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Sample records for potential drug target

  1. Metabolic Enzymes of Helminth Parasites: Potential as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways that extract energy from carbon compounds are essential for an organism's survival. Therefore, inhibition of enzymes in these pathways represents a potential therapeutic strategy to combat parasitic infections. However, the high degree of similarity between host and parasite enzymes makes this strategy potentially difficult. Nevertheless, several existing drugs to treat infections by parasitic helminths (worms) target metabolic enzymes. These include the trivalent antimonials that target phosphofructokinase and Clorsulon that targets phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglycerate kinase. Glycolytic enzymes from a variety of helminths have been characterised biochemically, and some inhibitors identified. To date none of these inhibitors have been developed into therapies. Many of these enzymes are externalised from the parasite and so are also of interest in the development of potential vaccines. Less work has been done on tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Again, while some inhibitors have been identified none have been developed into drug-like molecules. Barriers to the development of novel drugs targeting metabolic enzymes include the lack of experimentally determined structures of helminth enzymes, lack of direct proof that the enzymes are vital in the parasites and lack of cell culture systems for many helminth species. Nevertheless, the success of Clorsulon (which discriminates between highly similar host and parasite enzymes) should inspire us to consider making serious efforts to discover novel anthelminthics, which target metabolic enzymes. PMID:26983888

  2. Targeting cancer with sesterterpenoids: the new potential antitumor drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caiguo; Liu, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Cancer remains a major cause of death in the world to date. A variety of anticancer drugs have been used in clinical chemotherapy, acting on the particular oncogenic abnormalities that are responsible for malignant transformation and progression. Interestingly, some of these anticancer drugs are developed from natural sources such as plants, marine organisms, and microorganisms. Over the past decades, a family of naturally occuring molecules, namely sesterterpenoids, has been isolated from different organisms and they exhibit significant potential in the inhibition of tumor cells in vitro, while the molecular targets of these compounds and their functional mechanisms are still obscure. In this review, we summarize and discuss the functions of these sesterterpenoids in the inhibition of cancer cells. Moreover, we also highlight and discuss chemical structure-activity relationships of some compounds, demonstrating their pervasiveness and importance in cancer therapy. PMID:25894074

  3. Potential drug targets for calcific aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and, given its association with age, the prevalence of CAVD is expected to continue to rise as global life expectancy increases. No drug strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. Given that valve replacement is the only available clinical option, patients often cope with a deteriorating quality of life until diminished valve function demands intervention. The recognition that CAVD results from active cellular mechanisms suggests that the underlying pathways might be targeted to treat the condition. However, no such therapeutic strategy has been successfully developed to date. One hope was that drugs already used to treat vascular complications might also improve CAVD outcomes, but the mechanisms of CAVD progression and the desired therapeutic outcomes are often different from those of vascular diseases. We, therefore, discuss the benchmarks that must be met by a CAVD treatment approach, and highlight advances in the understanding of CAVD mechanisms to identify potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24445487

  4. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com . PMID:27167132

  5. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  6. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  7. HNF4α -- role in drug metabolism and potential drug target?

    PubMed Central

    Hwang-Verslues, Wendy W.; Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. It is best known as a master regulator of liver-specific gene expression, especially those genes involved in lipid transport and glucose metabolism. However, there is also a growing body of work that indicates the importance of HNF4α in the regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic and drug metabolism. A recent study identifying the essential fatty acid linoleic acid (LA, C18:2) as the endogenous, reversible ligand for HNF4α suggests that HNF4α may also be a potential drug target and that its activity may be regulated by diet. This review will discuss the role of HNF4α in drug metabolism, including the genes it regulates, the factors that regulate its activity, and its potential as a drug target. PMID:20833107

  8. Sirtuins as potential drug targets for metablic diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies of the sirtuin family of proteins, which possess NAD+/-dependent deacetylase and ADP ribosyltransferase activities, indicate that they regulate many biological functions, such as longevity and metabolism. These findings also suggest that sirtuins might serve as valuable drug targets f...

  9. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  10. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hassan, Mubashir; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18). Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor-ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. PMID:24899801

  11. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hassan, Mubashir; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18). Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. PMID:24899801

  12. A-kinase anchoring proteins as potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Tröger, Jessica; Moutty, Marie C; Skroblin, Philipp; Klussmann, Enno

    2012-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) crucially contribute to the spatial and temporal control of cellular signalling. They directly interact with a variety of protein binding partners and cellular constituents, thereby directing pools of signalling components to defined locales. In particular, AKAPs mediate compartmentalization of cAMP signalling. Alterations in AKAP expression and their interactions are associated with or cause diseases including chronic heart failure, various cancers and disorders of the immune system such as HIV. A number of cellular dysfunctions result from mutations of specific AKAPs. The link between malfunctions of single AKAP complexes and a disease makes AKAPs and their interactions interesting targets for the development of novel drugs. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Novel cAMP Signalling Paradigms. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-2 PMID:22122509

  13. Enzymology of the nematode cuticle: A potential drug target?

    PubMed

    Page, Antony P; Stepek, Gillian; Winter, Alan D; Pertab, David

    2014-08-01

    All nematodes possess an external structure known as the cuticle, which is crucial for their development and survival. This structure is composed primarily of collagen, which is secreted from the underlying hypodermal cells. Extensive studies using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrate that formation of the cuticle requires the activity of an extensive range of enzymes. Enzymes are required both pre-secretion, for synthesis of component proteins such as collagen, and post-secretion, for removal of the previous developmental stage cuticle, in a process known as moulting or exsheathment. The excretion/secretion products of numerous parasitic nematodes contain metallo-, serine and cysteine proteases, and these proteases are conserved across the nematode phylum and many are involved in the moulting/exsheathment process. This review highlights the enzymes required for cuticle formation, with a focus on the post-secretion moulting events. Where orthologues of the C. elegans enzymes have been identified in parasitic nematodes these may represent novel candidate targets for future drug/vaccine development. PMID:25057463

  14. Potential Targets for Antifungal Drug Discovery Based on Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyun; Hou, Yinglong; Yue, Longtao; Liu, Shuyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially infections caused by Candida albicans, remain a challenging problem in clinical settings. Despite the development of more-effective antifungal drugs, their application is limited for various reasons. Thus, alternative treatments with drugs aimed at novel targets in C. albicans are needed. Knowledge of growth and virulence in fungal cells is essential not only to understand their pathogenic mechanisms but also to identify potential antifungal targets. This article reviews the current knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and virulence in C. albicans and examines potential targets for the development of new antifungal drugs. PMID:26195510

  15. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets. PMID:24799897

  16. Bacterial Magnetosome: A Novel Biogenetic Magnetic Targeted Drug Carrier with Potential Multifunctions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianbo; Li, Ying; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria have recently drawn great interest due to their unique features. BMs are used experimentally as carriers for antibodies, enzymes, ligands, nucleic acids, and chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition to the common attractive properties of magnetic carriers, BMs also show superiority as targeting nanoscale drug carriers, which is hardly matched by artificial magnetic particles. We are presenting the potential applications of BMs as drug carriers by introducing the drug-loading methods and strategies and the recent research progress of BMs which has contributed to the application of BMs as drug carriers. PMID:22448162

  17. Modular Nanotransporters for Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Drugs: Folate Receptors as Potential Targets

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to a subcellular drug delivery system, modular nanotransporters (MNT) that can penetrate into target cells and deliver a therapeutic into their subcellular compartments, particularly into the nucleus. The therapeutics which need such type of delivery belong to two groups: (i) those that exert their effect only when delivered into a certain cell compartment (like DNA delivered into the nucleus); and (ii) those drugs that are capable of exerting their effect in different parts of the cells, however there can be found a cell compartment that is the most sensitive to their effect. A particular interest attract such cytotoxic agents as Auger electron emitters which are known to be ineffective outside the cell nucleus, whereas they possess high cytotoxicity in the vicinity of nuclear DNA through the induction of non-reparable double-strand DNA breaks. The review discusses main approaches permitting to choose internalizable receptors permitting both recognition of target cells and penetration into them. Special interest attract folate receptors which become accessible to blood circulating therapeutics after malignant transformation or on activated macrophages which makes them an attractive target for both several oncological and inflammatory diseases, like atherosclerosis. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that MNT is a promising platform for targeted delivery of different therapeutics into the nuclei of target cells. PMID:25312738

  18. UDP-galactopyranose mutase, a potential drug target against human pathogenic nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sweta; Valicherla, Guru R; Mohd Shahab; Gupta, Jyoti; Gayen, Jiaur R; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a vector-borne neglected tropical disease affects millions of population in tropical and subtropical countries. Vaccine unavailability and emerging drug resistance against standard antifilarial drugs necessitate search of novel drug targets for developing alternate drugs. Recently, UDP-galactopyranose mutases (UGM) have emerged as a promising drug target playing an important role in parasite virulence and survival. This study deals with the cloning and characterization of Brugia malayi UGM and further exploring its antifilarial drug target potential. The recombinant protein was actively involved in conversion of UDP-galactopyranose (substrate) to UDP-galactofuranose (product) revealing Km and Vmax to be ∼51.15 μM and ∼1.27 μM/min, respectively. The purified protein appeared to be decameric in native state and its 3D homology modeling using Aspergillus fumigatus UGM enzyme as template revealed conservation of active site residues. Two specific prokaryotic inhibitors (compounds A and B) of the enzyme inhibited B. malayi UGM enzymatic activity competitively depicting Ki values ∼22.68 and ∼23.0 μM, respectively. These compounds were also active in vitro and in vivo against B. malayi The findings suggest that B. malayi UGM could be a potential antifilarial therapeutic drug target. PMID:27465638

  19. Identification of potential drug targets in Helicobacter pylori strain HPAG1 by in silico genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Mutha, Naresh V R; Akula, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Drugs for treatment of H. pylori relieve from gastritis or pain but are not specific to H. pylori. Therefore, there is an immediate requirement for new therapeutic molecules to treat H. pylori. Current study investigates identification of drug targets in the strain HPAG1 of H. pylori by in silico genome analysis. Genome of HPAG1 was reconstructed for metabolic pathways and compared with Homosapien sapiens to identify genes which are unique to H. pylori. These unique genes were subjected to gene property analysis to identify the potentiality of the drug targets. Among the total number of genes analysed in H. pylori strain HPAG1, nearly 542 genes qualified as unique molecules and among them 29 were identified to be potential drug targets. Co/Zn/Cd efflux system membrane fusion protein, Ferric sidephore transport system and biopolymer transport protein EXbB were found to be critical drug targets to H. pylori HPAG1. Five genes (superoxide dismutase, HtrA protease/chaperone protein, Heatinducible transcription repressor HrcA, HspR, transcriptional repressor of DnaK operon, Cobalt-zinccadmium resistance protein CzcA) of the 29 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lending credence to our unique approach. PMID:26205802

  20. Sodium Dependent Multivitamin Transporter (SMVT): A Potential Target for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge, etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22420308

  1. Inorganic nanovehicle for potential targeted drug delivery to tumor cells, tumor optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiyong; Gao, Xuechuan; Baigude, Huricha; Hai, Xiao; Zhang, Renfei; Gao, Xiaolong; Shen, Beibei; Li, Zhao; Tan, Zhibing; Su, Haiquan

    2015-03-11

    In this work, an inorganic multifunctional nanovehicle was tailored as a carrier to deliver anticancer drug for tumor optical imaging and therapy. The nanovehicle could be used as a dually targeted drug nanovehicle by bonded magnetical (passive) and folic acid (active) targeting capabilities. In addition, it was developed using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a fluorescence reagent, and an α-zirconium phosphate nanoplatform (Zr(HPO4)2·H2O, abbreviated as α-ZrP) as the anticancer drug nanovehicle. The novel drug-release system was designed and fabricated by intercalation of α-ZrP with magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by reacting with a folate acid-chitosan-rhodamine6G (FA-CHI-R6G) complex, and then α-ZrP intercalated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was successfully encapsulated into chitosan (CHI). The resultant multifunctional drug delivery system was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, photoluminescence spectra, magnetometry, fluorescence microscopy imaging studies and other characterization methods. Simultaneously, the drug release in vitro on the obtained nanocomposites that exhibited a sustained release behavior was carried out in buffer solution at 37 °C, which demonstrated clearly that the nanocomposites shown a sustained release behavior. Meanwhile, cell culture experiments also indicated that the drug-release system had the potential to be used as an dually targeted drug nanovehicle into the tumor cells. PMID:25693506

  2. The Validation of Nematode-Specific Acetylcholine-Gated Chloride Channels as Potential Anthelmintic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wever, Claudia M.; Farrington, Danielle; Dent, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    New compounds are needed to treat parasitic nematode infections in humans, livestock and plants. Small molecule anthelmintics are the primary means of nematode parasite control in animals; however, widespread resistance to the currently available drug classes means control will be impossible without the introduction of new compounds. Adverse environmental effects associated with nematocides used to control plant parasitic species are also motivating the search for safer, more effective compounds. Discovery of new anthelmintic drugs in particular has been a serious challenge due to the difficulty of obtaining and culturing target parasites for high-throughput screens and the lack of functional genomic techniques to validate potential drug targets in these pathogens. We present here a novel strategy for target validation that employs the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to demonstrate the value of new ligand-gated ion channels as targets for anthelmintic discovery. Many successful anthelmintics, including ivermectin, levamisole and monepantel, are agonists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, suggesting that the unexploited pentameric ion channels encoded in parasite genomes may be suitable drug targets. We validated five members of the nematode-specific family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channels as targets of agonists with anthelmintic properties by ectopically expressing an ivermectin-gated chloride channel, AVR-15, in tissues that endogenously express the acetylcholine-gated chloride channels and using the effects of ivermectin to predict the effects of an acetylcholine-gated chloride channel agonist. In principle, our strategy can be applied to validate any ion channel as a putative anti-parasitic drug target. PMID:26393923

  3. ROCK1 is a potential combinatorial drug target for BRAF mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Marjon A; Maddalo, Gianluca; Greig, Kylie; Raaijmakers, Linsey M; Possik, Patricia A; van Breukelen, Bas; Cappadona, Salvatore; Heck, Albert JR; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of BRAF mutant melanomas with specific BRAF inhibitors leads to tumor remission. However, most patients eventually relapse due to drug resistance. Therefore, we designed an integrated strategy using (phospho)proteomic and functional genomic platforms to identify drug targets whose inhibition sensitizes melanoma cells to BRAF inhibition. We found many proteins to be induced upon PLX4720 (BRAF inhibitor) treatment that are known to be involved in BRAF inhibitor resistance, including FOXD3 and ErbB3. Several proteins were down-regulated, including Rnd3, a negative regulator of ROCK1 kinase. For our genomic approach, we performed two parallel shRNA screens using a kinome library to identify genes whose inhibition sensitizes to BRAF or ERK inhibitor treatment. By integrating our functional genomic and (phospho)proteomic data, we identified ROCK1 as a potential drug target for BRAF mutant melanoma. ROCK1 silencing increased melanoma cell elimination when combined with BRAF or ERK inhibitor treatment. Translating this to a preclinical setting, a ROCK inhibitor showed augmented melanoma cell death upon BRAF or ERK inhibition in vitro. These data merit exploration of ROCK1 as a target in combination with current BRAF mutant melanoma therapies. PMID:25538140

  4. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery. PMID:25093328

  5. Diacylglycerol Kinases as Emerging Potential Drug Targets for a Variety of Diseases: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Fumio; Mizuno, Satoru; Komenoi, Suguru

    2016-01-01

    Ten mammalian diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) isozymes (α–κ) have been identified to date. Our previous review noted that several DGK isozymes can serve as potential drug targets for cancer, epilepsy, autoimmunity, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and type II diabetes (Sakane et al., 2008). Since then, recent genome-wide association studies have implied several new possible relationships between DGK isozymes and diseases. For example, DGKθ and DGKκ have been suggested to be associated with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and hypospadias, respectively. In addition, the DGKη gene has been repeatedly identified as a bipolar disorder (BPD) susceptibility gene. Intriguingly, we found that DGKη-knockout mice showed lithium (BPD remedy)-sensitive mania-like behaviors, suggesting that DGKη is one of key enzymes of the etiology of BPD. Because DGKs are potential drug targets for a wide variety of diseases, the development of DGK isozyme-specific inhibitors/activators has been eagerly awaited. Recently, we have identified DGKα-selective inhibitors. Because DGKα has both pro-tumoral and anti-immunogenic properties, the DGKα-selective inhibitors would simultaneously have anti-tumoral and pro-immunogenic (anti-tumor immunogenic) effects. Although the ten DGK isozymes are highly similar to each other, our current results have encouraged us to identify and develop specific inhibitors/activators against every DGK isozyme that can be effective regulators and drugs against a wide variety of physiological events and diseases. PMID:27583247

  6. Diacylglycerol Kinases as Emerging Potential Drug Targets for a Variety of Diseases: An Update.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Fumio; Mizuno, Satoru; Komenoi, Suguru

    2016-01-01

    Ten mammalian diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) isozymes (α-κ) have been identified to date. Our previous review noted that several DGK isozymes can serve as potential drug targets for cancer, epilepsy, autoimmunity, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and type II diabetes (Sakane et al., 2008). Since then, recent genome-wide association studies have implied several new possible relationships between DGK isozymes and diseases. For example, DGKθ and DGKκ have been suggested to be associated with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and hypospadias, respectively. In addition, the DGKη gene has been repeatedly identified as a bipolar disorder (BPD) susceptibility gene. Intriguingly, we found that DGKη-knockout mice showed lithium (BPD remedy)-sensitive mania-like behaviors, suggesting that DGKη is one of key enzymes of the etiology of BPD. Because DGKs are potential drug targets for a wide variety of diseases, the development of DGK isozyme-specific inhibitors/activators has been eagerly awaited. Recently, we have identified DGKα-selective inhibitors. Because DGKα has both pro-tumoral and anti-immunogenic properties, the DGKα-selective inhibitors would simultaneously have anti-tumoral and pro-immunogenic (anti-tumor immunogenic) effects. Although the ten DGK isozymes are highly similar to each other, our current results have encouraged us to identify and develop specific inhibitors/activators against every DGK isozyme that can be effective regulators and drugs against a wide variety of physiological events and diseases. PMID:27583247

  7. In silico analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei genome sequence for potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Chong, Chan-Eng; Lim, Boon-San; Nathan, Sheila; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have enabled elucidation of whole genome information from a plethora of organisms. In parallel with this technology, various bioinformatics tools have driven the comparative analysis of the genome sequences between species and within isolates. While drawing meaningful conclusions from a large amount of raw material, computer-aided identification of suitable targets for further experimental analysis and characterization, has also led to the prediction of non-human homologous essential genes in bacteria as promising candidates for novel drug discovery. Here, we present a comparative genomic analysis to identify essential genes in Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our in silico prediction has identified 312 essential genes which could also be potential drug candidates. These genes encode essential proteins to support the survival of B. pseudomallei including outer-inner membrane and surface structures, regulators, proteins involved in pathogenenicity, adaptation, chaperones as well as degradation of small and macromolecules, energy metabolism, information transfer, central/intermediate/miscellaneous metabolism pathways and some conserved hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Therefore, our in silico approach has enabled rapid screening and identification of potential drug targets for further characterization in the laboratory. PMID:16922696

  8. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. PMID:25847157

  9. Potential of targeted drug delivery system for the treatment of bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Raichur; KusumDevi, V

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a devastating complication of cancer that requires an immediate attention. Although our understanding of the metastatic process has improved over the years, yet a number of questions still remain unanswered, and more research is required for complete understanding of the skeletal consequences of metastasis. Furthermore, as no effective treatments are available for some of the most common skeleton disorders such as arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteosarcoma and metastatic bone cancer, there is an urgent need to develop new drugs and drug delivery systems for safe and efficient clinical treatments. Hence this article describes the potential of targeted delivery platforms aimed specifically at bone metastasized tumors. The review gives a brief understanding of the proposed mechanisms of metastasis and focuses primarily on the targeting moieties such as bisphosphonates, which represent the current gold standard in bone metastasis therapies. Special focus has been given to the targeted nanoparticulate systems for treating bone metastasis and its future. Also highlighted are some of the therapeutic targets that can be exploited for designing therapies for bone metastasis. Some of the patented molecules for bone metastasis prevention and treatment have also been discussed. Recently proposed HIFU-CHEM, which utilizes High Intensity Focused ultrasound (HIFU) guided by MRI in combination with temperature-sensitive nanomedicines has also been briefed. The study has been concluded with a focus on the innovations requiring an immediate attention that could improve the treatment modality of bone metastasis. PMID:24839990

  10. Global transcriptional responses to cisplatin in Dictyostelium discoideum identify potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, Nancy; Alexander, Hannah; Min, Junxia; Kuspa, Adam; Alexander, Stephen; Shaulsky, Gad

    2007-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum is a useful model for studying mechanisms of cisplatin drug sensitivity. Our previous findings, that mutations in sphingolipid metabolism genes confer cisplatin resistance in D. discoideum and in human cells, raised interest in the resistance mechanisms and their implications for cisplatin chemotherapy. Here we used expression microarrays to monitor physiological changes and to identify pathways that are affected by cisplatin treatment of D. discoideum. We found >400 genes whose regulation was altered by cisplatin treatment of wild-type cells, including groups of genes that participate in cell proliferation and in nucleotide and protein metabolism, showing that the cisplatin response is orderly and multifaceted. Transcriptional profiling of two isogenic cisplatin-resistant mutants, impaired in different sphingolipid metabolism steps, showed that the effect of cisplatin treatment was greater than the effect of the mutations, indicating that cisplatin resistance in the mutants is due to specific abilities to overcome the drug effects rather than to general drug insensitivity. Nevertheless, the mutants exhibited significantly different responses to cisplatin compared with the parent, and >200 genes accounted for that difference. Mutations in five cisplatin response genes (sgkB, csbA, acbA, smlA, and atg8) resulted in altered drug sensitivity, implicating novel pathways in cisplatin response. Our data illustrate how modeling complex cellular responses to drugs in genetically stable and tractable systems can uncover new targets with the potential for improving chemotherapy. PMID:17878305

  11. Sigma receptors: potential targets for a new class of antidepressant drug

    PubMed Central

    Fishback, James A.; Robson, Matthew J.; Xu, Yan-Tong; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the widespread and devastating impact of depression on society, our current understanding of its pathogenesis is limited. Likewise, existing treatments are inadequate, providing relief to only a subset of people suffering from depression. The search for more effective antidepressant drugs includes the investigation of new molecular targets. Among them, current data suggests that sigma receptors are involved in multiple processes effecting antidepressant-like actions in vivo and in vitro. This review summarizes accumulated evidence supporting a role for sigma receptors in antidepressant effects and provides a conceptual framework for delineating their potential roles over the course of antidepressant treatment. PMID:20438757

  12. The exploration of network motifs as potential drug targets from post-translational regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Song, Jiangning; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation and proteolysis are among the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), and play critical roles in various biological processes. More recent discoveries imply that the crosstalks between these two PTMs are involved in many diseases. In this work, we construct a post-translational regulatory network (PTRN) consists of phosphorylation and proteolysis processes, which enables us to investigate the regulatory interplays between these two PTMs. With the PTRN, we identify some functional network motifs that are significantly enriched with drug targets, some of which are further found to contain multiple proteins targeted by combinatorial drugs. These findings imply that the network motifs may be used to predict targets when designing new drugs. Inspired by this, we propose a novel computational approach called NetTar for predicting drug targets using the identified network motifs. Benchmarking results on real data indicate that our approach can be used for accurate prediction of novel proteins targeted by known drugs. PMID:26853265

  13. The exploration of network motifs as potential drug targets from post-translational regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Song, Jiangning; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation and proteolysis are among the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), and play critical roles in various biological processes. More recent discoveries imply that the crosstalks between these two PTMs are involved in many diseases. In this work, we construct a post-translational regulatory network (PTRN) consists of phosphorylation and proteolysis processes, which enables us to investigate the regulatory interplays between these two PTMs. With the PTRN, we identify some functional network motifs that are significantly enriched with drug targets, some of which are further found to contain multiple proteins targeted by combinatorial drugs. These findings imply that the network motifs may be used to predict targets when designing new drugs. Inspired by this, we propose a novel computational approach called NetTar for predicting drug targets using the identified network motifs. Benchmarking results on real data indicate that our approach can be used for accurate prediction of novel proteins targeted by known drugs. PMID:26853265

  14. Metabonomic analysis of potential biomarkers and drug targets involved in diabetic nephropathy mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tingting; Zhao, Liangcai; Jia, Jianmin; Xia, Huanhuan; Du, Yao; Lin, Qiuting; Lin, Xiaodong; Ye, Xinjian; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the lethal manifestations of diabetic systemic microvascular disease. Elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during diabetic progression is critical to understand its pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers and drug targets involved in the disease. In this study, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabonomics with correlative analysis was performed to study the characteristic metabolites, as well as the related pathways in urine and kidney samples of db/db diabetic mice, compared with age-matched wildtype mice. The time trajectory plot of db/db mice revealed alterations, in an age-dependent manner, in urinary metabolic profiles along with progression of renal damage and dysfunction. Age-dependent and correlated metabolite analysis identified that cis-aconitate and allantoin could serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis of DN. Further correlative analysis revealed that the enzymes dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMG-CoA lyase) were involved in dimethylamine metabolism, ketogenesis and GTP metabolism pathways, respectively, and could be potential therapeutic targets for DN. Our results highlight that metabonomic analysis can be used as a tool to identify potential biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of diseases. PMID:26149603

  15. Metabonomic analysis of potential biomarkers and drug targets involved in diabetic nephropathy mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tingting; Zhao, Liangcai; Jia, Jianmin; Xia, Huanhuan; Du, Yao; Lin, Qiuting; Lin, Xiaodong; Ye, Xinjian; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the lethal manifestations of diabetic systemic microvascular disease. Elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during diabetic progression is critical to understand its pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers and drug targets involved in the disease. In this study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)-based metabonomics with correlative analysis was performed to study the characteristic metabolites, as well as the related pathways in urine and kidney samples of db/db diabetic mice, compared with age-matched wildtype mice. The time trajectory plot of db/db mice revealed alterations, in an age-dependent manner, in urinary metabolic profiles along with progression of renal damage and dysfunction. Age-dependent and correlated metabolite analysis identified that cis-aconitate and allantoin could serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis of DN. Further correlative analysis revealed that the enzymes dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMG-CoA lyase) were involved in dimethylamine metabolism, ketogenesis and GTP metabolism pathways, respectively, and could be potential therapeutic targets for DN. Our results highlight that metabonomic analysis can be used as a tool to identify potential biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of diseases. PMID:26149603

  16. Hyperlipidemia, Disease Associations, and Top 10 Potential Drug Targets: A Network View.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sneha; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of acquired hyperlipidemia has increased due to sedentary life style and lipid-rich diet. In this work, a lipid-protein-protein interaction network (LPPIN) for acquired hyperlipidemia was prepared by incorporating differentially expressed genes in obese fatty liver as seed nodes, protein interactions from PathwayLinker, and lipid interactions from STITCH4.0. Cholesterol, diacylglycreol, phosphatidylinositol-bis-phosphate, and inositol triphosphate were identified as core lipids that influence the signaling pathways in the LPPIN. RACα serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT1) was a highly essential central protein. The gastrin-CREB pathway was greatly enriched; all enriched pathways in the LPPIN showed crosstalk with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt pathway, correlating with the central role of AKT1 in the network. The disease clusters identified in the LPPIN were cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Type II diabetes. In this context, we note that the commercially approved drug targets for hyperlipidemia in each disease cluster may potentially be repurposed for treatment of the specific disease. We report here top 10 potential drug targets that may mediate progression from hyperlipidemia to the respective disease state. ToppGene Suite was employed to identify candidates followed by a) discarding high closeness centrality nodes, and b) selecting nodes with high bridging centrality. Three potential targets could be mapped to specific disease clusters in the LPPIN. Lipids associated with acquired hyperlipidemia and each disease cluster identified may be useful as prognostic fingerprints. These findings provide an integrative view of lipid-protein interactions leading to acquired hyperlipidemia and the associated diseases, and might prove useful in future translational pharmaceutical research. PMID:26983022

  17. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Sheketha R.; Hedlund, Peter B.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed—including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction. PMID:25628528

  18. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Sheketha R; Hedlund, Peter B; Roberts, Amanda J; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L; Engleman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed-including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction. PMID:25628528

