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Sample records for potent tumor vaccine

  1. Elimination of IL-10 inducing T-helper epitopes from an IGFBP-2 vaccine ensures potent anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Denise L.; Holt, Gregory E.; Park, Kyong Hwa; Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Childs, Jennifer; Higgins, Doreen; Disis, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against self-tumor antigens can induce T-regulatory cells which inhibit proliferation of Type I CD4+ T-helper (Th1) and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. Type I T-cells are required for potent anti-tumor immunity. We questioned whether immunosuppressive epitopes could be identified and deleted from a cancer vaccine targeting IGFBP-2 and enhance vaccine efficacy. Screening breast cancer patient lymphocytes with IFN-γ and IL-10 ELISPOT, we found epitopes in the N-terminus of IGFBP-2 that elicited predominantly Th1 while the C-terminus stimulated Th2 and mixed Th1/Th2 responses. Epitope-specific Th2 demonstrated a higher functional avidity for antigen than epitopes which induced IFN-γ (p=0.014). We immunized TgMMTV-neu mice with DNA constructs encoding IGFBP-2 N-and C-termini. T-cell lines expanded from the C-terminus vaccinated animals secreted significantly more Type II cytokines than those vaccinated with the N-terminus and could not control tumor growth when infused into tumor-bearing animals. In contrast, N-terminus epitope-specific T-cells secreted Th1 cytokines and significantly inhibited tumor growth, as compared with naïve T-cells, when adoptively transferred (p=0.005). To determine whether removal of Th2 inducing epitopes had any effect on the vaccinated anti-tumor response, we immunized mice with the N-terminus, C-terminus and a mix of equivalent concentrations of both vaccines. The N-terminus vaccine significantly inhibited tumor growth (p<0.001) as compared to the C-terminus vaccine which had no anti-tumor effect. Mixing the C-terminus with the N-terminus vaccine abrogated the anti-tumor response of the N-terminus vaccine alone. The clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines targeting self-tumor antigens may be greatly improved by identification and removal of immunosuppressive epitopes. PMID:24778415

  2. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy. PMID:26079374

  3. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  4. Chimeric infectious bursal disease virus-like particles as potent vaccines for eradication of established HPV-16 E7-dependent tumors.

    PubMed

    Martin Caballero, Juan; Garzón, Ana; González-Cintado, Leticia; Kowalczyk, Wioleta; Jimenez Torres, Ignacio; Calderita, Gloria; Rodriguez, Margarita; Gondar, Virgínia; Bernal, Juan Jose; Ardavín, Carlos; Andreu, David; Zürcher, Thomas; von Kobbe, Cayetano

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and represents the second most frequent gynecological malignancy in the world. The HPV-16 type accounts for up to 55% of all cervical cancers. The HPV-16 oncoproteins E6 and E7 are necessary for induction and maintenance of malignant transformation and represent tumor-specific antigens for targeted cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immunotherapy. Therapeutic cancer vaccines have become a challenging area of oncology research in recent decades. Among current cancer immunotherapy strategies, virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines have emerged as a potent and safe approach. We generated a vaccine (VLP-E7) incorporating a long C-terminal fragment of HPV-16 E7 protein into the infectious bursal disease virus VLP and tested its therapeutic potential in HLA-A2 humanized transgenic mice grafted with TC1/A2 tumor cells. We performed a series of tumor challenge experiments demonstrating a strong immune response against already-formed tumors (complete eradication). Remarkably, therapeutic efficacy was obtained with a single dose without adjuvant and against two injections of tumor cells, indicating a potent and long-lasting immune response. PMID:23300838

  5. Maraba Virus as a Potent Oncolytic Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Jonathan G; Zhang, Liang; Bridle, Byram W; Stephenson, Kyle B; Rességuier, Julien; Hanson, Stephen; Chen, Lan; Kazdhan, Natasha; Bramson, Jonathan L; Stojdl, David F; Wan, Yonghong; Lichty, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    The rhabdovirus Maraba has recently been characterized as a potent oncolytic virus. In the present study, we engineered an attenuated Maraba strain, defined as MG1, to express a melanoma-associated tumor antigen. Its ability to mount an antitumor immunity was evaluated in tumor-free and melanoma tumor-bearing mice. Alone, the MG1 vaccine appeared insufficient to prime detectable adaptive immunity against the tumor antigen. However, when used as a boosting vector in a heterologous prime-boost regimen, MG1 vaccine rapidly generated strong antigen-specific T-cell immune responses. Once applied for treating syngeneic murine melanoma tumors, our oncolytic prime-boost vaccination protocol involving Maraba MG1 dramatically extended median survival and allowed complete remission in more than 20% of the animals treated. This work describes Maraba virus MG1 as a potent vaccine vector for cancer immunotherapy displaying both oncolytic activity and a remarkable ability to boost adaptive antitumor immunity. PMID:24322333

  6. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  7. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bol, Kalijn F; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Pots, Jeanette M; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; de Boer, Annemiek J; van Oorschot, Tom G M; Croockewit, Sandra A J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Mus, Roel D M; van Rossum, Michelle M; van der Graaf, Chantal A A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Adema, Gosse J; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combined intradermal/intravenous injection (16 patients) with VAC-DC loaded with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mRNA encoding tumor antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Tumor antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored in blood and skin-test infiltrating-lymphocyte cultures. Almost all patients mounted prophylactic vaccine- or KLH-specific immune responses. Both after intranodal injection and after intradermal/intravenous injection, tumor antigen-specific immune responses were detected, which coincide with longer overall survival in stage IV melanoma patients. VAC-DC induce local and systemic CTC grade 2 and 3 toxicity, which is most likely caused by BCG in the maturation cocktail. The side effects were self-limiting or resolved upon a short period of systemic steroid therapy. We conclude that VAC-DC can induce functional tumor-specific responses. Unfortunately, toxicity observed after vaccination precludes the general application of VAC-DC, since in DC maturated with prophylactic vaccines BCG appears to be essential in the maturation cocktail. PMID:26861670

  8. Highly optimized DNA vaccine targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase stimulates potent antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Thomas H.; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Morrow, Matthew P.; Walters, Jewell N.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) are detected in over 85% of human cancers. Immunological analysis supports hTERT is a widely applicable target recognized by T cells and can be potentially studied as a broad cancer immune therapeutic, or a unique line of defense against tumor recurrence. There remains an urgent need to develop more potent hTERT vaccines. Here, a synthetic highly optimized full-length hTERT DNA vaccine (phTERT) was designed and the induced immunity was examined in mice and non-human primates. When delivered by electroporation, phTERT elicited strong, broad hTERT-specific CD8 responses including induction of T-cells expressing CD107a, IFN-γ and TNF-α in mice. The ability of phTERT to overcome tolerance was evaluated in a NHP model, whose TERT is 96% homologous to that of hTERT. Immunized monkeys exhibited robust (average 1834 SFU/106 PBMCs), diverse (multiple immunodominant epitopes) IFN-γ responses and antigen-specific perforin release (average 332 SFU/106 PBMCs), suggesting phTERT breaks tolerance and induces potent cytotoxic responses in this human relevant model. Moreover, in an HPV16-associated tumor model, vaccination of phTERT slows tumor growth and improves survival rate in both prophylactic and therapeutic studies. Lastly, in vivo cytotoxicity assay confirmed that phTERT-induced CD8 T cells exhibited specific CTL activity, capable of eliminating hTERT-pulsed target cells. These findings support that this synthetic EP-delivered DNA phTERT may have a role as a broad therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:24777680

  9. Dendritic-Tumor Fusion Cell-Based Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immunity. Therefore, various strategies have been developed to deliver tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) to DCs as cancer vaccines. The fusion of DCs and whole tumor cells to generate DC-tumor fusion cells (DC-tumor FCs) is an alternative strategy to treat cancer patients. The cell fusion method allows DCs to be exposed to the broad array of TAAs originally expressed by whole tumor cells. DCs then process TAAs endogenously and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of costimulatory molecules, resulting in simultaneous activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. DC-tumor FCs require optimized enhanced immunogenicity of both DCs and whole tumor cells. In this context, an effective fusion strategy also needs to produce immunogenic DC-tumor FCs. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor FCs and the recent progress in improving clinical outcomes by DC-tumor FC-based cancer vaccines. PMID:27240347

  10. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  11. A plant-expressed conjugate vaccine breaks CD4+ tolerance and induces potent immunity against metastatic Her2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chotprakaikiat, Warayut; Allen, Alex; Bui-Minh, Duc; Harden, Elena; Jobsri, Jantipa; Cavallo, Federica; Gleba, Yuri; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian; Klimyuk, Victor; Savelyeva, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passive antibody therapy for cancer is an effective but costly treatment modality. Induction of therapeutically potent anticancer antibodies by active vaccination is an attractive alternative but has proven challenging in cancer due to tolerogenic pressure in patients. Here, we used the clinically relevant cancer target Her2, known to be susceptible to targeting by antibody therapy, to demonstrate how potent antibody can be induced by vaccination. A novel 44kD Her2 protein fragment was generated and found to be highly effective at inducing anti-Her2 antibody including trastuzumab-like reactivities. In the tolerant and spontaneous BALB-neuT mouse model of metastatic breast cancer this Her2-targeting vaccine was only effective if the fragment was conjugated to a foreign immunogenic carrier; Fragment C of tetanus toxin. Only the conjugate vaccine induced high affinity anti-Her2 antibody of multiple isotypes and suppressed tumor development. The magnitude of CD4+ T-cell help and breadth of cytokines secreted by the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells induced to the foreign antigen was critical. We used a highly efficient plant-based bio-manufacturing process for protein antigens, magnICON, for vaccine expression, to underpin feasibility of future clinical testing. Hence, our novel Her2-targeting conjugate vaccine combines preclinical efficacy with clinical deliverability, thus setting the scene for therapeutic testing. PMID:27471642

  12. Vaccination against strontium-90-induced bone tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Triest, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The thesis was tested that immunization against a murine osteosarcoma virus can reduce the incidence of bone tumors induced by /sup 90/Sr. C57BL/6J female mice (190) were divided into three sets of 2 groups. Each set consisted of a control group and an experimental group treated ip with 1.0 muCi /sup 90/Sr at 66 days of age. The three sets of groups received the following additional treatments: none (controls), 6 injections of Formalin-inactivated FBJ osteosarcoma virus (vaccinated group), or 6 injections of active FBJ virus (active virus controls). Only 1 bone tumor developed in a mouse not treated with /sup 90/Sr in the active virus controls. In /sup 90/Sr-treated mice, vaccination reduced bone tumor deaths during the first 600 days from 9 of 36 in controls to 1 of 33 in vaccinated mice (P less than .01), but bone tumor deaths during the entire life-span, 10 of 36 and 5 of 33, respectively, were not significantly different (P . .07). Thus the vaccination procedure delayed the development of bone tumors. In contrast, injection of active virus into /sup 90/Sr-treated mice increased the lifetime incidence of bone tumors from 10 of 36 in controls to 19 of 32 (P . .01).

  13. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  14. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design.

    PubMed

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  15. Application of autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine in treatment of tumors of digestive traet

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Sun, Tie-Mie; Yao, Wen-Qing; Chen, Li-Li; Jin, Yu; Li, Chun-Ling; Meng, Fan-Juan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To treat patients with stage I-IV malignant tumors of digestive tract using autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV (Newcastle disease virus) vaccine, and observe the survival period and curative effect. METHODS: 335 patients with malignant tumors of digestive tract were treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine. The autologous tumor cell vaccine received were assigned for long-term survival observation. While these failed to obtain the autologous tumor tissue were given with NDV vaccine for a received short-term observation on curative effect. RESULTS: The colorectal cancer patients treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine were divided into two groups: the controlled group (subjected to resection alone) (n = 257), the vaccine group (subjected to both resection and immunotherapy) (n = 310). 25 patients treated with NDV immunotherapy were all at stage IV without having resection. In postoperation adjuvant therapy patients, the 5, 6 and 7-year survival rates were 66.51%, 60.52%, 56.50% respectively; whereas in patients with resection alone, only 45.57%, 44.76% and 43.42% respectively. The average survival period was 5.13 years (resection alone group 4.15 years), the median survival period was over 7 years (resection alone group 4.46 years). There were significant differences between the two groups. The patients treated with resection plus vaccine were measured delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions after vaccination, (indurative scope > 5 mm). The magnitude of DTH was related to the prognosis. The 5-year survival rate was 80% for those with indurations greater than 5 mm, compared with 30% for those with indurations less than 5 mm. The 1-year survival rate was 96% for 25 patients treated with NDV immunotherapy. The total effective rate (CR+PR) was 24.00% in NDV immunotherapy; complete remission (CR) in 1 case (4.00%), partial remission (PR) in 5 cases (20.00%), stabilizedin in 16 cases (64.00%), progression (PD) in 1 case (4.00%). After

  16. Nasal vaccination stimulates CD8(+) T cells for potent protection against mucosal Brucella melitensis challenge.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Beata; Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W

    2016-05-01

    Brucellosis remains a significant zoonotic threat worldwide. Humans and animals acquire infection via their oropharynx and upper respiratory tract following oral or aerosol exposure. After mucosal infection, brucellosis develops into a systemic disease. Mucosal vaccination could offer a viable alternative to conventional injection practices to deter disease. Using a nasal vaccination approach, the ΔznuA B. melitensis was found to confer potent protection against pulmonary Brucella challenge, and reduce colonization of spleens and lungs by more than 2500-fold, with >50% of vaccinated mice showing no detectable brucellae. Furthermore, 10-fold more brucellae-specific, interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing CD8(+) T cells than CD4(+) T cells were induced in the spleen and respiratory lymph nodes. Evaluation of pulmonary and splenic CD8(+) T cells from mice vaccinated with ΔznuA B. melitensis revealed that these expressed an activated effector memory (CD44(hi)CD62L(lo)CCR7(lo)) T cells producing elevated levels of IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, perforin and granzyme B. To assess the relative importance of these increased numbers of CD8(+) T cells, CD8(-/-) mice were challenged with virulent B. melitensis, and they showed markedly increased bacterial loads in organs in contrast to similarly challenged CD4(-/-) mice. Only ΔznuA B. melitensis- and Rev-1-vaccinated CD4(-/-) and wild-type mice, not CD8(-/-) mice, were completely protected against Brucella challenge. Determination of cytokines responsible for conferring protection showed the relative importance of IFN-γ, but not interleukin-17 (IL-17). Unlike wild-type (wt) mice, IL-17 was greatly induced in IFN-γ(-/-) mice, but IL-17 could not substitute for IFN-γ's protection, although an increase in brucellae dissemination was observed upon in vivo IL-17 neutralization. These results show that nasal ΔznuA B. melitensis vaccination represents an attractive means to stimulate systemic and mucosal immune protection via CD

  17. Interleukin-12-secreting human papillomavirus type 16-transformed cells provide a potent cancer vaccine that generates E7-directed immunity.

    PubMed

    Hallez, S; Detremmerie, O; Giannouli, C; Thielemans, K; Gajewski, T F; Burny, A; Leo, O

    1999-05-01

    The development of a vaccine that would be capable of preventing or curing the (pre)cancerous lesions induced by genital oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the focus of much research. Many studies are presently evaluating vaccines based on the viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins, both of which are continually expressed by tumor cells. The success of a cancer vaccine relies, in large part, on the induction of a tumor-specific Th1-type immunity. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of B7-related and/or interleukin-12 (IL-12)-expressing, non-immunogenic murine HPV16-transformed BMK-16/myc cells, to achieve this goal. BMK-16/myc cells engineered to express surface B7-1 or B7-2 molecules remain tumorigenic in syngeneic BALB/c mice, suggesting that expression of these molecules alone is not sufficient to induce tumor regression. In contrast, mice injected with tumor cells engineered to secrete IL-12 remained tumor-free, demonstrating that IL-12 expression is sufficient to induce tumor rejection. IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells were further shown to induce potent and specific long-term tumor resistance, even after irradiation. B7-1 was found to slightly but systematically improve anti-tumor immunity elicited by IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells. Injection of irradiated B7-1/IL-12+ BMK-16/myc cells generates long-lasting, Th1-type, BMK-16/myc-directed immunity in tumor-resistant mice. These mice display a memory-type, E7-specific, cell-mediated immune response, which is potentially significant for clinical applications. PMID:10209958

  18. Novel cancer vaccines prepared by anchoring cytokines to tumor cells avoiding gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizard, Philippe; Gross, David-Alexandre; Chenal, Alexandre; Beaumelle, Bruno; Kosmatopoulos, Konstadinos; Gillet, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Cytokines have a strong potential for triggering anticancer immunity if released in the tumor microenvironment. Successful vaccines have been engineered using tumor cells genetically modified to secrete the cytokines. Unfortunately, this approach remains difficult and hazardous to perform in the clinic. We describe a new way of combining cytokines with tumor cells to prepare anticancer vaccines. This consists in anchoring recombinant cytokines to the membrane of killed tumor cells. Attachment is mediated by a fragment of diphtheria toxin (T) genetically connected to the cytokine. It is triggered by an acid pH pulse. The method was applied to IL-2, a potent anti-tumor cytokine. IL-2 anchored to the surface of tumor cells by the T anchor retained its IL-2 activity and remained exposed several days. Interestingly, vaccination of mice with these modified tumor cells induced a protective anti-tumor immunity mediated by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This procedure presents several advantages as compared to the conventional approaches based on the transfection of tumor cells with cytokine genes. It does not require the culture of tumor cells from the patients and eliminates the safety problems connected with viral vectors while allowing the control of the amount of cytokines delivered with the vaccine.

  19. Plant-made vaccines against West Nile virus are potent, safe, and economically feasible

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The threat of West Nile virus (WNV) epidemics with increasingly severe neuroinvasive infections demands the development and licensing of effective vaccines. To date, vaccine candidates based on inactivated, live-attenuated, or chimeric virus, and viral DNA and WNV protein subunits have been developed. Some have been approved for veterinary use or are under clinical investigation, yet no vaccine has been licensed for human use. Reaching the milestone of a commercialized human vaccine, however, may largely depend on the economics of vaccine production. Analysis suggests that currently only novel low-cost production technologies would allow vaccination to outcompete the cost of surveillance and clinical treatment. Here, we review progress using plants to address the economic challenges of WNV vaccine production. The advantages of plants as hosts for vaccine production in cost, speed and scalability, especially those of viral vector-based transient expression systems, are discussed. The progress in developing WNV subunit vaccines in plants is reviewed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, and immunogenicity in animal models. The development of vaccines based on enveloped and non-enveloped virus-like particles is also discussed. These advancements suggest that plants may provide a production platform that offers potent, safe and affordable human vaccines against WNV. PMID:25676782

  20. Identification of immune factors regulating anti-tumor immunity using polymeric vaccines with multiple adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar A.; Verbeke, Catia; Johnson, Chris; Sands, Warren; Lewin, Sarah A.; White, Des; Doherty, Edward; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The innate cellular and molecular components required to mediate effective vaccination against weak tumor-associated antigens remain unclear. In this study we utilized polymeric cancer vaccines incorporating different classes of adjuvants to induce tumor protection, in order to identify dendritic cell subsets and cytokines critical to this efficacy. Three-dimensional, porous polymer matrices loaded with tumor lysates and presenting distinct combinations of GM-CSF and various TLR agonists effected 70–90% prophylactic tumor protection in B16-F10 melanoma models. In aggressive, therapeutic B16 models, the vaccine systems incorporating GM-CSF in combination with P(I:C) or CpG-ODN induced the complete regression of solid tumors (≤40mm2) resulting in 33% long-term survival. Regression analysis revealed that the numbers of vaccine-resident CD8(+) DCs and plasmacytoid DCs, along with local IL-12, and G-CSF concentrations correlated strongly to vaccine efficacy regardless of adjuvant type. Further, vaccine studies in Batf3−/− mice revealed that CD8(+) DCs are required to effect tumor protection, as vaccines in these mice were deficient in cytotoxic T cell priming, and IL-12 induction in comparison to wild-type. These studies broadly demonstrate that three-dimensional polymeric vaccines provide a potent platform for prophylactic and therapeutic protection, and can be used as a tool to identify critical components of a desired immune response. Specifically, these results suggest that CD8(+) DCs, plasmacytoid DCs, IL-12, and G-CSF play important roles in priming effective anti-tumor responses with these vaccines. PMID:24480625

  1. Differential Fc-receptor engagement drives an anti-tumor vaccinal effect

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, David J.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Passively-administered anti-tumor mAbs rapidly kill tumor targets via FcγR-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), a short-term process. However, anti-tumor mAb treatment can also induce a vaccinal effect, in which mAb-mediated tumor death induces a long-term anti-tumor cellular immune response. To determine how such responses are generated, we utilized a murine model of an anti-tumor vaccinal effect against a model neoantigen. We demonstrate that FcγR expression by CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells is required to generate anti-tumor T cell responses upon ADCC-mediated tumor clearance. Using FcγR-humanized mice, we demonstrate that anti-tumor huIgG1 must engage hFcγRIIIA on macrophages to mediate ADCC, but also engage hFcγRIIA, the sole hFcγR expressed by human DCs, to generate a potent vaccinal effect. Thus, while next-generation anti-tumor antibodies with enhanced binding to only hFcγRIIIA are now in clinical use, ideal anti-tumor antibodies must be optimized for both cytotoxic effects as well as hFcγRIIA engagement on DCs to stimulate long-term anti-tumor cellular immunity. PMID:25976835

  2. Keratinocyte growth factor enhances DNA plasmid tumor vaccine responses after murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jenq, Robert R.; King, Christopher G.; Volk, Christine; Suh, David; Smith, Odette M.; Rao, Uttam K.; Yim, Nury L.; Holland, Amanda M.; Lu, Sydney X.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Diab, Adi; Alpdogan, Onder; Penack, Olaf; Na, Il-Kang; Kappel, Lucy W.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Houghton, Alan N.; Perales, Miguel-Angel

    2009-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), which is given exogenously to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) recipients, supports thymic epithelial cells and increases thymic output of naive T cells. Here, we demonstrate that this improved T-cell reconstitution leads to enhanced responses to DNA plasmid tumor vaccination. Tumor-bearing mice treated with KGF and DNA vaccination have improved long-term survival and decreased tumor burden after allo-BMT. When assayed before vaccination, KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients have increased numbers of peripheral T cells, including CD8+ T cells with vaccine-recognition potential. In response to vaccination, KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients, compared with control subjects, generate increased numbers of tumor-specific CD8+ cells, as well as increased numbers of CD8+ cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We also found unanticipated benefits to antitumor immunity with the administration of KGF. KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients have an improved ratio of T effector cells to regulatory T cells, a larger fraction of effector cells that display a central memory phenotype, and effector cells that are derived from a broader T-cell–receptor repertoire. In conclusion, our data suggest that KGF can function as a potent vaccine adjuvant after allo-BMT through its effects on posttransplantation T-cell reconstitution. PMID:19011222

  3. Exploiting the mutanome for tumor vaccination.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Kreiter, Sebastian; Diekmann, Jan; Löwer, Martin; van de Roemer, Niels; de Graaf, Jos; Selmi, Abderraouf; Diken, Mustafa; Boegel, Sebastian; Paret, Claudia; Koslowski, Michael; Kuhn, Andreas N; Britten, Cedrik M; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Ozlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-03-01

    Multiple genetic events and subsequent clonal evolution drive carcinogenesis, making disease elimination with single-targeted drugs difficult. The multiplicity of gene mutations derived from clonal heterogeneity therefore represents an ideal setting for multiepitope tumor vaccination. Here, we used next generation sequencing exome resequencing to identify 962 nonsynonymous somatic point mutations in B16F10 murine melanoma cells, with 563 of those mutations in expressed genes. Potential driver mutations occurred in classical tumor suppressor genes and genes involved in proto-oncogenic signaling pathways that control cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis. Aim1 and Trrap mutations known to be altered in human melanoma were included among those found. The immunogenicity and specificity of 50 validated mutations was determined by immunizing mice with long peptides encoding the mutated epitopes. One-third of these peptides were found to be immunogenic, with 60% in this group eliciting immune responses directed preferentially against the mutated sequence as compared with the wild-type sequence. In tumor transplant models, peptide immunization conferred in vivo tumor control in protective and therapeutic settings, thereby qualifying mutated epitopes that include single amino acid substitutions as effective vaccines. Together, our findings provide a comprehensive picture of the mutanome of B16F10 melanoma which is used widely in immunotherapy studies. In addition, they offer insight into the extent of the immunogenicity of nonsynonymous base substitution mutations. Lastly, they argue that the use of deep sequencing to systematically analyze immunogenicity mutations may pave the way for individualized immunotherapy of cancer patients. PMID:22237626

  4. A potent Brucella abortus 2308 Δery live vaccine allows for the differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junbo; Yin, Shuanghong; Guo, Fei; Meng, Ren; Chen, Chuangfu; Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhiqiang; Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Hu, Shengwei; Ni, Wei; Li, Tiansen; Zhang, Ke

    2014-08-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease that causes animal and human diseases. However, the current Brucella abortus vaccines (S19 and RB51) are deficient; they can cause abortion in pregnant animals. Moreover, when the vaccine S19 is used, tests cannot differentiate natural from vaccinated infection. Therefore, a safer and more potent vaccine is needed. A Brucella abortus 2308 ery promoter mutant (Δery) was constructed to overcome these drawbacks. The growth of the Δery mutant was significantly attenuated in macrophages and mice and induced high protective immunity in mice. Moreover, Δery induced an anti-Brucella-specific IgG (immunoglobulin G) response and stimulated the expression of interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Furthermore, the expression of EryA antigen allowed for the serological differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection in mice. These results indicate that the Δery mutant is a potential attenuated live vaccine candidate against virulent Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) infection. PMID:24994009

  5. Tetanus toxin fragment C fused to flagellin makes a potent mucosal vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recombinant subunit vaccines provide safe and targeted protection against microbial infections. However, the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit vaccines tends to be less potent than the whole cell vaccines, especially when they are administered through mucosal routes. We have reported that a bacterial flagellin has strong mucosal adjuvant activity to induce protective immune responses. In this study, we tested whether FlaB could be used as a fusion partner of subunit vaccine for tetanus. Materials and Methods We constructed fusion proteins consisted with tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFC), the nontoxic C-terminal portion of tetanus toxin, and a Toll-like receptor 5 agonist from Vibrio vulnificus (FlaB). Mice were intranasally administered with fusion protein and protective immune responses of the vaccinated mice were analyzed. Results FlaB-TTFC recombinant protein induced strong tetanus-specific antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments and prolonged the survival of mice after challenge with a supra-lethal dose of tetanus toxin. Conclusion This study establishes FlaB as a successful fusion partner for recombinant subunit tetanus vaccine applicable through mucosal route, and it further endorses our previous observations that FlaB could be a stable adjuvant partner for mucosal vaccines. PMID:25649002

  6. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing tumor suppressor p53 is a highly attenuated, potent oncolytic agent.

    PubMed

    Heiber, Joshua F; Barber, Glen N

    2011-10-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a negative-strand RNA rhabdovirus, preferentially replicates in and eradicates transformed versus nontransformed cells and is thus being considered for use as a potential anticancer treatment. The genetic malleability of VSV also affords an opportunity to develop more potent agents that exhibit increased therapeutic activity. The tumor suppressor p53 has been shown to exert potent antitumor properties, which may in part involve stimulating host innate immune responses to malignancies. To evaluate whether VSV expressing p53 exhibited enhanced oncolytic action, the murine p53 (mp53) gene was incorporated into recombinant VSVs with or without a functional viral M gene-encoded protein that could either block (VSV-mp53) or enable [VSV-M(mut)-mp53] host mRNA export following infection of susceptible cells. Our results indicated that VSV-mp53 and VSV-M(mut)-mp53 expressed high levels of functional p53 and retained the ability to lyse transformed versus normal cells. In addition, we observed that VSV-ΔM-mp53 was extremely attenuated in vivo due to p53 activating innate immune genes, such as type I interferon (IFN). Significantly, immunocompetent animals with metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma exhibited increased survival following treatment with a single inoculation of VSV-ΔM-mp53, the mechanisms of which involved enhanced CD49b+ NK and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Our data indicate that VSV incorporating p53 could provide a safe, effective strategy for the design of VSV oncolytic therapeutics and VSV-based vaccines. PMID:21813611

  7. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends. PMID:23850019

  8. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant adenovirus encoding nucleoprotein provides potent protection against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Hee; Kim, Joo Young; Choi, Youngjoo; Nguyen, Huan H; Song, Man Ki; Chang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Influenza vaccines that target the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase cause inconvenience of having vaccination every year. For this reason, development of universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components is needed. In this study, we generated recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vaccine encoding nucleoprotein (NP) of A/PR/8/34 influenza virus, designated rAd/NP. BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally or sublingually with rAd/NP vaccine and subsequently challenged with lethal doses of heterologous as well as homologous influenza viruses. We found that intranasal immunization of rAd/NP elicited strong mucosal IgA responses as well as stronger CD8 T-cell responses toward immunodominant K(d)-restricted NP147-155 epitope than sublingual immunization. Importantly, only single intranasal but not sublingual immunization of rAd/NP provides potent protection against both homologous and heterologous influenza virus challenges. These results suggest that recombinant rAd/NP could be a universal vaccine candidate for mucosal administration against influenza virus. PMID:24086536

  9. Interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles as synthetic vaccines for potent humoral and cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, James J.; Suh, Heikyung; Bershteyn, Anna; Stephan, Matthias T.; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Bonnie; Sohail, Mashaal; Luo, Samantha; Ho Um, Soong; Khant, Htet; Goodwin, Jessica T.; Ramos, Jenelyn; Chiu, Wah; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2011-03-01

    Vaccines based on recombinant proteins avoid the toxicity and antivector immunity associated with live vaccine (for example, viral) vectors, but their immunogenicity is poor, particularly for CD8+ T-cell responses. Synthetic particles carrying antigens and adjuvant molecules have been developed to enhance subunit vaccines, but in general these materials have failed to elicit CD8+ T-cell responses comparable to those for live vectors in preclinical animal models. Here, we describe interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles formed by crosslinking headgroups of adjacent lipid bilayers within multilamellar vesicles. Interbilayer-crosslinked vesicles stably entrapped protein antigens in the vesicle core and lipid-based immunostimulatory molecules in the vesicle walls under extracellular conditions, but exhibited rapid release in the presence of endolysosomal lipases. We found that these antigen/adjuvant-carrying vesicles form an extremely potent whole-protein vaccine, eliciting endogenous T-cell and antibody responses comparable to those for the strongest vaccine vectors. These materials should enable a range of subunit vaccines and provide new possibilities for therapeutic protein delivery.

  10. Antitumor efficacy of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Wang, D.Q.; Maru, M.; Nakajima, K.; Kato, S.; Kurimura, T.; Wakamiya, N. )

    1990-11-01

    The antitumor efficacies of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccines were examined in murine syngeneic MH134 and X5563 tumor cells. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was inoculated i.p. into C3H/HeN mice that had received whole body X-irradiation at 150 rads. After 3 weeks, the vaccines were administered i.p. 3 times at weekly intervals. One week after the last injection, mice were challenged i.p. with various doses of syngeneic MH134 or X5563 viable tumor cells. Four methods were used for preparing tumor cell vaccines: X-ray irradiation; fixation with paraformaldehyde for 1 h or 3 months; and purification of the membrane fraction. All four vaccines were effective, but the former two vaccines were the most effective. A mixture of the membrane fraction of untreated tumor cells and UV-inactivated vaccinia virus also had an antitumor effect. These results indicate that vaccine with the complete cell structure is the most effective. The membrane fraction of UV-inactivated vaccinia virus-absorbed tumor cells was also effective. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus can react with not only intact tumor cells but also the purified membrane fraction of tumor cells and augment antitumor activity.

