to bind to the voltage-gated sodium channel, blocking the passage of nerve impulses and leading to death via respiratory paralysis. Recent advances in saxitoxin research are discussed, including the molecular biology of toxin synthesis, new protein targets, association with metal-binding motifs and methods of detection. The eco-evolutionary role(s) PSTs may serve for phytoplankton species that produce them are also discussed. PMID:23535394

  18. Neurotoxin-conjugated upconversion nanoprobes for direct visualization of tumors under near-infrared irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue-Feng; Sun, Zhengbo; Li, Min; Xiang, Yang; Wang, Qu-Quan; Tang, Fenfen; Wu, Yingliang; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin

    2010-11-01

    We report the development of neurotoxin-mediated upconversion nanoprobes for tumor targeting and visualization in living animals. The nanoprobes were synthesized by preparing polyethylenimine-coated hexagonal-phase NaYF(4):Yb,Er/Ce nanoparticles and conjugating them with recombinant chlorotoxin, a typical peptide neurotoxin that could bind with high specificity to many types of cancer cells. Nanoprobes that specifically targeted glioma cells were visualized by laser scanning upconversion fluorescence microscopy. Good probe biocompatibility was displayed with cellular and animal toxicity determinations. Animal studies were performed using Balb-c nude mice injected intravenously with the nanoprobes. The obtained high-contrast images demonstrated highly specific tumor binding and direct tumor visualization with bright red fluorescence under 980-nm near-infrared irradiation. The high sensitivity and high specificity of the neurotoxin-mediated upconversion nanoprobes and the simplification of the required optical device for tumor visualization suggest an approach that may help improve the effectiveness of the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities available for tumor patients. PMID:20728213

  19. Geochemical legacies and the future health of cities: A tale of two neurotoxins in urban soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fillipelli, Gabriel M.; Risch, Martin R.; Laidlaw, Mark A. S.; Nichols, Deborah E.; Crewe, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Acute exposure to lead (Pb), a powerful neurotoxin to which children are particularly susceptible, has largely been eliminated in the U.S. and other countries through policy-based restrictions on leaded gasoline and lead-based paints. But the legacy of these sources remains in the form of surface soil Pb contamination, a common problem in cities and one that has only recently emerged as a widespread chronic exposure mechanism in cities. Some urban soils are also contaminated with another neurotoxin, mercury (Hg). The greatest human exposure to Hg is through fish consumption, so eating fish caught in urban areas presents risks for toxic Hg exposure. The potential double impact of chronic exposure to these two neurotoxins is pronounced in cities. Overall, there is a paradigmatic shift from reaction to and remediation of acute exposures towards a more nuanced understanding of the dynamic cycling of persistent environmental contaminants with resultant widespread and chronic exposure of inner-city dwellers, leading to chronic toxic illness and disability at substantial human and social cost.

  20. On the translocation of botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins across the membrane of acidic intracellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Pirazzini, Marco; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Leka, Oneda; Zanetti, Giulia; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-03-01

    Tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins are produced by anaerobic bacteria of the genus Clostridium and are the most poisonous toxins known, with 50% mouse lethal dose comprised within the range of 0.1-few nanograms per Kg, depending on the individual toxin. Botulinum neurotoxins are similarly toxic to humans and can therefore be considered for potential use in bioterrorism. At the same time, their neurospecificity and reversibility of action make them excellent therapeutics for a growing and heterogeneous number of human diseases that are characterized by a hyperactivity of peripheral nerve terminals. The complete crystallographic structure is available for some botulinum toxins, and reveals that they consist of four domains functionally related to the four steps of their mechanism of neuron intoxication: 1) binding to specific receptors of the presynaptic membrane; 2) internalization via endocytic vesicles; 3) translocation across the membrane of endocytic vesicles into the neuronal cytosol; 4) catalytic activity of the enzymatic moiety directed towards the SNARE proteins. Despite the many advances in understanding the structure-mechanism relationship of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins, the molecular events involved in the translocation step have been only partially elucidated. Here we will review recent advances that have provided relevant insights on the process and discuss possible models that can be experimentally tested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. PMID:26307528

  1. RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Pavithra; Mello, Charlene M.; Singh, Bal Ram; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Cai, Shuowei

    2013-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance based RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin is reported. Using detoxified recombinant type A botulinum neurotoxin as the surrogate, the aptasensor detects active toxin within 90 minutes. The detection limit of the aptasensor in phosphate buffered saline, carrot juice, and fat free milk is 5.8 ng/ml, 20.3 ng/ml and 23.4 ng/ml, respectively, while that in 5-fold diluted human serum is 22.5 ng/ml. Recovery of toxin from disparate sample matrices are within 91% to 116%. Most significant is the ability of this aptasensor to effectively differentiate the natively folded toxin from denatured, inactive toxin, which is important for homeland security surveillance and threat assessment. The aptasensor is stable for more than 30 days and over 400 injections/regeneration cycles. Such an aptasensor holds great promise for rapid detection of active botulinum neurotoxin for field surveillance due to its robustness, stability and reusability. PMID:24209341

  2. Genomic sequences of six botulinum neurotoxin-producing strains representing three clostridial species illustrate the mobility and diversity of botulinum neurotoxin genes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Theresa J; Hill, Karen K; Xie, Gary; Foley, Brian T; Williamson, Charles H D; Foster, Jeffrey T; Johnson, Shannon L; Chertkov, Olga; Teshima, Hazuki; Gibbons, Henry S; Johnsky, Lauren A; Karavis, Mark A; Smith, Leonard A

    2015-03-01

    The whole genomes for six botulinum neurotoxin-producing clostridial strains were sequenced to provide references for under-represented toxin types, bivalent strains or unusual toxin complexes associated with a bont gene. The strains include three Clostridium botulinum Group I strains (CDC 297, CDC 1436, and Prevot 594), a Group II C. botulinum strain (Eklund 202F), a Group IV Clostridium argentinense strain (CDC 2741), and a Group V Clostridium baratii strain (Sullivan). Comparisons of the Group I genomic sequences revealed close relationships and conservation of toxin gene locations with previously published Group I C. botulinum genomes. The bont/F6 gene of strain Eklund 202F was determined to be a chimeric toxin gene composed of bont/F1 and bont/F2. The serotype G strain CDC 2741 remained unfinished in 20 contigs with the bont/G located within a 1.15Mb contig, indicating a possible chromosomal location for this toxin gene. Within the genome of C. baratii Sullivan strain, direct repeats of IS1182 insertion sequence (IS) elements were identified flanking the bont/F7 toxin complex that may be the mechanism of bont insertion into C. baratii. Highlights of the six strains are described and release of their genomic sequences will allow further study of unusual neurotoxin-producing clostridial strains. PMID:25489752

  3. A chemotype that inhibits three unrelated pathogenic targets: the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain, P. falciparum malaria, and the Ebola filovirus

    PubMed Central

    Opsenica, Igor; Burnett, James C.; Gussio, Rick; Opsenica, Dejan; Todorović, Nina; Lanteri, Charlotte A.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Gettayacamin, Montip; Basilico, Nicoletta; Taramelli, Donatella; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Wanner, Laura; Panchal, Rekha G.; Šolaja, Bogdan A.; Bavari, Sina

    2011-01-01

    A 1,7-bis(alkylamino)diazachrysene-based small molecule was previously identified as an inhibitor of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain metalloprotease. Subsequently, a variety of derivatives of this chemotype were synthesized to develop structure-activity relationships, and all are inhibitors of the BoNT/A LC. Three-dimensional analyses indicated that half of the originally discovered 1,7-DAAC structure superimposed well with 4-amino-7-chloroquinoline-based antimalarial agents. This observation led to the discovery that several of the 1,7-DAAC derivatives are potent in vitro inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum, and in general, are more efficacious against CQ-resistant strains than against CQ-susceptible strains. In addition, by inhibiting β-hematin formation, the most efficacious 1,7-DAAC-based antimalarials employ a mechanism of action analogous to that of 4,7-ACQ-based antimalarials, and are well tolerated by normal cells. One candidate was also effective when administered orally in a rodent-based malaria model. Finally, the 1,7-DAAC-based derivatives were examined for Ebola filovirus inhibition in an assay employing Vero76 cells, and three provided promising antiviral activities and acceptably low toxicities. PMID:21265542

  4. SRC family kinase inhibitors antagonize the toxicity of multiple serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin in human embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Kiris, Erkan; Burnett, James C; Nuss, Jonathan E; Wanner, Laura M; Peyser, Brian D; Du, Hao T; Gomba, Glenn Y; Kota, Krishna P; Panchal, Rekha G; Gussio, Rick; Kane, Christopher D; Tessarollo, Lino; Bavari, Sina

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the causative agents of botulism, are potent inhibitors of neurotransmitter release from motor neurons. There are currently no drugs to treat BoNT intoxication after the onset of the disease symptoms. In this study, we explored how modulation of key host pathways affects the process of BoNT intoxication in human motor neurons, focusing on Src family kinase (SFK) signaling. Motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells were treated with a panel of SFK inhibitors and intoxicated with BoNT serotypes A, B, or E (which are responsible for >95 % of human botulism cases). Subsequently, it was found that bosutinib, dasatinib, KX2-391, PP1, PP2, Src inhibitor-1, and SU6656 significantly antagonized all three of the serotypes. Furthermore, the data indicated that the treatment of hES-derived motor neurons with multiple SFK inhibitors increased the antagonistic effect synergistically. Mechanistically, the small molecules appear to inhibit BoNTs by targeting host pathways necessary for intoxication and not by directly inhibiting the toxins' proteolytic activity. Importantly, the identified inhibitors are all well-studied with some in clinical trials while others are FDA-approved drugs. Overall, this study emphasizes the importance of targeting host neuronal pathways, rather than the toxin's enzymatic components, to antagonize multiple BoNT serotypes in motor neurons. PMID:25782580

  5. A graphene oxide based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingyu; Guo, Jiubiao; Bai, Gongxun; Chan, Chunyu; Liu, Xuan; Ye, Weiwei; Hao, Jianhua; Chen, Sheng; Yang, Mo

    2014-10-23

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent toxic bacterial proteins for humans, which make them potential agents for bioterrorism. Therefore, an ultrasensitive detection of BoNTs and their active states is in great need as field-deployable systems for anti-terrorism applications. We report the construction of a novel graphene oxide (GO)-peptide based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of the BoNT serotype A light chain (BoNT-LcA) protease activity. A green fluorescence protein (GFP) modified SNAP-25 peptide substrate (SNAP-25-GFP) was optimally designed and synthesized with the centralized recognition/cleavage sites. This FRET platform was constructed by covalent immobilization of peptide substrate on GO with BSA passivation which have advantages of low non-specific adsorption and high stability in protein abundant solution. BoNT-LcA can specifically cleave SNAP-25-GFP substrate covalently immobilized on GO to release the fragment with GFP. Based on fluorescence signal recovery measurement, the target BoNT-LcA was detected sensitively and selectively with the linear detection range from 1fg/mL to 1pg/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) for BoNT-LcA is around 1fg/mL. PMID:25461164

  6. Isolation and functional characterization of the novel Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin A8 subtype.

    PubMed

    Kull, Skadi; Schulz, K Melanie; Weisemann, Jasmin; Kirchner, Sebastian; Schreiber, Tanja; Bollenbach, Alexander; Dabrowski, P Wojtek; Nitsche, Andreas; Kalb, Suzanne R; Dorner, Martin B; Barr, John R; Rummel, Andreas; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-01-01

    Botulism is a severe neurological disease caused by the complex family of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT). Based on the different serotypes known today, a classification of serotype variants termed subtypes has been proposed according to sequence diversity and immunological properties. However, the relevance of BoNT subtypes is currently not well understood. Here we describe the isolation of a novel Clostridium botulinum strain from a food-borne botulism outbreak near Chemnitz, Germany. Comparison of its botulinum neurotoxin gene sequence with published sequences identified it to be a novel subtype within the BoNT/A serotype designated BoNT/A8. The neurotoxin gene is located within an ha-orfX+ cluster and showed highest homology to BoNT/A1, A2, A5, and A6. Unexpectedly, we found an arginine insertion located in the HC domain of the heavy chain, which is unique compared to all other BoNT/A subtypes known so far. Functional characterization revealed that the binding characteristics to its main neuronal protein receptor SV2C seemed unaffected, whereas binding to membrane-incorporated gangliosides was reduced in comparison to BoNT/A1. Moreover, we found significantly lower enzymatic activity of the natural, full-length neurotoxin and the recombinant light chain of BoNT/A8 compared to BoNT/A1 in different endopeptidase assays. Both reduced ganglioside binding and enzymatic activity may contribute to the considerably lower biological activity of BoNT/A8 as measured in a mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay. Despite its reduced activity the novel BoNT/A8 subtype caused severe botulism in a 63-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the first description and a comprehensive characterization of a novel BoNT/A subtype which combines genetic information on the neurotoxin gene cluster with an in-depth functional analysis using different technical approaches. Our results show that subtyping of BoNT is highly relevant and that understanding of the detailed toxin function might

  7. Molecular structure of tetanus neurotoxin as revealed by Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R; Fuller, M P; Schiavo, G

    1990-07-01

    Secondary structure contents of tetanus neurotoxin have been estimated at neutral and acidic pH using circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. An analysis of the far-ultraviolet CD spectra of the neurotoxin dissolved in 50 mM citrate-phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) revealed 20.0 +/- 2.1% alpha-helix, 50.5 +/- 2.1% beta-pleated sheets, no beta-turns, and 29.5% random coils, which is at considerable variance with results from an earlier detailed study of tetanus neurotoxin's secondary structures (J.P. Robinson, L.A. Holladay, J.H. Hash and D. Puett, J. Biol. Chem. 257 (1982) 407). However, the alpha-helix content estimated in this study is consistent with the earlier studies of Robinson et al. (J.P. Robinson, L.A. Holladay, J.B. Picklesimer and D. Puett, Mol. Cell. Biochem. 5 (1974) 147; J.P. Robinson, J.B. Picklesimer and D. Puett, J. Biol. Chem. 250 (1975) 7435) and with the study by Lazarovici et al. (P. Lazarovici, P. Yanai and E. Yavin, J. Biol. Chem. 262 (1986) 2645), although other secondary structural features do not agree with those of the previous studies. Secondary structure estimation from Fourier transform infrared spectra in both amide I and amide III frequency regions revealed 22-23% alpha-helix, 49-51% beta-pleated sheets and 27-28% random coils, indicating a good correlation with the secondary structure content estimated from CD analysis. Lowering of the pH of the neurotoxin to 5.5 or 4.0 did not result in any noticeable change in the overall secondary structures. However, there were significant pH-induced variations observed in the individual curve-fitted FT-IR bands in the amide III frequency region. For example, the 1302 cm-1 band (relative area, 4.2%) observed at pH 7.0 was shifted to 1297 cm-1 (relative area, 2.2%) at pH 5.5, and the relative area of the band at 1316-1317 cm-1 (alpha-helix) increased by approx. 40%. This study suggests that contrary to earlier reports, tetanus neurotoxin is a beta-pleated sheet

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis).

    PubMed

    Brown, L R; Wüthrich, K

    1992-10-20

    The three-dimensional structure in solution of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A high quality structure for this 60-residue protein was obtained from 656 NOE distance constraints and 143 dihedral angle constraints, using the distance geometry program DIANA for the structure calculation and AMBER for restrained energy minimization. For a group of 20 conformers used to represent the solution structure, the average root-mean-square deviation value calculated for the polypeptide backbone heavy atoms relative to the mean structure was 0.45 A. The protein consists of a core region from which three finger-like loops extend outwards. It includes a short, two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet of residues 1-5 and 13-17, a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet involving residues 23-31, 34-42 and 51-55, and four disulfide bridges in the core region. There is also extensive non-regular hydrogen bonding between the carboxy-terminal tail of the polypeptide chain and the rest of the core region. Comparison with the crystal structure of erabutoxin-b indicates that the structure of alpha-neurotoxin is quite similar to other neurotoxin structures, but that local structural differences are seen in regions thought to be important for binding of neurotoxins to the acetylcholine receptor. For two regions of the alpha-neurotoxin structure there is evidence for an equilibrium between multiple conformations, which might be related to conformational rearrangements upon binding to the receptor. Overall, the alpha-neurotoxin presents itself as a protein with a stable core and flexible surface areas that interact with the acetylcholine receptor in such a way that high affinity binding is achieved by conformational rearrangements of the deformable regions of the neurotoxin structure. PMID:1433289

  9. Three Classes of Plasmid (47–63 kb) Carry the Type B Neurotoxin Gene Cluster of Group II Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47–63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin–antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4. PMID:25079343

  10. Botulinum neurotoxin type A: structure and interaction with the micellar concentration of SDS determined by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R; Fuller, M P; DasGupta, B R

    1991-12-01

    Secondary structures of botulinum neurotoxin type A have been determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the amide I and amide III frequency regions. Using Fourier self-deconvolution, second derivatization, and curve-fit analysis, the amide I frequency contour was resolved into Gaussian bands at 1678, 1654, 1644, and 1634 cm-1. In the amide III frequency region, several small bands were resolved between 1320 and 1225 cm-1. Assignments of the bands in both amide I and amide III frequency regions to various types of secondary structures and the estimation of spectral band strengths by integrating areas under each band suggested that the neurotoxin contains 29% alpha-helix, 45-49% beta-sheets and 22-26% random coils. These values agreed very well with those determined earlier from CD spectra. The neurotoxin was treated with a micellar concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate to simulate interaction between the protein and the amphipathic molecules. Sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles induced significant alterations both in the spectral band positions, and their strengths suggest refolding of the neurotoxin polypeptides. However, these changes were not entirely reversible, which could implicate the role of the altered structures in the function of the neurotoxin. PMID:1815589

  11. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Novel Homodimeric Three-finger Neurotoxin from the Venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amrita; Zhou, Xingding; Chong, Ming Zhi; D'hoedt, Dieter; Foo, Chun Shin; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Bertrand, Daniel; Sivaraman, J.; Kini, R. Manjunatha

    2010-01-01

    Snake venoms are a mixture of pharmacologically active proteins and polypeptides that have led to the development of molecular probes and therapeutic agents. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a novel neurotoxin, haditoxin, from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Haditoxin exhibited novel pharmacology with antagonism toward muscle (αβγδ) and neuronal (α7, α3β2, and α4β2) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with highest affinity for α7-nAChRs. The high resolution (1.5 Å) crystal structure revealed haditoxin to be a homodimer, like κ-neurotoxins, which target neuronal α3β2- and α4β2-nAChRs. Interestingly however, the monomeric subunits of haditoxin were composed of a three-finger protein fold typical of curaremimetic short-chain α-neurotoxins. Biochemical studies confirmed that it existed as a non-covalent dimer species in solution. Its structural similarity to short-chain α-neurotoxins and κ-neurotoxins notwithstanding, haditoxin exhibited unique blockade of α7-nAChRs (IC50 180 nm), which is recognized by neither short-chain α-neurotoxins nor κ-neurotoxins. This is the first report of a dimeric short-chain α-neurotoxin interacting with neuronal α7-nAChRs as well as the first homodimeric three-finger toxin to interact with muscle nAChRs. PMID:20071329

  12. Structural and Functional Interactions between Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Subfamily 1 and Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxins are produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria. There are eight serologically distinct botulinum neurotoxin isoforms (serotypes A–H). Currently, botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT⁄A) is commonly used for the treatment of many disorders, such as hyperactive musculoskeletal disorders, dystonia, and pain. However, the effectiveness of BoNT⁄A for pain alleviation and the mechanisms that mediate the analgesic effects of BoNT⁄A remain unclear. To define the antinociceptive mechanisms by which BoNT/A functions, the interactions between BoNT⁄A and the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) were investigated using immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation, and western blot analysis in primary mouse embryonic dorsal root ganglion neuronal cultures. Results 1) Three-week-old cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons highly expressed transient TRPV1, synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25). SV2A and SNAP-25 are the binding receptor and target protein, respectively, of BoNT⁄A. 2) TRPV1 colocalized with both BoNT⁄A and cleaved SNAP-25 when BoNT⁄A was added to dorsal root ganglia neuronal cultures. 3) After 24 hours of BoNT⁄A treatment (1 nmol⁄l), both TRPV1 and BoNT⁄A positive bands were detected in western blots of immunoprecipitated pellets. 4) Blocking TRPV1 with a specific antibody decreased the cleavage of SNAP-25 by BoNT⁄A. Conclusion BoNT/A interacts with TRPV1 both structurally and functionally in cultured mouse embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that an alternative mechanism is used by BoNT⁄A to mediate pain relief. PMID:26745805

  13. Geochemical Legacies and the Future Health of Cities: An Analysis of two Neurotoxins in Urban Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippelli, G. M.; Risch, M.

    2015-12-01

    The past and future of cities are inextricably linked, a linkage that can be seen clearly in the long-term impacts of urban geochemical legacies. As loci of population as well as the means of employment and industry to support these populations, cities have a long history of co-locating contaminating practices and people, sometimes with negative implications for human health. Working at the intersection between geochemical processes, communities, and human health is critical to grapple with environmental legacies and to support healthy, sustainable, and growing urban populations. An emerging area of environmental health research is to understand the impacts of chronic exposures and exposure mixtures—these impacts are very poorly studied, yet have materialized as perhaps the greatest threat to large-scale population health. Acute exposure to lead (Pb), a powerful neurotoxin to which children are particularly susceptible, has largely been eliminated in the U.S. and other countries through policy-based restrictions on leaded gasoline and lead-based paints. But these legacy Pb sources are still around in the form of surface soil Pb contamination, a common problem in cities and one that has only recently emerged as a pernicious and widespread chronic exposure mechanism in cities. Some urban soils are also contaminated with another neurotoxin, mercury (Hg), although very little work has been done to understand human exposures to low levels of this element in soils. The most documented human exposure to Hg is through fish consumption, so eating fish caught in urban areas presents risks for above average dietary Hg exposure. The potential double impact of chronic exposure to these two neurotoxins is pronounced in cities. Many aspects of the dose-response curves for individual elements and mixtures are poorly understood, especially at lower levels, leaving unanswered several interesting and provocative questions about environmental impacts on neurological and

  14. Differential role of molten globule and protein folding in distinguishing unique features of botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Kukreja, Roshan V; Cai, Shuowei; Singh, Bal R

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are proteins of great interest not only because of their extreme toxicity but also paradoxically for their therapeutic applications. All the known serotypes (A-G) have varying degrees of longevity and potency inside the neuronal cell. Differential chemical modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination have been suggested as possible mechanisms for their longevity, but the molecular basis of the longevity remains unclear. Since the endopeptidase domain (light chain; LC) of toxin apparently survives inside the neuronal cells for months, it is important to examine the structural features of this domain to understand its resistance to intracellular degradation. Published crystal structures (both botulinum neurotoxins and endopeptidase domain) have not provided adequate explanation for the intracellular longevity of the domain. Structural features obtained from spectroscopic analysis of LCA and LCB were similar, and a PRIME (PReImminent Molten Globule Enzyme) conformation appears to be responsible for their optimal enzymatic activity at 37°C. LCE, on the other hand, was although optimally active at 37°C, but its active conformation differed from the PRIME conformation of LCA and LCB. This study establishes and confirms our earlier finding that an optimally active conformation of these proteins in the form of PRIME exists for the most poisonous poison, botulinum neurotoxin. There are substantial variations in the structural and functional characteristics of these active molten globule related structures among the three BoNT endopeptidases examined. These differential conformations of LCs are important in understanding the fundamental structural features of proteins, and their possible connection to intracellular longevity could provide significant clues for devising new countermeasures and effective therapeutics. PMID:24568862

  15. Properties and use of botulinum toxin and other microbial neurotoxins in medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Schantz, E J; Johnson, E A

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline botulinum toxin type A was licensed in December 1989 by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of certain spasmodic muscle disorders following 10 or more years of experimental treatment on human volunteers. Botulinum toxin exerts its action on a muscle indirectly by blocking the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at the nerve ending, resulting in reduced muscle activity or paralysis. The injection of only nanogram quantities (1 ng = 30 mouse 50% lethal doses [U]) of the toxin into a spastic muscle is required to bring about the desired muscle control. The type A toxin produced in anaerobic culture and purified in crystalline form has a specific toxicity in mice of 3 x 10(7) U/mg. The crystalline toxin is a high-molecular-weight protein of 900,000 Mr and is composed of two molecules of neurotoxin (ca. 150,000 Mr) noncovalently bound to nontoxic proteins that play an important role in the stability of the toxic unit and its effective toxicity. Because the toxin is administered by injection directly into neuromuscular tissue, the methods of culturing and purification are vital. Its chemical, physical, and biological properties as applied to its use in medicine are described. Dilution and drying of the toxin for dispensing causes some detoxification, and the mouse assay is the only means of evaluation for human treatment. Other microbial neurotoxins may have uses in medicine; these include serotypes of botulinum toxins and tetanus toxin. Certain neurotoxins produced by dinoflagellates, including saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin, cause muscle paralysis through their effect on the action potential at the voltage-gated sodium channel. Saxitoxin used with anaesthetics lengthens the effect of the anaesthetic and may enhance the effectiveness of other medical drugs. Combining toxins with drugs could increase their effectiveness in treatment of human disease. PMID:1579114

  16. Interactions of the Neurotoxin Vipoxin in Solution Studied by Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Dessislava Nikolova; Genov, Nicolay; Hristov, Krassimir; Dierks, Karsten; Betzel, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The neurotoxin vipoxin is the lethal component of the venom of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis. It is a heterodimer of a basic toxic His-48 phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and an acidic nontoxic Gln-48 PLA2. The shape of the neurotoxin and its separated components in solution as well as their interactions with calcium, the brain phospholipid phosphatidylcholine, and two inhibitors, elaidoylamide and vitamin E, were investigated by dynamic light scattering. Calcium binding is connected with a conformational change in vipoxin observed as a change of the hydrodynamic shape from oblate ellipsoid to a shape closer to a sphere. The Ca2+-bound form of vipoxin, which is catalytically active, is more compact and symmetric than the calcium-free heterodimer. Similar changes were observed as a result of the Ca2+-binding to the two separated subunits. In the presence of aggregated phosphatidylcholine, the neurotoxic complex dissociates to subunits. It is supposed that only the toxic component binds to the substrate, and the other subunit, which plays a chaperone function, remains in solution. The inhibition of vipoxin with the synthetic inhibitor elaidoylamide and the natural compound vitamin E changes the shape of the toxin from oblate to prolate ellipsoid. The inhibited toxin is more asymmetric in comparison to the native one. Similar, but not so pronounced, effects were observed after the inhibition of the monomeric and homodimeric forms of the toxic His-48 PLA2. Circular dichroism measurements in the presence of urea, methylurea, and ethylurea indicate a strong hydrophobic stabilization of the neurotoxin. Hydrophobic interactions stabilize not only the folded regions but also the regions of intersubunit contacts. PMID:14695289

  17. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  18. Molecular decoys: ligand-binding recombinant proteins protect mice from curarimimetic neurotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Gershoni, J M; Aronheim, A

    1988-01-01

    Mimic ligand-binding sites of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor bind d-tubocurarine and alpha-bungarotoxin in vitro. Injection of such binding sites into mice could act as molecular decoys in vivo, providing protection against toxic ligands. This hypothesis of molecular "decoyance" has been tested in greater than 250 mice. Bacterially produced cholinergic binding sites provided a 2-fold increase in the survival rate of animals challenged with curarimimetic neurotoxins. Possible considerations for decoy designs and their applications are discussed. Images PMID:3375254

  19. Intracellular Localization of the Neurotoxin 2,4-Diaminobutyric Acid in Lathyrus sylvestris L. Leaf Tissue.

    PubMed

    Foster, J G; Cress, W D; Wright, S F; Hess, J L

    1987-04-01

    The intracellular distribution of the neurotoxin 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) in mature leaves of the perennial legume Lathyrus sylvestris L. var ;Lathco' (flatpea) was determined using subcellular fractions from mesophyll protoplasts. Chloroplasts contained about 15% of the cellular DABA. At least 75% of the DABA was vacuolar, based on the assumptions that each protoplast contained a single vacuole and that acid phosphatase occurred exclusively in the vacuole. DABA was not detectable in peroxisomal and mitochondrial fractions. Because the vacuole is not a major site of amino acid synthesis, this distribution implicates synthesis of DABA within chloroplasts with subsequent transport to and storage within the vacuoles of the mesophyll cells. PMID:16665360

  20. Early onset of neurological symptoms in fragile X premutation carriers exposed to neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ripon; Pessah, Isaac N; Gane, Louise; Ono, Michele; Hagerman, Paul J; Brunberg, James A; Tassone, Flora; Bourgeois, James A; Adams, Patrick E; Nguyen, Danh V; Hagerman, Randi

    2010-08-01

    We present four cases of fragile X premutation carriers with early neurological symptoms, including symptoms consistent with multiple sclerosis (MS) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Each patient had significant exposure to one or more environmental neurotoxicants that have documented neurotoxicity (i.e. hexachlorocyclopentadiene or C56, Agent Orange, and 2,4- or 2,6-toluene diisocyanate and dichlormate). We hypothesize that premutation carriers are a vulnerable group to neurotoxins because elevated mRNA in the premutation can lead to early cell death and brain disease, leading to neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms consistent with FXTAS. PMID:20466021

  1. Presence of antibotulinum neurotoxin antibodies in selected wild canids in Israel.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Amir; Millet, Neta; Frenkel, Chana; King, Roni; Shpigel, Nahum Y

    2007-07-01

    Serum samples from 35 golden jackals (Canis aureus syriacus), eight wolves (Canis lupus), and four red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from various regions of Israel were collected during the years 2001-04 and tested for antibodies to Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types C and D. Antibodies against BoNT types C and D were detected in 10 (29%) and in 3 (9%) of 35 golden jackals, respectively, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This report describes detection of anti BoNT antibodies in wild canids other than coyotes (Canis latrans) for the first time and demonstrates that C. botulinum type C is prevalent in Israel. PMID:17699099

  2. Biomagnification of cycad neurotoxins in flying foxes: implications for ALS-PDC in Guam.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Cox, Paul Alan

    2003-08-12

    Beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) occurs in higher levels in museum specimens of the Guamanian flying fox than in the cycad seeds the flying foxes feed on, confirming the hypothesis that cycad neurotoxins are biomagnified within the Guam ecosystem. Consumption of a single flying fox may have resulted in an equivalent BMAA dose obtained from eating 174 to 1,014 kg of processed cycad flour. Traditional feasting on flying foxes may be related to the prevalence of neuropathologic disease in Guam. PMID:12913204

  3. Early onset of neurological symptoms in fragile X premutation carriers exposed to neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Ripon; Pessah, Isaac N.; Gane, Louise; Ono, Michele; Hagerman, Paul J.; Brunberg, James A.; Tassone, Flora; Bourgeois, James A.; Adams, Patrick E.; Nguyen, Danh V.; Hagerman, Randi

    2014-01-01

    We present four cases of fragile X premutation carriers with early neurological symptoms, including symptoms consistent with multiple sclerosis (MS) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Each patient had significant exposure to one or more environmental neurotoxicants that have documented neurotoxicity (i.e. hexachlorocyclopentadiene or C56, Agent Orange, and 2,4- or 2,6-toluene diisocyanate and dichlormate). We hypothesize that premutation carriers are a vulnerable group to neurotoxins because elevated mRNA in the premutation can lead to early cell death and brain disease, leading to neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms consistent with FXTAS. PMID:20466021

  4. Two-Component Signal Transduction System CBO0787/CBO0786 Represses Transcription from Botulinum Neurotoxin Promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Dahlsten, Elias; Sahala, Elina; Heap, John T.; Minton, Nigel P.; Lindström, Miia

    2013-01-01

    Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved −10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike. PMID:23555260

  5. Detection of Clostridium tetani in human clinical samples using tetX specific primers targeting the neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Madhu; Sheikh, Nasira K; Shah, Pooja; Mehetre, Gajanan; Dharne, Mahesh S; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus resulting from ear injury remains an important health problem, particularly in the developing world. We report the successful detection of Clostridium tetani using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin. The sample was obtained from an ear discharge of a case of otogenic tetanus in a 2-year-old male child. Based on the culture results of the ear discharge, Gram staining and virulence testing by genotyping, a diagnosis of tetanus was confirmed. This is the first report from India on the successful detection of Cl. tetani in a human clinical sample using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin. PMID:26220795

  6. Tetanus neurotoxin-mediated cleavage of cellubrevin impairs epithelial cell migration and integrin-dependent cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Gavard, Julie; Irinopoulou, Theano; Mège, René-Marc; Galli, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    A role for endocytosis and exocytosis in cell migration has been proposed but not yet demonstrated. Here, we show that cellubrevin (Cb), an early endosomal v-SNARE, mediates trafficking in the lamellipod of migrating epithelial cells and partially colocalizes with markers of focal contacts. Expression of tetanus neurotoxin, which selectively cleaves Cb, significantly reduced the speed of migrating epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of tetanus neurotoxin enhanced the adhesion of epithelial cells to collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and E-cadherin; altered spreading on collagen; and impaired the recycling of β1 integrins. These results suggest that Cb-dependent membrane trafficking participates in cell motility through the regulation of cell adhesion. PMID:15851685

  7. Noradrenergic-Dopaminergic Interactions Due to DSP-4-MPTP Neurotoxin Treatments: Iron Connection.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The investigations of noradrenergic lesions and dopaminergic lesions have established particular profiles of functional deficits and accompanying alterations of biomarkers in brain regions and circuits. In the present account, the focus of these lesions is directed toward the effects upon dopaminergic neurotransmission and expression that are associated with the movement disorders and psychosis-like behavior. In this context, it was established that noradrenergic denervation, through administration of the selective noradrenaline (NA) neurotoxin, DSP-4, should be performed prior to the depletion of dopamine (DA) with the selective neurotoxin, MPTP. Employing this regime, it was shown that (i) following DSP-4 (50 mg/kg) pretreatment of C57/Bl6 mice, both the functional and neurochemical (DA loss) effects of MPTP (2 × 20 and 2 × 40 mg/kg) were markedly exacerbated, and (ii) following postnatal iron (Fe(2+), 7.5 mg/kg, on postnatal days 19-12), pretreatment with DSP-4 followed by the lower 2 × 20 mg/kg MPTP dose induced even greater losses of motor behavior and striatal DA. As yet, the combination of NA-DA depletions, and even more so Fe(2+)-NA-DA depletion, has been considered to present a movement disorder aspect although studies exploring cognitive domains are lacking. With intrusion of iron overload into this formula, the likelihood of neuropsychiatric disorder, as well, unfolds. PMID:26718588

  8. Domain Organization in Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type E is Unique: Its Implication in Faster Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, D.; Eswaramoorthy, S; Furey, W; Navaza, J; Sax, M; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven antigenically distinct neurotoxins [C. botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) A-G] sharing a significant sequence homology. Based on sequence and functional similarity, it was believed that their three-dimensional structures will also be similar. Indeed, the crystal structures of BoNTs A and B exhibit similar fold and domain association where the translocation domain is flanked on either side by binding and catalytic domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of BoNT E holotoxin and show that the domain association is different and unique, although the individual domains are similar to those of BoNTs A and B. In BoNT E, both the binding domain and the catalytic domain are on the same side of the translocation domain, and all three have mutual interfaces. This unique association may have an effect on the rate of translocation, with the molecule strategically positioned in the vesicle for quick entry into cytosol. Botulism, the disease caused by BoNT E, sets in faster than any other serotype because of its speedy internalization and translocation, and the present structure offers a credible explanation. We propose that the translocation domain in other BoNTs follows a two-step process to attain translocation-competent conformation as in BoNT E. We also suggest that this translocation-competent conformation in BoNT E is a probable reason for its faster toxic rate compared to BoNT A. However, this needs further experimental elucidation.