  19. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel IF

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy. PMID:23055607

  20. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  1. Characterisation of the Candida albicans Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt2 as a Potential Antifungal Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Dobb, Katharine S.; Kaye, Sarah J.; Beckmann, Nicola; Thain, John L.; Stateva, Lubomira; Birch, Mike; Oliver, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs acting via new mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat the increasing numbers of severe fungal infections caused by pathogens such as Candida albicans. The phosphopantetheinyl transferase of Aspergillus fumigatus, encoded by the essential gene pptB, has previously been identified as a potential antifungal target. This study investigated the function of its orthologue in C. albicans, PPT2/C1_09480W by placing one allele under the control of the regulatable MET3 promoter, and deleting the remaining allele. The phenotypes of this conditional null mutant showed that, as in A. fumigatus, the gene PPT2 is essential for growth in C. albicans, thus fulfilling one aspect of an efficient antifungal target. The catalytic activity of Ppt2 as a phosphopantetheinyl transferase and the acyl carrier protein Acp1 as a substrate were demonstrated in a fluorescence transfer assay, using recombinant Ppt2 and Acp1 produced and purified from E.coli. A fluorescence polarisation assay amenable to high-throughput screening was also developed. Therefore we have identified Ppt2 as a broad-spectrum novel antifungal target and developed tools to identify inhibitors as potentially new antifungal compounds. PMID:26606674

  2. Plasmodium falciparum glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase 6-phosphogluconolactonase is a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Allen, Stacey M; Lim, Erin E; Jortzik, Esther; Preuss, Janina; Chua, Hwa Huat; MacRae, James I; Rahlfs, Stefan; Haeussler, Kristina; Downton, Matthew T; McConville, Malcolm J; Becker, Katja; Ralph, Stuart A

    2015-10-01

    The malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum is exposed to substantial redox challenges during its complex life cycle. In intraerythrocytic parasites, haemoglobin breakdown is a major source of reactive oxygen species. Deficiencies in human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), lead to a disturbed redox equilibrium in infected erythrocytes and partial protection against severe malaria. In P. falciparum, the first two reactions of the PPP are catalysed by the bifunctional enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase 6-phosphogluconolactonase (PfGluPho). This enzyme differs structurally from its human counterparts and represents a potential target for drugs. In the present study we used epitope tagging of endogenous PfGluPho to verify that the enzyme localises to the parasite cytosol. Furthermore, attempted double crossover disruption of the PfGluPho gene indicates that the enzyme is essential for the growth of blood stage parasites. As a further step towards targeting PfGluPho pharmacologically, ellagic acid was characterised as a potent PfGluPho inhibitor with an IC50 of 76 nM. Interestingly, pro-oxidative drugs or treatment of the parasites with H2O2 only slightly altered PfGluPho expression or activity under the conditions tested. Furthermore, metabolic profiling suggested that pro-oxidative drugs do not significantly perturb the abundance of PPP intermediates. These data indicate that PfGluPho is essential in asexual parasites, but that the oxidative arm of the PPP is not strongly regulated in response to oxidative challenge. PMID:26198663

  3. Exploring the Trypanosoma brucei Hsp83 Potential as a Target for Structure Guided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Hills, Tanya; Senisterra, Guillermo; Wernimont, Amy K.; Mackenzie, Claire; Norcross, Neil R.; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Wyatt, Paul G.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Hui, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis is a neglected parasitic disease that is fatal if untreated. The current drugs available to eliminate the causative agent Trypanosoma brucei have multiple liabilities, including toxicity, increasing problems due to treatment failure and limited efficacy. There are two approaches to discover novel antimicrobial drugs - whole-cell screening and target-based discovery. In the latter case, there is a need to identify and validate novel drug targets in Trypanosoma parasites. The heat shock proteins (Hsp), while best known as cancer targets with a number of drug candidates in clinical development, are a family of emerging targets for infectious diseases. In this paper, we report the exploration of T. brucei Hsp83 – a homolog of human Hsp90 – as a drug target using multiple biophysical and biochemical techniques. Our approach included the characterization of the chemical sensitivity of the parasitic chaperone against a library of known Hsp90 inhibitors by means of differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). Several compounds identified by this screening procedure were further studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography, as well as tested in parasite growth inhibitions assays. These experiments led us to the identification of a benzamide derivative compound capable of interacting with TbHsp83 more strongly than with its human homologs and structural rationalization of this selectivity. The results highlight the opportunities created by subtle structural differences to develop new series of compounds to selectively target the Trypanosoma brucei chaperone and effectively kill the sleeping sickness parasite. PMID:24147171

  4. Entamoeba thiol-based redox metabolism: A potential target for drug development.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is an intestinal infection widespread throughout the world caused by the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers and emergence of resistance in other protozoa with similar anaerobic metabolism. Therefore, identification and characterization of specific targets is urgently needed to design new therapeutics for improved treatment against amebiasis. Toward this goal, thiol-dependent redox metabolism is of particular interest. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism in E. histolytica consists of proteins including peroxiredoxin, rubrerythrin, Fe-superoxide dismutase, flavodiiron proteins, NADPH: flavin oxidoreductase, and amino acids including l-cysteine, S-methyl-l-cysteine, and thioprolines (thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids). E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione and its metabolism, and l-cysteine is the major intracellular low molecular mass thiol. Moreover, this parasite possesses a functional thioredoxin system consisting of thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase system with antioxidant and redox regulatory roles. In this review, we summarize and highlight the thiol-based redox metabolism and its control mechanisms in E. histolytica, in particular, the features of the system unique to E. histolytica, and its potential use for drug development against amebiasis. PMID:26775086

  5. Molecular and Kinetic Characterization of Babesia microti Gray Strain Lactate Dehydrogenase as a Potential Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Vudriko, Patrick; Masatani, Tatsunori; Cao, Shinuo; Terkawi, Mohamad Alla; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Mousa, Ahmed A; Adjou Moumouni, Paul F; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2014-01-01

    Babesia microti is an emerging zoonotic protozoan organism that causes “malaria-like” symptoms that can be fatal in immunocompromised people. Owing to lack of specific therapeutic regiment against the disease, we cloned and characterized B. microti lactate dehydrogenase (BmLDH) as a potential molecular drug receptor. The in vitro kinetic properties of BmLDH enzyme was evaluated using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a co-factor and lactate as a substrate. Inhibitory assay was also done using gossypol as BmLDH inhibitor to determine the inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50). The result showed that the 0.99 kbp BmLDH gene codes for a barely soluble 36 kDa protein (332 amino acids) localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the parasite. In vitro enzyme kinetic studies further revealed that BmLDH is an active enzyme with a high catalytic efficiency at optimal pH of 10.2. The Km values of NAD+ and lactate were 8.7 ± 0.57 mM and 99.9 ± 22.33 mM, respectively. The IC50 value for gossypol was 0.345 μM, while at 2.5 μM, gossypol caused 100% inhibition of BmLDH catalytic activity. These findings, therefore, provide initial evidence that BmLDH could be a potential drug target, although further in vivo studies are needed to validate the practical application of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors against B. microti infection. PMID:25125971

  6. Potential application of functional porous TiO2 nanoparticles in light-controlled drug release and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyi; Jiang, Haitao; Wan, Long; Zhao, Qinfu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Bing; Wang, Siling

    2015-02-01

    Novel multifunctional porous titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles modified with polyethylenimine (PEI) were developed to explore the feasibility of exploiting the photocatalytic property of titanium dioxide to achieve ultraviolet (UV) light triggered drug release. Additionally, in order to further realize targeting delivery, folic acid, which chemically conjugated to the surface of the functionalized multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles through amide linkage with free amine groups of PEI, was used as a cancer-targeting agent to effectively promote cancer-cell-specific uptake through receptor-mediated endocytosis. And a typical poorly water-soluble anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel, was encapsulated in multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles. The PEI on the surface of multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles could effectively block the channel to prevent premature drug release, thus providing enough circulation time to target cancer cells. Following UV light radiation, PEI molecules on the surface were cut off by the free radicals (OH˙ and O2-) that TiO2 produced, and then the drug loaded in the carrier was released rapidly into the cytoplasm. Importantly, the amount of drug released from multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles can be regulated by the UV-light radiation time to further control the anti-cancer effect. This multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticle exhibits a combination of stimuli-triggered drug release and cancer cell targeting. The authors believe that the present study will provide important information for the use of porous TiO2 nanomaterials in light-controlled drug release and targeted therapy. PMID:25462846

  7. Microbial Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerases (PPIases): Virulence Factors and Potential Alternative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Initially discovered in the context of immunomodulation, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) were soon identified as enzymes catalyzing the rate-limiting protein folding step at peptidyl bonds preceding proline residues. Intense searches revealed that PPIases are a superfamily of proteins consisting of three structurally distinguishable families with representatives in every described species of prokaryote and eukaryote and, recently, even in some giant viruses. Despite the clear-cut enzymatic activity and ubiquitous distribution of PPIases, reports on solely PPIase-dependent biological roles remain scarce. Nevertheless, they have been found to be involved in a plethora of biological processes, such as gene expression, signal transduction, protein secretion, development, and tissue regeneration, underscoring their general importance. Hence, it is not surprising that PPIases have also been identified as virulence-associated proteins. The extent of contribution to virulence is highly variable and dependent on the pleiotropic roles of a single PPIase in the respective pathogen. The main objective of this review is to discuss this variety in virulence-related bacterial and protozoan PPIases as well as the involvement of host PPIases in infectious processes. Moreover, a special focus is given to Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) and Mip-like PPIases of other pathogens, as the best-characterized virulence-related representatives of this family. Finally, the potential of PPIases as alternative drug targets and first tangible results are highlighted. PMID:25184565

  8. Phytochemical-mediated Protein Expression Profiling and the Potential Applications in Therapeutic Drug Target Identifications.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fai-Chu; Tan, Siok-Thing; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2016-07-29

    Many phytochemicals derived from edible medicinal plants have been investigated intensively for their various bioactivities. However, the detailed mechanism and their corresponding molecular targets frequently remain elusive. In this review, we present a summary of the research works done on phytochemical-mediated molecular targets, identified via proteomic approach. Concurrently, we also highlighted some pharmaceutical drugs which could be traced back to their origins in phytochemicals. For ease of presentation, these identified protein targets were categorized into two important healthcare-related fields, namely anti-bacterial and anti-cancer research. Through this review, we hope to highlight the usefulness of comparative proteomic as a powerful tool in phytochemical-mediated protein target identifications. Likewise, we wish to inspire further investigations on some of these protein targets identified over the last few years. With contributions from all researchers, the accumulative efforts could eventually lead to the discovery of some target-specific, low-toxicity therapeutic agents. PMID:26193174

  9. Comparative analyses of the proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human genomes: Identification of potential tuberculosis drug targets.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Dash, Pallabini; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2016-03-15

    Tuberculosis, one of the major infectious diseases affecting human beings is caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Increased resistance to known drugs commonly used for the treatment of tuberculosis has created an urgent need to identify new targets for validation and to develop drugs. In this study, we have used various bioinformatics tools, to compare the protein sequences from twenty-three M. tuberculosis genome strains along with the known human protein sequences, in order to identify the 'conserved' M. tuberculosis proteins absent in human. Further, based on the analysis of protein interaction networks, we selected one-hundred and forty proteins that were predicted as potential M. tuberculosis drug targets and prioritized according to the ranking of 'clusters' of interacting proteins. Comparison of the predicted 140 TB targets with literature indicated that 46 of them were previously reported, thereby increasing the confidence in our predictions of the remaining 94 targets too. The analyses of the structures and functions corresponding to the predicted potential TB drug targets indicated a diverse range of proteins that included ten 'druggable' targets with some of the known drugs. PMID:26762852

  10. The clinicopathological significance and potential drug target of E-cadherin in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kaize; Chen, Weiwen; Xiao, Ning; Zhao, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Human epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), a member of transmembrane glycoprotein family, encoded by the E-cadherin gene, plays a key role in cell-cell adhesion, adherent junction in normal epithelial tissues, contributing to tissue differentiation and homeostasis. Although previous studies indicated that inactivation of the E-cadherin is mainly induced by hypermethylation of E-cadherin gene, evidence concerning E-cadherin hypermethylation in the carcinogenesis and development of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remains controversial. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of E-cadherin hypermethylation on the incidence and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC. A comprehensive search of PubMed and Embase databases was performed up to October 2014. Analyses of pooled data were performed. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated and summarized. Our meta-analysis combining 18 published articles demonstrated that the hypermethylation frequencies in NSCLC were significantly higher than those in normal control tissues, OR = 3.55, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.98-6.36, p < 0.0001. Further analysis showed that E-cadherin hypermethylation was not strongly associated with the sex or smoking status in NSCLC patients. In addition, E-cadherin hypermethylation was also not strongly associated with pathological types, differentiated status, clinical stages, or metastatic status in NSCLC patients. The results from the current study indicate that the hypermethylation frequency of E-cadherin in NSCLC is strongly associated with NSCLC incidence and it may be an early event in carcinogenesis of NSCLC. We also discussed the potential value of E-cadherin as a drug target that may bring new direction and hope for cancer treatment through gene-targeted therapy. PMID:25758052

  11. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Moynie, Lucille; Schnell, Robert; McMahon, Stephen A.; Sandalova, Tatyana; Boulkerou, Wassila Abdelli; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Alphey, Magnus; Cukier, Cyprian; Duthie, Fraser; Kopec, Jolanta; Liu, Huanting; Jacewicz, Agata; Hunter, William N.; Naismith, James H.; Schneider, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns. PMID:23295481

  12. Targeting the Toll of Drug Abuse: The Translational Potential of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Bachtell, Ryan; Hutchinson, Mark R; Wang, Xiaohui; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that glial proinflammatory activation importantly contributes to the rewarding and reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse, including cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, and alcohol. It has recently been proposed that glia are recognizing, and becoming activated by, such drugs as a CNS immunological response to these agents being xenobiotics; that is, substances foreign to the brain. Activation of glia, primarily microglia, by various drugs of abuse occurs via toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The detection of such xenobiotics by TLR4 results in the release of glial neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic substances. These glial products of TLR4 activation enhance neuronal excitability within brain reward circuitry, thereby enhancing their rewarding and reinforcing effects. Indeed, selective pharmacological blockade of TLR4 activation, such as with the non-opioid TLR4 antagonist (+)-naltrexone, suppresses a number of indices of drug reward/reinforcement. These include: conditioned place preference, self-administration, drugprimed reinstatement, incubation of craving, and elevations of nucleus accumbens shell dopamine. Notably, TLR4 blockade fails to alter self-administration of food, indicative of a selective effect on drugs of abuse. Genetic disruption of TLR4 signaling recapitulates the effects of pharmacological TLR4 blockade, providing converging lines of evidence of a central importance of TLR4. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence converge to raise TLR4 as a promising therapeutic target for drug abuse. PMID:26022268

  13. Drug addiction: targeting dynamic neuroimmune receptor interactions as a potential therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonathan Henry W; Hutchinson, Mark R; Mustafa, Sanam

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction and dependence have proven to be difficult psychiatric disorders to treat. The limited efficacy of neuronally acting medications, such as acamprosate and naltrexone, highlights the need to identify novel targets. Recent research has underscored the importance of the neuroimmune system in many behavioural manifestations of drug addiction. In this review, we propose that our appreciation for complex phenotypes such as drug addiction and dependence will come with a greater understanding that these disorders are the result of intricate, interconnected signalling pathways that are, if only partially, determined at the receptor level. The idea of receptor heteromerisation and receptor mosaics will be introduced to explain cross talk between the receptors and signalling molecules implicated in neuroimmune signalling pathways. PMID:26657076

  14. A novel antidiabetic therapy: free fatty acid receptors as potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Hasegawa, Sae; Pelisch, Nicolas; Kimura, Ikuo; Ichimura, Atsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Excessive dietary intake of fat is strongly involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Free fatty acids (FFAs), which are provided from dietary fat, are not only important nutrients, but also act as signaling molecules and stimulate key biological functions. Recent physiological and pharmacological studies have shown that several G-protein coupled receptors, such as FFAR1-4, are receptors for FFAs. FFAR1 and FFAR4 are activated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids, whereas FFAR2 and FFAR3 are activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). These FFA receptors (FFARs) mediate various physiological functions, depending on the carbon chain length of the FFAs and the ligand specificity of the FFARs. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs mediate important metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and thereby contribute to energy homeostasis. Since imbalances in energy homeostasis lead to metabolic disorders, such as obesity and T2D, FFARs are considered to be key therapeutic targets in these diseases. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of FFAR1 and FFAR4 improved glucose metabolism and ameliorated systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the biological functions of SCFAs in anti-inflammation and energy metabolism are linked with the activation of FFAR2 and FFAR3. Hence, in this review, we summarize the physiological functions of FFARs and discuss the potential of selective ligands of FFARs for development as drugs to treat metabolic disorders, such as T2D and obesity. PMID:25732031

  15. NAD(P) biosynthesis enzymes as potential targets for selective drug design.

    PubMed

    Magni, G; Di Stefano, M; Orsomando, G; Raffaelli, N; Ruggieri, S

    2009-01-01

    NAD(P) biosynthetic pathways can be considered a generous source of enzymatic targets for drug development. Key reactions for NAD(P) biosynthesis in all organisms, common to both de novo and salvage routes, are catalyzed by NMN/NaMN adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), NAD synthetase (NADS), and NAD kinase (NADK). These reactions represent a three-step pathway, present in the vast majority of living organisms, which is responsible for the generation of both NAD and NADP cellular pools. The validation of these enzymes as drug targets is based on their essentiality and conservation among a large variety of pathogenic microorganisms, as well as on their differential structural features or their differential metabolic contribution to NAD(P) homeostasis between microbial and human cell types. This review describes the structural and functional properties of eubacterial and human enzymes endowed with NMNAT, NADS, and NADK activities, as well as with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NamPRT) and nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) activities, highlighting the species-related differences, with emphasis on their relevance for drug design. In addition, since the overall NMNAT activity in humans is accounted by multiple isozymes differentially involved in the metabolic activation of antineoplastic compounds, their individual diagnostic value for early therapy optimization is outlined. The involvement of human NMNAT in neurodegenerative disorders and its role in neuroprotection is also discussed. PMID:19355893

  16. Identification of Potential Drug Targets in Cancer Signaling Pathways using Stochastic Logical Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Peican; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Uludağ, Hasan; Han, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of vulnerable components in a signaling pathway can contribute to development of drug therapy addressing aberrations in that pathway. Here, an original signaling pathway is derived from the published literature on breast cancer models. New stochastic logical models are then developed to analyze the vulnerability of the components in multiple signalling sub-pathways involved in this signaling cascade. The computational results are consistent with the experimental results, where the selected proteins were silenced using specific siRNAs and the viability of the cells were analyzed 72 hours after silencing. The genes elF4E and NFkB are found to have nearly no effect on the relative cell viability and the genes JAK2, Stat3, S6K, JUN, FOS, Myc, and Mcl1 are effective candidates to influence the relative cell growth. The vulnerabilities of some targets such as Myc and S6K are found to vary significantly depending on the weights of the sub-pathways; this will be indicative of the chosen target to require customization for therapy. When these targets are utilized, the response of breast cancers from different patients will be highly variable because of the known heterogeneities in signaling pathways among the patients. The targets whose vulnerabilities are invariably high might be more universally acceptable targets. PMID:26988076

  17. The β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Mani, I; Chaudhary, D K; Somvanshi, P

    2011-01-01

    The continuous preventive measures and control of tuberculosis are often hampered by re-emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel drug approach is desperately needed to combat the global threat posed by MDR strains. In spite of current advancement in biological techniques viz. microarray and proteomics data for tuberculosis, no such potent drug has been developed in the past decades yet. Therefore, mycolic acid is an essential constituent which is involved in the formation of cell wall of Mycobacterium species. The biosynthesis of mycolic acid is involved in two fatty acid synthase systems, the multifunctional polypeptide fatty acid synthase I (FASI) which performs de novo fatty acid synthesis and dissociate FASII system. FASII system consists of monofunctional enzymes and acyl carrier protein (ACP), elongating FASI products to long chain mycolic acid precursor. In this review, the β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases (fadH, kasA and kasB) are distinct and play a vital role in mycolic acid synthesis, cell wall synthesis, biofilm formation and also pathogenesis. On the basis of substantial observation we suggest that these enzymes may be used as promising and attractive targets for novel anti-TB drugs designing and discovery. PMID:21370994

  18. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yash N.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Perou, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs)’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways. PMID:27149990

  19. DNA G-quadruplex and its potential as anticancer drug target

    PubMed Central

    Buket, ONEL; Clement, LIN; DanZhou, YANG

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex secondary structures are four-stranded globular nucleic acid structures form in the specific DNA and RNA G-rich sequences with biological significance such as human telomeres, oncogene-promoter regions, replication initiation sites, and 5′ and 3′-untranslated (UTR) regions. The non-canonical G-quadruplex secondary structures can readily form under physiologically relevant ionic conditions and are considered to be new molecular target for cancer therapeutics. This review discusses the essential progress in our lab related to the structures and functions of biologically relevant DNA G-quadruplexes in human gene promoters and telomeres, and the opportunities presented for the development of G-quadruplex-targeted small- molecule drugs. PMID:27182219

  20. Brucella melitensis Methionyl-tRNA-Synthetase (MetRS), a Potential Drug Target for Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Dranow, David M.; Myers, Janette B.; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa Hewitt, Steve; Edwards, Thomas E.; Davies, Douglas R.; Lorimer, Donald; Boyle, Stephen M.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Brucella melitensis methionyl-tRNA-synthetase (BmMetRS) with molecular, structural and phenotypic methods to learn if BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. Recombinant BmMetRS was expressed, purified from wild type Brucella melitensis biovar Abortus 2308 strain ATCC/CRP #DD-156 and screened by a thermal melt assay against a focused library of one hundred previously classified methionyl-tRNA-synthetase inhibitors of the blood stage form of Trypanosoma brucei. Three compounds showed appreciable shift of denaturation temperature and were selected for further studies on inhibition of the recombinant enzyme activity and cell viability against wild type B. melitensis strain 16M. BmMetRS protein complexed with these three inhibitors resolved into three-dimensional crystal structures and was analyzed. All three selected methionyl-tRNA-synthetase compounds inhibit recombinant BmMetRS enzymatic functions in an aminoacylation assay at varying concentrations. Furthermore, growth inhibition of B. melitensis strain 16M by the compounds was shown. Inhibitor-BmMetRS crystal structure models were used to illustrate the molecular basis of the enzyme inhibition. Our current data suggests that BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. However, further studies are needed to optimize lead compound potency, efficacy and safety as well as determine the pharmacokinetics, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment. PMID:27500735

  1. Identification of potential drug targets by subtractive genome analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7: an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shakhinur Islam; Ferdous, Sabiha; Jewel, Nurnabi Azad; Akter, Arzuba; Mahmud, Zabed; Islam, Md Muzahidul; Afrin, Tanzila; Karim, Nurul

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial enteric infections resulting in diarrhea, dysentery, or enteric fever constitute a huge public health problem, with more than a billion episodes of disease annually in developing and developed countries. In this study, the deadly agent of hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome, Escherichia coli O157:H7 was investigated with extensive computational approaches aimed at identifying novel and broad-spectrum antibiotic targets. A systematic in silico workflow consisting of comparative genomics, metabolic pathways analysis, and additional drug prioritizing parameters was used to identify novel drug targets that were essential for the pathogen's survival but absent in its human host. Comparative genomic analysis of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotated metabolic pathways identified 350 putative target proteins in E. coli O157:H7 which showed no similarity to human proteins. Further bio-informatic approaches including prediction of subcellular localization, calculation of molecular weight, and web-based investigation of 3D structural characteristics greatly aided in filtering the potential drug targets from 350 to 120. Ultimately, 44 non-homologous essential proteins of E. coli O157:H7 were prioritized and proved to have the eligibility to become novel broad-spectrum antibiotic targets and DNA polymerase III alpha (dnaE) was the top-ranked among these targets. Moreover, druggability of each of the identified drug targets was evaluated by the DrugBank database. In addition, 3D structure of the dnaE was modeled and explored further for in silico docking with ligands having potential druggability. Finally, we confirmed that the compounds N-coeleneterazine and N-(1,4-dihydro-5H-tetrazol-5-ylidene)-9-oxo-9H-xanthene-2-sulfon-amide were the most suitable ligands of dnaE and hence proposed as the potential inhibitors of this target protein. The results of this study could facilitate the discovery and release of new and effective drugs against E

  2. Identification of potential drug targets by subtractive genome analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7: an in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Shakhinur Islam; Ferdous, Sabiha; Jewel, Nurnabi Azad; Akter, Arzuba; Mahmud, Zabed; Islam, Md Muzahidul; Afrin, Tanzila; Karim, Nurul

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial enteric infections resulting in diarrhea, dysentery, or enteric fever constitute a huge public health problem, with more than a billion episodes of disease annually in developing and developed countries. In this study, the deadly agent of hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome, Escherichia coli O157:H7 was investigated with extensive computational approaches aimed at identifying novel and broad-spectrum antibiotic targets. A systematic in silico workflow consisting of comparative genomics, metabolic pathways analysis, and additional drug prioritizing parameters was used to identify novel drug targets that were essential for the pathogen’s survival but absent in its human host. Comparative genomic analysis of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotated metabolic pathways identified 350 putative target proteins in E. coli O157:H7 which showed no similarity to human proteins. Further bio-informatic approaches including prediction of subcellular localization, calculation of molecular weight, and web-based investigation of 3D structural characteristics greatly aided in filtering the potential drug targets from 350 to 120. Ultimately, 44 non-homologous essential proteins of E. coli O157:H7 were prioritized and proved to have the eligibility to become novel broad-spectrum antibiotic targets and DNA polymerase III alpha (dnaE) was the top-ranked among these targets. Moreover, druggability of each of the identified drug targets was evaluated by the DrugBank database. In addition, 3D structure of the dnaE was modeled and explored further for in silico docking with ligands having potential druggability. Finally, we confirmed that the compounds N-coeleneterazine and N-(1,4-dihydro-5H-tetrazol-5-ylidene)-9-oxo-9H-xanthene-2-sulfon-amide were the most suitable ligands of dnaE and hence proposed as the potential inhibitors of this target protein. The results of this study could facilitate the discovery and release of new and effective drugs against E

  3. The Metaboloepigenetic Dimension of Cancer Stem Cells: Evaluating the Market Potential for New Metabostemness-Targeting Oncology Drugs.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The current global portfolio of oncology drugs is unlikely to produce durable disease remission for millions of cancer patients worldwide. This is due, in part, to the existence of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), a particularly aggressive type of malignant cell that is capable of indefinite self-replication, is refractory to conventional treatments, and is skilled at spreading and colonizing distant organs. To date, no drugs from big-league Pharma companies are capable of killing CSCs. Why? Quite simply, a classic drug development approach based on mutated genes and pathological protein products cannot efficiently target the plastic, epigenetic proclivity of cancer tissues to generate CSCs. Recent studies have proposed that certain elite metabolites (oncometabolites) and other common metabolites can significantly influence the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures of stemness and cancer. Consequently, cellular metabolism and the core epigenetic codes, DNA methylation and histone modification, can be better viewed as an integrated metaboloepigenetic dimension of CSCs, which we have recently termed cancer metabostemness. By targeting weaknesses in the bridge connecting metabolism and epigenetics, a new generation of metabostemnessspecific drugs can be generated for potent and long-lasting elimination of life-threatening CSCs. Here I evaluate the market potential of re-modeling the oncology drug pipeline by discovering and developing new metabolic approaches able to target the apparently undruggable epigenetic programs that dynamically regulate the plasticity of non-CSC and CSC cellular states. PMID:26166605

  4. NPY receptors as potential targets for anti-obesity drug development

    PubMed Central

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide Y system has proven to be one of the most important regulators of feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis, thus presenting great potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of disorders such as obesity and at the other extreme, anorexia. Due to the initial lack of pharmacological tools that are active in vivo, functions of the different Y receptors have been mainly studied in knockout and transgenic mouse models. However, over recent years various Y receptor selective peptidic and non-peptidic agonists and antagonists have been developed and tested. Their therapeutic potential in relation to treating obesity and other disorders of energy homeostasis is discussed in this review. PMID:21545413