  11. Vaccination with vascular progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells elicits antitumor immunity targeting vascular and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ito, Masaki; Sagawa, Yukiko; Okamoto, Masato; Hayashi, Kazumi; Nagasaki, Eijiro; Kan, Shin; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Homma, Sadamu

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the lysate of induced vascular progenitor (iVP) cells derived from murine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells significantly suppressed the tumor of CMS-4 fibrosarcomas and prolonged the survival of CMS-4-inoculated mice. This prophylactic antitumor activity was more potent than that of immunization with DCs loaded with iPS cells or CMS-4 tumor cells. Tumors developed slowly in mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with iVP cells (DC/iVP) and exhibited a limited vascular bed. Immunohistochemistry and a tomato-lectin perfusion study demonstrated that the tumors that developed in the iVP-immunized mice showed a marked decrease in tumor vasculature. Immunization with DC/iVP induced a potent suppressive effect on vascular-rich CMS-4 tumors, a weaker effect on BNL tumors with moderate vasculature, and nearly no effect on C26 tumors with poor vasculature. Treatment of DC/iVP-immunized mice with a monoclonal antibody against CD4 or CD8, but not anti-asialo GM1, inhibited the antitumor activity. CD8(+) T cells from DC/iVP-vaccinated mice showed significant cytotoxic activity against murine endothelial cells and CMS-4 cells, whereas CD8(+) T cells from DC/iPS-vaccinated mice did not. DNA microarray analysis showed that the products of 29 vasculature-associated genes shared between genes upregulated by differentiation from iPS cells into iVP cells and genes shared by iVP cells and isolated Flk-1(+) vascular cells in CMS-4 tumor tissue might be possible targets in the immune response. These results suggest that iVP cells from iPS cells could be used as a cancer vaccine targeting tumor vascular cells and tumor cells. PMID:24627093

  12. Nanomaterials in the application of tumor vaccines: advantages and disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    Li, XD; Gao, JY; Yang, Y; Fang, HY; Han, YJ; Wang, XM; Ge, W

    2013-01-01

    Tumor vaccines are a novel approach to the treatment of malignancy, and are attracting the attention of the medical profession. Nanomaterials have significant advantages in the preparation of a tumor vaccine, including their ability to penetrate and target cancer tissue and their antigenic properties. In this review, we focus on several nanomaterials, ie, carbon nanotubes, nanoemulsions, nanosized aluminum, and nanochitosan. Applications for these nanomaterials in nanovaccines and their biological characteristics, as well as their potential toxicity, are discussed. PMID:23776336

  13. Intravaginal HPV DNA vaccination with electroporation induces local CD8+ T-cell immune responses and antitumor effects against cervicovaginal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y; Peng, S; Qiu, J; Miao, J; Yang, B; Jeang, J; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have the potential to inhibit the progression of an established HPV infection to precancer and cancer lesions by targeting HPV oncoproteins. We have previously developed a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to E7, CRT/E7 DNA vaccine, for use in the treatment of HPV-associated lesions. Since the transfection efficiency of DNA vaccines administered in vivo is typically low, we examined the use of electroporation as well as different routes of administration to enhance antigen-specific tumor control. We tested the effects of the CRT/E7 DNA vaccine administered intramuscularly or intravaginally, with or without electroporation, on the generation of CD8+ T-cell immunity and therapeutic antitumor effects in HPV16 E7-expressing cervicovaginal tumor-bearing mice. We found that intravaginal vaccination of CRT/E7 DNA followed by electroporation-induced potent E7-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the cervicovaginal tract, compared with intramuscular injection followed by electroporation. Furthermore, tumor-bearing mice vaccinated intravaginally followed by electroporation had an enhanced survival, antitumor effects and local production of IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells compared with those vaccinated intramuscularly with electroporation. Thus, we show that intravaginal CRT/E7 DNA vaccination followed by electroporation generates the most potent therapeutic antitumor effects against an orthotopic E7-expressing tumor model. The current study will have significant clinical implications once a clinically applicable electroporation device for intravaginal use becomes available. PMID:25786869

  14. Tumor endothelial marker 1–specific DNA vaccination targets tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Facciponte, John G.; Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Liping; Nair, Gautham; Sehgal, Sandy; Raj, Arjun; Matthaiou, Efthymia; Coukos, George; Facciabene, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1; also known as endosialin or CD248) is a protein found on tumor vasculature and in tumor stroma. Here, we tested whether TEM1 has potential as a therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy by immunizing immunocompetent mice with Tem1 cDNA fused to the minimal domain of the C fragment of tetanus toxoid (referred to herein as Tem1-TT vaccine). Tem1-TT vaccination elicited CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cell responses against immunodominant TEM1 protein sequences. Prophylactic immunization of animals with Tem1-TT prevented or delayed tumor formation in several murine tumor models. Therapeutic vaccination of tumor-bearing mice reduced tumor vascularity, increased infiltration of CD3+ T cells into the tumor, and controlled progression of established tumors. Tem1-TT vaccination also elicited CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses against murine tumor-specific antigens. Effective Tem1-TT vaccination did not affect angiogenesis-dependent physiological processes, including wound healing and reproduction. Based on these data and the widespread expression of TEM1 on the vasculature of different tumor types, we conclude that targeting TEM1 has therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24642465

  15. Selected anti-tumor vaccines merit a place in multimodal tumor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eva-Maria; Wunderlich, Roland; Ebel, Nina; Rubner, Yvonne; Schlücker, Eberhard; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland; Ott, Oliver J.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal approaches are nowadays successfully applied in cancer therapy. Primary locally acting therapies such as radiotherapy (RT) and surgery are combined with systemic administration of chemotherapeutics. Nevertheless, the therapy of cancer is still a big challenge in medicine. The treatments often fail to induce long-lasting anti-tumor responses. Tumor recurrences and metastases result. Immunotherapies are therefore ideal adjuncts to standard tumor therapies since they aim to activate the patient's immune system against malignant cells even outside the primary treatment areas (abscopal effects). Especially cancer vaccines may have the potential both to train the immune system against cancer cells and to generate an immunological memory, resulting in long-lasting anti-tumor effects. However, despite promising results in phase I and II studies, most of the concepts finally failed. There are some critical aspects in development and application of cancer vaccines that may decide on their efficiency. The time point and frequency of medication, usage of an adequate immune adjuvant, the vaccine's immunogenic potential, and the tumor burden of the patient are crucial. Whole tumor cell vaccines have advantages compared to peptide-based ones since a variety of tumor antigens (TAs) are present. The master requirements of cell-based, therapeutic tumor vaccines are the complete inactivation of the tumor cells and the increase of their immunogenicity. Since the latter is highly connected with the cell death modality, the inactivation procedure of the tumor cell material may significantly influence the vaccine's efficiency. We therefore also introduce high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an innovative inactivation technology for tumor cell-based vaccines and outline that HHP efficiently inactivates tumor cells by enhancing their immunogenicity. Finally studies are presented proving that anti-tumor immune responses can be triggered by combining RT with selected immune

  16. Immunotherapy of prostate cancer in the Dunning rat model: use of cytokine gene modified tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vieweg, J; Rosenthal, F M; Bannerji, R; Heston, W D; Fair, W R; Gansbacher, B; Gilboa, E

    1994-04-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common cancer in men. The majority of cancers are discovered once they have already metastasized, and there is no effective therapy for prostatic cancer at this stage. The use of cytokine-secreting tumor cell preparations as therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer was investigated in the Dunning rat R3327-MatLyLu prostatic tumor model. IL-2 secreting, irradiated, tumor cell preparations were capable of curing animals with s.c. established tumors, and induced immunological memory that protected animals from subsequent tumor challenge. Immunotherapy was less effective when tumors were induced orthotopically, but nevertheless led to improved outcome, significantly delaying, and occasionally preventing, recurrence of tumors after resection of the cancerous prostate. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor secreting tumor cell preparations were less effective, and interferon-gamma secreting cells had only a marginal effect. Induction of a potent immune response in tumor bearing animals against the nonimmunogenic MatLyLu tumor supports the view that active immunotherapy warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach to prostate cancer. PMID:8137291

  17. Early Potent Protection against Heterologous SIVsmE660 Challenge Following Live Attenuated SIV Vaccination in Mauritian Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Neil; Ham, Claire; Mee, Edward T.; Rose, Nicola J.; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Jenkins, Adrian; Page, Mark; Elsley, William; Robinson, Mark; Smith, Deborah; Ferguson, Deborah; Towers, Greg; Almond, Neil; Stebbings, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccines represent the most effective means of vaccinating macaques against pathogenic SIV challenge. However, thus far, protection has been demonstrated to be more effective against homologous than heterologous strains. Immune correlates of vaccine-induced protection have also been difficult to identify, particularly those measurable in the peripheral circulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe potent protection in 6 out of 8 Mauritian-derived cynomolgus macaques (MCM) against heterologous virus challenge with the pathogenic, uncloned SIVsmE660 viral stock following vaccination with live attenuated SIVmac251/C8. MCM provided a characterised host genetic background with limited Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and TRIM5α allelic diversity. Early protection, observed as soon as 3 weeks post-vaccination, was comparable to that of 20 weeks vaccination. Recrudescence of vaccine virus was most pronounced in breakthrough cases where simultaneous identification of vaccine and challenge viruses by virus-specific PCR was indicative of active co-infection. Persistence of the vaccine virus in a range of lymphoid tissues was typified by a consistent level of SIV RNA positive cells in protected vaccinates. However, no association between MHC class I /II haplotype or TRIM5α polymorphism and study outcome was identified. Conclusion/Significance This SIV vaccine study, conducted in MHC-characterised MCM, demonstrated potent protection against the pathogenic, heterologous SIVsmE660 challenge stock after only 3 weeks vaccination. This level of protection against this viral stock by intravenous challenge has not been hitherto observed. The mechanism(s) of protection by vaccination with live attenuated SIV must account for the heterologous and early protection data described in this study, including those which relate to the innate immune system. PMID:21853072

  18. Potent and tumor specific: arming bacteria with therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Van Dessel, Nele; Swofford, Charles A; Forbes, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are perfect vessels for targeted cancer therapy. Conventional chemotherapy is limited by passive diffusion, and systemic administration causes severe side effects. Bacteria can overcome these obstacles by delivering therapeutic proteins specifically to tumors. Bacteria have been modified to produce proteins that directly kill cells, induce apoptosis via signaling pathways, and stimulate the immune system. These three modes of bacterial treatment have all been shown to reduce tumor growth in animal models. Bacteria have also been designed to convert nontoxic prodrugs to active therapeutic compounds. The ease of genetic manipulation enables creation of arrays of bacteria that release many new protein drugs. This versatility will allow targeting of multiple cancer pathways and will establish a platform for individualized cancer medicine. PMID:25853312

  19. NKT cell adjuvant-based tumor vaccine for treatment of myc oncogene-driven mouse B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    West, Alison C.; Steegh, Kim; Duret, Helene; Paget, Christophe; Martin, Ben; Matthews, Geoffrey M.; Shortt, Jake; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Bots, Michael; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2012-01-01

    Immunomodulators are effective in controlling hematologic malignancy by initiating or reactivating host antitumor immunity to otherwise poorly immunogenic and immune suppressive cancers. We aimed to boost antitumor immunity in B-cell lymphoma by developing a tumor cell vaccine incorporating α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) that targets the immune adjuvant properties of NKT cells. In the Eμ-myc transgenic mouse model, single therapeutic vaccination of irradiated, α-GalCer–loaded autologous tumor cells was sufficient to significantly inhibit growth of established tumors and prolong survival. Vaccine-induced antilymphoma immunity required NKT cells, NK cells, and CD8 T cells, and early IL-12–dependent production of IFN-γ. CD4 T cells, gamma/delta T cells, and IL-18 were not critical. Vaccine treatment induced a large systemic spike of IFN-γ and transient peripheral expansion of both NKT cells and NK cells, the major sources of IFN-γ. Furthermore, this vaccine approach was assessed in several other hematopoietic tumor models and was also therapeutically effective against AML-ETO9a acute myeloid leukemia. Replacing α-GalCer with β-mannosylceramide resulted in prolonged protection against Eμ-myc lymphoma. Overall, our results demonstrate a potent immune adjuvant effect of NKT cell ligands in therapeutic anticancer vaccination against oncogene-driven lymphomas, and this work supports clinical investigation of NKT cell–based immunotherapy in patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:22932803

  20. Adjuvants for enhancing the immunogenicity of whole tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Kandalaft, Lana E; Coukos, George

    2011-01-01

    Whole tumor cell lysates can serve as excellent multivalent vaccines for priming tumor-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Whole cell vaccines can be prepared with hypochlorous acid oxidation, UVB-irradiation and repeat cycles of freeze and thaw. One major obstacle to successful immunotherapy is breaking self-tolerance to tumor antigens. Clinically approved adjuvants, including Montanide™ ISA-51 and 720, and keyhole-limpet proteins can be used to enhance tumor cell immunogenicity by stimulating both humoral and cellular anti-tumor responses. Other potential adjuvants, such as Toll-like receptor agonists (e.g., CpG, MPLA and PolyI:C), and cytokines (e.g., granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), have also been investigated. PMID:21557641

  1. Development of soluble inulin microparticles as a potent and safe vaccine adjuvant and delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Tummala, Hemachand

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the present study is to develop a potent and safe vaccine adjuvant that can also stabilize vaccine formulations during lyophilization and storage. Inulin is a safe plant polysaccharide, and in its water soluble isoform, it is known to stabilize protein formulations during storage. However, soluble inulins have never been shown to stimulate the immune system. In this study, for the first time, we showed that water soluble inulins could be developed into vaccine adjuvants by formulating as antigen encapsulated microparticles. A method was developed to prepare soluble inulin microparticles (sIMs) with high encapsulation efficiency (∼75%) and loading (∼75 μg/mg) of the antigen. When immunized in mice, sIMs have generated robust Th2-type antibody titers (IgG1: 500,000) compared to unadjuvanted antigens (IgG1: 17,500) or alum adjuvanted antigens (IgG1: 80,000). In vitro assays showed that a higher proportion of antigen presenting cells (APC's) have taken up the antigen when presented in sIMs versus in solution (99 % vs 22 %). In addition, the amount of antigen taken up per cell has also been enhanced by more than 25 times when antigen was presented in sIMs. Efficient uptake of the antigen by APCs through sIMS was attributed to the observed enhancement in the immune response by antigen loaded sIMs. The sIMs neither caused any granuloma/tissue damage at the injection site in mice nor were they toxic to the APC's in cell culture. In conclusion, the current study has developed a safe, soluble inulin based vaccine adjuvant and delivery system. PMID:23506468

  2. Nasal Vaccination Stimulates CD8+ T Cells for Potent Protection Against Mucosal Brucella melitensis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Beata; Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis remains a significant zoonotic threat worldwide. Humans and animals acquire infection via their oropharynx and upper respiratory tract following oral or aerosol exposure. After mucosal infection, brucellosis develops into a systemic disease. Mucosal vaccination could offer a viable alternative to conventional injection practices to deter disease. Using a nasal vaccination approach, the ΔznuA B. melitensis was found to confer potent protection against pulmonary Brucella challenge, and reduce colonization of spleens and lungs by more than 2500-fold, with more than 50% of vaccinated mice showing no detectable brucellae. Furthermore, tenfold more brucellae-specific, IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells than CD4+ T cells were induced in the spleen and respiratory lymph nodes. Evaluation of pulmonary and splenic CD8+ T cells from mice vaccinated with ΔznuA B. melitensis revealed that these expressed an activated effector memory (CD44hiCD62LloCCR7lo) T cells producing elevated levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin, and granzyme B. To assess the relative importance of these increased numbers of CD8+ T cells, CD8−/− mice were challenged with virulent B. melitensis, and they showed markedly increased bacterial loads in organs in contrast to similarly challenged CD4−/− mice. Only ΔznuA B. melitensis- and Rev-1-vaccinated CD4−/− and wild-type mice, not CD8−/− mice, were completely protected against Brucella challenge. Determination of cytokines responsible for conferring protection showed the relative importance of IFN-γ, but not IL-17. Unlike wild-type mice, IL-17 was greatly induced in IFN-γ−/− mice, but IL-17 could not substitute for IFN-γ’s protection, although an increase in brucellae dissemination was observed upon in vivo IL-17 neutralization. These results show that nasal ΔznuA B. melitensis vaccination represents an attractive means to stimulate systemic and mucosal immune protection via CD8+ T cell engagement. PMID:26752510

  3. Dendritic cell based immunotherapy using tumor stem cells mediates potent antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Amir; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Memarnejadian, Arash; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are demonstrated to be usually less sensitive to conventional methods of cancer therapies, resulting in tumor relapse. It is well-known that an ideal treatment would be able to selectively target and kill CSCs, so as to avoid the tumor reversion. The aim of our present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine against CSCs in a mouse model of malignant melanoma. C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) or CSC lysates were used as a vaccine. Immunization of mice with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs was able to induce a significant prophylactic effect by a higher increase in lifespan and obvious depression of tumor growth in tumor bearing mice. The mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with CSC-lysate were revealed to produce specific cytotoxic responses to CSCs. The proliferation assay and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4) secretion of mice vaccinated with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs also showed more favorable results, when compared to those receiving B16F10 lysate-pulsed DCs. These findings suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy of cancers. PMID:26803056

  4. Whole-cell cancer vaccination: from autologous to allogeneic tumor- and dendritic cell-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Pinedo, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    The field of tumor vaccination is currently undergoing a shift in focus, from individualized tailor-made vaccines to more generally applicable vaccine formulations. Although primarily predicated by financial and logistic considerations, stemming from a growing awareness that clinical development for wide-scale application can only be achieved through backing from major pharmaceutical companies, these new approaches are also supported by a growing knowledge of the intricacies and minutiae of antigen presentation and effector T-cell activation. Here, the development of whole-cell tumor and dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines from an individualized autologous set-up to a more widely applicable allogeneic approach will be discussed as reflected by translational studies carried out over the past two decades at our laboratories and clinics in the vrije universiteit medical center (VUmc) in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. PMID:18523771

  5. Coloring brain tumor with multi-potent micellar nanoscale drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kyuha; Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, EunSoo; Han, Eun Chun; Lee, Jungsul; Cha, Junghwa; Ku, Taeyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, Ji Ho; Choi, Chulhee

    2012-10-01

    Brain tumor, especially glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is one of the most malignant tumors, which not only demands perplexing treatment approaches but also requires potent and effective treatment modality to deal with recurrence of the tumor. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment which has been recommended as a third-level treatment. We are trying to investigate possibility of the PDT as an efficient adjuvant therapeutic modality for the treatment of brain tumor. Inhibition of tumor progression with photosensitizer was verified, in vitro. With micellar nanoscale drug delivery system, localization of the tumor was identified, in vivo, which is able to be referred as photodynamic diagnosis. With consequent results, we are suggesting photodynamic diagnosis and therapy is able to be performed simultaneously with our nanoscale drug delivery system.

  6. A Novel Potent Oral Series of VEGFR2 Inhibitors Abrogate Tumor Growth by Inhibiting Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bold, Guido; Schnell, Christian; Furet, Pascal; McSheehy, Paul; Brüggen, Josef; Mestan, Jürgen; Manley, Paul W; Drückes, Peter; Burglin, Marion; Dürler, Ursula; Loretan, Jacqueline; Reuter, Robert; Wartmann, Markus; Theuer, Andreas; Bauer-Probst, Beatrice; Martiny-Baron, Georg; Allegrini, Peter; Goepfert, Arnaud; Wood, Jeanette; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda

    2016-01-14

    This paper describes the identification of 6-(pyrimidin-4-yloxy)-naphthalene-1-carboxamides as a new class of potent and selective human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In biochemical and cellular assays, the compounds exhibit single-digit nanomolar potency toward VEGFR2. Compounds of this series show good exposure in rodents when dosed orally. They potently inhibit VEGF-driven angiogenesis in a chamber model and rodent tumor models at daily doses of less than 3 mg/kg by targeting the tumor vasculature as demonstrated by ELISA for TIE-2 in lysates or by immunohistochemical analysis. This novel series of compounds shows a potential for the treatment of solid tumors and other diseases where angiogenesis plays an important role. PMID:26629594

  7. Abscopal Regression of Antigen Disparate Tumors by Antigen Cascade After Systemic Tumor Vaccination in Combination with Local Tumor Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Hadley J.; Gameiro, Sofia R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Radiation is a primary modality in cancer treatment. Radiation can also reduce tumor growth outside the treatment field, often referred to as the abscopal effect. The mechanisms and therapeutic potential of the abscopal effect have not been fully elucidated. We evaluated the role of vaccination directed against a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) in the induction and amplification of radiation induced abscopal effects. Active-specific immunotherapy with a TAA-specific vaccine regimen was used to induce and potentiate T-cell responses against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with local irradiation of subcutaneous tumors. We examined the potential synergy of a poxvirus-based CEA vaccine regimen in CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice in combination with either external beam radiation or brachytherapy of local tumors. The induction of CD8+ T cells specific for multiple TAAs not encoded by the vaccine was observed after the combination therapy. In two tumor models, the antigen cascade responses induced by vaccine and local irradiation mediated the regression of antigen negative metastases at distal subcutaneous or pulmonary sites. Clinically, local control of the primary tumor is necessary and can sometimes prevent metastases; however, irradiation generally fails to control preexisting metastases. These studies suggest that by coupling tumor irradiation with immunotherapy, the abscopal effect can transcend from anecdotal observation to a defined mechanism that can be exploited for the treatment of systemic disease. PMID:22283603

  8. Xenogeneic human p53 DNA vaccination by electroporation breaks immune tolerance to control murine tumors expressing mouse p53.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Trieu, Janson; Lee, Sung Yong; He, Liangmei; Tsai, Ya-Chea; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2013-01-01

    The pivotal role of p53 as a tumor suppressor protein is illustrated by the fact that this protein is found mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. In most cases, mutations in p53 greatly increase the otherwise short half-life of this protein in normal tissue and cause it to accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumors. The overexpression of mutated p53 in tumor cells makes p53 a potentially desirable target for the development of cancer immunotherapy. However, p53 protein represents an endogenous tumor-associated antigen (TAA). Immunization against a self-antigen is challenging because an antigen-specific immune response likely generates only low affinity antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells. This represents a bottleneck of tumor immunotherapy when targeting endogenous TAAs expressed by tumors. The objective of the current study is to develop a safe cancer immunotherapy using a naked DNA vaccine. The vaccine employs a xenogeneic p53 gene to break immune tolerance resulting in a potent therapeutic antitumor effect against tumors expressing mutated p53. Our study assessed the therapeutic antitumor effect after immunization with DNA encoding human p53 (hp53) or mouse p53 (mp53). Mice immunized with xenogeneic full length hp53 DNA plasmid intramuscularly followed by electroporation were protected against challenge with murine colon cancer MC38 while those immunized with mp53 DNA were not. In a therapeutic model, established MC38 tumors were also well controlled by treatment with hp53 DNA therapy in tumor bearing mice compared to mp53 DNA. Mice vaccinated with hp53 DNA plasmid also exhibited an increase in mp53-specific CD8(+) T-cell precursors compared to vaccination with mp53 DNA. Antibody depletion experiments also demonstrated that CD8(+) T-cells play crucial roles in the antitumor effects. This study showed intramuscular vaccination with xenogeneic p53 DNA vaccine followed by electroporation is capable of inducing potent antitumor effects against tumors expressing mutated

  9. Costimulation as a platform for the development of vaccines: a peptide-based vaccine containing a novel form of 4-1BB ligand eradicates established tumors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajesh K; Elpek, Kutlu G; Yolcu, Esma S; Schabowsky, Rich-Henry; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Shirwan, Haval

    2009-05-15

    Vaccines represent an attractive treatment modality for the management of cancer primarily because of their specificity and generation of immunologic memory important for controlling recurrences. However, the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines may require formulations that not only generate effective immune responses but also overcome immune evasion mechanisms employed by progressing tumor. Costimulatory molecules play critical roles in modulating innate, adaptive, and regulatory immunity and have potential to serve as effective immunomodulatory components of therapeutic vaccines. In this study, we tested the function of a novel soluble form of 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) costimulatory molecule in modulating innate, adaptive, and regulatory immunity and assessed its therapeutic efficacy in the HPV-16 E7-expressing TC-1 cervical cancer and survivin-expressing 3LL lung carcinoma mouse models. Vaccination with 4-1BBL activated dendritic cells and enhanced antigen uptake, generated CD8(+) T-cell effector/memory responses, and endowed T effector cells refractory to suppression by CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells. Immunization with 4-1BBL in combination with an E7 peptide or survivin protein resulted in eradication of TC-1 and 3LL tumors, respectively. 4-1BBL was more effective than TLR agonists LPS, MPL, and CpG and an agonistic 4-1BB antibody as a component of E7 peptide-based therapeutic vaccine for the generation of immune responses and eradication of TC-1 established tumors in the absence of detectable toxicity. Therapeutic efficacy was associated with reversal of tumor-mediated nonresponsiveness/anergy as well as establishment of long-term CD8(+) T-cell memory. Potent pleiotropic immunomodulatory activities combined with lack of toxicity highlight the potential of 4-1BBL molecule as an effective component of therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:19435920

  10. Green synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extract of anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Devi, V.; Adavallan, K.; Saranya, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we have explored anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron) as a reducing agent for one pot size controlled green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) at ambient conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The prepared AuNPs showed surface Plasmon resonance centered at 549 nm with average particle size of 15±5 nm. Stable, spherical and triangular crystalline AuNPs with well-defined dimensions were synthesized using anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron). Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles is confirmed from the HR-TEM, SAED and SEM images, and XRD patterns. From the FTIR spectra it is found that the biomolecules are responsible for capping in gold nanoparticles.

  11. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  12. Characterization of Nonpathogenic, Live, Viral Vaccine Vectors Inducing Potent Cellular Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Publicover, Jean; Ramsburg, Elizabeth; Rose, John K.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental vaccines based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) expressing foreign viral proteins are protective in several animal disease models. Although these attenuated viruses are nonpathogenic in nonhuman primates when given by nasal, oral, or intramuscular routes, they are pathogenic in mice when given intranasally, and further vector attenuation may be required before human trials with VSV-based vectors can begin. Mutations truncating the VSV glycoprotein (G) cytoplasmic domain from 29 to 9 or 1 amino acid (designated CT9 or CT1, respectively) were shown previously to attenuate VSV growth in cell culture and pathogenesis in mice. Here we show that VSV recombinants carrying either the CT1 or CT9 deletion and expressing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Env protein are nonpathogenic in mice, even when given by the intranasal route. We then carried out a detailed analysis of the CD8+ T-cell responses, including in vivo cytotoxic T-cell activity, induced by these vectors. When given by either the intranasal or intraperitoneal route, the VSV-CT9 vector expressing HIV Env elicited primary and memory CD8+ T-cell responses to Env equivalent to those elicited by recombinant wild-type VSV expressing Env. The VSV-CT1 vector also induced potent CD8+ T-cell responses after intraperitoneal vaccination, but was less effective when given by the intranasal route. The VSV-CT1 vector was also substantially less effective than the VSV-CT9 or wild-type vector at inducing antibody to Env. The VSV-CT9 vector appears ideal because of its lack of pathogenesis, propagation to high titers in vitro, and stimulation of strong cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:15308726

  13. A multi-antigen vaccine in combination with an immunotoxin targeting tumor-associated fibroblast for treating murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jinxu; Hu, Biliang; Li, Si; Zhang, Chupei; Liu, Yarong; Wang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutically effective cancer vaccine must generate potent antitumor immune responses and be able to overcome tolerance mechanisms mediated by the progressing tumor itself. Previous studies showed that glycoprotein 100 (gp100), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1), and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) are promising immunogens for melanoma immunotherapy. In this study, we administered these three melanoma-associated antigens via lentiviral vectors (termed LV-3Ag) and found that this multi-antigen vaccine strategy markedly increased functional T-cell infiltration into tumors and generated protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity. We also engineered a novel immunotoxin, αFAP-PE38, capable of targeting fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing fibroblasts within the tumor stroma. When combined with αFAP-PE38, LV-3Ag exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor effects on tumor growth in an established B16 melanoma model. The mechanism of action underlying this combination treatment likely modulates the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment and, consequently, activates cytotoxic CD8+ T cells capable of specifically recognizing and destroying tumor cells. Taken together, these results provide a strong rationale for combining an immunotoxin with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. PMID:27119119

  14. Targeting tumors with nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii uracil auxotroph vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Sanders, Kiah L; Chen, Shan; Bzik, David J

    2013-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that has evolved to actively control its invaded host cells. Toxoplasma triggers then actively regulates host innate interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses that elicit T cell control of infection. A live, nonreplicating avirulent uracil auxotroph vaccine strain (cps) of Toxoplasma triggers novel innate immune responses that stimulate amplified CD8(+) T cell responses and life-long immunity in vaccinated mice. Here, we review recent reports showing that intratumoral treatment with cps activated immune-mediated regression of established solid tumors in mice. We speculate that a better understanding of host-parasite interaction at the molecular level and applying improved genetic models based on Δku80 Toxoplasma strains will stimulate development of highly effective immunotherapeutic cancer vaccine strategies using engineered uracil auxotrophs. PMID:23928100

  15. Targeting tumors with nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii uracil auxotroph vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Sanders, Kiah L.; Chen, Shan; Bzik, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that has evolved to actively control its invaded host cells. Toxoplasma triggers then actively regulates host innate IL-12 and interferon-γ responses that elicit T cell control of infection. A live, nonreplicating avirulent uracil auxotroph vaccine strain (cps) of Toxoplasma triggers novel innate immune responses that stimulate amplified CD8+ T cell responses and life-long immunity in vaccinated mice. Here, we review recent reports showing that intratumoral treatment with cps activated immune-mediated regression of established solid tumors in mice. We speculate that a better understanding of host-parasite interaction at the molecular level and applying improved genetic models based on Δku80 Toxoplasma strains will stimulate development of highly effective immunotherapeutic cancer vaccine strategies using engineered uracil auxotrophs. PMID:23928100

  16. A Potent Gelatinase Inhibitor with Anti-Tumor-Invasive Activity and its Metabolic Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mijoon; Celenza, Giuseppe; Boggess, Bill; Blase, Jennifer; Shi, Qicun; Toth, Marta; Bernardo, M. Margarida; Wolter, William R.; Suckow, Mark A.; Hesek, Dusan; Noll, Bruce C.; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic tumors lead to more than 90% fatality. Despite the importance of invasiveness of tumors to poor disease outcome, no anti-invasive compounds have been commercialized. We describe herein the synthesis and evaluation of 4-(4-(thiiranylmethylsulfonyl)phenoxy)-phenyl methane-sulfonate (compound 2) as a potent and selective inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9), two enzymes implicated in invasiveness of tumors. It was demonstrated that compound 2 significantly attenuated the invasiveness of human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080). The metabolism of compound 2 involved hydroxylation at the a-methylene, which generates sulfinic acid, thiirane ring-opening, followed by methylation and oxidation, and cysteine conjugation of both the thiirane and phenyl rings. PMID:19207421

  17. Integrin-Targeting Knottin Peptide-Drug Conjugates Are Potent Inhibitors of Tumor Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nick; Kintzing, James R; Smith, Mark; Grant, Gerald A; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-08-16

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) offer increased efficacy and reduced toxicity compared to systemic chemotherapy. Less attention has been paid to peptide-drug delivery, which has the potential for increased tumor penetration and facile synthesis. We report a knottin peptide-drug conjugate (KDC) and demonstrate that it can selectively deliver gemcitabine to malignant cells expressing tumor-associated integrins. This KDC binds to tumor cells with low-nanomolar affinity, is internalized by an integrin-mediated process, releases its payload intracellularly, and is a highly potent inhibitor of brain, breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Notably, these features enable this KDC to bypass a gemcitabine-resistance mechanism found in pancreatic cancer cells. This work expands the therapeutic relevance of knottin peptides to include targeted drug delivery, and further motivates efforts to expand the drug-conjugate toolkit to include non-antibody protein scaffolds. PMID:27304709

  18. Optimized tumor cryptic peptides: the basis for universal neo-antigen-like tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Menez-Jamet, Jeanne; Gallou, Catherine; Rougeot, Aude; Kosmatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-07-01

    The very impressive clinical results recently obtained in cancer patients treated with immune response checkpoint inhibitors boosted the interest in immunotherapy as a therapeutic choice in cancer treatment. However, these inhibitors require a pre-existing tumor specific immune response and the presence of tumor infiltrating T cells to be efficient. This immune response can be triggered by cancer vaccines. One of the main issues in tumor vaccination is the choice of the right antigen to target. All vaccines tested to date targeted tumor associated antigens (TAA) that are self-antigens and failed to show a clinical efficacy because of the immune self-tolerance to TAA. A new class of tumor antigens has recently been described, the neo-antigens that are created by point mutations of tumor expressing proteins and are recognized by the immune system as non-self. Neo-antigens exhibit two main properties: they are not involved in the immune self-tolerance process and are immunogenic. However, the majority of the neo-antigens are patient specific and their use as cancer vaccines requires their previous identification in each patient individualy that can be done only in highly specialized research centers. It is therefore evident that neo-antigens cannot be used for patient vaccination worldwide. This raises the question of whether we can find neo-antigen like vaccines, which would not be patient specific. In this review we show that optimized cryptic peptides from TAA are neo-antigen like peptides. Optimized cryptic peptides are recognized by the immune system as non-self because they target self-cryptic peptides that escape self-tolerance; in addition they are strongly immunogenic because their sequence is modified in order to enhance their affinity for the HLA molecule. The first vaccine based on the optimized cryptic peptide approach, Vx-001, which targets the widely expressed tumor antigen telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), has completed a large phase I clinical

  19. Optimized tumor cryptic peptides: the basis for universal neo-antigen-like tumor vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Menez-Jamet, Jeanne; Gallou, Catherine; Rougeot, Aude

    2016-01-01

    The very impressive clinical results recently obtained in cancer patients treated with immune response checkpoint inhibitors boosted the interest in immunotherapy as a therapeutic choice in cancer treatment. However, these inhibitors require a pre-existing tumor specific immune response and the presence of tumor infiltrating T cells to be efficient. This immune response can be triggered by cancer vaccines. One of the main issues in tumor vaccination is the choice of the right antigen to target. All vaccines tested to date targeted tumor associated antigens (TAA) that are self-antigens and failed to show a clinical efficacy because of the immune self-tolerance to TAA. A new class of tumor antigens has recently been described, the neo-antigens that are created by point mutations of tumor expressing proteins and are recognized by the immune system as non-self. Neo-antigens exhibit two main properties: they are not involved in the immune self-tolerance process and are immunogenic. However, the majority of the neo-antigens are patient specific and their use as cancer vaccines requires their previous identification in each patient individualy that can be done only in highly specialized research centers. It is therefore evident that neo-antigens cannot be used for patient vaccination worldwide. This raises the question of whether we can find neo-antigen like vaccines, which would not be patient specific. In this review we show that optimized cryptic peptides from TAA are neo-antigen like peptides. Optimized cryptic peptides are recognized by the immune system as non-self because they target self-cryptic peptides that escape self-tolerance; in addition they are strongly immunogenic because their sequence is modified in order to enhance their affinity for the HLA molecule. The first vaccine based on the optimized cryptic peptide approach, Vx-001, which targets the widely expressed tumor antigen telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), has completed a large phase I clinical

  20. Systemic Administration of Interleukin 2 Enhances the Therapeutic Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Based Tumor Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, K.; Fields, R. C.; Giedlin, M.; Mule, J. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have reported previously that murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with whole tumor lysates can mediate potent antitumor immune responses both in vitro and in vivo. Because successful therapy was dependent on host immune T cells, we have now evaluated whether the systemic administration of the T cell stimulatory/growth promoting cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) could enhance tumor lysate-pulsed DC-based immunizations to further promote protective immunity toward, and therapeutic rejection of, syngeneic murine tumors. In three separate approaches using a weakly immunogenic sarcoma (MCA-207), the systemic administration of non-toxic doses of recombinant IL-2 (20,000 and 40,000 IU/dose) was capable of mediating significant increases in the potency of DC-based immunizations. IL-2 could augment the efficacy of tumor lysate-pulsed DC to induce protective immunity to lethal tumor challenge as well as enhance splenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and interferon-γ production in these treated mice. Moreover, treatment with the combination of tumor lysate-pulsed DC and IL-2 could also mediate regressions of established pulmonary 3-day micrometastases and 7-day macrometastases as well as established 14- and 28-day s.c. tumors, leading to either significant cure rates or prolongation in overall survival. Collectively, these findings show that nontoxic doses of recombinant IL-2 can potentiate the antitumor effects of tumor lysate-pulsed DC in vivo and provide preclinical rationale for the use of IL-2 in DC-based vaccine strategies in patients with advanced cancer.