  9. Inhibition of botulinum neurotoxins interchain disulfide bond reduction prevents the peripheral neuroparalysis of botulism.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Giulia; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Pirazzini, Marcon; Binz, Thomas; Shone, Clifford C; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) form a growing family of metalloproteases with a unique specificity either for VAMP, SNAP25 or syntaxin. The BoNTs are grouped in seven different serotypes indicated by letters from A to G. These neurotoxins enter the cytosol of nerve terminals via a 100 kDa chain which binds to the presynaptic membrane and assists the translocation of a 50 kDa metalloprotease chain. These two chains are linked by a single disulfide bridge which plays an essential role during the entry of the metalloprotease chain in the cytosol, but thereafter it has to be reduced to free the proteolytic activity. Its reduction is mediated by thioredoxin which is continuously regenerated by its reductase. Here we show that inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase or of thioredoxin prevent the specific proteolysis of VAMP by the four VAMP-specific BoNTs: type B, D, F and G. These compounds are effective not only in primary cultures of neurons, but also in preventing the in vivo mouse limb neuroparalysis. In addition, one of these inhibitors, Ebselen, largely protects mice from the death caused by a systemic injection. Together with recent results obtained with BoNTs specific for SNAP25 and syntaxin, the present data demonstrate the essential role of the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system in reducing the interchain disulfide during the nerve intoxication mechanism of all serotypes. Therefore its inhibitors should be considered for a possible use to prevent botulism and for treating infant botulism. PMID:26449594

  10. Acute Radiation Disease : Cutaneous Syndrome and Toxic properties of Radiomimetics -Radiation Neurotoxins and Hematotoxins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Cutaneous injury is an important complication of a general or local acute irradiation. A type of a skin and tissues lesions depends on a type, intensity, and period of irradiation. Also, the clinical picture, signs, and manifestations of the cutaneous syndrome depend on a type of the radiation toxins circulated in lymph and blood of irradiated mammals. Radiation Toxins were isolated from lymph of the mammals that were irradiated and developed different forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) -Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, and Hematopoietic. Radiation Toxins can be divided into the two important types of toxins (Neu-rotoxins and Hematotoxins) or four groups. The effects of Radiation Neurotoxins include severe damages and cell death of brain, heart, gastrointestinal tissues and endothelial cells of blood and lymphatic vessels. The hematotoxicity of Hematotoxic Radiation Toxins includes lym-phopenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia in the blood circulation and transitory lymphocytosis and leukocytosis in the Central Lymphatic System. In all cases, administration of the Radiomimetics (Radiation Toxins) intramuscularly or intravenously to healthy, radiation naive mammals had induced and developed the typical clinical manifestations of the ARS. In all cases, administration of Radiomimetics by subtoxic doses had demonstrated development of typical clinical signs of the cutaneous syndrome such as hair loss, erythema, swelling, desqua-mation, blistering and skin necrosis. In animal-toxic models, we have activated development of the local skin and tissue injury after injection of Radiation Toxins with cytoxic properties.

  11. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  12. Recent developments with metalloprotease inhibitor class of drug candidates for Botulinum neurotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Gyanendra; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-03-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxins are the most poisonous of all toxins with lethal dose in nanogram quantities. They are also potential biological warfare and bioterrorism agents due to their high toxicity and ease of preparation. On the other hand BoNTs are also being increasingly used for therapeutic and cosmetic purposes, and with that the chances of accidental overdose are increasing. And despite the potential damage they could cause to human health, there are no post-intoxication drugs available so far. But progress is being made in this direction. The crystal structures in native form and bound with substrate peptides have been determined, and these are enabling structure-based drug discovery possible. High throughput assays have also been designed to speed up the screening progress. Substrate-based and small molecule inhibitors have been identified. But turning high affinity inhibitors into clinically viable drug candidates has remained a challenge. We discuss here the latest developments and the future challenges in drug discovery for Botulinum neurotoxins.

  13. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2014-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum (MADS) response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differentially regulate MEF2s remains largely unknown. In this work, we showed that MEF2A but not MEF2C or MEF2D was modified by ubiquitination in dopaminergic neuronal cell line SN4741 cells. MEF2A was ubiquitinated at its N’-terminus, and the ubiquitination of MEF2A was first detectable in the nuclear compartment and later in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitination of MEF2A correlated with reduced DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity. More importantly, disturbing the degradation of ubiquitinated MEF2A through proteasome pathway by neurotoxins known to induce Parkinson’s disease (PD) features in model animals caused accumulation of ubiquitinated MEF2A, reduced MEF2 activity, and impaired cellular viability. Our work thus provides the first evidence to demonstrate an isoforms specific regulation of MEF2s by ubiquitination-proteasome pathway in dopaminergic neuronal cell by neurotoxins, suggesting that stress signal and cellular context dependent dysregulation of MEF2s may underlie the loss of neuronal viability. PMID:22764880

  14. The elusive compass of clostridial neurotoxins: deciding when and where to go?

    PubMed

    Bercsenyi, Kinga; Giribaldi, Francesco; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2013-01-01

    Axonal transport ensures long-range delivery of essential components and signals between proximal and distal areas of the neuron, and it is crucial for neuronal homeostasis and survival. Several pathogens and virulence factors use this route to gain access to the central nervous system, exploiting the complex and still poorly understood trafficking mechanisms that regulate the dynamics of their cellular receptors. Studying the intracellular transport of neurotropic pathogens is therefore instrumental to glean new insights into these important molecular events. Botulinum (BoNT) and tetanus (TeNT) neurotoxins bind with high affinity to a variety of neurons and are internalised by specialised endocytic pathways leading to specific intracellular fates. Whereas BoNT trafficking is largely confined to the neuromuscular junction, TeNT is internalised in signalling endosomes shared with neurotrophins and their receptors, which are recruited to the fast axonal retrograde transport pathway. Recently, important paradigms regarding the mechanisms by which BoNT and TeNT interact with their cellular targets and are transported in neurons have been challenged. In this review, we summarise new findings concerning the uptake and intracellular trafficking of these neurotoxins, and discuss their implications in terms of the physiological effects of BoNT and TeNT in the central nervous system. PMID:23239350

  15. Current Status and Future Directions of Botulinum Neurotoxins for Targeting Pain Processing

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Yaksh, Tony L.; Ramachandran, Roshni

    2015-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) A1 and B1, given locally into peripheral tissues such as skin, muscles, and joints, alter nociceptive processing otherwise initiated by inflammation or nerve injury in animal models and humans. Recent data indicate that such locally delivered BoNTs exert not only local action on sensory afferent terminals but undergo transport to central afferent cell bodies (dorsal root ganglia) and spinal dorsal horn terminals, where they cleave SNAREs and block transmitter release. Increasing evidence supports the possibility of a trans-synaptic movement to alter postsynaptic function in neuronal and possibly non-neuronal (glial) cells. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted on BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B1, the only two pharmaceutically developed variants. However, now over 40 different subtypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) have been identified. By combining our existing and rapidly growing understanding of BoNT/A1 and /B1 in altering nociceptive processing with explorations of the specific characteristics of the various toxins from this family, we may be able to discover or design novel, effective, and long-lasting pain therapeutics. This review will focus on our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby BoNTs alter pain processing, and future directions in the development of these agents as pain therapeutics. PMID:26556371

  16. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in Shark Fins

    PubMed Central

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A.; Mash, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  17. Cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in shark fins.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A; Mash, Deborah C

    2012-02-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  18. Recent developments with metalloprotease inhibitor class of drug candidates for Botulinum neurotoxins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumar, Gyanendra; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2015-03-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxins are the most poisonous of all toxins with lethal dose in nanogram quantities. They are also potential biological warfare and bioterrorism agents due to their high toxicity and ease of preparation. On the other hand BoNTs are also being increasingly used for therapeutic and cosmetic purposes, and with that the chances of accidental overdose are increasing. And despite the potential damage they could cause to human health, there are no post-intoxication drugs available so far. But progress is being made in this direction. The crystal structures in native form and bound with substrate peptides have been determined, andmore » these are enabling structure-based drug discovery possible. High throughput assays have also been designed to speed up the screening progress. Substrate-based and small molecule inhibitors have been identified. But turning high affinity inhibitors into clinically viable drug candidates has remained a challenge. We discuss here the latest developments and the future challenges in drug discovery for Botulinum neurotoxins.« less

  19. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  20. Oligosaccharide composition of the neurotoxin responsive Na/sup +/ channel and the requirement of sialic acid for activity

    SciTech Connect

    Negishi, M.; Shaw, G.W.; Glick, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    The neurotoxin responsive Na/sup +/ channel was purified to homogeneity in an 18% yield from a clonal cell line of mouse neuroblastoma, N-18, metabolically labeled with L-(/sup 3/H)fucose. The Na/sup +/ channel, a glycoprotein, M/sub r/=200,000 (gradient 7-14% PAGE) was digested with Pronase and the glycopeptides were characterized by serial lectin affinity chromatography. greater than 90% of the oligosaccharides contained sialic acid and 18% were biantennary, 39% were triantennary and 30% tetraantennary. The glycoprotein was reconstituted into artificial phospholipid vesicles and /sup 86/Rb flux was stimulated (65%) by 200 ..mu..M veratridine and 1.2 ..mu..g of scorpion venom and was inhibited (95%) by 5 ..mu..M tetrodotoxin. The requirement of sialic acid for Na/sup +/ channel activity was demonstrated since neuraminidase (0.01 U) treatment of the reconstituted glycoprotein eliminated the response of /sup 86/Rb flux to the stimulating neurotoxins. In other experiments, treatment of N-18 cells with 10 ..mu..M swainsonine, an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing, altered the oligosaccharide composition of the Na/sup +/ channel. When the abnormally glycosylated Na/sup +/ channel was reconstituted into artificial phospholipid vesicles, /sup 86/Rb flux in response to neurotoxins was impaired. Thus, glycosylation of the polypeptide with oligosaccharides of specific composition and structure is essential for expression of the biological activity of the neurotoxin responsive Na/sup +/ channel.

  1. Detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A, B, and F proteolytic activity in complex matrices with picomolar to femtomolar sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid, high-throughput assays that detect and quantify botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) activity in diverse matrices are required for environmental, clinical, pharmaceutical, and food testing. The current standard, the mouse bioassay, is sensitive but is low in throughput and accuracy. In this study, we...

  2. Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew T; Austin, John W; Weedmark, Kelly A; Peck, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of more than 150 Clostridium botulinum Group II type E genomes identified a small fraction (6%) where neurotoxin-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Seven closely related (134-144 kb) neurotoxigenic plasmids of subtypes E1, E3, and E10 were characterized; all carried genes associated with plasmid mobility via conjugation. Each plasmid contained the same 24-kb neurotoxin cluster cassette (six neurotoxin cluster and six flanking genes) that had split a helicase gene, rather than the more common chromosomal rarA. The neurotoxin cluster cassettes had evolved as separate genetic units which had either exited their chromosomal rarA locus in a series of parallel events, inserting into the plasmid-borne helicase gene, or vice versa. A single intact version of the helicase gene was discovered on a nonneurotoxigenic form of this plasmid. The observed low frequency for the plasmid location may reflect one or more of the following: 1) Less efficient recombination mechanism for the helicase gene target, 2) lack of suitable target plasmids, and 3) loss of neurotoxigenic plasmids. Type E1 and E10 plasmids possessed a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus with spacers that recognized C. botulinum Group II plasmids, but not C. botulinum Group I plasmids, demonstrating their long-term separation. Clostridium botulinum Group II type E strains also carry nonneurotoxigenic plasmids closely related to C. botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. PMID:26936890

  3. Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Peck, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of more than 150 Clostridium botulinum Group II type E genomes identified a small fraction (6%) where neurotoxin-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Seven closely related (134–144 kb) neurotoxigenic plasmids of subtypes E1, E3, and E10 were characterized; all carried genes associated with plasmid mobility via conjugation. Each plasmid contained the same 24-kb neurotoxin cluster cassette (six neurotoxin cluster and six flanking genes) that had split a helicase gene, rather than the more common chromosomal rarA. The neurotoxin cluster cassettes had evolved as separate genetic units which had either exited their chromosomal rarA locus in a series of parallel events, inserting into the plasmid-borne helicase gene, or vice versa. A single intact version of the helicase gene was discovered on a nonneurotoxigenic form of this plasmid. The observed low frequency for the plasmid location may reflect one or more of the following: 1) Less efficient recombination mechanism for the helicase gene target, 2) lack of suitable target plasmids, and 3) loss of neurotoxigenic plasmids. Type E1 and E10 plasmids possessed a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus with spacers that recognized C. botulinum Group II plasmids, but not C. botulinum Group I plasmids, demonstrating their long-term separation. Clostridium botulinum Group II type E strains also carry nonneurotoxigenic plasmids closely related to C. botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. PMID:26936890

  4. Structural dynamics of the alpha-neurotoxin-acetylcholine-binding protein complex: hydrodynamic and fluorescence anisotropy decay analyses.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, Ryan E; Johnson, David A; Shi, Jianxin; Hansen, Scott B; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-20

    The three-fingered alpha-neurotoxins have played a pivotal role in elucidating the structure and function of the muscle-type and neuronal alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To advance our understanding of the alpha-neurotoxin-nAChR interaction, we examined the flexibility of alpha-neurotoxin bound to the acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP), which shares structural similarity and sequence identities with the extracellular domain of nAChRs. Because the crystal structure of five alpha-cobratoxin molecules bound to AChBP shows the toxins projecting radially like propeller "blades" from the perimeter of the donut-shaped AChBP, the toxin molecules should increase the frictional resistance and thereby alter the hydrodynamic properties of the complex. alpha-Bungarotoxin binding had little effect on the frictional coefficients of AChBP measured by analytical ultracentrifugation, suggesting that the bound toxins are flexible. To support this conclusion, we measured the anisotropy decay of four site-specifically labeled alpha-cobratoxins (conjugated at positions Lys(23), Lys(35), Lys(49), and Lys(69)) bound to AChBP and free in solution and compared their anisotropy decay properties with fluorescently labeled cysteine mutants of AChBP. The results indicated that the core of the toxin molecule is relatively flexible when bound to AChBP. When hydrodynamic and anisotropy decay analyses are taken together, they establish that only one face of the second loop of the alpha-neurotoxin is immobilized significantly by its binding. The results indicate that bound alpha-neurotoxin is not rigidly oriented on the surface of AChBP but rather exhibits segmental motion by virtue of flexibility in its fingerlike structure. PMID:16342951

  5. Analysis of Gene Expression in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Neurons Exposed to Botulinum Neurotoxin A Subtype 1 and a Type A Atoxic Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Scherf, Jacob M.; Hu, Xiaoyang Serene; Tepp, William H.; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Johnson, Eric A.; Pellett, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A1 (BoNT/A1) is a potent protein toxin responsible for the potentially fatal human illness botulism. Notwithstanding, the long-lasting flaccid muscle paralysis caused by BoNT/A has led to its utility as a powerful and versatile bio-pharmaceutical. The flaccid paralysis is due to specific cleavage of neuronal SNAREs by BoNTs. However, actions of BoNTs on intoxicated neurons besides the cleavage of SNAREs have not been studied in detail. In this study we investigated by microarray analysis the effects of BoNT/A and a catalytically inactive derivative (BoNT/A ad) on the transcriptome of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons at 2 days and 2 weeks after exposure. While there were only minor changes in expression levels at 2 days post exposure, at 2 weeks post exposure 492 genes were differentially expressed more than 2-fold in BoNT/A1-exposed cells when compared to non-exposed populations, and 682 genes were differentially expressed in BoNT/A ad-exposed cells. The vast majority of genes were similarly regulated in BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A ad-exposed neurons, and the few genes differentially regulated between BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A ad-exposed neurons were differentially expressed less than 3.5 fold. These data indicate a similar response of neurons to BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A ad exposure. The most highly regulated genes in cells exposed to either BoNT/A1 or BoNT/A ad are involved in neurite outgrowth and calcium channel sensitization. PMID:25337697

  6. Excitatory cholinergic and purinergic signaling in bladder are equally susceptible to botulinum neurotoxin a consistent with co-release of transmitters from efferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary W; Aoki, K Roger; Dolly, J Oliver

    2010-09-01

    Mediators of neuromuscular transmission in rat bladder strips were dissected pharmacologically to examine their susceptibilities to inhibition by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and elucidate a basis for the clinical effectiveness of BoNT/A in alleviating smooth muscle spasms associated with overactive bladder. BoNT/A, BoNT/C1, or BoNT/E reduced peak and average force of muscle contractions induced by electric field stimulation (EFS) in dose-dependent manners by acting only on neurogenic, tetrodotoxin-sensitive responses. BoNTs that cleaved vesicle-associated membrane protein proved to be much less effective. Acetylcholine (ACh) and ATP were found to provide virtually all excitatory input, because EFS-evoked contractions were abolished by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, combined with either a desensitizing agonist of P2X(1) and P2X(3) or a nonselective ATP receptor antagonist. Both transmitters were released in the innervated muscle layer and, thus, persisted after removal of urothelium. Atropine or a desensitizer of the P2X(1) or P2X(3) receptors did not alter the rate at which muscle contractions were weakened by BoNT/A. Moreover, although cholinergic and purinergic signaling could be partially delineated by using high-frequency EFS (which intensified a transient, largely atropine-resistant spike in muscle contractions that was reduced after P2X receptor desensitization), they proved equally susceptible to BoNT/A. Thus, equi-potent blockade of ATP co-released with ACh from muscle efferents probably contributes to the effectiveness of BoNT/A in treating bladder overactivity, including nonresponders to anticholinergic drugs. Because purinergic receptors are known mediators of sensory afferent excitation, inhibition of efferent ATP release by BoNT/A could also help to ameliorate acute pain and urgency sensation reported by some recipients. PMID:20576797

  7. Sensitive and quantitative detection of botulinum neurotoxin in neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Du, Zhong-wei; Pier, Christina L; Tepp, William H; Zhang, Su-chun; Johnson, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous protein toxins known, represent a serious bioterrorism threat but are also used as a unique and important bio-pharmaceutical to treat an increasing myriad of neurological disorders. The only currently accepted detection method by the United States Food and Drug Administration for biological activity of BoNTs and for potency determination of pharmaceutical preparations is the mouse bioassay (MBA). Recent advances have indicated that cell-based assays using primary neuronal cells can provide an equally sensitive and robust detection platform as the MBA to reliably and quantitatively detect biologically active BoNTs. This study reports for the first time a BoNT detection assay using mouse embryonic stem cells to produce a neuronal cell culture. The data presented indicate that this assay can reliably detect BoNT/A with a similar sensitivity as the MBA. PMID:21130748

  8. The receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype C binds phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD(50) of ∼1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a "dual receptor" mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro domain. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides in both assays. Interactions with phosphoinositides may facilitate tighter binding between neuronal membranes and BoNT/C. PMID:22120109

  9. Recombinant botulinum neurotoxin A heavy chain-based delivery vehicles for neuronal cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mengfei; Chang, Li-Hsin; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Bloom, Jordan E.; Gu, Zhengrong; Aberle, Karla K.; Teymorian, Sasha A.; Bannai, Yuka; Johnson, Steven C.; McArdle, Joseph J.; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2011-01-01

    The long half-life of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in cells poses a challenge in developing post-exposure therapeutics complementary to existing antitoxin strategies. Delivery vehicles consisting of the toxin heavy chain (HC), including the receptor-binding domain and translocation domain, connected to an inhibitory cargo offer a possible solution for rescuing intoxicated neurons in victims paralyzed from botulism. Here, we report the expression and purification of soluble recombinant prototype green fluorescent protein (GFP) cargo proteins fused to the entire BoNT/A-HC (residues 544–1295) in Escherichia coli with up to a 40 amino acid linker inserted between the cargo and BoNT/A-HC vehicle. We show that these GFP-HC fusion proteins are functionally active and readily taken up by cultured neuronal cells as well as by neuronal cells in mouse motor nerve endings. PMID:21051321

  10. [Expression, antiserum preparation and bioactivity assays of insect neurotoxin LqhIT2].

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Xia, Yuxian

    2008-10-01

    According to the codon bias of Pichia pastoris, the mature insect neurotoxin gene LqhIT2 was synthesized based on its amino acid sequence and was cloned to vector of PET-30a (+) and pPIC9K respectively. The fusion protein expressed in Escherichia. coli was induced with IPTG and purified with Ni-NTA His Bind Column. The purified fusion protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice, and antiserum obtained was highly specific with the titer of over 1:128 000. Using the antiserum, high-level expression transformants of P. pastoris were screened by dot blotting. The highest expression of recombinant LqhIT2 was about 9 mg/L in baffled flasks. The fusion protein of LqhIT2 expressed in E. coli was not toxic to locust, but the recombinant LqhIT2 expressed in P. pastoris had insecticidal activity against locust through injection. PMID:19149189

  11. Differential Response of Pig Masseter to Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes A and B

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zi-Jun; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Ye, Wenmin; Herring, Susan W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pigs respond to direct administration of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), although they are resistant to botulism. The human masseter is frequently targeted for BoNT therapy. We aimed to understand how BoNT affects chewing by injecting porcine masseters. Methods One masseter of minipigs was injected with BoNT serotype A or B at doses comparable to those used in humans. Masticatory function was evaluated electromyographically. Muscle force was measured during tetany. Four weeks after injection, strain gauges affixed to the mandible assessed bone strain during chewing. Masseter mass and fiber diameter were measured after euthanasia. Results BoNT-A had no measurable effect. In contrast, BoNT-B reduced electrical activity and muscle force, producing substantial asymmetry between injected and uninjected muscles. Discussion The pig masseter is highly resistant to direct injection of BoNT-A, but it is affected by BoNT-B. PMID:26039454

  12. Three Dimensional Solution Structure of Neurotoxin CM-11 from the Ophiophagus hannah.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Dong; Pei, Feng-Kui; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pang, Yu-Xi

    1998-01-01

    The Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra) neurotoxin CM-11 is a small protein with 72 amino acid residues. Based on complete assignments of (1)H-NMR resonances and determination of secondary structures of CM-11, 349 distance and 27 dihedral angle constraints including 19 psi's and 8 Xi (1)'s were collected from NOESY and DQF-COSY, and the chemical stereospecific assignment of Beta(1)H was partially achieved. Twelve structures with lower energy were obtained via metric matrix distance geometry and refinement with simulated annealing. These structures have a low RMSD of 0.14 nm for backbone atoms and 0.20 nm for heavy atoms, with no distance constraint violation more than 0.05 nm, and no dihedral angle violation more than 3deg;. PMID:12174257

  13. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Measuring its Activity in Serum and Milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are bacterial protein toxins which are considered likely agents for bioterrorism due to their extreme toxicity and high availability. A new mass spectrometry based assay called Endopep MS detects and defines the toxin serotype in clinical and food matrices via toxin activity upon a peptide substrate which mimics the toxin's natural target. Furthermore, the subtype of the toxin is differentiated by employing mass spectrometry based proteomic techniques on the same sample. The Endopep-MS assay selectively detects active BoNT and defines the serotype faster and with sensitivity greater than the mouse bioassay. One 96-well plate can be analyzed in under 7 h. On higher level or "hot" samples, the subtype can then be differentiated in less than 2 h with no need for DNA.

  14. Neutralizing antibodies to botulinum neurotoxin type A in aesthetic medicine: five case reports

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sebastian; Hamilton, Mark; Sanches, Elena; Starovatova, Polina; Gubanova, Elena; Reshetnikova, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin injections are a valuable treatment modality for many therapeutic indications as well as in the aesthetic field for facial rejuvenation. As successful treatment requires repeated injections over a long period of time, secondary resistance to botulinum toxin preparations after repeated injections is an ongoing concern. We report five case studies in which neutralizing antibodies to botulinum toxin type A developed after injection for aesthetic use and resulted in secondary treatment failure. These results add to the growing number of reports in the literature for secondary treatment failure associated with high titers of neutralizing antibodies in the aesthetic field. Clinicians should be aware of this risk and implement injection protocols that minimize resistance development. PMID:24379687

  15. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  16. Phenyltriazolinones as potent factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quan, Mimi L; Pinto, Donald J P; Rossi, Karen A; Sheriff, Steven; Alexander, Richard S; Amparo, Eugene; Kish, Kevin; Knabb, Robert M; Luettgen, Joseph M; Morin, Paul; Smallwood, Angela; Woerner, Francis J; Wexler, Ruth R

    2010-02-15

    We have discovered that phenyltriazolinone is a novel and potent P1 moiety for coagulation factor Xa. X-ray structures of the inhibitors with a phenyltriazolinone in the P1 position revealed that the side chain of Asp189 has reoriented resulting in a novel S1 binding pocket which is larger in size to accommodate the phenyltriazolinone P1 substrate. PMID:20100660

  17. Botulinum neurotoxin type A inhibits synaptic vesicle 2 expression in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Bandala, C; Cortés-Algara, AL; Mejía-Barradas, CM; Ilizaliturri-Flores, I; Dominguez-Rubio, R; Bazán-Méndez, CI; Floriano-Sánchez, E; Luna-Arias, JP; Anaya-Ruiz, M; Lara-Padilla, E

    2015-01-01

    Aim: It is known that botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) improves some kinds of cancer (e.g. prostate) and that synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) is the molecular target of this neurotoxin. Besides having potential therapeutic value, this glycoprotein has recently been proposed as a molecular marker for several types of cancer. Although the mechanisms of cancer development and the improvement found with botulinum treatment are not well understood, the formation of the botulinum-SV2 complex may influence the presence and distribution of SV2 and the function of vesicles. To date, there are no reports on the possible effect of botulinum on breast cancer of unknown causes, which have a great impact on women’s health. Thus we determined the presence of SV2 in three breast cancer cell lines and the alterations found with botulinum application. Materials and methods: With and without adding 10 units of botulinum, SV2 protein expression was determined by optical densitometry in T47D, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines and the distribution of SV2 was observed with immunochemistry (hematoxylin staining). Results: The SV2 protein was abundant in the cancer cells herein tested, and maximally so in T47D. In all three cancer cell lines botulinum diminished SV2 expression, which was found mostly in the cell periphery. Conclusion: SV2 could be a molecular marker in breast cancer. Its expression and distribution is regulated by botulinum, suggesting an interesting control mechanism for SV2 expression and a possible alternative therapy. Further studies are needed in this sense. PMID:26339411

  18. Neurotoxin-sensitive sodium channels in neurons developing in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Couraud, F; Martin-Moutot, N; Koulakoff, A; Berwald-Netter, Y

    1986-01-01

    Fetal mouse brain cells were investigated by 22Na+ flux assays with the aim to determine the ontogenetic time course of appearance of functional voltage-sensitive sodium channels. Their pharmacological properties were assessed by measurement of the response to known neurotoxins, acting at site 1, 2, or 3 of the Na+ channel. Brain cell suspensions, prepared at 11-19 d of prenatal development in vivo, and fetal brain neurons in culture were explored. In vivo neurotoxin-sensitive Na+ influx becomes detectable at 12 d of gestation, in concordance with the time of appearance of saturable binding sites for alpha-scorpion toxin (alpha-ScTx) and saxitoxin. Progression in fetal age or in time in vitro is accompanied by an increase in the initial rate and in the amplitude of Na+ uptake stimulated by batrachotoxin or veratridine. The general pharmacological properties of developing Na+ channels are very similar to the known properties of voltage-dependent Na+ channels in adult nerve: Batrachotoxin acts as a full channel agonist and veratridine as a partial agonist. Their respective apparent affinities are increased in presence of alpha-ScTx, in agreement with the known positive cooperativity of toxins acting at sites 2 and 3 of the Na+ channel. alpha-ScTx alone induces a small increase in Na+ permeability; its effect is greatly amplified in the presence of batrachotoxin or veratridine. The apparent affinity of alpha-ScTx is reduced by cell depolarization. Tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin block the increase in Na+ permeability induced by batrachotoxin, veratridine, and alpha-ScTx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2418173

  19. Protective potential of recombinant non-purified botulinum neurotoxin serotypes C and D.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Clóvis; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo Pouey; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2016-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes C and D are responsible for cattle botulism, a fatal paralytic disease that results in great economic losses in livestock production. Vaccination is the main approach to prevent cattle botulism. However, production of commercially available vaccines (toxoids) involves high risk and presents variation of BoNT production between batches. Such limitations can be attenuated by the development of novel nontoxic recombinant vaccines through a simple and reproducible process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective potential of recombinant non-purified botulinum neurotoxin serotypes C and D. Bivalent vaccines containing 200 μg rHCC and rHCD each were formulated in three different ways: (1) purified antigens; (2) recombinant Escherichia coli bacterins; (3) recombinant E. coli cell lysates (supernatant and inclusion bodies). Guinea pigs immunized subcutaneously with recombinant formulations developed a protective immune response against the respective BoNTs as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. Purified recombinant antigens were capable of inducing 13 IU/mL antitoxin C and 21 IU/mL antitoxin D. Similarly, both the recombinant bacterins and the cell lysate formulations were capable of inducing 12 IU/mL antitoxin C and 20 IU/mL antitoxin D. These values are two times as high as compared to values induced by the commercial toxoid used as control, and two to ten times as high as the minimum amount required by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MAPA), respectively. Therefore, we used a practical, industry-friendly, and efficient vaccine production process that resulted in formulations capable of inducing protective immune response (neutralizing antitoxins) against botulism serotypes C and D. PMID:27236078

  20. A protein chip membrane-capture assay for botulinum neurotoxin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, Severine; Ferracci, Geraldine; Berthomieu, Maelys; Kozaki, Shunji; Miquelis, Raymond; Boucraut, Jose; Seagar, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins A and B (BoNT/A and B) are neuromuscular blocking agents which inhibit neurotransmission by cleaving the intra-cellular presynaptic SNARE proteins SNAP-25 and VAMP2, localized respectively in plasma membrane and synaptic vesicles. These neurotoxins are both dangerous pathogens and powerful therapeutic agents with numerous clinical and cosmetic applications. Consequently there is a need for in vitro assays of their biological activity to screen for potential inhibitors and to replace the widely used in vivo mouse assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure membrane vesicle capture by antibodies against SNAP-25 and VAMP2. Substrate cleavage by BoNTs modified capture providing a method to assay toxin activity. Firstly using synaptic vesicles as a substrate, a comparison of the EC{sub 50}s for BoNT/B obtained by SPR, ELISA or flow cytometry indicated similar sensitivity although SPR assays were more rapid. Sonication of brain or neuronal cultures generated plasma membrane fragments with accessible intra-cellular epitopes adapted to measurement of BoNT/A activity. SPR responses were proportional to antigen concentration permitting detection of as little as 4 pM SNAP-25 in crude lysates. BoNT/A activity was assayed using monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize a SNAP-25 epitope generated by the proteolytic action of the toxin. Incubation of intact primary cultured neurons with BoNT/A yielded an EC{sub 50} of 0.5 pM. The SPR biosensor method was sensitive enough to monitor BoNT/A and B activity in cells cultured in a 96-well format providing an alternative to experimental animals for toxicological assays.

  1. Structural studies on the zinc-endopeptidase light chain of tetanus neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, V; Vangelista, L; Schiavo, G; Tonello, F; Montecucco, C

    1995-04-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) blocks neuroexocytosis via a zinc-endopeptidase activity highly specific for vescicle-associated membrane protein(VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT is the prototype of clostridial neurotoxins, a new family of metalloproteinases. They consist of three domains and the proteolytic activity is displayed by the 50-kDa light chain (L chain). The L chain was isolated here in the native state from bacterial filtrates of Clostridium tetani and its structure was studied via circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The secondary structure content (27% alpha-helix and 43% beta-sheet), estimated by far-ultraviolet CD measurements, was in reasonable agreement with that obtained by standard predictive methods (25% alpha-helix and 49% beta-sheet). Moreover, the hypothetical zinc-binding motif, encompassing residues His-Glu-Leu-Ile-His, was correctly predicted to be in alpha-helical conformation, as also expected on the basis of the geometrical requirements for a correct coordination of the zinc ion. Both near-ultraviolet CD and fluorescence data strongly suggest that the single Trp43 residue is buried and constrained in a hydrophobic environment, likely distant from the zinc ion located in the active-site cleft. The contribution of the bound zinc ion to the overall conformation of TeNT L chain was investigated by different and complementary techniques, including spectroscopic (far- and near-ultraviolet CD, fluorescence, second derivative absorption spectroscopy) as well as proteolytic probes. The results indicate that the zinc ion plays little, if any, role in determining the structural properties of the L chain molecule. Similarly, the metal-free apo-enzyme and the holo-protein share common stability features evaluated in respect to different physico-chemical parameters (pH, temperature and urea concentration). These results parallel those obtained on thermolysin, a zinc-dependent neutral endoprotease from Bacillus thermoproteolyticus, where both

  2. Active-site mutagenesis of tetanus neurotoxin implicates TYR-375 and GLU-271 in metalloproteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, O; Caccin, P; Rigoni, M; Tonello, F; Bortoletto, N; Stevens, R C; Montecucco, C

    2001-08-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) blocks neurotransmitter release by cleaving VAMP/synaptobrevin, a membrane associated protein involved in synaptic vesicle fusion. Such activity is exerted by the N-terminal 50kDa domain of TeNT which is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase (TeNT-L-chain). Based on the three-dimensional structure of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) and serotype B (BoNT/B), two proteins closely related to TeNT, and on X-ray scattering studies of TeNT, we have designed mutations at two active site residues to probe their involvement in activity. The active site of metalloproteases is composed of a primary sphere of residues co-ordinating the zinc atom, and a secondary sphere of residues that determines proteolytic specificity and activity. Glu-261 and Glu-267 directly co-ordinates the zinc atom in BoNT/A and BoNT/B respectively and the corresponding residue of TeNT was replaced by Asp or by the non conservative residue Ala. Tyr-365 is 4.3A away from zinc in BoNT/A, and the corresponding residue of TeNT was replaced by Phe or by Ala. The purified mutants had CD, fluorescence and UV spectra closely similar to those of the wild-type molecule. The proteolytic activity of TeNT-Asp-271 (E271D) is similar to that of the native molecule, whereas that of TeNT-Phe-375 (Y375F) is lower than the control. Interestingly, the two Ala mutants are completely devoid of enzymatic activity. These results demonstrate that both Glu-271 and Tyr-375 are essential for the proteolytic activity of TeNT. PMID:11306125

  3. Novel Ganglioside-mediated Entry of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D into Neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kroken, Abby R.; Karalewitz, Andrew P.-A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2012-02-07

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are organized into seven serotypes, A-G. Although several BoNT serotypes enter neurons through synaptic vesicle cycling utilizing dual receptors (a ganglioside and a synaptic vesicle-associated protein), the entry pathway of BoNT/D is less well understood. Although BoNT/D entry is ganglioside-dependent, alignment and structural studies show that BoNT/D lacks key residues within a conserved ganglioside binding pocket that are present in BoNT serotypes A, B, E, F, and G, which indicate that BoNT/D-ganglioside interactions may be unique. In this study BoNT/D is shown to have a unique association with ganglioside relative to the other BoNT serotypes, utilizing a ganglioside binding loop (GBL, residues Tyr-1235-Ala-1245) within the receptor binding domain of BoNT/D (HCR/D) via b-series gangliosides, including GT1b, GD1b, and GD2. HCR/D bound gangliosides and entered neurons dependent upon the aromatic ring of Phe-1240 within the GBL. This is the first BoNT-ganglioside interaction that is mediated by a phenylalanine. In contrast, Trp-1238, located near the N terminus of the ganglioside binding loop, was mostly solvent-inaccessible and appeared to contribute to maintaining the loop structure. BoNT/D entry and intoxication were enhanced by membrane depolarization via synaptic vesicle cycling, where HCR/D colocalized with synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle marker, but immunoprecipitation experiments did not detect direct association with synaptic vesicle protein 2. Thus, BoNT/D utilizes unique associations with gangliosides and synaptic vesicles to enter neurons, which may facilitate new neurotoxin therapies.

  4. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities. PMID:24755394

  5. High-resolution crystal structure of HA33 of botulinum neurotoxin type B progenitor toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced as progenitor toxin complexes (PTCs) by Clostridium botulinum. The PTCs are composed of BoNT and non-toxic neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs), which serve to protect and deliver BoNT through the gastrointestinal tract in food borne botulism. HA33 is a key NAP component that specifically recognizes host carbohydrates and helps enrich PTC on the intestinal lumen preceding its transport across the epithelial barriers. Here, we report the crystal structure of HA33 of type B PTC (HA33/B) in complex with lactose at 1.46Å resolution. The structural comparisons among HA33 of serotypes A-D reveal two different HA33-glycan interaction modes. The glycan-binding pockets on HA33/A and B are more suitable to recognize galactose-containing glycans in comparison to the equivalent sites on HA33/C and D. On the contrary, HA33/C and D could potentially recognize Neu5Ac as an independent receptor, whereas HA33/A and B do not. These findings indicate that the different oral toxicity and host susceptibility observed among different BoNT serotypes could be partly determined by the serotype-specific interaction between HA33 and host carbohydrate receptors. Furthermore, we have identified a key structural water molecule that mediates the HA33/B-lactose interactions. It provides the structural basis for development of new receptor-mimicking compounds, which have enhanced binding affinity with HA33 through their water-displacing moiety. PMID:24631690

  6. Snake venom toxins. The amino-acid sequence of a short-neurotoxin homologue from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Strydom, D J

    1977-06-01

    The third most abundant component of black mamba venom, named FS2, was sequenced with the aid of sequenator studies and peptides derived by tryptic and chymotryptic digestion. Cyanogen bromide digests provided extra information to support the proposed structure. This protein is a homologue of the short neurotoxins of snake venom, but is much less toxic. Its structure is quite different from both neurotoxins and the other mamba proteins, called angusticeps types (neurotoxin homologues). Comparison of the known angusticeps-type toxins from mamba venom with mamba neurotoxins and each other leads to proposals that these proteins of low toxicity are inventions of the group of mambas and that three different, as yet unknown, functions will be associated with the three subgroups that are discernable. PMID:880951

  7. Expression and characterization of recombinant human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin-anti-transferrin receptor sFv.