  5. Giardia fatty acyl-CoA synthetases as potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fengguang; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Argüello-García, Raúl; Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Giardiasis caused by Giardia intestinalis (syn. G. lamblia, G. duodenalis) is one of the leading causes of diarrheal parasitic diseases worldwide. Although limited drugs to treat giardiasis are available, there are concerns regarding toxicity in some patients and the emerging drug resistance. By data-mining genome sequences, we observed that G. intestinalis is incapable of synthesizing fatty acids (FA) de novo. However, this parasite has five long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (GiACS1 to GiACS5) to activate FA scavenged from the host. ACS is an essential enzyme because FA need to be activated to form acyl-CoA thioesters before they can enter subsequent metabolism. In the present study, we performed experiments to explore whether some GiACS enzymes could serve as drug targets in Giardia. Based on the high-throughput datasets and protein modeling analyses, we initially studied the GiACS1 and GiACS2, because genes encoding these two enzymes were found to be more consistently expressed in varied parasite life cycle stages and when interacting with host cells based on previously reported transcriptome data. These two proteins were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins. Biochemical analysis revealed that both had apparent substrate preference toward palmitic acid (C16:0) and myristic acid (C14:0), and allosteric or Michaelis–Menten kinetics on palmitic acid or ATP. The ACS inhibitor triacsin C inhibited the activity of both enzymes (IC50 = 1.56 μM, Ki = 0.18 μM for GiACS1, and IC50 = 2.28 μM, Ki = 0.23 μM for GiACS2, respectively) and the growth of G. intestinalis in vitro (IC50 = 0.8 μM). As expected from giardial evolutionary characteristics, both GiACSs displayed differences in overall folding structure as compared with their human counterparts. These observations support the notion that some of the GiACS enzymes may be explored as drug targets in this parasite. PMID:26257723

  6. Targeting Prefrontal Cortical Systems for Drug Development: Potential Therapies for Cognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Arnsten, Amy F.T.; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Medications to treat cognitive disorders are increasingly needed, yet researchers have had few successes in this challenging arena. Cognitive abilities in primates arise from highly evolved N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor circuits in layer III of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These circuits have unique modulatory needs that can differ from the layer V neurons that predominate in rodents, but they offer multiple therapeutic targets. Cognitive improvement often requires low doses that enhance the pattern of information held in working memory, whereas higher doses can produce nonspecific changes that obscure information. Identifying appropriate doses for clinical trials may be helped by assessments in monkeys and by flexible, individualized dose designs. The use of guanfacine (Intuniv) for prefrontal cortical disorders was based on research in monkeys, supporting this approach. Coupling our knowledge of higher primate circuits with the powerful methods now available in drug design will help create effective treatments for cognitive disorders. PMID:26738476

  7. Targeting Prefrontal Cortical Systems for Drug Development: Potential Therapies for Cognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Arnsten, Amy F T; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Medications to treat cognitive disorders are increasingly needed, yet researchers have had few successes in this challenging arena. Cognitive abilities in primates arise from highly evolved N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor circuits in layer III of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These circuits have unique modulatory needs that can differ from the layer V neurons that predominate in rodents, but they offer multiple therapeutic targets. Cognitive improvement often requires low doses that enhance the pattern of information held in working memory, whereas higher doses can produce nonspecific changes that obscure information. Identifying appropriate doses for clinical trials may be helped by assessments in monkeys and by flexible, individualized dose designs. The use of guanfacine (Intuniv) for prefrontal cortical disorders was based on research in monkeys, supporting this approach. Coupling our knowledge of higher primate circuits with the powerful methods now available in drug design will help create effective treatments for cognitive disorders. PMID:26738476

  8. Magnetic nanoscale metal organic frameworks for potential targeted anticancer drug delivery, imaging and as an MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ray Chowdhuri, Angshuman; Bhattacharya, Dipsikha; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-02-21

    The development of a novel multifunctional porous nanoplatform for targeted anticancer drug delivery with cell imaging and magnetic resonance imaging has been realised in the current work. Here we have developed a magnetic nanoscale metal organic frameworks (NMOF) for potential targeted drug delivery. These magnetic NMOFs were fabricated by incorporation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles into porous isoreticular metal organic frameworks (IRMOF-3). To achieve targeted drug delivery towards cancer cells specifically, folic acid was conjugated to the NMOF surface. Then, the fluorescent molecule rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) was conjugated to the NMOFs for biological imaging applications. The synthesized magnetic NMOFs were fully characterised by FTIR, powder XRD, XPS, SQUID, TGA, TEM, FESEM, and DLS. The synthesized magnetic NMOFs were observed to be smaller than 100 nm and were found to be nontoxic towards human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa) and murine fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells according to cell viability assays. The cancer chemotherapy drug paclitaxel was conjugated to the magnetic NMOFs through hydrophobic interactions with a relatively high loading capacity. Moreover, these folic acid-conjugated magnetic NMOFs showed stronger T2-weighted MRI contrast towards the cancer cells, justifying their possible significance in imaging. PMID:26754449

  9. FK506-Binding Protein 10, a Potential Novel Drug Target for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Knüppel, Larissa; Maul, Julia; Heinzelmann, Katharina; Juan-Guardela, Brenda M.; Hennen, Elisabeth; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Neurohr, Claus; Hatz, Rudolf; Lindner, Michael; Behr, Jürgen; Kaminski, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    secretion by phLF. Conclusions: FKBP10 might be a novel drug target for IPF. PMID:26039104

  10. Enteric P2X receptors as potential targets for drug treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galligan, James J

    2004-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting millions of patients. IBS symptoms include diarrhea, constipation and pain. The etiology of IBS is due partly to changes in the function of nerves supplying the gastrointestinal tract, immune system activation and to psychological factors. P2X receptors are multimeric ATP-gated cation channels expressed by neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Sensory nerve endings in the gastrointestinal tract express P2X receptors. ATP released from gastrointestinal cells activates P2X receptors on sensory nerve endings to stimulate motor reflexes and to transmit nociceptive signals. Antagonists acting at P2X receptors on sensory nerves could attenuate abdominal pain in IBS patients. Primary afferent neurons intrinsic to the gut, and enteric motor- and interneurons express P2X receptors. These neurons participate in motor reflexes. Agonists acting at enteric P2X receptors may enhance gastrointestinal propulsion and secretion, and these drugs could be useful for treating constipation-predominant IBS. Antagonists acting at enteric P2X receptors would decrease propulsion and secretion and they might be useful for treating diarrhea-predominant IBS. Current knowledge of P2X receptor distribution and function in the gut of laboratory animals provides a rational basis for further exploration of the therapeutic potential for drugs acting at P2X receptors in IBS patients. However, more information about P2X receptor distribution and function in the human gastrointestinal tract is needed. Data on the distribution and function of P2X receptors on gastrointestinal immune cells would also provide insights into the therapeutic potential of P2X receptor agents in IBS. PMID:15051631

  11. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N; Sinha, Satyesh; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  12. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N.; Sinha, Satyesh; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  13. The Response Regulator BfmR Is a Potential Drug Target for Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Akshay; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; MacDonald, Ulrike; Graham, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification and validation is the first phase of target-based antimicrobial development. BfmR (RstA), a response regulator in a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) in Acinetobacter baumannii, is an intriguing potential antimicrobial target. A unique characteristic of BfmR is that its inhibition would have the dual benefit of significantly decreasing in vivo survival and increasing sensitivity to selected antimicrobials. Studies on the clinically relevant strain AB307-0294 have shown BfmR to be essential in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype in strains AB307-0294 and AB908 is mediated, in part, by enabling growth in human ascites fluid and serum. Further, BfmR conferred resistance to complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was independent of capsular polysaccharide. Importantly, BfmR also increased resistance to the clinically important antimicrobials meropenem and colistin. BfmR was highly conserved among A. baumannii strains. The crystal structure of the receiver domain of BfmR was determined, lending insight into putative ligand binding sites. This enabled an in silico ligand binding analysis and a blind docking strategy to assess use as a potential druggable target. Predicted binding hot spots exist at the homodimer interface and the phosphorylation site. These data support pursuing the next step in the development process, which includes determining the degree of inhibition needed to impact growth/survival and the development a BfmR activity assay amenable to high-throughput screening for the identification of inhibitors. Such agents would represent a new class of antimicrobials active against A. baumannii which could be active against other Gram-negative bacilli that possess a TCS with shared homology. IMPORTANCE Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacilli, has significantly affected the ability of physicians to treat infections, with resultant increased morbidity, mortality, and

  14. The Response Regulator BfmR Is a Potential Drug Target for Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Russo, Thomas A; Manohar, Akshay; Beanan, Janet M; Olson, Ruth; MacDonald, Ulrike; Graham, Jessica; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Identification and validation is the first phase of target-based antimicrobial development. BfmR (RstA), a response regulator in a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) in Acinetobacter baumannii, is an intriguing potential antimicrobial target. A unique characteristic of BfmR is that its inhibition would have the dual benefit of significantly decreasing in vivo survival and increasing sensitivity to selected antimicrobials. Studies on the clinically relevant strain AB307-0294 have shown BfmR to be essential in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype in strains AB307-0294 and AB908 is mediated, in part, by enabling growth in human ascites fluid and serum. Further, BfmR conferred resistance to complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was independent of capsular polysaccharide. Importantly, BfmR also increased resistance to the clinically important antimicrobials meropenem and colistin. BfmR was highly conserved among A. baumannii strains. The crystal structure of the receiver domain of BfmR was determined, lending insight into putative ligand binding sites. This enabled an in silico ligand binding analysis and a blind docking strategy to assess use as a potential druggable target. Predicted binding hot spots exist at the homodimer interface and the phosphorylation site. These data support pursuing the next step in the development process, which includes determining the degree of inhibition needed to impact growth/survival and the development a BfmR activity assay amenable to high-throughput screening for the identification of inhibitors. Such agents would represent a new class of antimicrobials active against A. baumannii which could be active against other Gram-negative bacilli that possess a TCS with shared homology. IMPORTANCE Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacilli, has significantly affected the ability of physicians to treat infections, with resultant increased morbidity, mortality, and health

  15. Medicinal Chemistry of ATP Synthase: A Potential Drug Target of Dietary Polyphenols and Amphibian Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the inhibitory effects of dietary polyphenols and amphibian antimicrobial/antitumor peptides on ATP synthase. In the beginning general structural features highlighting catalytic and motor functions of ATP synthase will be described. Some details on the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it an interesting drug target with respect to dietary polyphenols and amphibian antimicrobial peptides will also be reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have distinct polyphenol and peptide binding sites at the interface of α/β subunits. Molecular interaction of polyphenols and peptides with ATP synthase at their respective binding sites will be discussed. Binding and inhibition of other proteins or enzymes will also be covered so as to understand the therapeutic roles of both types of molecules. Lastly, the effects of polyphenols and peptides on the inhibition of Escherichia coli cell growth through their action on ATP synthase will also be presented. PMID:20586714

  16. PPAR{alpha} is a potential therapeutic target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Hidenori; Oishi, Katsutaka; Kudo, Takashi; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ishida, Norio . E-mail: n.ishida@aist.go.jp

    2007-06-08

    Recent progress at the molecular level has revealed that nuclear receptors play an important role in the generation of mammalian circadian rhythms. To examine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in the regulation of circadian behavioral rhythms in mammals, we evaluated the locomotor activity of mice administered with the hypolipidemic PPAR{alpha} ligand, bezafibrate. Circadian locomotor activity was phase-advanced about 3 h in mice given bezafibrate under light-dark (LD) conditions. Transfer from LD to constant darkness did not change the onset of activity in these mice, suggesting that bezafibrate advanced the phase of the endogenous clock. Surprisingly, bezafibrate also advanced the phase in mice with lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the central clock in mammals). The circadian expression of clock genes such as period2, BMAL1, and Rev-erb{alpha} was also phase-advanced in various tissues (cortex, liver, and fat) without affecting the SCN. Bezafibrate also phase-advanced the activity phase that is delayed in model mice with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) due to a Clock gene mutation. Our results indicated that PPAR{alpha} is involved in circadian clock control independently of the SCN and that PPAR{alpha} could be a potent target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders including DSPS.

  17. Potential prostate cancer drug target: bioactivation of androstanediol by conversion to dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Mohler, James L; Titus, Mark A; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2011-09-15

    High-affinity binding of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to the androgen receptor (AR) initiates androgen-dependent gene activation, required for normal male sex development in utero, and contributes to prostate cancer development and progression in men. Under normal physiologic conditions, DHT is synthesized predominantly by 5α-reduction of testosterone, the major circulating androgen produced by the testis. During androgen deprivation therapy, intratumoral androgen production is sufficient for AR activation and prostate cancer growth, even though circulating testicular androgen levels are low. Recent studies indicate that the metabolism of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol by 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 6 in benign prostate and prostate cancer cells is a major biosynthetic pathway for intratumoral synthesis of DHT, which binds AR and initiates transactivation to promote prostate cancer growth during androgen deprivation therapy. Drugs that target the so-called backdoor pathway of DHT synthesis provide an opportunity to enhance clinical response to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists or antagonists, AR antagonists, and inhibitors of 5α-reductase enzymes (finasteride or dutasteride), and other steroid metabolism enzyme inhibitors (ketoconazole or the recently available abiraterone acetate). PMID:21705451

  18. microRNAs of parasitic helminths – Identification, characterization and potential as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Collette; Winter, Alan D.; Gillan, Victoria; Devaney, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. They were first identified in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where the miRNAs lin-4 and let-7 were shown to be essential for regulating correct developmental progression. The sequence of let-7 was subsequently found to be conserved in higher organisms and changes in expression of let-7, as well as other miRNAs, are associated with certain cancers, indicating important regulatory roles. Some miRNAs have been shown to have essential functions, but the roles of many are currently unknown. With the increasing availability of genome sequence data, miRNAs have now been identified from a number of parasitic helminths, by deep sequencing of small RNA libraries and bioinformatic approaches. While some miRNAs are widely conserved in a range of organisms, others are helminth-specific and many are novel to each species. Here we review the potential roles of miRNAs in regulating helminth development, in interacting with the host environment and in development of drug resistance. Use of fluorescently-labeled small RNAs demonstrates uptake by parasites, at least in vitro. Therefore delivery of miRNA inhibitors or mimics has potential to alter miRNA activity, providing a useful tool for probing the roles of miRNAs and suggesting novel routes to therapeutics for parasite control. PMID:25057458

  19. microRNAs of parasitic helminths - Identification, characterization and potential as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Britton, Collette; Winter, Alan D; Gillan, Victoria; Devaney, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. They were first identified in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where the miRNAs lin-4 and let-7 were shown to be essential for regulating correct developmental progression. The sequence of let-7 was subsequently found to be conserved in higher organisms and changes in expression of let-7, as well as other miRNAs, are associated with certain cancers, indicating important regulatory roles. Some miRNAs have been shown to have essential functions, but the roles of many are currently unknown. With the increasing availability of genome sequence data, miRNAs have now been identified from a number of parasitic helminths, by deep sequencing of small RNA libraries and bioinformatic approaches. While some miRNAs are widely conserved in a range of organisms, others are helminth-specific and many are novel to each species. Here we review the potential roles of miRNAs in regulating helminth development, in interacting with the host environment and in development of drug resistance. Use of fluorescently-labeled small RNAs demonstrates uptake by parasites, at least in vitro. Therefore delivery of miRNA inhibitors or mimics has potential to alter miRNA activity, providing a useful tool for probing the roles of miRNAs and suggesting novel routes to therapeutics for parasite control. PMID:25057458

  20. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification. PMID:26082378

  1. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification. PMID:26082378

  2. Understanding the cardiovascular actions of soy isoflavones: potential novel targets for antihypertensive drug development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Doug; Song, Jin; Mark, Connie; Eyster, Kathleen

    2008-12-01

    Interest in and use of "natural" remedies has grown exponentially in recent years. Compounds that have attracted considerable attention are the isoflavones, particular those found in soy. This review will provide a critical evaluation of our current understanding of the effects, mechanisms of action, and potential clinical applications of soy isoflavones in hypertension. Current data indicate that soy isoflavones, such as genistein and daidzein and equol, relax vascular smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo via a combination of mechanisms including potentiation of endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasodilator systems and inhibition of constrictor mechanisms. These effects involve both classical genomic as well non genomic actions. Isoflavone actions are mediated in part via interactions with estrogen receptors where soy isoflavones induce unique receptor conformations and exert tissue dependent effects similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulators. Signaling pathways such as ERK1/2, PI3-Kinase/Akt and cAMP contribute to isoflavone isoflavone activation of eNOS in the vasculature as well. Isoflavones also target the kidney to increase renal blood flow and sodium excretion. Finally, soy isoflavones interact with humoral systems such as the renin angiotensin. Data from animal studies show consistently that the aggregate effect of these actions is attenuation of hypertension. In contrast, studies in humans remain controversial. Recent data also suggest that analogues of isoflavones may possess unique vascular actions. Thus significant opportunity remains for study of the effects and mechanisms of action of soy isoflavones on hypertension in both animals and humans. PMID:19202595

  3. Core Proteomic Analysis of Unique Metabolic Pathways of Salmonella enterica for the Identification of Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections caused by Salmonella enterica, a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, are major threats to the health of humans and animals. The recent availability of complete genome data of pathogenic strains of the S. enterica gives new avenues for the identification of drug targets and drug candidates. We have used the genomic and metabolic pathway data to identify pathways and proteins essential to the pathogen and absent from the host. Methods We took the whole proteome sequence data of 42 strains of S. enterica and Homo sapiens along with KEGG-annotated metabolic pathway data, clustered proteins sequences using CD-HIT, identified essential genes using DEG database and discarded S. enterica homologs of human proteins in unique metabolic pathways (UMPs) and characterized hypothetical proteins with SVM-prot and InterProScan. Through this core proteomic analysis we have identified enzymes essential to the pathogen. Results The identification of 73 enzymes common in 42 strains of S. enterica is the real strength of the current study. We proposed all 73 unexplored enzymes as potential drug targets against the infections caused by the S. enterica. The study is comprehensive around S. enterica and simultaneously considered every possible pathogenic strain of S. enterica. This comprehensiveness turned the current study significant since, to the best of our knowledge it is the first subtractive core proteomic analysis of the unique metabolic pathways applied to any pathogen for the identification of drug targets. We applied extensive computational methods to shortlist few potential drug targets considering the druggability criteria e.g. Non-homologous to the human host, essential to the pathogen and playing significant role in essential metabolic pathways of the pathogen (i.e. S. enterica). In the current study, the subtractive proteomics through a novel approach was applied i.e. by considering only proteins

  4. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Aminoglycosides Resistant and Susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates for Exploring Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Divakar; Kumar, Bhavnesh; Lata, Manju; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, amikacin (AK) and kanamycin (KM) are second line anti-tuberculosis drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and resistance to them affects the treatment. Membrane and membrane associated proteins have an anticipated role in biological processes and pathogenesis and are potential targets for the development of new diagnostics/vaccine/therapeutics. In this study we compared membrane and membrane associated proteins of AK and KM resistant and susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and bioinformatic tools. Twelve proteins were found to have increased intensities (PDQuest Advanced Software) in resistant isolates and were identified as ATP synthase subunit alpha (Rv1308), Trigger factor (Rv2462c), Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Rv0462), Elongation factor Tu (Rv0685), Transcriptional regulator MoxR1(Rv1479), Universal stress protein (Rv2005c), 35kDa hypothetical protein (Rv2744c), Proteasome subunit alpha (Rv2109c), Putative short-chain type dehydrogenase/reductase (Rv0148), Bacterioferritin (Rv1876), Ferritin (Rv3841) and Alpha-crystallin/HspX (Rv2031c). Among these Rv2005c, Rv2744c and Rv0148 are proteins with unknown functions. Docking showed that both drugs bind to the conserved domain (Usp, PspA and SDR domain) of these hypothetical proteins and GPS-PUP predicted potential pupylation sites within them. Increased intensities of these proteins and proteasome subunit alpha might not only be neutralized/modulated the drug molecules but also involved in protein turnover to overcome the AK and KM resistance. Besides that Rv1876, Rv3841 and Rv0685 were found to be associated with iron regulation signifying the role of iron in resistance. Further research is needed to explore how these potential protein targets contribute to resistance of AK and KM. PMID:26436944

  5. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qvit, Nir; Schechtman, Deborah; Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Soares, Chrislaine Oliveira; Miao, Qianqian; Liang, Liying (Annie); Baron, Lauren A.; Teh-Poot, Christian; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Churchill, Eric; Cunningham, Anna D.; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Federspiel, Nancy A.; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Manso Alves, Maria Julia; Jardim, Armando; Momar, Ndao; Dumonteil, Eric; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases cause ∼500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase) and TRACK (Trypanosomareceptor for activated C-kinase). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase), may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs. PMID:27054066

  6. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Schechtman, Deborah; Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Soares, Chrislaine Oliveira; Miao, Qianqian; Liang, Liying Annie; Baron, Lauren A; Teh-Poot, Christian; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Churchill, Eric; Cunningham, Anna D; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Federspiel, Nancy A; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Manso Alves, Maria Julia; Jardim, Armando; Momar, Ndao; Dumonteil, Eric; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-04-01

    Parasitic diseases cause ∼ 500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase) and TRACK (Trypanosoma receptor for activated C-kinase). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase), may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs. PMID:27054066

  7. Comparative protein modeling of methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT) enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a potential target for antituberculosis drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Santosh A; Malde, Alpeshkumar K; Coutinho, Evans C

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a successful pathogen that overcomes the numerous challenges presented by the immune system of the host. In the last 40 years few anti-TB drugs have been developed, while the drug-resistance problem is increasing; there is thus a pressing need to develop new anti-TB drugs active against both the acute and chronic growth phases of the mycobacterium. Methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a methyl donor essential for mycolipid biosynthesis. As an anti-TB drug target, Mtb-MAT has been well validated. A homology model of MAT has been constructed using the X-ray structures of E. coli MAT (PDB code: 1MXA) and rat MAT (PDB code: 1QM4) as templates, by comparative protein modeling principles. The resulting model has the correct stereochemistry as gauged from the Ramachandran plot and good three-dimensional (3D) structure compatibility as assessed by the Profiles-3D score. The structurally and functionally important residues (active site) of Mtb-MAT have been identified using the E. coli and rat MAT crystal structures and the reported point mutation data. The homology model conserves the topological and active site features of the MAT family of proteins. The differences in the molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) of Mtb and human MAT provide evidences that selective and specific Mtb-MAT inhibitors can be designed using the homology model, by the structure-based drug design approaches. PMID:15670956

  8. G-coupled protein receptors and breast cancer progression: potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Taborga, Marcelo; Corcoran, Kelly E; Fernandes, Neil; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2007-03-01

    Breast cancer remains a leading cause of death despite early screening and advances in medicine. Bone marrow metastasis often complicates the clinical picture by requiring more aggressive treatment and worsening long-term prognoses. Recent therapeutic targeting of hormonal receptors such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and estrogen receptor has shown limited success in treating localized disease for those patients whose cancer cells are responsive. Although traditional approaches such as chemotherapy have demonstrated many successes, these agents fail to target quiescent cancer stem cells, which might have entered the bone marrow where they might be responsible for the quiescence population. Following years of clinical remission, these dormant cells could lead to secondary cancer resurgence. To date, little progress has been made in the development of targeted treatments for receptor negative and metastatic disease. In this review, we discuss the role of G-protein coupled receptors, including neurokinin-1, neurokinin-2 and chemokine receptor 4, as novel targets in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:17346217

  9. Octreotide-modified N-octyl-O, N-carboxymethyl chitosan micelles as potential carriers for targeted antitumor drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zou, Aifeng; Huo, Meirong; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianping; Yin, Xiaoqiang; Yao, Chengli; Zhu, Qinnv; Zhang, Min; Ren, Jinshan; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-02-01

    Octreotide (OCT) was recently found to have high binding affinity to the positive tumor cells of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). In this study, octreotide-Phe-polyethylene glycol-stearic acid was first successfully synthesized and used as a targeting molecule for N-octyl-O, N-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCC). Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into OCT-modified OCC micelles (DOX-OCC-OCT). The drug-loaded micelles obtained exhibited spherical shape, small particle sizes, and negative zeta potentials. The cytotoxicity of DOX-OCC-OCT micelles against MCF-7 cells (SSTRs expressing) was found to significantly increase with the increased amount of OCT modification, whereas no significant difference was observed against WI-38 cells (no SSTRs expressing). Results of flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that DOX-OCC-OCT micelles could remarkably increase the uptake of DOX in MCF-7 cells. All the results indicated that OCC-OCT micelles may be a promising intracellular targeting carrier for efficient delivery of antitumor drugs into tumor cells. PMID:22083725

  10. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  11. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems. PMID:27054112

  12. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems. PMID:27054112

  13. Nuclear Targeting with an Auger Electron Emitter Potentiates the Action of a Widely Used Antineoplastic Drug.

    PubMed

    Imstepf, Sebastian; Pierroz, Vanessa; Raposinho, Paula; Bauwens, Matthias; Felber, Michael; Fox, Thomas; Shapiro, Adam B; Freudenberg, Robert; Fernandes, Célia; Gama, Sofia; Gasser, Gilles; Motthagy, Felix; Santos, Isabel R; Alberto, Roger

    2015-12-16

    We present the combination of the clinically well-proven chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, and (99m)Tc, an Auger and internal conversion electron emitter, into a dual-action agent for therapy. Chemical conjugation of Doxorubicin to (99m)Tc afforded a construct which autonomously ferries a radioactive payload into the cell nucleus. At this site, damage is exerted by dose deposition from Auger radiation. The (99m)Tc-conjugate exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of survival in a selected panel of cancer cells and an in vivo study in healthy mice evidenced a biodistribution which is comparable to that of the parent drug. The homologous Rhenium conjugate was found to effectively bind to DNA, inhibited human Topoisomerase II, and exhibited cytotoxicity in vitro. The collective in vitro and in vivo data demonstrate that the presented metallo-conjugates closely mimic native Doxorubicin. PMID:26473388

  14. Intrinsically disordered amphiphilic peptides as potential targets in drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Marian; Accardo, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Annamaria; Ronga, Luisa; Guillon, Jean; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Rossi, Filomena; Tesauro, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins/peptides play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological events and may assume a precise conformation upon binding to a specific target. Recently, we have described the conformational and functional properties of two linear ester peptides provided with the following sequences: Y-G-E-C-P-C-K-OAllyl (PepK) and Y-G-E-C-P-C-E-OAllyl (PepE). Both peptides are characterized by the presence of the "CPC" motif together with a few amino acids able to promote disorder. The CPC sequence is a binding motif for the CXCR4 receptor that represents a well-known target for cancer therapies. In this paper, we report on synthetic amphiphilic peptides that consist of lipophilic derivatives of PepE and PepK bearing two stearic alkyl chains and/or an ethoxylic spacer. These peptide amphiphiles form stable supramolecular aggregates; they present conformational features that are typical of intrinsically disordered molecules as shown by CD spectroscopy. Solution fluorescence and DLS studies have been performed to evaluate Critical Micellar Concentrations and the dimension of supramolecular aggregates. Moreover, preliminary in vitro cell-based assays have been conducted to investigate the molecular recognition processes involving the CXCR4 receptor. In the end, the results obtained have been compared with the previous data generated by the corresponding non-amphiphilic peptides (PepE and PepK). PMID:26263446

  15. Energy metabolism targeted drugs synergize with photodynamic therapy to potentiate breast cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing

    2014-12-01

    Malignant cells are highly dependent on aerobic glycolysis, which differs significantly from normal cells (the Warburg effect). Interference of this metabolic process has been considered as an innovative method for developing selective cancer therapy. A recent study demonstrated that the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) can potentiate PDT efficacy, whereas the possible mechanisms have not been carefully investigated. This study firstly proved the general potentiation of PDT efficacy by 2-DG and 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, and carefully elucidated the underlying mechanism in the process. Our results showed that both 2-DG and 3-BP could significantly promote a PDT-induced cell cytotoxic effect when compared with either monotherapy. Synergistic potentiation of mitochondria- and caspase-dependent cell apoptosis was observed, including a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) drop, Bax translocation, and caspase-3 activation. Besides, ROS generation and the expression of oxidative stress related proteins such as P38 MAPK phosphorylation and JNK phosphorylation were notably increased after the combined treatments. Moreover, when pretreated with the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the ROS generation, the MMP drop, cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity were differently inhibited, suggesting that ROS was vertical in the pro-apoptotic process induced by 2-DG/3-BP combined with PDT treatment. These results indicate that the combination of glycolytic antagonists and PDT may be a promising therapeutic strategy to effectively kill cancer cells. PMID:25363473