  1. Control of HPV-associated tumors by innovative therapeutic HPV DNA vaccine in the absence of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are particularly problematic for HIV + and solid organ transplant patients with compromised CD4+ T cell-dependent immunity as they produce more severe and progressive disease compared to healthy individuals. There are no specific treatments for chronic HPV infection, resulting in an urgent unmet need for a modality that is safe and effective for both immunocompromised and otherwise normal patients with recalcitrant disease. DNA vaccination is attractive because it avoids the risks of administration of live vectors to immunocompromised patients, and can induce potent HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. We have developed a DNA vaccine (pNGVL4a-hCRTE6E7L2) encoding calreticulin (CRT) fused to E6, E7 and L2 proteins of HPV-16, the genotype associated with approximately 90% vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile and oropharyngeal HPV-associated cancers and the majority of cervical cancers. Administration of the DNA vaccine by intramuscular (IM) injection followed by electroporation induced significantly greater HPV-specific immune responses compared to IM injection alone or mixed with alum. Furthermore, pNGVL4a-hCRTE6E7L2 DNA vaccination via electroporation of mice carrying an intravaginal HPV-16 E6/E7-expressing syngeneic tumor demonstrated more potent therapeutic effects than IM vaccination alone. Of note, administration of the DNA vaccine by IM injection followed by electroporation elicited potent E6 and E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses and antitumor effects despite CD4+ T cell-depletion, although no antibody response was detected. While CD4+ T cell-depletion did reduce the E6 and E7-specific CD8+ T cell response, it remained sufficient to prevent subcutaneous tumor growth and to eliminate circulating tumor cells in a model of metastatic HPV-16+ cancer. Thus, the antibody response was CD4-dependent, whereas CD4+ T cell help enhanced the E6/E7-specific CD8+ T cell immunity, but was not required. Taken together, our data suggest that

  2. Ineffective Vaccination Against Solid Tumors Can Be Enhanced by Hematopoetic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Müller, Antonia M. S.; Tseng, William Wei-Lin; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Winer, Daniel; Luong, Richard; Shizuru, Judith A.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Vaccination with tumor antigens has not been an effective treatment for solid tumors. The goal of the current study was to determine whether a combination of vaccination and hematopoetic cell transplantation (HCT) can effectively treat primary, disseminated or metastatic CT26 and MC38 murine colon tumors. Vaccination of tumor bearing mice with irradiated tumor cells and CpG adjuvant failed to alter progressive tumor growth. However, mice bearing primary, disseminated lung or metastatic liver tumors were uniformly cured after administration total body irradiation (TBI) followed by the transplantation of hematopoetic progenitor cells and T cells from syngeneic but not allogeneic vaccinated donors. Requirements for effective treatment of tumors included irradiation of hosts, vaccination of donors with both tumor cells and CpG, transfer of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells along with progenitor cells, and ability of donor cells to produce IFN-γ. Irradiation markedly increased the infiltration of donor T cells into the tumors, and the combined irradiation and HCT altered the balance of tumor infiltrating cells to favor CD8+ effector memory T cells as compared to CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells. The combination of vaccination and autologous hematopoetic cell transplantation was also effective in treating tumors. In conclusion, these findings show that otherwise ineffective vaccination to solid non-hematologic tumors can be dramatically enhanced by HCT. PMID:19890041

  3. Alarmin IL-33 acts as an immunoadjuvant for enhancing antigen-specific cell-mediated immunity resulting in potent anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O.; Wise, Megan C.; Walters, Jewell N.; Reuschel, Emma; Choi, Min Joung; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 33 (IL-33) has emerged as a cytokine that can exhibit pleiotropic properties. Here we examine IL-33 for its immunoadjuvant effects in an HPV-associated cancer immune therapy model in which cell-mediated immunity is critical for protection. It is known that two biologically active forms of IL-33 exist: full-length IL-33 and mature IL-33. The potential ability of both isoforms to act as vaccine adjuvants to influence the CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell immune responses has not been well defined. We show that both isoforms of IL-33 are capable of enhancing potent antigen (Ag)-specific effector and memory T cell immunity in vivo in a DNA vaccine setting. We also show that while both forms of IL-33 drove robust IFN-γ responses, neither form drove high secretion of IL-4 or any elevation of IgE levels. Moreover, both isoforms augmented vaccine-induced Ag-specific polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, with a large proportion of CD8+ T cells undergoing cytolytic plurifunctional degranulation. Therapeutic studies indicated that established TC-1-bearing mice undergo rapid and complete regression after therapeutic vaccination with both IL-33 adjuvant isoforms used in conjunction with an HPV DNA vaccine. Furthermore, using the P14 transgenic mouse model, we show that IL-33 can significantly expand the magnitude of Ag-specific CD8+ T cell responses and elicit bonafide effector-memory CD8+ T cells. Overall, the data suggests the potential use of these two IL-33 isoforms as immunoadjuvant candidates in future vaccination against other pathogens and in the context of anti-tumor immune-based therapy. PMID:24448242

  4. Dimers of Melampomagnolide B Exhibit Potent Anticancer Activity against Hematological and Solid Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Janganati, Venumadhav; Ponder, Jessica; Jordan, Craig T; Borrelli, Michael J; Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Crooks, Peter A

    2015-11-25

    Novel carbamate (7a-7h) and carbonate (7i, 7j, and 8) dimers of melampomagnolide B have been synthesized by reaction of the melampomagnolide-B-triazole carbamate synthon 6 with various terminal diamino- and dihydroxyalkanes. Dimeric carbamate products 7b, 7c, and 7f exhibited potent growth inhibition (GI50 = 0.16-0.99 μM) against the majority of cell lines in the NCI panel of 60 human hematological and solid tumor cell lines. Compound 7f and 8 exhibited anticancer activity that was 300-fold and 1 × 10(6)-fold more cytotoxic than DMAPT, respectively, at a concentration of 10 μM against rat 9L-SF gliosarcoma cells. Compounds 7a-7j and 8 were also screened against M9-ENL1 and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) primary cell lines and exhibited 2- to 10-fold more potent antileukemic activity against M9-ENL1 cells (EC50 = 0.57-2.90 μM) when compared to parthenolide (EC50 = 6.0) and showed potent antileukemic activity against five primary AML cell lines (EC50 = 0.76-7.3 μM). PMID:26540463

  5. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  6. PD-1 and Tim-3 regulate the expansion of tumor antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells induced by melanoma vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Pagliano, Ornella; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Sander, Cindy; Janjic, Bratislav; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Tawbi, Hussein A; Kirkwood, John M; Moschos, Stergios; Wang, Hong; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel F; Krieg, Arthur; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Zarour, Hassane M

    2014-02-15

    Although melanoma vaccines stimulate tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, objective clinical responses are rarely observed. To investigate this discrepancy, we evaluated the character of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells with regard to the inhibitory T-cell coreceptors PD-1 and Tim-3 in patients with metastatic melanoma who were administered tumor vaccines. The vaccines included incomplete Freund's adjuvant, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG), and the HLA-A2-restricted analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V, either by itself or in combination with the pan-DR epitope NY-ESO-1 119-143. Both vaccines stimulated rapid tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses detected ex vivo, however, tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells produced more IFN-γ and exhibited higher lytic function upon immunization with MHC class I and class II epitopes. Notably, the vast majority of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells upregulated PD-1 and a minority also upregulated Tim-3. Levels of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression by vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells at the time of vaccine administration correlated inversely with their expansion in vivo. Dual blockade of PD-1 and Tim-3 enhanced the expansion and cytokine production of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, our findings support the use of PD-1 and Tim-3 blockades with cancer vaccines to stimulate potent antitumor T-cell responses and increase the likelihood of clinical responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:24343228

  7. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A.; Britt, William J.; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. IMPORTANCE As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based

  8. The reprogramming of tumor stroma by HSF1 is a potent enabler of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Scherz-Shouval, Ruth; Santagata, Sandro; Mendillo, Marc L.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Ben-Aharon, Irit; Beck, Andrew H.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Koeva, Martina; Stemmer, Salomon M.; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment are essential for tumor progression and metastasis. Surprisingly little is known about the factors that drive the transcriptional reprogramming of stromal cells within tumors. We report that the transcriptional regulator Heat-Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) is frequently activated in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), where it is a potent enabler of malignancy. HSF1 drives a transcriptional program in CAFs that complements, yet is completely different from, the program it drives in adjacent cancer cells. This CAF program is uniquely structured to support the malignant potential of cancer cells in a non-cell-autonomous way. Two central stromal signaling molecules—TGFβ and stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF1) – play a critical role. In early stage breast and lung cancer, high stromal HSF1 activation is strongly associated with poor patient outcome. Thus, tumors co-opt the ancient survival functions of HSF1 to orchestrate malignancy in both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous ways, with far-reaching therapeutic implications. PMID:25083868

  9. Transarterial oily chemoembolization with lidamycin shows potent therapeutic efficacy in VX2 rabbit liver tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Genshen; Qi, Jinsong; Huo, Shuhua; Xue, Huichao; Xu, Zhishan; Li, Jinsong; Zhou, Yanjun; Wu, Minna; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Transarterial oily chemoembolization (TOCE) is one of the most effective approaches for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), who are not suitable for surgical therapy. Lidamycin (LDM), a potent antitumor antibiotic, demonstrates good antitumor efficacy in various tumor types, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the antitumor efficacy of LDM combined with TOCE against the rabbit VX2 tumor was assessed. A toxicity assay with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) demonstrated that a combination of LDM with lipiodol did not impair the cytotoxicity of LDM against HepG2 cells in vitro. Using TOCE in rabbit VX2 tumor models, LDM showed a more powerful inhibitory effect against the tumor and lowered the expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) compared to Adriamycin (ADM); moreover, this improvement was not accompanied by an increase of hepatotoxicity as shown by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels. These results suggested that LDM combined with TOCE may be a feasible strategy in HCC therapy in the future. PMID:26543376

  10. Discovery of the First Potent Inhibitors of Mutant IDH1 That Lower Tumor 2-HG in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of a series of R132H IDH1 inhibitors from a high throughput screen led to the first potent molecules that show robust tumor 2-HG inhibition in a xenograft model. Compound 35 shows good potency in the U87 R132H cell based assay and ∼90% tumor 2-HG inhibition in the corresponding mouse xenograft model following BID dosing. The magnitude and duration of tumor 2-HG inhibition correlates with free plasma concentration. PMID:24900389

  11. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P.; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases. arginase | immunosuppression | myeloid cells | nitric oxide | immunotherapy

  12. In Situ Tumor Vaccination by Combining Local Radiation and Tumor-Specific Antibody or Immunocytokine Treatments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Zachary S; Guy, Emily I; Francis, David M; Gressett, Monica M; Werner, Lauryn R; Carmichael, Lakeesha L; Yang, Richard K; Armstrong, Eric A; Huang, Shyhmin; Navid, Fariba; Gillies, Stephen D; Korman, Alan; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Harari, Paul M; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    Interest in combining radiotherapy and immune checkpoint therapy is growing rapidly. In this study, we explored a novel combination of this type to augment antitumor immune responses in preclinical murine models of melanoma, neuroblastoma, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Cooperative effects were observed with local radiotherapy and intratumoral injection of tumor-specific antibodies, arising in part from enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We could improve this response by combining radiation with intratumoral injection of an IL2-linked tumor-specific antibody (termed here an immunocytokine), resulting in complete regression of established tumors in most animals associated with a tumor-specific memory T-cell response. Given the T-cell response elicited by combined local radiation and intratumoral immunocytokine, we tested the potential benefit of adding this treatment to immune checkpoint blockade. In mice bearing large primary tumors or disseminated metastases, the triple-combination of intratumoral immunocytokine, radiation, and systemic anti-CTLA-4 improved primary tumor response and animal survival compared with combinations of any two of these three interventions. Taken together, our results show how combining radiation and intratumoral immunocytokine in murine tumor models can eradicate large tumors and metastases, eliciting an in situ vaccination effect that can be leveraged further by T-cell checkpoint blockade, with immediate implications for clinical evaluation. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3929-41. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197149

  13. Murine responses to recombinant MVA versus ALVAC vaccines against tumor-associated antigens, gp100 and 5T4.

    PubMed

    Hanwell, David G; McNeil, Bryan; Visan, Lucian; Rodrigues, Lauren; Dunn, Pamela; Shewen, Patricia E; Macallum, Grace E; Turner, Patricia V; Vogel, Thorsten U

    2013-05-01

    Virally vectored cancer vaccines comprise a new form of immunotherapy that aim to generate anti-tumor immune responses with potential for tumor clearance and enhanced patient survival. Here, we compared 2 replication-deficient poxviruses modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and ALVAC(2) in their ability to induce antigen expression and immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) 5T4 and gp100. To facilitate the comparison, recombinant MVA-gp100M and ALVAC(2)-5T4 were constructed to complement existing ALVAC(2)-gp100M and MVA-5T4 vectors. Recombinant TAA expression in chicken embryo fibroblast cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. 5T4 expression was approximately equal for both viruses, whereas ALVAC-derived gp100 was quickly degraded, at a time point when MVA-derived gp100 was still stable and expressed at high levels. Human leukocyte antigen-A2 transgenic mice were vaccinated with recombinant viruses and the CD8 T-cell responses elicited against each TAA were monitored by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot. No 5T4 peptide responses were detected using splenocytes from mice vaccinated with either vector, whereas vaccination with MVA elicited a significantly higher gp100-specific response than ALVAC(2) at 10 PFU (P<0.001). In CD-1 mice, each vector elicited similar 5T4 antibody responses, whereas MVA was more potent and induced gp100 antibody responses at a lower immunization dose than ALVAC (P<0.001). In this study, immunogenicity varied depending on the viral vector used and reflected vector-associated differences in in vitro TAA expression and stability. These findings suggest that novel vector-transgene combinations must be assessed individually when designing vaccines, and that stability of vector-encoded proteins produced in vitro may be useful as a predictor for in vitro immunogenicity. PMID:23603858

  14. Antitumor cell-complex vaccines employing genetically modified tumor cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F

    2014-02-01

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells. PMID:24556729

  15. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells. PMID:24556729

  16. Design of universal cancer vaccines using natural tumor vessel-specific antigens (SANTAVAC)

    PubMed Central

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against endothelial cells (ECs) lining the tumor vasculature represents one of the most attractive potential cancer immunotherapy options due to its ability to prevent solid tumor growth. Using this approach, target antigens can be derived from ECs and used to develop a universal cancer vaccine. Unfortunately, direct immunization with EC preparations can elicit autoimmune vasculitis in normal tissues. Recently, tumor-induced changes to the human EC surface were described that provided a basis for designing efficient EC-based vaccines capable of eliciting immune responses that targeted the tumor endothelium directly. This review examines these data from the perspective of designing EC-based cancer vaccines for the treatment of all solid tumors, including the antigen composition of vaccine formulations, the selection ECs for antigen derivation, the production and control of antigens, and the method for estimating vaccine efficacy and safety. As the vaccine preparation requires a specifically derived set of natural cell surface antigens, a new vaccine preparation concept was formulated. Antigen compositions prepared according to this concept were named SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer). PMID:25714389

  17. Dimers of melampomagnolide B exhibit potent anticancer activity against hematological and solid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Janganati, Venumadhav; Ponder, Jessica; Jordan, Craig T.; Borrelli, Michael J.; Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Crooks, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel carbamate and carbonate dimers of melampomagnolide B (MMB) have been synthesized by reaction of the MMB-triazole carbamate synthon 6 with various terminal diamino and dihydroxy alkanes. The resulting dimeric products 7b, 7c and 7f were selected and evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human hematological and solid tumor cell lines. The most active compounds, 7b, 7c and 7f, exhibited GI50 values in the range 250-780 nM against the majority of leukemia cell lines in the tumor cell panel. Specifically, compounds 7b and 7f exhibited potent growth inhibition against non-small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H522 (GI50 = 160 nM) and HOP-92 (GI50 = 170 nM), respectively. Also, compound 7f also potently inhibited the growth of melanoma cell lines LOX IMVI, MALME-3M, and UACC-62 (GI50 values = 170, 190 and 190 nM, respectively); breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 (GI50 = 190 nM); colon cancer cell line HCT-116 (GI50 = 190 nM); and renal cancer cell line RXF 393 (GI50 = 160 nM). Compound 7f and the simple dicarbonate dimer of MMB (8) showed anticancer activity 300-fold and 1 × 106-fold, respectively, more cytotoxic than 7f and DMAPT at a concentration of 10 μM against rat 9L-SF gliosarcoma cells. The dimeric compounds 7a-7j & 8 were also screened for antileukemic activity against M9-ENL1 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and primary AML cell specimens. These compounds exhibited two to twelve-fold more potent antileukemic activity (EC50 = 0.5-2.9 μM) against the M9-ENL1 cell line when compared to parthenolide (EC50 = 6.0 μM). The dimeric analogues were also active against the primary AML cell specimens in the nanomolar to lower micromolar range and exhibited two to ten-fold more potent antileukemic activity (EC50 = 0.86-4.2 μM) when compared to parthenolide (EC50 = 2.5-16 μM). Thus, dimer 7f exhibited promising anticancer activity against a variety of both hematological and solid human tumor cell lines, while dimer 8 was

  18. Prospective immunotherapies in childhood sarcomas: PD1/PDL1 blockade in combination with tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Theodore S; Anderson, Jennifer L; Federman, Noah

    2016-03-01

    Progress has slowed substantially in improving survival rates for pediatric sarcomas, particularly in refractory and metastatic disease. Significant progress has been made in the field of tumor vaccines for such malignancies, which target established tumor antigens. While tumor vaccines have demonstrated safety and improved survival rates, they are inadequate in mediating the regression of established tumor masses and metastases. Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) is a cell-surface protein induced in a number of adult malignancies. By acting on the corresponding T-cell receptor PD1, PDL1 is able to suppress cytotoxic T-cell-mediated tumor responses. Recent therapeutics blocking this interaction have shown promise in various adult cancers by restoring a functional T-cell response and by directing this response toward an activated, rather than regulatory, T-cell phenotype. We shall discuss the current state of tumor vaccines targeting pediatric sarcomas, review PD1-PDL1 interactions and current therapies targeting these interactions in adult malignancies, and discuss recent studies in which tumor vaccines, combined with PDL1 blockades, produced superior tumor regression compared with the vaccine alone. These studies provide a compelling case for investigation of PDL1 expression and its inhibition in pediatric sarcomas, while continuing to utilize tumor vaccines in tandem to achieve superior clinical outcomes. PMID:26595537

  19. Cancer anti-angiogenesis vaccines: Is the tumor vasculature antigenically unique?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Ichim, Thomas E; Ma, Hong; Szymanski, Julia; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Bogin, Vladimir; Patel, Amit N; Marincola, Francisco M; Kesari, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for the growth and metastasis of solid tumors. The tumor endothelium exists in a state of chronic activation and proliferation, fueled by the tumor milieu where angiogenic mediators are aberrantly over-expressed. Uncontrolled tumor growth, immune evasion, and therapeutic resistance are all driven by the dysregulated and constitutive angiogenesis occurring in the vasculature. Accordingly, great efforts have been dedicated toward identifying molecular signatures of this pathological angiogenesis in order to devise selective tumor endothelium targeting therapies while minimizing potential autoimmunity against physiologically normal endothelium. Vaccination with angiogenic antigens to generate cellular and/or humoral immunity against the tumor endothelium has proven to be a promising strategy for inhibiting or normalizing tumor angiogenesis and reducing cancer growth. Here we review tumor endothelium vaccines developed to date including active immunization strategies using specific tumor endothelium-associated antigens and whole endothelial cell-based vaccines designed to elicit immune responses against diverse target antigens. Among the novel therapeutic options, we describe a placenta-derived endothelial cell vaccine, ValloVax™, a polyvalent vaccine that is antigenically similar to proliferating tumor endothelium and is supported by pre-clinical studies to be safe and efficacious against several tumor types. PMID:26510973

  20. Potent anti-tumor effects of EGFR-targeted hybrid peptide on mice bearing liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Gaowa, Arong; Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide for the treatment of liver metastasis from colon carcinoma. The cytotoxic activity of the hybrid peptide against luciferase-expressing human colon cancer (HCT-116-luc) cells was determined by the WST-8 assay. The experimental mouse model of liver metastases was generated by splenic injection of HCT-116-luc cells. The hybrid peptide was intravenously injected into mice the day after cell implantation at a dose of 5 mg/kg and this was repeated on alternate days for a total of 7 doses. Saline-treated mice were used as controls. Tumor growth and therapeutic responses were monitored by an IVIS imaging system. It was shown that the hybrid peptide exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against HCT-116-luc cells and the liver metastases were significantly reduced after intravenous injections of hybrid peptide compared with controls. Furthermore, Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that hybrid peptide-treated mice had significantly longer survival than controls. In addition, bright-field and ex vivo imaging of liver tissue revealed that mice treated with the hybrid peptide had significantly fewer tumors compared with controls. These results demonstrated that the EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide is a potential treatment option for patients with colorectal cancer metastases in the liver. PMID:26467564

  1. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  2. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  3. CIS is a potent checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Delconte, Rebecca B; Kolesnik, Tatiana B; Dagley, Laura F; Rautela, Jai; Shi, Wei; Putz, Eva M; Stannard, Kimberley; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Teh, Charis; Firth, Matt; Ushiki, Takashi; Andoniou, Christopher E; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Sharp, Phillip P; Sanvitale, Caroline E; Infusini, Giuseppe; Liau, Nicholas P D; Linossi, Edmond M; Burns, Christopher J; Carotta, Sebastian; Gray, Daniel H D; Seillet, Cyril; Hutchinson, Dana S; Belz, Gabrielle T; Webb, Andrew I; Alexander, Warren S; Li, Shawn S; Bullock, Alex N; Babon, Jeffery J; Smyth, Mark J; Nicholson, Sandra E; Huntington, Nicholas D

    2016-07-01

    The detection of aberrant cells by natural killer (NK) cells is controlled by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory ligands and from cytokines such as IL-15. We identified cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS, encoded by Cish) as a critical negative regulator of IL-15 signaling in NK cells. Cish was rapidly induced in response to IL-15, and deletion of Cish rendered NK cells hypersensitive to IL-15, as evidenced by enhanced proliferation, survival, IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity toward tumors. This was associated with increased JAK-STAT signaling in NK cells in which Cish was deleted. Correspondingly, CIS interacted with the tyrosine kinase JAK1, inhibiting its enzymatic activity and targeting JAK for proteasomal degradation. Cish(-/-) mice were resistant to melanoma, prostate and breast cancer metastasis in vivo, and this was intrinsic to NK cell activity. Our data uncover a potent intracellular checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity and suggest possibilities for new cancer immunotherapies directed at blocking CIS function. PMID:27213690

  4. Comparison of melanoma antigens in whole tumor vaccine to those from IIB-MEL-J cells.

    PubMed

    McGee, J M; Patten, M R; Malnar, K F; Price, J A; Mayes, J S; Watson, G H

    1999-06-01

    Immunotherapy for melanoma shows promise. Our previous whole tumor (WT) vaccine was noted to have positive clinical effects. We have now developed a new, safer melanoma vaccine that is derived from IIB-MEL-J tissue culture (TC) cells. In this study, we compare by Western blot analyses the antigens in the WT vaccine to antigens in the TC vaccine. Sera from 12 WT vaccine recipients, 8 melanoma patients who received no immunotherapy, and 8 controls served as a source of antibodies to investigate potential antigens in the vaccines. Three major antigenic peptides with approximate molecular weighs of 46, 40, and 36 kDA were present in both vaccines, while two other antigenic peptides with approximate molecular weighs of 68 and 48 kDA were present only in the TC vaccine. The reaction was similar between the patients who received the WT vaccine and those who did not receive the vaccine. Some of the individuals who did not have melanoma showed some reaction, but not to the extent of the melanoma patients. The intensity of immunostaining was greater for the TC vaccine when compared to the WT vaccine, indicating that these proteins are in a higher concentration in the TC vaccine. This new vaccine from IIB-MEL-J tissue culture cells provides a higher yield and a much more consistent source of potentially clinically relevant antigens without risk of infection or contamination by other irrelevant materials. PMID:10850304

  5. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2015-09-29

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  6. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  7. Potent inhibition of rhabdoid tumor cells by combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rhabdoid Tumors (RTs) are highly aggressive pediatric malignancies with poor prognosis. There are currently no standard or effective treatments for RTs in part because treatments are not designed to specifically target these tumors. Our previous studies indicated that targeting the cyclin/cdk pathway is a novel therapeutic strategy for RTs and that a pan-cdk inhibitor, flavopiridol, inhibits RT growth. Since the toxicities and narrow window of activity associated with flavopiridol may limit its clinical use, we tested the effect of combining flavopiridol with 4-hydroxy-Tamoxifen (4OH-Tam) in order to reduce the concentration of flavopiridol needed for inhibition of RTs. Methods The effects of flavopiridol, 4OH-Tam, and their combination on RT cell cycle regulation and apoptosis were assessed by: i) cell survival assays, ii) FACS analysis, iii) caspase activity assays, and iv) immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the role of p53 in flavopiridol- and 4OH-Tam-mediated induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis was characterized using RNA interference (siRNA) analysis. The effect of p53 on flavopiridol-mediated induction of caspases 2, 3, 8 and 9 was also determined. Results We found that the combination of flavopiridol and 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells. Low nanomolar concentrations of flavopiridol induced G2 arrest, which was correlated to down-modulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p53. Addition of 4OH-Tam did not affect flavopiridol-mediated G2 arrest, but enhanced caspase 3,7-mediated apoptosis induced by the drug. Abrogation of p53 by siRNA abolished flavopiridol-induced G2 arrest, but enhanced flavopiridol- (but not 4OH-Tam-) mediated apoptosis, by enhancing caspase 2 and 3 activities. Conclusions Combining flavopiridol with 4OH-Tam potently inhibited the growth of RT cells by increasing the ability of either drug alone to induce caspases 2 and 3 thereby causing apoptosis. The potency of flavopiridol was enhanced by abrogation

  8. Poly-L-lysine-coated nanoparticles: a potent delivery system to enhance DNA vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Minigo, Gabriela; Scholzen, Anja; Tang, Choon K; Hanley, Jennifer C; Kalkanidis, Martha; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2007-01-26

    DNA formulations provide the basis for safe and cost efficient vaccines. However, naked plasmid DNA is only poorly immunogenic and new effective delivery strategies are needed to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines. In this study, we present a novel approach for the delivery of DNA vaccines using inert poly-L-lysine (PLL) coated polystyrene particles, which greatly enhance DNA immunogenicity. Intradermal injection of plasmid DNA encoding for chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) complexed with PLL-coated polystyrene nanoparticles induced high levels of CD8 T cells as well as OVA-specific antibodies in C57BL/6 mice and furthermore inhibited tumour growth after challenge with the OVA expressing EG7 tumour cell line. Importantly, vaccine efficacy depended critically on the size of the particles used as well as on the presence of the PLL linker. Our data show that PLL-coated polystyrene nanoparticles of 0.05 microm but not 0.02 microm or 1.0 microm in diameter are highly effective for the delivery of DNA vaccines. PMID:17052812

  9. Increasing the efficacy of tumor cell vaccines by enhancing cross priming

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Brian M.; Ohlfest, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been attempted for more than a century, and investment has intensified in the last 20 years. The complexity of the immune system is exemplified by the myriad of immunotherapeutic approaches under investigation. While anti-tumor immunity has been achieved experimentally with multiple effector cells and molecules, particular promise is shown for harnessing the CD8 T cell response. Tumor cell-based vaccines have been employed in hundreds of clinical trials to date and offer several advantages over subunit and peptide vaccines. However, tumor cell-based vaccines, often aimed at cross priming tumor-reactive CD8 T cells, have shown modest success in clinical trials. Here we review the mechanisms of cross priming and discuss strategies to increase the efficacy of tumor cell-based vaccines. A synthesis of recent findings on tissue culture conditions, cell death, and dendritic cell activation reveals promising new avenues for clinical investigation. PMID:22809568

  10. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  11. Cell-free tumor microparticle vaccines stimulate dendritic cells via cGAS/STING signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huafeng; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Ruihua; Ma, Jingwei; Li, Yong; Luo, Shunqun; Liang, Xiaoyu; Ji, Tiantian; Gu, Zhichao; Lu, Jinzhi; He, Wei; Cao, Xuetao; Wan, Yonghong; Huang, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Tumor antigens and innate signals are vital considerations in developing new therapeutic or prophylactic antitumor vaccines. The role or requirement of intact tumor cells in the development of an effective tumor vaccine remains incompletely understood. This study reveals the mechanism by which tumor cell-derived microparticles (T-MP) can act as a cell-free tumor vaccine. Vaccinations with T-MPs give rise to prophylactic effects against the challenge of various tumor cell types, while T-MP-loaded dendritic cells (DC) also exhibit therapeutic effects in various tumor models. Such antitumor effects of T-MPs are perhaps attributable to their ability to generate immune signaling and to represent tumor antigens. Mechanically, T-MPs effectively transfer DNA fragments to DCs, leading to type I IFN production through the cGAS/STING-mediated DNA-sensing pathway. In turn, type I IFN promotes DC maturation and presentation of tumor antigens to T cells for antitumor immunity. These findings highlight a novel tumor cell-free vaccine strategy with potential clinical applications. PMID:25477253

  12. The tumor protection effect of high-frequency administration of whole tumor cell vaccine and enhanced efficacy by the protein component from Agrocybe aegerita

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yi; Sun, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Whole tumor cell vaccines have been widely studied and elicits limited immune responses because of the poor immunogenicity. In the present study, we discovered that high-frequency administration of irradiated whole tumor cell vaccine triggered rejection of tumor cells (90% or 100% of the mice that were vaccinated with irradiated H22 cells or S180 respectively were protected), and provided cross-protection and long-term anti-tumor immunity in BALB/c mouse models. The antitumor activity required CD4+, CD8+ T cells and macrophage that was proved in the nude mice and cell depletion mouse models. The adoptive transfer experiment suggested that repeated whole tumor cell vaccination successfully stimulated the anti-tumor response by activation of the immune cells. A high immunization frequency within a short period of time and the presence of glycosylated molecules and nucleic acids on the surface of intact tumor cells were crucial for the successful prevention of tumor growth by whole tumor cell vaccines. Moreover, Yt, the protein component from fungus Agrocybe aegerita, increased whole tumor cell vaccine-mediated tumor rejection and cross-protection effect. These data indicated that the frequency of administration of whole tumor cell vaccines was of critical importance for the efficacy, which needed to be integrated into vaccine strategies for producing potential vaccines. PMID:26221228

  13. TLR-3 stimulation improves anti-tumor immunity elicited by dendritic cell exosome-based vaccines in a murine model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Damo, Martina; Wilson, David S.; Simeoni, Eleonora; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (Dexo) contain the machinery necessary to activate potent antigen-specific immune responses. As promising cell-free immunogens, Dexo have been tested in previous clinical trials for cancer vaccine immunotherapy, yet resulted in limited therapeutic benefit. Here, we explore a novel Dexo vaccine formulation composed of Dexo purified from DCs loaded with antigens and matured with either the TLR-3 ligand poly(I:C), the TLR-4 ligand LPS or the TLR-9 ligand CpG-B. When poly(I:C) was used to produce exosomes together with ovalbumin (OVA), the resulting Dexo vaccine strongly stimulated OVA-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to proliferate and acquire effector functions. When a B16F10 melanoma cell lysate was used to load DCs with tumor antigens during exosome production together with poly(I:C), we obtained a Dexo vaccine capable of inducing robust activation of melanoma-specific CD8+ T cells and the recruitment of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, NK and NK-T cells to the tumor site, resulting in significantly reduced tumor growth and enhanced survival as compared to a Dexo vaccine formulation similar to the one previously tested on human patients. Our results indicate that poly(I:C) is a particularly favorable TLR agonist for DC maturation during antigen loading and exosome production for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26631690

  14. Listeria-based HPV-16 E7 vaccines limit autochthonous tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model for HPV-16 transformed tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Duane A.; Pan, Zhen Kun; Paterson, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    We have shown that Listeria-based cancer vaccines inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors in a transgenic mouse model of immune tolerance where HPV-16 E7 is expressed in the thyroid gland. In this study we determine whether these vaccines are able to inhibit autochthonous tumor growth in this animal model. Mice treated with Listeria vaccines expressing E7 had significantly smaller thyroid tumors than did mice treated with controls and possessed higher numbers of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the spleens, tumors, and peripheral blood. This study shows that Listeria-based vaccines are able to slow autochthonous tumor growth and break immunological tolerance. PMID:18680778

  15. Immune Consequences of Decreasing Tumor Vasculature with Antiangiogenic Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Combination with Therapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Farsaci, Benedetto; Donahue, Renee N.; Coplin, Michael A.; Grenga, Italia; Lepone, Lauren M.; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Hodge, James W.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects on the tumor microenvironment of combining antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) with therapeutic vaccines, and in particular, how vascular changes affect tumor-infiltrating immune cells. We conducted studies using a TKI (sunitinib or sorafenib) in combination with recombinant vaccines in 2 murine tumor models: colon carcinoma (MC38-CEA) and breast cancer (4T1). Tumor vasculature was measured by immunohistochemistry using 3 endothelial cell markers: CD31 (mature), CD105 (immature/proliferating), and CD11b (monocytic). We assessed oxygenation, tight junctions, compactness, and pressure within tumors, along with the frequency and phenotype of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) following treatment with antiangiogenic TKIs alone, vaccine alone, or the combination of a TKI with vaccine. The combined regimen decreased tumor vasculature, compactness, tight junctions, and pressure, leading to vascular normalization and increased tumor oxygenation. This combination therapy also increased TILs, including tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells, and elevated the expression of activation markers FAS-L, CXCL-9, CD31, and CD105 in MDSCs and TAMs, leading to reduced tumor volumes and an increase in the number of tumor-free animals. The improved antitumor activity induced by combining antiangiogenic TKIs with vaccine may be the result of activated lymphoid and myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment, resulting from vascular normalization, decreased tumor-cell density, and the consequent improvement in vascular perfusion and oxygenation. Therapies that alter tumor architecture can thus have a dramatic impact on the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25092771

  16. SR16388: a steroidal antiangiogenic agent with potent inhibitory effect on tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wan-Ru; Amin, Khalid; Shi, Yihui; Hobbs, Peter; Tanabe, Mas; Tanga, Mary; Jong, Ling; Collins, Nathan; Peters, Richard; Laderoute, Keith; Dinh, Dominic; Yean, Dawn; Hou, Carol; Sato, Barbara; Alt, Carsten; Sambucetti, Lidia

    2011-03-01

    Angiogenesis is one of the major processes controlling growth and metastasis of tumors. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been targeted for the treatment of various cancers for more than 2 decades. We have developed a novel class of steroidal compounds aimed at blocking the angiogenic process in cancerous tissues. Our lead compound, SR16388, is a potent antiangiogenic agent with binding affinity to estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and -β (ER-β) at the nanomolar range. This compound inhibited the proliferation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and various types of human cancer cells in vitro. SR16388 inhibited embryonic angiogenesis as measured in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. The blood vessel density in the CAM was greatly reduced after the embryos were treated with 3 μg/CAM of SR16388 for 24 h. SR16388 at a dose of 2 μM prevented tube formation in Matrigel after HMVEC cells were treated for 8 h. In a modified Boyden chamber assay, SR16388 inhibited the migration of HMVECs by 80% at 500 nM. Using a novel in vivo Fibrin Z-chamber model, we demonstrated that SR16388 at a single daily oral dose of 3 mg/kg for 12 days significantly inhibited the granulation tissue (GT) thickness and the microvessel density of the GT as compared to control. More importantly, SR16388 down-regulated the pro-angiogenic transcription factors, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Together, these effects of SR16388 can lead to the reduction of vascularization and tumor growth in vivo. PMID:21104121

  17. Fulvene-5 potently inhibits NADPH oxidase 4 and blocks the growth of endothelial tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarkar, Sulochana S.; Jaconi, Marisa; Fried, Levi E.; Bonner, Michael Y.; Lefkove, Benjamin; Govindarajan, Baskaran; Perry, Betsy N.; Parhar, Ravi; Mackelfresh, Jamie; Sohn, Allie; Stouffs, Michael; Knaus, Ulla; Yancopoulos, George; Reiss, Yvonne; Benest, Andrew V.; Augustin, Hellmut G.; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2009-01-01

    Hemangiomas are the most common type of tumor in infants. As they are endothelial cell–derived neoplasias, their growth can be regulated by the autocrine-acting Tie2 ligand angiopoietin 2 (Ang2). Using an experimental model of human hemangiomas, in which polyoma middle T–transformed brain endothelial (bEnd) cells are grafted subcutaneously into nude mice, we compared hemangioma growth originating from bEnd cells derived from wild-type, Ang2+/–, and Ang2–/– mice. Surprisingly, Ang2-deficient bEnd cells formed endothelial tumors that grew rapidly and were devoid of the typical cavernous architecture of slow-growing Ang2-expressing hemangiomas, while Ang2+/– cells were greatly impaired in their in vivo growth. Gene array analysis identified a strong downregulation of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) in Ang2+/– cells. Correspondingly, lentiviral silencing of Nox4 in an Ang2-sufficient bEnd cell line decreased Ang2 mRNA levels and greatly impaired hemangioma growth in vivo. Using a structure-based approach, we identified fulvenes as what we believe to be a novel class of Nox inhibitors. We therefore produced and began the initial characterization of fulvenes as potential Nox inhibitors, finding that fulvene-5 efficiently inhibited Nox activity in vitro and potently inhibited hemangioma growth in vivo. In conclusion, the present study establishes Nox4 as a critical regulator of hemangioma growth and identifies fulvenes as a potential class of candidate inhibitor to therapeutically interfere with Nox function. PMID:19620773

  18. Serial Transfer of a Transplantable Tumor: Implications for Marek's Vaccine Mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanism of Marek’s disease (MD) vaccination to prevent the lymphoproliferative disease in chickens is not well understood. It is generally recognized that vaccination prevents disease, including the induction of T cell tumors, but does not prevent the pathogenic virus from infecting and repli...