    PubMed

    Newton, D L; Nicholls, P J; Rybak, S M; Youle, R J

    1994-10-28

    The gene for the human recombinant eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (rEDN) was synthesized and fused to the gene encoding a single chain antibody (sFv) to the human transferrin receptor (EDNsFv). Both rEDN and EDNsFv were expressed as insoluble proteins in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Following denaturation and renaturation, EDN and EDNsFv were partially purified by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. Final purification of EDN was achieved by Sephadex G-100, whereas EDNsFv which contained a 6-histidyl residue carboxyl terminus was highly purified using the metal chelate resin, Ni(2+)-nitriloacetic acid. Whereas the recombinant EDN had ribonuclease activity that was similar to the native protein, the fusion protein had enzymatic activity that was 6-13% that of native EDN. The fusion protein was able to bind to the human transferrin receptor. In contrast to rEDN that had no inherent cytotoxicity to human tumor cells, the EDNsFv fusion protein was cytotoxic to human leukemia cells that express the human transferrin receptor with an IC50, 0.2-1 nM. At 1.3 nM EDNsFv, no cytotoxicity was observed on cells that lack the human transferrin receptor. Free antibody to the human transferrin receptor, E6, inhibited the cytotoxicity of the EDNsFv. Human enzymes may be engineered to acquire cytotoxic properties by fusing them to antibodies. Thus, they may be candidates for the construction of immunofusion proteins that may be less immunogenic than immunotoxins containing bacterial- or plant-derived toxin moieties. PMID:7929408

  8. Structure-function relationships of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and of a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein in their interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, T.L. )

    1991-11-12

    Peptides corresponding to portions of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and to a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthetically modified in order to gain information on structure-function relationships of neurotoxin loop 2 interactions with the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of synthetic peptides to the acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ membranes was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of {sup 125}I-{alpha}-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The peptides showing the highest affinity for the receptor were a peptide corresponding to the sequence of loop 2 (residues 25-44) of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) toxin b and the structurally similar segment of CVS rabies virus glycoprotein. These affinities were comparable to those of d-tubocurarine and suberyldicholine. These results demonstrate the importance of loop 2 in the neurotoxin interaction with the receptor. N- and C-terminal deletions of the loop 2 peptides and substitution of residues invariant or highly conserved among neurotoxins were performed in order to determine the role of individual residues in binding. Residues 25-40 are the most crucial in the interaction with the acetylcholine receptor. Since this region of the glycoprotein contains residues corresponding to all of the functionally invariant neurotoxin residues, it may interact with the acetylcholine receptor through a mechanism similar to that of the neurotoxins.

  9. Optimizing facial rejuvenation outcomes by combining poly-L-lactic acid, hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and neurotoxins: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Z Paul; Daro-Kaftan, Elizabeth

    2014-02-01

    Reversal of the visible signs of facial aging with the use of injectable products as an alternative to surgery has become more popular, with nearly 5 million procedures performed in the United States in 2012. Volume augmentation products, such as hyaluronic acid (HA), calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), are often used in combination with one another and with neurotoxins for facial rejuvenation because of the complementary modes of action. This article presents 2 case reports involving patientspecific combinations of 2 different HA products, injectable PLLA, and CaHA with incobotulinumtoxinA or abobotulinumtoxinA. The combination of HA, CaHA, PLLA, and neurotoxins has resulted in outstanding outcomes for many patients, with no clinical evidence of increased adverse events secondary to combination therapy. PMID:24509971

  10. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing: Sequential assignment of resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Krishna, N.R. )

    1989-02-21

    The authors report the sequential assignment of resonances to specific residues in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the variant-3 neurotoxin from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (range southwestern U.S.A.). A combination of two-dimensional NMR experiments such as 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and single- and double-RELAY coherence transfer spectroscopy has been employed on samples of the protein dissolved in D{sub 2}O and in H{sub 2}O for assignment purposes. These studies provide a basis for the determination of the solution-phase conformation of this protein and for undertaking detailed structure-function studies of these neurotoxins that modulate the flow of sodium current by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  11. Lycopodium clavatum exine microcapsules enable safe oral delivery of 3,4-diaminopyridine for treatment of botulinum neurotoxin A intoxication.

    PubMed

    Harris, T L; Wenthur, C J; Diego-Taboada, A; Mackenzie, G; Corbitt, T S; Janda, K D

    2016-03-18

    3,4-Diaminopyridine has shown promise in reversing botulinum intoxication, but poor pharmacokinetics and a narrow therapeutic window limit its clinical utility. Thus, we developed a pH-dependent oral delivery platform using club moss spore exines. These exine microcapsules slowed 3,4-diaminopyridine absorption, limited its seizure activity, and enabled delivery of doses which prolonged mouse survival after botulism neurotoxin A intoxication. PMID:26906286

  12. Structural And Biochemical Studies of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype C1 Light Chain Protease: Implications for Dual Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, R.; Sikorra, S.; Stegmann, C.M.; Pich, A.; Binz, T.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism and tetanus. They block neurotransmitter release through specific proteolysis of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) SNAP-25, syntaxin, and synaptobrevin, which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The catalytic component of the clostridial neurotoxins is their light chain (LC), a Zn2+ endopeptidase. There are seven structurally and functionally related botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), termed serotype A to G, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). Each of them exhibits unique specificity for their target SNAREs and peptide bond(s) they cleave. The mechanisms of action for substrate recognition and target cleavage are largely unknown. Here, we report structural and biochemical studies of BoNT/C1-LC, which is unique among BoNTs in that it exhibits dual specificity toward both syntaxin and SNAP-25. A distinct pocket (S1') near the active site likely achieves the correct register for the cleavage site by only allowing Ala as the P1' residue for both SNAP-25 and syntaxin. Mutations of this SNAP-25 residue dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. The remote a-exosite that was previously identified in the complex of BoNT/A-LC and SNAP-25 is structurally conserved in BoNT/C1. However, mutagenesis experiments show that the a-exosite of BoNT/C1 plays a less stringent role in substrate discrimination in comparison to that of BoNT/A, which could account for its dual substrate specificity.

  13. Structural and biochemical studies of botulinum neurotoxin serotype C1 light chain protease: implications for dual substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongsheng; Sikorra, Stefan; Stegmann, Christian M; Pich, Andreas; Binz, Thomas; Brunger, Axel T

    2007-09-18

    Clostridial neurotoxins are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism and tetanus. They block neurotransmitter release through specific proteolysis of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) SNAP-25, syntaxin, and synaptobrevin, which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The catalytic component of the clostridial neurotoxins is their light chain (LC), a Zn2+ endopeptidase. There are seven structurally and functionally related botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), termed serotype A to G, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). Each of them exhibits unique specificity for their target SNAREs and peptide bond(s) they cleave. The mechanisms of action for substrate recognition and target cleavage are largely unknown. Here, we report structural and biochemical studies of BoNT/C1-LC, which is unique among BoNTs in that it exhibits dual specificity toward both syntaxin and SNAP-25. A distinct pocket (S1') near the active site likely achieves the correct register for the cleavage site by only allowing Ala as the P1' residue for both SNAP-25 and syntaxin. Mutations of this SNAP-25 residue dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. The remote alpha-exosite that was previously identified in the complex of BoNT/A-LC and SNAP-25 is structurally conserved in BoNT/C1. However, mutagenesis experiments show that the alpha-exosite of BoNT/C1 plays a less stringent role in substrate discrimination in comparison to that of BoNT/A, which could account for its dual substrate specificity. PMID:17718519

  14. In vitro detection of cardiotoxins or neurotoxins affecting ion channels or pumps using beating cardiomyocytes as alternative for animal testing.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Peter J M; de Haan, Laura H J; Koning, Rosella; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Bovee, Toine F H

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated if and to what extent murine stem cell-derived beating cardiomyocytes within embryoid bodies can be used as a broad screening in vitro assay for neurotoxicity testing, replacing for example in vivo tests for marine neurotoxins. Effect of nine model compounds, acting on either the Na(+), K(+), or Ca(2+) channels or the Na(+)/K(+) ATP-ase pump, on the beating was assessed. Diphenhydramine, veratridine, isradipine, verapamil and ouabain induced specific beating arrests that were reversible and none of the concentrations tested induced cytotoxicity. Three K(+) channel blockers, amiodarone, clofilium and sematilide, and the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump inhibitor digoxin had no specific effect on the beating. In addition, two marine neurotoxins i.e. saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin elicited specific beating arrests in cardiomyocytes. Comparison of the results obtained with cardiomyocytes to those obtained with the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay revealed that the cardiomyocytes were generally somewhat more sensitive for the model compounds affecting Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, but less sensitive for the compounds affecting K(+) channels. The stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were not as sensitive as the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay for saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin. It is concluded that the murine stem cell-derived beating cardiomyocytes provide a sensitive model for detection of specific neurotoxins and that the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay may be a more promising cell-based assay for the screening of marine biotoxins. PMID:25479353

  15. Induction of protective neutralizing antibody responses against botulinum neurotoxin serotype C using plasmid carried by PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruwona, Tinashe B; Xu, Haiyue; Li, Junwei; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Kumar, Amit; Zeng, Mingtao; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a lethal neurotoxin, for which there is currently not an approved vaccine. Recent efforts in developing vaccine candidates against botulism have been directed at the heavy chain fragment of BoNT, because antibodies against this region have been shown to prevent BoNT from binding to its receptor and thus to nerve cell surface, offering protection against BoNT intoxication. In the present study, it was shown that immunization with plasmid DNA that encodes the 50 KDa C-terminal fragment of the heavy chain of BoNT serotype C (i.e., BoNT/C-Hc50) and is carried by cationic poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles induces stronger BoNT/C-specific antibody responses, as compared to immunization with the plasmid alone. Importantly, the antibodies have BoNT/C-neutralizing activity, protecting the immunized mice from a lethal dose of BoNT/C challenge. A plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the Hc50 fragments of BoNT serotypes that cause human botulism may represent a viable vaccine candidate for protecting against botulinum neurotoxin intoxication. PMID:26837242

  16. A programmable microvalve-based microfluidic array for characterization of neurotoxin-induced responses of individual C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hui; Jiang, Lei; Shi, Weiwei; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2009-01-01

    The soil dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is an excellent model organism for the study of numerous disease including neurodegenerative disease. In this study, a programmable microvalve-based microfluidic array for real-time and long-term monitoring of the neurotoxin-induced responses of the individual C. elegans was developed. The device consisted of a flow layer and a control layer, which were used for worm manipulation. By activating the programmable microvalves in the control layer, mutiple worms could be individually captured and intermittently immobilized in parallel channels. Thus the mobility behavior, together with the corresponding dopaminergic neuron features of the worms in response to neurotoxin, could be investigated simultaneously. It was found that the neurotoxin MPP+ enabled to induce mobility defects and dopaminergic neurons loss in worms. The established system is easy and fast to operate, which offers not only the controllable microenvironment for analyzing the individual worms in parallel, monitoring the same worm over time, but also the capability to characterize the mobility behavior and neuron features in response to stimuli simultaneously. In addition, the device enabled to sustain the worm culture over most of their adult lifespan without any harm to worm, providing a potential platform for lifespan and aging research. PMID:20216976

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of deposits of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and eosinophil peroxidase in the myocardium of patients with Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Molina, H A; Kierszenbaum, F

    1988-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study of eosinophil distribution in the inflammatory cell infiltrates of four different types of myocardial lesions associated with Chagas' disease--caused by Trypanosoma cruzi--showed larger numbers of these cells in areas presenting tissue necrosis and degeneration, most notably in patients with the most severe myocarditis from a histopathological stand-point. Using antisera specific for human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin or eosinophil peroxidase, we detected deposits of these secretion products on myofibres and in the interstitium of chagasic myocardium displaying necrosis and degeneration but rarely in other types of lesions. These deposits were not detectable in the myocardium of non-chagasic patients who had died from myocardial infarction (acute or in the scarring stage) or myocarditis secondary to bacterial endocarditis. When human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin was incubated with myoblast monolayers there was a significant cell injury, detachment and lysis. These effects were abrogated by yeast RNA, added as a competitive ribonuclease substrate, and inhibited by the ribonuclease inhibitor RNasin, suggesting that the ribonuclease activity of the eosinophil-derived neurotoxin was involved in the effect. These results suggest a link between eosinophil infiltration and necrosis in chagasic myocardial lesions and point to EDN, and perhaps other toxic eosinophil secretion products, as possible mediators of tissue damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3049321

  18. Ex vivo inhibition of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types B, C, E, and F by small molecular weight inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Vicki A; Ahmed, S Ashraf; Olson, Mark A; Mizanur, Rahman M; Stafford, Robert G; Roxas-Duncan, Virginia I; Smith, Leonard A

    2015-05-01

    Two small molecular weight inhibitors, compounds CB7969312 and CB7967495, that displayed inhibition of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A in a previous study, were evaluated for inhibition of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes B, C, E, and F. The small molecular weight inhibitors were assessed by molecular modeling, UPLC-based peptide cleavage assay; and an ex vivo assay, the mouse phrenic nerve - hemidiaphragm assay (MPNHDA). While both compounds were inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes B, C, and F in the MPNHDA, compound CB7969312 was effective at lower molar concentrations than compound CB7967495. However, compound CB7967495 was significantly more effective at preventing BoNTE intoxication than compound CB7969312. In the UPLC-based peptide cleavage assay, CB7969312 was also more effective against LcC. Both compounds inhibited BoNTE, but not BoNTF, LcE, or LcF in the UPLC-based peptide cleavage assay. Molecular modeling studies predicted that both compounds would be effective inhibitors of BoNTs B, C, E, and F. But CB7967495 was predicted to be a more effective inhibitor of the four serotypes (B, C, E, and F) than CB7969312. This is the first report of a small molecular weight compound that inhibits serotypes B, C, E, and F in the ex vivo assay. PMID:25707753

  19. Specific neurotoxin lesions of median raphe serotonergic neurons disrupt maternal behavior in the lactating rat.

    PubMed

    Barofsky, A L; Taylor, J; Tizabi, Y; Kumar, R; Jones-Quartey, K

    1983-11-01

    Impairments in lactation after electrolytic lesions of the median raphe (MR) nucleus have been corrected by treatment with PRL. Specific serotonin neurotoxin lesions were used in the present study to determine whether decrements in litter growth after electrolytic lesions could be attributed to serotonergic neuron damage at the MR locus, and whether MR lesions (MRL) disrupted suckling-induced PRL release. Intracerebral microinjection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into the MR nucleus produced dose-related decrements in litter growth after either 4 micrograms (sham, 1.35 +/- 0.05; MRL, 1.04 +/- 0.05 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001) or 8 micrograms 5,7-DHT (sham, 1.35 +/- 0.06; MRL, 0.87 +/- 0.11 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001). Despite hypothalamic serotonin depletions of 15% and 55%, respectively, for the two doses of 5,7-DHT, there was no difference between sham and MRL animals in either basal or suckling-induced PRL release. When lesions were placed on day 1 of lactation (L) so that killing on day 7-L corresponded to the early maximal neurotoxin effect, MRL mothers still showed litter growth decrements (0.37 +/- 0.07; sham, 0.98 +/- 0.08 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001) and normal PRL values. When maternal behavior was examined, MRL animals exhibited a higher incidence of abnormal behaviors (failure to retrieve pups, cannibalism, and failure to initiate suckling during a 1-h test period; Fisher's exact P, Sham vs. MRL, less than 0.01, less than 0.05, and 0.15, respectively) than sham animals or animals with 5,7-DHT lesions in the dorsal raphe nucleus or superior colliculus. In addition, suckling behavior scores, determined from daily suckling behavior observations, were lowest in the MRL group and correlated with litter growth only in this group (r = 0.789; P less than 0.01). These data suggest that serotonergic elements in the MR nucleus play an obligatory role in maintaining normal maternal behavior during lactation, but they are not involved in suckling

  20. Oxidative modification of human ceruloplasmin induced by a catechol neurotoxin, salsolinol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Sub; Kang, Jae Yoon; Kang, Jung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Salsolinol (SAL), a compound derived from dopamine metabolism, is the most probable neurotoxin involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this study, we investigated the modification and inactivation of human ceruloplasmin (hCP) induced by SAL. Incubation of hCP with SAL increased the protein aggregation and enzyme inactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species scavengers and copper chelators inhibited the SAL-mediated hCP modification and inactivation. The formation of dityrosine was detected in SAL-mediated hCP aggregates. Amino acid analysis post the exposure of hCP to SAL revealed that aspartate, histidine, lysine, threonine and tyrosine residues were particularly sensitive. Since hCP is a major copper transport protein, oxidative damage of hCP by SAL may induce perturbation of the copper transport system, which subsequently leads to deleterious conditions in cells. This study of the mechanism by which ceruloplasmin is modified by salsolinol may provide an explanation for the deterioration of organs under neurodegenerative disorders such as PD. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(1): 45-50] PMID:26077029

  1. Molecular cloning of the human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin: A member of the ribonuclease gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.F.; Tenen, D.G.; Ackerman, S.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors have isolated a 725-base-pair cDNA clone for human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). EDN is a distinct cationic protein of the eosinophil's large specific granule known primarily for its ability to induce ataxia, paralysis, and central nervous system cellular degeneration in experimental animals (Gordon phenomenon). The open reading frame encodes a 134-amino acid mature polypeptide with a molecular mass of 15.5 kDa and a 27-residue amino-terminal hydrophobic leader sequence. The sequence of the mature polypeptide is identical to that reported for human urinary ribonuclease, and to the amino-terminal sequence of human liver ribonuclease; the cDNA encodes a tryptophan in position 7. Both EDN and the related granule protein, eosinophil cationic protein, have ribonucleolytic activity; sequence similarities among EDN, eosinophil cationic protein, ribonucleases from liver, urine, and pancreas, and angiogenin define a ribonuclease multigene family. mRNA encoding EDN was detected in uninduced HL-60 cells and was up-regulated in cells induced toward eosinophilic differentiation with B-cell growth factor 2/interleukin 5 and toward neutrophilic differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide. EDN mRNA was detected in mature neutrophils even though EDN-like neurotoxic activity is not found neutrophil extracts. These results suggest that neutrophils contain a protein that is closely related or identical to EDN.

  2. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Irene; Castillo, Erick Y.; Romero-Piña, Mario E.; Torres-Viquez, Itzel; Paniagua, Dayanira; Boyer, Leslie V.; Alagón, Alejandro; Medina, Luis Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx). The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%–78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50) and PLA2 activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with 67Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming. PMID:27023607

  3. Structural Basis of the pH-Dependent Assembly of a Botulinum Neurotoxin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Tsutomu; Gu, Shenyan; Lam, Kwok-ho; Carter, Lester G.; Rummel, Andreas; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most poisonous biological substances known. They assemble with non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNHA) protein to form the minimally functional progenitor toxin complexes (M-PTC), which protects BoNT in the gastrointestinal tract and release it upon entry into the circulation. Here we provide molecular insight into the assembly between BoNT/A and NTNHA-A using small-angle X-ray scattering. We found that the free form BoNT/A maintains a pH-independent conformation with limited domain flexibility. Intriguingly, the free form NTNHA-A adopts pH-dependent conformational changes due to a torsional motion of its C-terminal domain. Once forming a complex at acidic pH, they each adopt a stable conformation that is similar to that observed in the crystal structure of the M-PTC. Our results suggest that assembly of the M-PTC depends on the environmental pH, and that the complex form of BoNT/A is induced by interacting with NTNHA-A at acidic pH. PMID:25240768

  4. Interactions of the neurotoxin apamin with a Ca2+-activated K+ channel in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Seagar, M J; Granier, C; Couraud, F

    1984-02-10

    Mono[125I]iodoapamin bound to specific sites on cultured rat embryonic neurons. The dissociation constant for the receptor-neurotoxin complex measured at equilibrium was 60-120 pM at pH 7.2 and 4 degrees C, with a maximal binding capacity of 3-8 fmol/mg of cell protein. Apamin inhibited calcium ionophore-induced 86Rb+ release from cell cultures. The dose effect curve for this pharmacological test corresponded closely to the displacement of 125I-apamin by native apamin in binding experiments. Formation of the 125I-apamin receptor complex requires exogenous K+. Reduced binding in the absence of K+ was due to diminished binding capacity rather than a lower affinity. The apamin receptor seems to be associated with a cell surface K+ site which shows 50% occupancy at 1.6 mM, and which could be involved in the regulation of channel activity. Apamin sites were present at the earliest developmental stage tested and their number did not evolve during 8 days in culture. In the same period, however, alpha-scorpion toxin binding increased by a factor of 10. The ontogenesis of Ca2+-activated K+ channels does not seem to occur in parallel with that of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels. PMID:6319399

  5. Regulation of neurotoxin and protease formation in Clostridium botulinum Okra B and Hall A by arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Curtis, S I; Johnson, E A

    1989-01-01

    Supplementation of a minimal medium with high levels of arginine (20 g/liter) markedly decreased neurotoxin titers and protease activities in cultures of Clostridium botulinum Okra B and Hall A. Nitrogenous nutrients that are known to be derived from arginine, including proline, glutamate, and ammonia, also decreased protease and toxin but less so than did arginine. Proteases synthesized during growth were rapidly inactivated after growth stopped in media containing high levels of arginine. Separation of extracellular proteins by electrophoresis and immunoblots with antibodies to toxin showed that the decrease in toxin titers in media containing high levels of arginine was caused by both reduced synthesis of protoxin and impaired proteolytic activation. In contrast, certain other nutritional conditions stimulated protease and toxin formation in C. botulinum and counteracted the repression by arginine. Supplementation of the minimal medium with casein or casein hydrolysates increased protease activities and toxin titers. Casein supplementation of a medium containing high levels of arginine prevented protease inactivation. High levels of glucose (50 g/liter) also delayed the inactivation of proteases in both the minimal medium and a medium containing high levels of arginine. These observations suggest that the availability of nitrogen and energy sources, particularly arginine, affects the production and proteolytic processing of toxins and proteases in C. botulinum. Images PMID:2669631

  6. In vivo onset and duration of action varies for botulinum neurotoxin A subtypes 1-5.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Whitemarsh, Regina C M; Bradshaw, Marite; Johnson, Eric A

    2015-12-01

    To date, over 40 subtypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) have been identified. BoNTs are classified into 7 serotypes distinguished primarily by their antigenic properties, but also characterized by their unique SNARE targets and cleavage sites, host specificity, and duration of action. Sequencing efforts in the last decade have identified several subtypes within the serotypes. Subtypes are currently defined as distinct based solely on amino acid sequence comparison, with a similarity cut-off of 2.5% difference. Ten subtypes have been identified for BoNT/A, which is the serotype associated with the most severe human botulism and also the most commonly used serotype for clinical purposes. Analyses of several of these subtypes have revealed distinct characteristics, ranging from differences in cell entry and enzyme kinetics to differences in potency in mice and cell-model specific potency. A long-term activity study in cultured primary neurons has indicated that BoNT/A1, 2, 4, and 5 have a similar duration of action, whereas BoNT/A3 has a significantly shorter duration of action. This report describes an in vivo mouse study, showing that after local injection BoNT/A2 resulted in faster onset of local paralysis than BoNT/A1, 3, 4, and 5, whereas BoNT/A3 resulted in significantly faster recovery of motor-neuron deficiency. PMID:26130522

  7. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A complex by carbohydrate receptor mimics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna-Magdalena; Mahrhold, Stefan; Perry, Kay; Cheng, Luisa W; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes for botulism. BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and is subsequently transported through the intestinal epithelium into the general circulation. Several hemagglutinin proteins form a multi-protein complex (HA complex) that recognizes host glycans on the intestinal epithelial cell surface to facilitate BoNT absorption. Blocking carbohydrate binding to the HA complex could significantly inhibit the oral toxicity of BoNT. Here, we identify lactulose, a galactose-containing non-digestible sugar commonly used to treat constipation, as a prototype inhibitor against oral BoNT/A intoxication. As revealed by a crystal structure, lactulose binds to the HA complex at the same site where the host galactose-containing carbohydrate receptors bind. In vitro assays using intestinal Caco-2 cells demonstrated that lactulose inhibits HA from compromising the integrity of the epithelial cell monolayers and blocks the internalization of HA. Furthermore, co-administration of lactulose significantly protected mice against BoNT/A oral intoxication in vivo. Taken together, these data encourage the development of carbohydrate receptor mimics as a therapeutic intervention to prevent BoNT oral intoxication. PMID:26272706

  8. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Irene; Castillo, Erick Y; Romero-Piña, Mario E; Torres-Viquez, Itzel; Paniagua, Dayanira; Boyer, Leslie V; Alagón, Alejandro; Medina, Luis Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx). The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%-78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50) and PLA₂ activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-(67)Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with (67)Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-(67)Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-(67)Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming. PMID:27023607

  9. An optical biosensor assay for rapid dual detection of Botulinum neurotoxins A and E

    PubMed Central

    Lévêque, Christian; Ferracci, Géraldine; Maulet, Yves; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R.; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Seagar, Michael; El Far, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of the pathogenic botulinum neurotoxins type A and E (BoNT/A and E) leads to potentially lethal paralytic symptoms in humans and their prompt detection is of crucial importance. A chip assay based on Surface Plasmon Resonance monitoring of the cleavage products is a simple method that we have previously established to detect BoNT/A activity. We have now developed a similar format assay to measure BoNT/E activity. A monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing SNAP25 cleaved by BoNT/E was generated and used to measure the appearance of the neo-epitope following injection of BoNT/E over SNAP-25 immobilized on a chip. This assay detects BoNT/E activity at 1 LD50/ml within minutes and linear dose-responses curves were obtained using a multiplexed biosensor. A threshold of 0.01 LD50/ml was achieved after 5 h of cleavage. This assay is 10-fold more sensitive than the in vivo assay for direct detection of BoNT/E in serum samples. The SNAP25 chip assay is able to discriminate in an automated manner the presence of BoNT/E, BoNT/A or a combination of both toxins. PMID:26648139

  10. The destructive effect of botulinum neurotoxins on the SNARE protein: SNAP-25 and synaptic membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic exocytosis requires the assembly of syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane and synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2) on the vesicular membrane to bridge the two opposite membranes. It is believed that the three SNARE proteins assemble in steps along the dynamic assembly pathway. The C-terminus of SNAP-25 is known to be the target of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A and BoNT/E) that block neurotransmitters release in vivo. In this study, we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the SNAP-25 C-terminus in binary and ternary SNARE complexes. The fluorescence lipid mixing assay shows that the C-terminal of SNAP-25 is essential for membrane fusion, and that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants cleaved by BoNT/A and BoNT/E display different inhibition effects on membrane fusion: SNAP-25E (Δ26) abolishes the fusion activity of the SNARE complex, while SNAP-25A (Δ9) loses most of its function, although it can still form a SDS-resistant SNARE complex as the wild-type SNAP-25. CW-EPR spectra validate the unstable structures of the SNARE complex formed by SNAP-25 mutants. We propose that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants will disrupt the assembly of the SNARE core complex, and then inhibit the synaptic membrane fusion accordingly. PMID:26157630

  11. A Monoclonal Antibody Based Capture ELISA for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B: Toxin Detection in Food

    PubMed Central

    Stanker, Larry H.; Scotcher, Miles C.; Cheng, Luisa; Ching, Kathryn; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hodge, David; Hnasko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A – H) have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture) ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD’s) for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10−11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D.), ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule) and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested. PMID:24253240

  12. Activity of botulinum neurotoxin type D (strain 1873) in human neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H.; Scherf, Jacob M.; Pier, Christina L.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxin type D (BoNT/D) causes periodic outbreaks of botulism in cattle and horses, but is rarely associated with human botulism. Previous studies have shown that humans responded poorly to peripheral injection of up to 10 U of BoNT/D. Isolated human pyramidalis muscle preparations were resistant to BoNT/D, whereas isolated human intercostal muscle preparations responded to BoNT/D similarly as to other BoNT serotypes. In vitro data indicate that BoNT/D does not cleave human VAMP1 efficiently, and differential expression of the VAMP 1 and 2 isoforms may be responsible for the above observations. Here we examined sensitivity of cultured human neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells to BoNT/D. Our data indicate that BoNT/D can enter and cleave VAMP 2 in human neurons, but at significantly lower efficiency than other BoNT serotypes. In addition, BoNT/D had a short duration of action in the cultured neurons, similar to that of BoNT/E. In vivo analyses indicated a slower time to death in mice, as well as a later onset and shorter duration of action than BoNT/A1. Finally, examination of BoNT/D activity in various rodent and human cell models resulted in dramatic differences in sensitivity, indicating a unique cell entry mechanism of BoNT/D. PMID:25937339

  13. Evaluation of Lateral-Flow Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Kits for Food Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shashi K.; Eblen, Brian S.; Bull, Robert L.; Burr, Donald H.; Whiting, Richard C.

    2005-01-01

    The suitability and sensitivity of two in vitro lateral-flow assays for detecting Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) in an assortment of foods were evaluated. Toxin extraction and preparation methods for various liquid, solid, and high-fat-content foods were developed. The lateral-flow assays, one developed by the Naval Medical Research Center (Silver Spring, MD) and the other by Alexeter Technologies (Gaithersburg, MD), are based on the immunodetection of BoNT types A, B, and E. The assays were found to be rapid and easy to perform with minimum requirements for laboratory equipment or skills. They can readily detect 10 ng/ml of BoNT types A and B and 20 ng/ml of BoNT type E. Compared to other in vitro detection methods, these assays are less sensitive, and the assessment of a result is strictly qualitative. However, the assay was found to be simple to use and to require minimal training. The assays successfully detected BoNT types A, B, and E in a wide variety of foods, suggesting their potential usefulness as a preliminary screening system for triaging food samples with elevated BoNT levels in the event of a C. botulinum contamination event. PMID:16000807

  14. Transfer of a cyanobacterial neurotoxin within a temperate aquatic ecosystem suggests pathways for human exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Sara; Eriksson, Johan; Berntzon, Lotta; Spáčil, Zdenĕk; Ilag, Leopold L.; Ronnevi, Lars-Olof; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic nonprotein amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria, has been proposed to be the causative agent of devastating neurodegenerative diseases on the island of Guam in the Pacific Ocean. Because cyanobacteria are widespread globally, we hypothesized that BMAA might occur and bioaccumulate in other ecosystems. Here we demonstrate, based on a recently developed extraction and HPLC-MS/MS method and long-term monitoring of BMAA in cyanobacterial populations of a temperate aquatic ecosystem (Baltic Sea, 2007–2008), that BMAA is biosynthesized by cyanobacterial genera dominating the massive surface blooms of this water body. BMAA also was found at higher concentrations in organisms of higher trophic levels that directly or indirectly feed on cyanobacteria, such as zooplankton and various vertebrates (fish) and invertebrates (mussels, oysters). Pelagic and benthic fish species used for human consumption were included. The highest BMAA levels were detected in the muscle and brain of bottom-dwelling fishes. The discovery of regular biosynthesis of the neurotoxin BMAA in a large temperate aquatic ecosystem combined with its possible transfer and bioaccumulation within major food webs, some ending in human consumption, is alarming and requires attention. PMID:20439734

  15. Proteomic Changes in Rat Thyroarytenoid Muscle Induced by Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Nathan V.; Marriott, Gerard; Tateya, Ichiro; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle is a commonly performed medical intervention for adductor spasmodic dysphonia. The mechanism of action of BoNT at the neuromuscular junction is well understood, however, aside from reports focused on myosin heavy chain isoform abundance, there is a paucity of data addressing the effects of therapeutic BoNT injection on the TA muscle proteome. In this study, 12 adult Sprague Dawley rats underwent unilateral TA muscle BoNT serotype A injection followed by tissue harvest at 72 hrs, 7 days, 14 days, and 56 days post-injection. Three additional rats were reserved as controls. Proteomic analysis was performed using 2D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-MS. Vocal fold movement was significantly reduced by 72 hrs, with complete return of function by 56 days. Twenty-five protein spots demonstrated significant protein abundance changes following BoNT injection, and were associated with alterations in energy metabolism, muscle contractile function, cellular stress response, transcription, translation, and cell proliferation. A number of protein abundance changes persisted beyond the return of gross physiologic TA function. These findings represent the first report of BoNT induced changes in any skeletal muscle proteome, and reinforce the utility of applying proteomic tools to the study of system-wide biological processes in normal and perturbed TA muscle function. PMID:18442174

  16. Analysis of the neurotoxin anisatin in star anise by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mathon, Caroline; Bongard, Benjamin; Duret, Monique; Ortelli, Didier; Christen, Philippe; Bieri, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an analytical method capable of determining the presence of anisatin in star anise. This neurotoxin may induce severe side effects such as epileptic convulsions. It is therefore of prime importance to have rapid and accurate analytical methods able to detect and quantify anisatin in samples that are purportedly edible star anise. The sample preparation combined an automated accelerated solvent extraction with a solid-supported liquid-liquid purification step on EXtrelut®. Samples were analysed on a porous graphitic carbon HPLC column and quantified by tandem mass spectrometry operating in the negative ionisation mode. The quantification range of anisatin was between 0.2 and 8 mg kg⁻¹. The applicability of this validated method was demonstrated by the analysis of several Illicium species and star anise samples purchased on the Swiss market. High levels of anisatin were measured in Illicium lanceolatum, I. majus and I. anisatum, which may cause health concerns if they are misidentified or mixed with edible Illicium verum. PMID:23802692

  17. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L.

    2014-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

  18. The influence of glyphosate on the microbiota and production of botulinum neurotoxin during ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Wagis; Coenen, Manfred; Schrödl, Wieland; Shehata, Awad A; Krüger, Monika

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of glyphosate on the microbiota and on the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) expression during in vitro ruminal fermentation. This study was conducted using two DAISY(II)-incubators with four ventilated incubation vessels filled with rumen fluid of a 4-year-old non-lactating Holstein-Friesian cow. Two hundred milliliter rumen fluid and 800 ml buffer solution were used with six filter bags containing 500 mg concentrated feed or crude fiber-enriched diet. Final concentrations of 0, 1, 10, and 100 µg/ml of glyphosate in the diluted rumen fluids were added and incubated under CO2-aerated conditions for 48 h. The protozoal population was analyzed microscopically and the ruminal flora was characterized using the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique. Clostridium botulinum and BoNT were quantified using most probable number and ELISA, respectively. Results showed that glyphosate had an inhibitory effect on select groups of the ruminal microbiota, but increased the population of pathogenic species. The BoNT was produced during incubation when inoculum was treated with high doses of glyphosate. In conclusion, glyphosate causes dysbiosis which favors the production of BoNT in the rumen. The global regulations restrictions for the use of glyphosate should be re-evaluated. PMID:25407376

  19. Presence of the Neurotoxin BMAA in Aquatic Ecosystems: What Do We Really Know?

    PubMed Central

    Faassen, Elisabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. BMAA production by cyanobacteria has been reported and contact with cyanobacteria infested waters or consumption of aquatic organisms are possible pathways to human exposure. However, there is little consensus regarding whether BMAA is present in cyanobacteria or not, and if so, at what concentrations. The aim of this review is to indicate the current state of knowledge on the presence of BMAA in aquatic ecosystems. Some studies have convincingly shown that BMAA can be present in aquatic samples at the µg/g dry weight level, which is around the detection limit of some equally credible studies in which no BMAA was detected. However, for the majority of the reviewed articles, it was unclear whether BMAA was correctly identified, either because inadequate analytical methods were used, or because poor reporting of analyses made it impossible to verify the results. Poor analysis, reporting and prolific errors have shaken the foundations of BMAA research. First steps towards estimation of human BMAA exposure are to develop and use selective, inter-laboratory validated methods and to correctly report the analytical work. PMID:24662480

  20. Presence of the neurotoxin BMAA in aquatic ecosystems: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J

    2014-03-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. BMAA production by cyanobacteria has been reported and contact with cyanobacteria infested waters or consumption of aquatic organisms are possible pathways to human exposure. However, there is little consensus regarding whether BMAA is present in cyanobacteria or not, and if so, at what concentrations. The aim of this review is to indicate the current state of knowledge on the presence of BMAA in aquatic ecosystems. Some studies have convincingly shown that BMAA can be present in aquatic samples at the µg/g dry weight level, which is around the detection limit of some equally credible studies in which no BMAA was detected. However, for the majority of the reviewed articles, it was unclear whether BMAA was correctly identified, either because inadequate analytical methods were used, or because poor reporting of analyses made it impossible to verify the results. Poor analysis, reporting and prolific errors have shaken the foundations of BMAA research. First steps towards estimation of human BMAA exposure are to develop and use selective, inter-laboratory validated methods and to correctly report the analytical work. PMID:24662480

  1. Amino acid neurotoxins in feathers of the Lesser Flamingo, Phoeniconaias minor.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, J S; Banack, S A; Kotut, K; Krienitz, L; Codd, G A

    2013-01-01

    The Lesser Flamingo (Phoeniconaias minor) is known to use cyanobacteria (primarily Arthrospira) as a major food source in the East African Rift Valley lakes. Periodically, mass mortalities have occurred, associated with the cyanobacterial toxins (cyanotoxins), microcystins and anatoxin-a. Deposition of these cyanotoxins into P. minor feathers has been shown to occur, consistent with the presence of cyanotoxins in the livers, stomach and faecal contents after dietary intake. As cyanobacteria have been shown to also produce the neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB), stored wing feathers, previously recovered from flamingos which had been exposed to microcystins and anatoxin-a and had subsequently died, were analysed for these neurotoxic amino acids. Trace amounts of BMAA were detected in extracts from Lake Nakuru flamingo feathers, with DAB also present at concentrations between 3.5 and 8.5 μg g(-1) dry weight in feathers from both lakes. Toxin recovery by solid-phase extraction of feather digests was tested with spiked deuterated BMAA and showed good recovery when analysed by LC-MS/MS (80-94%). This is the first report of these neurotoxic amino acids in birds. We discuss the origin and significance of DAB, alongside other cyanotoxins of dietary origin, in the feathers of the Lesser Flamingo. PMID:23123117

  2. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments. PMID:25373604

  3. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  4. Camelid-derived heavy-chain nanobody against Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin E in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Baghban, Roghayyeh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Nazarian, Shahram; Bakherad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) result in severe and often fatal disease, botulism. Common remedial measures such as equine antitoxin and human botulism immunoglobulin in turn are problematic and time-consuming. Therefore, diagnosis and therapy of BoNTs are vital. The variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) has unique features, such as the ability to identify and bind specifically to target epitopes and ease of production in bacteria and yeast. The Pichia pastoris is suitable for expression of recombinant antibody fragments. Disulfide bond formation and correct folds of protein with a high yield are some of the advantages of this eukaryotic host. In this study, we have expressed and purified the camelid VHH against BoNT/E in P. pastoris. The final yield of P. pastoris-expressed antibody was estimated to be 16 mg/l, which is higher than that expressed by Escherichia coli. The nanobody expressed in P. pastoris neutralized 4LD50 of the BoNT/E upon i.p. injection in 25% of mice. The nanobody expressed in E. coli extended the mice's survival to 1.5-fold compared to the control. This experiment indicated that the quality of expressed protein in the yeast is superior to that of the bacterial expression. Favorable protein folding by P. pastoris seems to play a role in its better toxin-binding property. PMID:24673401

  5. Human pharmacokinetic study of tutin in honey; a plant-derived neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Fields, Barry A; Reeve, John; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Mueller, Utz

    2014-10-01

    Over the last 150 years a number of people in New Zealand have been incapacitated, hospitalised, or died from eating honey contaminated with tutin, a plant-derived neurotoxin. A feature of the most recent poisoning incident in 2008 was the large variability in the onset time of clinical signs and symptoms of toxicity (0.5-17 h). To investigate the basis of this variability a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken in which 6 healthy males received a single oral dose of tutin-containing honey giving a tutin dose of 1.8 μg/kg body weight. The serum concentration-time curve for all volunteers exhibited two discrete peaks with the second and higher level occurring at approximately 15 h post-dose. Two subjects reported mild, transient headache at a time post-dose corresponding to maximum tutin concentrations. There were no other signs or symptoms typical of tutin intoxication such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness or seizures. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a two-site absorption model resulted in a good fit to the observed concentration data. A novel analytical method subsequently revealed the presence of glycoside conjugates of tutin in addition to unconjugated tutin in honey. These pharmacokinetic data will be important to better define a safe maximum tutin concentration in honey. PMID:25084484

  6. In vitro detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin type E activity in avian blood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Timothy M.; Blehert, David S.; Dunning, F. Mark; Berlowski-Zier, Brenda M.; Zeytin, Fusun N.; Samuel, Michael D.; Tucker, Ward C.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E) outbreaks in the Great Lakes region cause large annual avian mortality events, with an estimated 17,000 bird deaths reported in 2007 alone. During an outbreak investigation, blood collected from bird carcasses is tested for the presence of BoNT/E using the mouse lethality assay. While sensitive, this method is labor-intensive and low throughput and can take up to 7 days to complete. We developed a rapid and sensitive in vitro assay, the BoTest Matrix E assay, that combines immunoprecipitation with high-affinity endopeptidase activity detection by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to rapidly quantify BoNT/E activity in avian blood with detection limits comparable to those of the mouse lethality assay. On the basis of the analysis of archived blood samples (n = 87) collected from bird carcasses during avian mortality investigations, BoTest Matrix E detected picomolar quantities of BoNT/E following a 2-h incubation and femtomolar quantities of BoNT/E following extended incubation (24 h) with 100% diagnostic specificity and 91% diagnostic sensitivity.