  16. Fabrication of lactobionic-loaded chitosan microcapsules as potential drug carriers targeting the liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Cao; Xue, Zhi-Yuan; Cheng, Hai-Wei; Huang, Fu-Wei; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2011-04-01

    This paper demonstrates a general approach for fabrication of lactobionic chitosan microcapsules using layer-by-layer assembly via click chemistry. Chitosan was selectively modified with either azide (CHI-Az) or alkyne (CHI-Alk) groups. The growth of the CHI-Az/CHI-Alk click multilayer was studied experimentally by multilayer assembly on planar supports. Linear buildup of the film was observed. The chitosan click capsules were also analyzed with confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Capsules were found to have regular spherical shapes. In addition, (CHI-Az/CHI-Alk)-coated particles were modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate to ensure that the particles can be easily post-functionalized. Finally, lactobionic acid was conjugated onto the (CHI-Az/CHI-Alk)-coated particles and the lactobionic particles exhibited hepatoma cell (HepG2) targeting behavior. PMID:21130904

  17. The Apoptosome: Emerging Insights and New Potential Targets for Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    D’Amelio, Marcello; Tino, Elisa

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis plays a crucial role in tissue homeostasis, development and many diseases. The relevance of Apaf1, the molecular core of apoptosome, has been underlined in mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, which according to a growing body of evidence, is involved in various pathologies where the equilibrium of life-and-death is dysregulated, such as heart attack, stroke, liver failure, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, great interest has emerged in devising therapeutic strategies for regulating the key molecules involved in the life-and-death decision. Here we review recent progress in apoptosis-based pharmacological therapies and, in particular, we point out a possible role of the apoptosome as an emerging and promising pharmacological target. PMID:17674158

  18. Iron-binding drugs targeted to lysosomes: a potential strategy to treat inflammatory lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Persson, H Lennart; Richardson, Des R

    2005-08-01

    In many inflammatory lung disorders, an abnormal assimilation of redox-active iron will exacerbate oxidative tissue damage. It may be that the most important cellular pool of redox-active iron exists within lysosomes, making these organelles vulnerable to oxidative stress. In experiments employing respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages, the chelation of intra-lysosomal iron efficiently prevented lysosomal rupture and the ensuing cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide, ionising radiation or silica particles. Furthermore, cell-permeable iron-binding agents (weak bases) that accumulate within lysosomes due to proton trapping were much more efficient for cytoprotection than the chelator, desferrioxamine. On a molar basis, the weak base alpha-lipoic acid plus was 5000 times more effective than desferrioxamine at preventing lysosomal rupture and apoptotic cell death in cell cultures exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Thus, iron-chelating therapy that targets the lysosome might be a future treatment strategy for inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:16050792

  19. Imeglimin: A Potential New Multi-Target Drug for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vuylsteke, Valerie; Chastain, Lisa M; Maggu, Geeta A; Brown, Crystal

    2015-09-01

    Imeglimin is a novel agent currently in development to treat type 2 diabetes. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that it has the potential to impact the three main pathophysiologic components of type 2 diabetes: impaired glucose uptake by muscle tissue, excess hepatic gluconeogenesis, and increased beta-cell apoptosis. Preliminary human studies that have been published within the last 2 years demonstrate that imeglimin improves hemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose similarly when compared with metformin and with sitagliptin. There has also been a low incidence of adverse effects, especially hypoglycemia, reported in these early human studies. Currently, imeglimin is lacking long-term evidence to demonstrate any effects on its cardiovascular safety, and data on morbidity and mortality, though some studies are currently in progress. There is great potential for imeglimin, if FDA approved, to play a significant role in the type 2 diabetes management algorithm. PMID:26254210

  20. TRPM7 in cerebral ischemia and potential target for drug development in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Christine You-jin; Sun, Hong-shuo

    2011-01-01

    Searching for effective pharmacological agents for stroke treatment has largely been unsuccessful. Despite initial excitement, antagonists for glutamate receptors, the most studied receptor channels in ischemic stroke, have shown insufficient neuroprotective effects in clinical trials. Outside the traditional glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, recent evidence suggests few non-glutamate mechanisms, which may also cause ionic imbalance and cell death in cerebral ischemia. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a Ca2+ permeable, non-selective cation channel that has recently gained attention as a potential cation influx pathway involved in ischemic events. Compelling new evidence from an in vivo study demonstrated that suppression of TRPM7 channels in adult rat brain in vivo using virally mediated gene silencing approach reduced delayed neuronal cell death and preserved neuronal functions in global cerebral ischemia. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of the role of TRPM7 channels in physiology and pathophysiology as well as its therapeutic potential in stroke. PMID:21552293

  1. SW43-DOX ± loading onto drug-eluting bead, a potential new targeted drug delivery platform for systemic and locoregional cancer treatment – An in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Johannes M.; Gai, Yongkang; Sun, Lingyi; Xiang, Guangya; Zeng, Dexing; Kim, Hyun S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of unresectable primary cancer and their distant metastases, with the liver representing one of the most frequent location, is still plagued by insufficient treatment success and poor survival rates. The Sigma-2 receptor is preferentially expressed on many tumor cells making it an appealing target for therapy. Thus, we developed a potential targeted drug conjugate consisting of the Sigma-2 receptor ligand SW43 and Doxorubicin (SW43-DOX) for systemic cancer therapy and for locoregional treatment of primary and secondary liver malignancies when loaded onto drug-eluting bead (DEB) which was compared in vitro to the treatment with Doxorubicin alone. SW43-DOX binds specifically to the Sigma-2 receptor expressed on hepatocellular (Hep G2, Hep 3B), pancreatic (Panc-1) and colorectal (HT-29) carcinoma cell lines with high affinity and subsequent early specific internalization. Free SW43-DOX showed superior concentration and time depended cancer toxicity than treatment with Doxorubicin alone. Action mechanisms analysis revealed an apoptotic cell death with increased caspase 3/7 activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Only ROS scavenging with α-Tocopherol, but not the caspase inhibition (Z-VAD-FMK), partly reverted the effect. SW43-DOX could successfully be loaded onto DEB and showed prolonged eluting kinetics compared to Doxorubicin. SW43-DOX loaded DEB vs. Doxorubicin loaded DEB showed a significantly greater time dependent toxicity in all cell lines. In conclusion, the novel conjugate SW43-DOX ± loading onto DEB is a promising drug delivery platform for targeted systemic and locoregional cancer therapy. PMID:27262893

  2. Identification of potential drug targets in Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium using metabolic modelling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Hassan B; Fell, David A; Rossell, Sergio; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Woodward, Martin J; Thorndahl, Lotte; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Raghunathan, Anu; Daefler, Simon; Poolman, Mark G

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium is an established model organism for Gram-negative, intracellular pathogens. Owing to the rapid spread of resistance to antibiotics among this group of pathogens, new approaches to identify suitable target proteins are required. Based on the genome sequence of S. Typhimurium and associated databases, a genome-scale metabolic model was constructed. Output was based on an experimental determination of the biomass of Salmonella when growing in glucose minimal medium. Linear programming was used to simulate variations in the energy demand while growing in glucose minimal medium. By grouping reactions with similar flux responses, a subnetwork of 34 reactions responding to this variation was identified (the catabolic core). This network was used to identify sets of one and two reactions that when removed from the genome-scale model interfered with energy and biomass generation. Eleven such sets were found to be essential for the production of biomass precursors. Experimental investigation of seven of these showed that knockouts of the associated genes resulted in attenuated growth for four pairs of reactions, whilst three single reactions were shown to be essential for growth. PMID:24777662

  3. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 7, a potential cancer drug target

    PubMed Central

    Lountos, George T.; Austin, Brian P.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 7 (DUSP7/Pyst2) is a 320-residue protein that belongs to the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP) subfamily of dual-specificity phosphatases. Although its precise biological function is still not fully understood, previous reports have demonstrated that DUSP7 is overexpressed in myeloid leukemia and other malignancies. Therefore, there is interest in developing DUSP7 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents, especially for cancer. Here, the purification, crystallization and structure determination of the catalytic domain of DUSP7 (Ser141–Ser289/C232S) at 1.67 Å resolution are reported. The structure described here provides a starting point for structure-assisted inhibitor-design efforts and adds to the growing knowledge base of three-dimensional structures of the dual-specificity phosphatase family. PMID:26057789

  4. The Co-Metabolism within the Gut-Brain Metabolic Interaction: Potential Targets for Drug Treatment and Design.

    PubMed

    Obrenovich, Mark; Flückiger, Rudolf; Sykes, Lorraine; Donskey, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    We know that within the complex mammalian gut is any number of metabolic biomes. The gut has been sometimes called the "second brain" within the "gut-brain axis". A more informative term would be the gut-brain metabolic interactome, which is coined here to underscore the relationship between the digestive system and cognitive function or dysfunction as the case may be. Co-metabolism between the host and the intestinal microbiota is essential for life's processes. How diet, lifestyle, antibiotics and other factors shape the gut microbiome constitutes a rapidly growing area of research. Conversely, the gut microbiome also affects mammalian systems. Metabolites of the gut-brain axis are potential targets for treatment and drug design since the interaction or biochemical interplay results in net metabolite production or end-products with either positive or negative effects on human health. This review explores the gut-brain metabolic interactome, with particular emphasis on drug design and treatment strategies and how commensal bacteria or their disruption lead to dysbiosis and the effect this has on neurochemistry. Increasing data indicate that the intestinal microbiome can affect neurobiology, from mental and even behavioral health to memory, depression, mood, anxiety, obesity, cravings and even the creation and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. PMID:26831263

  5. Integrated gene co-expression network analysis in the growth phase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals new potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Verma, Srikant Prasad; Kumar, Sanjiv; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-11-01

    We have carried out weighted gene co-expression network analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to gain insights into gene expression architecture during log phase growth. The differentially expressed genes between at least one pair of 11 different M. tuberculosis strains as source of biological variability were used for co-expression network analysis. This data included genes with highest coefficient of variation in expression. Five distinct modules were identified using topological overlap based clustering. All the modules together showed significant enrichment in biological processes: fatty acid biosynthesis, cell membrane, intracellular membrane bound organelle, DNA replication, Quinone biosynthesis, cell shape and peptidoglycan biosynthesis, ribosome and structural constituents of ribosome and transposition. We then extracted the co-expressed connections which were supported either by transcriptional regulatory network or STRING database or high edge weight of topological overlap. The genes trpC, nadC, pitA, Rv3404c, atpA, pknA, Rv0996, purB, Rv2106 and Rv0796 emerged as top hub genes. After overlaying this network on the iNJ661 metabolic network, the reactions catalyzed by 15 highly connected metabolic genes were knocked down in silico and evaluated by Flux Balance Analysis. The results showed that in 12 out of 15 cases, in 11 more than 50% of reactions catalyzed by genes connected through co-expressed connections also had altered fluxes. The modules 'Turquoise', 'Blue' and 'Red' also showed enrichment in essential genes. We could map 152 of the previously known or proposed drug targets in these modules and identified 15 new potential drug targets based on their high degree of co-expressed connections and strong correlation with module eigengenes. PMID:24056838

  6. Ephrin receptor A10 is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancers including triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuya; Maeda, Yuka; Kanasaki, So-Ichiro; Watanabe, Takanobu; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi

    2014-09-10

    Ephrin receptor A10 (EphA10) is a relatively uncharacterized protein which is expressed in many breast cancers but not expressed in normal breast tissues. Here, we examined the potential of EphA10 as a drug target in breast cancer. Immunohistochemical staining of clinical tissue sections revealed that EphA10 was expressed in various breast cancer subtypes, including triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs), with no expression observed in normal tissues apart from testis. Ligand-dependent proliferation was observed in EphA10-transfected MDA-MB-435 cells (MDA-MB-435(EphA10)) and native TNBC cells (MDA-MB-436). However, this phenomenon was not observed in parental MDA-MB-435 cells which express a low level of EphA10. Finally, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by administration of an anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody in a xenograft mouse model. These results suggest that inhibition of EphA10 signaling may be a novel therapeutic option for management of breast cancer, including TNBCs which are currently not treated with molecularly targeted agents. PMID:24946238

  7. GESSE: Predicting Drug Side Effects from Drug-Target Relationships.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I; Souchet, Michel; Karaboga, Arnaud S; Ritchie, David W

    2015-09-28

    The in silico prediction of unwanted side effects (SEs) caused by the promiscuous behavior of drugs and their targets is highly relevant to the pharmaceutical industry. Considerable effort is now being put into computational and experimental screening of several suspected off-target proteins in the hope that SEs might be identified early, before the cost associated with developing a drug candidate rises steeply. Following this need, we present a new method called GESSE to predict potential SEs of drugs from their physicochemical properties (three-dimensional shape plus chemistry) and to target protein data extracted from predicted drug-target relationships. The GESSE approach uses a canonical correlation analysis of the full drug-target and drug-SE matrices, and it then calculates a probability that each drug in the resulting drug-target matrix will have a given SE using a Bayesian discriminant analysis (DA) technique. The performance of GESSE is quantified using retrospective (external database) analysis and literature examples by means of area under the ROC curve analysis, "top hit rates", misclassification rates, and a χ(2) independence test. Overall, the robust and very promising retrospective statistics obtained and the many SE predictions that have experimental corroboration demonstrate that GESSE can successfully predict potential drug-SE profiles of candidate drug compounds from their predicted drug-target relationships. PMID:26251970

  8. Other targeted drugs in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rodón, Jordi; Karachaliou, Niki; Sánchez, Jesús; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Riso, Aldo; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy drugs are developed against specific molecular alterations on cancer cells. Because they are “targeted” to the tumor, these therapies are more effective and better tolerated than conventional therapies such as chemotherapy. In the last decade, great advances have been made in understanding of melanoma biology and identification of molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of cells. The identification of oncogenic mutated kinases involved in this process provides an opportunity for development of new target therapies. The dependence of melanoma on BRAF-mutant kinase has provided an opportunity for development of mutation-specific inhibitors with high activity and excellent tolerance that are now being used in clinical practice. This marked a new era in the treatment of metastatic melanoma and much research is now ongoing to identify other “druggable” kinases and transduction signaling networking. It is expected that in the near future the spectrum of target drugs for melanoma treatment will increase. Herein, we review the most relevant potential novel drugs for melanoma treatment based on preclinical data and the results of early clinical trials. PMID:26605312

  9. The clinicopathological significance and drug target potential of FHIT in breast cancer, a meta-analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Su, Yunshu; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Jun; Xu, Junming; Xu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    FHIT is a bona fide tumor-suppressor gene and its loss contributes to tumorigenesis of epithelial cancers including breast cancer (BC). However, the association and clinicopathological significance between FHIT promoter hypermethylation and BC remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis and literature review to investigate the clinicopathological significance of FHIT methylation in BC. A detailed literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. The data were extracted and assessed by two reviewers independently. Odds ratios with 95% corresponding confidence intervals were calculated. A total of seven relevant articles were available for meta-analysis, which included 985 patients. The frequency of FHIT hypermethylation was significantly increased in invasive ductal carcinoma compared to benign breast disease, the pooled odds ratio was 8.43, P<0.00001. The rate of FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly different between stage I/II and stage III/IV, odds ratio was 2.98, P=0.06. In addition, FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly associated with ER and PR status. FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly correlated with premenopausal and postmenopausal patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. In summary, our meta-analysis indicated that the frequency of FHIT hypermethylation was significantly increased in BC compared to benign breast disease. The rate of FHIT hypermethylation in advanced stages of BC was higher than in earlier stages; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Our data suggested that FHIT methylation could be a diagnostic biomarker of BC carcinogenesis. FHIT is a potential drug target for development of demethylation treatment for patients with BC. PMID:26491255

  10. Targeting MDR in breast and lung cancer: discriminating its potential importance from the failure of drug resistance reversal studies.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Basseville, Agnes; Kurdziel, Karen; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Bates, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This special issue of Drug Resistance Updates is dedicated to multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR-1), 35 years after its discovery. While enormous progress has been made and our understanding of drug resistance has become more sophisticated and nuanced, after 35 years the role of MDR-1 in clinical oncology remains a work in progress. Despite clear in vitro evidence that P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by MDR-1, is able to dramatically reduce drug concentrations in cultured cells, and that drug accumulation can be increased by small molecule inhibitors, clinical trials testing this paradigm have mostly failed. Some have argued that it is no longer worthy of study. However, repeated analyses have demonstrated MDR-1 expression in a tumor is a poor prognostic indicator leading some to conclude MDR-1 is a marker of a more aggressive phenotype, rather than a mechanism of drug resistance. In this review we will re-evaluate the MDR-1 story in light of our new understanding of molecular targeted therapy, using breast and lung cancer as examples. In the end we will reconcile the data available and the knowledge gained in support of a thesis that we understand far more than we realize, and that we can use this knowledge to improve future therapies. PMID:22464282

  11. Targeted Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Effective drug delivery in pancreatic cancer treatment remains a major challenge. Because of the high resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer is extremely low. Recent advances in drug delivery systems hold great promise for improving cancer therapy. Using liposomes, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes to deliver cancer drugs and other therapeutic agents such as siRNA, suicide gene, oncolytic virus, small molecule inhibitor and antibody has been a success in recent pre-clinical trials. However, how to improve the specificity and stability of the delivered drug using ligand or antibody directed delivery represent a major problem. Therefore, developing novel, specific, tumor-targeted drug delivery systems is urgently needed for this terrible disease. This review summarizes the current progress on targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer, and provides important information on potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19853645

  12. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery. PMID:19663765

  13. Risk assessment of drug interaction potential and concomitant dosing pattern on targeted toxicities in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Patel, Dimple; Dombrowsky, Erin; Bajaj, Gaurav; Skolnik, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    This investigation evaluated the impact of potential drug interactions on the incidence of reported toxicities seen with common dosing patterns in children with cancer, with the intent of being able to screen and reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the future. Toxicity reported in pediatric cancer patients treated at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2004 to 2010 were abstracted from a cancer tumor registry and merged with drug order profiles from the medical record system. Analysis datasets were created in SAS and permutation algorithms were used to identify pairwise drug combinations associated with specific toxicity occurrence. Relative risk of toxicity based on dosing pattern was assessed via comparison to control patients. A total of 326 of 1,713 patients (19%) had reportable toxicities. Neutrophil count decreases and alanine aminotransferase increases represented the highest occurring, corresponding to 28.8% and 31.9% prevalence among patients reporting toxicity, respectively. Of coadministered drug pairs, acetaminophen-diphenhydramine occurred most frequently; however, methotrexate-vincristine was the highest occurring pair linked to a single toxicity (hepatotoxicity). Toxicity was highly associated with the diagnoses of leukemia (52.1%) or neuroblastoma (28.5%). Comparison of the dosing interval (≤30 versus >30 min) suggested that risk of toxicity can be associated with the timing of coadministration, with ≤30 min increasing the risk of hepatotoxicity with fentanyl-midazolam and methotrexate-midazolam combinations. Knowledge of drug interactions in children with cancer may help reduce the incidence of ADRs by providing pharmacotherapy options that may reduce the likelihood of toxicity. PMID:23595361

  14. Drug targeting using solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Azandaryani, Abbas H; Faramarzi, Hossain; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Omidfar, Kobra

    2014-07-01

    The present review aims to show the features of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) which are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Because of some unique features of SLNs such as their unique size dependent properties it offers possibility to develop new therapeutics. A common denominator of all these SLN-based platforms is to deliver drugs into specific tissues or cells in a pathological setting with minimal adverse effects on bystander cells. SLNs are capable to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers which lead to a new prototype in drug delivery which maybe used for drug targeting. Hence solid lipid nanoparticles hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of targeted solid lipid nanoparticles discussing their types such as antibody SLN, magnetic SLN, pH sensitive SLN and cationic SLN. PMID:24717692

  15. Choline kinase-alpha by regulating cell aggressiveness and drug sensitivity is a potential druggable target for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Granata, A; Nicoletti, R; Tinaglia, V; De Cecco, L; Pisanu, M E; Ricci, A; Podo, F; Canevari, S; Iorio, E; Bagnoli, M; Mezzanzanica, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aberrant choline metabolism has been proposed as a novel cancer hallmark. We recently showed that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) possesses an altered MRS-choline profile, characterised by increased phosphocholine (PCho) content to which mainly contribute over-expression and activation of choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-alpha). Methods: To assess its biological relevance, ChoK-alpha expression was downmodulated by transient RNA interference in EOC in vitro models. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis and functional analysis was performed to identify the pathway/functions perturbed in ChoK-alpha-silenced cells, then validated by in vitro experiments. Results: In silenced cells, compared with control, we observed: (I) a significant reduction of both CHKA transcript and ChoK-alpha protein expression; (II) a dramatic, proportional drop in PCho content ranging from 60 to 71%, as revealed by 1H-magnetic spectroscopy analysis; (III) a 35–36% of cell growth inhibition, with no evidences of apoptosis or modification of the main cellular survival signalling pathways; (IV) 476 differentially expressed genes, including genes related to lipid metabolism. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified cellular functions related to cell death and cellular proliferation and movement as the most perturbed. Accordingly, CHKA-silenced cells displayed a significant delay in wound repair, a reduced migration and invasion capability were also observed. Furthermore, although CHKA silencing did not directly induce cell death, a significant increase of sensitivity to platinum, paclitaxel and doxorubicin was observed even in a drug-resistant context. Conclusion: We showed for the first time in EOC that CHKA downregulation significantly decreased the aggressive EOC cell behaviour also affecting cells' sensitivity to drug treatment. These observations open the way to further analysis for ChoK-alpha validation as a new EOC therapeutic target to be used alone or in combination with

  16. Development of oxaliplatin encapsulated in magnetic nanocarriers of pectin as a potential targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Raj Kumar; Sahu, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and oxaliplatin (OHP) were in-situ encapsulated in pectin cross-linked with Ca2+ forming 100–200 nm sized magnetically functionalized pectin nanocarriers, referred here as MP-OHP nanocarriers. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed formation of spherical nanostructures. The magnetic measurements by vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) revealed high saturation magnetization (Ms=45.65 emu/g). The superparamagnetic property of MP-OHP was confirmed from the blocking temperature (TB) determined from field cooled and zero field cooled magnetization, measured by superconducting quantum unit interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. The stability of the aqueous dispersion of MP-OHP nanocarriers was confirmed from its high zeta potential (−30.5 mV). The drug encapsulation efficiency (55.2±4.8% w/w) and the drug loading content (0.10±0.04 wt%) in MP-OHP nanocarriers were determined from corresponding platinum contents in OHP and MP-OHP batches measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). These nanocarriers exhibited a sustained release of OHP in phosphate buffer solution maintained at pH 5.5 and 7.4, where the drug release profile satisfied a combination of diffusion and swelling controlled mechanism. The cytotoxicity effect of MP-OHP nanocarriers was studied on MIA-PaCa-2 (pancreas) cancer cell line, where the GI50 values were more than 5 mg/mL and it exhibited 10 folds higher cytoxicity than the equivalent concentration of free drug. PMID:25755993

  17. Emerging targets for antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, Govinarajan; Rangarajan, Pundi N

    2001-08-01

    The absence of an effective vaccine against malaria and the ability of the parasite to develop resistance to known antimalarial drugs makes it mandatory to unravel newer drug targets with a view to developing newer pharmacophores. While conventional targets such as the purine, pyrimidine and folate pathways are still being investigated in the light of newer knowledge, a new opportunity has emerged from an understanding of certain unique features of the parasite biology. These include the food vacuole, haemoglobin catabolism, haeme biosynthesis, apicoplasts and their metabolism as well as macromolecular transactions, import of host proteins, parasite induced alterations in the red cell surface and transport phenomena. This review seeks to emphasise the new and emerging targets, while giving a brief account of the targets that have already been exploited. PMID:12540258

  18. Structures of Wild-Type and Mutant Human Spermidine/Spermine N1-acetyltransferase, a Potential Therapeutic Drug Target

    SciTech Connect

    Bewley,M.; Graziano, V.; Jiang, J.; Matz, E.; Studier, F.; Pegg, A.; Coleman, C.; Flanagan, J.

    2006-01-01

    Spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SSAT) is a key enzyme in the control of polyamine levels in human cells, as acetylation of spermidine and spermine triggers export or degradation. Increased intracellular polyamine levels accompany several types of cancers as well as other human diseases, and compounds that affect the expression, activity, or stability of SSAT are being explored as potential therapeutic drugs. We have expressed human SSAT from the cloned cDNA in Escherichia coli and have determined high-resolution structures of wild-type and mutant SSAT, as the free dimer and in binary and ternary complexes with CoA, acetyl-CoA (AcCoA), spermine, and the inhibitor N{sup 1},N{sup 11}-bis-(ethyl)-norspermine (BE-3-3-3). These structures show details of binding sites for cofactor, substrates, and inhibitor and provide a framework to understand enzymatic activity, mutations, and the action of potential drugs. Two dimer conformations were observed: a symmetric form with two open surface channels capable of binding substrate or cofactor, and an asymmetric form in which only one of the surface channels appears capable of binding and acetylating polyamines. SSAT was found to self-acetylate lysine-26 in the presence of AcCoA and absence of substrate, a reaction apparently catalyzed by AcCoA bound in the second channel of the asymmetric dimer. These unexpected and intriguing complexities seem likely to have some as yet undefined role in regulating SSAT activity or stability as a part of polyamine homeostasis. Sequence signatures group SSAT with proteins that appear to have thialysine N{sup {var_epsilon}}-acetyltransferase activity.

  19. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  20. Quinoxalines Potential to Target Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Tristán-Manzano, María; Guirado, Antonio; Martínez-Esparza, María; Gálvez, Jesús; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J

    2015-01-01

    The study of quinoxalines has increased immeasurably during the last two decades, due firstly to their relatively simple chemical synthesis, which has generated a vast variety of compounds with diverse structural modifications, and secondly, to the wide therapeutic potential and biological activities exhibited by this family of compounds. Quinoxalines constitute a rising biomedical class of low-molecular weight heterocyclic compounds with potential functions as antitumour, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiparasitic and antidiabetic agents, as well as being of interest for the potential treatment of glaucoma, insomnia, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, among others. However, a deeper knowledge of the molecular targets of quinoxalines that fulfil a key role in certain pathologies is required for the development of new and more specific drugs through a rational design strategy to avoid undesirable side effects. In the present review, we summarize the most important molecular targets of the quinoxaline derivatives discovered to date, thus providing a first reference index for researchers to identify the potential targets of their quinoxalines derived collections, which could facilitate the development of new quinoxaline- based therapies. PMID:26264925

  1. The Robustness of Pathway Analysis in Identifying Potential Drug Targets in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dalby, Andrew; Bailey, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes responsible for causing cancers from gene expression data has had varied success. Often the genes identified depend on the methods used for detecting expression patterns, or on the ways that the data had been normalized and filtered. The use of gene set enrichment analysis is one way to introduce biological information in order to improve the detection of differentially expressed genes and pathways. In this paper we show that the use of network models while still subject to the problems of normalization is a more robust method for detecting pathways that are differentially overrepresented in lung cancer data. Such differences may provide opportunities for novel therapeutics. In addition, we present evidence that non-small cell lung carcinoma is not a series of homogeneous diseases; rather that there is a heterogeny within the genotype which defies phenotype classification. This diversity helps to explain the lack of progress in developing therapies against non-small cell carcinoma and suggests that drug development may consider multiple pathways as treatment targets.