  19. Synergistic antitumor efficacy of combined DNA vaccines targeting tumor cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Lin; Du, Zhiyan; Gao, Jiangping; Yu, Jiyun

    2015-09-18

    To further enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA vaccine, we proposed a synergistic strategy that targeted tumor cells and angiogenesis simultaneously. In this study, a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon DNA vaccine expressing 1-4 domains of murine VEGFR2 and IL12 was constructed, and was named pSVK-VEGFR2-GFc-IL12 (CAVE). The expression of VEGFR2 antigen and IL12 adjuvant molecule in 293T cells in vitro were verified by western blot and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Then CAVE was co-immunized with CAVA, a SFV replicon DNA vaccine targeting survivin and β-hCG antigens constructed previously. The antitumor efficacy of our combined replicon vaccines was evaluated in mice model and the possible mechanism was further investigated. The combined vaccines could elicit efficient humoral and cellular immune responses against survivin, β-hCG and VEGFR2 simultaneously. Compared with CAVE or CAVA vaccine alone, the combined vaccines inhibited the tumor growth and improved the survival rate in B16 melanoma mice model more effectively. Furthermore, the intratumoral microvessel density was lowest in combined vaccines group than CAVE or CAVA alone group. Therefore, this synergistic strategy of DNA vaccines for tumor treatment results in an increased antitumor efficacy, and may be more suitable for translation to future research and clinic. PMID:26253468

  20. Nanoparticulate STING agonists are potent lymph node–targeted vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Melissa C.; Crespo, Monica P.; Abraham, Wuhbet; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Chen, Stephanie H.; Melo, Mariane B.; Mueller, Stefanie; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) are agonists of stimulator of IFN genes (STING) and have potential as vaccine adjuvants. However, cyclic di-GMP (cdGMP) injected s.c. shows minimal uptake into lymphatics/draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and instead is rapidly distributed to the bloodstream, leading to systemic inflammation. Here, we encapsulated cdGMP within PEGylated lipid nanoparticles (NP-cdGMP) to redirect this adjuvant to dLNs. Compared with unformulated CDNs, encapsulation blocked systemic dissemination and markedly enhanced dLN accumulation in murine models. Delivery of NP-cdGMP increased CD8+ T cell responses primed by peptide vaccines and enhanced therapeutic antitumor immunity. A combination of a poorly immunogenic liposomal HIV gp41 peptide antigen and NP-cdGMP robustly induced type I IFN in dLNs, induced a greater expansion of vaccine-specific CD4+ T cells, and greatly increased germinal center B cell differentiation in dLNs compared with a combination of liposomal HIV gp41 and soluble CDN. Further, NP-cdGMP promoted durable antibody titers that were substantially higher than those promoted by the well-studied TLR agonist monophosphoryl lipid A and comparable to a much larger dose of unformulated cdGMP, without the systemic toxicity of the latter. These results demonstrate that nanoparticulate delivery safely targets CDNs to the dLNs and enhances the efficacy of this adjuvant. Moreover, this approach can be broadly applied to other small-molecule immunomodulators of interest for vaccines and immunotherapy. PMID:25938786

  1. A potent multivalent vaccine for modulation of immune system in atherosclerosis: an in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Atherosclerosis is classically defined as an immune-mediated disease characterized by accumulation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol over intima in medium sized and large arteries. Recent studies have demonstrated that both innate and adaptive immune responses are involved in atherosclerosis. In addition, experimental and human models have recognized many autoantigens in pathophysiology of this disease. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins, β2 glycoprotein I (β-2-GPI), and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) are the best studied of them which can represent promising approach to design worthwhile vaccines for modulation of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods In silico approaches are the best tools for design and evaluation of the vaccines before initiating the experimental study. In this study, we identified immunogenic epitopes of HSP60, ApoB-100, and β-2-GPI as major antigens to construct a chimeric protein through bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we have evaluated physico-chemical properties, structures, stability, MHC binding properties, humoral and cellular immune responses, and allergenicity of this chimeric protein by means of bioinformatics tools and servers. Results Validation results indicated that 89.1% residues locate in favorite or additional allowed region of Ramachandran plot. Also, based on Ramachandran plot analysis this protein could be classified as a stable fusion protein. In addition, the epitopes in the chimeric protein had strong potential to induce both the B-cell and T-cell mediated immune responses. Conclusion Our results supported that this chimeric vaccine could be effectively utilized as a multivalent vaccine for prevention and modulation of atherosclerosis. PMID:26866024

  2. Immune consequences of decreasing tumor vasculature with antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors in combination with therapeutic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Farsaci, Benedetto; Donahue, Renee N; Coplin, Michael A; Grenga, Italia; Lepone, Lauren M; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Hodge, James W

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the effects on the tumor microenvironment (TME) of combining antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) with therapeutic vaccines, and in particular, how vascular changes affect tumor-infiltrating immune cells. We conducted studies using a TKI (sunitinib or sorafenib) in combination with recombinant vaccines in two murine tumor models: colon carcinoma (MC38-CEA) and breast cancer (4T1). Tumor vasculature was measured by immunohistochemistry using three endothelial cell markers: CD31 (mature), CD105 (immature/proliferating), and CD11b (monocytic). We assessed oxygenation, tight junctions, compactness, and pressure within tumors, along with the frequency and phenotype of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) following treatment with antiangiogenic TKIs alone, vaccine alone, or the combination of a TKI with vaccine. The combined regimen decreased tumor vasculature, compactness, tight junctions, and pressure, leading to vascular normalization and increased tumor oxygenation. This combination therapy also increased TILs, including tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells, and elevated the expression of activation markers FAS-L, CXCL-9, CD31, and CD105 in MDSCs and TAMs, leading to reduced tumor volumes and an increase in the number of tumor-free animals. The improved antitumor activity induced by combining antiangiogenic TKIs with vaccine may be the result of activated lymphoid and myeloid cells in the TME, resulting from vascular normalization, decreased tumor-cell density, and the consequent improvement in vascular perfusion and oxygenation. Therapies that alter tumor architecture can, thus, have a dramatic impact on the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25092771

  3. Lunatic Fringe is a potent tumor suppressor in Kras-initiated pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Chung, W-C; Xu, K

    2016-05-12

    Notch controls pancreatic differentiation during development and is reactivated in pancreatic cancer. In recent years, the importance of Notch signaling in pancreatic tumorigenesis has become increasingly evident; however, it remains unclear how Notch activities are regulated in this context. Here we report differential regulation of Notch receptors by Lunatic Fringe (Lfng), which encodes an O-fucosylpeptide 3-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase known to modify epidermal growth factor repeats in the Notch extracellular domain, during pathogenesis of Kras-induced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We show that Lfng is uniquely expressed in a subset of acinar cells in the adult pancreas. Deletion of Lfng in the Kras(LSL-G12D/+);Pdx1-Cre mouse model caused increased activation of Notch3 throughout PDAC initiation and progression, and Notch1 after the onset of disease, associated with marked upregulation of Notch target gene Hes1. Deletion of Lfng also resulted in accumulation of Aldh1-positive cell population. We found that loss of Lfng significantly accelerated Kras-initiated PDAC development and shortened survival of the PDAC mice. Interestingly, Lfng-deficient tumors showed a propensity for a poorly differentiated state with features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Likewise, knockdown of LFNG in human PDAC cell lines caused elevated Notch activation, associated with either accelerated cell proliferation or expanded Aldh1-positive cell population. Deletion of Lfng resulted in downregulation of Tgfb1, Tgfb2 and Tgfbr2 expression in the wild-type pancreas at all ages examined, and in the Kras(LSL-G12D/+);Pdx1-Cre pancreas after PDAC onset, as well as reduced phospho-Smad2 levels in pancreatic tumors. We provide evidence that Lfng regulates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling through Notch-mediated transcriptional repression of TGF-β pathway genes. Taken together, our results reveal a potent tumor-suppressive function for Lfng and crosstalk

  4. Induction of potent anti-tumor responses while eliminating systemic side effects via liposome-anchored combinatorial immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Brandon; Liu, Haipeng; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2011-01-01

    Immunostimulatory therapies that activate immune response pathways are of great interest for overcoming the immunosuppression present in advanced tumors. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies and CpG oligonucleotides have previously demonstrated potent, synergistic anti-tumor effects, but their clinical use even as monotherapies is hampered by dose-limiting inflammatory toxicity provoked upon systemic exposure. We hypothesized that by anchoring immuno-agonist compounds to lipid nanoparticles we could retain the bio-activity of therapeutics in the local tumor tissue and tumor-draining lymph node, but limit systemic exposure to these potent molecules. We prepared PEGylated liposomes bearing surface-conjugated anti-CD40 and CpG and assessed their therapeutic efficacy and systemic toxicity compared to soluble versions of the same immuno-agonists, injected intratumorally in the B16F10 murine model of melanoma. Anti-CD40/CpG-liposomes significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced a survival benefit similar to locally injected soluble anti-CD40+CpG. Biodistribution analyses following local delivery showed that the liposomal carriers successfully sequestered anti-CD40 and CpG in vivo, reducing leakage into systemic circulation while allowing draining to the tumor-proximal lymph node. Contrary to locally administered soluble immunotherapy, anti-CD40/CpG liposomes did not elicit significant increases in serum levels of ALT enzyme, systemic inflammatory cytokines, or overall weight loss, confirming that off-target inflammatory effects had been minimized. The development of a delivery strategy capable of inducing robust anti-tumor responses concurrent with minimal systemic side effects is crucial for the continued progress of potent immunotherapies toward widespread clinical translation. PMID:21514665

  5. Murine Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Whole Tumor Lysates Mediate Potent Antitumor Immune Responses in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, R. C.; Shimizu, K.; Mule, J. J.

    1998-08-01

    The highly efficient nature of dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells raises the possibility of uncovering in tumor-bearing hosts very low levels of T cell reactivity to poorly immunogenic tumors that are virtually undetectable by other means. Here, we demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo capacities of murine bone marrow-derived, cytokine-driven DC to elicit potent and specific anti-tumor responses when pulsed with whole tumor lysates. Stimulation of naive spleen-derived T cells by tumor lysate-pulsed DC generated tumor-specific proliferative cytokine release and cytolytic reactivities in vitro. In addition, in two separate strains of mice with histologically distinct tumors, s.c. injections of DC pulsed with whole tumor lysates effectively primed these animals to reject subsequent lethal challenges with viable parental tumor cells and, important to note, also mediated significant reductions in the number of metastases established in the lungs. Tumor rejection depended on host-derived CD8+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells. Spleens from mice that had rejected their tumors contained specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The use of whole tumor lysates as a source of tumor-associated antigen(s) for pulsing of DC circumvents several limitations encountered with other methods as well as provides certain distinct advantages, which are discussed. These data serve as rationale for our recent initiation of a phase I clinical trial of immunization with autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC in adult and pediatric cancer patients.

  6. Generation and screening of a large collection of novel simian Adenovirus allows the identification of vaccine vectors inducing potent cellular immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Stefano; Folgori, Antonella; Ammendola, Virginia; Capone, Stefania; Cirillo, Agostino; Siani, Loredana; Naddeo, Mariarosaria; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Ambrosio, Maria; Sparacino, Angela; Bartiromo, Marta; Meola, Annalisa; Smith, Kira; Kurioka, Ayako; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Ewer, Katie J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Traboni, Cinzia; Barnes, Eleanor; Klenerman, Paul; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Replication defective Adenovirus vectors based on the human serotype 5 (Ad5) have been shown to induce protective immune responses against diverse pathogens and cancer in animal models and to elicit robust and sustained cellular immunity in humans. However, most humans have anti-Ad5 neutralising antibodies that can impair the immunological potency of such vaccines. Here we show that most other human Adenoviruses from rare serotypes are far less potent as vaccine vectors than Ad5 in mice and non-human primates, casting doubt on their potential efficacy in humans. To identify novel vaccine carriers suitable for vaccine delivery in humans we isolated and sequenced over a thousand Adenovirus strains from chimpanzees (ChAd). Replication-defective vectors were generated from different ChAd serotypes and were screened for neutralization by human sera and for ability to grow in human cell lines already approved for clinical studies. Most importantly, we devised a screening strategy to rank the ChAd vectors by immunological potency in mice which predicts their immunogenicity in non-human primates and humans. The vectors studied varied by up to a thousand-fold in potency for CD8 T cell induction in mice. Two of the most potent ChAd vectors were selected for clinical studies as carriers for Malaria and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genetic vaccines. These ChAd vectors were found to be safe and immunologically potent in Phase I clinical trials thereby validating our screening approach. The ChAd vectors that we have developed represent a large collection of non cross-reactive, potent vectors that can be exploited for diverse vaccine strategies. PMID:22218691

  7. Vaccination of colorectal cancer patients with TroVax given alongside chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leukovorin and irinotecan) is safe and induces potent immune responses.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Drury, Noel; Shingler, William; Chikoti, Priscilla; Redchenko, Irina; Carroll, Miles W; Kingsman, Susan M; Naylor, Stuart; Griffiths, Richard; Steven, Neil; Hawkins, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) encoding the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax) has been evaluated in an open label phase II study in metastatic colorectal cancer patients. The primary objective was to assess the safety and immunogenicity of TroVax injected before, during and after treatment with 5-fluorouracil, leukovorin and irinotecan. TroVax was administered to 19 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Twelve patients had blood samples taken following each of the six injections and were considered to be evaluable for assessment of immunological responses. Both antibody and cellular responses specific for the tumor antigen 5T4 and the viral vector MVA were monitored throughout the study. Administration of TroVax alongside chemotherapy was safe and well tolerated with no SAEs attributed to the vaccine and no enhancement of chemo-related toxicity. Of the 12 patients who were evaluable for assessment of immune responses, ten mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses with titers ranging from 10 to > 5,000. IFNgamma ELISPOT responses specific for 5T4 were detected in 11 patients with frequencies exceeding one in 1,000 PBMCs in five patients. Eight patients presented with elevated circulating CEA concentrations, six of whom showed decreases in excess of 50% during chemotherapy and four had CEA levels which remained stable for > 1 month following completion of chemotherapy. Of the 19 intention to treat (ITT) patients, one had a CR, six had PRs and five had SD. Potent 5T4-specific cellular and/or humoral immune responses were induced in all 12 evaluable patients and were detectable in most patients during the period in which chemotherapy was administered. These data demonstrate that TroVax can be layered on top of chemotherapy regimens without any evidence of enhanced toxicity or reduced immunological or therapeutic efficacy. PMID:18060404

  8. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  9. Tumor-derived vaccines containing CD200 inhibit immune activation: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengming; Ampudia-Mesias, Elisabet; Shaver, Rob; Horbinski, Craig M; Moertel, Christopher L; Olin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    There are over 400 ongoing clinical trials using tumor-derived vaccines. This approach is especially attractive for many types of brain tumors, including glioblastoma, yet so far the clinical response is highly variable. One contributor to poor response is CD200, which acts as a checkpoint blockade, inducing immune tolerance. We demonstrate that, in response to vaccination, glioma-derived CD200 suppresses the anti-tumor immune response. In contrast, a CD200 peptide inhibitor that activates antigen-presenting cells overcomes immune tolerance. The addition of the CD200 inhibitor significantly increased leukocyte infiltration into the vaccine site, cytokine and chemokine production, and cytolytic activity. Our data therefore suggest that CD200 suppresses the immune system's response to vaccines, and that blocking CD200 could improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27485078

  10. Pilot study of p62 DNA vaccine in dogs with mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Vladimir; Venanzi, Franco M; Bagashova, Elena; Rud, Oksana; Mariotti, Francesca; Vullo, Cecilia; Catone, Giuseppe; Sherman, Michael Y; Concetti, Antonio; Chursov, Andrey; Latanova, Anastasia; Shcherbinina, Vita; Shifrin, Victor; Shneider, Alexander

    2014-12-30

    Our previous data demonstrated profound anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of p62 (sqstm1) DNA vaccine in rodents with various types of transplantable tumors. Testing anti-cancer medicine in dogs as an intermediary step of translational research program provides two major benefits. First, clinical data collected in target animals is required for FDA/USDA approval as a veterinary anti-cancer drug or vaccine. It is noteworthy that the veterinary community is in need of novel medicine for the prevention and treatment of canine and feline cancers. The second more important benefit of testing anti-cancer vaccines in dogs is that spontaneous tumors in dogs may provide invaluable information for human trials. Here, we evaluated the effect(s) of p62 DNA vaccine on mammary tumors of dogs. We found that p62 DNA vaccine administered i.m. decreased or stabilized growth of locally advanced lesions in absence of its overall toxic effects. The observed antitumor activity was associated with lymphocyte infiltration and tumor encapsulation via fibrotic reaction. This data justifies both human clinical trials and veterinary application of p62 DNA vaccine. PMID:25296974

  11. Pilot study of p62 DNA vaccine in dogs with mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bagashova, Elena; Rud, Oksana; Mariotti, Francesca; Vullo, Cecilia; Catone, Giuseppe; Sherman, Michael Y.; Concetti, Antonio; Chursov, Andrey; Latanova, Anastasia; Shcherbinina, Vita; Shneider, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated profound anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of p62 (sqstm1) DNA vaccine in rodents with various types of transplantable tumors. Testing anti-cancer medicine in dogs as an intermediary step of translational research program provides two major benefits. First, clinical data collected in target animals is required for FDA/USDA approval as a veterinary anti-cancer drug or vaccine. It is noteworthy that the veterinary community is in need of novel medicine for the prevention and treatment of canine and feline cancers. The second more important benefit of testing anti-cancer vaccines in dogs is that spontaneous tumors in dogs may provide invaluable information for human trials. Here, we evaluated the effect(s) of p62 DNA vaccine on mammary tumors of dogs. We found that p62 DNA vaccine administered i.m. decreased or stabilized growth of locally advanced lesions in absence of its overall toxic effects. The observed antitumor activity was associated with lymphocyte infiltration and tumor encapsulation via fibrotic reaction. This data justifies both human clinical trials and veterinary application of p62 DNA vaccine. PMID:25296974

  12. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 1010 peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  13. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 10(10) peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  14. Engineered Single Human CD4 Domains as Potent HIV-1 Inhibitors and Components of Vaccine Immunogens ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Gong, Rui; Zhu, Zhongyu; Wang, Yanping; Zhao, Qi; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    Soluble forms of the HIV-1 receptor CD4 (sCD4) have been extensively characterized for more than 2 decades as promising inhibitors and components of vaccine immunogens. However, they were mostly based on the first two CD4 domains (D1D2), and numerous attempts to develop functional, high-affinity, stable soluble one-domain sCD4 (D1) have not been successful because of the strong interactions between the two domains. We have hypothesized that combining the power of structure-based design with sequential panning of large D1 mutant libraries against different HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) and screening for soluble mutants could not only help solve the fundamental stability problem of isolated D1, but may also allow improvement of D1 affinity while preserving its cross-reactivity. By using this strategy, we identified two stable monomeric D1 mutants, mD1.1 and mD1.2, which were significantly more soluble and bound Env gp120s more strongly (50-fold) than D1D2, neutralized a panel of HIV-1 primary isolates from different clades more potently than D1D2, induced conformational changes in gp120, and sensitized HIV-1 for neutralization by CD4-induced antibodies. mD1.1 and mD1.2 exhibited much lower binding to human blood cell lines than D1D2; moreover, they preserved a β-strand secondary structure and stability against thermally induced unfolding, trypsin digestion, and degradation by human serum. Because of their superior properties, mD1.1 and mD1.2 could be potentially useful as candidate therapeutics, components of vaccine immunogens, and research reagents for exploration of HIV-1 entry and immune responses. Our approach could be applied to other cases where soluble isolated protein domains are needed. PMID:21715496

  15. Relating TCR-peptide-MHC affinity to immunogenicity for the design of tumor vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Rachel H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Jordan, Kimberly R.; Dow, Steven W.; Wilson, Darcy B.; Slansky, Jill E.

    2006-01-01

    One approach to enhancing the T cell response to tumors is vaccination with mimotopes, mimics of tumor epitopes. While mimotopes can stimulate proliferation of T cells that recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), this expansion does not always correlate with control of tumor growth. We hypothesized that vaccination with mimotopes of optimal affinity in this interaction will improve antitumor immunity. Using a combinatorial peptide library and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone that recognizes a TAA, we identified a panel of mimotopes that, when complexed with MHC, bound the TAA-specific TCR with a range of affinities. As expected, in vitro assays showed that the affinity of the TCR-peptide-MHC (TCR-pMHC) interaction correlated with activity of the T cell clone. However, only vaccination with mimotopes in the intermediate-affinity range elicited functional T cells and provided protection against tumor growth in vivo. Vaccination with mimotopes with the highest-affinity TCR-pMHC interactions elicited TAA-specific T cells to the tumor, but did not control tumor growth at any of the peptide concentrations tested. Further analysis of these T cells showed functional defects in response to the TAA. Thus, stimulation of an antitumor response by mimotopes may be optimal with peptides that increase but do not maximize the affinity of the TCR-pMHC interaction. PMID:16932807

  16. Protective Killed Leptospira borgpetersenii Vaccine Induces Potent Th1 Immunity Comprising Responses by CD4 and γδ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Naiman, Brian M.; Alt, David; Bolin, Carole A.; Zuerner, Richard; Baldwin, Cynthia L.

    2001-01-01

    Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar hardjo is the most common cause of bovine leptospirosis and also causes zoonotic infections of humans. A protective killed vaccine against serovar hardjo was shown to induce strong antigen-specific proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from vaccinated cattle by 2 months after the first dose of vaccine. This response was absent from nonvaccinated control cattle. The mean response peaked by 2 months after completion of the two-dose vaccination regimen, and substantial proliferation was measured in in vitro cultures throughout the 7 months of the study period. Variations in magnitude of the response occurred among the vaccinated animals, but by 7 months postvaccination there was a substantial antigen-specific response with PBMC from all vaccinated animals. Up to one-third of the PBMC from vaccinated animals produced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) after 7 days in culture with antigen, as ascertained by flow cytometric analysis, and significant levels of IFN-γ were measured in culture supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that one-third of the IFN-γ-producing cells were γδ T cells, with the remaining cells being CD4+ T cells. The significance of this study is the very potent Th1-type immune response induced and sustained following vaccination with a killed bacterial vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide and the involvement of γδ T cells in the response. Moreover, induction of this Th1-type cellular immune response is associated with the protection afforded by the bovine leptospiral vaccine against L. borgpetersenii serovar hardjo. PMID:11705932

  17. Inhibitory effects of a dendritic cell vaccine loaded with radiation-induced apoptotic tumor cells on tumor cell antigens in mouse bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, X F; Ding, Q; Hou, J G; Chen, G

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the preparation of a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine with radiation-induced apoptotic tumor cells and its immunological effects on bladder cancer in C57BL/6 mice was investigated. We used radiation to obtain a MB49 cell antigen that was sensitive to bone marrow-derived DCs to prepare a DC vaccine. An animal model of tumor-bearing mice was established with the MB49 mouse bladder cancer cell line. Animals were randomly allocated to an experimental group or control group. DC vaccine or phosphate-buffered saline was given 7 days before inoculation with tumor cells. Each group consisted of 2 subgroups in which tumor volume and the survival of tumor-bearing mice were recorded. Tumor volumes and average tumor masses of mice administered DC vaccine loaded with radiation-induced apoptotic cells were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.01). Survival in the experimental group was also longer than that in the control group, and 2 mice survived without tumor formation. In the DC vaccine group, 2 mice were alive without tumor growth after 30 days, and no tumor was observed at 30 days after subcutaneous inoculation of MB49 cells. The DC vaccine loaded with radiation-induced apoptotic tumor cells had an anti-tumor effect and was associated with increased survival in a bladder cancer model in mice. PMID:26214433

  18. Protective Vaccination against Papillomavirus-Induced Skin Tumors under Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressive Conditions: A Preclinical Study Using a Natural Outbred Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Braspenning-Wesch, Ilona; Müller, Martin; Geissler, Edward K.; Nindl, Ingo; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Certain cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which are ubiquitous and acquired early during childhood, can cause a variety of skin tumors and are likely involved in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, the burden of these clinical manifestations demands for a prophylactic approach. To evaluate whether protective efficacy of a vaccine is potentially translatable to patients, we used the rodent Mastomys coucha that is naturally infected with Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV). This skin type papillomavirus induces not only benign skin tumours, such as papillomas and keratoacanthomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas, thereby allowing a straightforward read-out for successful vaccination in a small immunocompetent laboratory animal. Here, we examined the efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine on either previously or newly established infections. VLPs raise a strong and long-lasting neutralizing antibody response that confers protection even under systemic long-term cyclosporine A treatment. Remarkably, the vaccine completely prevents the appearance of benign as well as malignant skin tumors. Protection involves the maintenance of a low viral load in the skin by an antibody-dependent prevention of virus spread. Our results provide first evidence that VLPs elicit an effective immune response in the skin under immunocompetent and immunosuppressed conditions in an outbred animal model, irrespective of the infection status at the time of vaccination. These findings provide the basis for the clinical development of potent vaccination strategies against cutaneous HPV infections and HPV-induced tumors, especially in patients awaiting organ transplantation. PMID:24586150

  19. The requirement for potent adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of protein vaccines can be overcome by prior immunization with a recombinant adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    de Cassan, Simone C.; Forbes, Emily K.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Milicic, Anita; Singh, Bijender; Gupta, Puneet; Chauhan, Virander S.; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    A central goal in vaccinology is the induction of high and sustained antibody responses. Protein-in-adjuvant formulations are commonly used to achieve such responses. However, their clinical development can be limited by the reactogenicity of some of the most potent pre-clinical adjuvants and the cost and complexity of licensing new adjuvants for human use. Also, few adjuvants induce strong cellular immunity which is important for protection against many diseases, such as malaria. We compared classical adjuvants such as alum to new pre-clinical adjuvants and adjuvants in clinical development such as Abisco®100, CoVaccine HT™, Montanide®ISA720 and SE-GLA, for their ability to induce high and sustained antibody responses and T cell responses. These adjuvants induced a broad range of antibody responses when used in a three-shot protein-in-adjuvant regime using the model antigen ovalbumin and leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate antigens. Surprisingly, this range of antibody immunogenicity was greatly reduced when a protein-in-adjuvant vaccine was used to boost antibody responses primed by a human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5) vaccine recombinant for the same antigen. This AdHu5-protein regime also induced a more cytophilic antibody response and demonstrated improved efficacy of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) protein vaccines against a Plasmodium yoelii blood-stage challenge. This indicates that the differential immunogenicity of protein vaccine adjuvants may be largely overcome by prior immunization with recombinant adenovirus, especially for adjuvants that are traditionally considered poorly immunogenic in the context of subunit vaccination, and may circumvent the need for more potent chemical adjuvants. PMID:21813775

  20. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines. PMID:26583156

  1. Phase I study of XL281 (BMS-908662), a potent oral RAF kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Mark A; Gordon, Michael S; Edelman, Gerald; Bendell, Johanna C; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; LoRusso, Patricia M; Johnston, Stuart H; Clary, Douglas O; Schwartz, Gary K

    2015-04-01

    Background XL281 is a potent and selective inhibitor of wild-type and mutant RAF kinases with anti-tumor activity in multiple xenograft models. Mutations in KRAS or BRAF can activate the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in human tumors and may confer sensitivity to RAF kinase inhibitors. Methods We performed a phase I study of XL281 in patients with advanced solid tumors. Patients were enrolled in successive cohorts of XL281 orally once daily in 28-day cycles. Twice daily dosing, different formulations, and the effect of food and famotidine were also studied. At the MTD expanded cohorts with defined mutations were treated. Results In total, 160 patients were treated. The MTD on the QD schedule was 150 mg. The most common toxicities were diarrhea, nausea, and fatigue. Plasma Cmax and AUC increased with dose. Famotidine resulted in lower AUC while food had no effect. Two patients had partial responses by RECIST: One with papillary thyroid cancer with NRAS mutation and one with uveal melanoma. Another nine patients had tumor decrease of >10% but did not meet RECIST criteria for PR. Matched tumors pairs from 33 patients showed evidence of RAF inhibition with significant decreases in pERK, pMEK and pAKT. Conclusions XL281 was generally well tolerated and the MTD was established at 150 mg/day. Partial responses and clinical benefit were observed in several patients. Tumor biopsies demonstrated effective target inhibition. PMID:25476894

  2. Mammea E/BB, An Isoprenylated Dihydroxycoumarin Protonophore that Potently Uncouples Mitochondrial Electron Transport Disrupts Hypoxic Signaling in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The mammea-type coumarin mammea E/BB (1) was found to inhibit both hypoxia-induced and iron chelator-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in human breast tumor T47D cells with IC50 values of 0.96 and 0.89 µM, respectively. Compound 1 suppressed the hypoxic induction of secreted VEGF protein (T47D cells) and inhibited cell viability/proliferation in four human tumor cell lines. Compound 1 (at 5 and 20 µM) inhibited human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cell migration. While the mechanisms that underlay their biological activities have remained unknown, prenylated mammea coumarins have been shown to be cytotoxic to human tumor cells, suppress tumor growth in animal models, and display a wide variety of antimicrobial effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 appears to exert an assemblage of cellular effects by functioning as an anionic protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport and disrupts mitochondrial signaling in human tumor cell lines. PMID:20929261

  3. Low-dose radiation enhances therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination in tumor-bearing hosts.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih-Wen; Trimble, Cornelia; Zeng, Qi; Monie, Archana; Alvarez, Ronald D; Huh, Warner K; Hoory, Talia; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2009-05-01

    Current therapeutic approaches to treatment of patients with bulky cervical cancer are based on conventional in situ ablative modalities including cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The 5-year survival of patients with nonresectable disease is dismal. Because over 99% of squamous cervical cancer is caused by persistent infection with an oncogenic strain of human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly type 16 and viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 are functionally required for disease initiation and persistence, HPV-targeted immune strategies present a compelling opportunity in which to demonstrate proof of principle. Sublethal doses of radiation and chemotherapeutic agents have been shown to have synergistic effect in combination with either vaccination against cancer-specific antigens, or with passive transfer of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Here, we explored the combination of low-dose radiation therapy with DNA vaccination with calreticulin (CRT) linked to the mutated form of HPV-16 E7 antigen (E7(detox)), CRT/E7(detox) in the treatment of E7-expressing TC-1 tumors. We observed that TC-1 tumor-bearing mice treated with radiotherapy combined with CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generated significant therapeutic antitumor effects and the highest frequency of E7-specific CD8(+) T cells in the tumors and spleens of treated mice. Furthermore, treatment with radiotherapy was shown to render the TC-1 tumor cells more susceptible to lysis by E7-specific CTLs. In addition, we observed that treatment with radiotherapy during the second DNA vaccination generated the highest frequency of E7-specific CD8(+) T cells in the tumors and spleens of TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. Finally, TC-1 tumor-bearing mice treated with the chemotherapy in combination with radiation and CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generate significantly enhanced therapeutic antitumor effects. The clinical implications of the study are discussed. PMID:18815785

  4. Combination adjuvants for the induction of potent, long-lasting antibody and T-cell responses to influenza vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wack, Andreas; Baudner, Barbara C; Hilbert, Anne K; Manini, Ilaria; Nuti, Sandra; Tavarini, Simona; Scheffczik, Hanno; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Singh, Manmohan; Kazzaz, Jina; Montomoli, Emanuele; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; O'Hagan, Derek T

    2008-01-24

    Influenza is controlled by protective titres of neutralizing antibodies, induced with the help of CD4 T-cells, and by antiviral T-cell effector function. Adjuvants are essential for the efficient vaccination of a naïve population against avian influenza. We evaluated a range of adjuvants for their ability to enhance, in naïve mice, protective hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titres, which represent the generally accepted correlate of protection, virus-neutralizing titres and T-cell responses to a new generation influenza vaccine produced in cell culture. The selected adjuvants include alum, calcium phosphate (CAP), MF59, the delivery system poly-(lactide co-glycolide) (PLG) and the immune potentiator CpG. MF59 was clearly the most potent single adjuvant and induced significantly enhanced, long-lasting HI and neutralizing titres and T-cell responses in comparison to all alternatives. The combination of alum, MF59, CAP or PLG with CpG generally induced slightly more potent titres. The addition of CpG to MF59 also induced a more potent Th1 cellular immune response, represented by higher IgG2a titres and the induction of a strongly enhanced IFN-gamma response in splenocytes from immunized mice. These observations have significant implications for the development of new and improved flu vaccines against pandemic and inter-pandemic influenza virus strains. PMID:18162266

  5. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of "eat me" and "don't eat me" signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80(high), CD86(high), and CD40(high)) and functional stimulation (NO(high), IL-10(absent)) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of "eat me" signal and "don't eat me" signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  6. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of “eat me” and “don't eat me” signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80high, CD86high, and CD40high) and functional stimulation (NOhigh, IL-10absent) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of “eat me” signal and “don't eat me” signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  7. Identification of CKD-516: a potent tubulin polymerization inhibitor with marked antitumor activity against murine and human solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaekwang; Kim, Soo Jin; Choi, Hojin; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, In Taek; Yang, Hyun-mo; Lee, Chang Sik; Kang, Hee Ryong; Ahn, Soon Kil; Moon, Seung Kee; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lee, Sungsook; Choi, Nam Song; Lee, Kyung Joo

    2010-09-01

    Tubulin polymerization inhibitors had emerged as one of promising anticancer therapeutics because of their dual mechanism of action, i.e. apoptosis by cell-cycle arrest and VDA, vascular disrupting agent. VDAs are believed to be more efficient, less toxic, and several of them are currently undergoing clinical trials. To identify novel tubulin inhibitors that possess potent cytotoxicity and strong inhibition of tubulin polymerization as well as potent in vivo antitumor efficacy, we have utilized benzophenone scaffold. Complete SAR analysis of newly synthesized analogues that were prepared by incorporation of small heterocycles (C2, C4, and C5 position) into B-ring along with the evaluation of their in vitro cytotoxicity, tubulin polymerization inhibition, and in vivo antitumor activity allowed us to identify 22 (S516). Compound 22 was found to have potent cytotoxicity against several cancer cells including P-gp overexpressing MDR positive cell line (HCT15). It also induced cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase, which is associated with strong inhibition of tubulin polymerization. Its in vivo efficacy was improved by preparing its (l)-valine prodrug, 65 (CKD-516), which together with greatly improved aqueous solubility has shown marked antitumor efficacy against both murine tumors (CT26 and 3LL) and human xenogratfs (HCT116 and HCT15) in mice. PMID:20690624