  7. Molecular Evolution of Antibody Cross-Reactivity for Two Subtypes of Type a Botulinum Neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Rodriguez, C.; Levy, R.; Arndt, J.W.; Forsyth, C.M.; Razai, A.; Lou, J.; Geren, I.; Stevens, R.C.; Marks, J.D.; /UC, San Francisco /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-09

    Broadening antibody specificity without compromising affinity should facilitate detection and neutralization of toxin and viral subtypes. We used yeast display and a co-selection strategy to increase cross-reactivity of a single chain (sc) Fv antibody to botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Starting with a scFv that binds the BoNT/A1 subtype with high affinity (136 pM) and the BoNT/A2 subtype with low affinity (109 nM), we increased its affinity for BoNT/A2 1,250-fold, to 87 pM, while maintaining high-affinity binding to BoNT/A1 (115 pM). To find the molecular basis for improved cross-reactivity, we determined the X-ray co-crystal structures of wild-type and cross-reactive antibodies complexed to BoNT/A1 at resolutions up to 2.6 A, and measured the thermodynamic contribution of BoNT/A1 and A2 amino acids to wild-type and cross-reactive antibody binding. The results show how an antibody can be engineered to bind two different antigens despite structural differences in the antigen-antibody interface and may provide a general strategy for tuning antibody specificity and cross-reactivity.

  8. SLEEPLESS, a Ly–6/Neurotoxin Family Member, Regulates Levels, Localization, and Activity of Shaker

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mark N.; Joiner, William J.; Dean, Terry; Yue, Zhifeng; Smith, Corinne J.; Chen, Dechun; Hoshi, Toshinori; Sehgal, Amita; Koh, Kyunghee

    2009-01-01

    Sleep is a whole–organism phenomenon accompanied by global changes in neural activity. We previously identified SLEEPLESS (SSS) as a novel glycosylphosphatidyl–inositol–anchored protein required for sleep in Drosophila. Here, we demonstrate a critical role for SSS in regulating the sleep–modulating potassium channel, Shaker. SSS and Shaker exhibit similar expression patterns in the brain and specifically affect each other’s expression levels. sss mutants exhibit altered Shaker localization, reduced Shaker current density, and slower Shaker current kinetics. Transgenic expression of sss in sss mutants rescues defects in Shaker expression and activity cell–autonomously and also suggests that SSS functions in wake–promoting, cholinergic neurons. Importantly, in heterologous cells, SSS accelerates kinetics of Shaker currents and can be co–immunoprecipitated with Shaker, suggesting that SSS interacts with Shaker and modulates its activity. SSS is predicted to belong to the Ly–6/neurotoxin superfamily, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of neuronal excitability by endogenous toxin–like molecules. PMID:20010822

  9. Cannabidiol Exposure During Neuronal Differentiation Sensitizes Cells Against Redox-Active Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schönhofen, Patrícia; de Medeiros, Liana M; Bristot, Ivi Juliana; Lopes, Fernanda M; De Bastiani, Marco A; Kapczinski, Flávio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Castro, Mauro Antônio A; Parsons, Richard B; Klamt, Fábio

    2015-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the most abundant Cannabis sativa-derived compounds, has been implicated with neuroprotective effect in several human pathologies. Until now, no undesired side effects have been associated with CBD. In this study, we evaluated CBD's neuroprotective effect in terminal differentiation (mature) and during neuronal differentiation (neuronal developmental toxicity model) of the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. A dose-response curve was performed to establish a sublethal dose of CBD with antioxidant activity (2.5 μM). In terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, incubation with 2.5 μM CBD was unable to protect cells against the neurotoxic effect of glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, 6-hydroxydopamine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, no difference in antioxidant potential and neurite density was observed. When SH-SY5Y cells undergoing neuronal differentiation were exposed to CBD, no differences in antioxidant potential and neurite density were observed. However, CBD potentiated the neurotoxicity induced by all redox-active drugs tested. Our data indicate that 2.5 μM of CBD, the higher dose tolerated by differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, does not provide neuroprotection for terminally differentiated cells and shows, for the first time, that exposure of CBD during neuronal differentiation could sensitize immature cells to future challenges with neurotoxins. PMID:25108670

  10. Common binding site for disialyllactose and tri-peptide in C-fragment of tetanus neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Kumaran, Desigan; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2005-11-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are comprised of botulinum (BoNT) and tetanus (TeNT), which share significant structural and functional similarity. Crystal structures of the binding domain of TeNT complexed with disialyllactose (DiSia) and a tri-peptide Tyr-Glu-Trp (YEW) have been determined to 2.3 and 2.2 A, respectively. Both DiSia and YEW bind in a shallow cleft region on the surface of the molecule in the beta-trefoil domain, interacting with a set of common residues, Asp1147, Asp1214, Asn1216, and Arg1226. DiSia and YEW binding at the same site in tetanus toxin provides a putative site that could be occupied either by a ganglioside moiety or a peptide. Soaking experiments with a mixture of YEW and DiSia show that YEW competes with DiSia, suggesting that YEW can be used to block ganglioside binding. A comparison with the TeNT binding domain in complex with small molecules, BoNT/A and /B, provides insight into the different modes of ganglioside binding. PMID:16104015

  11. Resolution of sub-nanosecond motions in botulinum neurotoxin endopeptidase: An evidence of internal flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Cai, Shuowei; Ojadi, Emmanuel; Singh, Bal R

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous substances known to mankind, which act on the peripheral nervous system leading to flaccid paralysis. Although co-crystal structure of BoNT/A light chain (LC) reveals some unique features of the biological function of this molecule, structural characteristics in solution reveal its dynamic features, not available through the published crystal structures. In this study, we have examined internal flexibility of this molecule by measuring rotational correlation time as a function of viscosity, using frequency domain fluorescence anisotropy decay technique. Fluorescence anisotropy decay of BoNT/A LC resolved sub-nanosecond local motion (faster component), interpreted as internal flexibility of the molecule was affected significantly with viscosity. Both local and global movements were affected by viscosity, which indicates the accessibility of protein core and flexibility of overall structure. In conclusion, this work demonstrates the presence of flexibility in the internal peptide segments, which appears to play a significant role in BoNT/A LC biological function. PMID:25578806

  12. Botulinum neurotoxin: unique folding of enzyme domain of the most-poisonous poison.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Kukreja, Roshan V; Li, Li; Zhmurov, Artem; Kononova, Olga; Cai, Shuowei; Ahmed, Syed A; Barsegov, Valeri; Singh, Bal Ram

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most toxic substance known to mankind, is the first example of the fully active molten globule state. To understand its folding mechanism, we performed urea denaturation experiments and theoretical modeling using BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A). We found that the extent of BoNT/A denaturation from the native state (N) shows a nonmonotonic dependence on urea concentration indicating a unique multistep denaturation process, N → I1 [Formula: see text] I2 [Formula: see text] U, with two intermediate states I1 and I2. BoNT/A loses almost all its secondary structure in 3.75 M urea (I1), yet it displays a native-like secondary structure in 5 M urea (I2). This agrees with the results of theoretical modeling, which helped to determine the molecular basis of unique behavior of BoNT/A in solution. Except for I2, all the states revert back to full enzymatic activity for SNAP-25 including the unfolded state U stable in 7 M urea. Our results stress the importance of structural flexibility in the toxin's mechanism of survival and action, an unmatched evolutionary trait from billion-year-old bacteria, which also correlates with the long-lasting enzymatic activity of BoNT inside neuronal cells. BoNT/A provides a rich model to explore protein folding in relation to functional activity. PMID:23746226

  13. In vitro detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin type E activity in avian blood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, T.M.; Blehert, D.S.; Dunning, F.M.; Berlowski-Zier, B. M.; Zeytin, F.N.; Samuel, M.D.; Tucker, W.C.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E) outbreaks in the Great Lakes region cause large annual avian mortality events, with an estimated 17,000 bird deaths reported in 2007 alone. During an outbreak investigation, blood collected from bird carcasses is tested for the presence of BoNT/E using the mouse lethality assay. While sensitive, this method is labor-intensive and low throughput and can take up to 7 days to complete. We developed a rapid and sensitive in vitro assay, the BoTest Matrix E assay, that combines immunoprecipitation with high-affinity endopeptidase activity detection by F??rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to rapidly quantify BoNT/E activity in avian blood with detection limits comparable to those of the mouse lethality assay. On the basis of the analysis of archived blood samples (n = 87) collected from bird carcasses during avian mortality investigations, BoTest Matrix E detected picomolar quantities of BoNT/E following a 2-h incubation and femtomolar quantities of BoNT/E following extended incubation (24 h) with 100% diagnostic specificity and 91% diagnostic sensitivity. ?? 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Recommended Immunological Strategies to Screen for Botulinum Neurotoxin-Containing Samples.

    PubMed

    Simon, Stéphanie; Fiebig, Uwe; Liu, Yvonne; Tierney, Rob; Dano, Julie; Worbs, Sylvia; Endermann, Tanja; Nevers, Marie-Claire; Volland, Hervé; Sesardic, Dorothea; Dorner, Martin B

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the life-threatening neurological illness botulism in humans and animals and are divided into seven serotypes (BoNT/A-G), of which serotypes A, B, E, and F cause the disease in humans. BoNTs are classified as "category A" bioterrorism threat agents and are relevant in the context of the Biological Weapons Convention. An international proficiency test (PT) was conducted to evaluate detection, quantification and discrimination capabilities of 23 expert laboratories from the health, food and security areas. Here we describe three immunological strategies that proved to be successful for the detection and quantification of BoNT/A, B, and E considering the restricted sample volume (1 mL) distributed. To analyze the samples qualitatively and quantitatively, the first strategy was based on sensitive immunoenzymatic and immunochromatographic assays for fast qualitative and quantitative analyses. In the second approach, a bead-based suspension array was used for screening followed by conventional ELISA for quantification. In the third approach, an ELISA plate format assay was used for serotype specific immunodetection of BoNT-cleaved substrates, detecting the activity of the light chain, rather than the toxin protein. The results provide guidance for further steps in quality assurance and highlight problems to address in the future. PMID:26703727

  15. High sensitivity detection of active botulinum neurotoxin by glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Jeong, Eun Ji; Yoo, Yung Choon; Cai, Chao; Yang, Gi-Hyeok; Lee, Jae Chul; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J; Lee, Kyung Bok

    2014-03-01

    The sensitive detection of highly toxic botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) from Clostridium botulinum is of critical importance because it causes human illnesses if foodborne or introduced in wounds and as an iatrogenic substance. Moreover, it has been recently considered a possible biological warfare agent. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in BoNT detection technologies, including mouse lethality assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and endopeptidase assays and by mass spectrometry. Critical assay requirements, including rapid assay, active toxin detection, sensitive and accurate detection, still remain challenging. Here, we present a novel method to detect active BoNTs using a Glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction (qPCR) approach. Sialyllactose, which interacts with the binding-domain of BoNTs, is incorporated into a sialyllactose-DNA conjugate as a binding-probe for active BoNT and recovered through BoNT-immunoprecipitation. Glyco-qPCR analysis of the bound sialyllactose-DNA is then used to detect low attomolar concentrations of BoNT and attomolar to femtomolar concentrations of BoNT in honey, the most common foodborne source of infant botulism. PMID:24506443

  16. Crystal structures of botulinum neurotoxin DC in complex with its protein receptors synaptotagmin I and II

    PubMed Central

    Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne; Peng, Lisheng; Svensson, Linda Marie; Dong, Min; Stenmark, Pål

    2013-01-01

    Summary Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) can cause paralysis at exceptionally low concentrations and include seven serotypes (BoNT/A-G). The chimeric BoNT/DC toxin has a receptor binding domain similar to the same region in BoNT/C. However, BoNT/DC does not share protein receptor with BoNT/C. Instead, it shares synaptotagmin (Syt) I and II as receptors with BoNT/B, despite their low sequence similarity. Here we present the crystal structures of the binding domain of BoNT/DC in complex with the recognition domains of its protein receptors, Syt-I and Syt-II. The structures reveal that BoNT/DC possesses a novel Syt binding site, distinct from the established Syt-II binding site in BoNT/B. Structure-based mutagenesis further show that hydrophobic interactions play a key role in Syt binding. The structures suggest that the BoNT/DC ganglioside binding sites are independent of the protein receptor binding site. Our results reveal the remarkable versatility in the receptor recognition of the BoNTs. PMID:23932591

  17. Recommended Immunological Strategies to Screen for Botulinum Neurotoxin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Stéphanie; Fiebig, Uwe; Liu, Yvonne; Tierney, Rob; Dano, Julie; Worbs, Sylvia; Endermann, Tanja; Nevers, Marie-Claire; Volland, Hervé; Sesardic, Dorothea; Dorner, Martin B.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the life-threatening neurological illness botulism in humans and animals and are divided into seven serotypes (BoNT/A–G), of which serotypes A, B, E, and F cause the disease in humans. BoNTs are classified as “category A” bioterrorism threat agents and are relevant in the context of the Biological Weapons Convention. An international proficiency test (PT) was conducted to evaluate detection, quantification and discrimination capabilities of 23 expert laboratories from the health, food and security areas. Here we describe three immunological strategies that proved to be successful for the detection and quantification of BoNT/A, B, and E considering the restricted sample volume (1 mL) distributed. To analyze the samples qualitatively and quantitatively, the first strategy was based on sensitive immunoenzymatic and immunochromatographic assays for fast qualitative and quantitative analyses. In the second approach, a bead-based suspension array was used for screening followed by conventional ELISA for quantification. In the third approach, an ELISA plate format assay was used for serotype specific immunodetection of BoNT-cleaved substrates, detecting the activity of the light chain, rather than the toxin protein. The results provide guidance for further steps in quality assurance and highlight problems to address in the future. PMID:26703727

  18. A High Content Imaging Assay for Identification of Botulinum Neurotoxin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Krishna P.; Soloveva, Veronica; Wanner, Laura M.; Gomba, Glenn; Kiris, Erkan; Panchal, Rekha G.; Kane, Christopher D.; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25) is a component of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex that is essential for synaptic neurotransmitter release. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is a zinc metalloprotease that blocks exocytosis of neurotransmitter by cleaving the SNAP-25 component of the SNARE complex. Currently there are no licensed medicines to treat BoNT/A poisoning after internalization of the toxin by motor neurons. The development of effective therapeutic measures to counter BoNT/A intoxication has been limited, due in part to the lack of robust high-throughput assays for screening small molecule libraries. Here we describe a high content imaging (HCI) assay with utility for identification of BoNT/A inhibitors. Initial optimization efforts focused on improving the reproducibility of inter-plate results across multiple, independent experiments. Automation of immunostaining, image acquisition, and image analysis were found to increase assay consistency and minimize variability while enabling the multiparameter evaluation of experimental compounds in a murine motor neuron system. PMID:25489815

  19. Mode of VAMP Substrate Recognition and Inhibition of Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin F

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, R.; Schmidt, J; Stafford, R; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cleave neuronal proteins responsible for neurotransmitter release, causing the neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNT serotypes B, D, F and G cleave and inactivate vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), each at a unique peptide bond. The specificity of BoNTs depends on the mode of substrate recognition. We have investigated the mechanism of substrate recognition of BoNT F by determining the crystal structures of its complex with two substrate-based inhibitors, VAMP 22-58/Gln58D-cysteine and 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. The inhibitors bind to BoNT F in the canonical direction (as seen for BoNTs A and E substrates) but are positioned specifically via three major exosites away from the active site. The cysteine sulfur of the inhibitors interacts with the zinc and exists as sulfinic acid in the inhibitor VAMP 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. Arg133 and Arg171, which form part of two separate exosites, are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis.

  20. Persistence of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Subtypes 1-5 in Primary Rat Spinal Cord Cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitemarsh, Regina Clare Meyer; Tepp, William Howard; Johnson, Eric Arthur; Pellett, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous substances known and cause the severe disease botulism. BoNTs have also been remarkably effective as therapeutics in treating many neuronal and neuromuscular disorders. One of the hallmarks of BoNTs, particularly serotype A, is its long persistence of 2-6 months in patients at concentrations as low as fM or pM. The mechanisms for this persistence are currently unclear. In this study we determined the persistence of the BoNT/A subtypes 1 through 5 in primary rat spinal neurons. Remarkably, the duration of intracellular enzymatic activity of BoNT/A1, /A2, /A4 and /A5 was shown to be at least 10 months. Conversely, the effects of BoNT/A3 were observed for up to ∼5 months. An intermittent dosing with BoNT/E showed intracellular activity of the shorter acting BoNT/E for 2–3 weeks, followed by reoccurrence and persistence of BoNT/A-induced SNAP-25 cleavage products. PMID:24587301

  1. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Botulinum Neurotoxin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Baudys, Jakub; Wang, Dongxia; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease called botulism, which can be lethal. BoNTs are proteins secreted by some species of clostridia and are known to cause paralysis by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Although the human lethal dose of BoNT is not accurately known, it is estimated to be between 0.1 μg to 70 μg, so it is important to enable detection of small amounts of these toxins. Our laboratory previously reported on the development of Endopep-MS, a mass-spectrometric‑based endopeptidase method to detect, differentiate, and quantify BoNT immunoaffinity purified from complex matrices. In this work, we describe the application of Endopep-MS for the analysis of thirteen blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. This method successfully identified the presence or absence of BoNT in all thirteen samples and was able to successfully differentiate the serotype of BoNT present in the samples, which included matrices such as buffer, milk, meat extract, and serum. Furthermore, the method yielded quantitative results which had z-scores in the range of −3 to +3 for quantification of BoNT/A containing samples. These results indicate that Endopep-MS is an excellent technique for detection, differentiation, and quantification of BoNT in complex matrices. PMID:25996606

  2. Intraprostatic Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia-A Spotlight in Reality.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Chao; Wang, Hung-Jen; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It inhibits the release of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters from the nerve terminal. Botulinum toxin, specifically toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been used since the 1970s to reduce the muscular hypercontraction disorders. The application of BoNT-A in urology field started from intra-bladder injection for overactive bladder, which has been recognized as third line therapy in many countries. Since prostate gland as well as bladder is under the influence of autonomic innervation, theorectically, injection of BoNT-A into the prostate induces chemo-denervation and modulation of prostate function, and reduces lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This article reviews the application of BoNT-A in patients with LUTS/ benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from mechanisms of action to clinical results. BoNT-A has been shown to induce prostate apoptosis, downregulation of alpha 1A receptors, and reduce contractile function of prostate in animal studies. Open studies of intraprostate BoNT-A injection have demonstrated promising results of reducing LUTS and improvement of voiding function in human LUTS/BPH, however, intraprostatic BoNT-A injection did not perform better than the placebo group in recent publications of placebo controlled studies. We suggested that BoNT-A prostate injection might benefit selected population of BPH/LUTS, but it is unlikely to be an effective therapy for general population of male LUTS/BPH. PMID:27128942

  3. Intraprostatic Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia—A Spotlight in Reality

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Chao; Wang, Hung-Jen; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It inhibits the release of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters from the nerve terminal. Botulinum toxin, specifically toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been used since the 1970s to reduce the muscular hypercontraction disorders. The application of BoNT-A in urology field started from intra-bladder injection for overactive bladder, which has been recognized as third line therapy in many countries. Since prostate gland as well as bladder is under the influence of autonomic innervation, theorectically, injection of BoNT-A into the prostate induces chemo-denervation and modulation of prostate function, and reduces lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This article reviews the application of BoNT-A in patients with LUTS/ benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from mechanisms of action to clinical results. BoNT-A has been shown to induce prostate apoptosis, downregulation of alpha 1A receptors, and reduce contractile function of prostate in animal studies. Open studies of intraprostate BoNT-A injection have demonstrated promising results of reducing LUTS and improvement of voiding function in human LUTS/BPH, however, intraprostatic BoNT-A injection did not perform better than the placebo group in recent publications of placebo controlled studies. We suggested that BoNT-A prostate injection might benefit selected population of BPH/LUTS, but it is unlikely to be an effective therapy for general population of male LUTS/BPH. PMID:27128942

  4. Iterative Structure-Based Peptide-Like Inhibitor Design against the Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga, Jorge E.; Hammill, Jared T.; Drory, Omri; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Burnett, James C.; Gussio, Rick; Wipf, Peter; Bavari, Sina; Brunger, Axel T.

    2010-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A LC) protease is the catalytic component responsible for the neuroparalysis that is characteristic of the disease state botulism. Three related peptide-like molecules (PLMs) were designed using previous information from co-crystal structures, synthesized, and assayed for in vitro inhibition against BoNT/A LC. Our results indicate these PLMS are competitive inhibitors of the BoNT/A LC protease and their Ki values are in the nM-range. A co-crystal structure for one of these inhibitors was determined and reveals that the PLM, in accord with the goals of our design strategy, simultaneously involves both ionic interactions via its P1 residue and hydrophobic contacts by means of an aromatic group in the P2′ position. The PLM adopts a helical conformation similar to previously determined co-crystal structures of PLMs, although there are also major differences to these other structures such as contacts with specific BoNT/A LC residues. Our structure further demonstrates the remarkable plasticity of the substrate binding cleft of the BoNT/A LC protease and provides a paradigm for iterative structure-based design and development of BoNT/A LC inhibitors. PMID:20614028

  5. Molecular basis for disruption of E-cadherin adhesion by botulinum neurotoxin A complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangkook; Zhong, Xiaofen; Gu, Shenyan; Kruel, Anna Magdalena; Dorner, Martin B; Perry, Kay; Rummel, Andreas; Dong, Min; Jin, Rongsheng

    2014-06-20

    How botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cross the host intestinal epithelial barrier in foodborne botulism is poorly understood. Here, we present the crystal structure of a clostridial hemagglutinin (HA) complex of serotype BoNT/A bound to the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin at 2.4 angstroms. The HA complex recognizes E-cadherin with high specificity involving extensive intermolecular interactions and also binds to carbohydrates on the cell surface. Binding of the HA complex sequesters E-cadherin in the monomeric state, compromising the E-cadherin-mediated intercellular barrier and facilitating paracellular absorption of BoNT/A. We reconstituted the complete 14-subunit BoNT/A complex using recombinantly produced components and demonstrated that abolishing either E-cadherin- or carbohydrate-binding of the HA complex drastically reduces oral toxicity of BoNT/A complex in vivo. Together, these studies establish the molecular mechanism of how HAs contribute to the oral toxicity of BoNT/A. PMID:24948737

  6. Recommended mass spectrometry-based strategies to identify botulinum neurotoxin-containing samples.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Baudys, Jakub; Wang, Dongxia; Barr, John R

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease called botulism, which can be lethal. BoNTs are proteins secreted by some species of clostridia and are known to cause paralysis by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Although the human lethal dose of BoNT is not accurately known, it is estimated to be between 0.1 μg to 70 μg, so it is important to enable detection of small amounts of these toxins. Our laboratory previously reported on the development of Endopep-MS, a mass-spectrometric‑based endopeptidase method to detect, differentiate, and quantify BoNT immunoaffinity purified from complex matrices. In this work, we describe the application of Endopep-MS for the analysis of thirteen blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. This method successfully identified the presence or absence of BoNT in all thirteen samples and was able to successfully differentiate the serotype of BoNT present in the samples, which included matrices such as buffer, milk, meat extract, and serum. Furthermore, the method yielded quantitative results which had z-scores in the range of -3 to +3 for quantification of BoNT/A containing samples. These results indicate that Endopep-MS is an excellent technique for detection, differentiation, and quantification of BoNT in complex matrices. PMID:25996606

  7. Persistence of botulinum neurotoxin a subtypes 1-5 in primary rat spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Whitemarsh, Regina Clare Meyer; Tepp, William Howard; Johnson, Eric Arthur; Pellett, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous substances known and cause the severe disease botulism. BoNTs have also been remarkably effective as therapeutics in treating many neuronal and neuromuscular disorders. One of the hallmarks of BoNTs, particularly serotype A, is its long persistence of 2-6 months in patients at concentrations as low as fM or pM. The mechanisms for this persistence are currently unclear. In this study we determined the persistence of the BoNT/A subtypes 1 through 5 in primary rat spinal neurons. Remarkably, the duration of intracellular enzymatic activity of BoNT/A1, /A2, /A4 and /A5 was shown to be at least 10 months. Conversely, the effects of BoNT/A3 were observed for up to ∼5 months. An intermittent dosing with BoNT/E showed intracellular activity of the shorter acting BoNT/E for 2-3 weeks, followed by reoccurrence and persistence of BoNT/A-induced SNAP-25 cleavage products. PMID:24587301

  8. A high content imaging assay for identification of Botulinum neurotoxin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kota, Krishna P; Soloveva, Veronica; Wanner, Laura M; Gomba, Glenn; Kiris, Erkan; Panchal, Rekha G; Kane, Christopher D; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25) is a component of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex that is essential for synaptic neurotransmitter release. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is a zinc metalloprotease that blocks exocytosis of neurotransmitter by cleaving the SNAP-25 component of the SNARE complex. Currently there are no licensed medicines to treat BoNT/A poisoning after internalization of the toxin by motor neurons. The development of effective therapeutic measures to counter BoNT/A intoxication has been limited, due in part to the lack of robust high-throughput assays for screening small molecule libraries. Here we describe a high content imaging (HCI) assay with utility for identification of BoNT/A inhibitors. Initial optimization efforts focused on improving the reproducibility of inter-plate results across multiple, independent experiments. Automation of immunostaining, image acquisition, and image analysis were found to increase assay consistency and minimize variability while enabling the multiparameter evaluation of experimental compounds in a murine motor neuron system. PMID:25489815

  9. Activity of botulinum neurotoxin type D (strain 1873) in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Scherf, Jacob M; Pier, Christina L; Johnson, Eric A

    2015-07-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxin type D (BoNT/D) causes periodic outbreaks of botulism in cattle and horses, but is rarely associated with human botulism. Previous studies have shown that humans responded poorly to peripheral injection of up to 10U of BoNT/D. Isolated human pyramidalis muscle preparations were resistant to BoNT/D, whereas isolated human intercostal muscle preparations responded to BoNT/D similarly as to other BoNT serotypes. In vitro data indicate that BoNT/D does not cleave human VAMP1 efficiently, and differential expression of the VAMP 1 and 2 isoforms may be responsible for the above observations. Here we examined sensitivity of cultured human neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells to BoNT/D. Our data indicate that BoNT/D can enter and cleave VAMP 2 in human neurons, but at significantly lower efficiency than other BoNT serotypes. In addition, BoNT/D had a short duration of action in the cultured neurons, similar to that of BoNT/E. In vivo analyses indicated a slower time to death in mice, as well as a later onset and shorter duration of action than BoNT/A1. Finally, examination of BoNT/D activity in various rodent and human cell models resulted in dramatic differences in sensitivity, indicating a unique cell entry mechanism of BoNT/D. PMID:25937339

  10. Engineered Promoters for Potent Transient Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Ideses, Diana; Tikotzki, Ravid; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Shefi, Orit; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    The core promoter, which is generally defined as the region to which RNA Polymerase II is recruited to initiate transcription, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of gene expression. The core promoter consists of different combinations of several short DNA sequences, termed core promoter elements or motifs, which confer specific functional properties to each promoter. Earlier studies that examined the ability to modulate gene expression levels via the core promoter, led to the design of strong synthetic core promoters, which combine different core elements into a single core promoter. Here, we designed a new core promoter, termed super core promoter 3 (SCP3), which combines four core promoter elements (the TATA box, Inr, MTE and DPE) into a single promoter that drives prolonged and potent gene expression. We analyzed the effect of core promoter architecture on the temporal dynamics of reporter gene expression by engineering EGFP expression vectors that are driven by distinct core promoters. We used live cell imaging and flow cytometric analyses in different human cell lines to demonstrate that SCPs, particularly the novel SCP3, drive unusually strong long-term EGFP expression. Importantly, this is the first demonstration of long-term expression in transiently transfected mammalian cells, indicating that engineered core promoters can provide a novel non-viral strategy for biotechnological as well as gene-therapy-related applications that require potent expression for extended time periods. PMID:26872062

  11. Gene expression profiling in brain of mice exposed to the marine neurotoxin ciguatoxin reveals an acute anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective response

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are polyether marine neurotoxins and potent activators of voltage-gated sodium channels. This toxin is carried by multiple reef-fish species and human consumption of ciguatoxins can result in an explosive gastrointestinal/neurologic illness. This study characterizes the global transcriptional response in mouse brain to a symptomatic dose of the highly toxic Pacific ciguatoxin P-CTX-1 and additionally compares this data to transcriptional profiles from liver and whole blood examined previously. Adult male C57/BL6 mice were injected with 0.26 ng/g P-CTX-1 while controls received only vehicle. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 4 and 24 hrs and transcriptional profiling was performed on brain RNA with Agilent whole genome microarrays. RT-PCR was used to independently validate gene expression and the web tool DAVID was used to analyze gene ontology (GO) and molecular pathway enrichment of the gene expression data. Results A pronounced 4°C hypothermic response was recorded in these mice, reaching a minimum at 1 hr and lasting for 8 hrs post toxin exposure. Ratio expression data were filtered by intensity, fold change and p-value, with the resulting data used for time course analysis, K-means clustering, ontology classification and KEGG pathway enrichment. Top GO hits for this gene set included acute phase response and mono-oxygenase activity. Molecular pathway analysis showed enrichment for complement/coagulation cascades and metabolism of xenobiotics. Many immediate early genes such as Fos, Jun and Early Growth Response isoforms were down-regulated although others associated with stress such as glucocorticoid responsive genes were up-regulated. Real time PCR confirmation was performed on 22 differentially expressed genes with a correlation of 0.9 (Spearman's Rho, p < 0.0001) with microarray results. Conclusions Many of the genes differentially expressed in this study, in parallel with the hypothermia, figure prominently in protection against

  12. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis. PMID:22112764

  13. Orally Bioavailable Potent Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yan; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of N,N′-disubstituted ureas having a conformationally restricted cis- or trans-1,4-cyclohexane α to the urea were prepared and tested as soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors. This series of compounds showed low nanomolar to picomolar activities against recombinant human sEH. Both isomers showed similar potencies, but the trans isomers were more metabolically stable in human hepatic microsomes. Furthermore, these new potent inhibitors show a greater metabolic stability in vivo than previously described sEH inhibitors. We demonstrated that trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid 13g (t-AUCB, IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.05 nM) had excellent oral bioavailability (98%, n = 2) and blood area under the curve in dogs and was effective in vivo to treat hypotension in lipopolysaccharide challenged murine models. PMID:17616115

  14. Functional Evaluation of Biological Neurotoxins in Networked Cultures of Stem Cell-derived Central Nervous System Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Kyle; Beske, Phillip; Lyman, Megan; McNutt, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic and mechanistic studies of the presynaptically targeted clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) have been limited by the need for a scalable, cell-based model that produces functioning synapses and undergoes physiological responses to intoxication. Here we describe a simple and robust method to efficiently differentiate murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into defined lineages of synaptically active, networked neurons. Following an 8 day differentiation protocol, mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) rapidly express and compartmentalize neurotypic proteins, form neuronal morphologies and develop intrinsic electrical responses. By 18 days after differentiation (DIV 18), ESNs exhibit active glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic synapses and emergent network behaviors characterized by an excitatory:inhibitory balance. To determine whether intoxication with CNTs functionally antagonizes synaptic neurotransmission, thereby replicating the in vivo pathophysiology that is responsible for clinical manifestations of botulism or tetanus, whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology was used to quantify spontaneous miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) in ESNs exposed to tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) or botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes /A-/G. In all cases, ESNs exhibited near-complete loss of synaptic activity within 20 hr. Intoxicated neurons remained viable, as demonstrated by unchanged resting membrane potentials and intrinsic electrical responses. To further characterize the sensitivity of this approach, dose-dependent effects of intoxication on synaptic activity were measured 20 hr after addition of BoNT/A. Intoxication with 0.005 pM BoNT/A resulted in a significant decrement in mEPSCs, with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.013 pM. Comparisons of median doses indicate that functional measurements of synaptic inhibition are faster, more specific and more sensitive than SNARE cleavage assays or the mouse lethality assay

  15. Botulinum and Tetanus Neurotoxin-Induced Blockade of Synaptic Transmission in Networked Cultures of Human and Rodent Neurons.