  2. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  3. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Streptococcus pyogenes M49 metabolic network reveals growth requirements and indicates potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Levering, Jennifer; Fiedler, Tomas; Sieg, Antje; van Grinsven, Koen W A; Hering, Silvio; Veith, Nadine; Olivier, Brett G; Klett, Lara; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Teusink, Bas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Kummer, Ursula

    2016-08-20

    Genome-scale metabolic models comprise stoichiometric relations between metabolites, as well as associations between genes and metabolic reactions and facilitate the analysis of metabolism. We computationally reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes M49. Initially, we based the reconstruction on genome annotations and already existing and curated metabolic networks of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis. This initial draft was manually curated with the final reconstruction accounting for 480 genes associated with 576 reactions and 558 metabolites. In order to constrain the model further, we performed growth experiments of wild type and arcA deletion strains of S. pyogenes M49 in a chemically defined medium and calculated nutrient uptake and production fluxes. We additionally performed amino acid auxotrophy experiments to test the consistency of the model. The established genome-scale model can be used to understand the growth requirements of the human pathogen S. pyogenes and define optimal and suboptimal conditions, but also to describe differences and similarities between S. pyogenes and related lactic acid bacteria such as L. lactis in order to find strategies to reduce the growth of the pathogen and propose drug targets. PMID:26970054

  4. Analyses of the Binding between Water Soluble C60 Derivatives and Potential Drug Targets through a Molecular Docking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Zhang, Houjin

    2016-01-01

    Fullerene C60, a unique sphere-shaped molecule consisting of carbon, has been proved to have inhibitory effects on many diseases. However, the applications of C60 in medicine have been severely hindered by its complete insolubility in water and low solubility in almost all organic solvents. In this study, the water-soluble C60 derivatives and the C60 binding protein’s structures were collected from the literature. The selected proteins fall into several groups, including acetylcholinesterase, glutamate racemase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, lumazine synthase, human estrogen receptor alpha, dihydrofolate reductase and N-myristoyltransferase. The C60 derivatives were docked into the binding sites in the proteins. The binding affinities of the C60 derivatives were calculated. The bindings between proteins and their known inhibitors or native ligands were also characterized in the same way. The results show that C60 derivatives form good interactions with the binding sites of different protein targets. In many cases, the binding affinities of C60 derivatives are better than those of known inhibitors and native ligands. This study demonstrates the interaction patterns of C60 derivatives and their binding partners, which will have good impact on the fullerene-based drug discovery. PMID:26829126

  5. Therapeutic target database update 2012: a resource for facilitating target-oriented drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Feng; Shi, Zhe; Qin, Chu; Tao, Lin; Liu, Xin; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Li; Song, Yang; Liu, Xianghui; Zhang, Jingxian; Han, Bucong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yuzong

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge and investigation of therapeutic targets (responsible for drug efficacy) and the targeted drugs facilitate target and drug discovery and validation. Therapeutic Target Database (TTD, http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) has been developed to provide comprehensive information about efficacy targets and the corresponding approved, clinical trial and investigative drugs. Since its last update, major improvements and updates have been made to TTD. In addition to the significant increase of data content (from 1894 targets and 5028 drugs to 2025 targets and 17 816 drugs), we added target validation information (drug potency against target, effect against disease models and effect of target knockout, knockdown or genetic variations) for 932 targets, and 841 quantitative structure activity relationship models for active compounds of 228 chemical types against 121 targets. Moreover, we added the data from our previous drug studies including 3681 multi-target agents against 108 target pairs, 116 drug combinations with their synergistic, additive, antagonistic, potentiative or reductive mechanisms, 1427 natural product-derived approved, clinical trial and pre-clinical drugs and cross-links to the clinical trial information page in the ClinicalTrials.gov database for 770 clinical trial drugs. These updates are useful for facilitating target discovery and validation, drug lead discovery and optimization, and the development of multi-target drugs and drug combinations. PMID:21948793

  6. Bone-targeted delivery of nanodiamond-based drug carriers conjugated with alendronate for potential osteoporosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae-Kyung; Kang, Rae-Hyoung; Jeong, Ki-Young; Jun, Dae-Ryong; Koh, Jung-Min; Kim, Doyun; Bae, Soo Kyung; Choi, Sung-Wook

    2016-06-28

    This paper describes the design of alendronate-conjugated nanodiamonds (Alen-NDs) and evaluation of their feasibility for bone-targeted delivery. Alen-NDs exhibited a high affinity to hydroxyapatite (HAp, the mineral component of bone) due to the presence of Alen. Unlike NDs (without Alen), Alen-NDs were preferentially taken up by MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells, compared to NIH3T3 and HepG2 cells, suggesting their cellular specificity. In addition, NDs itself increased ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells, compared to control group (osteogenic medium) and Alen-NDs exhibited more enhanced ALP activity. In addition, an in vivo study revealed that Alen-NDs effectively accumulated in bone tissues after intravenous tail vein injection. These results confirm the superior properties of Alen-NDs with advantages of high HAp affinity, specific uptake for MC3T3-E1 cells, positive synergistic effect for ALP activity, and in vivo bone targeting ability. The Alen-NDs can potentially be employed for osteoporosis treatment by delivering both NDs and Alen to bone tissue. PMID:27094604

  7. High-throughput transcriptomic and RNAi analysis identifies AIM1, ERGIC1, TMED3 and TPX2 as potential drug targets in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Paula; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Mirtti, Tuomas; Alanen, Kalle A; Perälä, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases and there is a need for more efficient and targeted methods of treatment. In this study, the potential of gene expression data and RNA interference technique were combined to advance future personalized prostate cancer therapeutics. To distinguish the most promising in vivo prevalidated prostate cancer drug targets, a bioinformatic analysis was carried out using genome-wide gene expression data from 9873 human tissue samples. In total, 295 genes were selected for further functional studies in cultured prostate cancer cells due to their high mRNA expression in prostate, prostate cancer or in metastatic prostate cancer samples. Second, RNAi based cell viability assay was performed in VCaP and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Based on the siRNA results, gene expression patterns in human tissues and novelty, endoplasmic reticulum function associated targets AIM1, ERGIC1 and TMED3, as well as mitosis regulating TPX2 were selected for further validation. AIM1, ERGIC1, and TPX2 were shown to be highly expressed especially in prostate cancer tissues, and high mRNA expression of ERGIC1 and TMED3 associated with AR and ERG oncogene expression. ERGIC1 silencing specifically regulated the proliferation of ERG oncogene positive prostate cancer cells and inhibited ERG mRNA expression in these cells, indicating that it is a potent drug target in ERG positive subgroup of prostate cancers. TPX2 expression associated with PSA failure and TPX2 silencing reduced PSA expression, indicating that TPX2 regulates androgen receptor mediated signaling. In conclusion, the combinatorial usage of microarray and RNAi techniques yielded in a large number of potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets, for future development of targeted and personalized approaches for prostate cancer management. PMID:22761906

  8. Implant-Assisted Intrathecal Magnetic Drug Targeting to Aid in Therapeutic Nanoparticle Localization for Potential Treatment of Central Nervous System Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lueshen, Eric; Venugopal, Indu; Soni, Tejen; Alaraj, Ali; Linninger, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    There is an ongoing struggle to develop efficient drug delivery and targeting methods within the central nervous system. One technique known as intrathecal drug delivery, involves direct drug infusion into the spinal canal and has become standard practice for treating many central nervous system diseases due to reduced systemic toxicity from the drug bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Although intrathecal drug delivery boasts the advantage of reduced systemic toxicity compared to oral and intravenous drug delivery techniques, current intrathecal delivery protocols lack a means of sufficient drug targeting at specific locations of interest within the central nervous system. We previously proposed the method of intrathecal magnetic drug targeting in order to overcome the limited targeting capabilities of standard intrathecal drug delivery protocols, while simultaneously reducing the systemic toxicity as well as the amount of drug required to produce a therapeutic effect. Building off of our previous work, this paper presents the concept of implant-assisted intrathecal magnetic drug targeting. Ferritic stainless steel implants were incorporated within the subarachnoid space of our in vitro human spine model, and the targeting magnet was placed at a physiological distance away from the model and implant to mimic the distance between the epidermis and spinal canal. Computer simulations were performed to optimize implant design for generating high gradient magnetic fields and to study how these fields may aid in therapeutic nanoparticle localization. Experiments aiming to determine the effects of different magnetically-susceptible implants placed within an external magnetic field on the targeting efficiency of gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles were then performed on our in vitro human spine model. Our results indicate that implant-assisted intrathecal magnetic drug targeting is an excellent supplementary technique to further enhance the targeting capabilities of our

  9. Modeling of Human Prokineticin Receptors: Interactions with Novel Small-Molecule Binders and Potential Off-Target Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Anat; Yarnitzky, Talia; Wiener, Ayana; Meidan, Rina; Niv, Masha Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Motivation The Prokineticin receptor (PKR) 1 and 2 subtypes are novel members of family A GPCRs, which exhibit an unusually high degree of sequence similarity. Prokineticins (PKs), their cognate ligands, are small secreted proteins of ∼80 amino acids; however, non-peptidic low-molecular weight antagonists have also been identified. PKs and their receptors play important roles under various physiological conditions such as maintaining circadian rhythm and pain perception, as well as regulating angiogenesis and modulating immunity. Identifying binding sites for known antagonists and for additional potential binders will facilitate studying and regulating these novel receptors. Blocking PKRs may serve as a therapeutic tool for various diseases, including acute pain, inflammation and cancer. Methods and Results Ligand-based pharmacophore models were derived from known antagonists, and virtual screening performed on the DrugBank dataset identified potential human PKR (hPKR) ligands with novel scaffolds. Interestingly, these included several HIV protease inhibitors for which endothelial cell dysfunction is a documented side effect. Our results suggest that the side effects might be due to inhibition of the PKR signaling pathway. Docking of known binders to a 3D homology model of hPKR1 is in agreement with the well-established canonical TM-bundle binding site of family A GPCRs. Furthermore, the docking results highlight residues that may form specific contacts with the ligands. These contacts provide structural explanation for the importance of several chemical features that were obtained from the structure-activity analysis of known binders. With the exception of a single loop residue that might be perused in the future for obtaining subtype-specific regulation, the results suggest an identical TM-bundle binding site for hPKR1 and hPKR2. In addition, analysis of the intracellular regions highlights variable regions that may provide subtype specificity

  10. Chemical signatures and new drug targets for gametocytocidal drug development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Magle, Crystal T.; Huang, Wenwei; Southall, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Williamson, Kim C.; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Control of parasite transmission is critical for the eradication of malaria. However, most antimalarial drugs are not active against P. falciparum gametocytes, responsible for the spread of malaria. Consequently, patients can remain infectious for weeks after the clearance of asexual parasites and clinical symptoms. Here we report the identification of 27 potent gametocytocidal compounds (IC50 < 1 μM) from screening 5,215 known drugs and compounds. All these compounds were active against three strains of gametocytes with different drug sensitivities and geographical origins, 3D7, HB3 and Dd2. Cheminformatic analysis revealed chemical signatures for P. falciparum sexual and asexual stages indicative of druggability and suggesting potential targets. Torin 2, a top lead compound (IC50 = 8 nM against gametocytes in vitro), completely blocked oocyst formation in a mouse model of transmission. These results provide critical new leads and potential targets to expand the repertoire of malaria transmission-blocking reagents.

  11. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    -ligand complex via a hydrogen bonding interaction by aromatic-π contacts, and the ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) analysis of best leads indicate nontoxic in nature with good potential for drug development. PMID:25848225

  12. "Target-Site" Drug Metabolism and Transport.

    PubMed

    Foti, Robert S; Tyndale, Rachel F; Garcia, Kristine L P; Sweet, Douglas H; Nagar, Swati; Sharan, Satish; Rock, Dan A

    2015-08-01

    The recent symposium on "Target-Site" Drug Metabolism and Transport that was sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the 2014 Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego is summarized in this report. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter activity at the site of therapeutic action can affect the efficacy, safety, and metabolic properties of a given drug, with potential outcomes including altered dosing regimens, stricter exclusion criteria, or even the failure of a new chemical entity in clinical trials. Drug metabolism within the brain, for example, can contribute to metabolic activation of therapeutic drugs such as codeine as well as the elimination of potential neurotoxins in the brain. Similarly, the activity of oxidative and conjugative drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lung can have an effect on the efficacy of compounds such as resveratrol. In addition to metabolism, the active transport of compounds into or away from the site of action can also influence the outcome of a given therapeutic regimen or disease progression. For example, organic anion transporter 3 is involved in the initiation of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and may have a role in how uremic toxins enter pancreatic β-cells and ultimately contribute to the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes. Finally, it is likely that a combination of target-specific metabolism and cellular internalization may have a significant role in determining the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates, a finding which has resulted in the development of a host of new analytical methods that are now used for characterizing the metabolism and disposition of antibody-drug conjugates. Taken together, the research summarized herein can provide for an increased understanding of potential barriers to drug efficacy and allow for a more rational approach for developing safe and effective therapeutics. PMID:25986849

  13. Drug targeting to the brain.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-09-01

    The goal of brain drug targeting technology is the delivery of therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), including the human BBB. This is accomplished by re-engineering pharmaceuticals to cross the BBB via specific endogenous transporters localized within the brain capillary endothelium. Certain endogenous peptides, such as insulin or transferrin, undergo receptor-mediated transport (RMT) across the BBB in vivo. In addition, peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies (MAb) may also cross the BBB via RMT on the endogenous transporters. The MAb may be used as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry across the BBB large molecule pharmaceuticals, including recombinant proteins, antibodies, RNA interference drugs, or non-viral gene medicines. Fusion proteins of the molecular Trojan horse and either neurotrophins or single chain Fv antibodies have been genetically engineered. The fusion proteins retain bi-functional properties, and both bind the BBB receptor, to trigger transport into brain, and bind the cognate receptor inside brain to induce the pharmacologic effect. Trojan horse liposome technology enables the brain targeting of non-viral plasmid DNA. Molecular Trojan horses may be formulated with fusion protein technology, avidin-biotin technology, or Trojan horse liposomes to target to brain virtually any large molecule pharmaceutical. PMID:17554607

  14. Novel high throughput pooled shRNA screening identifies NQO1 as a potential drug target for host directed therapy for tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Karim, Ahmad F.; Ding, Xuedong; Das, Biswajit; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Gibson, Richard M.; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E.; Karn, Jonathan; Rojas, Roxana E.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical regulation of macrophage function is one key strategy for developing host-directed adjuvant therapies for tuberculosis (TB). A critical step to develop these therapies is the identification and characterization of specific macrophage molecules and pathways with a high potential to serve as drug targets. Using a barcoded lentivirus-based pooled short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) library combined with next generation sequencing, we identified 205 silenced host genes highly enriched in mycobacteria-resistant macrophages. Twenty-one of these “hits” belonged to the oxidoreductase functional category. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) was the top oxidoreductase “hit”. NQO1 expression was increased after mycobacterial infection, and NQO1 knockdown increased macrophage differentiation, NF-κB activation, and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in response to infection. This suggests that mycobacteria hijacks NQO1 to down-regulate pro-inflammatory and anti-bacterial functions. The competitive inhibitor of NQO1 dicoumarol synergized with rifampin to promote intracellular killing of mycobacteria. Thus, NQO1 is a new host target in mycobacterial infection that could potentially be exploited to increase antibiotic efficacy in vivo. Our findings also suggest that pooled shRNA libraries could be valuable tools for genome-wide screening in the search for novel druggable host targets for adjunctive TB therapies. PMID:27297123

  15. Using bioinformatics for drug target identification from the genome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenran; Zhou, Yanhong

    2005-01-01

    Genomics and proteomics technologies have created a paradigm shift in the drug discovery process, with bioinformatics having a key role in the exploitation of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie disease and to identify potential drug targets. We discuss the current state of the art for some of the bioinformatic approaches to identifying drug targets, including identifying new members of successful target classes and their functions, predicting disease relevant genes, and constructing gene networks and protein interaction networks. In addition, we introduce drug target discovery using the strategy of systems biology, and discuss some of the data resources for the identification of drug targets. Although bioinformatics tools and resources can be used to identify putative drug targets, validating targets is still a process that requires an understanding of the role of the gene or protein in the disease process and is heavily dependent on laboratory-based work. PMID:16336003

  16. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  17. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review.

    PubMed

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-12-16

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  18. A Systems-Pharmacology Analysis of Herbal Medicines Used in Health Improvement Treatment: Predicting Potential New Drugs and Targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianling; Pei, Mengjie; Zheng, Chunli; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Yang, Ling

    2013-01-01

    For thousands of years, tonic herbs have been successfully used all around the world to improve health, energy, and vitality. However, their underlying mechanisms of action in molecular/systems levels are still a mystery. In this work, two sets of tonic herbs, so called Qi-enriching herbs (QEH) and Blood-tonifying herbs (BTH) in TCM, were selected to elucidate why they can restore proper balance and harmony inside body, organ and energy system. Firstly, a pattern recognition model based on artificial neural network and discriminant analysis for assessing the molecular difference between QEH and BTH was developed. It is indicated that QEH compounds have high lipophilicity while BTH compounds possess high chemical reactivity. Secondly, a systematic investigation integrating ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) prediction, target fishing and network analysis was performed and validated on these herbs to obtain the compound-target associations for reconstructing the biologically-meaningful networks. The results suggest QEH enhance physical strength, immune system and normal well-being, acting as adjuvant therapy for chronic disorders while BTH stimulate hematopoiesis function in body. As an emerging approach, the systems pharmacology model might facilitate to understand the mechanisms of action of the tonic herbs, which brings about new development for complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:24369484

  19. A Computational Approach to Finding Novel Targets for Existing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yvonne Y.; An, Jianghong; Jones, Steven J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Repositioning existing drugs for new therapeutic uses is an efficient approach to drug discovery. We have developed a computational drug repositioning pipeline to perform large-scale molecular docking of small molecule drugs against protein drug targets, in order to map the drug-target interaction space and find novel interactions. Our method emphasizes removing false positive interaction predictions using criteria from known interaction docking, consensus scoring, and specificity. In all, our database contains 252 human protein drug targets that we classify as reliable-for-docking as well as 4621 approved and experimental small molecule drugs from DrugBank. These were cross-docked, then filtered through stringent scoring criteria to select top drug-target interactions. In particular, we used MAPK14 and the kinase inhibitor BIM-8 as examples where our stringent thresholds enriched the predicted drug-target interactions with known interactions up to 20 times compared to standard score thresholds. We validated nilotinib as a potent MAPK14 inhibitor in vitro (IC50 40 nM), suggesting a potential use for this drug in treating inflammatory diseases. The published literature indicated experimental evidence for 31 of the top predicted interactions, highlighting the promising nature of our approach. Novel interactions discovered may lead to the drug being repositioned as a therapeutic treatment for its off-target's associated disease, added insight into the drug's mechanism of action, and added insight into the drug's side effects. PMID:21909252

  20. Homology Modeling of NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase of the Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Brugia malayi and Its Drug Target Potential Using Dispiro-Cycloalkanones

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Nag, Jeetendra K.; Pandey, Jyoti; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Shah, Priyanka; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filarial nematodes maintain a mutualistic relationship with the endosymbiont Wolbachia. Depletion of Wolbachia produces profound defects in nematode development, fertility, and viability and thus has great promise as a novel approach for treating filarial diseases. NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is an essential enzyme of DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Therefore, in the present study, the antifilarial drug target potential of the NAD+-dependent DNA ligase of the Wolbachia symbiont of Brugia malayi (wBm-LigA) was investigated using dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds. Dispiro-cycloalkanone specifically inhibited the nick-closing and cohesive-end ligation activities of the enzyme without inhibiting human or T4 DNA ligase. The mode of inhibition was competitive with the NAD+ cofactor. Docking studies also revealed the interaction of these compounds with the active site of the target enzyme. The adverse effects of these inhibitors were observed on adult and microfilarial stages of B. malayi in vitro, and the most active compounds were further monitored in vivo in jirds and mastomys rodent models. Compounds 1, 2, and 5 had severe adverse effects in vitro on the motility of both adult worms and microfilariae at low concentrations. Compound 2 was the best inhibitor, with the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) (1.02 μM), followed by compound 5 (IC50, 2.3 μM) and compound 1 (IC50, 2.9 μM). These compounds also exhibited the same adverse effect on adult worms and microfilariae in vivo (P < 0.05). These compounds also tremendously reduced the wolbachial load, as evident by quantitative real-time PCR (P < 0.05). wBm-LigA thus shows great promise as an antifilarial drug target, and dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds show great promise as antifilarial lead candidates. PMID:25845868

  1. Bioinformatics and Molecular Biological Characterization of a Hypothetical Protein SAV1226 as a Potential Drug Target for Methicillin/Vancomycin-Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Nichole; Velk, Kimberly; McCune, Tyler; Wu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin/multiple-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are infectious bacteria that are resistant to common antibiotics. A previous in silico study in our group has identified a hypothetical protein SAV1226 as one of the potential drug targets. In this study, we reported the bioinformatics characterization, as well as cloning, expression, purification and kinetic assays of hypothetical protein SAV1226 from methicillin/vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Mu50 strain. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis revealed a low degree of structural similarity with known proteins. Kinetic assays demonstrated that hypothetical protein SAV1226 is neither a domain of an ATP dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase nor of a phosphotransferase system (PTS) dihydroxyacetone kinase, suggesting that the function of hypothetical protein SAV1226 might be misannotated on public databases such as UniProt and InterProScan 5. PMID:26388980

  2. Targeting tuberculosis: a glimpse of promising drug targets.

    PubMed

    Arora, N; Banerjee, A K

    2012-03-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has emerged as the biggest curse of our time causing significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing resistance in mycobacterium to existing drugs calls for exploration of metabolic pathways for finding novel drug targets and also for prioritization of known drug targets. Recent advances in molecular biology, bioinformatics and structural biology coupled with availability of M. tuberculosis genome sequence have provided much needed boost to drug discovery process. This review provides a glimpse of attractive drug targets for development of anti-mycobacterial drug development. PMID:22356190

  3. Sphingosines Derived from Marine Sponge as Potential Multi-Target Drug Related to Disorders in Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Biegelmeyer, Renata; Schröder, Rafael; Rambo, Douglas F; Dresch, Roger R; Carraro, João L F; Mothes, Beatriz; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Junior, Mário L C da Frota; Henriques, Amélia T

    2015-09-01

    Haliclona tubifera, marine sponge species abundant in Brazilian coastline, presents only a few papers published in the literature. Recently, we have reported the isolation of two modified C18 sphingoid bases: (2R,3R,6R,7Z)-2-aminooctadec-7-ene-1,3, 6-triol and and (2R,3R,6R)-2-aminooctadec-1,3,6-triol. In order to continue our research, in this work aimed at the biological investigation of fractions that led to the isolation of these compounds. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect of marine sponge H. tubifera fractions in glioma (U87) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) human cell lines. In addition, considering the link between cancer, imbalance of reactive oxygen species and coagulation disorders, we also investigated the in vitro effects on blood coagulation and their redox properties. We showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction, rich in sphingoid bases, had important cytotoxic effects in both cancer cell lines with an IC50 < 15 μg/mL and also can inhibit the production of peroxyl radicals. Interestingly, this fraction increased the recalcification time of human blood, showing anticoagulant properties. The present study indicates the sphingosines fraction as a promising source of chemical prototypes, especially multifunctional drugs in cancer therapy. PMID:26308014

  4. Sphingosines Derived from Marine Sponge as Potential Multi-Target Drug Related to Disorders in Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Biegelmeyer, Renata; Schröder, Rafael; Rambo, Douglas F.; Dresch, Roger R.; Carraro, João L. F.; Mothes, Beatriz; Moreira, José Cláudio F.; da Frota Junior, Mário L. C.; Henriques, Amélia T.

    2015-01-01

    Haliclona tubifera, marine sponge species abundant in Brazilian coastline, presents only a few papers published in the literature. Recently, we have reported the isolation of two modified C18 sphingoid bases: (2R,3R,6R,7Z)-2-aminooctadec-7-ene-1,3,6-triol and and (2R,3R,6R)-2-aminooctadec-1,3,6-triol. In order to continue our research, in this work aimed at the biological investigation of fractions that led to the isolation of these compounds. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect of marine sponge H. tubifera fractions in glioma (U87) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) human cell lines. In addition, considering the link between cancer, imbalance of reactive oxygen species and coagulation disorders, we also investigated the in vitro effects on blood coagulation and their redox properties. We showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction, rich in sphingoid bases, had important cytotoxic effects in both cancer cell lines with an IC50 < 15 μg/mL and also can inhibit the production of peroxyl radicals. Interestingly, this fraction increased the recalcification time of human blood, showing anticoagulant properties. The present study indicates the sphingosines fraction as a promising source of chemical prototypes, especially multifunctional drugs in cancer therapy. PMID:26308014

  5. AP-2-Associated Protein Kinase 1 and Cyclin G-Associated Kinase Regulate Hepatitis C Virus Entry and Are Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, Gregory; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Berkerman, Elena; Mulholland, Jon

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters its target cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2-associated protein kinase 1 (AAK1) and cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK) are host kinases that regulate clathrin adaptor protein (AP)-mediated trafficking in the endocytic and secretory pathways. We previously reported that AAK1 and GAK regulate HCV assembly by stimulating binding of the μ subunit of AP-2, AP2M1, to HCV core protein. We also discovered that AAK1 and GAK inhibitors, including the approved anticancer drugs sunitinib and erlotinib, could block HCV assembly. Here, we hypothesized that AAK1 and GAK regulate HCV entry independently of their effect on HCV assembly. Indeed, silencing AAK1 and GAK expression inhibited entry of pseudoparticles and cell culture grown-HCV and internalization of Dil-labeled HCV particles with no effect on HCV attachment or RNA replication. AAK1 or GAK depletion impaired epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated enhanced HCV entry and endocytosis of EGF receptor (EGFR), an HCV entry cofactor and erlotinib's cancer target. Moreover, either RNA interference-mediated depletion of AP2M1 or NUMB, each a substrate of AAK1 and/or GAK, or overexpression of either an AP2M1 or NUMB phosphorylation site mutant inhibited HCV entry. Last, in addition to affecting assembly, sunitinib and erlotinib inhibited HCV entry at a postbinding step, their combination was synergistic, and their antiviral effect was reversed by either AAK1 or GAK overexpression. Together, these results validate AAK1 and GAK as critical regulators of HCV entry that function in part by activating EGFR, AP2M1, and NUMB and as the molecular targets underlying the antiviral effect of sunitinib and erlotinib (in addition to EGFR), respectively. IMPORTANCE Understanding the host pathways hijacked by HCV is critical for developing host-centered anti-HCV approaches. Entry represents a potential target for antiviral strategies; however, no FDA-approved HCV entry inhibitors are currently

  6. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  7. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy: Potential new areas

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. . E-mail: jwong@coh.org

    2006-10-01

    Radiation oncology is entering an exciting new era with therapies being delivered in a targeted fashion through an increasing number of novel approaches. External beam radiotherapy now integrates functional and anatomic tumor imaging to guide delivery of conformal radiation to the tumor target. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) adds an important new dimension by making available to Radiation oncologist biologically targeted radiation therapy. Impressive clinical results with antibody-targeted radiotherapy, leading to the Food and Drug Administration's approval of two anti-CD20 radiolabeled antibodies, highlight the potential of STaRT. Optimization strategies will further improve the efficacy of STaRT by improving delivery systems, modifying the tumor microenvironment to increase targeted dose, and maximizing dose effect. Ultimately, the greatest potential for STaRT will not be as monotherapy, but as therapy integrated into established multimodality regimens and used as adjuvant or consolidative therapy in patients with minimal or micrometastatic disease.

  8. Targeting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) carriers to the brain: potential relevance as antiepileptic pro-drugs.