  8. A DNA vaccine targeting angiomotin inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Lars; Ambrosino, Elena; Birot, Olivier; Tullus, Carl; Veitonmäki, Niina; Levchenko, Tetyana; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Musiani, Piero; Iezzi, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica; Kiessling, Rolf

    2006-06-01

    Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have shown promise in preclinical trials, but clinical use has been hindered by low half-life in circulation and high production costs. Here, we describe a strategy that targets the angiostatin receptor angiomotin (Amot) by DNA vaccination. The vaccination procedure generated antibodies that detected Amot on the endothelial cell surface. Purified Ig bound to the endothelial cell membrane and inhibited endothelial cell migration. In vivo, DNA vaccination blocked angiogenesis in the matrigel plug assay and prevented growth of transplanted tumors for up to 150 days. We further demonstrate that a combination of DNA vaccines encoding Amot and the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human EGF receptor 2 (Her-2)/neu oncogene inhibited breast cancer progression and impaired tumor vascularization in Her-2/neu transgenic mice. No toxicity or impairment of normal blood vessels could be detected. This work shows that DNA vaccination targeting Amot may be used to mimic the effect of angiostatin. cancer vaccines | neoplasia | neovascularization | breast cancer | angiostatin

  9. Rapamycin Impairs Antitumor CD8+ T-cell Responses and Vaccine-Induced Tumor Eradication.

    PubMed

    Chaoul, Nada; Fayolle, Catherine; Desrues, Belinda; Oberkampf, Marine; Tang, Alexandre; Ladant, Daniel; Leclerc, Claude

    2015-08-15

    The metabolic sensor mTOR broadly regulates cell growth and division in cancer cells, leading to a significant focus on studies of rapamycin and its analogues as candidate anticancer drugs. However, mTOR inhibitors have failed to produce useful clinical efficacy, potentially because mTOR is also critical in T cells implicated in immunosurveillance. Indeed, recent studies using rapamycin have demonstrated the important role of mTOR in differentiation and induction of the CD8+ memory in T-cell responses associated with antitumor properties. In this study, we demonstrate that rapamycin harms antitumor immune responses mediated by T cells in the setting of cancer vaccine therapy. Specifically, we analyzed how rapamycin affects the antitumor efficacy of a human papilloma virus E7 peptide vaccine (CyaA-E7) capable of eradicating tumors in the TC-1 mouse model of cervical cancer. In animals vaccinated with CyaA-E7, rapamycin administration completely abolished recruitment of CD8+ T cells into TC-1 tumors along with the ability of the vaccine to reduce infiltration of T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Moreover, rapamycin completely abolished vaccine-induced cytotoxic T-cell responses and therapeutic activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate the powerful effects of mTOR inhibition in abolishing T-cell-mediated antitumor immune responses essential for the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines. PMID:26122844

  10. Tumor heterogeneity as a rationale for a multi-epitope approach in an autologous renal cell cancer tumor vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wittke, Stefan; Baxmann, Susann; Fahlenkamp, Dirk; Kiessig, Stephan T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An autologous tumor vaccine already used successfully in the immune therapy of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in detail. The evaluation of potential tumor markers should allow for the assessment of potency according to pharmaceutical regulations. Methods A panel of 36 tumor-associated antigens and cellular marker proteins was characterized in a total of 133 tumor cell lysates by methods such as ELISA, Western blots, and topological proteomics. The induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific antibodies was demonstrated by immunization in mice. Results Tumor heterogeneity was demonstrated: none of the tumor-associated antigens investigated were detectable in each tumor lysate. In parallel, the coincidental presence of potential danger signals was shown for HSP-60 and HSP-70. The presence of both antigen and danger signal allowed a successful induction of an immune response in a murine model. Conclusion The verified tumor heterogeneity indicates the need for a multi-epitope approach for the successful immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26889089

  11. Recent Advance in Tumor-associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs)-based Antitumor Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danyang; Shaikh, Abdul Sami; Wang, Fengshan

    2016-04-15

    Cancer cells can be distinguished from normal cells by displaying aberrant levels and types of carbohydrate structures on their surfaces. These carbohydrate structures are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). TACAs were considered as promising targets for the design of anticancer vaccines. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone can only evoke poor immunogenicity because they are unable to induce T-cell-dependent immune responses, which is critical for cancer therapy. Moreover, immunotolerance and immunosuppression are easily induced by using natural occurring TACAs as antigens due to their endogenous property. This review summarizes the recent strategies to overcome these obstacles: (1) covalently coupling TACAs to proper carriers to improve immunogenicity, including clustered or multivalent conjugate vaccines, (2) coupling TACAs to T-cell peptide epitopes or the built-in adjuvant to form multicomponent glycoconjugate vaccines, and (3) developing vaccines based on chemically modified TACAs, which is combined with metabolic engineering of cancer cells. PMID:26895482

  12. Mining the Melanosome for Tumor Vaccine Targets: P.polypeptide Is a Novel Tumor-associated Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Touloukian, Christopher E.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Robbins, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    To identify novel, tumor-specific target antigens for vaccine development, we studied immune responses to P.polypeptide, an Mr 110,000 integral melanosomal membrane protein associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome. Together with expressed sequence tag (EST) and serial analyses of gene expression (SAGE) library analyses, reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blotting verified that P.polypeptide expression was limited to melanoma and melanocytes. A single dominant epitope corresponding to positions 427–435 (IMLCLIAAV) was identified using allele-specific epitope forecasting combined with work in HLA-A*0201/Kb transgenic mice. This epitope was then used to generate de novo human P.polypeptide-specific CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing P.polypeptide expressing human tumor cell lines in an HLA-A*0201-restricted fashion. Thus, P.polypeptide may be valuable in the creation of novel therapeutic anticancer vaccines. PMID:11719435

  13. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L.; Brentville, Victoria A.; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M.; Durrant, Lindy G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10–40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses. PMID:27471648

  14. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    SciTech Connect

    Witek, Matthew; Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A.; Snook, Adam E.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  15. The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 potently blocks Stat3 signaling and oncogenesis in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hedvat, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Herrmann, Andreas; Gozgit, Joseph M; Schroeder, Anne; Sheehy, Adam; Buettner, Ralf; Proia, David; Kowolik, Claudia M; Xin, Hong; Armstrong, Brian; Bebernitz, Geraldine; Weng, Shaobu; Wang, Lin; Ye, Minwei; McEachern, Kristen; Chen, Huawei; Morosini, Deborah; Bell, Kirsten; Alimzhanov, Marat; Ioannidis, Stephanos; McCoon, Patricia; Cao, Zhu A; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard; Zinda, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Persistent activation of Stat3 is oncogenic and is prevalent in a wide variety of human cancers. Chronic cytokine stimulation is associated with Stat3 activation in some tumors, implicating cytokine receptor-associated Jak family kinases. Using Jak2 inhibitors, we demonstrate a central role of Jaks in modulating basal and cytokine-induced Stat3 activation in human solid tumor cell lines. Inhibition of Jak2 activity is associated with abrogation of Stat3 nuclear translocation and tumorigenesis. The Jak2 inhibitor AZD1480 suppresses the growth of human solid tumor xenografts harboring persistent Stat3 activity. We demonstrate the essential role of Stat3 downstream of Jaks by inhibition of tumor growth using short hairpin RNA targeting Stat3. Our data support a key role of Jak kinase activity in Stat3-dependent tumorigenesis. PMID:19962667

  16. 4-1BB Agonists: Multi-Potent Potentiators of Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Curran, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a rapidly expanding field of oncology aimed at targeting, not the tumor itself, but the immune system combating the cancerous lesion. Of the many approaches currently under study to boost anti-tumor immune responses; modulation of immune co-receptors on lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment has thus far proven to be the most effective. Antibody blockade of the T cell co-inhibitory receptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) has become the first FDA approved immune checkpoint blockade; however, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes express a diverse array of additional stimulatory and inhibitory co-receptors, which can be targeted to boost tumor immunity. Among these, the co-stimulatory receptor 4-1BB (CD137/TNFSF9) possesses an unequaled capacity for both activation and pro-inflammatory polarization of anti-tumor lymphocytes. While functional studies of 4-1BB have focused on its prominent role in augmenting cytotoxic CD8 T cells, 4-1BB can also modulate the activity of CD4 T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. 4-1BB’s expression on both T cells and antigen presenting cells, coupled with its capacity to promote survival, expansion, and enhanced effector function of activated T cells, has made it an alluring target for tumor immunotherapy. In contrast to immune checkpoint blocking antibodies, 4-1BB agonists can both potentiate anti-tumor and anti-viral immunity, while at the same time ameliorating autoimmune disease. Despite this, 4-1BB agonists can trigger high grade liver inflammation which has slowed their clinical development. In this review, we discuss how the underlying immunobiology of 4-1BB activation suggests the potential for therapeutically synergistic combination strategies in which immune adverse events can be minimized. PMID:26106583

  17. Tetrastatin, the NC1 Domain of the α4(IV) Collagen Chain: A Novel Potent Anti-Tumor Matrikine

    PubMed Central

    Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; Sénéchal, Karine; Thevenard, Jessica; Ramont, Laurent; Devy, Jérome; Di Stefano, Ludivine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurélie; Brézillon, Stéphane; Feru, Jezabel; Jazeron, Jean-François; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background NC1 domains from α1, α2, α3 and α6(IV) collagen chains were shown to exert anti-tumor or anti-angiogenic activities, whereas the NC1 domain of the α4(IV) chain did not show such activities so far. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate in the present paper that the NC1 α4(IV) domain exerts a potent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in an experimental human melanoma model in vivo. The overexpression of NC1 α4(IV) in human UACC-903 melanoma cells strongly inhibited their in vitro proliferative (–38%) and invasive (–52%) properties. MT1-MMP activation was largely decreased and its cellular distribution was modified, resulting in a loss of expression at the migration front associated with a loss of migratory phenotype. In an in vivo xenograft model in athymic nude mice, the subcutaneous injection of NC1 α4(IV)-overexpressing melanoma cells induced significantly smaller tumors (–80% tumor volume) than the Mock cells, due to a strong inhibition of tumor growth. Exogenously added recombinant human NC1 α4(IV) reproduced the inhibitory effects of NC1 α4(IV) overexpression in UACC-903 cells but not in dermal fibroblasts. An anti-αvβ3 integrin blocking antibody inhibited cell adhesion on recombinant human NC1 α4(IV) substratum. The involvement of αvβ3 integrin in mediating NC1 α4(IV) effect was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays showing that recombinant human NC1 α4(IV) binds to αvβ3 integrin (KD = 148±9.54 nM). Conclusion/Significance Collectively, our results demonstrate that the NC1 α4(IV) domain, named tetrastatin, is a new endogenous anti-tumor matrikine. PMID:22539938

  18. Combination of treatment with death receptor 5-specific antibody with therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination generates enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih Wen; Monie, Archana; Trimble, Cornelia; Alvarez, Ronald D; Huh, Warner K; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Straughn, J Michael; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Yagita, Hideo; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-08-12

    There is currently a vital need for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the control of advanced stage cancers. Antigen-specific immunotherapy and the employment of antibodies against the death receptor 5 (DR5) have emerged as two potentially promising strategies for cancer treatment. In the current study, we hypothesize that the combination of treatment with the anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody, MD5-1 with a DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 antigen (CRT/E7(detox)) administered via gene gun would lead to further enhancement of E7-specific immune responses as well as anti-tumor effects. Our results indicated that mice bearing the E7-expressing tumor, TC-1 treated with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody followed by CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generated the most potent therapeutic anti-tumor effects as well as highest levels of E7-specific CD8+ T cells among all the groups tested. In addition, treatment with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody was capable of rendering the TC-1 tumor cells more susceptible to lysis by E7-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our findings serve as an important foundation for future clinical translation. PMID:18598733

  19. Effect of HSV-IL12 Loaded Tumor Cell-Based Vaccination in a Mouse Model of High-Grade Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereboeva, Larisa; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Cloud, Gretchen A.; Langford, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    We designed multimodal tumor vaccine that consists of irradiated tumor cells infected with the oncolytic IL-12-expressing HSV-1 virus, M002. This vaccine was tested against the syngeneic neuroblastoma mouse model Neuro 2a injected into the right caudate nucleus of the immunocompetent A/J mice. Mice were vaccinated via intramuscular injection of multimodal vaccine or uninfected irradiated tumor cells at seven and 14 days after tumor establishment. While there was no survival difference between groups vaccinated with cell-based vaccine applied following tumor injection, a premunition prime/boost vaccination strategy produced a significant survival advantage in both groups and sustained immune response to an intracranial rechallenge of the same tumor. The syngeneic but unrelated H6 hepatocellular tumor cell line grew unrestricted in vaccinated mice, indicative of vaccine-mediated specific immunity to Neuro 2a tumors. Longitudinal analyses of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes revealed a primary adaptive T cell response involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Spleen cell mononuclear preparations from vaccinated mice were significantly more cytotoxic to Neuro 2a tumor cells than spleen cells from control mice as demonstrated in a four-hour in vitro cytotoxicity assay. These results strongly suggest that an irradiated whole cell tumor vaccine incorporating IL-12-expressing M002 HSV can produce a durable, specific immunization in a murine model of intracranial tumor. PMID:27610392

  20. Effect of HSV-IL12 Loaded Tumor Cell-Based Vaccination in a Mouse Model of High-Grade Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David F; Pereboeva, Larisa; Gillespie, G Yancey; Cloud, Gretchen A; Elzafarany, Osama; Langford, Catherine; Markert, James M; Jr, Lawrence S Lamb

    2016-01-01

    We designed multimodal tumor vaccine that consists of irradiated tumor cells infected with the oncolytic IL-12-expressing HSV-1 virus, M002. This vaccine was tested against the syngeneic neuroblastoma mouse model Neuro 2a injected into the right caudate nucleus of the immunocompetent A/J mice. Mice were vaccinated via intramuscular injection of multimodal vaccine or uninfected irradiated tumor cells at seven and 14 days after tumor establishment. While there was no survival difference between groups vaccinated with cell-based vaccine applied following tumor injection, a premunition prime/boost vaccination strategy produced a significant survival advantage in both groups and sustained immune response to an intracranial rechallenge of the same tumor. The syngeneic but unrelated H6 hepatocellular tumor cell line grew unrestricted in vaccinated mice, indicative of vaccine-mediated specific immunity to Neuro 2a tumors. Longitudinal analyses of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes revealed a primary adaptive T cell response involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Spleen cell mononuclear preparations from vaccinated mice were significantly more cytotoxic to Neuro 2a tumor cells than spleen cells from control mice as demonstrated in a four-hour in vitro cytotoxicity assay. These results strongly suggest that an irradiated whole cell tumor vaccine incorporating IL-12-expressing M002 HSV can produce a durable, specific immunization in a murine model of intracranial tumor. PMID:27610392

  1. Design and characterization of the tumor vaccine MGN1601, allogeneic fourfold gene-modified vaccine cells combined with a TLR-9 agonist.

    PubMed

    Volz, Barbara; Schmidt, Manuel; Heinrich, Kerstin; Kapp, Kerstin; Schroff, Matthias; Wittig, Burghardt

    2016-01-01

    The tumor vaccine MGN1601 was designed and developed for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). MGN1601 consists of a combination of fourfold gene-modified cells with the toll-like receptor 9 agonist dSLIM, a powerful connector of innate and adaptive immunity. Vaccine cells originate from a renal cell carcinoma cell line (grown from renal cell carcinoma tissue), express a variety of known tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and are gene modified to transiently express two co-stimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD154, and two cytokines, GM-CSF and IL-7, aimed to support immune response. Proof of concept of the designed vaccine was shown in mice: The murine homologue of the vaccine efficiently (100%) prevented tumor growth when used as prophylactic vaccine in a syngeneic setting. Use of the vaccine in a therapeutic setting showed complete response in 92% of mice as well as synergistic action and necessity of the components. In addition, specific cellular and humoral immune responses in mice were found when used in an allogeneic setting. Immune response to the vaccine was also shown in mRCC patients treated with MGN1601: Peptide array analysis revealed humoral CD4-based immune response to TAA expressed on vaccine cells, including survivin, cyclin D1, and stromelysin. PMID:27119114

  2. Design and characterization of the tumor vaccine MGN1601, allogeneic fourfold gene-modified vaccine cells combined with a TLR-9 agonist

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Barbara; Schmidt, Manuel; Heinrich, Kerstin; Kapp, Kerstin; Schroff, Matthias; Wittig, Burghardt

    2016-01-01

    The tumor vaccine MGN1601 was designed and developed for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). MGN1601 consists of a combination of fourfold gene-modified cells with the toll-like receptor 9 agonist dSLIM, a powerful connector of innate and adaptive immunity. Vaccine cells originate from a renal cell carcinoma cell line (grown from renal cell carcinoma tissue), express a variety of known tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and are gene modified to transiently express two co-stimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD154, and two cytokines, GM-CSF and IL-7, aimed to support immune response. Proof of concept of the designed vaccine was shown in mice: The murine homologue of the vaccine efficiently (100%) prevented tumor growth when used as prophylactic vaccine in a syngeneic setting. Use of the vaccine in a therapeutic setting showed complete response in 92% of mice as well as synergistic action and necessity of the components. In addition, specific cellular and humoral immune responses in mice were found when used in an allogeneic setting. Immune response to the vaccine was also shown in mRCC patients treated with MGN1601: Peptide array analysis revealed humoral CD4-based immune response to TAA expressed on vaccine cells, including survivin, cyclin D1, and stromelysin. PMID:27119114

  3. The antimicrobial peptide pardaxin exerts potent anti-tumor activity against canine perianal gland adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Chao-Nan; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Yu, Chao Yuan; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Chien, Chi-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Pardaxin is an antimicrobial peptide of 33 amino acids, originally isolated from marine fish. We previously demonstrated that pardaxin has anti-tumor activity against murine fibrosarcoma, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the anti-tumor activity, toxicity profile, and maximally-tolerated dose of pardaxin treatment in dogs with different types of refractory tumor. Local injection of pardaxin resulted in a significant reduction of perianal gland adenoma growth between 28 and 38 days post-treatment. Surgical resection of canine histiocytomas revealed large areas of ulceration, suggesting that pardaxin acts like a lytic peptide. Pardaxin treatment was not associated with significant variations in blood biochemical parameters or secretion of immune-related proteins. Our findings indicate that pardaxin has strong therapeutic potential for treating perianal gland adenomas in dogs. These data justify the veterinary application of pardaxin, and also provide invaluable information for veterinary medicine and future human clinical trials. PMID:25544775

  4. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens. PMID:25424922

  5. Boronated porphyrins in NCT: Results with a new potent tumor localizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.; Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Several chemical methods are available for the solubilization of boronated porphyrins. We have previously reported the tumor localization of nido carboranyl porphyrins in which the icosahedral carborane cages have been opened to give B/sub 9/C/sub 2/ anions. One of these species has shown tumor boron levels of nearly 50 ..mu..g B/g when delivered by week-long subcutaneous infusions. We report here recent in vivo experiments with a new, highly water-soluble porphyrin based on the hematoporphyrin-type of compound in which aqueous solubility is achieved using the two propionic acid side chains of the ''natural'' porphyrin frame. 7 refs.

  6. Tumor prevention in HPV8 transgenic mice by HPV8-E6 DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Awerkiew, Sabine; Hufbauer, Martin; Schädlich, Lysann; Gissmann, Lutz; Eming, Sabine; Pfister, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    The genus beta human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in individuals with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Immunosuppressed transplant recipients are prone to harbor particularly high betapapillomavirus DNA loads, which may contribute to their highly increased risk of SCC. Tumor induction in HPV8 transgenic mice correlates with increased expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E2. In an attempt to prevent skin tumor development, we evaluated an HPV8-E6-DNA vaccine, which was able to stimulate a detectable HPV8-E6-specific cell-mediated immune response in 8/15 immunized mice. When skin of HPV8 transgenic mice was grafted onto non-transgenic littermates, the grafted HPV8 transgenic tissue was not rejected and papillomas started to grow within 14 days all over the transplant of 9/9 non-vaccinated and 7/15 not successfully vaccinated mice. In contrast, no papillomas developed in 6/8 successfully vaccinated mice. In the other two of these eight mice, a large ulcerative lesion developed within the initial papilloma growth or papilloma development was highly delayed. As the vaccine completely or partially prevented papilloma development without rejecting the transplanted HPV8 positive skin, the immune system appears to attack only keratinocytes with increased levels of E6 protein, which would give rise to papillomas. PMID:24446083

  7. Therapeutic Antitumor Efficacy of B Cells Loaded With Tumor-derived Autophagasomes Vaccine (DRibbles)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongyan; Zhao, Simin; Li, Weixia; Dong, Huixia; Zhou, Meng; Cao, Meng; Hu, Hong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-derived autophagosomes (DRibble) selectively capture tumor-specific antigens and induce a dramatic T-cell activation and expansion when injected into lymph nodes of naive mice. Both dendritic and B cells can efficiently cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. In this report, we demonstrated that a booster vaccination with naive B cells loaded with DRibbles eradicated E.G7-OVA tumors in mice that were previously treated with adoptive transfer naive OT-I T cells and intranodal immunization with DRibbles derived from E.G7 tumors. The antitumor efficacy was accompanied by a heighten number of tumor-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells and antibodies. However, the same treatment in the absence of adoptive T-cell transfer exhibited a limited efficacy. In contrast, when DRibble-loaded B cells were activated with CpG and anti-CD40 antibody before use as booster vaccines, established E.G7 tumors were completely eradicated in the absence of T-cell transfer. Therefore, our results document that B cells could efficiently cross-present tumor-specific antigens captured by DRibbles and suggest that naive B cells can be deployed as an effective and readily accessible source of antigen-presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy clinical trials. PMID:25198526

  8. Relevance of the tumor antigen in the validation of three vaccination strategies for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bellone, M; Cantarella, D; Castiglioni, P; Crosti, M C; Ronchetti, A; Moro, M; Garancini, M P; Casorati, G; Dellabona, P

    2000-09-01

    Many preclinical studies of cancer immunotherapy are based on the testing of a single vaccination strategy in several tumor models. Moreover, most of those studies used xenogeneic Ags, which, owing to their high immunogenicity, may not represent realistic models for the validation of cancer immunotherapies. To address these issues, we compared the vaccination efficacy of three well established strategies (i.e., naked DNA; peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DC), or a mixture of peptide and the Escherichia coli toxin LTR72) using the xenogeneic OVA or the naturally expressed tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2) tumor Ag in the B16 melanoma model. C57BL/6 mice received one to three s.c. injections of peptide-pulsed DC or DNA, or one to four mucosal administrations of peptide-toxin mixture. One to 2 wk later, the animals were challenged s.c. with B16 or B16 cells expressing OVA (B16-OVA). Vaccination of mice with OVA induced in all cases melanoma-specific CTL and protection against B16-OVA. When TRP-2 was used, all three vaccines elicited B16-specific CTL, but only DC pulsed with the immunodominant T cell epitope TRP-2181-188 allowed protection against B16. Even more importantly, a vaccination regimen with TRP-2-pulsed DC, started 24 h after the injection of a lethal number of B16 cells, caused a therapeutic effect in 60% of the challenged animals. Our results strongly emphasize the relevance of the tumor Ag in the definition of immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer, and support the use of peptide-pulsed DC as cancer vaccine in humans. PMID:10946294

  9. Formononetin, a novel FGFR2 inhibitor, potently inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen Feng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jia Yun; Wu, Guan Nan; Yao, Xue Quan; Liu, Fu Kun; Li, Gang; Shen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified formononetin as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Formononetin demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, formononetin suppressed FGF2-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of formononetin on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that formononetin suppressed FGF2-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, formononetin directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer, formononetin showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, formononetin enhanced the effect of VEGFR2 inhibitor sunitinib on tumor growth inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that formononetin targets the FGFR2-mediated Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26575424

  10. Subclinical Chlamydial Infection of the Female Mouse Genital Tract Generates a Potent Protective Immune Response: Implications for Development of Live Attenuated Chlamydial Vaccine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Messer, Ronald; Whitmire, William; Hughes, Scott; Caldwell, Harlan D.

    2000-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease (STD) for which a vaccine is needed. CD4+ T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell-mediated immunity is an important component of protective immunity against murine chlamydial genital infection. Conventional vaccine approaches have not proven effective in eliciting chlamydial-specific CD4 Th1 immunity at the genital mucosa. Thus, it is possible that the development of a highly efficacious vaccine against genital infection will depend on the generation of a live attenuated C. trachomatis vaccine. Attenuated strains of C. trachomatis do not exist, so their potential utility as vaccines cannot be tested in animal models of infection. We have developed a surrogate model to study the effect of chlamydial attenuation on infection and immunity of the female genital tract by treating mice with a subchlamydiacidal concentration of oxytetracycline following vaginal infection. Compared to untreated control mice, antibiotic-treated mice shed significantly fewer infectious organisms (3 log10) from the cervico-vagina, produced a minimal inflammatory response in urogenital tissue, and did not experience infection-related sequelae. Antibiotic-treated mice generated levels of chlamydia-specific antibody and cell-mediated immunity equivalent to those of control mice. Importantly, antibiotic-treated mice were found to be as immune as control untreated mice when rechallenged vaginally. These findings demonstrate that subclinical chlamydial infection of the murine female genital tract is sufficient to stimulate a potent protective immune response. They also present indirect evidence supporting the possible use of live attenuated chlamydial organisms in the development of vaccines against chlamydial STDs. PMID:10603387

  11. Combination OX40 agonism/CTLA-4 blockade with HER2 vaccination reverses T-cell anergy and promotes survival in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Linch, Stefanie N.; Kasiewicz, Melissa J.; McNamara, Michael J.; Hilgart-Martiszus, Ian F.; Farhad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is gathering momentum as a primary therapy for cancer patients. However, monotherapies have limited efficacy in improving outcomes and benefit only a subset of patients. Combination therapies targeting multiple pathways can augment an immune response to improve survival further. Here, we demonstrate that dual aOX40 (anti-CD134)/aCTLA-4 (anti–cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein 4) immunotherapy generated a potent antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response, enhancing expansion, effector function, and memory T-cell persistence. Importantly, OX40 and CTLA-4 expression on CD8 T cells was critical for promoting their maximal expansion following combination therapy. Animals treated with combination therapy and vaccination using anti–DEC-205 (dendritic and epithelial cells, 205 kDa)–HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) had significantly improved survival in a mammary carcinoma model. Vaccination with combination therapy uniquely restricted Th2-cytokine production by CD4 cells, relative to combination therapy alone, and enhanced IFNγ production by CD8 and CD4 cells. We observed an increase in MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α)/CCL3 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3], MIP-1β/CCL4, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and excreted)/CCL5, and GM-CSF production by CD8 and CD4 T cells following treatment. Furthermore, this therapy was associated with extensive tumor destruction and T-cell infiltration into the tumor. Notably, in a spontaneous model of prostate adenocarcinoma, vaccination with combination therapy reversed anergy and enhanced the expansion and function of CD8 T cells recognizing a tumor-associated antigen. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the addition of a vaccine with combined aOX40/aCTLA-4 immunotherapy augmented antitumor CD8 T-cell function while limiting Th2 polarization in CD4 cells and improved overall survival. PMID:26729864

  12. A Trimeric, V2-Deleted HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Vaccine Elicits Potent Neutralizing Antibodies but Limited Breadth of Neutralization in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle A.; Elizaga, Marnie; Montefiori, David; Tomaras, Georgia D.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Hural, John; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Sato, Alicia; Huang, Yunda; Frey, Sharon E.; Sato, Paul; Donnelly, John; Barnett, Susan; Corey, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. A key missing element in the development of a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine is an immunogen that can generate broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates of the virus. Methods. This phase 1 clinical trial employed a DNA prime and subunit envelope protein boost in an attempt to generate cellular and humoral immune responses that might be desirable in a protective HIV vaccine. Priming was performed via intramuscular injection with gag and env DNA adsorbed to polylactide coglycolide microspheres, followed by boosting with a recombinant trimeric envelope (Env) glycoprotein delivered in MF59 adjuvant. Results. The DNA prime and protein boost were generally safe and well-tolerated. Env-specific CD4+ cellular responses were generated that were predominantly detected after Env protein boosting. Neutralizing antibody responses against the homologous SF162 viral isolate were remarkably strong and were present in the majority of vaccine recipients, including a strong response against CD4-induced epitopes on gp120. Despite the promising potency of this vaccine approach, neutralization breadth against heterologous tier 2 strains of HIV-1 was minimal. Conclusions. Potent neutralization against neutralization-sensitive strains of HIV is achievable in humans through a DNA prime, recombinant oligomeric Env protein boost regimen. Eliciting substantial breadth of neutralization remains an elusive goal.  Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00073216. PMID:21451004

  13. Constructing Tumor Vaccines Targeting for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) by DNA Shuffling.

    PubMed

    Bie, Nana; Zhao, Xiuyun; Li, Zhitao; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-09-01

    Most of tumor antigens are self-proteins with poor antigenicity because of immune tolerance. Here, we describe DNA shuffling for overcoming the tolerance of tumor antigens such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a growth factor associated with tumor angiogenesis. VEGF genes from mouse, rat, human, and chicken were randomly assembled to chimeric genes by DNA shuffling for constructing an expression library, then screened by PCR, SDS-PAGE, and immunization. A chimeric protein named as No. 46 was selected from the library with the strongest immunotherapy effects on mouse H22 hepatocellular carcinoma, which could induce long-lasted and high level of antibodies recognizing VEGF in mice. Immunization with this chimeric protein could significantly inhibit tumor angiogenesis, slow down tumor growth, increase the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice, and inhibit the lung metastases of tumor in mouse. Treatment with the anti-VEGF IgG induced by this chimeric protein also significantly inhibited tumor growth and improved the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice, by blocking the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 pathway of VEGF-VEGFR interaction. Our study provides an efficient approach to overcome the immune tolerance of self-antigens for developing novel tumor vaccines. PMID:27428264

  14. A Novel Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Has Potent Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiufen; Lu, Haizhen; Liang, Jing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Youhui; Zhang, Shuren; Liu, Shangmei; Liu, Binlei

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are promising treatments for many kinds of solid tumors. In this study, we constructed a novel oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2: oHSV2. We investigated the cytopathic effects of oHSV2 in vitro and tested its antitumor efficacy in a 4T1 breast cancer model. We compared its effect on the cell cycle and its immunologic impact with the traditional chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. In vitro data showed that oHSV2 infected most of the human and murine tumor cell lines and was highly oncolytic. oHSV2 infected and killed 4T1 tumor cells independent of their cell cycle phase, whereas doxorubicin mainly blocked cells that were in S and G2/M phase. In vivo study showed that both oHSV2 and doxorubicin had an antitumor effect, though the former was less toxic. oHSV2 treatment alone not only slowed down the growth of tumors without causing weight loss but also induced an elevation of NK cells and mild decrease of Tregs in spleen. In addition, combination therapy of doxorubicin followed by oHSV2 increased survival with weight loss than oHSV2 alone. The data showed that the oncolytic activity of oHSV2 was similar to oHSV1 in cell lines examined and in vivo. Therefore, we concluded that our virus is a safe and effective therapeutic agent for 4T1 breast cancer and that the sequential use of doxorubicin followed by oHSV2 could improve antitumor activity without enhancing doxorubicin’s toxicity. PMID:24671154

  15. Ursolic acid-loaded chitosan nanoparticles induce potent anti-angiogenesis in tumor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Yang, Fen; Wu, Chaomin; Cheng, Xueli; Bai, Haihua; Huang, Dan; Jiang, Jinhuan; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis provides necessary nutrients and oxygen for tumor growth and metastasis; thus, every stage of angiogenesis process is the potential target for cancer therapies. Ursolic acid (UA) is reported to decrease tumor burden through anti-angiogenesis pathway, but its poor water solubility greatly limits its efficiency and clinical application. Here, a simple method for preparing UA-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CH-UA-NPs) with anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activity was demonstrated. In vitro, CH-UA-NPs could significantly inhibit the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). After uptake by HUVECs, CH-UA-NPs were mainly localized in lysosomes and mitochondria, but not nuclei. CH-UA-NPs induced the destruction of lysosome membrane integrity, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and reorganization of cell cytoskeleton. All these changes led to the apoptosis or necrosis in HUVECs. In vivo, CH-UA-NPs could inhibit the angiogenesis in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and H22 xenograft model. Notably, comparing with free UA, such synthesized CH-UA-NPs could save about tenfold of UA doses, implying that this could significantly decrease the side effects induced by high doses of UA in biological organism. Our data showed that CH-UA-NPs and this nanoparticle-based drug delivery system could be as a potential drug candidate for anti-angiogenesis treatment. PMID:26883344

  16. Interleukin-15-Induced CD56+ Myeloid Dendritic Cells Combine Potent Tumor Antigen Presentation with Direct Tumoricidal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Anguille, Sébastien; Lion, Eva; Tel, Jurjen; de Vries, I. Jolanda M; Couderé, Karen; Fromm, Phillip D.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the quintessential antigen-presenting cells of the human immune system and play a prime role in coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses, explaining the strong and still growing interest in their application for cancer immunotherapy. Much current research in the field of DC-based immunotherapy focuses on optimizing the culture conditions for in vitro DC generation in order to assure that DCs with the best possible immunogenic qualities are being used for immunotherapy. In this context, monocyte-derived DCs that are alternatively induced by interleukin-15 (IL-15 DCs) have attracted recent attention due to their superior immunostimulatory characteristics. In this study, we show that IL-15 DCs, in addition to potent tumor antigen-presenting function, possess tumoricidal potential and thus qualify for the designation of killer DCs. Notwithstanding marked expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on a subset of IL-15 DCs, we found no evidence of a further phenotypic overlap between IL-15 DCs and NK cells. Allostimulation and antigen presentation assays confirmed that IL-15 DCs should be regarded as bona fide myeloid DCs not only from the phenotypic but also from the functional point of view. Concerning their cytotoxic activity, we demonstrate that IL-15 DCs are able to induce apoptotic cell death of the human K562 tumor cell line, while sparing tumor antigen-specific T cells. The cytotoxicity of IL-15 DCs is predominantly mediated by granzyme B and, to a small extent, by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but is independent of perforin, Fas ligand and TNF-α. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of a previously unappreciated role for IL-15 in the differentiation of human monocytes towards killer DCs. The observation that IL-15 DCs have killer DC capacity lends further support to their implementation in DC-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23284789

  17. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Muller, David A; Pearson, Frances E; Fernando, Germain J P; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S; Corrie, Simon R; Crichton, Michael L; Wei, Jonathan C J; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  18. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  19. Structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 potently inhibits tumor growth mainly through ROS-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Jing; Yu, Bin; Wang, Jun-Wei; Qi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Kai; Huang, Xin; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells always have increased ROS levels, thus making them more vulnerable to persistent endogenous oxidative stress. The biochemical difference between cancer and normal cells could be exploited to achieve selective cancer cell killing by exogenous ROS-producing agents. Herein we described a structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 and its anticancer efficacy. By241 exhibited potent inhibition against human cancer cells and less toxic to normal cells. By241 concentration-dependently induced apoptosis of MGC-803 and EC9706 cells, accompanied with the mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ROS levels. NAC can completely restore the decreased cell viability of MGC-803 cells caused by by241, suggesting ROS-mediated mechanisms. The expression levels of proteins involved in the mitochondrion-related pathways were detected, showing increased expression of proapoptotic proteins and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and activation of caspases-9/-3, but without activating caspase-8 expression. Pretreatment with Z-VAD-FMK partially rescued by241-induced apoptosis of MGC-803 cells. Additionally, by241 inhibited mTOR, activated p53 and its downstream proteins, cleaved MDM2 and PI3K/AKT as well as NF-κB signaling pathway. In vivo experiments showed that by241 did not have significant acute oral toxicity and exerted good anticancer efficacy against MGC-803 bearing mice models. Therefore, by241 may serve as a lead for further development for cancer therapy. PMID:27527552