    PubMed

    Beske, Phillip H; Bradford, Aaron B; Grynovicki, Justin O; Glotfelty, Elliot J; Hoffman, Katie M; Hubbard, Kyle S; Tuznik, Kaylie M; McNutt, Patrick M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical manifestations of tetanus and botulism result from an intricate series of interactions between clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) and nerve terminal proteins that ultimately cause proteolytic cleavage of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and functional blockade of neurotransmitter release. Although detection of cleaved SNARE proteins is routinely used as a molecular readout of CNT intoxication in cultured cells, impaired synaptic function is the pathophysiological basis of clinical disease. Work in our laboratory has suggested that the blockade of synaptic neurotransmission in networked neuron cultures offers a phenotypic readout of CNT intoxication that more closely replicates the functional endpoint of clinical disease. Here, we explore the value of measuring spontaneous neurotransmission frequencies as novel and functionally relevant readouts of CNT intoxication. The generalizability of this approach was confirmed in primary neuron cultures as well as human and mouse stem cell-derived neurons exposed to botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A-G and tetanus neurotoxin. The sensitivity and specificity of synaptic activity as a reporter of intoxication was evaluated in assays representing the principal clinical and research purposes of in vivo studies. Our findings confirm that synaptic activity offers a novel and functionally relevant readout for the in vitro characterizations of CNTs. They further suggest that the analysis of synaptic activity in neuronal cell cultures can serve as a surrogate for neuromuscular paralysis in the mouse lethal assay, and therefore is expected to significantly reduce the need for terminal animal use in toxin studies and facilitate identification of candidate therapeutics in cell-based screening assays. PMID:26615023

  16. The efficacy of botulinum neurotoxin A for the treatment of complete and partially recovered chronic sixth nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Repka, M X; Lam, G C; Morrison, N A

    1994-01-01

    Esotropia from chronic sixth nerve palsy or paresis usually requires surgery. Chemodenervation of the antagonist medial rectus muscle, while popular for the treatment of acute sixth nerve palsies and pareses, has not been used extensively for chronic cases. In this study, 22 patients with sixth nerve palsies or partially recovered palsies of greater than 5 months duration were treated with chemodenervation. The etiologies of the sixth nerve palsies were trauma (n = 7), tumor (n = 4), infection/inflammation (n = 3), nerve compression from aneurysm or increased intracranial pressure (n = 4), congenital (n = 1), ischemia (n = 2), and idiopathic (n = 1). The mean preinjection deviation was 41 prism diopters. A total of 38 injections were administered (mean, 1.7 per patient). Each patient received an injection of 2.5 to 7.5 units (mean, 4.1) of botulinum neurotoxin A to the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle. Treatment success was assessed 6 months after the last injection. A course of chemodenervation significantly improved the alignment of 9 of the 22 patients (41%). The mean postinjection deviation was 8 delta. Seven patients (32%) had single binocular vision in primary position restored. These patients had a mean horizontal binocular field of 70 degrees (range, 40 degrees to 100 degrees). Thirteen patients (59%) had only modest improvement and required surgery. The data suggest that injection of botulinum neurotoxin A is a useful treatment for some patients with chronic sixth nerve weakness. A course of chemodenervation therapy compares less favorably with transposition surgery with concomitant neurotoxin injection for the treatment of these difficult problems. PMID:8014791

  17. Production and evaluation of a recombinant subunit vaccine against botulinum neurotoxin serotype B using a 293E expression system.

    PubMed

    Yu, YunZhou; Shi, DanYang; Liu, Si; Gong, Zheng-Wei; Wang, Shuang; Sun, ZhiWei

    2015-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli and yeast were commonly used to express recombinant Hc of botulinum neurotoxins, as an alternative, in current study, a 293E expression system was used to express the Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) as soluble recombinant protein for experimental vaccine evaluation. Our results demonstrated that the 293E expression system could produce high level of recombinant secreted BHc protein, which was immunorecognized specifically by anti-botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) sera and showed ganglioside binding activities. The serological response and efficacy of recombinant BHc formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant were evaluated in mice. Immunization with Alhydrogel-formulated BHc subunit vaccine afforded the effective protection against BoNT/B challenge. A frequency- and dose-dependent effect to immunization with BHc subunit vaccine was observed and the ELISA antibody titers correlated well with neutralizing antibody titers and protection. And a solid-phase assay showed that the neutralizing antibodies from the BHc-immunized mice inhibited the binding of BHc to the ganglioside GT1b. Our results also show that the plasmid pABE293SBHc derived of the 293E expression system as DNA vaccine is capable of inducing stronger humoral response and protective efficacy against BoNT/B than the pVAX1SBHc. In summary, immunization with the 293E-expressed BHc protein generates effective immune protection against BoNT/B as E. coli or yeast-expressed BHc, so the efficient expression of botulinum Hc protein for experimental vaccine can be prepared using the 293E expression system. PMID:25483668

  18. Production and Evaluation of a Recombinant Chimeric Vaccine against Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Types C and D

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Luciana A. F.; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P.; Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Salvarani, Felipe M.; Assis, Ronnie A.; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F.; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Conceição, Fabricio R.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle. PMID:23936080

  19. Botulinum neurotoxin type A modulates vesicular release of glutamate from satellite glial cells

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Larissa Bittencourt; Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of cell membrane docking proteins synaptosomal-associated protein, 25 and 23 kD (SNAP-25 and SNAP-23) in satellite glial cells (SGCs) of rat trigeminal ganglion; whether cultured SGCs would release glutamate in a time- and calcium-dependent manner following calcium-ionophore ionomycin stimulation; and if botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA), in a dose-dependent manner, could block or decrease vesicular release of glutamate. SGCs were isolated from the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of adult Wistar rats and cultured for 7 days. The presence of SNAPs in TG sections and isolated SGCs were investigated using immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry, respectively. SGCs were stimulated with ionomycin (5 μM for 4, 8, 12 and 30 min.) to release glutamate. SGCs were then pre-incubated with BoNTA (24 hrs with 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 pM) to investigate if BoNTA could potentially block ionomycin-stimulated glutamate release. Glutamate concentrations were measured by ELISA. SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 were present in SGCs in TG sections and in cultured SGCs. Ionomycin significantly increased glutamate release from cultured SGCs 30 min. following the treatment (P < 0.001). BoNTA (100 pM) significantly decreased glutamate release (P < 0.01). Results from this study demonstrated that SGCs, when stimulated with ionomycin, released glutamate that was inhibited by BoNTA, possibly through cleavage of SNAP-25 and/or SNAP-23. These novel findings demonstrate the existence of vesicular glutamate release from SGCs, which could potentially play a role in the trigeminal sensory transmission. In addition, interaction of BoNTA with non-neuronal cells at the level of TG suggests a potential analgesic mechanism of action of BoNTA. PMID:25754332

  20. Isolation and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin from complex matrices using the BoTest matrix assays.

    PubMed

    Dunning, F Mark; Piazza, Timothy M; Zeytin, Füsûn N; Tucker, Ward C

    2014-01-01

    Accurate detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) in complex matrices is required for pharmaceutical, environmental, and food sample testing. Rapid BoNT testing of foodstuffs is needed during outbreak forensics, patient diagnosis, and food safety testing while accurate potency testing is required for BoNT-based drug product manufacturing and patient safety. The widely used mouse bioassay for BoNT testing is highly sensitive but lacks the precision and throughput needed for rapid and routine BoNT testing. Furthermore, the bioassay's use of animals has resulted in calls by drug product regulatory authorities and animal-rights proponents in the US and abroad to replace the mouse bioassay for BoNT testing. Several in vitro replacement assays have been developed that work well with purified BoNT in simple buffers, but most have not been shown to be applicable to testing in highly complex matrices. Here, a protocol for the detection of BoNT in complex matrices using the BoTest Matrix assays is presented. The assay consists of three parts: The first part involves preparation of the samples for testing, the second part is an immunoprecipitation step using anti-BoNT antibody-coated paramagnetic beads to purify BoNT from the matrix, and the third part quantifies the isolated BoNT's proteolytic activity using a fluorogenic reporter. The protocol is written for high throughput testing in 96-well plates using both liquid and solid matrices and requires about 2 hr of manual preparation with total assay times of 4-26 hr depending on the sample type, toxin load, and desired sensitivity. Data are presented for BoNT/A testing with phosphate-buffered saline, a drug product, culture supernatant, 2% milk, and fresh tomatoes and includes discussion of critical parameters for assay success. PMID:24638074

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Alpha-Exosite of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/A Inhibit Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Geren, Isin N.; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Marks, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The paralytic disease botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT), multi-domain proteins containing a zinc endopeptidase that cleaves the cognate SNARE protein, thereby blocking acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. Antitoxins currently used to treat botulism neutralize circulating BoNT but cannot enter, bind to or neutralize BoNT that has already entered the neuron. The light chain endopeptidase domain (LC) of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) was targeted for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis resulting from intoxication by BoNT/A. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized humans and mice were displayed on the surface of yeast, and 19 BoNT/A LC-specific mAbs were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Affinities of the mAbs for BoNT/A LC ranged from a KD value of 9.0×10−11 M to 3.53×10−8 M (mean KD 5.38×10−9 M and median KD 1.53×10−9 M), as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/A LC catalytic activity with IC50 values ranging from 8.3 ~73×10−9 M. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were also mapped by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that the inhibitory mAbs bound the α-exosite region remote from the BoNT/A LC catalytic center. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis post-intoxication and further define epitopes that could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors. PMID:26275214

  2. Accelerated neuronal cell recovery from Botulinum neurotoxin intoxication by targeted ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chueh-Ling; Oyler, George A; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a Category A biodefense agent, delivers a protease to motor neuron cytosol that cleaves one or more soluble NSF attachment protein receptors (SNARE) proteins involved in neurotransmission to cause a flaccid paralysis. No antidotes exist to reverse symptoms of BoNT intoxication so severely affected patients require artificial respiration with prolonged intensive care. Time to recovery depends on toxin serotype because the intraneuronal persistence of the seven known BoNT serotypes varies widely from days to many months. Our therapeutic antidote strategy is to develop 'targeted F-box' (TFB) agents that target the different intraneuronal BoNT proteases for accelerated degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), thus promoting rapid recovery from all serotypes. These agents consist of a camelid heavy chain-only V(H) (VHH) domain specific for a BoNT protease fused to an F-box domain recognized by an intraneuronal E3-ligase. A fusion protein containing the 14 kDa anti-BoNT/A protease VHH, ALcB8, joined to a 15 kDa F-box domain region of TrCP (D5) was sufficient to cause increased ubiquitination and accelerate turnover of the targeted BoNT/A protease within neurons. Neuronal cells expressing this TFB, called D5-B8, were also substantially resistant to BoNT/A intoxication and recovered from intoxication at least 2.5 fold quicker than control neurons. Fusion of D5 to a VHH specific for BoNT/B protease (BLcB10) led to accelerated turnover of the targeted protease within neurons, thus demonstrating the modular nature of these therapeutic agents and suggesting that development of similar therapeutic agents specific to all botulinum serotypes should be readily achievable. PMID:21629663

  3. Facile electrochemical detection of botulinum neurotoxin type E using a two-step proteolytic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonhwa; Shin, Yu Mi; Song, Ji-Joon; Yang, Haesik

    2015-10-15

    Facile electrochemical methods for measuring protease concentration or protease activity are essential for point-of-care testing of toxic proteases. However, electrochemical detection of proteases, such as botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E), that cleave a peptide bond between two specific amino acid residues is challenging. This study reports a facile and sensitive electrochemical method for BoNT/E detection. The method is based on a two-step proteolytic cleavage using a target BoNT/E light chain (BoNT/E-LC) and an externally supplemented exopeptidase, L-leucine-aminopeptidase (LAP). BoNT/E-LC cleaves a peptide bond between arginine and isoleucine in IDTQNRQIDRI-4-amino-1-naphthol (oligopeptide-AN) to generate isoleucine-AN. Subsequently, LAP cleaves a bond between isoleucine and AN to liberate a free electroactive AN species. The liberated AN participates in electrochemical-chemical-chemical (ECC) redox cycling involving Ru(NH3)6(3+), AN, and a reducing agent, which allows a high signal amplification. Electrochemical detection is carried out without surface modification of indium-tin oxide electrodes. We show that dithiothreitol is beneficial for enhancing the enzymatic activity of BoNT/E-LC and also for achieving a fast ECC redox cycling. An incubation temperature of 37°C and the use of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) buffer resulted in optimal signal-to-background ratios for efficient BoNT/E detection. BoNT/E-LC could be detected at concentrations of approximately 2.0 pg/mL, 0.2, and 3 ng/mL after 4h, 2h, and 15 min incubation in PBS buffer, respectively, and approximately 0.3 ng/mL after 2-h incubation in bottled water. The method developed could be applied in fast, sensitive, and selective detection of any protease that cleaves a peptide bond between two specific amino acid residues. PMID:25982730

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxins: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis Using the Mouse Phrenic Nerve Hemidiaphragm Assay (MPN)

    PubMed Central

    Bigalke, Hans; Rummel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The historical method for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is represented by the mouse bioassay (MBA) measuring the animal survival rate. Since the endpoint of the MBA is the death of the mice due to paralysis of the respiratory muscle, an ex vivo animal replacement method, called mouse phrenic nerve (MPN) assay, employs the isolated N. phrenicus-hemidiaphragm tissue. Here, BoNT causes a dose-dependent characteristic decrease of the contraction amplitude of the indirectly stimulated muscle. Within the EQuATox BoNT proficiency 13 test samples were analysed using the MPN assay by serial dilution to a bath concentration resulting in a paralysis time within the range of calibration curves generated with BoNT/A, B and E standards, respectively. For serotype identification the diluted samples were pre-incubated with polyclonal anti-BoNT/A, B or E antitoxin or a combination of each. All 13 samples were qualitatively correctly identified thereby delivering superior results compared to single in vitro methods like LFA, ELISA and LC-MS/MS. Having characterized the BoNT serotype, the final bath concentrations were calculated using the calibration curves and then multiplied by the respective dilution factor to obtain the sample concentration. Depending on the source of the BoNT standards used, the quantitation of ten BoNT/A containing samples delivered a mean z-score of 7 and of three BoNT/B or BoNT/E containing samples z-scores <2, respectively. PMID:26610569

  5. Blockade of glutamate release by botulinum neurotoxin type A in humans: A dermal microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Larissa Bittencourt; Karshenas, Ali; Bach, Flemming W; Rasmussen, Sten; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The analgesic action of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) has been linked to the blockade of peripheral release of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters in animal models; however, there is no direct evidence of this in humans. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of BoNTA on glutamate release in humans, using an experimental model of pain and sensitization provoked by capsaicin plus mild heat. METHODS: Twelve healthy volunteers (six men, six women) were pretreated with BoNTA (10 U) on the volar forearm and with a saline control on the contralateral side. Dermal microdialysis was applied one week later to collect interstitial samples before and after the application of a capsaicin patch (8%) plus mild heat (40°C/60 min) to provoke glutamate release, pain and vasodilation. Samples were collected every hour for 3 h using linear microdialysis probes (10 mm, 100 kD). Dialysate was analyzed for glutamate concentration. Pain intensity and skin vasomotor reactions (temperature and blood flow changes) were also recorded. RESULTS: BoNTA significantly reduced glutamate release compared with saline (P<0.05). The provoked pain intensity was lower in the BoNTA-pretreated arm (P<0.01). The reduction in pain scores was not correlated with glutamate level. Cutaneous blood flow (P<0.05), but not cutaneous temperature (P≥0.05), was significantly reduced by BoNTA. There was a correlation between glutamate level and skin blood flow (r=0.58/P<0.05) but not skin temperature (P≥0.05). No differences according to sex were observed in any response. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provided the first direct evidence supporting the inhibitory effect of BoNTA on glutamate release in human skin, which is potentially responsible for some of the analgesic action of BoNTA. PMID:24851237

  6. Predicting Improvement in Writer’s Cramp Symptoms following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Mallory; Delrobaei, Mehdi; Rahimi, Fariborz; Atashzar, S. Farokh; Shahbazi, Mahya; Patel, Rajni; Jog, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Writer’s cramp is a specific focal hand dystonia causing abnormal posturing and tremor in the upper limb. The most popular medical intervention, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) therapy, is variably effective for 50–70% of patients. BoNT-A non-responders undergo ineffective treatment and may experience significant side effects. Various assessments have been used to determine response prediction to BoNT-A, but not in the same population of patients. Methods A comprehensive assessment was employed to measure various symptom aspects. Clinical scales, full upper-limb kinematic measures, self-report, and task performance measures were assessed for nine writer’s cramp patients at baseline. Patients received two BoNT-A injections then were classified as responders or non-responders based on a quantified self-report measure. Baseline scores were compared between groups, across all measures, to determine which scores predicted a positive BoNT-A response. Results Five of nine patients were responders. No kinematic measures were predictably different between groups. Analyses revealed three features that predicted a favorable response and separated the two groups: higher than average cramp severity and cramp frequency, and below average cramp latency. Discussion Non-kinematic measures appear to be superior in making such predictions. Specifically, measures of cramp severity, frequency, and latency during performance of a specific set of writing and drawing tasks were predictive factors. Since kinematic was not used to determine the injection pattern and the injections were visually guided, it may still be possible to use individual patient kinematics for better outcomes. PMID:27625900

  7. Enhanced insecticidal activity of Chilo iridescent virus expressing an insect specific neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Muratoglu, Hacer; Yesilyurt, Aydın; van Oers, Monique M; Vlak, Just M; Demirbag, Zihni

    2016-07-01

    Previously we have generated a recombinant Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) by inserting the green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) into the CIV 157L open reading frame (ORF) locus and showed that this recombinant (rCIV-Δ157L-gfp) was fully infectious both in cell culture as well as in insect larvae. This study opened up a new avenue for increasing the speed of kill of CIV and other iridoviruses by inserting virulence or toxin genes into the viral genome. In the current study we constructed a recombinant CIV (rCIV-Δ157L/gfp-AaIT) where the 157L ORF was replaced with both the AaIT neurotoxin gene from the scorpion Androctonus australis and the gfp gene, each under control of the viral major capsid protein (mcp) gene promoter. Recombinant virus was purified by successive rounds of plaque purification using Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells. One-step growth curves for the recombinant viruses, rCIV-Δ157L/gfp-AaIT and rCIV-Δ157L-gfp, and wild-type CIVs in Sf-9 cells showed similar profiles. AaIT toxin expression in infected third instar Galleria mellonella larvae was confirmed by western blot analysis using an antibody against the AaIT protein. rCIV-Δ157L/gfp-AaIT infection at a concentration that kills 100% of the larvae caused paralysis in infected third instar G. mellonella larvae from two days after injection, whereas infection with non-AaIT containing viruses showed mortality starting much later (>10days). Bioassays on these larvae demonstrated that the speed of kill of CIV carrying AaIT was strikingly enhanced as compared to wild-type CIV. These results suggest that insertion of a toxin gene into CIV provides further opportunities to control a wide range of pest insects, such as weevils, using an iridovirus. PMID:27369385

  8. Neurotoxin gene profiling of clostridium botulinum types C and D native to different countries within Europe.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cedric; Skarin, Hanna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fenicia, Lucia; Bano, Luca; Drigo, Ilenia; Koene, Miriam; Bäyon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Buffereau, Jean-Philippe; De Medici, Dario; Fach, Patrick

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum types C and D, as well as their mosaic variants C-D and D-C, are associated with avian and mammalian botulism. This study reports on the development of low-density macroarrays based on the GeneDisc cycler platform (Pall-GeneDisc Technologies) applied to the simultaneous detection of the C. botulinum subtypes C, C-D, D, and D-C. The limit of detection of the PCR assays was 38 fg of total DNA, corresponding to 15 genome copies. Artificially contaminated samples of cecum showed a limit of detection below 50 spores/g. The tests were performed with a large variety of bacterial strains, including C. botulinum types C (n = 12), C-D (n = 29), D (n = 5), and D-C (n = 10), other botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT)-producing Clostridium strains (n = 20), non-BoNT-producing clostridia (n = 20), and other bacterial species (n = 23), and showed a high specificity. These PCR assays were compared to previously published real-time PCRs for the detection of C. botulinum in 292 samples collected from cases of botulism events in four European regions. The majority of the samples originated from wild birds (n = 108), poultry (n = 60), and bovines (n = 56). Among the 292 samples, 144 were positive for either the bont/C-D or the bont/D-C gene by using the GeneDisc arrays. The reliability of the results tallied to 97.94%. Interestingly, only BoNT mosaics, types C-D and D-C, were found in naturally contaminated samples whatever their animal origin and their geographical location. Further investigations should now be performed in order to check that mosaic types dominate in Europe and that acquisition of mosaic types helps in survival or adaptation to particular niche. PMID:22344654

  9. Neurotoxin Gene Profiling of Clostridium botulinum Types C and D Native to Different Countries within Europe

    PubMed Central

    Woudstra, Cedric; Skarin, Hanna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fenicia, Lucia; Bano, Luca; Drigo, Ilenia; Koene, Miriam; Bäyon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Buffereau, Jean-Philippe; De Medici, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum types C and D, as well as their mosaic variants C-D and D-C, are associated with avian and mammalian botulism. This study reports on the development of low-density macroarrays based on the GeneDisc cycler platform (Pall-GeneDisc Technologies) applied to the simultaneous detection of the C. botulinum subtypes C, C-D, D, and D-C. The limit of detection of the PCR assays was 38 fg of total DNA, corresponding to 15 genome copies. Artificially contaminated samples of cecum showed a limit of detection below 50 spores/g. The tests were performed with a large variety of bacterial strains, including C. botulinum types C (n = 12), C-D (n = 29), D (n = 5), and D-C (n = 10), other botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT)-producing Clostridium strains (n = 20), non-BoNT-producing clostridia (n = 20), and other bacterial species (n = 23), and showed a high specificity. These PCR assays were compared to previously published real-time PCRs for the detection of C. botulinum in 292 samples collected from cases of botulism events in four European regions. The majority of the samples originated from wild birds (n = 108), poultry (n = 60), and bovines (n = 56). Among the 292 samples, 144 were positive for either the bont/C-D or the bont/D-C gene by using the GeneDisc arrays. The reliability of the results tallied to 97.94%. Interestingly, only BoNT mosaics, types C-D and D-C, were found in naturally contaminated samples whatever their animal origin and their geographical location. Further investigations should now be performed in order to check that mosaic types dominate in Europe and that acquisition of mosaic types helps in survival or adaptation to particular niche. PMID:22344654

  10. Trans generational effects of the neurotoxin BMAA on the aquatic grazer Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; García-Altares, María; Mendes e Mello, Mariana; Lürling, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin that is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. BMAA has been detected in phytoplankton and globally, the main exposure routes for humans to BMAA are through direct contact with phytoplankton-infested waters and consumption of BMAA-contaminated fish and invertebrates. As BMAA can be transferred from mothers to offspring in mammals, BMAA exposure is expected to have transgenerational effects. The aim of our study was to determine whether maternal exposure to BMAA affects offspring fitness in zooplankton. We performed a multigenerational life history experiment and a multigenerational uptake experiment with the water flea Daphnia magna as a model species. In both experiments, offspring from nonexposed and exposed mothers were raised in clean and BMAA-containing medium. Direct exposure to 110μg/l BMAA reduced survival, somatic growth, reproduction and population growth. Maternal exposure did not affect D. magna fitness: animals from exposed mothers that were raised in clean medium had a higher mortality and produced lighter neonates than the controls, but this did not result in lower population growth rates. No evidence of adaptation was found. Instead, multigeneration exposure to BMAA had a negative effect: animals that were exposed during two generations had a lower brood viability and neonate weight than animals born from unexposed mothers, but raised in BMAA-containing medium. Maternal transfer of BMAA was observed, but BMAA concentrations in neonates raised in BMAA containing medium were similar for animals born from exposed and unexposed mothers. Our results indicate that zooplankton might be an important vector for the transfer of BMAA along the pelagic food chain, but whether BMAA plays a role in preventing zooplankton from controlling cyanobacterial blooms needs further investigation. PMID:26465128

  11. Neurotoxin-induced pathway perturbation in human neuroblastoma SH-EP cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Jin Hwan

    2014-09-01

    The exact causes of cell death in Parkinson's disease (PD) remain unknown despite extensive studies on PD.The identification of signaling and metabolic pathways involved in PD might provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying PD. The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) induces cellular changes characteristic of PD, and MPP(+)-based models have been extensively used for PD studies. In this study, pathways that were significantly perturbed in MPP(+)-treated human neuroblastoma SH-EP cells were identified from genome-wide gene expression data for five time points (1.5, 3, 9, 12, and 24 h) after treatment. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein processing pathway showed significant perturbation at all time points. Perturbation of each of these pathways resulted in the common outcome of upregulation of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3). Genes involved in ER protein processing pathway included ubiquitin ligase complex genes and ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-related genes. Additionally, overexpression of DDIT3 might induce oxidative stress via glutathione depletion as a result of overexpression of CHAC1. This study suggests that upregulation of DDIT3 caused by perturbation of the MAPK signaling pathway and ER protein processing pathway might play a key role in MPP(+)-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, the toxicity signal of MPP(+) resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction through inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain might feed back to the mitochondria via ER stress. This positive feedback could contribute to amplification of the death signal induced by MPP(+). PMID:25234470

  12. Neurotoxin-Induced Pathway Perturbation in Human Neuroblastoma SH-EP Cells

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jin Hwan

    2014-01-01

    The exact causes of cell death in Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain unknown despite extensive studies on PD.The identification of signaling and metabolic pathways involved in PD might provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying PD. The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) induces cellular changes characteristic of PD, and MPP+-based models have been extensively used for PD studies. In this study, pathways that were significantly perturbed in MPP+-treated human neuroblastoma SH-EP cells were identified from genome-wide gene expression data for five time points (1.5, 3, 9, 12, and 24 h) after treatment. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein processing pathway showed significant perturbation at all time points. Perturbation of each of these pathways resulted in the common outcome of upregulation of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3). Genes involved in ER protein processing pathway included ubiquitin ligase complex genes and ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-related genes. Additionally, overexpression of DDIT3 might induce oxidative stress via glutathione depletion as a result of overexpression of CHAC1. This study suggests that upregulation of DDIT3 caused by perturbation of the MAPK signaling pathway and ER protein processing pathway might play a key role in MPP+-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, the toxicity signal of MPP+ resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction through inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain might feed back to the mitochondria via ER stress. This positive feedback could contribute to amplification of the death signal induced by MPP+. PMID:25234470

  13. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luciana A F; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P; Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Salvarani, Felipe M; Assis, Ronnie A; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle. PMID:23936080

  14. Pre-Clinical Study of a Novel Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Derivative Engineered for Improved Safety

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin; Tenezaca, Luis; Angeles, Christopher; Syngkon, Aurelia; Liublinska, Victoria; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Band, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Cyto-012 is a recombinant derivative of Botulinum neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A). It primarily differs from wild type (wt) BoNT/A1 in that it incorporates two amino acid substitutions in the catalytic domain of the light chain (LC) metalloprotease (E224 > A and Y366 > A), designed to provide a safer clinical profile. Cyto-012 is specifically internalized into rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and cleaves Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25), the substrate of wt BoNT/A, but exhibits slower cleavage kinetics and therefore requires a higher absolute dose to exhibit pharmacologic activity. The pharmacodynamics of Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A have similar onset and duration of action using the Digital Abduction Assay (DAS). Intramuscular LD50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A respectively, were 0.63 ug (95% CI = 0.61, 0.66) and 6.22 pg (95% CI = 5.42, 7.02). ED50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A were respectively, 0.030 ug (95% CI = 0.026, 0.034) and 0.592 pg (95% CI = 0.488, 0.696). The safety margin (intramuscular LD50/ED50 ratio) for Cyto-012 was found to be improved 2-fold relative to wt BoNT/A (p < 0.001). The DAS response to Cyto-012 was diminished when a second injection was administered 32 days after the first. These data suggest that the safety margin of BoNT/A can be improved by modulating their activity towards SNAP-25. PMID:27484492

  15. Development of Human-Like scFv-Fc Neutralizing Botulinum Neurotoxin E

    PubMed Central

    Miethe, Sebastian; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Liu, Yvonne; Chahboun, Siham; Korkeala, Hannu; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Pelat, Thibaut; Thullier, Philippe; Sesardic, Dorothea; Hust, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are considered to be the most toxic substances known on earth and are responsible for human botulism, a life-threatening disease characterized by flaccid muscle paralysis that occurs naturally by food-poisoning or colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by BoNT-producing clostridia. BoNTs have been classified as category A agent by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and are listed among the six agents with the highest risk to be used as bioweapons. Neutralizing antibodies are required for the development of effective anti-botulism therapies to deal with the potential risk of exposure. Results In this study, a macaque (Macaca fascicularis) was immunized with recombinant light chain of BoNT/E3 and an immune phage display library was constructed. After a multi-step panning, several antibody fragments (scFv, single chain fragment variable) with nanomolar affinities were isolated, that inhibited the endopeptidase activity of pure BoNT/E3 in vitro by targeting its light chain. Furthermore, three scFv were confirmed to neutralize BoNT/E3 induced paralysis in an ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay. The most effective neutralization (20LD50/mL, BoNT/E3) was observed with scFv ELC18, with a minimum neutralizing concentration at 0.3 nM. Furthermore, ELC18 was highly effective in vivo when administered as an scFv-Fc construct. Complete protection of 1LD50 BoNT/E3 was observed with 1.6 ng/dose in the mouse flaccid paralysis assay. Conclusion These scFv-Fcs antibodies are the first recombinant antibodies neutralizing BoNT/E by targeting its light chain. The human-like nature of the isolated antibodies is predicting a good tolerance for further clinical development. PMID:26440796

  16. Antinociceptive Effects of Transcytosed Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Trigeminal Nociception in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Geun-Woo; Kim, Min-Ji; Yang, Kui-Ye; Kim, Seong-Taek; Bae, Yong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of peripherally or centrally administered botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) on orofacial inflammatory pain to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of BoNT-A and its underlying mechanisms. The experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the formalin-induced nociceptive response in the second phase. Both subcutaneous (1 or 3 U/kg) and intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) injection of BoNT-A increased the latency of head withdrawal response in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated rats. Intracisternal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evoked nociceptive behavior via the activation of trigeminal neurons, which was attenuated by the subcutaneous or intracisternal injection of BoNT-A. Intracisternal injection of NMDA up-regulated c-Fos expression in the trigeminal neurons of the medullary dorsal horn. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly reduced the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in the NMDA-treated rats. These results suggest that the central antinociceptive effects the peripherally or centrally administered BoNT-A are mediated by transcytosed BoNT-A or direct inhibition of trigeminal neurons. Our data suggest that central targets of BoNT-A might provide a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of orofacial chronic pain conditions. PMID:26170739

  17. Structural Analysis of the Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65{angstrom} resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10{angstrom} relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  18. Structural analysis of the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Lin; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-10-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65 Å resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10 Å relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  19. Effects of hydroxamate metalloendoprotease inhibitors on botulinum neurotoxin A poisoned mouse neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Potian, Joseph G.; Garcia, Carmen C.; Hognason, Kormakur; Čapková, Kateřina; Moe, Scott T.; Jacobson, Alan R.; Janda, Kim D.; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Currently the only therapy for botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) poisoning is antitoxin. Antidotes that are effective after BoNT/A has entered the motor nerve terminals would dramatically benefit BoNT/A therapy. Inhibition of proteolytic activity of BoNT/A light chain by metalloendoprotease inhibitors (MEIs) is under development. We tested the effects of MEIs on in vitro as well as in vivo BoNT/A poisoned mouse nerve muscle preparations (NMPs). The Ki for inhibition of BoNT/A metalloendoprotease was 0.40 and 0.36 μM, respectively, for 2, 4 – dichlorocinnamic acid hydroxamate (DCH) and its methyl derivative, ABS 130. Acute treatment of nerve muscle preparations with 10 pM BoNT/A inhibited nerve evoked muscle twitches, reduced mean quantal content, and induced failures of endplate currents (EPCs). Bath application of 10 μM DCH or 5 μM ABS 130 reduced failures, increased the quantal content of EPCs, and partially restored muscle twitches after a delay of 40 to 90 min. The restorative effects of DCH and ABS 130, as well as 3,4 diaminopyridine (DAP) on twitch tension were greater at 22 °C compared to 37 °C. Unlike DAP, neither DCH nor ABS 130 increased Ca2+ levels in cholinergic Neuro 2a cells. Injection of MEIs into mouse hind limbs before or after BoNT/A injection neither prevented the toe spread reflex inhibition nor improved muscle functions. We suggest that hydroxamate MEIs partially restore neurotransmission of acutely BoNT/A poisoned nerve muscle preparations in vitro in a temperature dependent manner without increasing the Ca2+ levels within motor nerve endings. PMID:20211192

  20. Neurotoxins from the venoms of the sea snakes Hydrophis ornatus and Hydrophis lapemoides.

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, N; Maeda, N; Cogger, H G

    1983-01-01

    The main neurotoxic components, toxins Hydrophis ornatus a and Hydrophis lapemoides a, were isolated from the venoms of the sea snakes Hydrophis ornatus and Hydrophis lapemoides respectively. The amino acid sequence of toxin Hydrophis ornatus a was deduced to be identical with that of toxin Astrotia stokesii a [Maeda & Tamiya (1978) Biochem. J. 175, 507-517] on the basis of identity of the tryptic peptide 'map' and the amino acid composition of each peptide. The amino acid sequence of toxin Hydrophis lapemoides a was determined mainly on the basis of identity of the amino acid compositions, mobilities on paper electrophoresis and migration positions on paper chromatography of the tryptic peptides with those of other sea-snake toxins whose sequences are known. Both toxins Hydrophis ornatus a and Hydrophis lapemoides a consisted of 60 amino acid residues and there were six amino acid replacements between them. The taxonomy of sea snakes in the Hydrophis ornatus complex has long been confused, and the above snakes were originally assigned to taxa that proved to be inconsistent with the relationships indicated by the neurotoxin amino acid sequences obtained. A subsequent re-examination of the specimens revealed an error in the original identifications and demonstrated the value of the protein amino acid sequences in systematic and phylogenetic studies. The isolation procedure and results of amino acid analysis of the tryptic peptides have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50121 (8 pages) with the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1983) 209, 5. PMID:6615431

  1. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective. PMID:27626445

  2. Synergistic capture of Clostridium botulinum Type A neurotoxin by scFv antibodies to novel epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Sean A.; Barr, John R.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Marks, James D.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Miller, Keith D.; Feldhaus, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    A non-immune library of human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies displayed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was screened for binding to the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain [BoNT/A (Hc)] with the goal of identifying scFv to novel epitopes. To do this, an antibody-mediated labeling strategy was used in which antigen-binding yeast clones were selected after labeling with previously characterized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the Hc. Twenty unique scFv clones were isolated that bound Hc. Of these, three also bound to full-length BoNT/A toxin complex with affinities ranging from 5 nM to 170 nM. Epitope binning showed that the three unique clones recognized at least two epitopes that were distinct from one another and from the detection MAbs. After production in E. coli, the scFv were coupled to magnetic particles and tested for their ability to capture BoNT/A holotoxin using an Endopep-MS assay. In this assay, toxin captured by scFv coated magnetic particles was detected by incubation of the complex with a peptide containing a BoNT/A-specific cleavage sequence. Mass spectrometry was used to detect the ratio of intact peptide to cleavage products as evidence for toxin capture. When tested individually, each of the scFv showed a weak positive Endopep-MS result. However, when the particles were coated with all three scFv simultaneously, they exhibited significantly higher Endopep-MS activity, consistent with synergistic binding. These results demonstrate novel approaches toward the isolation and characterization of scFv antibodies specific to unlabeled antigen. They also provide evidence that distinct scFv antibodies can work synergistically to increase the efficiency of antigen capture onto a solid support.

  3. Botulinum Neurotoxins Can Enter Cultured Neurons Independent of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H.; Scherf, Jacob M.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the causative agent of the severe and long-lasting disease botulism. At least seven different serotypes of BoNTs (denoted A-G) have been described. All BoNTs enter human or animal neuronal cells via receptor mediated endocytosis and cleave cytosolic SNARE proteins, resulting in a block of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, leading to the flaccid paralysis characteristic of botulism. Previous data have indicated that once a neuronal cell has been intoxicated by a BoNT, further entry of the same or other BoNTs is prevented due to disruption of synaptic vesicle recycling. However, it has also been shown that cultured neurons exposed to BoNT/A are still capable of taking up BoNT/E. In this report we show that in general BoNTs can enter cultured human or mouse neuronal cells that have previously been intoxicated with another BoNT serotype. Quantitative analysis of cell entry by assessing SNARE cleavage revealed none or only a minor difference in the efficiency of uptake of BoNTs into previously intoxicated neurons. Examination of the endocytic entry pathway by specific endocytosis inhibitors indicated that BoNTs are taken up by clathrin coated pits in both non pre-exposed and pre-exposed neurons. LDH release assays indicated that hiPSC derived neurons exposed consecutively to two different BoNT serotypes remained viable and healthy except in the case of BoNT/E or combinations of BoNT/E with BoNT/B, /D, or /F. Overall, our data indicate that previous intoxication of neuronal cells with BoNT does not inhibit further uptake of BoNTs. PMID:26207366

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxins: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis Using the Mouse Phrenic Nerve Hemidiaphragm Assay (MPN).

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Hans; Rummel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The historical method for the detection of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is represented by the mouse bioassay (MBA) measuring the animal survival rate. Since the endpoint of the MBA is the death of the mice due to paralysis of the respiratory muscle, an ex vivo animal replacement method, called mouse phrenic nerve (MPN) assay, employs the isolated N. phrenicus-hemidiaphragm tissue. Here, BoNT causes a dose-dependent characteristic decrease of the contraction amplitude of the indirectly stimulated muscle. Within the EQuATox BoNT proficiency 13 test samples were analysed using the MPN assay by serial dilution to a bath concentration resulting in a paralysis time within the range of calibration curves generated with BoNT/A, B and E standards, respectively. For serotype identification the diluted samples were pre-incubated with polyclonal anti-BoNT/A, B or E antitoxin or a combination of each. All 13 samples were qualitatively correctly identified thereby delivering superior results compared to single in vitro methods like LFA, ELISA and LC-MS/MS. Having characterized the BoNT serotype, the final bath concentrations were calculated using the calibration curves and then multiplied by the respective dilution factor to obtain the sample concentration. Depending on the source of the BoNT standards used, the quantitation of ten BoNT/A containing samples delivered a mean z-score of 7 and of three BoNT/B or BoNT/E containing samples z-scores <2, respectively. PMID:26610569

  5. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassay for visceral toxicosis of catfish and botulinum neurotoxin serotype E.