    PubMed

    Semreen, Mohammad H; El-Shorbagi, Abdel-Nasser; Al-Tel, Taleb H; Alsalahat, Izzeddin M M

    2010-05-01

    The search for antiepileptic compounds with more selective activity continues to be an area of intensive investigation in medicinal chemistry. 3,5-Disubstituted tetrahydro-2H-1,3,5-thiadiazine-2-thione (THTT) derivatives, 3a-g, potential prodrugs incorporating the neurotransmitter GABA were synthesized and studied for crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Compounds were prepared from primary amines and carbon disulfide to give dithiocarbamates 2a-g which upon reaction in situ with formaldehyde provided the intermediates Ia-g. Addition of Ia-g onto GABA furnished the title compounds 3a-g. The structures were verified by spectral data and the amounts of the compounds in the brain were investigated by using HPLC. The concentration profiles of the tested compounds in mice brain were determined and the in vivo anticonvulsant activity was measured. PMID:20632978

  9. Computational screening for new inhibitors of M. tuberculosis mycolyltransferases antigen 85 group of proteins as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Gahoi, Shachi; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Ivanisenko, Nikita; Shrivastava, Priyanka; Jain, Sriyans; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Raghunandanan, Muthukurrusi Varieth; Kanchan, Swarna; Taneja, Bhupesh; Mandal, Chhabinath; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Rita; Open Source Drug Discovery Consortium; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    The group of antigen 85 proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is responsible for converting trehalose monomycolate to trehalose dimycolate, which contributes to cell wall stability. Here, we have used a serial enrichment approach to identify new potential inhibitors by searching the libraries of compounds using both 2D atom pair descriptors and binary fingerprints followed by molecular docking. Three different docking softwares AutoDock, GOLD, and LigandFit were used for docking calculations. In addition, we applied the criteria of selecting compounds with binding efficiency close to the starting known inhibitor and showing potential to form hydrogen bonds with the active site amino acid residues. The starting inhibitor was ethyl-3-phenoxybenzyl-butylphosphonate, which had IC(50) value of 2.0 μM in mycolyltransferase inhibition assay. Our search from more than 34 million compounds from public libraries yielded 49 compounds. Subsequently, selection was restricted to compounds conforming to the Lipinski rule of five and exhibiting hydrogen bonding to any of the amino acid residues in the active site pocket of all three proteins of antigen 85A, 85B, and 85C. Finally, we selected those ligands which were ranked top in the table with other known decoys in all the docking results. The compound NIH415032 from tuberculosis antimicrobial acquisition and coordinating facility was further examined using molecular dynamics simulations for 10 ns. These results showed that the binding is stable, although some of the hydrogen bond atom pairs varied through the course of simulation. The NIH415032 has antitubercular properties with IC(90) at 20 μg/ml (53.023 μM). These results will be helpful to the medicinal chemists for developing new antitubercular molecules for testing. PMID:22804492

  10. In silico prediction of drug targets in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Katara, Pramod; Grover, Atul; Kuntal, Himani; Sharma, Vinay

    2011-10-01

    Identification of potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery, subjected to their validation and drug development. Whole genome sequences of a number of organisms allow prediction of potential drug targets using sequence comparison approaches. Here, we present a subtractive approach exploiting the knowledge of global gene expression along with sequence comparisons to predict the potential drug targets more efficiently. Based on the knowledge of 155 known virulence and their coexpressed genes mined from microarray database in the public domain, 357 coexpressed probable virulence genes for Vibrio cholerae were predicted. Based on screening of Database of Essential Genes using blastn, a total of 102 genes out of these 357 were enlisted as vitally essential genes, and hence good putative drug targets. As the effective drug target is a protein which is only present in the pathogen, similarity search of these 102 essential genes against human genome sequence led to subtraction of 66 genes, thus leaving behind a subset of 36 genes whose products have been called as potential drug targets. The gene ontology analysis using Blast2GO of these 36 genes revealed their roles in important metabolic pathways of V. cholerae or on the surface of the pathogen. Thus, we propose that the products of these genes be evaluated as target sites of drugs against V. cholerae in future investigations. PMID:21174131

  11. Identification of potential vaccine and drug target candidates by expressed sequence tag analysis and immunoscreening of Onchocerca volvulus larval cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Lizotte-Waniewski, M; Tawe, W; Guiliano, D B; Lu, W; Liu, J; Williams, S A; Lustigman, S

    2000-06-01

    The search for appropriate vaccine candidates and drug targets against onchocerciasis has so far been confronted with several limitations due to the unavailability of biological material, appropriate molecular resources, and knowledge of the parasite biology. To identify targets for vaccine or chemotherapy development we have undertaken two approaches. First, cDNA expression libraries were constructed from life cycle stages that are critical for establishment of Onchocerca volvulus infection, the third-stage larvae (L3) and the molting L3. A gene discovery effort was then initiated by random expressed sequence tag analysis of 5,506 cDNA clones. Cluster analyses showed that many of the transcripts were up-regulated and/or stage specific in either one or both of the cDNA libraries when compared to the microfilariae, L2, and both adult stages of the parasite. Homology searches against the GenBank database facilitated the identification of several genes of interest, such as proteinases, proteinase inhibitors, antioxidant or detoxification enzymes, and neurotransmitter receptors, as well as structural and housekeeping genes. Other O. volvulus genes showed homology only to predicted genes from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans or were entirely novel. Some of the novel proteins contain potential secretory leaders. Secondly, by immunoscreening the molting L3 cDNA library with a pool of human sera from putatively immune individuals, we identified six novel immunogenic proteins that otherwise would not have been identified as potential vaccinogens using the gene discovery effort. This study lays a solid foundation for a better understanding of the biology of O. volvulus as well as for the identification of novel targets for filaricidal agents and/or vaccines against onchocerciasis based on immunological and rational hypothesis-driven research. PMID:10816503

  12. Histamine pharmacology and new CNS drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Chazot, Paul L; Passani, M Beatrice

    2011-12-01

    During the last decade, the identification of a number of novel drug targets led to the development of promising new compounds which are currently under evaluation for their therapeutic prospective in CNS related disorders. Besides the established pleiotropic regulatory functions in the periphery, the interest in the potential homeostatic role of histamine in the brain was revived following the identification of H(3) and H(4) receptors some years ago. Complementing classical CNS pharmacology, the development of selective histamine receptor agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists provides the lead for the potential exploitation of the histaminergic system in the treatment of brain pathologies. Although no CNS disease entity has been associated directly to brain histamine dysfunction until now, the H(3) receptor is recognized as a drug target for neuropathic pain, sleep-wake disorders, including narcolepsy, and cognitive impairment associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease, while the first H(3) receptor ligands have already entered phase I-III clinical trials. Interestingly, the localization of the immunomodulatory H(4) receptor in the nervous system exposes attractive perspectives for the therapeutic exploitation of this new drug target in neuroimmunopharmacology. This review focuses on a concise presentation of the current "translational research" approach that exploits the latest advances in histamine pharmacology for the development of beneficial drug targets for the treatment of neuronal disorders, such as neuropathic pain, cognitive, and sleep-wake pathologies. Furthermore, the role of the brain histaminergic system(s) in neuroprotection and neuroimmunology/inflammation remains a challenging research area that is currently under consideration. PMID:22070192

  13. Helicases as Antiviral Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Frick, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Helicases catalytically unwind duplex DNA or RNA using energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates and are attractive drug targets because they are required for viral replication. This review discusses methods for helicase identification, classification and analysis, and presents an overview of helicases that are necessary for the replication of human pathogenic viruses. Newly developed methods to analyze helicases, coupled with recently determined atomic structures, have led to a better understanding of their mechanisms of action. The majority of this research has concentrated on enzymes encoded by the herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Helicase inhibitors that target the HSV helicase–primase complex comprised of the UL5, UL8 and UL52 proteins have recently been shown to effectively control HSV infection in animal models. In addition, several groups have reported structures of the HCV NS3 helicase at atomic resolutions, and mechanistic studies have uncovered characteristics that distinguish the HCV helicase from related cellular proteins. These new developments should eventually lead to new antiviral medications. PMID:12973446

  14. Functional genomics and cancer drug target discovery.

    PubMed

    Moody, Susan E; Boehm, Jesse S; Barbie, David A; Hahn, William C

    2010-06-01

    The recent development of technologies for whole-genome sequencing, copy number analysis and expression profiling enables the generation of comprehensive descriptions of cancer genomes. However, although the structural analysis and expression profiling of tumors and cancer cell lines can allow the identification of candidate molecules that are altered in the malignant state, functional analyses are necessary to confirm such genes as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Moreover, recent research suggests that tumor cells also depend on synthetic lethal targets, which are not mutated or amplified in cancer genomes; functional genomics screening can facilitate the discovery of such targets. This review provides an overview of the tools available for the study of functional genomics, and discusses recent research involving the use of these tools to identify potential novel drug targets in cancer. PMID:20521217

  15. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  16. Targeting the brain: advances in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Blumling Iii, James P; Silva, Gabriel A

    2012-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a significant obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. Many therapeutics with potential for treating neurological conditions prove incompatible with intravenous delivery simply because of this barrier. Rather than modifying drugs to penetrate the BBB directly, it has proven more efficacious to either physically bypass the barrier or to use specialized delivery vehicles that circumvent BBB regulatory mechanisms. Controlled-release intracranial polymer implants and particle injections are the clinical state of the art with regard to localized delivery, although these approaches can impose significant surgical risks. Focused ultrasound provides a non-invasive alternative that may prove more desirable for acute treatment of brain tumors and other conditions requiring local tissue necrosis. For targeting the brain as a whole, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and molecular trojan horses (MTHs) have demonstrated particular ability as delivery molecules and will likely see increased application. CPPs are not brain specific but offer the potential for efficient traversal of the BBB, and tandem systems with targeting molecules may produce extremely effective brain drug delivery tools. Molecular trojan horses utilize receptor-mediated transcytosis to transport cargo and are thus limited by the quantity of relevant receptors; however, they can be very selective for the BBB endothelium and have shown promise in gene therapy. PMID:23016646

  17. Multiple myeloma-associated hDIS3 mutations cause perturbations in cellular RNA metabolism and suggest hDIS3 PIN domain as a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Tomecki, Rafal; Drazkowska, Karolina; Kucinski, Iwo; Stodus, Krystian; Szczesny, Roman J; Gruchota, Jakub; Owczarek, Ewelina P; Kalisiak, Katarzyna; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    hDIS3 is a mainly nuclear, catalytic subunit of the human exosome complex, containing exonucleolytic (RNB) and endonucleolytic (PIN) active domains. Mutations in hDIS3 have been found in ∼10% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we show that these mutations interfere with hDIS3 exonucleolytic activity. Yeast harboring corresponding mutations in DIS3 show growth inhibition and changes in nuclear RNA metabolism typical for exosome dysfunction. Construction of a conditional DIS3 knockout in the chicken DT40 cell line revealed that DIS3 is essential for cell survival, indicating that its function cannot be replaced by other exosome-associated nucleases: hDIS3L and hRRP6. Moreover, HEK293-derived cells, in which depletion of endogenous wild-type hDIS3 was complemented with exogenously expressed MM hDIS3 mutants, proliferate at a slower rate and exhibit aberrant RNA metabolism. Importantly, MM mutations are synthetically lethal with the hDIS3 PIN domain catalytic mutation both in yeast and human cells. Since mutations in PIN domain alone have little effect on cell physiology, our results predict the hDIS3 PIN domain as a potential drug target for MM patients with hDIS3 mutations. It is an interesting example of intramolecular synthetic lethality with putative therapeutic potential in humans. PMID:24150935

  18. A weighted and integrated drug-target interactome: drug repurposing for schizophrenia as a use case

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational pharmacology can uniquely address some issues in the process of drug development by providing a macroscopic view and a deeper understanding of drug action. Specifically, network-assisted approach is promising for the inference of drug repurposing. However, the drug-target associations coming from different sources and various assays have much noise, leading to an inflation of the inference errors. To reduce the inference errors, it is necessary and critical to create a comprehensive and weighted data set of drug-target associations. Results In this study, we created a weighted and integrated drug-target interactome (WinDTome) to provide a comprehensive resource of drug-target associations for computational pharmacology. We first collected drug-target interactions from six commonly used drug-target centered data sources including DrugBank, KEGG, TTD, MATADOR, PDSP Ki Database, and BindingDB. Then, we employed the record linkage method to normalize drugs and targets to the unique identifiers by utilizing the public data sources including PubChem, Entrez Gene, and UniProt. To assess the reliability of the drug-target associations, we assigned two scores (Score_S and Score_R) to each drug-target association based on their data sources and publication references. Consequently, the WinDTome contains 546,196 drug-target associations among 303,018 compounds and 4,113 genes. To assess the application of the WinDTome, we designed a network-based approach for drug repurposing using mental disorder schizophrenia (SCZ) as a case. Starting from 41 known SCZ drugs and their targets, we inferred a total of 264 potential SCZ drugs through the associations of drug-target with Score_S higher than two in WinDTome and human protein-protein interactions. Among the 264 SCZ-related drugs, 39 drugs have been investigated in clinical trials for SCZ treatment and 74 drugs for the treatment of other mental disorders, respectively. Compared with the results using other

  19. Mitosis as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Kallio, Marko J

    2013-10-01

    Suppression of cell proliferation by targeting mitosis is one potential cancer intervention. A number of existing chemotherapy drugs disrupt mitosis by targeting microtubule dynamics. While efficacious, these drugs have limitations, i.e. neuropathy, unpredictability and development of resistance. In order to overcome these issues, a great deal of effort has been spent exploring novel mitotic targets including Polo-like kinase 1, Aurora kinases, Mps1, Cenp-E and KSP/Eg5. Here we summarize the latest developments in the discovery and clinical evaluation of new mitotic drug targets. PMID:23775312

  20. Drug Transport to Brain with Targeted Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Jean-Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Nanoparticle drug carriers consist of solid biodegradable particles in size ranging from 10 to 1000 nm (50–300 nm generally). They cannot freely diffuse through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and require receptor-mediated transport through brain capillary endothelium to deliver their content into the brain parenchyma. Polysorbate 80-coated polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles can deliver drugs to the brain by a still debated mechanism. Despite interesting results these nanoparticles have limitations, discussed in this review, that may preclude, or at least limit, their potential clinical applications. Long-circulating nanoparticles made of methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)- polylactide or poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (mPEG-PLA/PLGA) have a good safety profiles and provide drug-sustained release. The availability of functionalized PEG-PLA permits to prepare target-specific nanoparticles by conjugation of cell surface ligand. Using peptidomimetic antibodies to BBB transcytosis receptor, brain-targeted pegylated immunonanoparticles can now be synthesized that should make possible the delivery of entrapped actives into the brain parenchyma without inducing BBB permeability alteration. This review presents their general properties (structure, loading capacity, pharmacokinetics) and currently available methods for immunonanoparticle preparation. PMID:15717062

  1. Comparative protein modeling of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase enzyme from Plasmodium falciparum: a potential target for antimalarial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Chevé, Gwénaël; Avery, Mitchell A; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2006-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (Pf-DXR) is a potential target for antimalarial chemotherapy. The three-dimensional model (3D) of this enzyme was determined by means of comparative modeling through multiple alignment followed by intensive optimization, minimization, and validation. The resulting model demonstrates a reasonable topology as gauged from the Ramachandran plot and acceptable three-dimensional structure compatibility as assessed by the Profiles-3D score. The modeled monomeric subunit consists of three domains: (1) N-terminal NADPH binding domain, (2) connective or linker domain (with most of the active site residues located in this domain), and (3) a C-terminal domain. This structure proved to be consistent with known DXR crystal structures from other species. The predicted active site compared favorably with those of the templates and appears to have an active site with a highly conserved architecture. Additionally, the model explains several site-directed mutagenesis data. Besides using several protein structure-checking programs to validate the model, a set of known inhibitors of DXR were also docked into the active site of the modeled Pf-DXR. The docked scores correlated reasonably well with experimental pIC50 values with a regression coefficient (R2) equal to 0.84. Results of the current study should prove useful in the early design and development of inhibitors by either de novo drug design or virtual screening of large small-molecule databases leading to development of new antimalarial agents. PMID:16711755

  2. Proteomic analysis of two metabolic proteins with potential to translocate to plasma membrane associated with tumor metastasis development and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Luofu; Yao, Ling; Hu, Xiaofang; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-04-01

    Metastasis is the main cause for death of breast cancer patients. However, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. Plasma membrane (PM) proteins play a key role in various biological processes, especially for cell migration. In this study, we used a set of well-characterized mammary mouse cell lines, 67NR, 168FARN, 4T1, representing the metastatic progression, to study the differentially expressed membrane proteins. These proteins were analyzed by a linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LTQ-MS/MS) following cell surface biotinylation and streptavidin purification. A total of 1667 membrane proteins were identified, out of which 472 were characterized as differentially expressed with at least 2-fold change and p-value < 0.01. Functional clustering of the 472 proteins revealed that 178 of them were metabolic proteins. Finally, we focused on two metabolic proteins, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and NAD(P)H steroid dehydrogenase-like protein (NSDHL), which were validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. We found that FASN and NSDHL translocated to the plasma membrane from the intracellular compartment, and their expressions increased from 67NR to 4T1. This alteration of localization along with differential expressions might be necessary for metastasis development. Potentially, FASN and NSDHL could serve as drug targets in new antimetastasis therapy. PMID:23445495

  3. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  4. Incidence of potential drug-drug interactions with antidiabetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Samardzic, I; Bacic-Vrca, V

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to achieve normoglycemia more than one antidiabetic agent is usually needed. Diabetes is associated with several comorbidities and patients with diabetes are often treated with multiple medications. Therefore, patients with diabetes are especially exposed to drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence and type of potential DDIs of antidiabetic drugs in patients with diabetes. This retrospective study analyzed pharmacy record data of 225 patients with diabetes mellitus. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients who were taking at least one antidiabetic agent during the period of six months were included. We investigated associated therapy in that period in order to identify potential DDIs with antidiabetic therapy. Potential interactions were identified by Lexicomp Lexi-Interat Online (Lexi-Comp, Inc., Hudson, USA) software which categorizes potential DDIs according to clinical significance in five types (A, B, C, D and X). Categories C, D and X are of clinical concern and always require medical attention (therapy monitoring, therapy modification or avoiding combination). We found that 80.9% of patients had at least one potential category C interaction while there were no D and X interactions. Most frequently encountered potential DDI (n = 176) included antidiabetic drugs and thiazide or thiazide like diuretics. Patients with diabetes are exposed to a large number of potential clinically significant DDIs that may require appropriate monitoring. Using databases of DDIs could be helpful in reducing the risk of potential clinically significant DDIs. PMID:26189304

  5. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates. PMID:25960144

  6. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  7. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Huwyler, Jörg; Drewe, Jürgen; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles) have been used with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of application include lipid-based formulations to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble antitumor drugs, the use of pegylated liposomes for passive targeting of solid tumors as well as vector-conjugated liposomal carriers for active targeting of tumor tissue. Such formulation and drug targeting strategies enhance the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy and reduce at the same time the risk of toxic side-effects. The present article reviews the principles of different liposomal technologies and discusses current trends in this field of research. PMID:18488413

  8. Matrix metalloproteases: Underutilized targets for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Deepali G.; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiological molecules in the extracellular environment offer excellent targets that can be exploited for designing drug targeting systems. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular proteolytic enzymes that are characterized by their overexpression or overactivity in several pathologies. Over the last two decades, the MMP literature reveals heightened interest in the research involving MMP biology, pathology, and targeting. This review describes various strategies that have been designed to utilize MMPs for targeting therapeutic entities. Key factors that need to be considered in the successful design of such systems have been identified based on the analyses of these strategies. Development of targeted drug delivery using MMPs has been steadily pursued; however, drug delivery efforts using these targets need to be intensified and focused to realize the clinical application of the fast developing fundamental MMP research. PMID:17365270

  9. Targeted drugs and nanomedicine: present and future.

    PubMed

    Debbage, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Packaging small-molecule drugs into nanoparticles improves their bio-availability, bio-compatibility and safety profiles. Multifunctional particles carrying large drug payloads for targeted transport, immune evasion and favourable drug release kinetics at the target site, require a certain minimum size usually 30-300 nm diameter, so are nanoparticles. Targeting particles to a disease site can signal the presence of the disease site, block a function there, or deliver a drug to it. Targeted nanocarriers must navigate through blood-tissue barriers, varying in strength between organs and highest in the brain, to reach target cells. They must enter target cells to contact cytoplasmic targets; specific endocytotic and transcytotic transport mechanisms can be used as trojan horses to ferry nanoparticles across cellular barriers. Specific ligands to cell surface receptors, antibodies and antibody fragments, and aptamers can all access such transport mechanisms to ferry nanoparticles to their targets. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the targeted drug-bearing particle depend critically on particle size, chemistry, surface charge and other parameters. Particle types for targeting include liposomes, polymer and protein nanoparticles, dendrimers, carbon-based nanoparticles e.g. fullerenes, and others. Immunotargeting by use of monoclonal antibodies, chimeric antibodies and humanized antibodies has now reached the stage of clinical application. High-quality targeting groups are emerging: antibody engineering enables generation of human/like antibody (fragments) and facilitates the search for clinically relevant biomarkers; conjugation of nanocarriers to specific ligands and to aptamers enables specific targeting with improved clinical efficacy. Future developments depend on identification of clinically relevant targets and on raising targeting efficiency of the multifunctional nanocarriers. PMID:19149610

  10. Targeted Nanodelivery of Drugs and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret A.; Gran, Martin L.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials for targeted delivery are uniquely capable of localizing delivery of therapeutics and diagnostics to diseased tissues. The ability to achieve high, local concentrations of drugs or image contrast agents at a target site provides the opportunity for improved system performance and patient outcomes along with reduced systemic dosing. In this review, the design of targeted nanodelivery systems is discussed with an emphasis on in vivo performance, the physicochemical properties that affect localization at the target site, and the incorporation of therapeutic drugs into these systems. PMID:20543895

  11. Microarray: an approach for current drug targets.

    PubMed

    Gomase, Virendra S; Tagore, Somnath; Kale, Karbhari V

    2008-03-01

    Microarrays are a powerful tool has multiple applications both in clinical and cellular and molecular biology arenas. Early assessment of the probable biological importance of drug targets, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A list of new drug candidates along with proposed targets for intervention is described. Recent advances in the knowledge of microarrays analysis of organisms and the availability of the genomics sequences provide a wide range of novel targets for drug design. This review gives different process of microarray technologies; methods for comparative gene expression study, applications of microarrays in medicine and pharmacogenomics and current drug targets in research, which are relevant to common diseases as they relate to clinical and future perspectives. PMID:18336225

  12. Potentiating antilymphoma efficacy of chemotherapy using a liposome for integration of CD20 targeting, ultra-violet irradiation polymerizing, and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cong; Li, Huafei; Zhao, He; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Yan; Yue, Zhanyi; Lu, Qiong; Wan, Yuxiang; Tian, Xiaoyu; Deng, Anmei

    2014-08-01

    Unlike most malignancies, chemotherapy but not surgery plays the most important role in treating non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Currently, liposomes have been widely used to encapsulate chemotherapeutic drugs in treating solid tumors. However, higher in vivo stability owns a much more important position for excellent antitumor efficacy in treating hematological malignancies. In this study, we finely fabricated a rituximab Fab fragment-decorated liposome based on 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC), which can form intermolecular cross-linking through the diacetylenic group by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation. Our experimental results demonstrated that after the UV irradiation, the liposomes exhibit better serum stability and slower drug release with a decreased mean diameter of approximately 285 nm. The cellular uptake of adriamycin (ADR) by this Fab-navigated liposome was about four times of free drugs. Cytotoxicity assays against CD20+ lymphoma cells showed that the half maximal (50%) inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ADR-loaded immunoliposome was only one fourth of free ADR at the same condition. In vivo studies were evaluated in lymphoma-bearing SCID mice. With the high serum stability, finely regulated structure, active targeting strategy via antigen-antibody reaction and passive targeting strategy via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, our liposome exhibits durable and potent antitumor activities both in the disseminated and localized human NHL xeno-transplant models.

  13. Network-assisted prediction of potential drugs for addiction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Huang, Liang-Chin; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic and complex brain disease, adding much burden on the community. Though numerous efforts have been made to identify the effective treatment, it is necessary to find more novel therapeutics for this complex disease. As network pharmacology has become a promising approach for drug repurposing, we proposed to apply the approach to drug addiction, which might provide new clues for the development of effective addiction treatment drugs. We first extracted 44 addictive drugs from the NIDA and their targets from DrugBank. Then, we constructed two networks: an addictive drug-target network and an expanded addictive drug-target network by adding other drugs that have at least one common target with these addictive drugs. By performing network analyses, we found that those addictive drugs with similar actions tended to cluster together. Additionally, we predicted 94 nonaddictive drugs with potential pharmacological functions to the addictive drugs. By examining the PubMed data, 51 drugs significantly cooccurred with addictive keywords than expected. Thus, the network analyses provide a list of candidate drugs for further investigation of their potential in addiction treatment or risk. PMID:24689033

  14. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  15. Discovery of Anthelmintic Drug Targets and Drugs Using Chokepoints in Nematode Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christina M.; Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A.; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Powell, Kerrie; Schedl, Tim; Pearce, Edward J.; Abubucker, Sahar; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic roundworm infections plague more than 2 billion people (1/3 of humanity) and cause drastic losses in crops and livestock. New anthelmintic drugs are urgently needed as new drug resistance and environmental concerns arise. A “chokepoint reaction” is defined as a reaction that either consumes a unique substrate or produces a unique product. A chokepoint analysis provides a systematic method of identifying novel potential drug targets. Chokepoint enzymes were identified in the genomes of 10 nematode species, and the intersection and union of all chokepoint enzymes were found. By studying and experimentally testing available compounds known to target proteins orthologous to nematode chokepoint proteins in public databases, this study uncovers features of chokepoints that make them successful drug targets. Chemogenomic screening was performed on drug-like compounds from public drug databases to find existing compounds that target homologs of nematode chokepoints. The compounds were prioritized based on chemical properties frequently found in successful drugs and were experimentally tested using Caenorhabditis elegans. Several drugs that are already known anthelmintic drugs and novel candidate targets were identified. Seven of the compounds were tested in Caenorhabditis elegans and three yielded a detrimental phenotype. One of these three drug-like compounds, Perhexiline, also yielded a deleterious effect in Haemonchus contortus and Onchocerca lienalis, two nematodes with divergent forms of parasitism. Perhexiline, known to affect the fatty acid oxidation pathway in mammals, caused a reduction in oxygen consumption rates in C. elegans and genome-wide gene expression profiles provided an additional confirmation of its mode of action. Computational modeling of Perhexiline and its target provided structural insights regarding its binding mode and specificity. Our lists of prioritized drug targets and drug-like compounds have potential to expedite the discovery

  16. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  17. Diallyl Sulfide: Potential Use in Novel Therapeutic Interventions in Alcohol, Drugs, and Disease Mediated Cellular Toxicity by Targeting Cytochrome P450 2E1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Midde, Narasimha M; Miller, Duane D.; Chauhan, Subhash; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Diallyl sulfide (DAS) and other organosulfur compounds are chief constituents of garlic. These compounds have many health benefits, as they are very efficient in detoxifying natural agents. Therefore, these compounds may be useful for prevention/treatment of cancers. However, DAS has shown appreciable allergic reactions and toxicity, as they can also affect normal cells. Thus their use as in the prevention and treatment of cancer is limited. DAS is a selective inhibitor of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which is known to metabolize many xenobiotics including alcohol and analgesic drugs in the liver. CYP2E1-mediated alcohol/drug metabolism produce reactive oxygen species and reactive metabolites, which damage DNA, protein, and lipid membranes, subsequently causing liver damage. Several groups have shown that DAS is not only capable of inhibiting alcohol- and drug-mediated cellular toxicities, but also HIV protein- and diabetes-mediated toxicities by selectively inhibiting CYP2E1 in various cell types. However, due to known DAS toxicities, its use as a treatment modality for alcohol/drug- and HIV/diabetes-mediated toxicity have only limited clinical relevance. Therefore, effort is being made to generate DAS analogs, which are potent and selective inhibitor of CYP2E1 and poor substrate of CYP2E1. This review summarizes current advances in the field of DAS, its anticancer properties, role as a CYP2E1 inhibitor, preventing agent of cellular toxicities from alcohol, analgesic drugs, xenobiotics, as well as, from diseases like HIV and diabetes. Finally, this review also provides insights toward developing novel DAS analogues for chemical intervention of many disease conditions by targeting CYP2E1 enzyme. PMID:26264202

  18. Novel drugs targeting transthyretin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Mazen

    2014-03-01

    Transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is either a hereditary disease related to a mutation in the transthyretin gene that leads to neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy or an acquired disease of the elderly that leads to restrictive cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of this disease is higher than once thought and awareness is likely to increase amongst physicians and in particular cardiologists. Until recently there have been no treatment options for this disease except to treat the heart failure with diuretics and the neuropathy symptomatically. However, there are several emerging pharmacologic therapies designed to slow or stop the progression of ATTR. This article reviews novel therapeutic drugs that work at different points in the pathogenesis of this disease attempting to change its natural history and improve outcomes. PMID:24464360

  19. Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

  20. Potential new therapeutic targets for pathological pruritus.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Very few approved medications are indicated for the treatment of pruritus, and drug development for pruritic diseases is awaited. During the past two decades, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the physiology and pathophysiology of pruritus. Newly identified potential targets for pathological pruritus include receptors (histamine H4 receptor, leukotriene B4 receptors, interleukin-31 receptor A, bombesin BB2 receptor, toll-like receptor 3, α-adrenoceptor, and opioid μ- and κ-receptors), channels (transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 and TRPA1 channels), and enzymes (histidine decarboxylase, sphingomyelin glucosylceramide deacylase, 5-lipoxygenase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase, and autotaxin). The development of specific, effective blockers and agonists/antagonists of these targets is awaited. PMID:23902965