  20. Structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 potently inhibits tumor growth mainly through ROS-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Jing; Yu, Bin; Wang, Jun-Wei; Qi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Kai; Huang, Xin; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells always have increased ROS levels, thus making them more vulnerable to persistent endogenous oxidative stress. The biochemical difference between cancer and normal cells could be exploited to achieve selective cancer cell killing by exogenous ROS-producing agents. Herein we described a structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 and its anticancer efficacy. By241 exhibited potent inhibition against human cancer cells and less toxic to normal cells. By241 concentration-dependently induced apoptosis of MGC-803 and EC9706 cells, accompanied with the mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ROS levels. NAC can completely restore the decreased cell viability of MGC-803 cells caused by by241, suggesting ROS-mediated mechanisms. The expression levels of proteins involved in the mitochondrion-related pathways were detected, showing increased expression of proapoptotic proteins and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and activation of caspases-9/-3, but without activating caspase-8 expression. Pretreatment with Z-VAD-FMK partially rescued by241-induced apoptosis of MGC-803 cells. Additionally, by241 inhibited mTOR, activated p53 and its downstream proteins, cleaved MDM2 and PI3K/AKT as well as NF-κB signaling pathway. In vivo experiments showed that by241 did not have significant acute oral toxicity and exerted good anticancer efficacy against MGC-803 bearing mice models. Therefore, by241 may serve as a lead for further development for cancer therapy. PMID:27527552

  1. Multi-component self-assembled anti-tumor nano-vaccines based on MUC1 glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Y; Chen, P G; Liu, Y F; Zhang, B D; Wu, J J; Chen, Y X; Zhao, Y F; Li, Y M

    2016-06-18

    Novel multi-component self-assembled nano-vaccines containing both Pam3CSK4 and CpG were developed for the first time. These multi-component vaccines could effectively activate the macrophages in vitro and elicit strong antibody immune responses and anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. PMID:27216415

  2. Anti-tumor effects of genetic vaccines against HPV major oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Marcelo Nazário; Paolini, Francesca; Massa, Silvia; Curzio, Gianfranca; Illiano, Elena; Duarte Silva, Anna Jéssica; Franconi, Rosella; Bissa, Massimiliano; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; Venuti, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Expression of HPV E5, E6 and E7 oncogenes are likely to overcome the regulation of cell proliferation and to escape immunological control, allowing uncontrolled growth and providing the potential for malignant transformation. Thus, their three oncogenic products may represent ideal target antigens for immunotherapeutic strategies. In previous attempts, we demonstrated that genetic vaccines against recombinant HPV16 E7 antigen were able to affect the tumor growth in a pre-clinical mouse model. To improve this anti-HPV strategy we developed a novel approach in which we explored the effects of E5-based genetic immunization. We designed novel HPV16 E5 genetic vaccines based on two different gene versions: whole E5 gene and E5Multi. The last one is a long multi epitope gene designed as a harmless E5 version. Both E5 genes were codon optimized for mammalian expression. In addition, we demonstrated that HPV 16 E5 oncogene is expressed in C3 mouse cell line making it an elective model for the study of E5 based vaccine. In this mouse model the immunological and biological activity of the E5 vaccines were assessed in parallel with the activity of anti-E7 and anti-E6 vaccines already reported to be effective in an immunotherapeutic setting. These E7 and E6 vaccines were made with mutated oncogenes, the E7GGG mutant that does not bind pRb and the E6F47R mutant that is less effective in inhibiting p53, respectively. Results confirmed the immunological activity of genetic formulations based on attenuated HPV16 oncogenes and showed that E5-based genetic immunization provided notable anti-tumor effects. PMID:25483514

  3. In-situ tumor vaccination: Bringing the fight to the tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Robert H; Campbell, Jean S; Pai, Sara I; Brody, Joshua D; Kohrt, Holbrook EK

    2015-01-01

    After decades of development in the shadow of traditional cancer treatment, immunotherapy has come into the spotlight. Treatment of metastatic tumors with monoclonal antibodies to T cell checkpoints like programed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand, (PD-L1), have resulted in significant clinical responses across multiple tumor types. However, these therapies fail in the majority of patients with solid tumors, in particular those who lack PD1+CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within their tumors. Intratumoral “in situ vaccination” approaches seek to enhance immunogenicity, generate tumor infiltrating lymophcytes (TIL) and drive a systemic anti-tumor immune response, directed against “unvaccinated,” disseminated tumors. Given the emerging picture of intratumoral immunotherapy as safe and capable of delivering systemic efficacy, it is anticipated that these approaches will become integrated into future multi-modality therapy. PMID:26055074

  4. A novel peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine of human telomerase reverse transcriptase induces a potent cytotoxic T-cell response in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hong; Hao, Jia; Wu, Chao; Shi, Yun; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Fang, Dian-chun . E-mail: fandianchun@hotmail.com

    2007-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is highly expressed in over 85% of human cancers, which makes it a broadly applicable molecular target for cancer therapy. Several groups have demonstrated that hTERT can efficiently evoke specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses for malignant tumors. In the present study, we developed a novel virus-like particulate peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine (PNDV) of hTERT, which was composed of a low-affinity epitope variant with encoding full-length gene in the same virus-size particulate. We verified the formation of PNDV by DNA retarding assay, DNase I protection assay and transmission electron microscopy, and confirmed its immunogenicity and transfection activities in mammalian cells. Furthermore, in vivo immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice generated efficient IFN-{gamma} secretion and hTERT-specific CTLs which are known to cause selective cell death of telomerase positive gastrointestinal cancer cells. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on collocating a low-affinity epitope variant with a full-length hTERT gene for anti-cancer vaccine design. This novel strategy for vaccine design not only enables enhanced immunity to a universal tumor antigen, but also has the potential to generate CTLs effective in telomerase-positive tumor cells of diverse tissue origins. Therefore, our findings bear significant implications for immunotherapy of human cancers.

  5. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  6. Pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of a MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boqi; Wang, Juan; Guo, Yingying; Chen, Tanxiu; Ni, Weihua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Nannan; Xie, Fei; Tai, Guixiang

    2016-04-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1), as an oncogene, plays a key role in the progression and tumorigenesis of many human adenocarcinomas and is an attractive target in tumor immunotherapy. Our previous study showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific Th1-dominant immune response, simulated MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing activity, and could significantly inhibit MUC1-expression B16 cells' growth in mice. To help move the vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial, in the current study, a pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of the vaccine was conducted. The evaluation was comprised of a single-dose acute toxicity study in mice, repeat-dose chronic toxicity and immunogenicity studies in rats, and pilot toxicity and immunogenicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys. The results showed that treatment with the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine did not cause any organ toxicity, except for arthritis or local nodules induced by BCG in several rats. Furthermore, the vaccine significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ in rats, indicating that Th1 cells were activated. In addition, the results showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific IgG antibody response both in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Collectively, these data are beneficial to move the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial. PMID:26896668

  7. Mucosal Imprinting of Vaccine-Induced CD8+ T Cells Is Crucial to Inhibit the Growth of Mucosal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Federico; Bureau, Michel-Francis; Freyburger, Ludovic; Clement, Olivier; Marcheteau, Elie; Gey, Alain; Fraisse, Guillaume; Bouguin, Cécilia; Merillon, Nathalie; Dransart, Estelle; Tran, Thi; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Autret, Gwennhael; Thiebaud, Marine; Suleman, Muhammad; Riffault, Sabine; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Launay, Odile; Danel, Claire; Taieb, Julien; Richardson, Jennifer; Zitvogel, Laurence; Fridman, Wolf H.; Johannes, Ludger; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although many human cancers are located in mucosal sites, most cancer vaccines are tested against subcutaneous tumors in preclinical models. We therefore wondered whether mucosa-specific homing instructions to the immune system might influence mucosal tumor outgrowth. We showed that the growth of orthotopic head and neck or lung cancers was inhibited when a cancer vaccine was delivered by the intranasal mucosal route but not the intramuscular route. This antitumor effect was dependent on CD8+ T cells. Indeed, only intranasal vaccination elicited mucosal-specific CD8+ T cells expressing the mucosal integrin CD49a. Blockade of CD49a decreased intratumoral CD8+ T cell infiltration and the efficacy of cancer vaccine on mucosal tumor. We then showed that after intranasal vaccination, dendritic cells from lung parenchyma, but not those from spleen, induced the expression of CD49a on cocultured specific CD8+ T cells. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from human mucosal lung cancer also expressed CD49a, which supports the relevance and possible extrapolation of these results in humans. We thus identified a link between the route of vaccination and the induction of a mucosal homing program on induced CD8+ T cells that controlled their trafficking. Immunization route directly affected the efficacy of the cancer vaccine to control mucosal tumors. PMID:23408053

  8. Supercritical fluid extracts of rosemary leaves exhibit potent anti-inflammation and anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Huei; Su, Jeng-De; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Ho, Shin-Shien; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical fluid SF-CO2 treatment of Rosemarinus officinalis L. fresh leaves under optimum conditions (80 degrees C at 5,000 psi) yielded 5.3% of extract supercritical fluid extraction (SFE)-80, in which five major active principles were identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), viz., rosmarinic acid, carnosol, 12-methoxycarnosic acid, carnosic acid, and methyl carnosate. Total phenolic content was 155.8 mg/ gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g in SFE-80, which showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging of 81.86% at 0.01 mg/ml. When treated in RAW 264.7, apparent dose-dependent NO inhibition occurred at dosages of 1.56 to 6.25 microg/ml, and more drastically at 12.5 and 25 microg/ml. At 0.5 to 5.0 microg/ml, SFE-80 exhibited dose-dependent viability suppression and significant tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in Hep 3B, whereas no effect was found in Chang liver cells. Furthermore, no effect was observed in RAW 264.7 at dosages of 3.13 to 25 microg/ml, indicating that SFE-80 exhibited a noncytotoxic character. Conclusively, rosemary can be considered an herbal anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. PMID:17827696

  9. Rapid Reprogramming of Primary Human Astrocytes into Potent Tumor-Initiating Cells with Defined Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Liu, Xinjian; Sampson, John H; Bigner, Darell D; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) are thought to drive brain cancer, but their cellular and molecular origins remain uncertain. Here, we report the successful generation of induced CSC (iCSC) from primary human astrocytes through the expression of defined genetic factors. Combined transduction of four factors, Myc, Oct-4, p53DD, and Ras, induced efficient transformation of primary human astrocytes into malignant cells with powerful tumor-initiating capabilities. Notably, transplantation of 100 transduced cells into nude mice was sufficient for tumor formation. The cells showed unlimited self-renewal ability with robust telomerase activities. In addition, they expressed typical glioma stem-like cell markers, such as CD133, CD15, and CD90. Moreover, these cells could form spheres in culture and differentiate into neuron-like, astrocyte-like, and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Finally, they also displayed resistance to the widely used brain cancer drug temozolomide. These iCSCs could provide important tools for studies of glioma biology and therapeutics development. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5143-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27364552

  10. Interest of Tumor-Specific CD4 T Helper 1 Cells for Therapeutic Anticancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galaine, Jeanne; Borg, Christophe; Godet, Yann; Adotévi, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, immunotherapy represents one promising approach for cancer treatment. Recently, spectacular results of cancer immunotherapy clinical trials have confirmed the crucial role of immune system in cancer regression. Therapeutic cancer vaccine represents one widely used immunotherapy strategy to stimulate tumor specific T cell responses but clinical impact remains disappointing in targeting CD8 T cells. Although CD8 T cells have been initially considered to be the main protagonists, it is now clear that CD4 T cells also play a critical role in antitumor response. In this article, we discuss the role of tumor antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses and how we can target these cells to improve cancer vaccines. PMID:26350591

  11. Comparative antitumor effect among GM-CSF, IL-12 and GM-CSF+IL-12 genetically modified tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Miguel, A; Herrero, M J; Sendra, L; Botella, R; Algás, R; Sánchez, M; Aliño, S F

    2013-10-01

    Genetically modified cells have been shown to be one of the most effective cancer vaccine strategies. An evaluation is made of the efficacy of both preventive and therapeutic antitumor vaccines against murine melanoma, using C57BL/6 mice and irradiated B16 tumor cells expressing granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-12 (IL-12) or both. Tumor was transplanted by the injection of wild-type B16 cells. Tumor growth and survival were measured to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination. Specific humoral response and immunoglobulin G (IgG) switch were evaluated measuring total IgG and IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes against tumor membrane proteins of B16 cells. In preventive vaccination, all treated groups showed delayed tumor growth. In addition, the group vaccinated to express only GM-CSF achieved 100% animal survival (P<0.005). Vaccination with GM-CSF+IL-12-producing B16 cells yielded lesser results (60% survival, P<0.005). Furthermore, all surviving animals remained disease-free after second tumor implantation 1 year later. The therapeutic vaccination strategies resulted in significantly delayed tumor growth, mainly using B16 cells producing GM-CSF+IL-12 cytokines, with 70% tumor growth inhibition (P<0.001)-although none of the animals reached overall survival. The results obtained suggest that the GM-CSF+IL-12 combination only increases the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines. No differences in classical regulatory T cells were found among the different groups. PMID:23969885

  12. Induction of Potent and Long-Lived Antibody and Cellular Immune Responses in the Genitorectal Mucosa Could be the Critical Determinant of HIV Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia; Ondondo, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The field of HIV prevention has indeed progressed in leaps and bounds, but with major limitations of the current prevention and treatment options, the world remains desperate for an HIV vaccine. Sadly, this continues to be elusive, because more than 30 years since its discovery there is no licensed HIV vaccine. Research aiming to define immunological biomarkers to accurately predict vaccine efficacy have focused mainly on systemic immune responses, and as such, studies defining correlates of protection in the genitorectal mucosa, the primary target site for HIV entry and seeding are sparse. Clearly, difficulties in sampling and analysis of mucosal specimens, as well as their limited size have been a major deterrent in characterizing the type (mucosal antibodies, cytokines, chemokines, or CTL), threshold (magnitude, depth, and breadth) and viral inhibitory capacity of HIV-1-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa, where they are needed to immediately block HIV acquisition and arrest subsequent virus dissemination. Nevertheless, a few studies document the existence of HIV-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa of HIV-infected aviremic and viremic controllers, as well as in highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS) individuals with natural resistance to HIV-1. Some of these responses strongly correlate with protection from HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, thus providing significant clues of the ideal components of an efficacious HIV vaccine. In this study, we provide an overview of the key features of protective immune responses found in HEPS, elite and viremic controllers, and discuss how these can be achieved through mucosal immunization. Inevitably, HIV vaccine development research will have to consider strategies that elicit potent antibody and cellular immune responses within the genitorectal mucosa or induction of systemic immune cells with an inherent potential to home and persist at mucosal sites of HIV entry. PMID

  13. Ad35 and Ad26 Vaccine Vectors Induce Potent and Cross-Reactive Antibody and T-Cell Responses to Multiple Filovirus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Roland; Gillisen, Gert; Roos, Anna; Koning, Marina; van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Weijtens, Mo; Grazia Pau, Maria; Radošević, Katarina; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Goudsmit, Jaap; Rodríguez, Ariane

    2012-01-01

    Filoviruses cause sporadic but highly lethal outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever in Africa in the human population. Currently, no drug or vaccine is available for treatment or prevention. A previous study with a vaccine candidate based on the low seroprevalent adenoviruses 26 and 35 (Ad26 and Ad35) was shown to provide protection against homologous Ebola Zaire challenge in non human primates (NHP) if applied in a prime-boost regimen. Here we have aimed to expand this principle to construct and evaluate Ad26 and Ad35 vectors for development of a vaccine to provide universal filovirus protection against all highly lethal strains that have caused major outbreaks in the past. We have therefore performed a phylogenetic analysis of filovirus glycoproteins to select the glycoproteins from two Ebola species (Ebola Zaire and Ebola Sudan/Gulu,), two Marburg strains (Marburg Angola and Marburg Ravn) and added the more distant non-lethal Ebola Ivory Coast species for broadest coverage. Ad26 and Ad35 vectors expressing these five filovirus glycoproteins were evaluated to induce a potent cellular and humoral immune response in mice. All adenoviral vectors induced a humoral immune response after single vaccination in a dose dependent manner that was cross-reactive within the Ebola and Marburg lineages. In addition, both strain-specific as well as cross-reactive T cell responses could be detected. A heterologous Ad26–Ad35 prime-boost regime enhanced mainly the humoral and to a lower extend the cellular immune response against the transgene. Combination of the five selected filovirus glycoproteins in one multivalent vaccine potentially elicits protective immunity in man against all major filovirus strains that have caused lethal outbreaks in the last 20 years. PMID:23236343

  14. Combining Anthrax Vaccine and Therapy: a Dominant-Negative Inhibitor of Anthrax Toxin Is Also a Potent and Safe Immunogen for Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Aulinger, Benedikt A.; Roehrl, Michael H.; Mekalanos, John J.; Collier, R. John; Wang, Julia Y.

    2005-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the unimpeded growth of Bacillus anthracis in the host and the secretion of toxins. The currently available vaccine is based on protective antigen (PA), a central component of anthrax toxin. Vaccination with PA raises no direct immune response against the bacilli and, being a natural toxin component, PA might be hazardous when used immediately following exposure to B. anthracis. Thus, we have sought to develop a vaccine or therapeutic agent that is safe and eliminates both secreted toxins and bacilli. To that end, we have previously developed a dually active vaccine by conjugating the capsular poly-γ-d-glutamate (PGA) with PA to elicit the production of antibodies specific for both bacilli and toxins. In the present report, we describe the improved potency of anthrax vaccines through the use of a dominant-negative inhibitory (DNI) mutant to replace PA in PA or PA-PGA vaccines. When tested in mice, DNI alone is more immunogenic than PA, and DNI-PGA conjugate elicits significantly higher levels of antibodies against PA and PGA than PA-PGA conjugate. To explain the enhanced immunogenicity of DNI, we propose that the two point mutations in DNI may have improved epitopes of PA allowing better antigen presentation to helper T cells. Alternatively, these mutations may enhance the immunological processing of PA by altering endosomal trafficking of the toxin in antigen-presenting cells. Because DNI has previously been demonstrated to inhibit anthrax toxin, postexposure use of DNI-based vaccines, including conjugate vaccines, may provide improved immunogenicity and therapeutic activity simultaneously. PMID:15908368

  15. Immune Escape Mechanisms are Plasmodium's Secret Weapons Foiling the Success of Potent and Persistently Efficacious Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Fouzia; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S

    2015-12-01

    Despite decades of active research, an efficacious vaccine mediating long-term protection is still not available. This review highlights various mechanisms and the different facets by which the parasites outsmart the immune system. An understanding of how the parasites escape immune recognition and interfere with the induction of a protective immune response that provides sterilizing immunity will be crucial to vaccine design. PMID:26342537

  16. Cholera toxin B subunit acts as a potent systemic adjuvant for HIV-1 DNA vaccination intramuscularly in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Ying; Hsi, Jenny; Wang, Hongzhi; Tao, Ran; Shao, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was investigated as a classical mucosal adjuvant that can increase vaccine immunogenicity. In this study, we found out the in vitro efficacy of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in activating mice bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. In vitro RNA and transcriptional level profiling arrays revealed that CTB guides high levels of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. Based on the robustness of these profiling results, we examined the induction of HIV Env-specific immunity by CTB co-inoculated with HIV Env DNA vaccine intramuscularly in vivo. CTB enhanced HIV-Env specific cellular immune responses in Env-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, compared with DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, CTB induced high levels of Env specific humoral response and promoted antibody maturation after the third round of vaccination. This combination immunization strategy induced a Th2-type bias response which is indicative of a high ratio of IgG1/IgG2a. This study reports that CTB as a classical mucosal adjuvant could enhance HIV-1 DNA-based vaccine immunogenicity intramuscularly; therefore, these findings suggest that CTB could serve as an effective candidate adjuvant for DNA vaccination. PMID:24633335

  17. Chicken IL-7 as a potent adjuvant enhances IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine immunogenicity and protective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shanshan; Zuo, Yuzhu; Li, Nan; Li, Xiujin; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Liyue; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Jianlou; Cui, Dan; He, Pingyou; Xu, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhu, Xiutong; Zhong, Fei

    2016-09-25

    Our previous work has demonstrated that the mammalian interleukin-7 (IL-7) gene can enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Whether chicken IL-7 (chIL-7) possesses the ability to enhance the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) remained unknown. To investigate this, we constructed a VP2 antigenic region (VP2366) gene and chIL-7 gene vectors, co-immunized chicken with these vectors and analyzed the effects of the chIL-7 gene on VP2366 gene immunogenicity. Results showed that co-administrated chIL-7 gene with VP2 DNA vaccine significantly increased specific serum antibody titers against IBDV, and enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-4 productions. More importantly, chIL-7 gene significantly increased VP2366 gene-induced protection against virulent IBDV infection, indicating that the chIL-7 gene possessed the capacity to enhance VP2366 DNA vaccine immunogenicity, and therefore might function as a novel adjuvant for IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine. Mechanically, chIL-7 could stimulate the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) expressions in vitro and in vivo, which might be involved in chIL-7 enhancement of the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine. PMID:27599941

  18. Intranasal mRNA nanoparticle vaccination induces prophylactic and therapeutic anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Staats, Herman F.; Leong, Kam W.; Nair, Smita K.

    2014-01-01

    Direct in vivo administration of messenger RNA (mRNA) delivered in both naked and nanoparticle formats are actively investigated because the use of dendritic cells transfected ex vivo with mRNA for cancer therapy is expensive and needs significant infrastructure. Notably, intravenous and subcutaneous injections are the only routes of administration tested for mRNA nanoparticle tumor vaccination. In this report, we demonstrate that tumor immunity can be achieved via nasal administration of mRNA. Mice nasally immunized with mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format demonstrate delayed tumor progression in both prophylactic and therapeutic immunization models. The observed tumor immunity correlates with splenic antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and is achieved only when mRNA is delivered in nanoparticle but not in naked format. In conclusion, we demonstrate, as a proof-of-concept, a non-invasive approach to mRNA tumor vaccination, increasing its potential as a broadly applicable and off-the-shelf therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:24894817

  19. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S; Anthony, Scott M; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases. PMID:24599269

  20. Vaccines targeting tumor blood vessel antigens promote CD8(+) T cell-dependent tumor eradication or dormancy in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Bose, Anamika; Komita, Hideo; Taylor, Jennifer L; Chi, Nina; Lowe, Devin B; Okada, Hideho; Cao, Ying; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Cohen, Peter A; Storkus, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    We have recently shown that effective cytokine gene therapy of solid tumors in HLA-A2 transgenic (HHD) mice lacking murine MHC class I molecule expression results in the generation of HLA-A2-restricted CD8(+) T effector cells selectively recognizing tumor blood vessel-associated pericytes and/or vascular endothelial cells. Using an HHD model in which HLA-A2(neg) tumor (MC38 colon carcinoma or B16 melanoma) cells are not recognized by the CD8(+) T cell repertoire, we now show that vaccines on the basis of tumor-associated blood vessel Ags (TBVA) elicit protective Tc1-dependent immunity capable of mediating tumor regression or extending overall survival. Vaccine efficacy was not observed if (HLA-A2(neg)) wild-type C57BL/6 mice were instead used as recipient animals. In the HHD model, effective vaccination resulted in profound infiltration of tumor lesions by CD8(+) (but not CD4(+)) T cells, in a coordinate reduction of CD31(+) blood vessels in the tumor microenvironment, and in the "spreading" of CD8(+) T cell responses to alternate TBVA that were not intrinsic to the vaccine. Protective Tc1-mediated immunity was durable and directly recognized pericytes and/or vascular endothelial cells flow-sorted from tumor tissue but not from tumor-uninvolved normal kidneys harvested from these same animals. Strikingly, the depletion of CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells at late time points after effective therapy frequently resulted in the recurrence of disease at the site of the regressed primary lesion. This suggests that the vaccine-induced anti-TBVA T cell repertoire can mediate the clinically preferred outcomes of either effectively eradicating tumors or policing a state of (occult) tumor dormancy. PMID:22246626

  1. A novel TLR2 agonist from Bordetella pertussis is a potent adjuvant that promotes protective immunity with an acellular pertussis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dunne, A; Mielke, L A; Allen, A C; Sutton, C E; Higgs, R; Cunningham, C C; Higgins, S C; Mills, K H G

    2015-05-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a severe and often lethal respiratory infection in infants. A recent resurgence of pertussis has been linked with waning or suboptimal immunity induced with acellular pertussis vaccines (Pa) that were introduced to most developed countries in the 1990s because of safety concerns around the use of whole-cell pertussis vaccines (Pw). Pa are composed of individual B. pertussis antigens absorbed to alum and promote strong antibody, T helper type 2 (Th2) and Th17 responses, but are less effective at inducing cellular immunity mediated by Th1 cells. In contrast, Pw, which include endogenous Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, induce Th1 as well as Th17 responses. Here we report the identification and characterization of novel TLR2-activating lipoproteins from B. pertussis. These proteins contain a characteristic N-terminal signal peptide that is unique to Gram-negative bacteria and we demonstrate that one of these lipoproteins, BP1569, activates murine dendritic cells and macrophages and human mononuclear cells via TLR2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a corresponding synthetic lipopeptide LP1569 has potent immunostimulatory and adjuvant properties, capable of enhancing Th1, Th17, and IgG2a antibody responses induced in mice with an experimental Pa that conferred superior protection against B. pertussis infection than an equivalent vaccine formulated with alum. PMID:25315966

  2. Ley specific antibody with potent anti-tumor activity is internalized and degraded in lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, J.; Garrigues, U.; Hellström, I.; Hellström, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    BR96 is a monoclonal antibody (MAb) that recognizes many human carcinomas and can kill antigen-positive tumor cells in vitro. Using both gold and radiolabeled MAb, the distribution and cellular processing of BR96 during cytolysis has been determined. After a brief (< 3 minutes) MAb treatment, cells in suspension are stained by the nuclear viability dye propidium iodide. Whole MAb and F(ab')2 fragments are equally cytotoxic; monovalent F(ab) fragments, however, have no effect on dye uptake unless cross-linked with goat anti-mouse IgG. The level of toxicity is dependent on both MAb dose and on cell surface receptor density. Cell contact may regulate receptor expression. BR96 receptors are more abundant on cells migrating into the open areas of a scratch wounded confluent culture than on the adjacent contact-inhibited cells. BR96 can also inhibit the anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells in soft agar showing that its effects on propidium iodide staining are not due to transient changes in membrane permeability. Immunogold electron microscopy reveals that, after a 1-minute treatment, BR96 induces significant infolding of the plasma membrane and that internalized MAb is localized to these structures. Immediately thereafter, large cell surface and intracellular vesicles form, mitochondria are swollen, and membrane integrity is lost. Therefore, BR96 seems to cause morphological changes characteristic of necrosis rather than apoptosis. When bound to adherent carcinoma cells, BR96 is distributed uniformly on the apical surface of cells labeled at 4 C and is enriched at points of cell substratum contact. Upon warming of the cells to 37 C, BR96 localizes in small perinuclear clusters and the cell margin is now devoid of label. Immunogold electron microscopy reveals that BR96 undergoes receptor mediated internalization and is localized within the same coated pits, endosomes, and lysosomes as the transferrin receptor. Quantitative studies using iodinated BR96 show that

  3. Akt inhibition enhances expansion of potent tumor-specific lymphocytes with memory cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Joseph G; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Clever, David; Gros, Alena; Eil, Robert L; Tran, Eric; Hanada, Ken-Ichi; Yu, Zhiya; Palmer, Douglas C; Kerkar, Sid P; Michalek, Ryan D; Upham, Trevor; Leonardi, Anthony; Acquavella, Nicolas; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Gattinoni, Luca; Muranski, Pawel; Sundrud, Mark S; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Fearon, Douglas T; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-01-15

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) results in complete regression of advanced cancer in some patients, but the efficacy of this potentially curative therapy may be limited by poor persistence of TIL after adoptive transfer. Pharmacologic inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase Akt has recently been shown to promote immunologic memory in virus-specific murine models, but whether this approach enhances features of memory (e.g., long-term persistence) in TIL that are characteristically exhausted and senescent is not established. Here, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of Akt enables expansion of TIL with the transcriptional, metabolic, and functional properties characteristic of memory T cells. Consequently, Akt inhibition results in enhanced persistence of TIL after adoptive transfer into an immunodeficient animal model and augments antitumor immunity of CD8 T cells in a mouse model of cell-based immunotherapy. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt represents a novel immunometabolomic approach to enhance the persistence of antitumor T cells and improve the efficacy of cell-based immunotherapy for metastatic cancer. PMID:25432172

  4. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively. PMID:26408817

  5. MUC1 and survivin combination tumor gene vaccine generates specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Liu, Chenlu; Zhang, Fangfang; Geng, Fei; Xia, Qiu; Lu, Zhenzhen; Xu, Ping; Xie, Yu; Wu, Hui; Yu, Bin; Wu, Jiaxin; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2016-05-23

    MUC1 and survivin are ideal tumor antigens. Although many cancer vaccines targeting survivin or MUC1 have entered clinical trials, no vaccine combining MUC1 and survivin have been reported. Due to tumor heterogeneity, vaccines containing a combination of antigens may have improved efficacy and coverage of a broader spectrum of cancer targets. Here, cellular responses and anti-tumor activities induced by a combination of DNA vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin (MS) were evaluated. Results showed that CTL activity and inhibition of tumor growth were obviously enhanced in mice immunized with the combined vaccine in a protection assay. However, in order to enhance the therapeutic effect in the treatment assay, a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vaccine expressing MUC1 and survivin (Ad-MS) was used as a booster following the DNA vaccine prime. Meanwhile, IL-2 promoting T cell proliferation was used as an immunoadjuvant for the DNA vaccine. Results showed that the CTL activity response to the DNA vaccine was enhanced nearly 200% when boosted by the rAd vaccine and was further enhanced by nearly 60% when combined with the IL-2 adjuvant. Therefore, DNA prime combined with rAd boost and IL-2 (MS/IL2/Ad-MS) adjuvant was considered as the best strategy and further evaluated. Multiple cytokines promoting cellular immune responses were shown to be greatly enhanced in mice immunized with MS/IL2/Ad-MS. Moreover, in the treatment assay, the tumor inhibition rate of MS/IL2/Ad-MS reached up to 50.1%, which may be attributed to the enhancement of immune responses and reduction of immunosuppressive factors in tumor-bearing mice. These results suggested that immunization with the combination vaccine targeting MUC1 and survivin using a DNA prime-rAd boost strategy along with IL-2 adjuvant may be an effective method for breaking through immune tolerance to tumors expressing these antigens with potential therapeutic benefits in melanoma cancer. PMID:27113167

  6. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M. S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  7. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  8. The inhibition of the T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim3) pathway enhances the efficacy of tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jin; Woo, Min-Yeong; Heo, Yoo Mi; Kim, Jung Sik; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun

    2010-11-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim3) plays an important role in the Th1-mediated immune response; however, its effect on the efficacy of tumor vaccines has not been fully evaluated. Here, we demonstrate the effect of Tim3 pathway inhibition on tumor growth in mice. Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) cells expressing a Tim3 pathway inhibitor, when injected into mice, showed suppressed tumor growth and a reduced frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T-cells. Furthermore, Tim3 pathway inhibition significantly enhanced the efficacy of a prophylactic tumor vaccine and marginally enhanced the efficacy of a therapeutic tumor vaccine. However, when given in combination with the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil, the therapeutic tumor vaccine capable of Tim3 pathway inhibition had no additional anti-tumor effect. Our results show that Tim3 pathway inhibition can enhance tumor vaccine efficacy. PMID:20920468

  9. Cyclophosphamide as a potent inhibitor of tumor thioredoxin reductase in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xufang; Zhang Jinsong . E-mail: zjszyzzc@mail.hf.ah.cn; Xu Tongwen

    2007-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is in the nitrogen mustard group of alkylating antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents. It is one of the most frequently used antitumor agents for the treatment of a broad spectrum of human cancers. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin and play an important role in multiple cellular events related to carcinogenesis including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell signaling. This enzyme represents a promising target for the development of cytostatic agents. The purpose of this study is to determine whether CTX could target TrxR in vivo. Lewis lung carcinoma and solid H22 hepatoma treated with 50-250 mg/kg CTX for 3 h lost TrxR activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Over 75% and 95% of TrxR activity was lost at the dose of 250 mg/kg. There was, however, a recovery of TrxR activity such that it attained normal levels by 120 h after a dose of 250 mg/kg. In addition, we found that CTX caused a preferential TrxR inhibition over other antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. We also used ascites H22 cells to investigate cancer cells response after TrxR was inhibited by CTX in vivo since CTX is needed to be activated by liver cytochrome P450 enzymes. The time course and dose-dependent changes of cellular TrxR activity were similar with those in tumor tissue. CTX caused a dose-dependent cellular proliferation inhibition which was positively correlated with TrxR inhibition at 3 h. Furthermore, when 3 h CTX-treated cells with various TrxR backgrounds, harvested from ascites-bearing mice, were implanted into mice, the proliferations of these cells were again proportionally dependent on TrxR activity. The TrxR inhibition could thereby be considered as a crucial mechanism contributing to anticancer effect seen upon clinical use of CTX.

  10. Vaccine therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Bulent; Zhou, Donger; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Edil, Barish H; Zheng, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease and currently available therapies have significant limitations. Pancreatic cancer is thus an ideal setting for the development of novel treatment modalities such as immunotherapy. However, relevant obstacles must be overcome for immunotherapeutic regimens against pancreatic cancer to be successful. Vaccine therapy relies on the administration of biological preparations that include an antigen that (at least ideally) is specifically expressed by malignant cells, boosting the natural ability of the immune system to react against neoplastic cells. There are a number of ways to deliver anticancer vaccines. Potent vaccines stimulate antigen presentation by dendritic cells, hence driving the expansion of antigen-specific effector and memory T cells. Unlike vaccines given as a prophylaxis against infectious diseases, anticancer vaccines require the concurrent administration of agents that interfere with the natural predisposition of tumors to drive immunosuppression. The safety and efficacy of vaccines against pancreatic cancer are nowadays being tested in early phase clinical trials. PMID:24498551

  11. COH-203, a novel microtubule inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-tumor activity via p53-dependent senescence in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Huan; Zuo, Dai-Ying; Bai, Zhao-Shi; Xu, Jing-Wen; Li, Zeng-Qiang; Shen, Qi-Rong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Wei-Ge; Wu, Ying-Liang

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • COH-203 exhibits anti-hepatoma effects in vitro and in vivo with low toxicity. • COH-203 inhibits tubulin polymerization. • COH-203 induces mitotic arrest followed by mitotic slippage in BEL-7402 cells. • COH-203 induces p53-dependent senescence in BEL-7402 cells. - Abstract: 5-(3-Hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-3H-1, 2-dithiol-3-one (COH-203) is a novel synthesized analogue of combretastatin A-4 that can be classified as a microtubule inhibitor. In this study, we evaluated the anti-hepatoma effect of COH-203 in vitro and in vivo and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. COH-203 was shown to be more effective in inhibiting the proliferation of liver cancer cells compared with normal liver cells. COH-203 also displayed potent anti-tumor activity in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model without significant toxicity. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that treatment with COH-203 induced mitotic arrest by inhibiting tubulin polymerization in BEL-7402 liver cancer cells. Long-term COH-203 treatment in BEL-7402 cells led to mitotic slippage followed by senescence via the p14{sup Arf}–p53–p21 and p16{sup INK4α}–Rb pathways. Furthermore, suppression of p53 via pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) and p53-siRNA attenuated COH-203-induced senescence in BEL-7402 cells, suggesting that COH-203 induced senescence p53-dependently. In conclusion, we report for the first time that COH-203, one compound in the combretastatin family, promotes anti-proliferative activity through the induction of p-53 dependent senescence. Our findings will provide a molecular rationale for the development of COH-203 as a promising anti-tumor agent.