    PubMed

    Chatla, Kamalakar; Gaunt, Patricia; Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Hohn, Claudia; Ford, Lorelei; Hanson, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Visceral toxicosis of catfish (VTC), a sporadic disease of cultured channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) often with high mortality, is caused by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E). Presumptive diagnosis of VTC is based on characteristic clinical signs and lesions, and the production of these signs and mortality after sera from affected fish is administered to sentinel catfish. The diagnosis is confirmed if the toxicity is neutralized with BoNT/E antitoxin. Because small catfish are often unavailable, the utility of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) was evaluated in BoNT/E and VTC bioassays. Channel catfish and zebrafish susceptibilities were compared using trypsin-activated BoNT/E in a 96-hr trial by intracoelomically administering 0, 1.87, 3.7, 7.5, 15, or 30 pg of toxin per gram of body weight (g-bw) of fish. All of the zebrafish died at the 7.5 pg/g-bw and higher, while the catfish died at the 15 pg/g-bw dose and higher. To test the bioassay, sera from VTC-affected fish or control sera were intracoelomically injected at a dose of 10 µl per zebrafish and 20 µl/g-bw for channel catfish. At 96 hr post-injection, 78% of the zebrafish and 50% of the catfish receiving VTC sera died, while no control fish died. When the VTC sera were preincubated with BoNT/E antitoxin, they became nontoxic to zebrafish. Histology of zebrafish injected with either VTC serum or BoNT/E demonstrated renal necrosis. Normal catfish serum was toxic to larval zebrafish in immersion exposures, abrogating their utility in VTC bioassays. The results demonstrate bioassays using adult zebrafish for detecting BoNT/E and VTC are sensitive and practical. PMID:24518279

  6. Botulinum Neurotoxins Can Enter Cultured Neurons Independent of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Scherf, Jacob M; Johnson, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the causative agent of the severe and long-lasting disease botulism. At least seven different serotypes of BoNTs (denoted A-G) have been described. All BoNTs enter human or animal neuronal cells via receptor mediated endocytosis and cleave cytosolic SNARE proteins, resulting in a block of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, leading to the flaccid paralysis characteristic of botulism. Previous data have indicated that once a neuronal cell has been intoxicated by a BoNT, further entry of the same or other BoNTs is prevented due to disruption of synaptic vesicle recycling. However, it has also been shown that cultured neurons exposed to BoNT/A are still capable of taking up BoNT/E. In this report we show that in general BoNTs can enter cultured human or mouse neuronal cells that have previously been intoxicated with another BoNT serotype. Quantitative analysis of cell entry by assessing SNARE cleavage revealed none or only a minor difference in the efficiency of uptake of BoNTs into previously intoxicated neurons. Examination of the endocytic entry pathway by specific endocytosis inhibitors indicated that BoNTs are taken up by clathrin coated pits in both non pre-exposed and pre-exposed neurons. LDH release assays indicated that hiPSC derived neurons exposed consecutively to two different BoNT serotypes remained viable and healthy except in the case of BoNT/E or combinations of BoNT/E with BoNT/B, /D, or /F. Overall, our data indicate that previous intoxication of neuronal cells with BoNT does not inhibit further uptake of BoNTs. PMID:26207366

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Alpha-Exosite of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/A Inhibit Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongfeng; Geren, Isin N; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A; Marks, James D

    2015-01-01

    The paralytic disease botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT), multi-domain proteins containing a zinc endopeptidase that cleaves the cognate SNARE protein, thereby blocking acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. Antitoxins currently used to treat botulism neutralize circulating BoNT but cannot enter, bind to or neutralize BoNT that has already entered the neuron. The light chain endopeptidase domain (LC) of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) was targeted for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis resulting from intoxication by BoNT/A. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized humans and mice were displayed on the surface of yeast, and 19 BoNT/A LC-specific mAbs were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Affinities of the mAbs for BoNT/A LC ranged from a KD value of 9.0×10-11 M to 3.53×10-8 M (mean KD 5.38×10-9 M and median KD 1.53×10-9 M), as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/A LC catalytic activity with IC50 values ranging from 8.3 ~73×10-9 M. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were also mapped by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that the inhibitory mAbs bound the α-exosite region remote from the BoNT/A LC catalytic center. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis post-intoxication and further define epitopes that could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors. PMID:26275214

  8. Unique biological activity of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin in murine species.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiji; Kohda, Tomoko; Shibata, Yuto; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Mitsunori; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Sasakawa, Nobuyuki; Kozaki, Shunji

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum types C and D cause animal botulism by the production of serotype-specific or mosaic botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). The D/C mosaic BoNT (BoNT/DC), which is produced by the isolate from bovine botulism in Japan, exhibits the highest toxicity to mice among all BoNTs. In contrast, rats appeared to be very resistant to BoNT/DC in type C and D BoNTs and their mosaic BoNTs. We attempted to characterize the enzymatic and receptor-binding activities of BoNT/DC by comparison with those of type C and D BoNTs (BoNT/C and BoNT/D). BoNT/DC and D showed similar toxic effects on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) derived from the mouse, but the former showed less toxicity to rat CGCs. In recombinant murine-derived vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), the enzymatic activities of both BoNTs to rat isoform 1 VAMP (VAMP1) were lower than those to the other VAMP homologues. We then examined the physiological significance of gangliosides as the binding components for types C and D, and mosaic BoNTs. BoNT/DC and C were found to cleave an intracellular substrate of PC12 cells upon the exogenous addition of GM1a and GT1b gangliosides, respectively, suggesting that each BoNT recognizes a different ganglioside moiety. The effect of BoNT/DC on glutamate release from CGCs was prevented by cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) but not by a site-directed mutant of CTB that did not bind to GM1a. Bovine adrenal chromaffin cells appeared to be more sensitive to BoNT/DC than to BoNT/C and D. These results suggest that a unique mechanism of receptor binding of BoNT/DC may differentially regulate its biological activities in animals. PMID:22665374

  9. Potent antitrypanosomal triterpenoid saponins from Mussaenda luteola

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M.; Bachkeet, Enaam Y.; Bayoumi, Soad A.; Jain, Surendra; Cutler, Stephen J.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    Five new triterpenoid saponins, heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (2), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (4) and N-(2S, 3R, 4R-3-methyl-4-pentanolid-2-yl)-18-hydroxylanosta-8 (9), 22E, 24E-trien-27-amide-3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (5) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola Delile (Rubiaceae). Structural elucidation was based on the analysis of spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR) and HR-ESI-MS. Compound 1 showed potent antitrypanosomal activity with an IC50 value of 8.80 μM. Compounds 2–4 showed highly potent antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 values ranging between (2.57–2.84 μM) and IC90 values ranging between (3.36–4.35 μM), which are 5 fold greater than the positive control DFMO (IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 μM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate affinity to μ-opioid receptors with Ki values of 9.936 μM and 0.872 μM, respectively compared to a Ki value of 1.958 nM for the positive control, naloxone HCl. PMID:26524249

  10. Potent antitrypanosomal triterpenoid saponins from Mussaenda luteola.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M; Bachkeet, Enaam Y; Bayoumi, Soad A; Jain, Surendra; Cutler, Stephen J; Tekwani, Babu L; Ross, Samir A

    2015-12-01

    Five new triterpenoid saponins, heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), heinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (2), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), 2α-hydroxyheinsiagenin A 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (4) and N-(2S, 3R, 4R-3-methyl-4-pentanolid-2-yl)-18-hydroxylanosta-8 (9), 22E, 24E-trien-27-amide-3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)]-[β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (5) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola Delile (Rubiaceae). Structural elucidation was based on the analysis of spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR) and HR-ESI-MS. Compound 1 showed potent antitrypanosomal activity with an IC50 value of 8.80μM. Compounds 2-4 showed highly potent antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 values ranging between (2.57-2.84μM) and IC90 values ranging between (3.36-4.35μM), which are 5 fold greater than the positive control DFMO (IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99μM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate affinity to μ-opioid receptors with Ki values of 9.936μM and 0.872μM, respectively compared to a Ki value of 1.958nM for the positive control, naloxone HCl. PMID:26524249

  11. Detection of Type A, B, E, and F Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins in Foods by Using an Amplified Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with Digoxigenin-Labeled Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shashi K.; Ferreira, Joseph. L.; Eblen, Brian S.; Whiting, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    An amplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of Clostridium botulinum complex neurotoxins was evaluated for its ability to detect these toxins in food. The assay was found to be suitable for detecting type A, B, E, and F botulinum neurotoxins in a variety of food matrices representing liquids, solid, and semisolid food. Specific foods included broccoli, orange juice, bottled water, cola soft drinks, vanilla extract, oregano, potato salad, apple juice, meat products, and dairy foods. The detection sensitivity of the test for these botulinum complex serotypes was found to be 60 pg/ml (1.9 50% lethal dose [LD50]) for botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), 176 pg/ml (1.58 LD50) for BoNT/B, 163 pg/ml for BoNT/E (4.5 LD50), and 117 pg/ml for BoNT/F (less than 1 LD50) in casein buffer. The test could also readily detect 2 ng/ml of neurotoxins type A, B, E, and F in a variety of food samples. For specificity studies, the assay was also used to test a large panel of type A C. botulinum, a smaller panel of proteolytic and nonproteolytic type B, E, and F neurotoxin-producing Clostridia, and nontoxigenic organisms using an overnight incubation of toxin production medium. The assay appears to be an effective tool for large-scale screening of the food supply in the event of a botulinum neurotoxin contamination event. PMID:16461671

  12. [Localization of binding sites in rat muscles and brain for cobra neurotoxin and serum immunoglobulins from patients with myasthenia].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V A; Vladeeva, N V; Lobzin, V S; Paniukov, A N

    1986-09-01

    Using the immunohistochemical technique, it was revealed that serum immunoglobulins of patients with myasthenia gravis (Ig) were irreversibly attached to the myoneuronal connections of the rat intercostal muscles like the marker of the nicotin cholinireceptors--the cobra venom neurotoxin (CT). In addition, Ig differs from CT in the binding to nervous cells of the claustrum and diencephalon reticular formation and with certain cells of the nucleus caudatus and hemispheric cerebral cortex. It is suggested that the autoimmune processes in patients with myasthenia gravis do not only involve myoneuronal connection but also participate in central mechanisms of the disease genesis. PMID:3756323

  13. Phospholipase A2-interacting weak neurotoxins from venom of monocled cobra Naja kaouthia display cell-specific cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2008-06-15

    The molecular weights of two phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2))-interacting polypeptides (kaouthiotoxins (KTXs)-KTX-A and KTX-B) purified from the venom of monocled cobra Naja kaouthia, were estimated by mass spectrometry as 7722 and 7627Da, respectively. Binary sequence alignment showed that both KTXs share substantial sequence homology with weak neurotoxins from cobra venom and they were devoid of any enzymatic activity. Their pI was determined at pH 8.1 showing basic nature of these proteins. KTXs displayed cell-specific cytotoxicity on mammalian and insect cells. PMID:18456298

  14. The biological activity of botulinum neurotoxin type C is dependent upon novel types of ganglioside binding sites.

    PubMed

    Strotmeier, Jasmin; Gu, Shenyan; Jutzi, Stephan; Mahrhold, Stefan; Zhou, Jie; Pich, Andreas; Eichner, Timo; Bigalke, Hans; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng; Binz, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The seven botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) cause muscle paralysis by selectively cleaving core components of the vesicular fusion machinery. Their extraordinary activity primarily relies on highly specific entry into neurons. Data on BoNT/A, B, E, F and G suggest that entry follows a dual receptor interaction with complex gangliosides via an established ganglioside binding region and a synaptic vesicle protein. Here, we report high resolution crystal structures of the BoNT/C cell binding fragment alone and in complex with sialic acid. The WY-motif characteristic of the established ganglioside binding region was located on an exposed loop. Sialic acid was co-ordinated at a novel position neighbouring the binding pocket for synaptotagmin in BoNT/B and G and the sialic acid binding site in BoNT/D and TeNT respectively. Employing synaptosomes and immobilized gangliosides binding studies with BoNT/C mutants showed that the ganglioside binding WY-loop, the newly identified sialic acid-co-ordinating pocket and the area corresponding to the established ganglioside binding region of other BoNTs are involved in ganglioside interaction. Phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm activity tests employing ganglioside deficient mice furthermore evidenced that the biological activity of BoNT/C depends on ganglioside interaction with at least two binding sites. These data suggest a unique cell binding and entry mechanism for BoNT/C among clostridial neurotoxins. PMID:21542861

  15. Characterization and immunological activity of different forms of recombinant secreted Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B products expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Shi, DanYang; Chang, ShaoHong; Gong, Xin; Yu, YunZhou; Sun, ZhiWei; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin are exclusively produced by intracellular heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris for use in subunit vaccines; the same Hc proteins produced by secreted heterologous expression are hyper-glycosylated and immunologically inert. Here, several different recombinant secreted Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) were expressed in yeast and we characterized and assessed their immunological activity in detail. Recombinant low-glycosylated secreted BHc products (BSK) were also immunologically inert, similar to hyper-glycosylated BHc products (BSG), although deglycosylation restored their immunological activities. Unexpectedly, deglycosylated proBHc contained an unexpected pro-peptide of an α-factor signal and fortuitous N-linked glycosylation sites in the non-cleaved pro-peptide sequences, but not in the BHc sequences. Notably, a non-glycosylated secreted homogeneous BHc isoform (mBHc), which we successfully prepared after deleting the pro-peptide and removing its single potential glycosylation site, was immunologically active and could confer effective protective immunity, similarly to non-glycosylated rBHc. In summary, we conclude that a non-glycosylated secreted BHc isoform can be prepared in yeast by deleting the pro-peptide of the α-factor signal and mutating its single potential glycosylation site. This approach provides a rational and feasible strategy for the secretory expression of botulism or other toxin antigens. PMID:25567004

  16. Development of a Highly Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Detecting Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A through Neural Culture Media Optimization.

    PubMed

    Hong, Won S; Pezzi, Hannah M; Schuster, Andrea R; Berry, Scott M; Sung, Kyung E; Beebe, David J

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most lethal naturally produced neurotoxin. Due to the extreme toxicity, BoNTs are implicated in bioterrorism, while the specific mechanism of action and long-lasting effect was found to be medically applicable in treating various neurological disorders. Therefore, for both public and patient safety, a highly sensitive, physiologic, and specific assay is needed. In this paper, we show a method for achieving a highly sensitive cell-based assay for BoNT/A detection using the motor neuron-like continuous cell line NG108-15. To achieve high sensitivity, we performed a media optimization study evaluating three commercially available neural supplements in combination with retinoic acid, purmorphamine, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and ganglioside GT1b. We found nonlinear combinatorial effects on BoNT/A detection sensitivity, achieving an EC50 of 7.4 U ± 1.5 SD (or ~7.9 pM). The achieved detection sensitivity is comparable to that of assays that used primary and stem cell-derived neurons as well as the mouse lethality assay. PMID:26420788

  17. Potent effects of dioscin against liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Han, Xu; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the promising effects of dioscin against liver injury, but its effect on liver fibrosis remains unknown. The present work investigated the activities of dioscin against liver fibrosis and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Dioscin effectively inhibited the cell viabilities of HSC-T6, LX-2 and primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but not hepatocytes. Furthermore, dioscin markedly increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression and significantly reduced a-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), collagen α1 (I) (COL1A1) and collagen α1 (III) (COL3A1) levels in vitro. Notably, dioscin inhibited HSCs activation and induced apoptosis in activated HSCs. In vivo, dioscin significantly improved body weight and hydroxylproline, laminin, α-SMA, TGF-β1, COL1A1 and COL3A1 levels, which were confirmed by histopathological assays. Dioscin facilitated matrix degradation, and exhibited hepatoprotective effects through the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation, in addition to exerting anti-fibrotic effects through the modulation of the TGF-β1/Smad, Wnt/β-catenin, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and mitochondrial signaling pathways, which triggered the senescence of activated HSCs. In conclusion, dioscin exhibited potent effects against liver fibrosis through the modulation of multiple targets and signaling pathways and should be developed as a novel candidate for the treatment of liver fibrosis in the future. PMID:25853178

  18. Potent effects of dioscin against liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Han, Xu; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the promising effects of dioscin against liver injury, but its effect on liver fibrosis remains unknown. The present work investigated the activities of dioscin against liver fibrosis and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Dioscin effectively inhibited the cell viabilities of HSC-T6, LX-2 and primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but not hepatocytes. Furthermore, dioscin markedly increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression and significantly reduced a-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), collagen α1 (I) (COL1A1) and collagen α1 (III) (COL3A1) levels in vitro. Notably, dioscin inhibited HSCs activation and induced apoptosis in activated HSCs. In vivo, dioscin significantly improved body weight and hydroxylproline, laminin, α-SMA, TGF-β1, COL1A1 and COL3A1 levels, which were confirmed by histopathological assays. Dioscin facilitated matrix degradation, and exhibited hepatoprotective effects through the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation, in addition to exerting anti-fibrotic effects through the modulation of the TGF-β1/Smad, Wnt/β-catenin, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and mitochondrial signaling pathways, which triggered the senescence of activated HSCs. In conclusion, dioscin exhibited potent effects against liver fibrosis through the modulation of multiple targets and signaling pathways and should be developed as a novel candidate for the treatment of liver fibrosis in the future. PMID:25853178

  19. Llama-derived single-domain antibodies for the detection of botulinum A neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Zabetakis, Dan; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAb) specific for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT A) were selected from an immune llama phage display library derived from a llama that was immunized with BoNT A toxoid. The constructed phage library was panned using two methods: panning on plates coated with BoNT A toxoid (BoNT A Td) and BoNT A complex toxoid (BoNT Ac Td) and panning on microspheres coupled to BoNT A Td and BoNT A toxin (BoNT A Tx). Both panning methods selected for binders that had identical sequences, suggesting that panning on toxoided material may be as effective as panning on bead-immobilized toxin for isolating specific binders. All of the isolated binders tested were observed to recognize bead-immobilized BoNT A Tx in direct binding assays, and showed very little cross-reactivity towards other BoNT serotypes and unrelated protein. Sandwich assays that incorporated selected sdAb as capture and tracer elements demonstrated that all of the sdAb were able to recognize soluble (“live”) BoNT A Tx and BoNT Ac Tx with virtually no cross-reactivity with other BoNT serotypes. The isolated sdAb did not exhibit the high degree of thermal stability often associated with these reagents; after the first heating cycle most of the binding activity was lost, but the portion of the protein that did refold and recover antigen-binding activity showed only minimal loss on subsequent heating and cooling cycles. The binding kinetics of selected binders, assessed by both an equilibrium fluid array assay as well as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using toxoided material, gave dissociation constants (KD) in the range 2.2×10−11 to 1.6×10−10M. These high-affinity binders may prove beneficial to the development of recombinant reagents for the rapid detection of BoNT A, particularly in field screening and monitoring applications. PMID:20582697

  20. Sheep monoclonal antibodies prevent systemic effects of botulinum neurotoxin A1.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Jean; McCann, Chase; Ofori, Kwasi; Hill, Julia; Baldwin, Karen; Shoemaker, Charles B; Harrison, Peter; Tzipori, Saul

    2012-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is responsible for causing botulism, a potentially fatal disease characterized by paralysis of skeletal muscle. Existing specific treatments include polyclonal antisera derived from immunized humans or horses. Both preparations have similar drawbacks, including limited supply, risk of adverse effects and batch to batch variation. Here, we describe a panel of six highly protective sheep monoclonal antibodies (SMAbs) derived from sheep immunized with BoNT/A1 toxoid (SMAbs 2G11, 4F7) or BoNT/A1 heavy chain C-terminus (HcC) (SMAbs 1G4, 5E2, 5F7, 16F9) with or without subsequent challenge immunization with BoNT/A1 toxin. Although each SMAb bound BoNT/A1 toxin, differences in specificity for native and recombinant constituents of BoNT/A1 were observed. Structural differences were suggested by pI (5E2 = 8.2; 2G11 = 7.1; 4F7 = 8.8; 1G4 = 7.4; 5F7 = 8.0; 16F9 = 5.1). SMAb protective efficacy vs. 10,000 LD50 BoNT/A1 was evaluated using the mouse lethality assay. Although not protective alone, divalent and trivalent combinations of SMabs, IG4, 5F7 and/or 16F9 were highly protective. Divalent combinations containing 0.5–4 μg/SMAb (1–8 μg total SMAb) were 100% protective against death with only mild signs of botulism observed; relative efficacy of each combination was 1G4 + 5F7 > 1G4 + 16F9 > 5F7 + 16F9. The trivalent combination of 1G4 + 5F7 + 16F9 at 0.25 μg/SMAb (0.75 μg total SMAb) was 100% protective against clinical signs and death. These results reflect levels of protective potency not reported previously. PMID:23342681

  1. Holotoxin Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype A4 Originating from a Nontoxigenic Clostridium botulinum Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Marite; Tepp, William H.; Whitemarsh, Regina C. M.; Pellett, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum subtype A4 neurotoxin (BoNT/A4) is naturally expressed in the dual-toxin-producing C. botulinum strain 657Ba at 100× lower titers than BoNT/B. In this study, we describe purification of recombinant BoNT/A4 (rBoNT/A4) expressed in a nonsporulating and nontoxigenic C. botulinum expression host strain. The rBoNT/A4 copurified with nontoxic toxin complex components provided in trans by the expression host and was proteolytically cleaved to the active dichain form. Activity of the recombinant BoNT/A4 in mice and in human neuronal cells was about 1,000-fold lower than that of BoNT/A1, and the recombinant BoNT/A4 was effectively neutralized by botulism heptavalent antitoxin. A previous report using recombinant truncated BoNT/A4 light chain (LC) expressed in Escherichia coli has indicated reduced stability and activity of BoNT/A4 LC compared to BoNT/A1 LC, which was surmounted by introduction of a single-amino-acid substitution, I264R. In order to determine whether this mutation would also affect the holotoxin activity of BoNT/A4, a recombinant full-length BoNT/A4 carrying this mutation as well as a second mutation predicted to increase solubility (L260F) was produced in the clostridial expression system. Comparative analyses of the in vitro, cellular, and in vivo activities of rBoNT/A4 and rBoNT/A4-L260F I264R showed 1,000-fold-lower activity than BoNT/A1 in both the mutated and nonmutated BoNT/A4. This indicates that these mutations do not alter the activity of BoNT/A4 holotoxin. In summary, a recombinant BoNT from a dual-toxin-producing strain was expressed and purified in an endogenous clostridial expression system, allowing analysis of this toxin. PMID:25239905

  2. Structural basis for recognition of synaptic vesicle protein 2C by botulinum neurotoxin A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Roger M.; Frey, Daniel; Hilbert, Manuel; Kevenaar, Josta T.; Wieser, Mara M.; Stirnimann, Christian U.; McMillan, David; Ceska, Tom; Lebon, Florence; Jaussi, Rolf; Steinmetz, Michel O.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) belongs to the most dangerous class of bioweapons. Despite this, BoNT/A is used to treat a wide range of common medical conditions such as migraines and a variety of ocular motility and movement disorders. BoNT/A is probably best known for its use as an antiwrinkle agent in cosmetic applications (including Botox and Dysport). BoNT/A application causes long-lasting flaccid paralysis of muscles through inhibiting the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by cleaving synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) within presynaptic nerve terminals. Two types of BoNT/A receptor have been identified, both of which are required for BoNT/A toxicity and are therefore likely to cooperate with each other: gangliosides and members of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) family, which are putative transporter proteins that are predicted to have 12 transmembrane domains, associate with the receptor-binding domain of the toxin. Recently, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) has also been reported to be a potential BoNT/A receptor. In SV2 proteins, the BoNT/A-binding site has been mapped to the luminal domain, but the molecular details of the interaction between BoNT/A and SV2 are unknown. Here we determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the BoNT/A receptor-binding domain (BoNT/A-RBD) in complex with the SV2C luminal domain (SV2C-LD). SV2C-LD consists of a right-handed, quadrilateral β-helix that associates with BoNT/A-RBD mainly through backbone-to-backbone interactions at open β-strand edges, in a manner that resembles the inter-strand interactions in amyloid structures. Competition experiments identified a peptide that inhibits the formation of the complex. Our findings provide a strong platform for the development of novel antitoxin agents and for the rational design of BoNT/A variants with improved therapeutic properties.

  3. Development of Germline-Humanized Antibodies Neutralizing Botulinum Neurotoxin A and B.

    PubMed

    Miethe, Sebastian; Mazuet, Christelle; Liu, Yvonne; Tierney, Robert; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Frenzel, André; Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Sesardic, Dorothea; Hust, Michael; Popoff, Michel Robert

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are counted among the most toxic substances known and are responsible for human botulism, a life-threatening disease characterized by flaccid muscle paralysis that occurs naturally by food poisoning or colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by BoNT-producing clostridia. To date, 7 serologically distinct serotypes of BoNT (serotype A-G) are known. Due to the high toxicity of BoNTs the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have classified BoNTs as category A agent, including the six biological agents with the highest potential risk of use as bioweapons. Well tolerated antibodies neutralizing BoNTs are required to deal with the potential risk. In a previous work, we described the development of scFv and scFv-Fc (Yumab) from macaque origin (Macaca fascicularis) neutralizing BoNT/A and B by targeting the heavy and light chain of each serotype. In the present study, we humanized the macaque antibodies SEM120-IIIC1 (anti-BoNT/A light chain), A1HC38 (anti-BoNT/A heavy chain), BLC3 (anti-BoNT/B light chain) and B2-7 (anti-BoNT/B heavy chain) by germline-humanization to obtain a better potential immunotolerance in humans. We increased the Germinality Index (GI) of SEM120-IIIC1 to 94.5%, for A1HC38, to 95% for BLC3 and to 94.4% for B2-7. Furthermore, the neutralization efficacies of the germline-humanized antibodies were analyzed in lethal and non-lethal in vivo mouse assays as full IgG. The germline-humanized IgGs hu8SEM120-IIIC1, hu8A1HC38, hu8BLC3 and hu8B2-7 were protective in vivo, when anti-heavy and anti-light chain antibodies were combined. The synergistic effect and high humanness of the selected IgGs makes them promising lead candidates for further clinical development. PMID:27560688

  4. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  5. Development of Germline-Humanized Antibodies Neutralizing Botulinum Neurotoxin A and B

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yvonne; Tierney, Robert; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Frenzel, André; Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Sesardic, Dorothea; Hust, Michael; Popoff, Michel Robert

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are counted among the most toxic substances known and are responsible for human botulism, a life-threatening disease characterized by flaccid muscle paralysis that occurs naturally by food poisoning or colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by BoNT-producing clostridia. To date, 7 serologically distinct serotypes of BoNT (serotype A-G) are known. Due to the high toxicity of BoNTs the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have classified BoNTs as category A agent, including the six biological agents with the highest potential risk of use as bioweapons. Well tolerated antibodies neutralizing BoNTs are required to deal with the potential risk. In a previous work, we described the development of scFv and scFv-Fc (Yumab) from macaque origin (Macaca fascicularis) neutralizing BoNT/A and B by targeting the heavy and light chain of each serotype. In the present study, we humanized the macaque antibodies SEM120-IIIC1 (anti-BoNT/A light chain), A1HC38 (anti-BoNT/A heavy chain), BLC3 (anti-BoNT/B light chain) and B2-7 (anti-BoNT/B heavy chain) by germline-humanization to obtain a better potential immunotolerance in humans. We increased the Germinality Index (GI) of SEM120-IIIC1 to 94.5%, for A1HC38, to 95% for BLC3 and to 94.4% for B2-7. Furthermore, the neutralization efficacies of the germline-humanized antibodies were analyzed in lethal and non-lethal in vivo mouse assays as full IgG. The germline-humanized IgGs hu8SEM120-IIIC1, hu8A1HC38, hu8BLC3 and hu8B2-7 were protective in vivo, when anti-heavy and anti-light chain antibodies were combined. The synergistic effect and high humanness of the selected IgGs makes them promising lead candidates for further clinical development. PMID:27560688

  6. Glycosylated SV2 and Gangliosides as Dual Receptors for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype F

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Zhuji; Chen, Chen; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Baldwin, Michael R.

    2010-02-22

    Botulinum neurotoxin causes rapid flaccid paralysis through the inhibition of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction. The seven BoNT serotypes (A-G) have been proposed to bind motor neurons via ganglioside-protein dual receptors. To date, the structure-function properties of BoNT/F host receptor interactions have not been resolved. Here, we report the crystal structures of the receptor binding domains (HCR) of BoNT/A and BoNT/F and the characterization of the dual receptors for BoNT/F. The overall polypeptide fold of HCR/A is essentially identical to the receptor binding domain of the BoNT/A holotoxin, and the structure of HCR/F is very similar to that of HCR/A, except for two regions implicated in neuronal binding. Solid phase array analysis identified two HCR/F binding glycans: ganglioside GD1a and oligosaccharides containing an N-acetyllactosamine core. Using affinity chromatography, HCR/F bound native synaptic vesicle glycoproteins as part of a protein complex. Deglycosylation of glycoproteins using {alpha}(1-3,4)-fucosidase, endo-{beta}-galactosidase, and PNGase F disrupted the interaction with HCR/F, while the binding of HCR/B to its cognate receptor, synaptotagmin I, was unaffected. These data indicate that the HCR/F binds synaptic vesicle glycoproteins through the keratan sulfate moiety of SV2. The interaction of HCR/F with gangliosides was also investigated. HCR/F bound specifically to gangliosides that contain {alpha}2,3-linked sialic acid on the terminal galactose of a neutral saccharide core (binding order GT1b = GD1a GM3; no binding to GD1b and GM1a). Mutations within the putative ganglioside binding pocket of HCR/F decreased binding to gangliosides, synaptic vesicle protein complexes, and primary rat hippocampal neurons. Thus, BoNT/F neuronal discrimination involves the recognition of ganglioside and protein (glycosylated SV2) carbohydrate moieties, providing a structural basis for the high affinity and specificity of BoNT/F for neurons.

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Individualized Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection Techniques in Patients with Essential Blepharospasm

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Youngje; Nam, Sang Min

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical outcomes following botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) treatment with an individualized injection technique based on the types of spasms and to compare the results of the individualized injection technique with those of the conventional injection technique in the same patients. Methods From November 2011 to July 2013, 77 BoNT-A injections were performed in 38 patients. Eighteen patients were treated with conventional BoNT-A injections before 2011, and 20 patients were referred to our hospital for unsatisfactory results after a conventional injection technique. We classified the patients by spasm-dominant sites: the lateral orbital area, representing the orbital orbicularis-dominant group (ODG); the glabella, representing the corrugator-dominant group (CDG); and the ptosis, representing the palpebral part of the orbicularis-dominant group (PDG). We increased the injection dose into the spasm-dominant sites of the blepharospasm groups. We assessed subjective symptom scores (functional disability score, FDS) after treatment. Results This study included 38 patients (26 women, 12 men; mean age, 60.6 ± 10.9 years). There were 21 patients in the ODG, 10 patients in the CDG, and 7 patients in the PDG. Mean ages were 59.7 ± 12.6, 59.8 ± 8.5, and 66.8 ± 9.0 years, and mean BoNT-A injection dose was 38.8 ± 11.2, 38.8 ± 11.2, and 38.8 ± 10.8 U in each group, respectively (p = 0.44, 0.82 Kruskal-Wallis test). Mean FDS after injection was 1.7 ± 0.7 in the ODG, 1.4 ± 0.8 in the CDG, and 1.2 ± 0.3 in the PDG. There were significant differences in reading and job scale among the three groups. In a comparison between the conventional and individualized injection techniques, there was a significant improvement in mean FDS and in the reading scale in the PDG with the individualized injection technique. The success rate was 92.1% in the conventional injection group and 94.1% in the individualized injection group. Conclusions The individualized

  8. Novel genes encoding six kinds of three-finger toxins in Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) and function characterization of two recombinant long-chain neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Huayuan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Kangsen

    2006-01-01

    Three-finger toxins are a family of low-molecular-mass toxins (<10 kDa) having very similar three-dimensional structures. In the present study, 19 novel cDNAs coding three-finger toxins were cloned from the venom gland of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra). Alignment analysis showed that the putative peptides could be divided into six kinds of three-finger toxins: LNTXs (long-chain neurotoxins), short-chain neurotoxins, cardiotoxins (CTXs), weak neurotoxins, muscarinic toxins and a toxin with a free SH group. Furthermore, a phylogenetic tree was established on the basis of the toxin cDNAs and the previously reported similar nucleotide sequences from the same source venom. It indicated that three-finger-toxin genes in O. hannah diverged early in the course of evolution by long- and short-type pathways. Two LNTXs, namely rLNTX1 (recombinant LNTX1) and rLNTX3, were expressed and showed cytolytic activity in addition to their neurotoxic function. By comparing the functional residues, we offer some possible explanations for the differences in their neurotoxic function. Moreover, a plausible elucidation of the additonal cytolytic activity was achieved by hydropathy-profile analysis. This, to our knowledge, is the first observation that recombinant long chain α-neurotoxins have a CTX-like cytolytic activity. PMID:16689684

  9. Development of High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A and a Sensitive Immunoassay with Detection Near that of the Mouse Bioassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins(BoNT)cause severe and potentially fatal neuroparalytic disease and are considered the most toxic biological agents known. BoNT is synthesized as a single 150 kDa precursor protein, which is cleaved to form two subunit polypeptides, linked by a single disulfide bond....

  10. Novel genes encoding six kinds of three-finger toxins in Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) and function characterization of two recombinant long-chain neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Huayuan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Kangsen

    2006-09-01

    Three-finger toxins are a family of low-molecular-mass toxins (<10 kDa) having very similar three-dimensional structures. In the present study, 19 novel cDNAs coding three-finger toxins were cloned from the venom gland of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra). Alignment analysis showed that the putative peptides could be divided into six kinds of three-finger toxins: LNTXs (long-chain neurotoxins), short-chain neurotoxins, cardiotoxins (CTXs), weak neurotoxins, muscarinic toxins and a toxin with a free SH group. Furthermore, a phylogenetic tree was established on the basis of the toxin cDNAs and the previously reported similar nucleotide sequences from the same source venom. It indicated that three-finger-toxin genes in O. hannah diverged early in the course of evolution by long- and short-type pathways. Two LNTXs, namely rLNTX1 (recombinant LNTX1) and rLNTX3, were expressed and showed cytolytic activity in addition to their neurotoxic function. By comparing the functional residues, we offer some possible explanations for the differences in their neurotoxic function. Moreover, a plausible elucidation of the additonal cytolytic activity was achieved by hydropathy-profile analysis. This, to our knowledge, is the first observation that recombinant long chain alpha-neurotoxins have a CTX-like cytolytic activity. PMID:16689684

  11. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Bivalent Clostridium botulinum Strain IBCA10-7060, Encoding Botulinum Neurotoxin B and a New FA Mosaic Type.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Thirunavukkarasu, Nagarajan; Singh, Ajay; Toro, Magaly; Brown, Eric W; Zink, Donald; Rummel, Andreas; Sharma, Shashi K

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the genome sequence of a Clostridium botulinum strain IBCA10-7060 producing botulinum neurotoxin serotype B and a new toxin serotype. Multilocus sequence typing analysis revealed that this strain belongs to a new sequence type, and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism analysis showed that this strain clustered with strains in lineage 2 from group I. PMID:25502671

  13. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  14. Interneuronal Transfer and Distal Action of Tetanus Toxin and Botulinum Neurotoxins A and D in Central Neurons.

    PubMed

    Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Vevea, Jason D; Brittain, Joel M; Figueroa-Bernier, Annette; Tepp, William H; Johnson, Eric A; Yeh, Felix L; Chapman, Edwin R

    2016-08-16

    Recent reports suggest that botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) A, which is widely used clinically to inhibit neurotransmission, can spread within networks of neurons to have distal effects, but this remains controversial. Moreover, it is not known whether other members of this toxin family are transferred between neurons. Here, we investigate the potential distal effects of BoNT/A, BoNT/D, and tetanus toxin (TeNT), using central neurons grown in microfluidic devices. Toxins acted upon the neurons that mediated initial entry, but all three toxins were also taken up, via an alternative pathway, into non-acidified organelles that mediated retrograde transport to the somato-dendritic compartment. Toxins were then released into the media, where they entered and exerted their effects upon upstream neurons. These findings directly demonstrate that these agents undergo transcytosis and interneuronal transfer in an active form, resulting in long-distance effects. PMID:27498860

  15. Identification of the environmental neurotoxins annonaceous acetogenins in an Annona cherimolia Mill. Alcoholic Beverage Using HPLC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap.