  1. Targeted Cellular Drug Delivery using Tailored Dendritic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2002-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorble, ‘peripheral’ functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug and gene delivery. The large number of end groups can also be tailored to create special affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, in-vitro drug loading, in-vitro drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Polyamidoamine and Polyol dendrimers, with different generations and end-groups are studied, with drugs such as Ibuprofen and Methotrexate. Our results indicate that a large number of drug molecules can be encapsulated/attached to the dendrimers, depending on the end groups. The drug-encapsulated dendrimer is able to enter the cells rapidly and deliver the drug. Targeting strategies being explored

  2. AZ17: a new bispecific drug targeting IL-6 and IL-23 with potential clinical use--improves psoriasis in a human xenograft transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Shanebeck, Kurt; Brady, William; Van Brunt, Michael P; King, Gordon; Marelli, Marcello; Slagle, Paul; Xu, Hengyu; Nairn, Natalie W; Johnson, Jeffrey; Wang, Aijun A; Li, Gary; Thornton, Kenneth C; Dam, Tomas N; Grabstein, Kenneth H

    2015-10-01

    Targeting more than one molecule in multifactorial diseases involving several disease mediators may provide improved therapeutic efficacy. Psoriasis is a multifactorial disease in which interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-23 are important disease mediators because they facilitate development of Th17 cells; widely accepted to be associated with psoriasis. To meet the need for new therapeutics, we aimed to create a clinically relevant bispecific drug, by combining the inhibitory properties of anti-IL-6 and anti-IL-23 antibodies, exhibiting high affinity, high stability and the ability to be produced in high yield. The bispecific molecule AZ17 was created by combining high affinity binding domains originating from monoclonal antibodies targeting human IL-6 and IL-23. To allow for high and efficient production, AZ17 was assembled by site-specific bioconjugation from two individual single chain fragment variables that were synthesized separately in Escherichia coli. To improve stability and extend pharmacokinetics, a flexible poly-ethylene glycol molecule was used as linker. In preclinical psoriasis models, AZ17 reduced IL-23-induced ear inflammation and improved psoriasis in a xenograft transplantation model where psoriasis skin is transplanted onto immune-deficient mice. The data presented here suggest AZ17 to be a promising drug candidate in psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases associated with Th17 cell development. PMID:26271488

  3. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load. PMID:26415215

  4. The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) for efficient target analysis and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Meik; Liang, Chunguang; Nilla, Santosh; Cecil, Alexander; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) has been designed to provide fast, tailored information on drugs and their protein networks including indications, protein targets and side-targets. Starting queries include compound, target and protein interactions and organism-specific protein families. Furthermore, drug name, chemical structures and their SMILES notation, affected proteins (potential drug targets), organisms as well as diseases can be queried including various combinations and refinement of searches. Drugs and protein interactions are analyzed in detail with reference to protein structures and catalytic domains, related compound structures as well as potential targets in other organisms. DrumPID considers drug functionality, compound similarity, target structure, interactome analysis and organismic range for a compound, useful for drug development, predicting drug side-effects and structure–activity relationships. Database URL: http://drumpid.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de PMID:27055828

  5. Preclinical validation of Aurora kinases-targeting drugs in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tavanti, E; Sero, V; Vella, S; Fanelli, M; Michelacci, F; Landuzzi, L; Magagnoli, G; Versteeg, R; Picci, P; Hattinger, C M; Serra, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aurora kinases are key regulators of cell cycle and represent new promising therapeutic targets in several human tumours. Methods: Biological relevance of Aurora kinase-A and -B was assessed on osteosarcoma clinical samples and by silencing these genes with specific siRNA in three human osteosarcoma cell lines. In vitro efficacy of two Aurora kinases-targeting drugs (VX-680 and ZM447439) was evaluated on a panel of four drug-sensitive and six drug-resistant human osteosarcoma cell lines. Results: Human osteosarcoma cell lines proved to be highly sensitive to both drugs. A decreased drug sensitivity was observed in doxorubicin-resistant cell lines, most probably related to ABCB1/MDR1 overexpression. Both drugs variably induced hyperploidy and apoptosis in the majority of cell lines. VX-680 also reduced in vitro cell motility and soft-agar cloning efficiency. Drug association experiments showed that VX-680 positively interacts with all conventional drugs used in osteosarcoma chemotherapy, overcoming the cross-resistance observed in the single-drug treatments. Conclusion: Aurora kinase-A and -B represent new candidate therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma. In vitro analysis of the Aurora kinases inhibitors VX-680 and ZM447439 indicated in VX-680 a new promising drug of potential clinical usefulness in association with conventional osteosarcoma chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24129234

  6. Drug target prediction using adverse event report systems: a pharmacogenomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Takarabe, Masataka; Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Unexpected drug activities derived from off-targets are usually undesired and harmful; however, they can occasionally be beneficial for different therapeutic indications. There are many uncharacterized drugs whose target proteins (including the primary target and off-targets) remain unknown. The identification of all potential drug targets has become an important issue in drug repositioning to reuse known drugs for new therapeutic indications. Results: We defined pharmacological similarity for all possible drugs using the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) adverse event reporting system (AERS) and developed a new method to predict unknown drug–target interactions on a large scale from the integration of pharmacological similarity of drugs and genomic sequence similarity of target proteins in the framework of a pharmacogenomic approach. The proposed method was applicable to a large number of drugs and it was useful especially for predicting unknown drug–target interactions that could not be expected from drug chemical structures. We made a comprehensive prediction for potential off-targets of 1874 drugs with known targets and potential target profiles of 2519 drugs without known targets, which suggests many potential drug–target interactions that were not predicted by previous chemogenomic or pharmacogenomic approaches. Availability: Softwares are available upon request. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp Supplementary Information: Datasets and all results are available at http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~yyamanishi/aers/. PMID:22962489

  7. Structure-Bioactivity Relationship for Benzimidazole Thiophene Inhibitors of Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1), a Potential Drug Target in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Long, Thavy; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Beasley, Rachel; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Suzuki, Brian M.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Dissous, Colette; McKerrow, James H.; Drewry, David H.; Zuercher, William J.; Singh, Rahul; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Schistosoma flatworm parasites cause schistosomiasis, a chronic and debilitating disease of poverty in developing countries. Praziquantel is employed for treatment and disease control. However, its efficacy spectrum is incomplete (less active or inactive against immature stages of the parasite) and there is a concern of drug resistance. Thus, there is a need to identify new drugs and drug targets. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that RNA interference (RNAi) of the Schistosoma mansoni ortholog of human polo-like kinase (huPLK)1 elicits a deleterious phenotypic alteration in post-infective larvae (schistosomula or somules). Phenotypic screening and analysis of schistosomula and adult S. mansoni with small molecule inhibitors of huPLK1 identified a number of potent anti-schistosomals. Among these was a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) benzimidazole thiophene inhibitor that has completed Phase I clinical trials for treatment of solid tumor malignancies. We then obtained GSKs Published Kinase Inhibitor Sets (PKIS) 1 and 2, and phenotypically screened an expanded series of 38 benzimidazole thiophene PLK1 inhibitors. Computational analysis of controls and PLK1 inhibitor-treated populations of somules demonstrated a distinctive phenotype distribution. Using principal component analysis (PCA), the phenotypes exhibited by these populations were mapped, visualized and analyzed through projection to a low-dimensional space. The phenotype distribution was found to have a distinct shape and topology, which could be elicited using cluster analysis. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) was identified for the benzimidazole thiophenes that held for both somules and adult parasites. The most potent inhibitors produced marked phenotypic alterations at 1–2 μM within 1 h. Among these were compounds previously characterized as potent inhibitors of huPLK1 in cell assays. Conclusions/Significance The reverse genetic and chemical SAR data support a continued investigation of Sm

  8. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  9. The role of estrogen receptor {beta} (ER{beta}) in malignant diseases-A new potential target for antiproliferative drugs in prevention and treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2010-05-21

    The discovery of ER{beta} in the middle of the 1990s represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of estrogen signaling. It has turned out that estrogen action is not mediated by one receptor, ER{alpha}, but by two balancing factors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, which are often antagonistic to one another. Excitingly, ER{beta} has been shown to be widespread in the body and to be involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological events. This has led to a strong interest of the pharmaceutical industry to target ER{beta} by drugs against various diseases. In this review, focus is on the role of ER{beta} in malignant diseases where the anti proliferative activity of ER{beta} gives hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3. PMID:26510391

  11. "Nanotheranostics" for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique is a promising tool that improves cancer detection, facilitates diagnosis and monitors therapeutic effects. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have emerged as MRI contrast agents for tumor imaging and as potential vectors for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery; nevertheless, the application of SPIOs has been hampered due to a lack of specificity to tumor tissues and premature drug release. This project aims at developing multifunctional SPIOs for both cancer imaging and targeted drug delivery via conjugation of tumor specific antibodies with SPIOs. The application of anti-TAG-72 antibodies as tumor targeting modalities was evaluated in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in xenograft models by using fluorescent imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It was demonstrated that antibody-labeled SPIOs were superior imaging agents and drug carriers for increased tumor specificity. The regulation and kinetics of intracellular drug release from SPIOs were explored by means of fluorescence imaging. In vitro and in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging was employed to investigate the mechanisms of premature drug release from nanocarriers. The large volume and high hydrophobicity of cell membranes were found to play an important role in premature drug release. The encapsulation of SPIOs into nanocarriers decreased drug release in a dose-dependent mode. This study provided future opportunities to improve the efficiency of nanocarriers by exploring the mechanism of drug release and disassembly of SPIO-loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of the recombinant thioredoxin reductase from Candida albicans as a potential target for vaccine and drug design.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; Kioshima, Érika Seki; Abadio, Ana Karina Rodrigues; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares; de Freitas, Sonia Maria; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet

    2016-05-01

    The thioredoxin system plays a critical role in maintaining the cytoplasm redox state, participating in functions that are important to the cellular viability of fungi. Although functional and structural information on targets in human pathogenic fungi has been scarcely described in the literature, such studies are essential for in silico drug design and biotechnological applications. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to produce recombinant proteins of the thioredoxin system from Candida albicans and evaluate their possible use as prophylactic or alternative therapies against the most important pathogenic fungus associated with nosocomial infections. We focused on biochemical and structural analyses of recombinant thioredoxin reductase from C. albicans with His-tag (CaTrxR-His) for further biotechnology applications. Heterologous CaTrxR-His was efficiently expressed in the soluble fraction of the Escherichia coli lysate. CaTrxR-His was obtained with a high level of purity and presented specific enzymatic activity. Conformational changes of the protein were observed at different pHs and temperatures, with higher thermal stability at pH 8.0. The CaTrxR-His vaccine was shown to effectively induce high levels of CaTrxR-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in Balb/c mice and reduce the renal fungal burden of experimental disseminated candidiasis in mice. These data may greatly impact future development strategies for vaccine and drug designs against C. albicans infection. PMID:26695160

  13. Therapeutic targets and potential of the novel brain- permeable multifunctional iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor drug, M-30, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Avramovich-Tirosh, Yael; Amit, Tamar; Bar-Am, Orit; Zheng, Hailin; Fridkin, Mati; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2007-01-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders comprise drug candidates designed specifically to act on multiple CNS targets. We have synthesized a multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron chelator drug, M-30, possessing propargyl monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory neuroprotective and iron-chelating moieties, from our prototype iron chelator VK-28. In the present study M-30 was shown to possess a wide range of pharmacological activities, including pro-survival neurorescue effects, induction of neuronal differentiation and regulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta) levels. M-30 was found to decrease apoptosis of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in a neurorescue, serum deprivation model, via reduction of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bad and Bax, and inhibition of the apoptosis-associated phosphorylated H2A.X protein (Ser 139) and caspase 3 activation. In addition, M-30 induced the outgrowth of neurites, triggered cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1) phase and enhanced the expression of growth associated protein-43. Furthermore, M-30 markedly reduced the levels of cellular APP and beta-C-terminal fragment (beta-CTF) and the levels of the amyloidogenic Abeta peptide in the medium of SH-SY5Y cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the APP 'Swedish' mutation. Levels of the non-amyloidogenic soluble APPalpha and alpha-CTF in the medium and cell lysate respectively were coordinately increased. These properties, together with its brain selective MAO inhibitory and propargylamine- dependent neuroprotective effects, suggest that M-30 might serve as an ideal drug for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, in which oxidative stress and iron dysregulation have been implicated. PMID:17144902

  14. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  15. Existing drugs and their application in drug discovery targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Junfang; Shim, Joong Sup

    2015-09-01

    Despite standard cancer therapies such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy have shown some efficacies, the cancer in many cases eventually relapses and metastasizes upon stopping the treatment. There is a small subpopulation of cancer cells within tumor, with specific characters similar to those found in stem cells. This group of cancer cells is known as tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have an ability to self-renew and give rise to cancer cell progeny. CSCs are related with drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancer, hence emerging as a crucial drug target for eliminating cancer. Rapid advancement of CSC biology has enabled researchers to isolate and culture CSCs in vitro, making the cells amenable to high-throughput drug screening. Recently, drug repositioning, which utilizes existing drugs to develop potential new indications, has been gaining popularity as an alternative approach for the drug discovery. As existing drugs have favorable bioavailability and safety profiles, drug repositioning is now actively exploited for prompt development of therapeutics for many serious diseases, such as cancer. In this review, we will introduce latest examples of attempted drug repositioning targeting CSCs and discuss potential use of the repositioned drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:26152874

  16. Open Challenges in Magnetic Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sandip; Nacev, Aleksander; Muro, Silvia; Stepanov, Pavel Y.; Weinberg, Irving N.

    2014-01-01

    The principle of magnetic drug targeting, wherein therapy is attached to magnetically responsive carriers and magnetic fields are used to direct that therapy to disease locations, has been around for nearly two decades. Yet our ability to safely and effectively direct therapy to where it needs to go, for instance to deep tissue targets, remains limited. To date, magnetic targeting methods have not yet passed regulatory approval or reached clinical use. Below we outline key challenges to magnetic targeting, which include designing and selecting magnetic carriers for specific clinical indications, safely and effectively reaching targets behind tissue and anatomical barriers, real-time carrier imaging, and magnet design and control for deep and precise targeting. Addressing these challenges will require interactions across disciplines. Nanofabricators and chemists should work with biologists, mathematicians and engineers to better understand how carriers move through live tissues and how to optimize carrier and magnet designs to better direct therapy to disease targets. Clinicians should be involved early on and throughout the whole process to ensure the methods that are being developed meet a compelling clinical need and will be practical in a clinical setting. Our hope is that highlighting these challenges will help researchers translate magnetic drug targeting from a novel concept to a clinically-available treatment that can put therapy where it needs to go in human patients. PMID:25377422

  17. Open challenges in magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Benjamin; Kulkarni, Sandip; Nacev, Aleksander; Muro, Silvia; Stepanov, Pavel Y; Weinberg, Irving N

    2015-01-01

    The principle of magnetic drug targeting, wherein therapy is attached to magnetically responsive carriers and magnetic fields are used to direct that therapy to disease locations, has been around for nearly two decades. Yet our ability to safely and effectively direct therapy to where it needs to go, for instance to deep tissue targets, remains limited. To date, magnetic targeting methods have not yet passed regulatory approval or reached clinical use. Below we outline key challenges to magnetic targeting, which include designing and selecting magnetic carriers for specific clinical indications, safely and effectively reaching targets behind tissue and anatomical barriers, real-time carrier imaging, and magnet design and control for deep and precise targeting. Addressing these challenges will require interactions across disciplines. Nanofabricators and chemists should work with biologists, mathematicians, and engineers to better understand how carriers move through live tissues and how to optimize carrier and magnet designs to better direct therapy to disease targets. Clinicians should be involved early on and throughout the whole process to ensure the methods that are being developed meet a compelling clinical need and will be practical in a clinical setting. Our hope is that highlighting these challenges will help researchers translate magnetic drug targeting from a novel concept to a clinically available treatment that can put therapy where it needs to go in human patients. PMID:25377422

  18. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  19. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hoop, M; Mushtaq, F; Hurter, C; Chen, X-Z; Nelson, B J; Pané, S

    2016-07-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. PMID:27297037

  20. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  1. Targeting of drugs and nanoparticles to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Sailor, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The various types of cells that comprise the tumor mass all carry molecular markers that are not expressed or are expressed at much lower levels in normal cells. These differentially expressed molecules can be used as docking sites to concentrate drug conjugates and nanoparticles at tumors. Specific markers in tumor vessels are particularly well suited for targeting because molecules at the surface of blood vessels are readily accessible to circulating compounds. The increased concentration of a drug in the site of disease made possible by targeted delivery can be used to increase efficacy, reduce side effects, or achieve some of both. We review the recent advances in this delivery approach with a focus on the use of molecular markers of tumor vasculature as the primary target and nanoparticles as the delivery vehicle. PMID:20231381

  2. Cryptic prophages as targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial chromosomes may contain up to 20% phage DNA that encodes diverse proteins ranging from those for photosynthesis to those for autoimmunity; hence, phages contribute greatly to the metabolic potential of pathogens. Active prophages carrying genes encoding virulence factors and antibiotic resistance can be excised from the host chromosome to form active phages and are transmissible among different bacterial hosts upon SOS responses. Cryptic prophages are artifacts of mutagenesis in which lysogenic phage are captured in the bacterial chromosome: they may excise but they do not form active phage particles or lyse their captors. Hence, cryptic prophages are relatively permanent reservoirs of genes, many of which benefit pathogens, in ways we are just beginning to discern. Here we explore the role of active prophage- and cryptic prophage-derived proteins in terms of (i) virulence, (ii) antibiotic resistance, and (iii) antibiotic tolerance; antibiotic tolerance occurs as a result of the non-heritable phenotype of dormancy which is a result of activation of toxins of toxin/antitoxin loci that are frequently encoded in cryptic prophages. Therefore, cryptic prophages are promising targets for drug development. PMID:27449596

  3. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan Trang Nguyen, Ngoc; Thi Le, Ly

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people.

  4. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. PMID:27235607

  5. In silico search of DNA drugs targeting oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent a class of drug candidates for antigene therapy. Based on strict criteria, we investigated the potential of 25 known oncogenes to be regulated by TFOs in the mRNA synthesis level and we report specific target sequences found in seven of these genes. PMID:23221090

  6. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future. PMID:24956585

  7. Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles for Imaging, Targeting, and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Monty; Lu, Jie; Kovochich, Michael; Xia, Tian; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Nel, Andre E.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Drug delivery, magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, magnetic manipulation, and cell targeting are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated inside mesostructured silica spheres that were labeled with fluorescent dye molecules and coated with hydrophilic groups to prevent aggregation. Water-insoluble anticancer drugs were delivered into human cancer cells; surface conjugation with cancer-specific targeting agents increased the uptake into cancer cells relative to that in non-cancerous fibroblasts. The highly versatile multifunctional nanoparticles could potentially be used for simultaneous imaging and therapeutic applications. PMID:19206485

  8. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  9. Mining metabolic networks for optimal drug targets.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Padmavati; Song, Bin; Kahveci, Tamer; Ranka, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in bioinformatics promote drug-design methods that aim to reduce side-effects. Efficient computational methods are required to identify the optimal enzyme-combination (i.e., drug targets) whose inhibition, will achieve the required effect of eliminating a given target set of compounds, while incurring minimal side-effects. We formulate the optimal enzyme-combination identification problem as an optimization problem on metabolic networks. We define a graph based computational damage model that encapsulates the impact of enzymes onto compounds in metabolic networks. We develop a branch-and-bound algorithm, named OPMET, to explore the search space dynamically. We also develop two filtering strategies to prune the search space while still guaranteeing an optimal solution. They compute an upper bound to the number of target compounds eliminated and a lower bound to the side-effect respectively. Our experiments on the human metabolic network demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the target enzymes for known successful drugs in the literature. Our experiments also show that OPMET can reduce the total search time by several orders of magnitude as compared to the exhaustive search. PMID:18229694

  10. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  11. Drug Normalization for Cancer Therapeutic and Druggable Genome Target Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoqian; Sohn, Sunghwan; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Wang, Chen; Liu, Hongfang; Chute, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous drug data representation among different druggable genome knowledge resources and datasets delays effective cancer therapeutic target discovery within the broad scientific community. The objective of the present paper is to describe the challenges and lessons learned from our efforts in developing and evaluating a standards-based drug normalization framework targeting cancer druggable genome datasets. Our findings suggested that mechanisms need to be established to deal with spelling errors and irregularities in normalizing clinical drug data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), whereas the annotations from NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) and PubChem are two layers of normalization that potentially bridge between the clinical phenotypes and the druggable genome knowledge for effective cancer therapeutic target discovery. PMID:26306243

  12. [Drug delivery strategies for targeted treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, C; Schmidt, C; Lange, K; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Present treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is preferable for a more effective therapy and thus demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about drug delivery strategies for the treatment of IBD. Therefore, established intestine-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the diseased part of the gastrointestinal tract will be presented, including prodrugs, and dosage forms with pH-/time-dependent drug release. Furthermore future-oriented disease-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the intestinal inflammation will be described, including micro-/nanosized synthetic and biologic drug carriers. This novel therapeutic approach may enable a more effective anti-inflammatory treatment of IBD with reduced risks of adverse reactions. PMID:25723326

  13. Vasorin is a potential serum biomarker and drug target of hepatocarcinoma screened by subtractive-EMSA-SELEX to clinic patient serum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Aixue; Li, Jie; Qin, Xingliang; Li, Fei; Lu, Guanyi; Ding, Hongmei; Su, Xueting; Hou, Lvbin; Xia, Wei; Shi, Ming; Zhang, Hongwen; Zhao, Qiang; Dong, Jie; Ge, Xingfeng; Sun, Leqiao; Bai, Chenjun; Wang, Chaonan; Shen, Xuelian; Fang, Tao; Wang, Fusheng; Zhang, Heqiu; Shao, Ningsheng

    2015-01-01

    We report a new biomarker of hepatocarcinoma, vasorin (VASN), screened by a subtractive EMSA-SELEX strategy from AFP negative serum of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with extrahepatic metastases. VASN was verified to be highly expressed in sera of 100 cases of HCC patients compared with 97 cases of normal persons and 129 cases of hepatitis patients. Further validation by Q-PCR, IFA and Western blot showed higher expression of VASN at mRNA and protein levels in HCC cell lines and HCC tissues than in normal controls. RNA interference and forced overexpression assays verified that VASN promotes cell proliferation and migration and inhibits apoptosis. Down-regulation of microRNA miR145 and miR146a is an important mechanism leading to high expression of VASN. Conclusion: As a membrane protein and/or as free protein, VASN may be an effective target for biological treatment of liver cancer and is a potential biomarker for HCC diagnosis. Small molecular nucleotides targeting VASN are promising biological therapies to HCC. PMID:25826090

  14. Prediction of drug-target interactions and drug repositioning via network-based inference.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Liu, Chuang; Jiang, Jing; Lu, Weiqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Zhou, Weixing; Huang, Jin; Tang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Drug-target interaction (DTI) is the basis of drug discovery and design. It is time consuming and costly to determine DTI experimentally. Hence, it is necessary to develop computational methods for the prediction of potential DTI. Based on complex network theory, three supervised inference methods were developed here to predict DTI and used for drug repositioning, namely drug-based similarity inference (DBSI), target-based similarity inference (TBSI) and network-based inference (NBI). Among them, NBI performed best on four benchmark data sets. Then a drug-target network was created with NBI based on 12,483 FDA-approved and experimental drug-target binary links, and some new DTIs were further predicted. In vitro assays confirmed that five old drugs, namely montelukast, diclofenac, simvastatin, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, showed polypharmacological features on estrogen receptors or dipeptidyl peptidase-IV with half maximal inhibitory or effective concentration ranged from 0.2 to 10 µM. Moreover, simvastatin and ketoconazole showed potent antiproliferative activities on human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in MTT assays. The results indicated that these methods could be powerful tools in prediction of DTIs and drug repositioning. PMID:22589709

  15. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions and Drug Repositioning via Network-Based Inference

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Lu, Weiqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Zhou, Weixing; Huang, Jin; Tang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Drug-target interaction (DTI) is the basis of drug discovery and design. It is time consuming and costly to determine DTI experimentally. Hence, it is necessary to develop computational methods for the prediction of potential DTI. Based on complex network theory, three supervised inference methods were developed here to predict DTI and used for drug repositioning, namely drug-based similarity inference (DBSI), target-based similarity inference (TBSI) and network-based inference (NBI). Among them, NBI performed best on four benchmark data sets. Then a drug-target network was created with NBI based on 12,483 FDA-approved and experimental drug-target binary links, and some new DTIs were further predicted. In vitro assays confirmed that five old drugs, namely montelukast, diclofenac, simvastatin, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, showed polypharmacological features on estrogen receptors or dipeptidyl peptidase-IV with half maximal inhibitory or effective concentration ranged from 0.2 to 10 µM. Moreover, simvastatin and ketoconazole showed potent antiproliferative activities on human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in MTT assays. The results indicated that these methods could be powerful tools in prediction of DTIs and drug repositioning. PMID:22589709

  16. Putative Drugs and Targets for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zarate, Carlos A.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder (BPD) is generally unsatisfactory for a large number of patients. Even with adequate modern bipolar pharmacological therapies, many afflicted individuals continue to have persistent mood episode relapses, residual symptoms, functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Creating novel therapeutics for BPD is urgently needed. Promising drug targets and compounds for BPD worthy of further study involve the following systems: purinergic, dynorphin opioid neuropeptide, cholinergic (muscarinic and nicotinic), melatonin and serotonin (5-HT2C receptor), glutamatergic, hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis have all been implicated. Intracellular pathways and targets worthy of further study include glycogen synthase kinase-3 protein, protein kinase C, arachidonic acid cascade. PMID:18704977

  17. A Pilot Study to Assess Adenosine 5’-triphosphate Metabolism in Red Blood Cells as a Drug Target for Potential Cardiovascular Protection

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pollen K.F.; Tinkel, Jodi; Seeto, Dena

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of exercise preconditioning on adenosine 5’triphosphate (ATP) metabolism in red blood cells and cardiovascular protection against injury induced by isoproterenol in vivo. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats (SDR) were each exercised on a treadmill for 15 minutes at 10 m/min and 10% grade (n = 7) (LowEx), or 14 m/min and 22% grade (n = 8) (VigEx). Two hours after the exercise, each rat received a single dose of isoproterenol (30 mg/kg) by subcutaneous (sc) injection. Two separate groups of SDR were used as control: One received no exercise (n = 10) (NoEx) and the other received no exercise and no isoproterenol (n = 11) (NoIso). Serial blood samples were collected over 5 hours for measurement of ATP and its catabolites by a validated HPLC. Hemodynamic recording was collected continuously for 
the duration of the experiment. Data were analysed using ANOVA and t-tests and difference considered significant at 
p < 0.05. Results: Exercise pre-conditioning (both LowEx and VigEx) reduced mortality after isoproterenol from 50% to < 30% 
(p > 0.05). It attenuated the rebound in blood pressure significantly (p < 0.05 between NoEx vs VigEx), attenuated the increase of RBC adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP) concentrations induced by isoproterenol, and also decreased the breakdown of ATP to AMP in the RBC (p < 0.05 vs NoEx). Conclusion: Exercise pre-conditioning decreased the blood pressure rebound and also breakdown of ATP in RBC after isoproterenol which may be exploited further as a drug target for cardiovascular protection and prevention.