  12. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Aaes, Tania Løve; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Delvaeye, Tinneke; De Craene, Bram; De Koker, Stefaan; Heyndrickx, Liesbeth; Delrue, Iris; Taminau, Joachim; Wiernicki, Bartosz; De Groote, Philippe; Garg, Abhishek D; Leybaert, Luc; Grooten, Johan; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Agostinis, Patrizia; Berx, Geert; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Krysko, Dmitri V

    2016-04-12

    Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns and promote maturation of dendritic cells, the cross-priming of cytotoxic T cells, and the production of IFN-γ in response to tumor antigen stimulation. Using both FADD-dependent and FADD-independent RIPK3 induction systems, we demonstrate the efficient vaccination potential of immunogenic necroptotic cells. Our study broadens the current concept of immunogenic cell death and opens doors for the development of new strategies in cancer therapy. PMID:27050509

  13. Synergistic anti-tumor therapy by a comb-like multifunctional antibody nanoarray with exceptionally potent activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huafei; Sun, Yun; Chen, Di; Zhao, He; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhu, Xiandi; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fulei; Wei, Huafeng; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneously blocking multiple mediators offers new hope for the treatment of complex diseases. However, the curative potential of current combination therapy by chronological administration of separate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or multi-specific mAbs is still moderate due to inconvenient manipulation, low cooperative effectors, poor pharmacokinetics and insufficient tumor accumulation. Here, we describe a facile strategy that arms distinct mAbs with cooperative effectors onto a long chain to form a multicomponent comb-like nano mAb. Unlike dissociative parental mAbs, the multifunctional mAb nanoarray (PL-RB) constructed from type I/II anti-CD20 mAbs shows good pharmacokinetics. This PL-RB simultaneously targets distinct epitopes on a single antigen (Ag) and neighboring Ags on different lymphocytes. This unique intra- and intercellular Ag cross-linking endows the multifunctional mAb nanoarray with potent apoptosis activity. The exceptional apoptosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) that are synchronously evoked by the nano PL-RB are further synergistically promoted via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR), which resulted in high intratumor accumulation and excellent anti-lymphoma efficiency. PMID:26508306

  14. Synergistic anti-tumor therapy by a comb-like multifunctional antibody nanoarray with exceptionally potent activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huafei; Sun, Yun; Chen, Di; Zhao, He; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhu, Xiandi; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fulei; Wei, Huafeng; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously blocking multiple mediators offers new hope for the treatment of complex diseases. However, the curative potential of current combination therapy by chronological administration of separate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or multi-specific mAbs is still moderate due to inconvenient manipulation, low cooperative effectors, poor pharmacokinetics and insufficient tumor accumulation. Here, we describe a facile strategy that arms distinct mAbs with cooperative effectors onto a long chain to form a multicomponent comb-like nano mAb. Unlike dissociative parental mAbs, the multifunctional mAb nanoarray (PL-RB) constructed from type I/II anti-CD20 mAbs shows good pharmacokinetics. This PL-RB simultaneously targets distinct epitopes on a single antigen (Ag) and neighboring Ags on different lymphocytes. This unique intra- and intercellular Ag cross-linking endows the multifunctional mAb nanoarray with potent apoptosis activity. The exceptional apoptosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) that are synchronously evoked by the nano PL-RB are further synergistically promoted via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR), which resulted in high intratumor accumulation and excellent anti-lymphoma efficiency.

  15. CCL4 as an adjuvant for DNA vaccination in a Her2/neu mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, T; Pham-Duc, M; Gries, M; Dörken, B; Pezzutto, A; Westermann, J

    2016-06-01

    Chemokines are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, MIP-1β) is a CC chemokine that has a broad spectrum of target cells including immature dendritic cells, which express the cognate receptor CCR5. We asked whether a plasmid encoding CCL4 is able to improve tumor protection and immune responses in a Her2/neu+ mouse tumor model. Balb/c mice were immunized twice intramuscularly with plasmid DNA on days 1 and 15. On day 25, a tumor challenge was performed with 2 × 10(5) syngeneic Her2/neu+ D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Different groups of mice were vaccinated with pDNA(Her2/neu) plus pDNA(CCL4), pDNA(Her2/neu), pDNA(CCL4) or mock vector alone. Our results show that CCL4 is able to (i) improve tumor protection and (ii) augment a TH1-polarized immune response against Her2/neu. Although Her2/neu-specific humoral and T-cell immune responses were comparable with that induced in previous studies using CCL19 or CCL21 as adjuvants, tumor protection conferred by CCL4 was inferior. Whether this is due to a different spectrum of (innate) immune cells, remains to be clarified. However, combination of CCL19/21 with CCL4 might be a reasonable approach in the future, particularly for DNA vaccination in Her2/neu+ breast cancer in the situation of minimal residual disease. PMID:27056671

  16. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  17. Fc Receptor-Mediated Phagocytosis in Tissues as a Potent Mechanism for Preventive and Therapeutic HIV Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sips, Magdalena; Krykbaeva, Marina; Diefenbach, Thomas J.; Ghebremichael, Musie; Bowman, Brittany A.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Boesch, Austin W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Kwon, Douglas S.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Brouckaert, Peter; Schacker, Timothy W.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    While the development of a protective HIV vaccine is the ultimate goal of HIV research, to date only one HIV vaccine trial, the RV144, has successfully induced a protective response. The 31% protection from infection achieved in the RV144 trial was linked to the induction of non-neutralizing antibodies, able to mediate ADCC, suggestive of an important role of Fc-mediated functions in protection. Likewise, Fc-mediated antiviral activity was recently shown to play a critical role in actively suppressing the viral reservoir, however, the Fc-effector mechanisms within tissues that provide protection from or after infection are largely unknown. Here we aimed to define the landscape of effector cells and Fc-receptors present within vulnerable tissues. We found negligible Fc-receptor expressing NK cells in the female reproductive and gastrointestinal mucosa. Conversely, Fc-receptor expressing macrophages were highly enriched in most tissues, but neutrophils mediated superior antibody-mediated phagocytosis. Modifications in Fc domain of VRC01 antibody increased phagocytic responses in both phagocytes. These data suggest that non-ADCC mediated mechanisms, such as phagocytosis and neutrophil activation, are more likely to play a role in preventative vaccine or reservoir-eliminating therapeutic approaches. PMID:26883728

  18. The route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influences the recruitment of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the lung that provide potent protection from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suda, Tatsuya; Kawano, Masaaki; Nogi, Yasuhisa; Ohno, Naohito; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Matsui, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the lung are considered to confer protection from respiratory viruses. Several groups demonstrated that the route of priming was likely to have an implication for the trafficking of antigen-specific CTLs. Therefore, we investigated whether the route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influenced the recruitment of virus-specific CTLs in the lung that should provide potent protection from influenza A virus. Mice were immunized with recombinant adenovirus expressing the matrix (M1) protein of influenza A virus via various immunization routes involving intraperitoneal, intranasal, intramuscular, or intravenous administration as well as subcutaneous administration in the hind hock. We found that the immunization route dramatically impacted the recruitment of M1-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells both in the lung and the spleen. Surprisingly, hock immunization was most effective for the accumulation in the lung of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells that possessed M1-specific cytolytic activity. Further, antigen-driven IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells in the lung, but not in the spleen, were likely to be correlated with the resistance to challenge with influenza A virus. These results may improve our ability to design vaccines that target virus-specific CTL responses to respiratory viruses such as influenza A virus. PMID:21722671

  19. Breakthrough of SIV strain smE660 challenge in SIV strain mac239-vaccinated rhesus macaques despite potent autologous neutralizing antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Burton, Samantha L; Kilgore, Katie M; Smith, S Abigail; Reddy, Sharmila; Hunter, Eric; Robinson, Harriet L; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama R; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2015-08-25

    Although the correlates of immunological protection from human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus infection remain incompletely understood, it is generally believed that medium to high titers of serum neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against the challenge virus will prevent infection. This paradigm is based on a series of studies in which passive transfer of HIV-specific nAbs protected rhesus macaques (RMs) from subsequent mucosal challenge with a chimeric human/simian immunodeficiency virus. However, it is unknown whether nAb titers define protection in the setting of active immunization. Here we determined serum nAb titers against breakthrough transmitted/founder (T/F) SIVsmE660-derived envelope glycoprotein (Env) variants from 14 RMs immunized with SIVmac239-based DNA-prime/modified vaccinia virus Ankara-boost vaccine regimens that included GM-CSF or CD40L adjuvants and conferred significant but incomplete protection against repeated low-dose intrarectal challenge. A single Env variant established infection in all RMs except one, with no identifiable genetic signature associated with vaccination breakthrough compared with T/F Envs from four unvaccinated monkeys. Breakthrough T/F Env pseudoviruses were potently neutralized in vitro by heterologous pooled serum from chronically SIVsmE660-infected monkeys at IC50 titers exceeding 1:1,000,000. Remarkably, the T/F Env pseudoviruses from 13 of 14 monkeys were also susceptible to neutralization by autologous prechallenge serum at in vitro IC50 titers ranging from 1:742-1:10,832. These titers were similar to those observed in vaccinated RMs that remained uninfected. These data suggest that the relationship between serum nAb titers and protection from mucosal SIV challenge in the setting of active immunization is more complex than previously recognized, warranting further studies into the balance between immune activation, target cell availability, and protective antibody responses. PMID:26261312

  20. Mucin-Based Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan P.; MacMillan, Derek

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated cell surface and secreted glycoproteins . In addition to orchestrating cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interactions in healthy organisms mucins are also the major carriers of altered glycosylation in carcinomas. Tumor-associated antigens displayed by cancer cells comprise oligosaccharide and glycopeptide motifs not encountered in the same locale or at the same frequency in healthy cells, and potentially confer a selective advantage to the tumor. Frequently tumor-associated antigens are under-glycosylated and prematurely sialylated, and it is these relatively simple saccharide and glycopeptide structures that have been targeted to serve as drug candidates in most cases. A major goal is to assemble glycopeptide vaccine candidates based on partial mucin sequences and displaying tumor-associated antigens that can mount a potent immunological tumor-specific response when, in reality, the tumor has already coerced the immune system into a state of co-existence.

  1. Effects of interferon-α-transduced tumor cell vaccines and blockade of programmed cell death-1 on the growth of established tumors.

    PubMed

    Omori, R; Eguchi, J; Hiroishi, K; Ishii, S; Hiraide, A; Sakaki, M; Doi, H; Kajiwara, A; Ito, T; Kogo, M; Imawari, M

    2012-09-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has strong antitumor effects, and IFN-α gene therapy has been used clinically against some cancers. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the combination of IFN-α-transduced tumor cell vaccines and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) blockade, and investigated the mechanisms of the antitumor effects of the combined therapy. A poorly immunogenic murine colorectal cancer cell line, MC38, was transduced to overexpress IFN-α. In a therapeutic model, parental tumor-bearing mice were inoculated with MC38-IFNα cells and an anti-PD-1 antagonistic antibody. Analyses of immunohistochemistry and tumor-specific lysis were performed. The outgrowth of the established tumors was significantly reduced in mice treated with the combination of IFN-α and anti-PD-1. Immunohistochemical analyses of the therapeutic model showed marked infiltration of CD4(+) cells and CD8(+) cells in the established MC38 tumors of mice treated with both IFN-α and anti-PD-1. Significant tumor-specific cytolysis was detected when splenocytes of mice that were treated with both IFN-α and anti-PD-1 were used as effector cells. These results suggest that blockade of the PD-1 PD-ligand enhanced the Th1-type antitumor immune responses induced by IFN-α. The combination of IFN-α gene-transduced tumor cell vaccines and PD-1 blockade may be a possible candidate for a cancer vaccine for clinical trials. PMID:22790963

  2. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To develop effective vaccine, we examined the effects of CO{sub 3}Ap as an antigen carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap was taken up by BMDCs more effectively than free OVA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA-immunized splenocytes was activated by OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap induced strong OVA-specific immune responses to C57BL/6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 3}Ap is promising antigen carrier for the achievement of effective vaccine. -- Abstract: The ability of carbonate apatite (CO{sub 3}Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO{sub 3}Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-{gamma} by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO{sub 3}Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO{sub 3}Ap.

  3. An adenoviral cancer vaccine co-encoding a tumor associated antigen together with secreted 4-1BBL leads to delayed tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Andersson, Anne-Marie C; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Laursen, Henriette; Holst, Peter J

    2016-04-19

    Previous studies have shown promising results when using an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody treatment against established tumors. While this is promising, this type of treatment can induce severe side effects. Therefore, we decided to incorporate the membrane form of 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) in a replicative deficient adenovirus vaccine expressing the invariant chain (Ii) adjuvant fused to a tumor associated antigen (TAA). The Ii adjuvant increases and prolongs TAA specific CD8+ T cells as previously shown and local expression of 4-1BBL was chosen to avoid the toxicity associated with systemic antibody administration. Furthermore, adenovirus encoded 4-1BBL expression has previously been successfully used to enhance responses toward Plasmodium falciparum and Influenza A antigens. We showed that the incorporation of 4-1BBL in the adenovirus vector led to surface expression of 4-1BBL on antigen presenting cells, but it did not enhance T cell responses in mice towards the Ii linked antigen. In tumor-bearing mice, our vaccine was found to decrease the frequency of TAA specific CD8+ T cells, but this difference did not alter the therapeutic efficacy. In order to reconcile our findings with the previous reports of increased anti-cancer efficacy using systemically delivered 4-1BB agonists, we incorporated a secreted version of 4-1BBL (Fc-4-1BBL) in our vaccine and co-expressed it with the Ii linked to TAA. In tumor bearing mice, this vaccine initially delayed tumor growth and slightly increased survival compared to the vaccine expressing the membrane form of 4-1BBL. Accordingly, secreted 4-1BBL co-encoded with the Ii linked antigen may offer a simplification compared to administration of drug and vaccine separately. PMID:27004934

  4. Clinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Tumor-Targeted, Plant-Made Id-KLH Conjugate Vaccines for Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tusé, Daniel; Ku, Nora; Bendandi, Maurizio; Becerra, Carlos; Collins, Robert; Langford, Nyla; Sancho, Susana Inogés; López-Díaz de Cerio, Ascensión; Pastor, Fernando; Kandzia, Romy; Thieme, Frank; Jarczowski, Franziska; Krause, Dieter; Ma, Julian K.-C.; Pandya, Shan; Klimyuk, Victor; Gleba, Yuri; Butler-Ransohoff, John E.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first evaluation of plant-made conjugate vaccines for targeted treatment of B-cell follicular lymphoma (FL) in a Phase I safety and immunogenicity clinical study. Each recombinant personalized immunogen consisted of a tumor-derived, plant-produced idiotypic antibody (Ab) hybrid comprising the hypervariable regions of the tumor-associated light and heavy Ab chains, genetically grafted onto a common human IgG1 scaffold. Each immunogen was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using twin magnICON vectors expressing the light and heavy chains of the idiotypic Ab. Each purified Ab was chemically linked to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to form a conjugate vaccine. The vaccines were administered to FL patients over a series of ≥6 subcutaneous injections in conjunction with the adjuvant Leukine (GM-CSF). The 27 patients enrolled in the study had previously received non-anti-CD20 cytoreductive therapy followed by ≥4 months of immune recovery prior to first vaccination. Of 11 patients who became evaluable at study conclusion, 82% (9/11) displayed a vaccine-induced, idiotype-specific cellular and/or humoral immune response. No patients showed serious adverse events (SAE) related to vaccination. The fully scalable plant-based manufacturing process yields safe and immunogenic personalized FL vaccines that can be produced within weeks of obtaining patient biopsies. PMID:26425548

  5. Clinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Tumor-Targeted, Plant-Made Id-KLH Conjugate Vaccines for Follicular Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tusé, Daniel; Ku, Nora; Bendandi, Maurizio; Becerra, Carlos; Collins, Robert; Langford, Nyla; Sancho, Susana Inogés; López-Díaz de Cerio, Ascensión; Pastor, Fernando; Kandzia, Romy; Thieme, Frank; Jarczowski, Franziska; Krause, Dieter; Ma, Julian K-C; Pandya, Shan; Klimyuk, Victor; Gleba, Yuri; Butler-Ransohoff, John E

    2015-01-01

    We report the first evaluation of plant-made conjugate vaccines for targeted treatment of B-cell follicular lymphoma (FL) in a Phase I safety and immunogenicity clinical study. Each recombinant personalized immunogen consisted of a tumor-derived, plant-produced idiotypic antibody (Ab) hybrid comprising the hypervariable regions of the tumor-associated light and heavy Ab chains, genetically grafted onto a common human IgG1 scaffold. Each immunogen was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using twin magnICON vectors expressing the light and heavy chains of the idiotypic Ab. Each purified Ab was chemically linked to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to form a conjugate vaccine. The vaccines were administered to FL patients over a series of ≥6 subcutaneous injections in conjunction with the adjuvant Leukine (GM-CSF). The 27 patients enrolled in the study had previously received non-anti-CD20 cytoreductive therapy followed by ≥4 months of immune recovery prior to first vaccination. Of 11 patients who became evaluable at study conclusion, 82% (9/11) displayed a vaccine-induced, idiotype-specific cellular and/or humoral immune response. No patients showed serious adverse events (SAE) related to vaccination. The fully scalable plant-based manufacturing process yields safe and immunogenic personalized FL vaccines that can be produced within weeks of obtaining patient biopsies. PMID:26425548

  6. Laurenditerpenol, a New Diterpene from the Tropical Marine Alga Laurencia intricata Potently Inhibits HIF-1 Mediated Hypoxic Signaling in Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Zhang, Lei; Bruick, Richard K.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The degree of tumor hypoxia correlates with advanced disease stages and treatment resistance. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) promotes tumor cell adaptation and survival under hypoxic conditions. Therefore, specific HIF-1 inhibitors represent an important new class of potential tumor-selective therapeutic agents. A T47D human breast tumor cell-based reporter assay was used to examine extracts of plants and marine organisms for inhibitors of HIF-1 activation. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipid extract of the red alga Laurencia intricata yielded a structurally novel diterpene laurenditerpenol (1). The structure of 1 was determined spectroscopically. The relative configurations of the substituents of each ring system were assigned based on NOESY correlations. The absolute configurations of positions C-1 was determined by the modified Mosher ester procedure (directly in NMR tubes). Compound 1 potently inhibited hypoxia-activated HIF-1 (IC50: 0.4 μM) and hypoxia-induced VEGF (a potent angiogenic factor) in T47D cells. Compound 1 selectively inhibits HIF-1 activation by hypoxia but not iron chelator induced activation. Further, 1 suppresses tumor cell survival under hypoxic conditions without affecting normoxic cell growth. Compound 1 inhibits HIF-1 by blocking the induction of the oxygen-regulated HIF-1α protein. Mitochondrial respiration studies revealed that 1 suppresses oxygen consumption. PMID:15620241

  7. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials. PMID:25625927

  8. Antigen-specific vaccines for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tagliamonte, Maria; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines targeting pathogens are generally effective and protective because based on foreign non-self antigens which are extremely potent in eliciting an immune response. On the contrary, efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still disappointing. One of the major reasons for such poor outcome, among others, is the difficulty of identifying tumor-specific target antigens which should be unique to the tumors or, at least, overexpressed on the tumors as compared to normal cells. Indeed, this is the only option to overcome the peripheral immune tolerance and elicit a non toxic immune response. New and more potent strategies are now available to identify specific tumor-associated antigens for development of cancer vaccine approaches aiming at eliciting targeted anti-tumor cellular responses. In the last years this aspect has been addressed and many therapeutic vaccination strategies based on either whole tumor cells or specific antigens have been and are being currently evaluated in clinical trials. This review summarizes the current state of cancer vaccines, mainly focusing on antigen-specific approaches. PMID:25483639

  9. Trifunctional bispecific antibodies induce tumor-specific T cells and elicit a vaccination effect.

    PubMed

    Eissler, Nina; Ruf, Peter; Mysliwietz, Josef; Lindhofer, Horst; Mocikat, Ralph

    2012-08-15

    A major goal of tumor immunotherapy is the induction of long-lasting systemic T-cell immunity. Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) that lack the immunoglobulin Fc region confer T-cell-mediated killing of tumor cells but do not induce long-term memory. In contrast, trifunctional bsAbs comprise an appropriate Fc region and, therefore, not only recruit T cells but also accessory cells that bear activating Fcγ receptors (FcγR), providing additional T-cell-activating signals and securing presentation of tumor-derived antigens to T cells. In this study, we show that trifunctional bsAbs induce a polyvalent T-cell response and, therefore, a vaccination effect. Mice were treated with melanoma cells and with a trifunctional bsAb directed against the melanoma target antigen ganglioside GD2 in addition to murine CD3. The trifunctional bsAb activated dendritic cells and induced a systemic immune response that was not replicated by treatment with the F(ab')2-counterpart lacking the Fc region. Restimulation of spleen and lymph node cells in vitro yielded T-cell lines that specifically produced interferon-γ in response to tumor. In addition, trifunctional bsAb-induced T cells recognized various specific peptides derived from melanoma-associated antigens. Moreover, these polyvalent responses proved to be tumor-suppressive and could not be induced by the corresponding bsF(ab')2-fragment. Taken together, our findings provide preclinical proof of concept that trifunctional bsAbs can induce tumor-specific T cells with defined antigen specificity. PMID:22745368

  10. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  11. Victory and Defeat in the Induction of a Therapeutic Response through Vaccine Therapy for Human and Canine Brain Tumors: A Review of the State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Michael R.; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Andersen, Brian M.; Shaver, Rob; Waldron, Nate N.; Moertel, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor immunotherapy using tumor lysate–based vaccines has made great advances over recent decades. Cancer vaccines aim to elicit adaptive immune responses through various pathways by providing tumor and tumor-associated antigens with an immune stimulant or adjuvant. These anti-tumor vaccines are therefore developed as personalized treatments. Utilizing tumors as a source of vaccine antigens in immunotherapy has demonstrated promising results with minimal toxicity. However, to date, researchers have failed to overcome the overpowering immune suppressive effects within the tumor microenvironment. Immune suppression occurs naturally via multiple mechanisms. These mechanisms serve an important homeostatic role restoring a normal tissue microenvironment following an inflammatory response. Due to these suppressive mechanisms and the inherent heterogeneity of tumors, it is imperative to then elicit and maintain a specific tumoricidal response if vaccine therapy or some other combination of reagents is chosen. In this review, we focus on the historical use of tumors as a source of antigens to elicit a tumoricidal response and the limitations encountered that prevent greater success in immunotherapy. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of various vaccines and their ineffectiveness due to tumor-induced immune suppression. PMID:25404047

  12. Priming of tumor-specific T cells in the draining lymph nodes after immunization with interleukin 2-secreting tumor cells: three consecutive stages may be required for successful tumor vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Maass, G; Schmidt, W; Berger, M; Schilcher, F; Koszik, F; Schneeberger, A; Stingl, G; Birnstiel, M L; Schweighoffer, T

    1995-01-01

    Although both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are clearly required to generate long-lasting anti-tumor immunity induced by s.c. vaccination with interleukin 2 (IL-2)-transfected, irradiated M-3 clone murine melanoma cells, some controversy continues about the site and mode of T-cell activation in this system. Macrophages, granulocytes, and natural killer cells infiltrate the vaccination site early after injection into either syngeneic euthymic DBA/2 mice or athymic nude mice and eliminate the inoculum within 48 hr. We could not find T cells at the vaccination site, which argues against the concept that T-cell priming by the IL-2-secreting cancer cells occurs directly at that location. However, reverse transcription-PCR revealed transcripts indicative of T-cell activation and expansion in the draining lymph nodes of mice immunized with the IL-2-secreting vaccine but not in mice vaccinated with untransfected, irradiated M-3 cells. We therefore propose that the antigen-presenting cells, which invade the vaccination site, process tumor-derived antigens and, subsequently, initiate priming of tumor-specific T lymphocytes in lymphoid organs. These findings suggest a three-stage process for the generation of effector T cells after vaccination with IL-2-secreting tumor cells: (i) tumor-antigen uptake and processing at the site of injection by antigen-presenting cells, (ii) migration of antigen-presenting cells into the regional draining lymph nodes, where T-cell priming occurs, and (iii) circulation of activated T cells that either perform or initiate effector mechanisms leading to tumor cell destruction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777545

  13. Anti-tumor angiogenesis effect of genetic fusion vaccine encoding murine beta-defensin 2 and tumor endothelial marker-8 in a CT-26 murine colorectal carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Xie, Ganfeng; Geng, Peiliang; Zheng, Chenhong; Li, Jianjun; Pan, Feng; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is an endothelial-specific marker that is upregulated during tumor angiogenesis. We previously demonstrated that DNA-based vaccine encoding xenogeneic TEM8 can potentiate anti-angiogenesis immunotherapy of malignancy; nevertheless, it remains to be improved in minimizing immune tolerance. Recently, it has been reported that murine beta-defensin 2 (MBD2) is chemotactic for immature dendritic cells and plays a pivotal role in breaking immune tolerance. Herein, we constructed a genetic fusion vaccine encoding murine TEM8 and MBD2 to investigate whether the novel vaccine preferentially elicits therapeutic antitumor immune responses and suppresses cancerous angiogenesis in mouse models. The anti-angiogenesis effect was determined by microvessel density (MVD) using immunohistochemical staining. The efficacy of the fusion vaccine was primarily assessed by detecting cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity (51Cr-release assay). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay was used to detect TEM8-specific INF-γ production, and the activity of CTL was further verified by a depletion of CD8+ T cells via anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody. Our results showed that the DNA fusion vaccine possessed an enhanced therapeutic antitumor immunity through anti-angiogenesis in BALB/c mice inoculated with CT26 cells, and this effect was generally attributed to stimulation of an antigen specific CD8+ T-cell response against mTEM8. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that the fusion vaccine based on mTEM8 and MBD2 induced autoimmunity against endothelial cells, resulting in deceleration of tumor growth, and could be potential therapeutical application in clinic. PMID:26064415

  14. Local Salmonella immunostimulation recruits vaccine-specific CD8 T cells and increases regression of bladder tumor

    PubMed Central

    Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Hojeij, Rim; Reggi, Erica; Derré, Laurent; Chevalier, Mathieu F; Romero, Pedro; Jichlinski, Patrice; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of antitumoral responses can be increased using combinatorial vaccine strategies. We recently showed that vaccination could be optimized by local administration of diverse molecular or bacterial agents to target and augment antitumoral CD8 T cells in the genital mucosa (GM) and increase regression of cervical cancer in an animal model. Non muscle-invasive bladder cancer is another disease that is easily amenable to local therapies. In contrast to data obtained in the GM, in this study we show that intravesical (IVES) instillation of synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists only modestly induced recruitment of CD8 T cells to the bladder. However, IVES administration of Ty21a, a live bacterial vaccine against typhoid fever, was much more effective and increased the number of total and vaccine-specific CD8 T cells in the bladder approximately 10 fold. Comparison of chemokines induced in the bladder by either CpG (a TLR-9 agonist) or Ty21a highlighted the preferential increase in complement component 5a, CXCL5, CXCL2, CCL8, and CCL5 by Ty21a, suggesting their involvement in the attraction of T cells to the bladder. IVES treatment with Ty21a after vaccination also significantly increased tumor regression compared to vaccination alone, resulting in 90% survival in an orthotopic murine model of bladder cancer expressing a prototype tumor antigen. Our data demonstrate that combining vaccination with local immunostimulation may be an effective treatment strategy for different types of cancer and also highlight the great potential of the Ty21a vaccine, which is routinely used worldwide, in such combinatorial therapies. PMID:26140240

  15. Anti-tumor effects of DNA vaccine targeting human fibroblast activation protein α by producing specific immune responses and altering tumor microenvironment in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Geng, Fei; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Wu, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a tumor stromal antigen overexpressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). CAFs are genetically more stable compared with the tumor cells and immunosuppressive components of the tumor microenvironment, rendering them excellent targets for cancer immunotherapy. DNA vaccines are widely applied due to their safety. To specifically destroy CAFs, we constructed and examined the immunogenicity and anti-tumor immune mechanism of a DNA vaccine expressing human FAPα. This vaccine successfully reduced 4T1 tumor growth through producing FAPα-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses which could kill CAFs, and the decrease in FAPα-expressing CAFs resulted in markedly attenuated expression of collagen I and other stromal factors that benefit the tumor progression. Based on these results, a DNA vaccine targeting human FAPα may be an attractive and effective cancer immunotherapy strategy. PMID:27020681

  16. The Development of a Novel Cancer Immunotherapeutic Platform Using Tumor-targeting Mesenchymal Stem Cells and a Protein Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hon-Jian; Wu, Alexander TH; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Lin, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Su, Ching-Hua; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Douglas, Frank L; Deng, Win-Ping

    2011-01-01

    An ideal anticancer strategy should target only the malignant cells but spare the normal ones. In this regard, we established a platform, consisting of an antigen-delivering vehicle and a protein vaccine, for developing an immunotherapeutic approach with the potential for eliminating various cancer types. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated capable of targeting tumors and integrating into the stroma. Moreover, we have developed a protein vaccine PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3 which specifically recognized E7 antigen and elicited immunity against cervical cancer. Taking advantage of tumor-homing property of MSCs and PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3, we used E6/E7-immortalized human MSCs (KP-hMSCs) as an E7 antigen-delivering vehicle to test if this protein vaccine could effectively eliminate non-E7-expressing tumor cells. Animals which received combined treatment of KP-hMSCs and PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3 demonstrated a significant inhibition of tumor growth and lung-metastasis when compared to PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3 only and KP-hMSCs only groups. The efficiency of tumor suppression correlated positively to the specific immune response induced by PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3. In addition, this combined treatment inhibited tumor growth via inducing apoptosis. Our findings indicated that KP-hMSCs could be used as a tumor-targeting device and mediate antitumor effect of PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3. We believe this strategy could serve as a platform for developing a universal vaccine for different cancer types. PMID:21792181

  17. Significant blockade of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases by MGCD516 (Sitravatinib), a novel small molecule inhibitor, shows potent anti-tumor activity in preclinical models of sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Musi, Elgilda; de Stanchina, Elisa; Schwartz, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare but highly aggressive mesenchymal tumors with a median survival of 10–18 months for metastatic disease. Mutation and/or overexpression of many receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including c-Met, PDGFR, c-Kit and IGF1-R drive defective signaling pathways in sarcomas. MGCD516 (Sitravatinib) is a novel small molecule inhibitor targeting multiple RTKs involved in driving sarcoma cell growth. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of MGCD516 both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models in vivo. MGCD516 treatment resulted in significant blockade of phosphorylation of potential driver RTKs and induced potent anti-proliferative effects in vitro. Furthermore, MGCD516 treatment of tumor xenografts in vivo resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth. Efficacy of MGCD516 was superior to imatinib and crizotinib, two other well-studied multi-kinase inhibitors with overlapping target specificities, both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report describing MGCD516 as a potent multi-kinase inhibitor in different models of sarcoma, superior to imatinib and crizotinib. Results from this study showing blockade of multiple driver signaling pathways provides a rationale for further clinical development of MGCD516 for the treatment of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma. PMID:26675259

  18. Significant blockade of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases by MGCD516 (Sitravatinib), a novel small molecule inhibitor, shows potent anti-tumor activity in preclinical models of sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Parag P; Ivy, Kathryn S; Musi, Elgilda; de Stanchina, Elisa; Schwartz, Gary K

    2016-01-26

    Sarcomas are rare but highly aggressive mesenchymal tumors with a median survival of 10-18 months for metastatic disease. Mutation and/or overexpression of many receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including c-Met, PDGFR, c-Kit and IGF1-R drive defective signaling pathways in sarcomas. MGCD516 (Sitravatinib) is a novel small molecule inhibitor targeting multiple RTKs involved in driving sarcoma cell growth. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of MGCD516 both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models in vivo. MGCD516 treatment resulted in significant blockade of phosphorylation of potential driver RTKs and induced potent anti-proliferative effects in vitro. Furthermore, MGCD516 treatment of tumor xenografts in vivo resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth. Efficacy of MGCD516 was superior to imatinib and crizotinib, two other well-studied multi-kinase inhibitors with overlapping target specificities, both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report describing MGCD516 as a potent multi-kinase inhibitor in different models of sarcoma, superior to imatinib and crizotinib. Results from this study showing blockade of multiple driver signaling pathways provides a rationale for further clinical development of MGCD516 for the treatment of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma. PMID:26675259

  19. Dendritic cell vaccine modified by Ag85A gene enhances anti-tumor immunity against bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Wang, Jinyan; Wang, Danan; Wang, Huan; Shan, Fengping; Chen, Liudan; Hou, Ying; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Chang-Long

    2012-11-01

    The ability of dendritic cells to provide all the signals required for T-cell activation makes them an ideal cancer vaccine platform. With the use of established DC2.4 cell line, originated from C57BL/6 mice and developed by superinfecting GM-CSF transduced bone marrow cells with myc and raf oncogenes, we investigated whether the DC 2.4 cell line transfected with Ag85A gene could enhance immunity against bladder cancer. Both phenotypic and functional analyses of Ag85A-DCs were done with use of FCM and T cell proliferation test. The cytotoxicity of Ag85A-DCs loaded with tumor cell lysate was verified by LDH. Finally, the production of interferon gamma was assayed by both ELISA and FCM. The immunotherapeutic effect of DC vaccine on murine bladder cancer was assessed pharmacologically and pathologically. Our results showed that Ag85A gene transfected DCs expressed high levels of key surface markers such as CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. The CTL primed with MB49 lysate-pulsed Ag85A-DCs elicits higher activity against MB49 tumor cells and upregulated level of IFN-γ production. Furthermore, the significant inhibitive effect on tumor growth in mice was found in the group of Ag85A-DC vaccine. The infiltration of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cell within established tumor treated by Ag85A-DC vaccine significantly increased as compared with control groups. It is therefore concluded that DCs engineered by Ag85A gene exerts enhanced anti-tumor immunity against bladder cancer and this study might provide a meaningful mode of action with the use of Ag85A engineered DC vaccination in anti-cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22884511

  20. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  1. Vaccination With Patient-Specific Tumor-Derived Antigen in First Remission Improves Disease-Free Survival in Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Stephen J.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Gause, Barry L.; Janik, John E.; Muggia, Franco M.; Gockerman, Jon P.; Winter, Jane N.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; McGaughey, Dean S.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Chong, Elise A.; Reynolds, Craig W.; Berry, Donald A.; Santos, Carlos F.; Popa, Mihaela A.; McCord, Amy M.; Kwak, Larry W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Vaccination with hybridoma-derived autologous tumor immunoglobulin (Ig) idiotype (Id) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and administered with granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces follicular lymphoma (FL) –specific immune responses. To determine the clinical benefit of this vaccine, we conducted a double-blind multicenter controlled phase III trial. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with advanced stage FL achieving complete response (CR) or CR unconfirmed (CRu) after chemotherapy were randomly assigned two to one to receive either Id vaccine (Id-KLH + GM-CSF) or control (KLH + GM-CSF). Primary efficacy end points were disease-free survival (DFS) for all randomly assigned patients and DFS for randomly assigned patients receiving at least one dose of Id vaccine or control. Results Of 234 patients enrolled, 177 (81%) achieved CR/CRu after chemotherapy and were randomly assigned. For 177 randomly assigned patients, including 60 patients not vaccinated because of relapse (n = 55) or other reasons (n = 5), median DFS between Id-vaccine and control arms was 23.0 versus 20.6 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.16; P = .256). For 117 patients who received Id vaccine (n = 76) or control (n = 41), median DFS after randomization was 44.2 months for Id-vaccine arm versus 30.6 months for control arm (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.99; P = .047) at median follow-up of 56.6 months (range, 12.6 to 89.3 months). In an unplanned subgroup analysis, median DFS was significantly prolonged for patients receiving IgM-Id (52.9 v 28.7 months; P = .001) but not IgG-Id vaccine (35.1 v 32.4 months; P = .807) compared with isotype-matched control-treated patients. Conclusion Vaccination with patient-specific hybridoma-derived Id vaccine after chemotherapy-induced CR/CRu may prolong DFS in patients with FL. Vaccine isotype may affect clinical outcome and explain differing results between this and other

  2. Targeting Attenuated Interferon-α to Myeloma Cells with a CD38 Antibody Induces Potent Tumor Regression with Reduced Off-Target Activity.