    PubMed

    Le Ven, Jessica; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Lewin, Guy; Brunelle, Alain; Touboul, David; Champy, Pierre

    2014-08-27

    Epidemiological and toxicological studies have suggested Annonaceaeous acetogenins to be environmental neurotoxins responsible for sporadic atypical parkinsonism/dementia in tropical areas. These compounds are present in the tropical genus Annona (Annonaceae), known for its fruit-yielding cultivated species such as Annona cherimolia. This species is widely cultivated in South America, Spain, and Portugal and yields acetogenins in its seeds, stems, and roots. The presence of these compounds in the pulp of its fruit and in derived food products is unclear. An innovative and sensitive methodology by HPLC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap with postcolumn infusion of lithium iodide was used to identify the presence of low levels of acetogenins in an A. cherimolia Mill. fruit-based commercial alcoholic beverage. More than 80 representatives were detected, and the 31 most intense acetogenins were identified. All together these findings indicate that this species should be considered as a risk factor within the framework of a worldwide problem of food toxicity. PMID:25088119

  16. Tryptophan-47 rotational isomerization in variant-3 scorpion neurotoxin. A combination thermodynamic perturbation and umbrella sampling study.

    PubMed Central

    Haydock, C; Sharp, J C; Prendergast, F G

    1990-01-01

    A combination thermodynamic perturbation and umbrella sampling study predicts two free energy wells for the rotational isomerization of the variant-3 scorpion neurotoxin tryptophan-47 indole side chain. One well has the indole side chain in the crystallographic orientation; the other has the indole rotated approximately 220 degrees to form a new conformation with a relative free energy of 3 +/- 2 kcal/mol. The activation barrier is 8.5 kcal/mol from the crystallographic well, from which transition state theory predicts a rate of escape of 2 x 10(5) s-1. Correlations in the displacements of side chains neighboring tryptophan-47 and the isomerization reaction coordinate last up to 20 ps. Favorable conditions of experimental verification are discussed. PMID:2393708

  17. Enhanced detection of type C botulinum neurotoxin by the Endopep-MS assay through optimization of peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxia; Krilich, Joan; Baudys, Jakub; Barr, John R; Kalb, Suzanne R

    2015-07-01

    It is essential to have a simple, quick and sensitive method for the detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxins, the most toxic substances and the causative agents of botulism. Type C botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/C) represents one of the seven members of distinctive BoNT serotypes (A to G) that cause botulism in animals and avians. Here we report the development of optimized peptide substrates for improving the detection of BoNT/C and /CD mosaic toxins using an Endopep-MS assay, a mass spectrometry-based method that is able to rapidly and sensitively detect and differentiate all types of BoNTs by extracting the toxin with specific antibodies and detecting the unique cleavage products of peptide substrates. Based on the sequence of a short SNAP-25 peptide, we conducted optimization through a comprehensive process including length determination, terminal modification, single and multiple amino acid residue substitution, and incorporation of unnatural amino acid residues. Our data demonstrate that an optimal peptide provides a more than 200-fold improvement over the substrate currently used in the Endopep-MS assay for the detection of BoNT/C1 and /CD mosaic. Using the new substrate in a four-hour cleavage reaction, the limit of detection for the BoNT/C1 complex spiked in buffer, serum and milk samples was determined to be 0.5, 0.5 and 1mouseLD50/mL, respectively, representing a similar or higher sensitivity than that obtained by traditional mouse bioassay. PMID:25913863

  18. Analysis of a unique Clostridium botulinum strain from the Southern hemisphere producing a novel type E botulinum neurotoxin subtype

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium botulinum strains that produce botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) are most commonly isolated from botulism cases, marine environments, and animals in regions of high latitude in the Northern hemisphere. A strain of C. botulinum type E (CDC66177) was isolated from soil in Chubut, Argentina. Previous studies showed that the amino acid sequences of BoNT/E produced by various strains differ by < 6% and that the type E neurotoxin gene cluster inserts into the rarA operon. Results Genetic and mass spectral analysis demonstrated that the BoNT/E produced by CDC66177 is a novel toxin subtype (E9). Toxin gene sequencing indicated that BoNT/E9 differed by nearly 11% at the amino acid level compared to BoNT/E1. Mass spectrometric analysis of BoNT/E9 revealed that its endopeptidase substrate cleavage site was identical to other BoNT/E subtypes. Further analysis of this strain demonstrated that its 16S rRNA sequence clustered with other Group II C. botulinum (producing BoNT types B, E, and F) strains. Genomic DNA isolated from strain CDC66177 hybridized with fewer probes using a Group II C. botulinum subtyping microarray compared to other type E strains examined. Whole genome shotgun sequencing of strain CDC66177 revealed that while the toxin gene cluster inserted into the rarA operon similar to other type E strains, its overall genome content shared greater similarity with a Group II C. botulinum type B strain (17B). Conclusions These results expand our understanding of the global distribution of C. botulinum type E strains and suggest that the type E toxin gene cluster may be able to insert into C. botulinum strains with a more diverse genetic background than previously recognized. PMID:23113872

  19. A scorpion venom neurotoxin paralytic to insects that affects sodium current inactivation: Purification, primary structure, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Eitan, M.; Fowler, E.; Herrmann, R.; Duval, A.; Pelhate, M.; Zlotkin, E. )

    1990-06-26

    A new toxin, Lqh alpha IT, which caused a unique mode of paralysis of blowfly larvae, was purified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus, and its structural and pharmacological properties were compared to those of three other groups of neurotoxins found in Buthinae scorpion venoms. Like the excitatory and depressant insect-selective neurotoxins, Lqh alpha IT was highly toxic to insects, but it differed from these toxins in two important characteristics: (a) Lqh alpha IT lacked strict selectivity for insects; it was highly toxic to crustaceans and had a measurable but low toxicity to mice. (b) It did not displace an excitatory insect toxin, 125I-AaIT, from its binding sites in the insect neuronal membrane; this indicates that the binding sites for Lqh alpha IT are different from those shared by the excitatory and depressant toxins. However, in its primary structure and its effect on excitable tissues, Lqh alpha IT strongly resembled the well-characterized alpha scorpion toxins, which affect mammals. The amino acid sequence was identical with alpha toxin sequences in 55%-75% of positions. This degree of similarity is comparable to that seen among the alpha toxins themselves. Voltage- and current-clamp studies showed that Lqh alpha IT caused an extreme prolongation of the action potential in both cockroach giant axon and rat skeletal muscle preparations as a result of the slowing and incomplete inactivation of the sodium currents. These observations indicate that Lqh alpha IT is an alpha toxin which acts on insect sodium channels.

  20. Characterization of the binding of the Ptychodiscus brevis neurotoxin T17 to sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) have been determined to bind to a unique receptor site associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in rat brain synaptosomes. Reduction of the C/sub 42/ aldehyde function of T34 to the alcohol function of T17 using NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/ yielded /sup 3/H-T17 with a specific activity of 15 Ci;/mmol. Using this specific probe, binding to sodium channels was measured at 4/sup 0/CC, 22/sup 0/C, and 37/sup 0/C. Rosenthal analysis of the binding data yielded a K/sub d/ of 2.9 nM and B/sub max/ of 6.8 pmoles /sup 3/H-T17 per mg of synaptosomal protein at 4/sup 0/C. Both K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ were found to be temperature dependent. Depolarization of the synaptosomes by osmotic lysis resulted in the loss of 34% of the available receptor sites, with no decrease in binding affinity. Unlabeled T17, T34, and synthetic T17 (reduced T34) were equipotent in their ability to displace /sup 3/H-T17 from its specific receptor site. Competition experiments using natural toxin probes specific for sites I-IV on the voltage-sensitive sodium channel demonstrate that /sup 3/H-T17 does not bind to any of the previously-described neurotoxin receptor sites. A fifth site is proposed.

  1. Development of a fluorescence internal quenching correction factor to correct botulinum neurotoxin type A endopeptidase kinetics using SNAPtide.

    PubMed

    Feltrup, Thomas M; Singh, Bal Ram

    2012-12-18

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which are highly toxic proteins responsible for botulism, are produced by different strains of Clostridium botulinum. These various strains of bacteria produce seven distinct serotypes, labeled A-G. Once inside cells, the zinc-dependent proteolytic light chain (LC) degrades specific proteins involved in acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions causing flaccid paralysis, specifically synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) for botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). BoNT endopeptidase assays using short substrate homologues have been widely used and developed because of their ease of synthesis, detection limits, and cost. SNAPtide, a 13-amino acid fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptide, was used in this study as a SNAP-25 homologue for the endopeptidase kinetics study of BoNT/A LC. SNAPtide uses a fluorescein isothiocyanate/4-((4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)azo) benzoic acid (FITC/DABCYL) FRET pair to produce a signal upon substrate cleavage. Signal quenching can become an issue after cleavage since quencher molecules can quench cleaved fluorophore molecules in close proximity, reducing the apparent signal. This reduction in apparent signal provides an inherent error as SNAPtide concentrations are increased. In this study, fluorescence internal quenching (FIQ) correction factors were derived using an unquenched SNAPtide peptide to quantify the signal quenching over a range of SNAPtide concentrations and temperatures. The BoNT/A LC endopeptidase kinetics at the optimally active temperature (37 °C) using SNAPtide were studied and used to demonstrate the FIQ correction factors in this study. The FIQ correction factors developed provide a convenient method to allow for improved accuracy in determining and comparing BoNT/A LC activity and kinetics using SNAPtide over a broad range of concentrations and temperatures. PMID:23181535

  2. Detection, differentiation, and identification of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes C, CD, D, and DC by highly specific immunoassays and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hansbauer, Eva-Maria; Skiba, Martin; Endermann, Tanja; Weisemann, Jasmin; Stern, Daniel; Dorner, Martin B; Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Wolf, Jessica; Luginbühl, Werner; Messelhäußer, Ute; Bellanger, Laurent; Woudstra, Cédric; Rummel, Andreas; Fach, Patrick; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2016-09-21

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes C and D and their mosaic variants CD and DC cause severe cases of botulism in animal husbandry and wildlife. Epidemiological data on the exact serotype or toxin variant causing outbreaks are rarely available, mainly because of their high sequence identity and the lack of fast and specific screening tools to detect and differentiate the four similar toxins. To fill this gap, we developed four highly specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) able to detect and differentiate botulinum neurotoxins type BoNT/C, D, CD, and DC based on four distinct combinations of specific monoclonal antibodies targeting both conserved and divergent subdomains of the four toxins. Here, highly sensitive detection with detection limits between 2 and 24 pg mL(-1) was achieved. The ELISAs were extensively validated and results were compared with data obtained by quantitative real-time PCR using a panel of Clostridium botulinum strains, real sample materials from veterinary botulism outbreaks, and non-BoNT-producing Clostridia. Additionally, in order to verify the results obtained by ELISA screening, the new monoclonal antibodies were used for BoNT enrichment and subsequent detection (i) on a functional level by endopeptidase mass spectrometry (Endopep-MS) assays and (ii) on a protein sequence level by LC-MS/MS spectrometry. Based on all technical information gathered in the validation study, the four differentiating ELISAs turned out to be highly reliable screening tools for the rapid analysis of veterinary botulism cases and should aid future field investigations of botulism outbreaks and the acquisition of epidemiological data. PMID:27353114

  3. Expression, purification and characterization of the receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B as a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Ben David, Alon; Torgeman, Amram; Barnea, Ada; Zichel, Ran

    2015-06-01

    The receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxins (the HC fragment) is a promising vaccine candidate. Among the HC fragments of the seven BoNT serotypes, the expression of HC/B in Escherichia coli is considered especially challenging due to its accumulation as a non-soluble protein aggregate. In this study, the effects of different parameters on the expression of soluble HC/B were evaluated using a screening assay that included growing the bacterium at a small scale, a chemical cell lysis step, and a specific ELISA. The highest soluble HC/B expression levels were obtained when the bacterium E. coli BL21(DE3)+pET-9a-HC/B was grown in terrific broth media at 18°C without induction. Under these conditions, the yield was an order of magnitude higher than previously reported. Standard purification of the protein using a nickel column resulted in a low purity of HC/B. However, the addition of an acidic wash step prior to protein elution released a major protein contaminant and significantly increased the purity level. Mass spectrometry analysis identified the contaminant as ArnA, an E. coli protein that often contaminates recombinant His-tagged protein preparations. The purified HC/B was highly immunogenic, protecting mice from a 10(6) LD50 challenge after a single vaccination and generating a neutralizing titer of 50IU/ml after three immunizations. Moreover, the functionality of the protein was preserved, as it inhibited BoNT/B intoxication in vivo, presumably due to blockade of the neurotoxin protein receptor synaptotagmin. PMID:25727047

  4. Discovery of novel and potent CRTH2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinji; Terasaka, Tadashi; Zenkoh, Tatsuya; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Hisashi; Nagata, Hiroshi; Imamura, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Miki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2012-01-15

    High throughput screening of our chemical library for CRTH2 antagonists provided a lead compound 1a. Initial optimization of the lead led to the discovery of a novel, potent and orally bioavailable CRTH2 antagonist 17. PMID:22178554

  5. Discovery of a Potent And Selective Aurora Kinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Oslob, J.D.; Romanowski, M.J.; Allen, D.A.; Baskaran, S.; Bui, M.; Elling, R.A.; Flanagan, W.M.; Fung, A.D.; Hanan, E.J.; Harris, S.; Heumann, S.A.; Hoch, U.; Jacobs, J.W.; Lam, J.; Lawrence, C.E.; McDowell, R.S.; Nannini, M.A.; Shen, W.; Silverman, J.A.; Sopko, M.M.; Tangonan, B.T.

    2009-05-21

    This communication describes the discovery of a novel series of Aurora kinase inhibitors. Key SAR and critical binding elements are discussed. Some of the more advanced analogues potently inhibit cellular proliferation and induce phenotypes consistent with Aurora kinase inhibition. In particular, compound 21 (SNS-314) is a potent and selective Aurora kinase inhibitor that exhibits significant activity in pre-clinical in vivo tumor models.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genomic Deletion of the Beta-1, 4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 Gene in Murine P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells Results in Low Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxin Type C

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Ozeki, Chikako; Kohda, Tomoko; Tsuji, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum cause flaccid paralysis by inhibiting neurotransmitter release at peripheral nerve terminals. Previously, we found that neurons derived from the murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cell line exhibited high sensitivity to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In order to prove the utility of P19 cells for the study of the intracellular mechanism of botulinum neurotoxins, ganglioside-knockout neurons were generated by deletion of the gene encoding beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 in P19 cells using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats combined with Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. By using this system, knockout cells could be generated more easily than with previous methods. The sensitivity of the generated beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1-depleted P19 neurons to botulinum neurotoxin type C was decreased considerably, and the exogenous addition of the gangliosides GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b restored the susceptibility of P19 cells to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In particular, addition of a mixture of these three ganglioside more effectively recovered the sensitivity of knockout cells compared to independent addition of GD1a, GD1b, or GT1b. Consequently, the genome-edited P19 cells generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system were useful for identifying and defining the intracellular molecules involved in the toxic action of botulinum neurotoxins. PMID:26177297

  7. Photolabeling reveals the proximity of the alpha-neurotoxin binding site to the M2 helix of the ion channel in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Machold, J; Utkin, Y; Kirsch, D; Kaufmann, R; Tsetlin, V; Hucho, F

    1995-01-01

    A photoactivatable derivative of neurotoxin II from Naja naja oxiana containing a 125I-labeled p-azidosalicylamidoethyl-1,3'-dithiopropyl label at Lys-25 forms a photo-induced cross-link with the delta subunit of the membrane-bound Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The cross-linked radioactive receptor peptide was isolated by reverse-phase HPLC after tryptic digestion of the labeled delta subunit. The sequence of this peptide, delta-(260-277), and the position of the label at Ala-268 were established by matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization mass spectrometry based on the molecular mass and on post-source decay fragment analysis. With the known dimensions of the AChR molecule, of the photolabel, and of alpha-neurotoxin, finding the cross-link at delta Ala-268 (located in the upper part of the channel-forming transmembrane helix M2) means that the center of the alpha-neurotoxin binding site is situated at least approximately 40 A from the extracellular surface of the AChR, proximal to the channel axis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7543679

  8. Endangered North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) experience repeated, concurrent exposure to multiple environmental neurotoxins produced by marine algae.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Gregory J; Mikulski, Christina M; King, Kristen L; Roth, Patricia B; Wang, Zhihong; Leandro, Luis F; DeGrasse, Stacey L; White, Kevin D; De Biase, Daniela; Gillett, Roxanne M; Rolland, Rosalind M

    2012-01-01

    The western North Atlantic population of right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) is one of the most critically endangered of any whale population in the world. Among the factors considered to have potentially adverse effects on the health and reproduction of E. glacialis are biotoxins produced by certain microalgae responsible for causing harmful algal blooms. The worldwide incidence of these events has continued to increase dramatically over the past several decades and is expected to remain problematic under predicted climate change scenarios. Previous investigations have demonstrated that N. Atlantic right whales are being exposed to at least two classes of algal-produced environmental neurotoxins-paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and domoic acid (DA). Our primary aims during this six-year study (2001-2006) were to assess whether the whales' exposure to these algal biotoxins occurred annually over multiple years, and to what extent individual whales were exposed repeatedly and/or concurrently to one or both toxin classes. Approximately 140 right whale fecal samples obtained across multiple habitats in the western N. Atlantic were analyzed for PSTs and DA. About 40% of these samples were attributed to individual whales in the North Atlantic Right Whale Catalog, permitting analysis of biotoxin exposure according to sex, age class, and reproductive status/history. Our findings demonstrate clearly that right whales are being exposed to both of these algal biotoxins on virtually an annual basis in multiple habitats for periods of up to six months (April through September), with similar exposure rates for females and males (PSTs: ∼70-80%; DA: ∼25-30%). Notably, only one of 14 lactating females sampled did not contain either PSTs or DA, suggesting the potential for maternal toxin transfer and possible effects on neonatal animals. Moreover, 22% of the fecal samples tested for PSTs and DA showed concurrent exposure to both neurotoxins, leading to questions of interactive

  9. A new potent immunosuppressive isoflavanonol from Campylotropis hirtella.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Bixia; Du, Xing; Li, Xiaoping; Shen, Zhengwu

    2016-06-01

    Four new flavonoids were isolated from Campylotropis hirtella and these are a chromone and a 2H-chromene, an isoflavone and an isoflavanonol. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic measurements. All of the compounds were assessed for immunosuppressive activity. Compound 4 showed very strong T lymphocyte suppression activity (IC50: 0.13 μM) and potent B lymphocyte suppression activity (IC50: 0.26 μM). Due to its potent immunosuppressive activity and lower cytotoxicity, further structure-activity studies will be pursued on this compound. PMID:26221996

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of potent FAAH inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Wei; Leleu-Chavain, Natascha; Barczyk, Amélie; Renault, Nicolas; Lemaire, Lucas; Chavatte, Philippe; Millet, Régis

    2016-06-01

    A new series of 3-carboxamido-5-aryl-isoxazoles was designed, synthesized and evaluated for their biological activity. Different pharmacomodulations have been explored and the lipophilicity of these compounds was assessed. Investigation of the in vitro biological activity led to the identification of 5 compounds as potent FAAH inhibitors, their good FAAH inhibition capacity is probably correlated with their suitable lipophilicity. Specifically, compound 25 showed similar inhibition potency against FAAH in comparison with URB597, one of the most potent FAAH inhibitor known to date. PMID:27117424

  11. Chroman and tetrahydroquinoline ureas as potent TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert G; Bayburt, Erol K; Latshaw, Steven P; Koenig, John R; Daanen, Jerome F; McDonald, Heath A; Bianchi, Bruce R; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen; Honore, Prisca; Marsh, Kennan C; Lee, Chih-Hung; Faltynek, Connie R; Gomtsyan, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    Novel chroman and tetrahydroquinoline ureas were synthesized and evaluated for their activity as TRPV1 antagonists. It was found that aryl substituents on the 7- or 8-position of both bicyclic scaffolds imparted the best in vitro potency at TRPV1. The most potent chroman ureas were assessed in chronic and acute pain models, and compounds with the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier were shown to be highly efficacious. The tetrahydroquinoline ureas were found to be potent CYP3A4 inhibitors, but replacement of bulky substituents at the nitrogen atom of the tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety with small groups such as methyl can minimize the inhibition. PMID:21315587

  12. Actions of sea anemone type 1 neurotoxins on voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Wanke, Enzo; Zaharenko, André Junqueira; Redaelli, Elisa; Schiavon, Emanuele

    2009-12-15

    As voltage-gated Na(+) channels are responsible for the conduction of electrical impulses in most excitable tissues in the majority of animals (except nematodes), they have become important targets for the toxins of venomous animals, from sea anemones to molluscs, scorpions, spiders and even fishes. During their evolution, different animals have developed a set of cysteine-rich peptides capable of binding different extracellular sites of this channel protein. A fundamental question concerning the mechanism of action of these toxins is whether they act at a common receptor site in Na(+) channels when exerting their different pharmacological effects, or at distinct receptor sites in different Na(v) channels subtypes whose particular properties lead to these pharmacological differences. The alpha-subunits of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)1.x) have been divided into at least nine subtypes on the basis of amino acid sequences. Sea anemones have been extensively studied from the toxinological point of view for more than 40 years. There are about 40 sea anemone type 1 peptides known to be active on Na(v)1.x channels and all are 46-49 amino acid residues long, with three disulfide bonds and their molecular weights range between 3000 and 5000 Da. About 12 years ago a general model of Na(v)1.2-toxin interaction, developed for the alpha-scorpion toxins, was shown to fit also to action of sea anemone toxin such as ATX-II. According to this model these peptides are specifically acting on the type 3 site known to be between segments 3 and 4 in domain IV of the Na(+) channel protein. This region is indeed responsible for the normal Na(+) currents fast inactivation that is potently slowed by these toxins. This fundamental "gain-of-function" mechanism is responsible for the strong increase in the action potential duration. They constitute a class of tools by means of which physiologists and pharmacologists can study the structure/function relationships of channel proteins. As

  13. Compositional changes in neurotoxins and their oxidative derivatives from the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, in seawater and marine aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Michael S.; Blum, Patricia C.; Osborn, Shannon E.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, Clinton M.; Bourdelais, Andrea J.; Naar, Jerome; Baden, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    The harmful alga, Karenia brevis, produces a suite of polyether neurotoxins, brevetoxins or PbTx, that cause marine animal mortality and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). A characteristic of K. brevis blooms is associated airborne toxins that result in severe respiratory problems. This study was undertaken to determine the composition of aerosolized brevetoxins and oxidative derivatives to which beachgoers are exposed during a K. brevis bloom. The suite of brevetoxins and derivatives in seawater is comprised of intra-cellular (IC) and extra-cellular (EC) compounds. We hypothesized that aerosolized compounds are generated primarily from EC, hydrophobic compounds in seawater by bubble-mediated transport. Thus the composition of aerosolized brevetoxins and derivatives, to which beachgoers are exposed, would reflect the EC composition of the source matrix (the local surf zone). Brevetoxins were extracted from water collected along the shore and from marine aerosols along Siesta Beach and Lido Beach in Sarasota, FL, USA, during K. brevis blooms. Water samples were further processed into IC and EC components. The primary brevetoxins observed in water and air included PbTx-1, -2, -3, -PbTx-2-carboxylic acid, and brevenal. Oxidation and/or hydrolysis products of PbTx-1, -2, -3 and -7 were also found in EC water and in aerosol, but not IC. PMID:21191552

  14. The use of Endopep-MS to detect multiple subtypes of botulinum neurotoxins A, B, E, and F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Smith, Theresa J.; Moura, Hercules; Hill, Karen; Lou, Jianlong; Geren, Isin N.; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Marks, James D.; Smith, Leonard A.; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism, which can be lethal if untreated. Rapid determination of exposure to BoNT is an important public health goal. Previous work in our laboratory focused on the development of Endopep-MS, a mass spectrometry-based endopeptidase method for detecting and differentiating BoNT A-G in buffer and BoNT A, B, E, and F in clinical samples. We introduce here the use of Endopep-MS to detect non-commercial subtypes of BoNT A, B, E, and F which have been associated with botulism outbreaks. We have now tested and successfully detected 15 of the 17 known subtypes of BoNT A, B, E, and F by Endopep-MS. Extraction of BoNT A and B from a complex mixture prior to analysis is accomplished by using monoclonal antibodies specific for the catalytically inactive heavy chain of the toxin. These antibodies have high-binding affinities and do not interfere with the catalytic activity of the light chain resulting in a lower limit of detection for BoNT A and B than previously reported. We also report for the first time limits of detection for BoNT A2, A3, B2, and bivalent B using Endopep-MS.

  15. Qualitative and Quantitative Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxins from Complex Matrices: Results of the First International Proficiency Test.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Sylvia; Fiebig, Uwe; Zeleny, Reinhard; Schimmel, Heinz; Rummel, Andreas; Luginbühl, Werner; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of the EU project EQuATox, a first international proficiency test (PT) on the detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) was conducted. Sample materials included BoNT serotypes A, B and E spiked into buffer, milk, meat extract and serum. Different methods were applied by the participants combining different principles of detection, identification and quantification. Based on qualitative assays, 95% of all results reported were correct. Successful strategies for BoNT detection were based on a combination of complementary immunological, MS-based and functional methods or on suitable functional in vivo/in vitro approaches (mouse bioassay, hemidiaphragm assay and Endopep-MS assay). Quantification of BoNT/A, BoNT/B and BoNT/E was performed by 48% of participating laboratories. It turned out that precise quantification of BoNT was difficult, resulting in a substantial scatter of quantitative data. This was especially true for results obtained by the mouse bioassay which is currently considered as "gold standard" for BoNT detection. The results clearly demonstrate the urgent need for certified BoNT reference materials and the development of methods replacing animal testing. In this context, the BoNT PT provided the valuable information that both the Endopep-MS assay and the hemidiaphragm assay delivered quantitative results superior to the mouse bioassay. PMID:26703724

  16. Sequence-specific H NMR assignments and secondary structure in the sea anemone polypeptide Stichodactyla helianthus neurotoxin I

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, R.H.; Mabbutt, B.C.; Kem, W.R.; Norton, R.S. )

    1989-02-21

    Sequence-specific assignments are reported for the 500-MHz H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the 48-residue polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (Sh I). Spin systems were first identified by using two-dimensional relayed or multiple quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy, double quantum spectroscopy, and spin lock experiments. Specific resonance assignments were then obtained from nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivities between protons from residues adjacent in the amino acid sequence. Of a total of 265 potentially observable resonances, 248 (i.e., 94%) were assigned, arising from 39 completely and 9 partially assigned amino acid spin systems. The secondary structure of Sh I was defined on the basis of the pattern of sequential NOE connectivities. NOEs between protons on separate strands of the polypeptide backbone, and backbone amide exchange rates. Sh I contains a four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet encompassing residues 1-5, 16-24, 30-33, and 40-46, with a {beta}-bulge at residues 17 and 18 and a reverse turn, probably a type II {beta}-turn, involving residues 27-30. No evidence of {alpha}-helical structure was found.

  17. Label-free electrochemical detection of botulinum neurotoxin type E based on its enzymatic activity using interdigitated electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Sang Hwa; Park, Dae Keun; Kang, Aeyeon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Daehee; Shin, Yu Mi; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Wan Soo

    2016-02-01

    We report a simple label-free electrochemical method of detecting low concentrations of botulinum neurotoxin type E light chain (BoNT/E LC) based on its peptide cleavage activity. Dual-mode cyclic voltammetry was employed to observe changes in the redox signal of ferri-/ferro-cyanide on interdigitated microelectrodes, whose surfaces were covered by peptides designed from synaptosomal-associated protein 25 to be cleaved by BoNT/E LC. With the introduction of BoNT/E LC, the redox signal showed a time-dependent increase due to cleavage of the immobilized peptide molecules. In addition to the increased redox signal intensity, its time-dependence can be considered as a strong evidence of BoNT/E sensing, since the time-dependent increase can only result from the enzymatic activity of BoNT/E LC. Using this method, BoNT/E LC, at concentrations as low as 5 pg/ml, was readily measurable with only an hour of incubation.

  18. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using (14)C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA. PMID:23591064

  19. Evaluation of a Commercial Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for the Determination of the Neurotoxin BMAA in Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Faassen, Elisabeth J.; Beekman, Wendy; Lürling, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Because BMAA seems to be produced by cyanobacteria, surface waters are screened for BMAA. However, reliable analysis of BMAA requires specialized and expensive equipment. In 2012, a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of BMAA in surface waters was released. This kit could enable fast and relatively cheap screening of surface waters for BMAA. The objective of this study was to determine whether the BMAA ELISA kit was suitable for the determination of BMAA concentrations in surface waters. We hypothesised that the recovery of spiked samples was close to 100% and that the results of unspiked sample analysis were comparable between ELISA and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. However, we found that recovery was higher than 100% in most spiked samples, highest determined recovery was over 400%. Furthermore, the ELISA gave a positive signal for nearly each tested sample while no BMAA could be detected by LC-MS/MS. We therefore conclude that in its current state, the kit is not suitable for screening surface waters for BMAA. PMID:23762331

  20. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of the neurotoxin BMAA in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; Beekman, Wendy; Lürling, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Because BMAA seems to be produced by cyanobacteria, surface waters are screened for BMAA. However, reliable analysis of BMAA requires specialized and expensive equipment. In 2012, a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of BMAA in surface waters was released. This kit could enable fast and relatively cheap screening of surface waters for BMAA. The objective of this study was to determine whether the BMAA ELISA kit was suitable for the determination of BMAA concentrations in surface waters. We hypothesised that the recovery of spiked samples was close to 100% and that the results of unspiked sample analysis were comparable between ELISA and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. However, we found that recovery was higher than 100% in most spiked samples, highest determined recovery was over 400%. Furthermore, the ELISA gave a positive signal for nearly each tested sample while no BMAA could be detected by LC-MS/MS. We therefore conclude that in its current state, the kit is not suitable for screening surface waters for BMAA. PMID:23762331

  1. Antigenic sites on the HN domain of botulinum neurotoxin A stimulate protective antibody responses against active toxin

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalakshmi Ayyar, B.; Tajhya, Rajeev B.; Beeton, Christine; Zouhair Atassi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic substances known. BoNT intoxicates cells in a highly programmed fashion initiated by binding to the cell surface, internalization and enzymatic cleavage of substrate, thus, inhibiting synaptic exocytosis. Over the past two decades, immunological significance of BoNT/A C-terminal heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) domains were investigated extensively leading to important findings. In the current work, we explored the significance of BoNT/A heavy chain N-terminal (HN) region as a vaccine candidate. Mice were immunized with recombinant HN519–845 generating antibodies (Abs) that were found to be protective against lethal dose of BoNT/A. Immuno-dominant regions of HN519–845 were identified and individually investigated for antibody response along with synthetic peptides within those regions, using in vivo protection assays against BoNT/A. Results were confirmed by patch-clamp analysis where anti-HN antibodies were studied for the ability to block toxin-induced channel formation. This data strongly indicated that HN519–593 is an important region in generating protective antibodies and should be valuable in a vaccine design. These results are the first to describe and dissect the protective activity of the BoNT/A HN domain. PMID:26508475

  2. Generation and Characterization of Six Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxins as Reference Material to Serve in an International Proficiency Test.

    PubMed

    Weisemann, Jasmin; Krez, Nadja; Fiebig, Uwe; Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Endermann, Tanja; Dorner, Martin B; Bergström, Tomas; Muñoz, Amalia; Zegers, Ingrid; Müller, Christian; Jenkinson, Stephen P; Avondet, Marc-Andre; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Denayer, Sarah; Zeleny, Reinhard; Schimmel, Heinz; Åstot, Crister; Dorner, Brigitte G; Rummel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The detection and identification of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) is complex due to the existence of seven serotypes, derived mosaic toxins and more than 40 subtypes. Expert laboratories currently use different technical approaches to detect, identify and quantify BoNT, but due to the lack of (certified) reference materials, analytical results can hardly be compared. In this study, the six BoNT/A1-F1 prototypes were successfully produced by recombinant techniques, facilitating handling, as well as improving purity, yield, reproducibility and biosafety. All six BoNTs were quantitatively nicked into active di-chain toxins linked by a disulfide bridge. The materials were thoroughly characterized with respect to purity, identity, protein concentration, catalytic and biological activities. For BoNT/A₁, B₁ and E₁, serotypes pathogenic to humans, the catalytic activity and the precise protein concentration were determined by Endopep-mass spectrometry and validated amino acid analysis, respectively. In addition, BoNT/A₁, B₁, E₁ and F₁ were successfully detected by immunological assays, unambiguously identified by mass spectrometric-based methods, and their specific activities were assigned by the mouse LD50 bioassay. The potencies of all six BoNT/A1-F1 were quantified by the ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay, allowing a direct comparison. In conclusion, highly pure recombinant BoNT reference materials were produced, thoroughly characterized and employed as spiking material in a worldwide BoNT proficiency test organized by the EQuATox consortium. PMID:26703728

  3. Effects of solution conditions and surface chemistry on the adsorption of three recombinant botulinum neurotoxin antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Vessely, Christina; Estey, Tia; Randolph, Theodore W; Henderson, Ian; Nayar, Rajiv; Carpenter, John F

    2007-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a biological warfare threat. Protein antigens have been developed against the seven major BoNT serotypes for the development of a recombinant protein vaccine. This study is an evaluation of adsorption profiles for three of the recombinant protein antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants in the development of a trivalent vaccine against BoNT. Adsorption profiles were obtained over a range of protein concentrations. The results document that charge-charge interactions dominate the adsorption of antigen to adjuvant. Optimal conditions for adsorption were determined. However, potency studies and solution stability studies indicated the necessity of using aluminum hydroxide adjuvant at low pH. To improve the adsorption profiles to AlOH adjuvant, phosphate ions were introduced into the adsorption buffers. The resulting change in the adjuvant chemistry led to an improvement of adsorption of the BoNT antigens to aluminum hydroxide adjuvant while maintaining potency. Competitive adsorption profiles were also determined, and showed changes in maximum adsorption from mixed solutions compared to adsorption from individual protein solutions. The adsorption profiles for each protein varied due to differences in adsorption mechanism and affinity for the adjuvant surface. These results emphasize the importance of evaluating competitive adsorption in the development of multivalent vaccine products. PMID:17518359

  4. Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A, B, and F Proteolytic Activity in Complex Matrices with Picomolar to Femtomolar Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, F. Mark; Ruge, Daniel R.; Piazza, Timothy M.; Stanker, Larry H.; Zeytin, Füsûn N.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, high-throughput assays that detect and quantify botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) activity in diverse matrices are required for environmental, clinical, pharmaceutical, and food testing. The current standard, the mouse bioassay, is sensitive but is low in throughput and precision. In this study, we present three biochemical assays for the detection and quantification of BoNT serotype A, B, and F proteolytic activities in complex matrices that offer picomolar to femtomolar sensitivity with small assay volumes and total assay times of less than 24 h. These assays consist of magnetic beads conjugated with BoNT serotype-specific antibodies that are used to purify BoNT from complex matrices before the quantification of bound BoNT proteolytic activity using the previously described BoTest reporter substrates. The matrices tested include human serum, whole milk, carrot juice, and baby food, as well as buffers containing common pharmaceutical excipients. The limits of detection were below 1 pM for BoNT/A and BoNT/F and below 10 pM for BoNT/B in most tested matrices using 200-μl samples and as low as 10 fM for BoNT/A with an increased sample volume. Together, these data describe rapid, robust, and high-throughput assays for BoNT detection that are compatible with a wide range of matrices. PMID:22923410

  5. The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) alters hippocampal excitatory synaptic transmission by modulation of the GABAergic system.

    PubMed

    Huang, YuYing; Chen, JunFang; Chen, Ying; Zhuang, YingHan; Sun, Mu; Behnisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms following administration to mice, monkeys, and humans. A common view is that MPTP is metabolized to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)) to induce its neurodegenerative effects on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Moreover, the hippocampus contains dopaminergic fibers, which are projecting from the ventral tegmental area, SN and pars compacta and contain the whole machinery required for dopamine synthesis making them sensitive to MPTP and MPP(+). Here, we present data showing that acute bath-application of MPP(+) elicited a dose-dependent facilitation followed by a depression of synaptic transmission of hippocampal Schaffer collaterals-CA1 synapses in mice. The effects of MPP(+) were not mediated by D1/D5- and D2-like receptor activation. Inhibition of the dopamine transporters did not prevent but increased the depression of excitatory post-synaptic field potentials. In the search for a possible mechanism, we observed that MPP(+) reduced the appearance of polyspikes in population spikes recorded in str. pyramidale and increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents. The acute effect of MPP(+) on synaptic transmission was attenuated by co-application of a GABAA receptor antagonist. Taking these data together, we suggest that MPP(+) affects hippocampal synaptic transmission by enhancing some aspects of the hippocampal GABAergic system. PMID:26300734

  6. Botulinum neurotoxin: Progress in negating its neurotoxicity; and in extending its therapeutic utility via molecular engineering. MiniReview.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa, Richard M; Kostrzewa, Rose Anna; Kostrzewa, John P

    2015-10-01

    While the poisonous effects of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) have been recognized since antiquity, the overall actions and mechanisms of effects of BoNT have been elucidated primarily over the past several decades. The general utility of BoNT is described in the paper, but the focus is mainly on the approaches towards negating the toxic effects of BoNT, and on the projection of an engineered BoNT molecule serving as a Trojan Horse to deliver a therapeutic load for treatment of a host of medical disorders. The BoNT molecule is configured with a binding domain, a zinc-dependent protease with specificity primarily for vesicular proteins, and a translocation domain for delivery of the metalloprotease into the cytoplasm. The anti-toxin approaches for BoNT include the use of vaccines, antibodies, block of BoNT binding or translocation, inhibition of metalloprotease activity, impeded translocation of the protease/catalytic domain, and inhibition of the downstream Src signaling pathway. Projections of BoNT as a therapeutic include its targeting to non-cholinergic nerves, also targeting to non-neuronal cells for treatment of hypersecretory disorders (e.g., cystic fibrosis), and treatment of hormonal disorders (e.g., acromegaly). Still in the exploratory phase, there is the expectation of major advances in BoNT neuroprotective strategies and burgeoning utility of engineered BoNTs as therapeutics. PMID:26192475

  7. Qualitative and Quantitative Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxins from Complex Matrices: Results of the First International Proficiency Test

    PubMed Central

    Worbs, Sylvia; Fiebig, Uwe; Zeleny, Reinhard; Schimmel, Heinz; Rummel, Andreas; Luginbühl, Werner; Dorner, Brigitte G.