  18. Potential molecular targets for Ewing's sarcoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Jully, Babu; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2012-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a highly malignant tumor of children and young adults. Modern therapy for Ewing's sarcoma combines high-dose chemotherapy for systemic control of disease, with advanced surgical and/or radiation therapeutic approaches for local control. Despite optimal management, the cure rate for localized disease is only approximately 70%, whereas the cure rate for metastatic disease at presentation is less than 30%. Patients who experience long-term disease-free survival are at risk for significant side-effects of therapy, including infertility, limb dysfunction and an increased risk for second malignancies. The identification of new targets for innovative therapeutic approaches is, therefore, strongly needed for its treatment. Many new pharmaceutical agents have been tested in early phases of clinical trials in ES patients who have recurrent disease. While some agents led to partial response or stable disease, the percentages of drugs eliciting responses or causing an overall effect have been minimal. Furthermore, of the new pharmaceuticals being introduced to clinical practice, the most effective agents also have dose-limiting toxicities. Novel approaches are needed to minimize non-specific toxicity, both for patients with recurrence and at diagnosis. This report presents an overview of the potential molecular targets in ES and highlights the possibility that they may serve as therapeutic targets for the disease. Although additional investigations are required before most of these approaches can be assessed in the clinic, they provide a great deal of hope for patients with Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:23580819

  19. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciara; Jefferies, Caroline; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation. PMID:21512579

  20. Functional and mechanistic analysis of telomerase: An antitumor drug target.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinnan; Zhang, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    The current research on anticancer drugs focuses on exploiting particular traits or hallmarks unique to cancer cells. Telomerase, a special reverse transcriptase, has been recognized as a common factor in most tumor cells, and in turn a distinctive characteristic with respect to non-malignant cells. This feature has made telomerase a preferred target for anticancer drug development and cancer therapy. This review aims to analyze the pharmacological function and mechanism and role of telomerase in oncogenesis; to provide fundamental knowledge for research on the structure, function, and working mechanism of telomerase; to expound the role that telomerase plays in the initiation and development of tumor and its relationship with tumor cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and related pathway molecules; and to display potential targets of antitumor drug for inhibiting the expression, reconstitution, and trafficking of the enzyme. We therefore summarize recent advances in potential telomerase inhibitors for antitumor including natural products, synthetic small molecules, peptides and proteins, which indicate that optimizing the delivery method and drug combination could be of help in a combinatorial drug treatment for tumor. More extensive understanding of the structure, biogenesis, and mechanism of telomerase will provide invaluable information for increasing the efficiency of rational antitumor drug design. PMID:27118336

  1. RepurposeVS: A Drug Repurposing-Focused Computational Method for Accurate Drug-Target Signature Predictions.

    PubMed

    Issa, Naiem T; Peters, Oakland J; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2015-01-01

    We describe here RepurposeVS for the reliable prediction of drug-target signatures using X-ray protein crystal structures. RepurposeVS is a virtual screening method that incorporates docking, drug-centric and protein-centric 2D/3D fingerprints with a rigorous mathematical normalization procedure to account for the variability in units and provide high-resolution contextual information for drug-target binding. Validity was confirmed by the following: (1) providing the greatest enrichment of known drug binders for multiple protein targets in virtual screening experiments, (2) determining that similarly shaped protein target pockets are predicted to bind drugs of similar 3D shapes when RepurposeVS is applied to 2,335 human protein targets, and (3) determining true biological associations in vitro for mebendazole (MBZ) across many predicted kinase targets for potential cancer repurposing. Since RepurposeVS is a drug repurposing-focused method, benchmarking was conducted on a set of 3,671 FDA approved and experimental drugs rather than the Database of Useful Decoys (DUDE) so as to streamline downstream repurposing experiments. We further apply RepurposeVS to explore the overall potential drug repurposing space for currently approved drugs. RepurposeVS is not computationally intensive and increases performance accuracy, thus serving as an efficient and powerful in silico tool to predict drug-target associations in drug repurposing. PMID:26234515

  2. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  3. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal. PMID:25635061

  4. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  5. The JAK kinases: not just another kinase drug discovery target.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew F

    2008-08-01

    There are four members of the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the human genome. Since their discovery in 1989, great strides have been made in the understanding of their role in normal intracellular signalling. Importantly, their roles in pathologies ranging from cancer to immune deficiencies have placed them front and centre as potential drug targets. The recent discovery of the role of activating mutations in the kinase-like domain (KLD) of JAK2 in the development of polycythemia rubra vera, and the elaboration of KLD mutation as a broader mechanism by which cells might become hyperproliferative has sparked enormous interest in the development of JAK selective drug candidates. I review herein the progress that has been made in the discovery of JAK-targeted inhibitors, and discuss the challenges that face the development of these drugs for use in the clinic. PMID:18721891

  6. Polyphenols as mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Gorlach, Sylwia; Fichna, Jakub; Lewandowska, Urszula

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are the respiratory and energetic centers of the cell where multiple intra- and extracellular signal transduction pathways converge leading to dysfunction of those organelles and, consequently, apoptotic or/and necrotic cell death. Mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs are referred to as mitocans; they have recently been classified by Neuzil et al. (2013) according to their molecular mode of action into: hexokinase inhibitors; mimickers of the Bcl-2 homology-3 (BH3) domains; thiol redox inhibitors; deregulators of voltage-dependent anionic channel (VDAC)/adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) complex; electron redox chain-targeting agents; lipophilic cations targeting the mitochondrial inner membrane; tricarboxylic acid cycle-targeting agents; and mitochondrial DNA-targeting agents. Polyphenols of plant origin and their synthetic or semisynthetic derivatives exhibit pleiotropic biological activities, including the above-mentioned modes of action characteristic of mitocans. Some of them have already been tested in clinical trials. Gossypol has served as a lead compound for developing more efficient BH3 mimetics such as ABT-737 and its orally available structural analog ABT-263 (Navitoclax). Furthermore, mitochondriotropic derivatives of phenolic compounds such as quercetin and resveratrol have been synthesized and reported to efficiently induce cancer cell death in vitro. PMID:26185003

  7. Cooperative assembly in targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auguste, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Described as cell analogues, liposomes are self-assembled lipid bilayer spheres that encapsulate aqueous volumes. Liposomes offer several drug delivery advantages due to their structural versatility related to size, composition, bilayer fluidity, and ability to encapsulate a large variety of compounds non-covalently. However, liposomes lack the structural information embedded within cell membranes. Partitioning of unsaturated and saturated lipids into liquid crystalline (Lα) and gel phase (Lβ) domains, respectively, affects local molecular diffusion and elasticity. Liposome microdomains may be used to pattern molecules, such as antibodies, on the liposome surface to create concentrated, segregated binding regions. We have synthesized, characterized, and evaluated a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous liposomal vehicles that target inflamed endothelium. These drug delivery vehicles are designed to complement the heterogeneous presentation of lipids and receptors on endothelial cells (ECs). EC surfaces are dynamic; they segregate receptors within saturated lipid microdomains on the cell surface to regulate binding and signaling events. We have demonstrated that cooperative binding of two antibodies enhances targeting by multiple fold. Further, we have shown that organization of these antibodies on the surface can further enhance cell uptake. The data suggest that EC targeting may be enhanced by designing liposomes that mirror the segregated structure of lipid and receptor molecules involved in neutrophil-EC adhesion. This strategy is employed in an atherosclerotic mouse model in vivo.

  8. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  9. Potential drug interactions with melatonin.

    PubMed

    Papagiannidou, Eleni; Skene, Debra J; Ioannides, Costas

    2014-05-28

    Possible interactions of melatonin with concurrently administered drugs were investigated in in vitro studies utilising human hepatic post-mitochondrial preparations; similar studies were conducted with rat preparations to ascertain whether rat is a suitable surrogate for human. Drugs were selected based not only on the knowledge that the 6-hydroxylation of exogenous melatonin, its principal pathway of metabolism, is mainly mediated by hepatic CYP1A2, but also on the likelihood of the drug being concurrently administered with melatonin. Hepatic preparations were incubated with either melatonin or 6-hydroxymelatonin in the presence and absence of a range of concentrations of interacting drug, and the production of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin monitored using a radioimmunoassay procedure. Of the drugs screened, only the potent CYP1A2 inhibitor 5-methoxypsoralen impaired the 6-melatonin hydroxylation at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, and is likely to lead to clinical interactions; diazepam, tamoxifen and acetaminophen (paracetamol) did not impair the metabolic conversion of melatonin to 6-sulphatoxymelatonin at concentrations attained following therapeutic administration. 17-Ethinhyloestradiol appeared not to suppress the 6-hydroxylation of melatonin but inhibited the sulphation of 6-hydroxymelatonin, but this is unlikely to result in an interaction following therapeutic intake of the steroid. Species differences in the inhibition of melatonin metabolism in human and rat hepatic post-mitochondrial preparations were evident implying that the rat may not be an appropriate surrogate of human in such studies. PMID:24732412

  10. Dengue protease activity: the structural integrity and interaction of NS2B with NS3 protease and its potential as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Phong, Wai Y; Moreland, Nicole J; Lim, Siew P; Wen, Daying; Paradkar, Prasad N; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2011-10-01

    Flaviviral NS3 serine proteases require the NS2B cofactor region (cNS2B) to be active. Recent crystal structures of WNV (West Nile virus) protease in complex with inhibitors revealed that cNS2B participates in the formation of the protease active site. No crystal structures of ternary complexes are currently available for DENV (dengue virus) to validate the role of cNS2B in active site formation. In the present study, a GST (glutathione transferase) fusion protein of DENV-2 cNS2B49-95 was used as a bait to pull down DENV-2 protease domain (NS3pro). The affinity of NS3pro for cNS2B was strong (equilibrium-binding constant <200 nM) and the heterodimeric complex displayed a catalytic efficiency similar to that of single-chain DENV-2 cNS2B/NS3pro. Various truncations and mutations in the cNS2B sequence showed that conformational integrity of the entire 47 amino acids is critical for protease activity. Furthermore, DENV-2 NS3 protease can be pulled down and transactivated by cNS2B cofactors from DENV-1, -3, -4 and WNV, suggesting that mechanisms for activation are conserved across the flavivirus genus. To validate NS2B as a potential target in allosteric inhibitor development, a cNS2B-specific human monoclonal antibody (3F10) was utilized. 3F10 disrupted the interaction between cNS2B and NS3 in vitro and reduced DENV viral replication in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. This provides proof-of-concept for developing assays to find inhibitors that block the interaction between NS2B and NS3 during viral translation. PMID:21329491

  11. New drugs and treatment targets in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic in the next years. Biologics are costly, require injections, and some patients experience tacaphylaxis, thus, the development of orally available, small-molecule inhibitors is desirable. Among small-molecules under investigation are A3 adenosine receptor agonists, Janus kinase inhibitors, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming years. We need to be aware of the limitations of drug safety data when selecting new novel treatments. Monitoring and clinical registries are still important tools. PMID:25111317

  12. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    bisphosphonates in model studies; In vitro, zoledronic acid causes increased apoptotic cell death; in vivo the drug has been shown to inhibit the production of pro-angiogenic factor MMP-9, as well as most recent evidence showing it can trigger the reversal of the TAMs phenotype from pro-tumoral M2 to tumoricidal M1. There is thus accumulating evidence supporting the hypothesis that effects on TAMs may contribute to the anti-tumour effect of bisphosphonates. This review will focus in detail on the role of tumour associated macrophages in breast cancer progression, the actions of bisphosphonates on macrophages in vitro and in tumour models in vivo and summarise the evidence supporting the potential for the targeting of tumour macrophages with bisphosphonates. PMID:22005011

  13. Increasing the structural coverage of tuberculosis drug targets.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W; Clifton, Matthew C; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M; Taylor, Brandy M; Muruthi, Marvin M; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W; Fox, David; Dieterich, Shellie H; Staker, Bart L; Gardberg, Anna S; Choi, Ryan; Hewitt, Stephen N; Napuli, Alberto J; Myers, Janette; Barrett, Lynn K; Zhang, Yang; Ferrell, Micah; Mundt, Elizabeth; Thompkins, Katie; Tran, Ngoc; Lyons-Abbott, Sally; Abramov, Ariel; Sekar, Aarthi; Serbzhinskiy, Dmitri; Lorimer, Don; Buchko, Garry W; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J; Edwards, Thomas E; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Myler, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus "homolog-rescue" strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. Of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structures would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1 Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases. PMID:25613812

  14. Increasing the structural coverage of tuberculosis drug targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M.; Taylor, Brandy M.; Muruthi, Marvin M.; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W.; et al

    2014-12-19

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. We found that of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structuresmore » would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1 Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases.« less

  15. Increasing the structural coverage of tuberculosis drug targets

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, Loren; Phan, Isabelle; Begley, Darren W.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Armour, Brianna; Dranow, David M.; Taylor, Brandy M.; Muruthi, Marvin M.; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W.; Fox, David; Dieterich, Shellie H.; Staker, Bart L.; Gardberg, Anna S.; Choi, Ryan; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Myers, Janette; Barrett, Lynn K.; Zhang, Yang; Ferrell, Micah; Mundt, Elizabeth; Thompkins, Katie; Tran, Ngoc; Lyons-Abbott, Sally; Abramov, Ariel; Sekar, Aarthi; Serbzhinskiy, Dmitri; Lorimer, Don; Buchko, Garry W.; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2014-12-19

    High-resolution three-dimensional structures of essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins provide templates for TB drug design, but are available for only a small fraction of the Mtb proteome. Here we evaluate an intra-genus “homolog-rescue” strategy to increase the structural information available for TB drug discovery by using mycobacterial homologs with conserved active sites. We found that of 179 potential TB drug targets selected for x-ray structure determination, only 16 yielded a crystal structure. By adding 1675 homologs from nine other mycobacterial species to the pipeline, structures representing an additional 52 otherwise intractable targets were solved. To determine whether these homolog structures would be useful surrogates in TB drug design, we compared the active sites of 106 pairs of Mtb and non-TB mycobacterial (NTM) enzyme homologs with experimentally determined structures, using three metrics of active site similarity, including superposition of continuous pharmacophoric property distributions. Pair-wise structural comparisons revealed that 19/22 pairs with >55% overall sequence identity had active site Cα RMSD <1 Å, >85% side chain identity, and ≥80% PSAPF (similarity based on pharmacophoric properties) indicating highly conserved active site shape and chemistry. Applying these results to the 52 NTM structures described above, 41 shared >55% sequence identity with the Mtb target, thus increasing the effective structural coverage of the 179 Mtb targets over three-fold (from 9% to 32%). The utility of these structures in TB drug design can be tested by designing inhibitors using the homolog structure and assaying the cognate Mtb enzyme; a promising test case, Mtb cytidylate kinase, is described. The homolog-rescue strategy evaluated here for TB is also generalizable to drug targets for other diseases.

  16. Genetic Approaches To Identifying Novel Osteoporosis Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Brommage, Robert

    2015-10-01

    During the past two decades effective drugs for treating osteoporosis have been developed, including anti-resorptives inhibiting bone resorption (estrogens, the SERM raloxifene, four bisphosphonates, RANKL inhibitor denosumab) and the anabolic bone forming daily injectable peptide teriparatide. Two potential drugs (odanacatib and romosozumab) are in late stage clinical development. The most pressing unmet need is for orally active anabolic drugs. This review describes the basic biological studies involved in developing these drugs, including the animal models employed for osteoporosis drug development. The genomics revolution continues to identify potential novel osteoporosis drug targets. Studies include human GWAS studies and identification of mutant genes in subjects having abnormal bone mass, mouse QTL and gene knockouts, and gene expression studies. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Wnt signaling plays a major role in regulating bone formation and continued study of this complex pathway is likely to lead to key discoveries. In addition to the classic Wnt signaling targets DKK1 and sclerostin, LRP4, LRP5/LRP6, SFRP4, WNT16, and NOTUM can potentially be targeted to modulate Wnt signaling. Next-generation whole genome and exome sequencing, RNA-sequencing and CRISPR/CAS9 gene editing are new experimental techniques contributing to understanding the genome. The International Knockout Mouse Consortium efforts to knockout and phenotype all mouse genes are poised to accelerate. Accumulating knowledge will focus attention on readily accessible databases (Big Data). Efforts are underway by the International Bone and Mineral Society to develop an annotated Skeletome database providing information on all genes directly influencing bone mass, architecture, mineralization or strength. PMID:25833316

  17. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  18. Carbon Nanotubes: An Emerging Drug Carrier for Targeting Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  19. Carbon nanotubes: an emerging drug carrier for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Yadav, Pragya; Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  20. Galactosylated fluorescent labeled micelles as a liver targeting drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Wu, De-Qun; Lu, Bo; Chang, Cong; Chen, Chang-Sheng; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Cheng, Si-Xue; Jiang, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2009-03-01

    Galactosylated and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled polycaprolactone-g-dextran (Gal-PCL-g-Dex-FITC) polymers were synthesized. The grafted polymers can self-assemble into stable micelles in aqueous medium and in serum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the self-assembled micelles were regularly spherical in shape. Micelle size determined by size analysis was around 120 nm. The anti-inflammation drug prednisone acetate as a model drug was loaded in the polymeric micelles, and the in vitro drug release was investigated. The galactosylated micelles could be selectively recognized by HepG2 cells and subsequently accumulate in HepG2 cells. The in vivo study demonstrated the relative uptake of the micelles by liver is much higher than the other tissues, indicating that the galactosylated micelles have great potential as a liver targeting drug carrier. PMID:19100617

  1. Multifunctional Particles for Melanoma-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wadajkar, Aniket S.; Bhavsar, Zarna; Ko, Cheng-Yu; Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Cui, Weina; Tang, Liping; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2012-01-01

    New magnetic-based core-shell particles (MBCSP) were developed to target skin cancer cells while delivering chemotherapeutic drugs in a controlled fashion. MBCSP consist of a thermo-responsive shell of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine) and a core of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) embedded with magnetite nanoparticles. To target melanoma cancer cells, MBCSP were conjugated with Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) peptides that specifically bind to the α5β3+ receptor of melanoma cell. MBCSP consist of unique multifunctional and controlled drug delivery characteristics. Specially, they can provide dual drug release mechanisms (a sustained release of drugs through degradation of PLGA core and a controlled release in response to changes in temperature via thermo-responsive polymer shell), and dual targeting mechanisms (magnetic localization and receptor-mediated targeting). Results from in vitro studies indicate that GRGDS-conjugated MBCSP has an average diameter of 296 nm and exhibit no cytotoxicity towards human dermal fibroblasts up to 500 μg ml−1. Further, a sustained release of curcumin from the core and a temperature-dependent release of doxorubicin from the shell of MBCSP were observed. The particles also produced a dark contrast signal in magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, the particles were accumulated at the tumor site in a B16F10 melanoma orthotopic mouse model, especially in presence of a magnet. Results indicate great potential of MBCSP as a platform technology to target, treat, and monitor melanoma for targeted drug delivery to reduce side effects of chemotherapeutic reagents. PMID:22561668

  2. Smooth muscle-specific drug targets for next generation Drug-eluting stent

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Chen, Shiyou

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of stent thrombosis is one of the major obstacles limiting the long-term clinical efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention. The anti-smooth muscle proliferation drugs coated on drug-eluting stents (DES) often indistinguishably block re-endothelialization, an essential step toward successful vascular repair, due to their non-specific effect on endothelial cells (EC). Therefore, identification of therapeutic targets that differentially regulate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and EC proliferation may lead to the development of ideal drugs for next generation DES. Our recent studies have shown that CTP synthase 1 (CTPS1) differentially regulates the proliferation of VSMC and EC following vascular injury. Therefore, CTPS1 inhibitors are promising agents for DES. In addition to CTPS1, other factors have also shown cell-specific effects on VSMC and/or EC proliferation and thus may become potential molecular targets for developing drugs to coat stents. PMID:24325297

  3. Therapeutic approaches to drug targets in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jamkhande, Prasad G; Chandak, Prakash G; Dhawale, Shashikant C; Barde, Sonal R; Tidke, Priti S; Sakhare, Ram S

    2014-07-01

    Non-communicable diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetes are responsible for major social and health burden as millions of people are dying every year. Out of which, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of deaths worldwide. The lipid abnormality is one of the major modifiable risk factors for atherosclerosis. Both genetic and environmental components are associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Immune and inflammatory mediators have a complex role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Understanding of all these processes will help to invent a range of new biomarkers and novel treatment modalities targeting various cellular events in acute and chronic inflammation that are accountable for atherosclerosis. Several biochemical pathways, receptors and enzymes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis that would be possible targets for improving strategies for disease diagnosis and management. Earlier anti-inflammatory or lipid-lowering treatments could be useful for alleviating morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, novel drug targets like endoglin receptor, PPARα, squalene synthase, thyroid hormone analogues, scavenger receptor and thyroid hormone analogues are more powerful to control the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the review briefly focuses on different novel targets that act at the starting stage of the plaque form to the thrombus formation in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25061401

  4. Immunoliposomes for Targeted Delivery of an Antifibrotic Drug.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Liane; Seifert, Oliver; Vollmer, Stefanie; Kontermann, Roland E; Schlosshauer, Burkhard; Hartmann, Hanna

    2015-09-01

    Excessive extracellular matrix formation in organs and tissues arises from an imbalance between the synthesis and degradation of matrix proteins, especially collagen. This condition interferes with proper wound healing and regeneration, and to date, no specific treatment is available. In the present study, we propose a targeted drug delivery system consisting of cell-specific immunoliposomes (ILs) loaded with deferoxamine (DFO) as an antifibrotic drug. ILs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve the steric stability and prolong their half-life. In addition, a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment that specifically targets fibroblast activation protein (FAP) was incorporated. An in vitro fibrosis model was employed to test this construct. This model consisted of highly activated pro-fibrotic fibroblasts with 2- to 6-fold induction of selected fibrosis markers: cell/matrix deposited collagen I, total soluble collagen, and α smooth muscle actin. The activation was accompanied by a significant and cell-specific elevation of FAP expression and activity, thereby confirming that FAP is an adequate target for antifibrotic drug delivery. Purified anti-FAP scFv was shown to bind specifically to these cells without influencing the FAP enzymatic activity. DFO was demonstrated to have a dose-dependent antifibrotic activity as quantified by collagen deposition. Specific binding and intracellular uptake of DiI-labeled ILs into the activated fibroblasts were shown by flow cytometry and microscopy. Finally, DFO-loaded ILs targeted to FAP caused a significant reduction in the collagen deposition, whereas no effect was observed using liposomes that lacked the targeting antibody fragment. These results suggest that the FAP-specific scFv-conjugated liposomes have considerable potential for cell-specific targeting applicable as a therapy for excessive collagen deposition during fibrosis. In general, through liposome encapsulation, bioactive molecules, such as

  5. P2X Receptors as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    The study of P2X receptors has long been handicapped by a poverty of small-molecule tools that serve as selective agonists and antagonists. There has been progress, particularly in the past 10 years, as cell-based high-throughput screening methods were applied, together with large chemical libraries. This has delivered some drug-like molecules in several chemical classes that selectively target P2X1, P2X3, or P2X7 receptors. Some of these are, or have been, in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis, pain, and cough. Current preclinical research programs are studying P2X receptor involvement in pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, and bladder dysfunction. The determination of the atomic structure of P2X receptors in closed and open (ATP-bound) states by X-ray crystallography is now allowing new approaches by molecular modeling. This is supported by a large body of previous work using mutagenesis and functional expression, and is now being supplemented by molecular dynamic simulations and in silico ligand docking. These approaches should lead to P2X receptors soon taking their place alongside other ion channel proteins as therapeutically important drug targets. PMID:23253448

  6. Mitochondrial biology, targets, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Milane, Lara; Trivedi, Malav; Singh, Amit; Talekar, Meghna; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-06-10

    In recent years, mitochondrial medicine has emerged as a new discipline resting at the intersection of mitochondrial biology, pathology, and pharmaceutics. The central role of mitochondria in critical cellular processes such as metabolism and apoptosis has placed mitochondria at the forefront of cell science. Advances in mitochondrial biology have revealed that these organelles continually undergo fusion and fission while functioning independently and in complex cellular networks, establishing direct membrane contacts with each other and with other organelles. Understanding the diverse cellular functions of mitochondria has contributed to understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in disease states. Polyplasmy and heteroplasmy contribute to mitochondrial phenotypes and associated dysfunction. Residing at the center of cell biology, cellular functions, and disease pathology and being laden with receptors and targets, mitochondria are beacons for pharmaceutical modification. This review presents the current state of mitochondrial medicine with a focus on mitochondrial function, dysfunction, and common disease; mitochondrial receptors, targets, and substrates; and mitochondrial drug design and drug delivery with a focus on the application of nanotechnology to mitochondrial medicine. Mitochondrial medicine is at the precipice of clinical translation; the objective of this review is to aid in the advancement of mitochondrial medicine from infancy to application. PMID:25841699

  7. Pin1 as an anticancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoyan G; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2009-09-01

    Pin1 specifically catalyzes the cis/trans isomerization of phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro bonds and plays an important role in many cellular events through the effects of conformational change on the function of its biological substrates, including cell division cycle 25 C (Cdc25C), c-Jun and p53. Pin1 is overexpressed in many human cancer tissues, including breast, prostate and lung cancer. Its expression correlates with cyclin D1 levels, which contribute to cell transformation. Overexpression of Pin1 promotes tumor growth, while inhibition of Pin1 causes tumor cell apoptosis. Pin1 plays an important role in oncogenesis and therefore may serve as an effective anticancer target. Many inhibitors of Pin1 have been discovered, including several classes of designed inhibitors (alkene isosteres, reduced amides, indanyl ketones) and natural products (juglone, pepticinnamin E analogues, PiB and its derivatives obtained from a library screen). Pin1 inhibitors could be used as a novel type of anticancer drug by blocking cell cycle progression. Therefore, Pin1 represents a new diagnostic and therapeutic anticancer drug target. PMID:19890497

  8. Targeted polymer-drug conjugates: Current progress and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyan; Ma, Haifeng; Yang, Peimin; Zhang, Xia; Wu, Xiangxia; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Hui; Xu, Dongmei

    2015-12-01

    The combination of polymer technology and targeted drug delivery may pave the way for more effective yet safer therapeutic options for cancer therapy. Polymer-drug conjugates belonging to polymer therapeutics represent an emerging approach for drug delivery. The development of smart targeted polymer-drug conjugates that can specifically deliver drugs at a sustained rate to tumor cells may substantially improve the therapeutic index of anticancer agents. In this update, we provide an overview of the most important targeting molecules, and systemically summarize the recent advances in the development of tumor-targeted polymer-drug conjugates. Additionally, several promising approaches for the future will also be presented. PMID:26513756

  9. Recognizing drug targets using evolutionary information: implications for repurposing FDA-approved drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-12-01

    Drug repurposing to explore target space has been gaining pace over the past decade with the upsurge in the use of systematic approaches for computational drug discovery. Such a cost and time-saving approach gains immense importance for pathogens of special interest, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. We report a comprehensive approach to repurpose drugs, based on the exploration of evolutionary relationships inferred from the comparative sequence and structural analyses between targets of FDA-approved drugs and the proteins of M. tuberculosis. This approach has facilitated the identification of several polypharmacological drugs that could potentially target unexploited M. tuberculosis proteins. A total of 130 FDA-approved drugs, originally intended against other diseases, could be repurposed against 78 potential targets in M. tuberculosis. Additionally, we have also made an attempt to augment the chemical space by recognizing compounds structurally similar to FDA-approved drugs. For three of the attractive cases we have investigated the probable binding modes of the drugs in their corresponding M. tuberculosis targets by means of structural modelling. Such prospective targets and small molecules could be prioritized for experimental endeavours, and could significantly influence drug-discovery and drug-development programmes for tuberculosis. PMID:26429199

  10. The hydrogenosome as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are spherical or slightly elongated organelles found in non-mitochondrial organisms. In Trichomonas hydrogenosomes measure between 200 to 500 nm, but under drug treatment they can reach 2 microm. Like mitochondria hydrogenosomes: (1) are surrounded by two closely apposed membranes and present a granular matrix: (2) divide in three different ways: segmentation, partition and the heart form; (3) they may divide at any phase of the cell cycle; (4) produce ATP; (5) participate in the metabolism of pyruvate formed during glycolysis; (6) are the site of molecular hydrogen formation; (7) present a relationship with the endoplasmic reticulum; (8) incorporate calcium; (9) import proteins post-translationally; (10) present cardiolipin. However, there are differences, such as: (1) absence of genetic material, at least in trichomonas; (2) lack a respiratory chain and cytochromes; (3) absence of the F(0)-F(1) ATPase; (4) absence of the tricarboxylic acid cycle; (5) lack of oxidative phosphorylation; (6) presence of peripheral vesicles. Hydrogenosomes are considered an excellent drug target since their metabolic pathway is distinct from those found in mitochondria and thus medicines directed to these organelles will probably not affect the host-cell. The main drug used against trichomonads is metronidazole, although other drugs such as beta-Lapachone, colchicine, Taxol, nocodazole, griseofulvin, cytochalasins, hydroxyurea, among others, have been used in trichomonad studies, showing: (1) flagella internalization forming pseudocyst; (2) dysfunctional hydrogenosomes; (3) hydrogenosomes with abnormal sizes and shapes and with an electron dense deposit called nucleoid; (4) intense autophagy in which hydrogenosomes are removed and further digested in lysosomes. PMID:18473836