    PubMed

    Pogue, Sarah L; Taura, Tetsuya; Bi, Mingying; Yun, Yong; Sho, Angela; Mikesell, Glen; Behrens, Collette; Sokolovsky, Maya; Hallak, Hussein; Rosenstock, Moti; Sanchez, Eric; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Doyle, Anthony; Nock, Steffen; Wilson, David S

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) has been prescribed to effectively treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other malignancies for decades. Its use has waned in recent years, however, due to significant toxicity and a narrow therapeutic index (TI). We sought to improve IFNα's TI by, first, attaching it to an anti-CD38 antibody, thereby directly targeting it to MM cells, and, second, by introducing an attenuating mutation into the IFNα portion of the fusion protein rendering it relatively inactive on normal, CD38 negative cells. This anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) immunocytokine, or CD38-Attenukine™, exhibits 10,000-fold increased specificity for CD38 positive cells in vitro compared to native IFNα and, significantly, is ~6,000-fold less toxic to normal bone marrow cells in vitro than native IFNα. Moreover, the attenuating mutation significantly decreases IFNα biomarker activity in cynomolgus macaques indicating that this approach may yield a better safety profile in humans than native IFNα or a non-attenuated IFNα immunocytokine. In human xenograft MM tumor models, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) exerts potent anti-tumor activity in mice, inducing complete tumor regression in most cases. Furthermore, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) is more efficacious than standard MM treatments (lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) and exhibits strong synergy with lenalidomide and with bortezomib in xenograft models. Our findings suggest that tumor-targeted attenuated cytokines such as IFNα can promote robust tumor killing while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27611189

  3. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy. PMID:27112931

  4. Combination immunotherapy and active-specific tumor cell vaccination augments anti-cancer immunity in a mouse model of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Active-specific immunotherapy used as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy is rather unexplored for cancers with poorly characterized tumor antigens like gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to augment a therapeutic immune response to a low immunogenic tumor cell line derived from a spontaneous gastric tumor of a CEA424-SV40 large T antigen (CEA424-SV40 TAg) transgenic mouse. Methods Mice were treated with a lymphodepleting dose of cyclophosphamide prior to reconstitution with syngeneic spleen cells and vaccination with a whole tumor cell vaccine combined with GM-CSF (a treatment strategy abbreviated as LRAST). Anti-tumor activity to subcutaneous tumor challenge was examined in a prophylactic as well as a therapeutic setting and compared to corresponding controls. Results LRAST enhances tumor-specific T cell responses and efficiently inhibits growth of subsequent transplanted tumor cells. In addition, LRAST tended to slow down growth of established tumors. The improved anti-tumor immune response was accompanied by a transient decrease in the frequency and absolute number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells (Tregs). Conclusions Our data support the concept that whole tumor cell vaccination in a lymphodepleted and reconstituted host in combination with GM-CSF induces therapeutic tumor-specific T cells. However, the long-term efficacy of the treatment may be dampened by the recurrence of Tregs. Strategies to counteract suppressive immune mechanisms are required to further evaluate this therapeutic vaccination protocol. PMID:21859450

  5. Isopentenyl pyrophosphate activated CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes display potent anti-tumor activity towards human squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Alan A.Z.; Maniar, Amudhan; Cummings, Jean-Saville; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Schulze, Dan H.; Gastman, Brian R.; Pauza, C. David; Strome, Scott E.; Chapoval, Andrei I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The expression of CD56, a natural killer (NK) cell-associated molecule, on αβ T lymphocytes correlates with their increased anti-tumor effector function. CD56 is also expressed on a subset of γδ T cells. However, anti-tumor effector functions of CD56+ γδ T cells are poorly characterized. Experimental design To investigate the potential effector role of CD56+ γδ T cells in tumor killing, we employed isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and IL-2 expanded γδ T cells from PBMC of healthy donors. Results Thirty to 70% of IPP+IL-2 expanded γδ T cells express CD56 on their surface. Interestingly, while both CD56+ and CD56− γδ T cells express comparable levels of receptors involved in the regulation of γδ T cell cytotoxicity (e.g. NKG2D and CD94) only CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes are capable of killing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and other solid tumor cell lines. This effect is likely mediated by the enhanced release of cytolytic granules, since CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes expressed higher levels of CD107a compared to CD56− controls, following exposure to tumor cell lines. Lysis of tumor cell lines is blocked by concanomycin A and a combination of anti-γδTCR + anti-NKG2D mAb, suggesting that the lytic activity of CD56+ γδ T cells involves the perforin-granzyme pathway and is mainly γδTCR/NKGD2 dependent. Importantly, CD56 expressing γδ T lymphocytes are resistant to Fas ligand and chemically induced apoptosis. Conclusions Our data indicate that CD56+ γδ T cells are potent anti-tumor effectors capable of killing SCC and may play an important therapeutic role in patients with head and neck cancer and other malignancies. PMID:18594005

  6. Dendritic cell vaccination with a toll-like receptor agonist derived from mycobacteria enhances anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Vo, Manh-Cuong; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Jong-Seok; Hoang, My-Dung; Choi, Nu-Ri; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Shin, Sung-Jae; Lee, Je-Jung

    2015-10-20

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are considered useful in cancer immunotherapy, and the interaction of DC and adjuvants is important in the design of the next generation vaccines. In this study, whether DC combined with Rv2299c derived from mycobacteria could improve anti-tumor immune responses in a colon cancer mouse model was evaluated. MC38 cell lines were injected subcutaneously to establish colon-cancer-bearing mice and the following four groups were evaluated: PBS control, tumor antigen (TA) loaded-DC, Rv2299c, and a combination of TA-loaded-DC and Rv2299c. The combination treatment with TA-loaded-DC and Rv2299c exhibited greater inhibition of tumor growth compared to other groups. These effects were associated with the reduction of suppressor cells, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells, and the induction of effector cells, such as CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, in spleen, and with the activation of cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and NK cells. These results suggest that TA-loaded-DC vaccination with Rv2299c derived from mycobacteria enhanced anti-tumor immunity in a mouse colon cancer model by inhibiting the generation of immune-suppressive cells and recovering numbers of effector cells, and demonstrated superior polarization of the Th1/Th2 balance in favor of the Th1 immune response. PMID:26418952

  7. Dendritic cell vaccination with a toll-like receptor agonist derived from mycobacteria enhances anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Manh-Cuong; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Jong-Seok; Hoang, My-Dung; Choi, Nu-Ri; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Shin, Sung-Jae; Lee, Je-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are considered useful in cancer immunotherapy, and the interaction of DC and adjuvants is important in the design of the next generation vaccines. In this study, whether DC combined with Rv2299c derived from mycobacteria could improve anti-tumor immune responses in a colon cancer mouse model was evaluated. MC38 cell lines were injected subcutaneously to establish colon-cancer-bearing mice and the following four groups were evaluated: PBS control, tumor antigen (TA) loaded-DC, Rv2299c, and a combination of TA-loaded-DC and Rv2299c. The combination treatment with TA-loaded-DC and Rv2299c exhibited greater inhibition of tumor growth compared to other groups. These effects were associated with the reduction of suppressor cells, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells, and the induction of effector cells, such as CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, in spleen, and with the activation of cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and NK cells. These results suggest that TA-loaded-DC vaccination with Rv2299c derived from mycobacteria enhanced anti-tumor immunity in a mouse colon cancer model by inhibiting the generation of immune-suppressive cells and recovering numbers of effector cells, and demonstrated superior polarization of the Th1/Th2 balance in favor of the Th1 immune response. PMID:26418952

  8. Interaction of acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521 with tumor response to photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Zhang, Wei; Saw, Kyi Min; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Bielawska, Alicja; Separovic, Duska

    2016-09-15

    Acid ceramidase has been identified as a promising target for cancer therapy. One of its most effective inhibitors, LCL521, was examined as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy (PDT) using mouse squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII model of head and neck cancer. Lethal effects of PDT, assessed by colony forming ability of in vitro treated SCCVII cells, were greatly enhanced when combined with 10 µM LCL521 treatment particularly when preceding PDT. When PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used to vaccinate SCCVII tumor-bearing mice (PDT vaccine protocol), adjuvant LCL521 treatment (75 mg/kg) resulted in a marked retardation of tumor growth. This effect can be attributed to the capacity of LCL521 to effectively restrict the activity of two main immunoregulatory cell populations (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, MDSCs) that are known to hinder the efficacy of PDT vaccines. The therapeutic benefit with adjuvant LCL521 was also achieved with SCCVII tumors treated with standard PDT when using immunocompetent mice but not with immunodeficient hosts. The interaction of LCL521 with PDT-based antitumor mechanisms is dominated by immune system contribution that includes overriding the effects of immunoregulatory cells, but could also include a tacit contribution from boosting direct tumor cell kill. PMID:27136745

  9. CIGB-247: a VEGF-based therapeutic vaccine that reduces experimental and spontaneous lung metastasis of C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mouse tumors.

    PubMed

    Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Morera, Yanelys; Ayala-Ávila, Marta; Ancizar, Julio; Soria, Yordanka; Blanco, Aracelys; Suárez-Alba, Jesús; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2012-02-27

    CIGB-247 is a novel cancer therapeutic vaccine that uses a mutated form of human VEGF as antigen. Being metastatic disease the most dramatic factor of tumor biology affecting patient survival and cure, preclinical evaluation of the impact of CIGB-247 vaccination on experimental metastasis mouse models is highly relevant, and constitutes the focus of this work. CIGB-247 was administered in a weekly schedule known to effectively reduce primary tumor growth. The vaccine was tested in experimental and spontaneous metastasis models of colon (CT26), lung (3LL-D122) and breast (F3II) carcinomas growing in C57Bl/6 or BALB/c mice. Primary tumor growth parameters, metastatic counts, and/or animal survival were recorded. Histology and specific humoral and cellular responses to the vaccine were evaluated. As compared to control groups, CIGB-247 vaccination significantly reduced the number and size of metastatic tumor foci in lungs after intravenous inoculation of CT26 and 3LL-D122 tumor cells. Spontaneous lung dissemination from 3LL-D122 and F3II breast tumor cells implanted in the footpad, or subcutaneously, was also reduced by immunization with CIGB-247. The vaccine elicited in both mouse strains antibodies specific for human and murine VEGF that effectively blocked the interaction of VEGF with VEGF receptor 2. Differing from other experimental reports that describe the use of VEGF for active tumor immunotherapy, CIGB-247 elicited a specific cellular response, measured both by a DTH increment and the induction of spleen cells cytotoxic to syngeneic tumor cells producing murine VEGF. In summary our results reinforce the potential of CIGB-247 vaccination to reduce both tumor growth and the number and size of tumor metastasis in lungs, the latter both after direct inoculations of cells in the blood stream, or as part of primary tumor progression in immunocompetent mice. PMID:22240345

  10. Sunitinib facilitates the activation and recruitment of therapeutic anti-tumor immunity in concert with specific vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Anamika; Taylor, Jennifer L.; Alber, Sean; Watkins, Simon C.; Garcia, Jorge A.; Rini, Brian I.; Ko, Jennifer S.; Cohen, Peter A.; Finke, James H.; Storkus, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    The multi-kinase inhibitor sunitinib malate (SUT) has been reported to reduce levels of myeloid suppressor cells and Treg cells in cancer patients, hypothetically diminishing intrinsic impediments for active immunization against tumor-associated antigens in such individuals. The goal of this study was to identify longitudinal immune molecular and cellular changes associated with tumor regression and disease-free status after the treatment of established day 7 s.c. MO5 (B16.OVA) melanomas with SUT alone (1 mg/day via oral gavage for 7 days), vaccination using OVA peptide-pulsed DC (VAC) alone, or the combination of SUT and VAC (SUT/VAC). We observed superior anti-tumor efficacy for SUT/VAC combination approaches, particularly when SUT was applied at the time of the initial vaccination or the vaccine boost. Treatment effectiveness was associated with the acute loss of (and/or failure to recruit) cells bearing myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) or Treg phenotypes within the tumor microenvironment (TME) and the corollary, prolonged enhancement of Type-1 anti-OVA CD8+ T cell responses in the tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) and the TME. Enhanced Type-1 T cell infiltration of tumors was associated with treatment-induced expression of VCAM-1 and CXCR3 ligand chemokines in vascular/peri-vascular cells within the TME, with SUT/VAC therapy benefits conditionally negated upon adminsitration of CXCR3 or VCAM-1 blocking antibodies. These data support the ability of a short 7 day course of SUT to (re)condition the TME to become more receptive to the recruitment and prolonged therapeutic action of (VAC-induced) anti-tumor Tc1 cells. PMID:21170961

  11. The bispecific immunoligand ULBP2-aCEA redirects natural killer cells to tumor cells and reveals potent anti-tumor activity against colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Achim; Jachimowicz, Ron D; Borchmann, Sven; Madlener, Marie; Keßler, Jörg; Reiners, Katrin S; Sauer, Maike; Hansen, Hinrich P; Ullrich, Roland T; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Borchmann, Peter; Yazaki, Paul; Koslowsky, Thomas C; Engert, Andreas; Heukamp, Lukas C; Hallek, Michael; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge

    2014-06-15

    NKG2D, an activating receptor expressed on NK cells and T cells, is critically involved in tumor immunosurveillance. In this study, we explored the potential therapeutic utility of the NKG2D ligand ULBP2 for the treatment of colon carcinoma. To this end we designed a fusion protein consisting of human ULBP2 and an antibody-derived single chain targeting the tumor carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The bispecific recombinant fusion protein re-directed NK cells towards malignant cells by binding to both, tumor cells and NK cells, and triggered NK cell-mediated target cell killing in vitro. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly delayed in a syngeneic colon carcinoma mouse model in response to immunoligand treatment. The anti-tumor activity could be attributed to the stimulation of immune cells with an elevated expression of the activation marker CD69 on NK, T and NKT cells and the infiltration of CD45+ immune cells into the solid tumor. In summary, it was demonstrated that immunoligands provide specific tumor targeting by NK cells and exert anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. This technology represents a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for solid tumors with the potential to be further developed for clinical applications. PMID:24242212

  12. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Brynn B; Highfill, Steven L; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L; Bachovchin, William W; Fry, Terry J

    2013-10-01

    Multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and result in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologs) enzymes can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b) cells, particularly myeloid DCs, to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11bLy6-CLy6-G) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared with either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies, particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT. PMID:23994886

  13. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Brynn B.; Highfill, Steven L.; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H.; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L.; Bachovchin, William W.; Fry, Terry J.

    2013-01-01

    Current multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and results in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (Dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologues) enzymes can mediate tumor regression via immune-mediated mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b+) cells, particularly myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11b+Ly6-ChiLy6-Glo) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1-/-) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared to either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT. PMID:23994886

  14. Selective inhibition of EZH2 by ZLD1039 blocks H3K27 methylation and leads to potent anti-tumor activity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Gao, Tiantao; Wang, Ningyu; Feng, Qiang; You, Xinyu; Ye, Tinghong; Lei, Qian; Zhu, Yongxia; Xiong, Menghua; Xia, Yong; Yang, Fangfang; Shi, Yaojie; Wei, Yuquan; Zhang, Lidan; Yu, Luoting

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a candidate oncogenic driver due to its prevalent overexpression and aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in diverse cancers. Therefore, blocking EZH2 enzyme activity may present a valid therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with EZH2 overexpression including breast cancers. Here, we described ZLD1039 a potent, highly selective, and orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of EZH2, which inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis. ZLD1039 considerably inhibited EZH2 methyltransferase activity with nanomolar potency, decreased global histone-3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation, and reactivated silenced tumor suppressors connected to increased survival of patients with breast cancer. Comparable to conditional silencing of EZH2, its inhibition by ZLD1039 decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis. Comparably, treatment of xenograft-bearing mice with ZLD1039 led to tumor growth regression and metastasis inhibition. These data confirmed the dependency of breast cancer progression on EZH2 activity and the usefulness of ZLD1039 as a promising treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26868841

  15. A novel bispecific EGFR/Met antibody blocks tumor-promoting phenotypic effects induced by resistance to EGFR inhibition and has potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, R; Ecker, V; Wiehle, L; Majety, M; Busl-Schuller, R; Asmussen, M; Nopora, A; Jucknischke, U; Osl, F; Kobold, S; Scheuer, W; Venturi, M; Klein, C; Niederfellner, G; Sustmann, C

    2013-12-12

    Simultaneous targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Met in cancer therapy is under pre-clinical and clinical evaluation. Here, we report the finding that treatment with EGFR inhibitors of various tumor cells, when stimulated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF, results in transient upregulation of phosphorylated AKT. Furthermore, EGFR inhibition in this setting stimulates a pro-invasive phenotype as assessed in Matrigel-based assays. Simultaneous treatment with AKT and EGFR inhibitors abrogates this invasive growth, hence functionally linking signaling and phenotype. This observation implies that during treatment of tumors a balanced ratio of EGFR and Met inhibition is required. To address this, we designed a bispecific antibody targeting EGFR and Met, which has the advantage of a fixed 2:1 stoichiometry. This bispecific antibody inhibits proliferation in tumor cell cultures and co-cultures with fibroblasts in an additive manner compared with treatment with both single agents. In addition, cell migration assays reveal a higher potency of the bispecific antibody in comparison with the antibodies' combination at low doses. We demonstrate that the bispecific antibody inhibits invasive growth, which is specifically observed with cetuximab. Finally, the bispecific antibody potently inhibits tumor growth in a non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model bearing a strong autocrine HGF-loop. Together, our findings strongly support a combination treatment of EGFR and Met inhibitors and further evaluation of resistance mechanisms to EGFR inhibition in the context of active Met signaling. PMID:23812422

  16. Selective inhibition of EZH2 by ZLD1039 blocks H3K27methylation and leads to potent anti-tumor activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejiao; Gao, Tiantao; Wang, Ningyu; Feng, Qiang; You, Xinyu; Ye, Tinghong; Lei, Qian; Zhu, Yongxia; Xiong, Menghua; Xia, Yong; Yang, Fangfang; Shi, Yaojie; Wei, Yuquan; Zhang, Lidan; Yu, Luoting

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a candidate oncogenic driver due to its prevalent overexpression and aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in diverse cancers. Therefore, blocking EZH2 enzyme activity may present a valid therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with EZH2 overexpression including breast cancers. Here, we described ZLD1039 a potent, highly selective, and orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of EZH2, which inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis. ZLD1039 considerably inhibited EZH2 methyltransferase activity with nanomolar potency, decreased global histone-3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation, and reactivated silenced tumor suppressors connected to increased survival of patients with breast cancer. Comparable to conditional silencing of EZH2, its inhibition by ZLD1039 decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis. Comparably, treatment of xenograft-bearing mice with ZLD1039 led to tumor growth regression and metastasis inhibition. These data confirmed the dependency of breast cancer progression on EZH2 activity and the usefulness of ZLD1039 as a promising treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26868841

  17. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Downregulating Genes for the Development of Antituberculous Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Aaron; Chen, Yong; Ji, Qingzhou; Zhu, Guofeng; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Vilchèze, Catherine; Weisbrod, Torin; Li, Weimin; Xu, Jiayong; Larsen, Michelle; Zhang, Jinghang; Porcelli, Steven A.; Jacobs, William R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) plays a critical role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in part by augmenting T cell responses through promoting macrophage phagolysosomal fusion (thereby optimizing CD4+ T cell immunity by enhancing antigen presentation) and apoptosis (a process that can lead to cross-priming of CD8+ T cells). M. tuberculosis can evade antituberculosis (anti-TB) immunity by inhibiting host cell TNF production via expression of specific mycobacterial components. We hypothesized that M. tuberculosis mutants with an increased capacity to induce host cell TNF production (TNF-enhancing mutants) and thus with enhanced immunogenicity can be useful for vaccine development. To identify mycobacterial genes that regulate host cell TNF production, we used a TNF reporter macrophage clone to screen an H37Rv M. tuberculosis cosmid library constructed in M. smegmatis. The screen has identified a set of TNF-downregulating mycobacterial genes that, when deleted in H37Rv, generate TNF-enhancing mutants. Analysis of mutants disrupted for a subset of TNF-downregulating genes, annotated to code for triacylglycerol synthases and fatty acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetase, enzymes that concern lipid biosynthesis and metabolism, has revealed that these strains can promote macrophage phagolysosomal fusion and apoptosis better than wild-type (WT) bacilli. Immunization of mice with the TNF-enhancing M. tuberculosis mutants elicits CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that are superior to those engendered by WT H37Rv. The results suggest that TNF-upregulating M. tuberculosis genes can be targeted to enhance the immunogenicity of mycobacterial strains that can serve as the substrates for the development of novel anti-TB vaccines. PMID:27247233

  18. Molecular mechanisms of paraptosis induction: implications for a non-genetically modified tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hoa, Neil; Myers, Michael P; Douglass, Thomas G; Zhang, Jian Gang; Delgado, Christina; Driggers, Lara; Callahan, Linda L; VanDeusen, Gerald; Pham, Jimmy T H; Bhakta, Nirav; Ge, Lisheng; Jadus, Martin R

    2009-01-01

    Paraptosis is the programmed cell death pathway that leads to cellular necrosis. Previously, rodent and human monocytes/macrophages killed glioma cells bearing the membrane macrophage colony stimulating factor (mM-CSF) through paraptosis, but the molecular mechanism of this killing process was never identified. We have demonstrated that paraptosis of rat T9 glioma cells can be initiated through a large potassium channel (BK)-dependent process initiated by reactive oxygen species. Macrophage mediated cytotoxicity upon the mM-CSF expressing T9-C2 cells was not prevented by the addition of the caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. By a combination of fluorescent confocal and electron microscopy, flow cytometry, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and genetic knock-down approaches, we demonstrated that these ion channels control cellular swelling and vacuolization of rat T9 glioma cells. Cell lysis is preceded by a depletion of intracellular ATP. Six-hour exposure to BK channel activation caused T9 cells to over express heat shock proteins (Hsp 60, 70, 90 and gp96). This same treatment forced HMGB1 translocation from the nuclear region to the periphery. These last molecules are "danger signals" that can stimulate immune responses. Similar inductions of mitochondrial swelling and increased Hsp70 and 90 expressions by BK channel activation were observed with the non-immunogenic F98 glioma cells. Rats injected with T9 cells which were killed by prolonged BK channel activation developed immunity against the T9 cells, while the injection of x-irradiated apoptotic T9 cells failed to produce the vaccinating effect. These results are the first to show that glioma cellular death induced by prolonged BK channel activation improves tumor immunogenicity; this treatment reproduces the vaccinating effects of mM-CSF transduced cells. Elucidation of strategies as described in this study may prove quite valuable in the development of clinical immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:19247476

  19. Xanthatin, a novel potent inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Yu, Jing; Pei, Chong Gang; Li, Yun Yan; Tu, Ping; Gao, Gui Ping; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, xanthatin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. The biochemical profiles of xanthatin were investigated using kinase assay, migration assay, tube formation, Matrigel plug assay, western blot, immunofluorescence and human tumor xenograft model. Xanthatin significantly inhibited growth, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cell as well as inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated angiogenesis. In addition, it inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator. Moreover, xanthatin directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Oral administration of xanthatin could markedly inhibit human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that xanthatin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:26617743

  20. Anti-CCR7 therapy exerts a potent anti-tumor activity in a xenograft model of human mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine receptor CCR7 mediates lymphoid dissemination of many cancers, including lymphomas and epithelial carcinomas, thus representing an attractive therapeutic target. Previous results have highlighted the potential of the anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit migration in transwell assays. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an anti-CCR7 antibody in a xenografted human mantle cell lymphoma model. Methods NOD/SCID mice were either subcutaneously or intravenously inoculated with Granta-519 cells, a human cell line derived from a leukemic mantle cell lymphoma. The anti-CCR7 mAb treatment (3 × 200 μg) was started on day 2 or 7 to target lymphoma cells in either a peri-implantation or a post-implantation stage, respectively. Results The anti-CCR7 therapy significantly delayed the tumor appearance and also reduced the volumes of tumors in the subcutaneous model. Moreover, an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells was detected in mice treated with the anti-CCR7 mAb compared to the untreated animals. In addition, significantly reduced number of Granta-519 cells migrated from subcutaneous tumors to distant lymphoid organs, such as bone marrow and spleen in the anti-CCR7 treated mice. In the intravenous models, the anti-CCR7 mAb drastically increased survival of the mice. Accordingly, dissemination and infiltration of tumor cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including lungs and central nervous system, was almost abrogated. Conclusions The anti-CCR7 mAb exerts a potent anti-tumor activity and might represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to conventional therapies. PMID:24305507

  1. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient's own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  2. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-06-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers.

  3. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  4. Modification of sPD1 with CRT induces potent anti-tumor immune responses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongze; Li, Zhiying; Tian, Huiqun; Wu, Wei; Liu, Chaoqi

    2015-12-01

    As a key factor for tumor occurrence and development, tumor cells escape immune surveillance and inhibit the body immune killer effect through negative signaling pathways. In this research, we designed and expressed the fusion protein CRT-sPD1 to block PD1/PDL1 negative signal pathway, indirectly bind CRT to the tumor cell surface and to increase the cell immunogenicity activity. Results from western blotting, flow cytometry (FCM) and ELISA showed that the cell lines that stably express CRT, PD1 and CRT-sPD1 protein were obtained and the transfected cellular supernatant contained PD1 and CRT-sPD1 could bind to PDL1 on the surface of EL4 cells. Vitro experiments indicated the secreted mCRT-sPD1 protein could bind to PDL1 and enhance lymphocyte proliferation and CTL activity. We also found that fusion protein CRT-sPD1 could activate and induce the immune system to kill the tumor cells, specifically inhibit the tumor growth and prolong the survival period in mouse tumor model. And all these suggested that CRT-sPD1 could be used as drug development and utilization of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26653551

  5. Design and Synthesis of Multifunctional Gold Nanoparticles Bearing Tumor-Associated Glycopeptide Antigens as Potential Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Brinas, Raymond P.; Sundgren, Andreas; Sahoo, Padmini; Morey, Susan; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Wilding, Greg E.; Deng, Wei; Barchi, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    The development of vaccines against specific types of cancers will offer new modalities for therapeutic intervention. Here we describe the synthesis of a novel vaccine construction prepared from spherical gold nanoparticles of 3–5 nm core diameters. The particles were coated with both the tumor-associated glycopeptides antigens containing the cell-surface mucin MUC4 with Thomsen Friedenreich (TF) antigen attached at different sites and a 28-residue peptide from the complement derived protein C3d to act as a B-cell activating “molecular adjuvant”. The synthesis entailed solid phase glycopeptide synthesis, design of appropriate linkers and attachment chemistry of the various molecules to the particles. Attachment to the gold surface was mediated by a novel thiol-containing 33 atom linker which was further modified to be included as a third “spacer” component in the synthesis of several three-component vaccine platforms. Groups of mice were vaccinated either with one of the nanoplatform constructs or with control particles without antigen coating. Evaluation of sera from the immunized animals in enzyme immunoassays (EIA) against each glycopeptide antigen showed a small but statistically significant immune response with production of both IgM and IgG isotypes. Vaccines with one carbohydrate antigen (B, C and E) gave more robust responses than the one with two contiguous disaccharides (D), and vaccine E with a TF antigen attached to threonine at the 10th position of the peptide was selected for IgG over IgM suggesting isotype switching. The data suggested that this platform may be a viable delivery system for tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens. PMID:22812418

  6. The generation and analyses of a novel combination of recombinant adenovirus vaccines targeting three tumor antigens as an immunotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S.; Tsang, Kwong Yok; Palena, Claudia; David, Justin M.; Fantini, Massimo; Kwilas, Anna; Rice, Adrian E.; Latchman, Yvette; Hodge, James W.; Gulley, James L.; Madan, Ravi A.; Heery, Christopher R.; Balint, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of human carcinoma lesions, including heterogeneity in expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), is a well-established phenomenon. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), MUC1, and brachyury are diverse TAAs, each of which is expressed on a wide range of human tumors. We have previously reported on a novel adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector gene delivery platform (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]) in which regions of the early 1 (E1), early 2 (E2b), and early 3 (E3) genes have been deleted. The unique deletions in this platform result in a dramatic decrease in late gene expression, leading to a marked reduction in host immune response to the vector. Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA vaccine (ETBX-011) has been employed in clinical studies as an active vaccine to induce immune responses to CEA in metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We report here the development of novel recombinant Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-brachyury and-MUC1 vaccine constructs, each capable of activating antigen-specific human T cells in vitro and inducing antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccinated mice. We also describe the use of a combination of the three vaccines (designated Tri-Ad5) of Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA, Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-brachyury and Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-MUC1, and demonstrate that there is minimal to no “antigenic competition” in in vitro studies of human dendritic cells, or in murine vaccination studies. The studies reported herein support the rationale for the application of Tri-Ad5 as a therapeutic modality to induce immune responses to a diverse range of human TAAs for potential clinical studies. PMID:26374823

  7. Targeting the Genital Tract Mucosa with a Lipopeptide/Recombinant Adenovirus Prime/Boost Vaccine Induces Potent and Long-Lasting CD8+ T Cell Immunity Against Herpes: Importance of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 881

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the mucosal immune system of the genital tract (GT) with subunit vaccines failed to induce potent and durable local CD8+ T cell immunity, crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral (STV) pathogens, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) that causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8+ T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8+ T cell epitope (gB498-505) and both were delivered intravaginally (IVAG) in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared to its homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo); the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice: (i) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8+ T cells, detected in both the GT draining nodes (GT-DLN) and in the vaginal mucosa (VM); (ii) had significantly lower virus titers; (iii) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and (iv) did not succumb to lethal infection (p < 0.005), following intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells, producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and exhibiting cytotoxic activity, were associated with protection (p < 0.005). The protective CD8+ T cell response was significantly compromised in the absence of the adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) (p = 0.0001). Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the VM with a Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost vaccine elicits a potent, MyD88-dependent, and long-lasting mucosal CD8+ T cell protective immunity against sexually transmitted herpes infection and disease. PMID:23018456

  8. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response. PMID:27622047

  9. Intraperitoneal Administration of a Tumor-Associated Antigen SART3, CD40L, and GM-CSF Gene-Loaded Polyplex Micelle Elicits a Vaccine Effect in Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Furugaki, Kouichi; Cui, Lin; Kunisawa, Yumi; Osada, Kensuke; Shinkai, Kentaro; Tanaka, Masao; Kataoka, Kazunori; Nakano, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Polyplex micelles have demonstrated biocompatibility and achieve efficient gene transfection in vivo. Here, we investigated a polyplex micelle encapsulating genes encoding the tumor-associated antigen squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells-3 (SART3), adjuvant CD40L, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a DNA vaccine platform in mouse tumor models with different types of major histocompatibility antigen complex (MHC). Intraperitoneally administrated polyplex micelles were predominantly found in the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Compared with mock controls, the triple gene vaccine significantly prolonged the survival of mice harboring peritoneal dissemination of CT26 colorectal cancer cells, of which long-term surviving mice showed complete rejection when re-challenged with CT26 tumors. Moreover, the DNA vaccine inhibited the growth and metastasis of subcutaneous CT26 and Lewis lung tumors in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively, which represent different MHC haplotypes. The DNA vaccine highly stimulated both cytotoxic T lymphocyte and natural killer cell activities, and increased the infiltration of CD11c+ DCs and CD4+/CD8a+ T cells into tumors. Depletion of CD4+ or CD8a+ T cells by neutralizing antibodies deteriorated the anti-tumor efficacy of the DNA vaccine. In conclusion, a SART3/CD40L+GM-CSF gene-loaded polyplex micelle can be applied as a novel vaccine platform to elicit tumor rejection immunity regardless of the recipient MHC haplotype. PMID:25013909

  10. MUC1 Vaccines, Comprised of Glycosylated or Non-Glycosylated Peptides or Tumor-Derived MUC1, Can Circumvent Immunoediting to Control Tumor Growth in MUC1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Vani; Supekar, Nitin T.; Wei, Jie; McCurry, Dustin B.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Kosiorek, Heidi E.; Trivedi, Priyanka P.; Bradley, Judy M.; Madsen, Cathy S.; Pathangey, Latha B.; Hoelzinger, Dominique B.; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    It remains challenging to produce decisive vaccines against MUC1, a tumor-associated antigen widely expressed by pancreas, breast and other tumors. Employing clinically relevant mouse models, we ruled out such causes as irreversible T-cell tolerance, inadequate avidity, and failure of T-cells to recognize aberrantly glycosylated tumor MUC1. Instead, every tested MUC1 preparation, even non-glycosylated synthetic 9mer peptides, induced interferon gamma-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells that recognized glycosylated variants including tumor-associated MUC1. Vaccination with synthetic peptides conferred protection as long as vaccination was repeated post tumor challenge. Failure to revaccinate post challenge was associated with down-regulated tumor MUC1 and MHC molecules. Surprisingly, direct admixture of MUC1-expressing tumor with MUC1-hyperimmune T-cells could not prevent tumor outgrowth or MUC1 immunoediting, whereas ex vivo activation of the hyperimmune T-cells prior to tumor admixture rendered them curative. Therefore, surrogate T-cell preactivation outside the tumor bed, either in culture or by repetitive vaccination, can overcome tumor escape. PMID:26788922