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the EU project EQuATox, a first international proficiency test (PT) on the detection and quantification of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) was conducted. Sample materials included BoNT serotypes A, B and E spiked into buffer, milk, meat extract and serum. Different methods were applied by the participants combining different principles of detection, identification and quantification. Based on qualitative assays, 95% of all results reported were correct. Successful strategies for BoNT detection were based on a combination of complementary immunological, MS-based and functional methods or on suitable functional in vivo/in vitro approaches (mouse bioassay, hemidiaphragm assay and Endopep-MS assay). Quantification of BoNT/A, BoNT/B and BoNT/E was performed by 48% of participating laboratories. It turned out that precise quantification of BoNT was difficult, resulting in a substantial scatter of quantitative data. This was especially true for results obtained by the mouse bioassay which is currently considered as “gold standard” for BoNT detection. The results clearly demonstrate the urgent need for certified BoNT reference materials and the development of methods replacing animal testing. In this context, the BoNT PT provided the valuable information that both the Endopep-MS assay and the hemidiaphragm assay delivered quantitative results superior to the mouse bioassay. PMID:26703724

  8. Characterization of botulinum neurotoxin type A subtypes by immunocapture enrichment and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Morineaux, Valérie; Mazuet, Christelle; Hilaire, Didier; Enche, Julien; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are divided into seven toxinotypes based on their immunological properties and each toxinotype contains several subtypes according to their amino acid sequences. Here, we designed a mass spectrometry method able to identify BoNT/A subtypes in complex matrices including crude culture supernatants, food, and environmental samples. Peptides from BoNT light chain (L) specific to the subtypes BoNT/A1 to A3 and BoNT/A5 to A8 were identified. The method consists of an immunocapture step with antibodies specific to BoNT/A L chains followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (QqQ) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. BoNT/A subtypes were correctly identified in culture supernatants and in tap water or orange juice samples with a limit of detection of 20 to 150 mouse lethal doses (MLD) and with a lower sensitivity in serum samples. PMID:26038189

  9. A Venom-derived Neurotoxin, CsTx-1, from the Spider Cupiennius salei Exhibits Cytolytic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Fedorova, Irina M.; Lüscher, Benjamin P.; Kopp, Lukas S.; Trachsel, Christian; Schaller, Johann; Vu, Xuan Lan; Seebeck, Thomas; Streitberger, Kathrin; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Sigel, Erwin; Magazanik, Lev G.

    2012-01-01

    CsTx-1, the main neurotoxic acting peptide in the venom of the spider Cupiennius salei, is composed of 74 amino acid residues, exhibits an inhibitory cysteine knot motif, and is further characterized by its highly cationic charged C terminus. Venom gland cDNA library analysis predicted a prepropeptide structure for CsTx-1 precursor. In the presence of trifluoroethanol, CsTx-1 and the long C-terminal part alone (CT1-long; Gly-45–Lys-74) exhibit an α-helical structure, as determined by CD measurements. CsTx-1 and CT1-long are insecticidal toward Drosophila flies and destroys Escherichia coli SBS 363 cells. CsTx-1 causes a stable and irreversible depolarization of insect larvae muscle cells and frog neuromuscular preparations, which seem to be receptor-independent. Furthermore, this membranolytic activity could be measured for Xenopus oocytes, in which CsTx-1 and CT1-long increase ion permeability non-specifically. These results support our assumption that the membranolytic activities of CsTx-1 are caused by its C-terminal tail, CT1-long. Together, CsTx-1 exhibits two different functions; as a neurotoxin it inhibits L-type Ca2+ channels, and as a membranolytic peptide it destroys a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell membranes. Such a dualism is discussed as an important new mechanism for the evolution of spider venomous peptides. PMID:22613721

  10. Cleavage of SNAP25 and its shorter versions by the protease domain of serotype A botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Mizanur, Rahman M; Stafford, Robert G; Ahmed, S Ashraf

    2014-01-01

    Various substrates, catalysts, and assay methods are currently used to screen inhibitors for their effect on the proteolytic activity of botulinum neurotoxin. As a result, significant variation exists in the reported results. Recently, we found that one source of variation was the use of various catalysts, and have therefore evaluated its three forms. In this paper, we characterize three substrates under near uniform reaction conditions using the most active catalytic form of the toxin. Bovine serum albumin at varying optimum concentrations stimulated enzymatic activity with all three substrates. Sodium chloride had a stimulating effect on the full length synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25) and its 66-mer substrates but had an inhibitory effect on the 17-mer substrate. We found that under optimum conditions, full length SNAP25 was a better substrate than its shorter 66-mer or 17-mer forms both in terms of kcat, Km, and catalytic efficiency kcat/Km. Assay times greater than 15 min introduced large variations and significantly reduced the catalytic efficiency. In addition to characterizing the three substrates, our results identify potential sources of variations in previous published results, and underscore the importance of using well-defined reaction components and assay conditions. PMID:24769566

  11. Comparative characterization of botulinum neurotoxin subtypes F1 and F7 featuring differential substrate recognition and cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    BoNT/F7, one of the seven subtypes of botulinum neurotoxin type F (F1 to F7), is the second-most divergent subtype of this group. Despite sharing >60% identity with BoNT/F1 at both holotoxin and enzymatic domain levels, it requires an N-terminal extended peptide substrate for efficient substrate cleavage, suggesting its unique substrate recognition and specificity mechanism. Substrate mapping and saturation mutagenesis analysis revealed that VAMP2 (20-65) was likely a minimally effective substrate for LC/F7 (light chain of BoNT/F7), and in addition, LC/F7 recognized VAMP2 in a unique way, which differed significantly from that of LC/F1, although both of them share similar substrate binding and hydrolysis mode. LC/F7 utilizes distinct pockets for specific substrate binding and recognition in particular for the B1, B2 and S2 sites recognitions. Our findings provide insights into the distinct substrate recognition features of BoNT subtypes and useful information for therapy development for BoNT/F. PMID:26748154

  12. Discovery of DF-461, a Potent Squalene Synthase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new trifluoromethyltriazolobenzoxazepine series of squalene synthase inhibitors. Structure–activity studies and pharmacokinetics optimization on this series led to the identification of compound 23 (DF-461), which exhibited potent squalene synthase inhibitory activity, high hepatic selectivity, excellent rat hepatic cholesterol synthesis inhibitory activity, and plasma lipid lowering efficacy in nonrodent repeated dose studies. PMID:24900587

  13. Potent pyrrolidine- and piperidine-based BACE-1 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Iserloh, U.; Wu, Y.; Cumming, J.N.; Pan, J.; Wang, L.Y.; Stamford, A.W.; Kennedy, M.E.; Kuvelkar, R.; Chen, X.; Parker, E.M.; Strickland, C.; Voigt, J.

    2008-08-18

    Based on lead compound 1 identified from the patent literature, we developed novel patentable BACE-1 inhibitors by introducing a cyclic amine scaffold. Extensive SAR studies on both pyrrolidines and piperidines ultimately led to inhibitor 2f, one of the most potent inhibitors synthesized to date. The discovery and development of novel BACE-1 inhibitors incorporating a cyclic amine scaffold is described.

  14. DIMETHYLARSINE AND TRIMETHYLARSINE ARE POTENT GENOTOXINS IN VITRO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dimethylarsine and Trimethylarsine are potent genotoxins in vitro
    Andrewes, P; Kitchin, KT; and Wallace, KA

    Abstract
    The mechanism of arsenic carcinogenesis is unclear. A complicating factor receiving increasing attention is that arsenic is biomethylated to form vari...

  15. Diethylamide of thujic acid: a potent repellent of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Hach, V; McDonald, E C

    1971-10-01

    A series of novel, representatively substituted amides of thujic acid were prepared and screened for insect repellent and attractant potential. In repel-lency tests the N,N-diethylamide was the most potent compound, surpassing the activity of the standard repellents dimethyl phthalate and fencholic acid. In contrast, the N-monoethylamide displayed attractant activity. PMID:5119622

  16. Structural and mutational analyses of the receptor binding domain of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin: Insight into the ganglioside binding mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Nuemket, Nipawan; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao; Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT in complex with 3'-sialyllactose. {yields} An electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. {yields} Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed that GBS and GBL are important for ganglioside binding. {yields} A cell binding mechanism, which involves cooperative contribution of two sites, was proposed. -- Abstract: Clostridium botulinum type D strain OFD05, which produces the D/C mosaic neurotoxin, was isolated from cattle killed by the recent botulism outbreak in Japan. The D/C mosaic neurotoxin is the most toxic of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) characterized to date. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT from strain OFD05 in complex with 3'-sialyllactose at a resolution of 3.0 A. In the structure, an electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed the significant contribution of the residues surrounding the cleft to ganglioside recognition. In addition, a loop adjoining the cleft also plays an important role in ganglioside recognition. In contrast, little effect was observed when the residues located around the surface previously identified as the protein receptor binding site in other BoNTs were substituted. The results of cell binding analysis of the mutants were significantly correlated with the ganglioside binding properties. Based on these observations, a cell binding mechanism of BoNT from strain OFD05 is proposed, which involves cooperative contribution of two ganglioside binding sites.

  17. A single-label fluorescent derivatization method for quantitative determination of neurotoxin in vivo by capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuiwei; Hu, Yiqin; Shi, Xiaowei; Tao, Chenghao; Zheng, Hongyue; Fei, Weidong; Han, Shunping; Zhu, Jiazhen; Wei, Yinghui; Li, Fanzhu

    2016-07-21

    Neurotoxin (NT), a short-chain α-neurotoxin, is the main neurotoxic protein identified from the venom of Naja naja atra. As an effective drug for the analgesis of advanced cancer patients, NT lasts longer than morphine and does not cause addiction. However, achieving a sensitive and high-resolution measurement of NT is difficult because of the extra-low content of NT in vivo. Therefore, developing a novel method to quantify NT is essential to study its pharmacokinetics in vivo. Although NT contains four primary amine groups that could react with the thiourea in fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), we developed a simple and reproducible single-label fluorescent derivatization method for NT which is related to the reaction of N-terminal α-amino of NT alone under optimized derivatization conditions. Furthermore, neurotoxin labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (NT-FITC) was prepared by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a purity value higher than 99.29% and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Finally, NT-FITC could be detected at 0.8 nmol L(-1) in rat plasma using capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). In this paper, the established method robustly and reliably quantified NT labelled with FITC via intravenous and intramuscular administrations in vivo. In addition, this work fully demonstrated the pharmacokinetic characteristics of NT in vivo, which could reduce the risk of drug accumulation, optimize therapies, and provide sufficient evidence for the rational use of NT in clinical and research laboratories. PMID:27175860

  18. Functional characterization of botulinum neurotoxin serotype H as a hybrid of known serotypes F and A (BoNT F/A).

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Baudys, Jakub; Raphael, Brian H; Dykes, Janet K; Lúquez, Carolina; Maslanka, Susan E; Barr, John R

    2015-04-01

    A unique strain of Clostridium botulinum (IBCA10-7060) was recently discovered which produces two toxins: botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotype B and a novel BoNT reported as serotype H. Previous molecular assessment showed that the light chain (LC) of the novel BoNT most resembled the bont of the light chain of known subtype F5, while the C-terminus of the heavy chain (HC) most resembled the binding domain of serotype A. We evaluated the functionality of both toxins produced in culture by first incorporating an immunoaffinity step using monoclonal antibodies to purify BoNT from culture supernatants and tested each immune-captured neurotoxin with full-length substrates vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), syntaxin, and shortened peptides representing the substrates. The BoNT/B produced by this strain behaved as a typical BoNT/B, having immunoaffinity for anti-B monoclonal antibodies and cleaving both full length VAMP-2 and a peptide based on the sequence of VAMP-2 in the expected location. As expected, there was no activity toward SNAP-25 or syntaxin. The novel BoNT demonstrated immunoaffinity for anti-A monoclonal antibodies but did not cleave SNAP-25 as expected for BoNT/A. Instead, the novel BoNT cleaved VAMP-2 and VAMP-2-based peptides in the same location as BoNT/F5. This is the first discovery of a single botulinum neurotoxin with BoNT/A antigenicity and BoNT/F light chain function. This work suggests that the newly reported serotype H may actually be a hybrid of previously known BoNT serotype A and serotype F, specifically subtype F5. PMID:25731972

  19. Vocal training, levodopa, and environment effects on ultrasonic vocalizations in a rat neurotoxin model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Brauer, Alexander F L; Ciucci, Michelle R

    2016-07-01

    Levodopa does not improve dysarthria in patients with Parkinson Disease (PD), although vocal exercise therapy, such as "LSVT/LOUD(®)", does improve vocal communication. Most patients receive vocal exercise therapy while concurrently being treated with levodopa, although the interaction between levodopa and vocal exercise therapy on communication in PD is relatively unknown. Further, carryover of vocal exercise therapy to novel situations is critical for successful outcomes, but the influence of novel situations on rehabilitated vocal communication is not well understood. To address the influence of exercise, medications, and environment on vocal communication with precise experimental control, we employed the widely used 6-OHDA rat neurotoxin model of PD (infusion to the medial forebrain bundle), and assessed ultrasonic vocalizations after: vocal exercise, vocal exercise with levodopa, levodopa alone, and control conditions. We tested USVs in the familiar training environment of the home cage and a novel cage. We hypothesized that parkinsonian rats that undergo vocal exercise would demonstrate significant improvement of ultrasonic vocalization (USV) acoustic parameters as compared to the control exercise and levodopa-only treatment groups. We further hypothesized that vocal exercise in combination with levodopa administration, similar to what is common in humans, would lead to improvement in USV outcomes, particularly when tested in a familiar versus a novel environment. We found that the combination of exercise and levodopa lead to some improvement in USV acoustic parameters and these effects were stronger in a familiar vs. a novel environment. Our results suggest that although treatment can improve aspects of communication, environment can influence the benefits of these effects. PMID:27025445

  20. Intrastriatal injection of botulinum neurotoxin-A is not cytotoxic in rat brain - A histological and stereological analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehlan, Juliane; Brosig, Hans; Schmitt, Oliver; Mix, Eilhard; Wree, Andreas; Hawlitschka, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, resulting in a deficiency of dopamine in the striatum and an increased release of acetylcholine by tonically active interneurons. Botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A) is well known for blocking transmitter release by cholinergic presynaptic terminals. Treating striatal hypercholinism by local application of BoNT-A could be a possible new local therapy option of PD. In previous studies of our group, we analyzed the effect of BoNT-A injection into the CPu of 6-OHDA lesioned hemiparkinsonian rats. Our studies showed that BoNT-A application in hemiparkinson rat model is capable of abolishing apomorphine induced rotations for approximately 3 months. Regularly occurring axonal swellings in the BoNT-A infiltrated striata were also discovered, which we named BoNT-A induced varicosities (BiVs). Résumé: Here we investigated the long-term effect of the injection of 1ng BoNT-A into the right CPu of naive Wistar rats on the number of ChAT-ir interneurons as well as on the numeric density and the volumetric size of the BiVs in the CPu. Significant differences in the number of ChAT-ir neurons between the right BoNT-A treated CPu and the left untreated CPu were not detected up to 12 month post BoNT-A injection. The numeric density of BiVs in the treated CPu reached a maximum 3 months after BoNT-A treatment and decreased afterwards, whereas the volume of single BiVs increased steadily throughout the whole time course of the experiment. PMID:26562665

  1. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E. PMID:26941734

  2. Selective inhibition of meningeal nociceptors by botulinum neurotoxin type A: Therapeutic implications for migraine and other pains

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Rami; Zhang, XiChun; Levy, Dan; Aoki, K Roger

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningeal and other trigeminal nociceptors are thought to play important roles in the initiation of migraine headache. Currently, the only approved peripherally administered chronic migraine prophylactic drug is onabotulinumtoxinA. The purpose of this study was to determine how botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) affects naïve and sensitized meningeal nociceptors. Material and methods Using electrophysiological techniques, we identified 43 C- and 36 Aδ-meningeal nociceptors, and measured their spontaneous and evoked firing before and after BoNT-A administration to intracranial dura and extracranial suture-receptive fields. Results As a rule, BoNT-A inhibited C- but not Aδ-meningeal nociceptors. When applied to nonsensitized C-units, BoNT-A inhibited responses to mechanical stimulation of the dura with suprathreshold forces. When applied to sensitized units, BoNT-A reversed mechanical hypersensitivity. When applied before sensitization, BoNT-A prevented development of mechanical hypersensitivity. When applied extracranially to suture branches of intracranial meningeal nociceptors, BoNT-A inhibited the mechanical responsiveness of the suture branch but not dural axon. In contrast, BoNT-A did not inhibit C-unit responses to mechanical stimulation of the dura with threshold forces, or their spontaneous activity. Discussion The study provides evidence for the ability of BoNT-A to inhibit mechanical nociception in peripheral trigeminovascular neurons. These findings suggest that BoNT-A interferes with neuronal surface expression of high-threshold mechanosensitive ion channels linked preferentially to mechanical pain by preventing their fusion into the nerve terminal membrane. PMID:24694964

  3. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of the aromatic residues in the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, N.R.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Bugg, C.E. )

    1989-02-21

    The amino acid sequence for the variant-3 (CsE-v3) toxin from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing contains eight aromatic residues. By use of 2D NMR spectroscopic methods, the resonances from the individual protons (NH, C{sup alpha}H, C{sup beta}H{prime}, H{double prime}, and the ring) for each of the individual aromatic residues have been completely assigned. The spatial arrangement of the aromatic ring systems with respect to each other has been qualitatively analyzed by 2D-NOESY techniques. The results show that Trp-47, Tyr-4, and Tyr-42 are in close spatial proximity to each other. The NOESY contacts and the ring current induced shifts in the resonances of the individual protons of Tyr-4 and Trp-47 suggest that the aromatic ring planes of these residues are in an orthogonal arrangement. A comparison with the published crystal structure suggests that there is a minor rearrangement of the aromatic rings in the solution phase. No 2D-NOESY contacts involving Phe-44 and Tyr-14 to any other aromatic ring protons have been observed. The pH dependence of the aromatic ring proton chemical shifts has also been studied. These results suggest that the Tyr-58 phenolic group is experiencing a hydrogen-bonding interaction with a positively charged group, while Tyr-4, -14, -38, and -40 are experiencing through-space interactions with proximal negatively charged groups. These studies define the microenvironment of the aromatic residues in the variant-3 neurotoxin in aqueous solution.

  4. Reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission of cerebellar granule cells in vivo by genetically manipulated expression of tetanus neurotoxin light chain.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mutsuya; Wada, Norio; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Watanabe, Dai; Anzai, Masayuki; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Teranishi, Yutaka; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2003-07-30

    We developed a novel technique that allowed reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cerebellar network. We generated two lines of transgenic mice termed Tet and TeNT mice and crossed the two transgenic lines to produce the Tet/TeNT double transgenic mice. In the Tet mice, the tetracycline-controlled reverse activator (rtTA) was expressed selectively in cerebellar granule cells by the promoter function of the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit gene. In the TeNT mice, the fusion gene of tetanus neurotoxin light chain (TeNT) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was designed to be induced by the interaction of doxycycline (DOX)-activated rtTA with the tetracycline-responsive promoter. The Tet/TeNT mice grew normally even after DOX treatment and exhibited a restricted DOX-dependent expression of TeNT in cerebellar granule cells. Along with this expression, TeNT proteolytically cleaved the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP2 (also termed synaptobrevin2) and reduced glutamate release from granule cells. Both cleavage of VAMP2/synaptobrevin2 and reduction of glutamate release were reversed by removal of DOX. Among the four genotypes generated by heterozygous crossing of Tet and TeNT mice, only Tet/TeNT mice showed DOX-dependent reversible motor impairments as analyzed with fixed bar and rota-rod tests. Reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission thus can be manipulated with spatiotemporal accuracy by DOX treatment and removal. These transgenic mice will serve as an animal model to study the cerebellar function in motor coordination and learning. PMID:12890769

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the solution properties of the polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, R.S.; Cossins, A.I.; Kem, W.R. )

    1989-02-21

    The solution properties of the polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (Sh I) have been investigated by high-resolution H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at 300 MHz. The pH dependence of the spectra has been examined over the range 1.1-12.2 at 27{degree}C. Individual pK{sub a} values have been obtained for the {alpha}-ammonium group of Ala-1 (8.6) and the side chains of Glu-8 (3.7), Tyr-36 (10.9), and Tyr-37 (10.8). For the remaining seven carboxyl groups in the molecule, four pK{sub a} values can be clearly identified. The five Lys residues titrate in the range 10.5-11, but individual pK{sub a} values could not be obtained because of peak overlap. Conformational changes associated with the protonation of carboxylates occur below pH 4, while in the alkaline pH range major unfolding occurs above pH 10. The molecule also unfolds at elevated temperatures. Exchange of the backbone amide protons has been monitored at various values of pH and temperature in the ranges pH 4-5 and 12-27{degree}C. Comparison of these properties of Sh I in solution with those of the related polypeptides anthopleurin A and Anemonia sulcata toxins I and II indicates that Sh I is less stable thermally and that there are some significant differences in the ionic interactions that maintain the tertiary structure. The solvent accessibility of aromatic residues has been probed with photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization NMR at 360 MHz.

  6. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari; Korniloff, Katariina; Weir, Adam; Häkkinen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability. PMID:26828215

  7. Maternal transfer of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) via milk to suckling offspring.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of (14)C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [(14)C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [(14)C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  8. Cellular Protection of SNAP-25 against Botulinum Neurotoxin/A: Inhibition of Thioredoxin Reductase through a Suicide Substrate Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seki, Hajime; Xue, Song; Pellett, Sabine; Šilhár, Peter; Johnson, Eric A; Janda, Kim D

    2016-05-01

    Botulium neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most lethal toxins known to man. They are comprised of seven serotypes with BoNT/A being the most deadly; yet, there is no approved therapeutic for their intoxication or one that has even advanced to clinical trials. Botulinum neurotoxicity is ultimately governed through light chain (LC) protease SNARE protein cleavage leading to a loss of neurotransmitter release. Pharmacological attempts to ablate BoNT/A intoxication have sought to either nullify cellular toxin entry or critical biochemical junctions found within its intricate mechanism of action. In these regards, reports have surfaced of nonpeptidic small molecule inhibitors, but few have demonstrated efficacy in neutralizing cellular toxicity, a key prerequisite before rodent lethality studies can be initiated. On the basis of a lead discovered in our BoNT/A cellular assay campaign, we investigated a family of N-hydroxysuccinimide inhibitors grounded upon structure activity relationship (SAR) fundamentals. Molecules stemming from this SAR exercise were theorized to be protease inhibitors. However, this proposition was overturned on the basis of extensive kinetic analysis. Unexpectedly, inhibitor data pointed to thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), an essential component required for BoNT protease translocation. Also unforeseen was the inhibitors' mechanism of action against TrxR, which was found to be brokered through a suicide-mechanism utilizing quinone methide as the inactivating element. This new series of TrxR inhibitors provides an alternative means to negate the etiological agent responsible for BoNT intoxication, the LC protease. PMID:27070533

  9. Detection of marine neurotoxins and characterization of the presynaptic activity of iotrochotin from the sponge Iotrochota birotulata

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    In order to detect novel presynaptic neurotoxins, a total of 766 extracts from marine organisms collected during expeditions of the research vessel Alpha Helix around the peninsula of Baja Mexico in 1974 and through the Caribbean in 1978 were tested for activity in a synaptosomal assay for the release of acetylcholine (ACh). To eliminate from consideration sample extracts which lysed the synaptosomal membrane, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was measured as a cytoplasmic marker. On the basis of the screening studies the extract of the sponge lotrochota birotulata was chosen for more detailed characterization. The active factor, iotrochotin (IOT), was sensitive to thermal inactivation, was partially activated by trypsin treatment and had a molecular weight of 12,000-13,000. The activity of IOT was found to be complete by one minute. The maximal release of radioactivity from synaptosomes preloaded with (/sup 3/H)choline was found to be dependent on the concentration of IOT irrespective of the time of further incubation. The concentration-response curve of IOT activity showed a sigmoid shape which did not fit the Hill equation. IOT caused release of both ACh and choline. Of the radioactivity released by IOT from synaptosomes preloaded with (/sup 3/H)choline, 50-60% was (/sup 3/H)ACh. IOT also released (/sup 3/H)GABA and (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine from synaptosomes preincubated with these labeled neurotransmitters. The activity of IOT was only minimally sensitive to reduction in Na/sup +/ or Ca/sup 2 +/ levels, and was not sensitive to tetrodotoxin. IOT did not dramatically change the fluorescence of synaptosomes incubated with a depolarization-indicating dye. However, depolarization of synaptosomes with high concentrations of K/sup +/ was still detectable by this method in the presence of IOT.

  10. Maternal Transfer of the Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) via Milk to Suckling Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B.; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of 14C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [14C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [14C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  11. Generation and Characterization of Six Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxins as Reference Material to Serve in an International Proficiency Test

    PubMed Central

    Weisemann, Jasmin; Krez, Nadja; Fiebig, Uwe; Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Endermann, Tanja; Dorner, Martin B.; Bergström, Tomas; Muñoz, Amalia; Zegers, Ingrid; Müller, Christian; Jenkinson, Stephen P.; Avondet, Marc-Andre; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Denayer, Sarah; Zeleny, Reinhard; Schimmel, Heinz; Åstot, Crister; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Rummel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The detection and identification of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) is complex due to the existence of seven serotypes, derived mosaic toxins and more than 40 subtypes. Expert laboratories currently use different technical approaches to detect, identify and quantify BoNT, but due to the lack of (certified) reference materials, analytical results can hardly be compared. In this study, the six BoNT/A1–F1 prototypes were successfully produced by recombinant techniques, facilitating handling, as well as improving purity, yield, reproducibility and biosafety. All six BoNTs were quantitatively nicked into active di-chain toxins linked by a disulfide bridge. The materials were thoroughly characterized with respect to purity, identity, protein concentration, catalytic and biological activities. For BoNT/A1, B1 and E1, serotypes pathogenic to humans, the catalytic activity and the precise protein concentration were determined by Endopep-mass spectrometry and validated amino acid analysis, respectively. In addition, BoNT/A1, B1, E1 and F1 were successfully detected by immunological assays, unambiguously identified by mass spectrometric-based methods, and their specific activities were assigned by the mouse LD50 bioassay. The potencies of all six BoNT/A1–F1 were quantified by the ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay, allowing a direct comparison. In conclusion, highly pure recombinant BoNT reference materials were produced, thoroughly characterized and employed as spiking material in a worldwide BoNT proficiency test organized by the EQuATox consortium. PMID:26703728

  12. Validation of the Endopep-MS method for qualitative detection of active botulinum neurotoxins in human and chicken serum

    PubMed Central

    Björnstad, Kristian; Åberg, Annica Tevell; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Wang, Dongxia; Barr, John R.; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteases produced by anaerobic bacteria. Traditionally, a mouse bioassay (MBA) has been used for detection of BoNTs, but for a long time, laboratories have worked with alternative methods for their detection. One of the most promising in vitro methods is a combination of an enzymatic and mass spectrometric assay called Endopep-MS. However, no comprehensive validation of the method has been presented. The main purpose of this work was to perform an in-house validation for the qualitative analysis of BoNT-A, B, C, C/D, D, D/C, E, and F in serum. The limit of detection (LOD), selectivity, precision, stability in matrix and solution, and correlation with the MBA were evaluated. The LOD was equal to or even better than that of the MBA for BoNT-A, B, D/C, E, and F. Furthermore, Endopep-MS was for the first time successfully used to differentiate between BoNT-C, D and their mosaics C/D and D/C by different combinations of antibodies and target peptides. In addition, sequential antibody capture was presented as a new way to multiplex the method when only a small sample volume is available. In the comparison with the MBA, all the samples analyzed were positive for BoNT-C/D with both methods. These results indicate that the Endopep-MS method is a good alternative to the MBA as the gold standard for BoNT detection based on its sensitivity, selectivity, speed, and that it does not require experimental animals. PMID:25228079

  13. DSP4, a selective neurotoxin for the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system. A review of its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ross, Svante B; Stenfors, Carina

    2015-01-01

    DSP4 (N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride) is a selective neurotoxin for the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system in the rodent and bird brain. It readily passes the blood-brain barrier and cyclizes to a reactive aziridinium derivative that is accumulated into the noradrenergic nerve terminals via the noradrenaline transporter. DSP4 is also an irreversible inhibitor of this transporter. Within the nerve terminals the aziridinium derivative reacts with unknown vital cellular components, destroying the terminals. At the dose 50 mg/kg i.p. this is characterized by a rapid and long-lasting loss of noradrenaline and a slower decrease in the dopamine-β-hydroxylase enzyme activity and immunoreactivity in the regions innervated from locus coeruleus. The tissue level of noradrenaline is reduced to 10-30% of the normal value. The extraneuronal concentration is, on the other hand, increased due to inflow from non-lesioned regions. Like the peripheral sympathetic nerves the non-locus coeruleus noradrenergic systems in the rodent brain is resistant to the neurotoxic action of DSP4. Serotoninergic and dopaminergic nerves are only slightly or not at all affected by DSP4. The neurotoxic effect is counteracted by pretreatment with noradrenaline uptake inhibitors (e.g., desipramine). MAO-B inhibitors of the N-propargylamine type (e.g., selegiline) also counteract the DSP4-induced neurotoxicity with another, yet unknown mechanism. Because of its selectivity for the locus coeruleus system DSP4 is a useful tool in studies of the functional role of this noradrenergic system in the brain. PMID:24964753

  14. Atoxic Derivative of Botulinum Neurotoxin A as a Prototype Molecular Vehicle for Targeted Delivery to the Neuronal Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin J.; Vakulenko, Maksim; Band, Philip A.; Stanker, Larry H.; Johnson, Eric A.; Ichtchenko, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described genetic constructs and expression systems that enable facile production of recombinant derivatives of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) that retain the structural and trafficking properties of wt BoNTs. In this report we describe the properties of one such derivative, BoNT/A ad, which was rendered atoxic by introducing two amino acid mutations to the light chain (LC) of wt BoNT/A, and which is being developed as a molecular vehicle for delivering drugs to the neuronal cytoplasm. The neuronal binding, internalization, and intracellular trafficking of BoNT/A ad in primary hippocampal cultures was evaluated using three complimentary techniques: flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Neuronal binding of BoNT ad was significantly increased when neurons were incubated in depolarizing medium. Flow cytometry demonstrated that BoNT/A ad internalized into neurons but not glia. After 24 hours, the majority of the neuron-bound BoNT/A ad became internalized, as determined by its resistance to pronase E-induced proteolytic degradation of proteins associated with the plasma membrane of intact cells. Significant amounts of the atoxic LC accumulated in a Triton X-100-extractable fraction of the neurons, and persisted as such for at least 11 days with no evidence of degradation. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated that the LC of BoNT/A ad was translocated to the neuronal cytoplasm after uptake and was specifically targeted to SNARE proteins. The atoxic LC consistently co-localized with synaptic markers SNAP-25 and VAMP-2, but was rarely co-localized with markers for early or late endosomes. These data demonstrate that BoNT/A ad mimics the trafficking properties of wt BoNT/A, confirming that our platform for designing and expressing BoNT derivatives provides an accessible system for elucidating the molecular details of BoNT trafficking, and can potentially be used to address multiple medical and biodefense needs. PMID:24465585

  15. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees

    SciTech Connect

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C. Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using {sup 14}C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA. - Highlights: • Investigating of neurotoxic effects of BMAA in honeybees • BMAA impairs ALS markers (ROS, Ca{sup 2+}, learning, memory, odor) in bees. • A method for the observation of ROS development in living bees brain was established. • Honeybees are a suitable model to explore neurodegenerative processes. • Neurotoxic BMAA can be spread in bee populations by trophallaxis.

  16. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression.

    PubMed

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E. PMID:26941734

  17. Vocal training, levodopa, and environment effects on ultrasonic vocalizations in a rat neurotoxin model of Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A.; Brauer, Alexander F.L.; Ciucci, Michelle R.

    2016-01-01

    Levodopa does not improve dysarthria in patients with Parkinson Disease (PD), although vocal exercise therapy, such as “LSVT/LOUD®”, does improve vocal communication. Most patients receive vocal exercise therapy while concurrently being treated with levodopa, although the interaction between levodopa and vocal exercise therapy on communication in PD is relatively unknown. Further, carryover of vocal exercise therapy to novel situations is critical for successful outcomes, but the influence of novel situations on rehabilitated vocal communication is not well understood. To address the influence of exercise, medications, and environment on vocal communication with precise experimental control, we employed the widely used 6-OHDA rat neurotoxin model of PD (infusion to the medial forebrain bundle), and assessed ultrasonic vocalizations after: vocal exercise, vocal exercise with levodopa, levodopa alone, and control conditions. We tested USVs in the familiar training environment of the home cage and a novel cage. We hypothesized that parkinsonian rats that undergo vocal exercise would demonstrate significant improvement of ultrasonic vocalization (USV) acoustic parameters as compared to the control exercise and levodopa-only treatment groups. We further hypothesized that vocal exercise in combination with levodopa administration, similar to what is common in humans, would lead to improvement in USV outcomes, particularly when tested in a familiar versus a novel environment. We found that the combination of exercise and levodopa lead to some improvement in USV acoustic parameters and these effects were stronger in a familiar vs. a novel environment. Our results suggest that although treatment can improve aspects of communication, environment can influence the benefits of these effects. PMID:27025445

  18. Structural and functional analysis of botulinum neurotoxin subunits for pH-dependent membrane channel formation and translocation.

    PubMed

    Chellappan, Gowri; Kumar, Raj; Santos, Erin; Goyal, Dipak; Cai, Shuowei; Singh, Bal Ram

    2015-10-01

    The structure-function relationship of Botulinum Neurotoxin (BoNT) proteins is greatly influenced by pH. While the low pH of endosome favors membrane interaction of the heavy chain (HC) for the formation of a membrane channel and translocation of the light chain (LC), the catalytic activity of the LC requires a neutral pH for cleavage of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex in the cytosol. In this study, we monitored secondary structural characteristics of LC, HC and holotoxin at individual pHs 4.5 and 7.2 and at the transition pH4.5 to 7.2 to identify the structural signatures underlying their function. The HC showed higher thermal stability at pH4.5 with a melting temperature (Tm) of 60.4°C. The structural analysis of HC in the presence of liposomes showed no difference in ellipticity with that of HC at pH7.2 at 208 and 222 nm but a 25.2% decrease in ellipticity at 208 nm at acidic pH, indicating low pH-induced structural changes that might facilitate interaction with the membrane. Further, HC showed 18% release of K+ ions from liposomes at pH4.5 as against 6% at neutral pH, reinforcing its role in membrane channel formation. LC on the other hand, showed maximum ellipticity at pH7.2, a condition that is relevant to its endopeptidase activity in the cytosol of the neurons. Also, the similarity in the structures at pH7.2 and transition pH4.5 to 7.2 suggested that the flexibility acquired by the protein at low pH was reversible upon exposure to neutral pH for cleavage of SNARE proteins. PMID:26012869

  19. Amino acid sequences of two novel long-chain neurotoxins from the venom of the sea snake Laticauda colubrina.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Tamiya, N

    1982-11-01

    From the venom of a population of the sea snake Laticauda colubrina from the Solomon Islands, a neurotoxic component, Laticauda colubrina a (toxin Lc a), was isolated in 16.6% (A280) yield. Similarly, from the venom of a population of L. colubrina from the Philippines, a neurotoxic component, Laticauda colubrina b (toxin Lc b), was obtained in 10.0% (A280) yield. The LD50 values of these toxins were 0.12 microgram/g body wt. on intramuscular injection in mice. Toxins Lc a and Lc b were each composed of molecules containing 69 amino acid residues with eight half-cystine residues. The complete amino acid sequences of these two toxins were elucidated. Toxins Lc a and Lc b are different from